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Sample records for recession curve analysis

  1. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  2. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hong-Yi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, L. Ruby; Wang, Shao-wen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-11-01

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top-down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage-discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage-discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  3. Geomorphological origin of recession curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Basudev; Marani, Marco

    2010-12-01

    We identify a previously undetected link between the river network morphology and key recession curves properties through a conceptual-physical model of the drainage process of the riparian unconfined aquifer. We show that the power-law exponent, α, of -dQ/dt vs. Q curves is related to the power-law exponent of N(l) vs. G(l) curves (which we show to be connected to Hack's law), where l is the downstream distance from the channel heads, N(l) is the number of channel reaches exactly located at a distance l from their channel head, and G(l) is the total length of the network located at a distance greater or equal to l from channel heads. Using Digital Terrain Models and daily discharge observations from 67 US basins we find that geomorphologic α estimates match well the values obtained from recession curves analyses. Finally, we argue that the link between recession flows and network morphology points to an important role of low-flow discharges in shaping the channel network.

  4. "Universal" Recession Curves and their Geomorphological Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marani, M.; Biswal, B.

    2011-12-01

    The basic structural organization of channel networks, and of the connected hillslopes, have been shown to be intimately linked to basin responses to rainfall events, leading to geomorphological theories of the hydrologic response. Here, We identify a previously undetected link between the river network morphology and key recession curves properties. We show that the power-law exponent of -dQ/dt vs. Q curves is related to the power-law exponent of N(l) vs. G(l) curves (which we show to be connected to Hack's law), where l is the downstream distance from the channel heads, N(l) is the number of channel reaches exactly located at a distance l from their channel head, and G(l) is the total length of the network located at a distance greater or equal to l from channel heads. We then generalize the power-law expressions of recession curves, to identify "universal" curves, independent of the initial moisture conditions and of basin area, by making the -dQ/dt vs. Q curve non-dimensional using an index discharge representative of initial moisture conditions. We subsequently rescale the geomorphic recession curve, N(l) vs. G(l), producing a collapse of the geomorphic recession curves constructed from the DTM's of 67 US study basins. Finally, by use of the specific discharge u = Q/A, we link the two previous results and define the specific recession curves, whose collapse across basins within homogeneous geographical areas lends further, decisive, support to the notion that the statistical properties of observational recession curves bear the signature of the geomorphological structure of the networks producing them.

  5. An improved method for delineating source protection zones for karst springs based on analysis of recession curve data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civita, Massimo V.

    2008-08-01

    A standard method for delineating source protection zones, particularly for karst and carbonate springs, has been improved. The method, based on recession curve analysis, defines four vulnerability scenarios with an evaluation of the appropriate dimensions of the protection areas, accommodating situations where field-test data are not available. The new approach makes it easier to separate the components of the spring discharge hydrograph. The objective is to achieve simplification, and an effective, more rigorous, procedure in the determination of the parameters used by Mangin’s model—Mangin A (1975) Contribution a l’étude hydrodynamique des aquifères karstiques-Troisieme partie: Constitution et fonctionnement des aquifères karstiques (Contribution to the hydrodynamic study of karst aquifers, part 3: formation and work of karst aquifers). Ann Speleol 30(1):21 124. The original procedure, plus the lack of sufficient data, was open to subjective interpretation. With the aid of modern technology, a very large quantity of data is now available and it is necessary to process it using denoise type computer-based filters before passing to interpretation. Working with discharge data series, a statistical approach is proposed to give an analytical solution for determining the values of fundamental parameters of the recession curve model. The new procedure is defined and compared with the original methodology. The new approach has been tested and applied to a number of karst springs in Italy. A case history for a spring located in the Piedmont region of the Maritime Alps, is presented. The proposed new procedure can be utilised to mark the limits of the protection zones of tapped groundwater supplied for potable use, as required by European and local legislation.

  6. HYDRORECESSION: A toolbox for streamflow recession analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega, S.

    2015-12-01

    Streamflow recession curves are hydrological signatures allowing to study the relationship between groundwater storage and baseflow and/or low flows at the catchment scale. Recent studies have showed that streamflow recession analysis can be quite sensitive to the combination of different models, extraction techniques and parameter estimation methods. In order to better characterize streamflow recession curves, new methodologies combining multiple approaches have been recommended. The HYDRORECESSION toolbox, presented here, is a Matlab graphical user interface developed to analyse streamflow recession time series with the support of different tools allowing to parameterize linear and nonlinear storage-outflow relationships through four of the most useful recession models (Maillet, Boussinesq, Coutagne and Wittenberg). The toolbox includes four parameter-fitting techniques (linear regression, lower envelope, data binning and mean squared error) and three different methods to extract hydrograph recessions segments (Vogel, Brutsaert and Aksoy). In addition, the toolbox has a module that separates the baseflow component from the observed hydrograph using the inverse reservoir algorithm. Potential applications provided by HYDRORECESSION include model parameter analysis, hydrological regionalization and classification, baseflow index estimates, catchment-scale recharge and low-flows modelling, among others. HYDRORECESSION is freely available for non-commercial and academic purposes.

  7. Interpretation of karst spring recession curves by the series reservoir model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    chang, Y.; Wu, J.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of karst spring recession is a commonly used approach for understanding the aquifer structure or acquiring hydrodynamic parameters. An approach frequently applied for recession analysis is based on the several parallel, typically two or three, linear reservoirs each of which represents different part with different hydraulic conductivities, such as the conduit system and the fissure system. However, this parallel reservoir structure cannot accord with the relationship between the conduit system and fissure system, which is actually in series rather than parallel. We, therefore, examine the recession curve of two linear reservoirs in series (the conduit reservoir and fissure reservoir), representing the conduit and fissure system respectively, and make comparisons with two corresponding parallel linear reservoirs. Some interesting results are presented. If the storages of two series systems are close and the recession coefficient of the conduit reservoir is larger than the fissure reservoir, two overlapping exponential recession processes still exist. And yet, the recession coefficient of each exponential process is different from that of each single reservoir. One of recession coefficient is larger than the conduit reservoir owing to extra water participation from the fissure reservoir except the drainage of conduit reservoir, while the other recession coefficient is smaller than the fissure reservoir because the water flowing out from the fissure reservoir is regulated by the conduit reservoir again. When the recession coefficient of conduit reservoir is close or smaller than the fissure system, the recession curve is expressed only by an exponential function and the recession coefficient is between the conduit and fissure system. Commonly, the storage of the conduit system is much smaller than the fissure system and the conduit flow is turbulent. When ignoring the storage of the conduit system, the conduit reservoir can be substituted by a pipe, in

  8. Summer base-flow recession curves for Iowa streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saboe, C.W.

    1966-01-01

    Base-flow recession. curves for the summer months (June through September) were developed in this study for gaging stations on interior Iowa streams having five or more years of record. The tabulated data enables the user, starting with a known base flow at a gage, to estimate base flows for up to 20 days in the future. Rainfall during the period o£ the forecast will require that a new estimate be made after the stream again reaches base flow.

  9. Synthesis of streamflow recession curves in dry environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega, Saul; Breña-Naranjo, Agustín; Pedrozo-Acuña, Adrían

    2015-04-01

    The elucidation and predictability of hydrological systems can largely benefit by extracting observed patterns in processes, data and models. Such type of research framework in hydrology, also known as synthesis has gained significant attention over the last decade. For instance, hydrological synthesis implies that the identification of patterns in catchment behavior can enhance the extrapolation of hydrological signatures over large spatial and temporal scales. Hydrological signatures during dry periods such as streamflow recession curves (SRC) are of special interest in regions coping with water scarcity. Indeed, the study of SRCs from observed hydrographs allows to extract information about the storage-discharge relationship of a specific catchment and some of their groundwater hydraulic properties. This work aims at performing a synthesis work of SRCs in semi-arid & arid environments across Northern Mexico. Our dataset consisted in observed daily SRCs in 63 catchments with minima human interferences. Three streamflow recession extraction methods (Vogel, Brutsaert and Aksoy-Wittenberg) along with four recession models (Maillet, Boussinesq, Coutagne y Wittenberg) and three parameter estimation techniques (regressions, lower envelope y data binning) were used to determine the combination among different possible methods, processes and models that better describes SRCs in our study sites. Our results show that the extraction method proposed by Aksoy-Wittenberg along with Coutagne's nonlinear recession model provides a better approximation of SRCs across Northern Mexico, whereas regression was found to be the most adequate parameter estimation method. This study suggests that hydrological synthesis turned out to be an useful framework to identify similar patterns and model parameters during dry periods across Mexico's water-limited environments.

  10. Event-based Recession Analysis across Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrograph recessions have long been a window to investigate hydrological processes and their interactions. The authors conducted an exploratory analysis of about 1000 individual hydrograph recessions in a period of around 15 years (1995-2010) from time series of hourly discharge (USGS IDA stream flow data set) at 27 USGS gauges located in Iowa and Cedar River basins with drainage area ranging from 6.7 to around 17000 km2. They calculated recession exponents with the same recession length but different time lags from the hydrograph peak ranging from ~0 to 96 hours, and then plotted them against time lags to construct the evolution of recession exponent. The result shows that, as recession continues, the recession exponent in first increases quickly, then decreases quickly, and finally stays constant. Occasionally and for different reasons, the decreasing portion is missing due to negligible contribution from soil water storage. The increasing part of the evolution of can be related to fast response to rainfall including overland flow and quick subsurface flow through macropores (or tiles), and the decreasing portion can be connected to the delayed soil water response. Lastly, the constant segment can be attributed to the groundwater storage with the slowest response. The points where recession exponent reaches its maximum and begins to plateau are the times that fast response and soil water response end, respectively. The authors conducted further theoretical analysis by combining mathematical derivation and literature results to explain the observed evolution path of the recession exponent . Their results have a direct application in hydrograph separation and important implications for dynamic basin storage-discharge relation analysis and hydrological process understanding across scales.

  11. Watershed model calibration to the base flow recession curve with and without evapotranspiration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, S. M.; Harmon, T. C.; Shi, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Calibration of watershed models to the shape of the base flow recession curve is a way to capture the important relationship between groundwater discharge and subsurface water storage in a catchment. In some montane Mediterranean regions, such as the midelevation Providence Creek catchment in the southern Sierra Nevada of California (USA), nearly all base flow recession occurs after snowmelt, and during this time evapotranspiration (ET) usually exceeds base flow. We assess the accuracy to which watershed models can be calibrated to ET-dominated base flow recession in Providence Creek, both in terms of fitting a discharge time-series and realistically capturing the observed discharge-storage relationship for the catchment. Model parameters estimated from calibrations to ET-dominated recession are compared to parameters estimated from reference calibrations to base flow recession with ET-effects removed ("potential recession"). We employ the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM) for simulations of base flow and ET, and methods that are otherwise general in nature. In models calibrated to ET-dominated recession, simulation errors in ET and the targeted relationship for recession (-dQ/dt versus Q) contribute substantially (up to 57% and 46%, respectively) to overestimates in the discharge-storage differential, defined as d(lnQ)/dS, relative to that derived from water flux observations. These errors result in overestimates of deep-subsurface hydraulic conductivity in models calibrated to ET-dominated recession, by up to an order of magnitude, relative to reference calibrations to potential recession. These results illustrate a potential opportunity for improving model representation of discharge-storage dynamics by calibrating to the shape of base flow recession after removing the complicating effects of ET.

  12. Recession Curve Generation for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Thermal Protection System Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Howard S.; Stuckey, C. Irvin; Davis, Darrell W.; Davis, Darrell (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ablatable Thermal Protection System (TPS) coatings are used on the Space Shuttle Vehicle Solid Rocket Boosters in order to protect the aluminum structure from experiencing excessive temperatures. The methodology used to characterize the recession of such materials is outlined. Details of the tests, including the facility, test articles and test article processing are also presented. The recession rates are collapsed into an empirical power-law relation. A design curve is defined using a 95-percentile student-t distribution. based on the nominal results. Actual test results are presented for the current acreage TPS material used.

  13. Fully automated objective-based method for master recession curve separation.

    PubMed

    Posavec, Kristijan; Parlov, Jelena; Nakić, Zoran

    2010-01-01

    The fully automated objective-based method for master recession curve (MRC) separation was developed by using Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) code. The core of the program code is used to construct an MRC by using the adapted matching strip method (Posavec et al. 2006). Criteria for separating the MRC into two or three segments are determined from the flow-duration curve and are represented as the probable range of percent of flow rate duration. Successive separations are performed automatically on two and three MRCs using sets of percent of flow rate duration from selected ranges and an optimal separation model scenario, having the highest average coefficient of determination R(2), is selected as the most appropriate one. The resulting separated master recession curves are presented graphically, whereas the statistics are presented numerically, all in separate sheets. Examples of field data obtained from two springs in Istria, Croatia, are used to illustrate its application. The freely available Excel spreadsheet and VBA program ensures the ease of use and applicability for larger data sets. PMID:20100291

  14. A computer program for predicting recharge with a master recession curve

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heppner, Christopher S.; Nimmo, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Water-table fluctuations occur in unconfined aquifers owing to ground-water recharge following precipitation and infiltration, and ground-water discharge to streams between storm events. Ground-water recharge can be estimated from well hydrograph data using the water-table fluctuation (WTF) principle, which states that recharge is equal to the product of the water-table rise and the specific yield of the subsurface porous medium. The water-table rise, however, must be expressed relative to the water level that would have occurred in the absence of recharge. This requires a means for estimating the recession pattern of the water-table at the site. For a given site there is often a characteristic relation between the water-table elevation and the water-table decline rate following a recharge event. A computer program was written which extracts the relation between decline rate and water-table elevation from well hydrograph data and uses it to construct a master recession curve (MRC). The MRC is a characteristic water-table recession hydrograph, representing the average behavior for a declining water-table at that site. The program then calculates recharge using the WTF method by comparing the measured well hydrograph with the hydrograph predicted by the MRC and multiplying the difference at each time step by the specific yield. This approach can be used to estimate recharge in a continuous fashion from long-term well records. Presented here is a description of the code including the WTF theory and instructions for running it to estimate recharge with continuous well hydrograph data.

  15. Recession analysis across scales: The impact of both random and nonrandom spatial variability on aggregated hydrologic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2015-04-01

    Recession analysis across scales can provide insight into the spatial aggregation of hydrologic processes. Accordingly, we analyzed individual late-time recession curves from 25 nested USGS stream gauges over a period of ∼150 days with negligible precipitation during the 2012-2013 North American drought. These gauges are located in the Iowa and Cedar River basins and drain areas ranging from ∼70 to 17,000 km2. Our data analyses show that these late-time recession processes can be represented by a linear reservoir model with a constant recession time scale of about 34 days, indicating linear and homogeneous recession behaviors at the large scales investigated. However, others have shown that the early-time recession process becomes more nonlinear as spatial scale and, thus, spatial variability increases. We developed a distributed drainage model as a diagnostic tool to understand these seemingly contradictory recession characteristics at multiple spatial scales and different stages. With a hierarchical description of the recession variability at the hillslope scale, our model can simultaneously produce the increasing nonlinear early-time and the linear and homogenous late-time recession behaviors at larger scales. The hierarchical representation classifies hillslopes according to the Strahler orders of the stream links into which they drain. We postulate that a larger difference in recession behaviors will occur between hillslopes from different orders than between those from the same order. Overall, this study shows how the spatial randomness and nonrandomness of small-scale process variability control the hydrologic responses at larger scales and suggests a combined (nonrandom-random) representation of watersheds for aggregating hydrologic processes.

  16. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  17. Peak flow rate and recession-curve characteristics of a karst spring in the Inner Bluegrass, central Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felton, G.K.; Currens, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The flow rate at the terminal spring of a 1929 ha karst ground-water catchment has been continuously monitored for 2 years, and 108 identifiable events were analyzed. The peak flow rates followed a beta frequency distribution with parameters ?? = 0.365 and ?? = 1.135. Events were separated into high-flow and low-flow. High-flow events had characteristics attributable to pipe flow. Correlation and stepwise regression were used to develop peak flow rate prediction equations for the combined 108 events and for the 81 low-flow events. The portion of the recession curve identified as pipe flow was a watershed constant and time invariant. The base flow was seasonal, increasing in the winter to approximately 0.071 m3s-1 and decreasing in the summer to approximately 0.014 m3s-1. ?? 1994.

  18. Evaluation of Regional Storage-Discharge Parameters from Recession Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface storage and discharge are important components of watershed behaviors to rainfall-runoff responses. The current representations of subsurface-surface relationships are poor in land surface models; such poor representation limits the application of land surface models to evaluate current and future conjunctive water management scenarios. The aim of this research is to derive storage-discharge relationships using streamflow recession hydrograph analysis for watersheds located throughout California. Regression analyses are performed to evaluate empirical storage-discharge parameters as a function of physical watershed parameters and catchment hydrologic characteristics. We illustrate how such regional empirical evaluations provide functional relationships consistent with historic literature to develop parameters for surface-subsurface interaction in fine-resolution land surface models for California.

  19. Aerodynamic Analysis of Simulated Heat Shield Recession for the Orion Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Mcdaniel, Ryan D.

    2008-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of the recession of the ablative thermal protection system for the Orion Command Module of the Crew Exploration Vehicle are important for the vehicle guidance. At the present time, the aerodynamic effects of recession being handled within the Orion aerodynamic database indirectly with an additional safety factor placed on the uncertainty bounds. This study is an initial attempt to quantify the effects for a particular set of recessed geometry shapes, in order to provide more rigorous analysis for managing recession effects within the aerodynamic database. The aerodynamic forces and moments for the baseline and recessed geometries were computed at several trajectory points using multiple CFD codes, both viscous and inviscid. The resulting aerodynamics for the baseline and recessed geometries were compared. The forces (lift, drag) show negligible differences between baseline and recessed geometries. Generally, the moments show a difference between baseline and recessed geometries that correlates with the maximum amount of recession of the geometry. The difference between the pitching moments for the baseline and recessed geometries increases as Mach number decreases (and the recession is greater), and reach a value of -0.0026 for the lowest Mach number. The change in trim angle of attack increases from approx. 0.5deg at M = 28.7 to approx. 1.3deg at M = 6, and is consistent with a previous analysis with a lower fidelity engineering tool. This correlation of the present results with the engineering tool results supports the continued use of the engineering tool for future work. The present analysis suggests there does not need to be an uncertainty due to recession in the Orion aerodynamic database for the force quantities. The magnitude of the change in pitching moment due to recession is large enough to warrant inclusion in the aerodynamic database. An increment in the uncertainty for pitching moment could be calculated from these results and

  20. Social Skills Intervention during Elementary School Recess: A Visual Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Butcher, Dawn; Newsome, W. Sean; Nay, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    This study builds on two studies that explored the effect of a social skills intervention on problem behaviors displayed by elementary school children during recess. Findings conclude that social skills intervention significantly decreased problem behaviors among school children at recess. Implications for behavioral management and healthy school…

  1. Estimating parental relationship in linkage analysis of recessive traits

    SciTech Connect

    Merette, C.; Ott, J.

    1996-05-17

    In linkage analysis of recessive traits, parental relationship is important. For the case that it is unknown, the question is investigated as to whether estimating parental relationship and using the estimated relationship in linkage analysis is beneficial. Results show that estimating parental relationship can reliably be carried out on the basis of 50-100 genetic marker loci (analysis based on theory by Thompson). Misspecification of parental relationship leads to a loss of linkage informativeness, but not to false-positive evidence for linkage. An asymptotic bias in the recombination fraction estimate occurs when parents are unrelated and falsely taken to be related, but no such bias is seen when related parents are taken to be unrelated. Results from this investigation suggest that an estimated parental relationship may be used in linkage analysis as if it were the correct relationship, when evidence for the estimated relationship is supported by a likelihood ratio of at least 10:1 against the parents being unrelated. 9 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Relating Field Observed Changes in the Active Stream Channel Network to Features of dQ/dt-Q Recession Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrologists have long plotted the rate of recession (dQ/dt) versus the absolute discharge (Q) to infer aquifer hydraulic properties. In recent years, these dQ/dt-Q plots have been examined in new ways, in particular, looking at individual event curves within the full dQ/dt-Q plot. When examining individual curves (in log-log space), in many cases one observes relatively constant slopes (usually near two) but finds that intercept values shift seasonally. Some have hypothesized that these two features of the dQ/dt-Q plots can be explained by the nature of the contraction of the stream channel network as flow diminishes (e.g. Biswal and Marani, 2010, GRL). To investigate this hypothesis, I have been mapping changes in the active channel network in a 250 ha catchment nested within the larger 69,000 ha Six Mile Creek watershed in central NY. Direct observations of the active channel network have been supplemented with streamflow measurements at 1st and 2nd order channels and the main channel. The larger Six Mile Creek watershed exhibits the expected constant dQ/dt-Q slopes and varying intercepts. However, the 250 ha catchment (assumed to be representative of the upland areas in the larger watershed) maintains a relatively constant active channel network, even during dry periods, and exhibits no systematic contraction of channel lengths. Most 1st order channels appear to be at least in part spring fed from their upper most point of origin. These field observations suggest that at least in this basin, the slope of two in log(dQ/dt) vs log(Q) plots is not directly related to contraction of the channel network. The fractional contribution of subbasins to total basin flow does indicate that these small upland basins contribute a decreased portion of total watershed flow during drier periods, supporting the notion that shifts in intercept may occur because of spatial changes in dominant contributing zones.

  3. Promising new baseflow separation and recession analysis methods applied to streamflow at Glendhu Catchment, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M. K.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding and modelling the relationship between rainfall and runoff has been a driving force in hydrology for many years. Baseflow separation and recession analysis have been two of the main tools for understanding runoff generation in catchments, but there are many different methods for each. The new baseflow separation method presented here (the bump and rise method or BRM) aims to accurately simulate the shape of tracer-determined baseflow or pre-event water. Application of the method by calibrating its parameters, using (a) tracer data or (b) an optimising method, is demonstrated for the Glendhu Catchment, New Zealand. The calibrated BRM algorithm is then applied to the Glendhu streamflow record. The new recession approach advances the thesis that recession analysis of streamflow alone gives misleading information on catchment storage reservoirs because streamflow is a varying mixture of components of very different origins and characteristics (at the simplest level, quickflow and baseflow as identified by the BRM method). Recession analyses of quickflow, baseflow and streamflow show that the steep power-law slopes often observed for streamflow at intermediate flows are artefacts due to mixing and are not representative of catchment reservoirs. Applying baseflow separation before recession analysis could therefore shed new light on water storage reservoirs in catchments and possibly resolve some current problems with recession analysis. Among other things it shows that both quickflow and baseflow reservoirs in the studied catchment have (non-linear) quadratic characteristics.

  4. Mapping of the recessive white locus and analysis of the tyrosinase gene in chickens.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Otake, T; Suzuki, C; Saburi, J; Kobayashi, E

    2007-10-01

    An F(2) chicken population of 265 individuals, obtained from an intercross between the Japanese Game (colored plumage) and the White Plymouth Rock (the recessive white) and genotyped for microsatellite markers, was used for determining the locus of the gene responsible for the recessive white plumage phenotype in chickens. Two hundred twenty-five markers were mapped in 28 linkage groups. Linkage analysis revealed that the recessive white gene was mapped to chromosome 1. Detailed analysis using additional markers uncovered a significant linkage between 2 new markers, mapped to the flanking region of the tyrosinase gene, which is associated with skin and plumage color. The sequence of the tyrosinase gene was investigated in recessive white chickens and colored chickens. There were no obvious differences in the tyrosinase gene exons between the recessive white chicken and the colored chicken. However, sequence analysis of tyrosinase intron 4 in the recessive white chicken revealed a presence of an insertion of an avian retroviral sequence. The White Plymouth Rock and the F(2) generation with white plumage were identified as homozygous carriers of the retroviral sequence. Expression of the normal transcript containing exon 5 was substantially decreased in the recessive white chicken compared with the colored chicken. Some abnormal tyrosinase gene transcripts were expressed in the skin of the White Plymouth Rock: reverse transcription PCR products amplified from exon 3 to intron 4 and from retroviral sequence 3' long terminal repeat to exon 5. Based on these results, it was confirmed that an avian retroviral sequence insertion in the tyrosinase gene was the cause of recessive white phenotype in chickens. PMID:17878441

  5. Evaluating the effect of partial contributing storage on the storage-discharge function from recession analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Wang, D.

    2013-10-01

    Hydrograph recession during dry periods has been used to construct water storage-discharge relationships and to quantify storage dynamics and evaporation when streamflow data is available. However, variable hydrologic connectivity among hillslope-riparian-stream zones may affect the lumped storage-discharge relationship, and as a result, affect the estimation of evaporation and storage change. Given observations of rainfall and runoff, and remote-sensing-based observations of evaporation, the ratio (α) between estimated daily evaporation from recession analysis and observed evaporation, and the ratio (β) between estimated contributing storage and total watershed storage are computed for 9 watersheds located in different climate regions. Both evaporation and storage change estimation from recession analysis are underestimated due to the effect of partial contributing storage, particularly when the discharge is low. It was found that the values of α decrease significantly during individual recession events, while the values of β are relatively stable during a recession event. The values of β are negatively correlated with the water table depth and vary significantly among recession events. The partial contributing storage effect is one possible cause for the multi-valued storage-discharge relationship.

  6. Evaluating the effect of partial contributing storage on storage-discharge function from recession analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Wang, D.

    2013-05-01

    Hydrograph recession during dry periods has been used to construct water storage-discharge relationship, and to quantify storage dynamics and evaporation when streamflow data is available. However, variable hydrologic connectivity among hillslope-riparian-stream zones may affect the lumped storage-discharge relationship, and as a result, affect the estimation of evaporation and storage change. Given observations of rainfall and runoff, and remote sensing-based observation of evaporation, the ratio (α) between estimated daily evaporation from recession analysis and observed evaporation, and the ratio (β) between estimated contributing storage and total watershed storage are computed for 9 watersheds located in different climate regions. Both evaporation and storage change estimation from recession analysis are underestimated due to the effect of partial contributing storage, particularly when the discharge is low. It was found that the values of α decrease significantly during individual recession events, while the values of β are relatively stable during a recession event. The values of β are negatively correlated with the water table depth, and vary significantly among recession events. The partial contributing storage effect is one possible cause for the multi-valued storage-discharge relationship.

  7. Performance analysis of SOI MOSFET with rectangular recessed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M.; Mishra, S.; Mohanty, S. S.; Mishra, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a two dimensional (2D) rectangular recessed channel-silicon on insulator metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (RRC-SOI MOSFET), using the concept of groove between source and drain regions, which is one of the channel engineering technique to suppress the short channel effect (SCE). This suppression is mainly due to corner potential barrier of the groove and the simulation is carried out by using ATLAS 2D device simulator. To have further improvement of SCE in RRC-SOI MOSFET, three more devices are designed by using dual material gate (DMG) and gate dielectric technique, which results in formation of devices i.e. DMRRC-SOI,MLSMRRC-SOI, MLDMRRC-SOI MOSFET. The effect of different structures of RRC-SOI on AC and RF parameters are investigated and the importance of these devices over RRC MOSFET regarding short channel effect is analyzed.

  8. Peranso - Light curve and period analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Vanmunster, T.

    2016-03-01

    A time series is a sample of observations of well-defined data points obtained through repeated measurements over a certain time range. The analysis of such data samples has become increasingly important not only in natural science but also in many other fields of research. Peranso offers a complete set of powerful light curve and period analysis functions to work with large astronomical data sets. Substantial attention has been given to ease-of-use and data accuracy, making it one of the most productive time series analysis software available. In this paper, we give an introduction to Peranso and its functionality.

  9. Analysis of light curve of LP Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudil, Z.; Skarka, M.; Zejda, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present photometric analysis of the RRab type pulsating star LP Cam. The star was observed at Brno Observatory and Planetarium during nine nights. Measurements were calibrated to the Johnson photometric system. Four captured and thirteen previously published maxima timings allowed us to refine the pulsation period and the zero epoch. The light curve was Fourier decomposed to estimate physical parameters using empirical relations. Our results suggest that LP Cam is a common RR Lyrae star with high, almost solar metallicity.

  10. Incorporating Experience Curves in Appliance Standards Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, Karina; Chan, Peter; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Kantner, Colleen; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Stephen; Rosenquist, Gregory; Buskirk, Robert Van; Yang, Hung-Chia; Desroches, Louis-Benoit

    2011-10-31

    The technical analyses in support of U.S. energy conservation standards for residential appliances and commercial equipment have typically assumed that manufacturing costs and retail prices remain constant during the projected 30-year analysis period. There is, however, considerable evidence that this assumption does not reflect real market prices. Costs and prices generally fall in relation to cumulative production, a phenomenon known as experience and modeled by a fairly robust empirical experience curve. Using price data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and shipment data obtained as part of the standards analysis process, we present U.S. experience curves for room air conditioners, clothes dryers, central air conditioners, furnaces, and refrigerators and freezers. These allow us to develop more representative appliance price projections than the assumption-based approach of constant prices. These experience curves were incorporated into recent energy conservation standards for these products. The impact on the national modeling can be significant, often increasing the net present value of potential standard levels in the analysis. In some cases a previously cost-negative potential standard level demonstrates a benefit when incorporating experience. These results imply that past energy conservation standards analyses may have undervalued the economic benefits of potential standard levels.

  11. NEXT Performance Curve Analysis and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, Pratik; Cardiff, Eric; Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Performance curves of the NEXT thruster are highly important in determining the thruster's ability in performing towards mission-specific goals. New performance curves are proposed and examined here. The Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG) is used to verify variations in mission solutions based on both available thruster curves and the new curves generated. Furthermore, variations in BOL and EOL curves are also examined. Mission design results shown here validate the use of EMTG and the new performance curves.

  12. Light-curve Analysis of Neon Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed light curves of five neon novae, QU Vul, V351 Pup, V382 Vel, V693 CrA, and V1974 Cyg, and determined their white dwarf (WD) masses and distance moduli on the basis of theoretical light curves composed of free-free and photospheric emission. For QU Vul, we obtained a distance of d ˜ 2.4 kpc, reddening of E(B - V) ˜ 0.55, and WD mass of MWD = 0.82-0.96 {M}⊙ . This suggests that an oxygen-neon WD lost a mass of more than ˜ 0.1 {M}⊙ since its birth. For V351 Pup, we obtained d˜ 5.5 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.45, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . For V382 Vel, we obtained d˜ 1.6 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.15, and {M}{{WD}}=1.13-1.28 {M}⊙ . For V693 CrA, we obtained d˜ 7.1 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.05, and {M}{{WD}}=1.15-1.25 {M}⊙ . For V1974 Cyg, we obtained d˜ 1.8 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.95-1.1 {M}⊙ . For comparison, we added the carbon-oxygen nova V1668 Cyg to our analysis and obtained d˜ 5.4 {{kpc}}, E(B-V)˜ 0.30, and {M}{{WD}}=0.98-1.1 {M}⊙ . In QU Vul, photospheric emission contributes 0.4-0.8 mag at most to the optical light curve compared with free-free emission only. In V351 Pup and V1974 Cyg, photospheric emission contributes very little (0.2-0.4 mag at most) to the optical light curve. In V382 Vel and V693 CrA, free-free emission dominates the continuum spectra, and photospheric emission does not contribute to the optical magnitudes. We also discuss the maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relation for these novae based on the universal decline law.

  13. The Informative Analysis of Individual Trend Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Roderick P.

    2004-01-01

    Additive and non-additive models for an individual trend curve are examined, and five methods for fitting these to a set of individuals are described. It is suggested that classical fitting methods are more informative than latent curve methods, and commonly preferable. A limited study of the effect of time-structure is reported, and results on…

  14. Aq Psc Analysis of New Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Atsuma

    2005-04-01

    New BV light curves of the A-type W UMa star AQ Psc (P = 0.476d) have been observed and are described. A few times of minimum light are obtained and the ephemeris is improved. The light curves are analyzed for the binary parameters with a light curve synthesis method. Combining the results with Lu and Rucinski’s spectroscopic mass ratio we determined the masses and radii of the components: M 1 = 1.69M ⊙, M 2 = 0.38M ⊙, R 1 = 1.77R ⊙, and R 2 = 0.89R ⊙.

  15. Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus’ Forgetting Curve

    PubMed Central

    Murre, Jaap M. J.; Dros, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus’ classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point. PMID:26148023

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease by molecular genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Chae, Hyojin; Shin, Jong Chul; Park, In Yang; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo

    2011-11-01

    A 27-year-old primigravida was referred for evaluation of severe oligohydramnios at 22 weeks of gestation. For a more accurate diagnosis and detection of other fetal anomalies, complementary fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. Findings of fetal MRI evaluation were consistent with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). Parental mutation analysis in the PKHD1 gene was performed. By PKHD1 mutation analysis, we were able to identify a heterozygous missense mutation in exon 20 (K626R) in the father. Molecular genetic analysis can be helpful for an early and reliable prenatal diagnosis of ARPKD. Herein, we present a case of ARPKD that was diagnosed at 22 weeks of gestation by ultrasonographic examination and MRI and verified by PKHD1 mutation analysis and array-based genetic deletion analysis. PMID:21790888

  17. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  18. Estimation of baseflow and water transfer in karst catchments in Mediterranean Turkey by nonlinear recession analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eris, Ebru; Wittenberg, Hartmut

    2015-11-01

    Because of water transfers through fissures, cavities, caves and phreatic channels of various sizes and unknown directions, the topographic watersheds of karst catchments have little significance for their aquifers. Most of the flow in the Manavgat River in South Anatolia has its origin outside of the surface watershed and is transferred through karst pathways. Previous investigations found evidence for this by groundwater tracing techniques. In this study, flow recession analysis and baseflow separation are applied to the time series of daily flows 1992-2008 from three gauging stations. Flow recessions were found corresponding to the nonlinear storage-baseflow relationship S = a·Qb, with b values around 0.5 as typical for unconfined groundwater, while the coefficient a showed marked seasonal variations with higher values in the rainy winter time and decreasing values towards the dry summer. For catchments which receive water transfers from other areas, the decrease of a is retarded. Flow recession is slower since more water is available. Baseflow separation by using the same nonlinear model revealed that direct flow, which is mainly surface flow, corresponds roughly to the surface catchments while baseflow, which accounts for most of the total flow, is highly influenced by transfers from karst sink areas outside the surface watersheds. The subsurface transfer was simulated by a nonlinear reservoir routing algorithm. Time series of monthly baseflow from catchments which receive transfer water were compared with those of sinkhole (loss) areas. The procedure allows inferring the origin area of the inflows and estimating the retention or lag time of the transfer.

  19. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Azygoesophageal recess.

    PubMed

    Ravenel, James G; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2002-07-01

    Knowledge of the normal radiologic appearance and manifestations of disease in the azygoesophageal recess can facilitate the detection and diagnosis of intrathoracic disease. The azygoesophageal recess is located lateral or posterior to the esophagus and anterior to the spine. It extends from the anterior turn of the azygous vein to the aortic hiatus. The configuration of the azygoesophageal recess is normally a smooth arc convex to the left. Because the right lung extends into the recess, pathology in this region can often be detected radiographically and typically manifests as increased opacity and/or as a contour abnormality. In adults, convexity directed to the right and immediately below the level of the azygous vein on a frontal radiograph is abnormal and requires further evaluation. PMID:12082374

  1. Analysis of colloid and tracer breakthrough curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindrod, Peter; Edwards, Mark S.; Higgo, Jenny J. W.; Williams, Geoffrey M.

    1996-02-01

    the flow regime). It is important to realize that even for unretarded species, an earlier peak in the breakthrough curve does not necessarily correspond to a faster mean elution rate, or vice versa. But rather that a colloid may elute faster but disperse less than an equivalent tracer. Hence its peak may be retarded compared to that of the tracer, even assuming no retardation. Hence one must consider a combination of mean elution rate and mean dispersion rate, and not rely on "peak times" to corroborate chromatographic effects. The importance of this lies in the fact that these processes are not independent and yet upscale differently. Thus realistic estimates of effective colloid dispersion rates should be upscaled in a way consistent with that adopted for tracers within the same system.

  2. Light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas; Budavari, Tamas; Hendry, Martin A.; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2015-08-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Schematically, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We are applying the framework to a variety of problems in synoptic time-domain survey astronomy, including optimal detection of weak sources in multi-epoch data, and improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities from detailed demographic modeling of ensembles of Cepheid light curves.

  3. Sex-linked recessive

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked recessive; Genetics - sex-linked recessive; X-linked recessive ... X-linked recessive diseases usually occur in males. Males have only one X chromosome. A single recessive ...

  4. Band analysis by spectral curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Shaw, J. H.; Calvert, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A method of estimating the values of the parameters in the models describing the positions, widths, and intensities of the lines in rotation-vibration bands of gases, without the need for line by line analysis, is described. To illustrate the technique, portions of the 1-0 bands of HCl and CO have been analyzed. The values of up to 27 parameters, their standard deviations, and the correlations between the parameters required to describe the spectra have been obtained.

  5. Molecular and phenotypic analysis of 25 recessive, homozygous-viable alleles at the mouse agouti locus.

    PubMed Central

    Miltenberger, Rosalynn J; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Woychik, Richard P; Russell, Liane B; Michaud, Edward J

    2002-01-01

    Agouti is a paracrine-acting, transient antagonist of melanocortin 1 receptors that specifies the subapical band of yellow on otherwise black hairs of the wild-type coat. To better understand both agouti structure/function and the germline damage caused by chemicals and radiation, an allelic series of 25 recessive, homozygous-viable agouti mutations generated in specific-locus tests were characterized. Visual inspection of fur, augmented by quantifiable chemical analysis of hair melanins, suggested four phenotypic categories (mild, moderate, umbrous-like, severe) for the 18 hypomorphs and a single category for the 7 amorphs (null). Molecular analysis indicated protein-coding alterations in 8 hypomorphs and 6 amorphs, with mild-moderate phenotypes correlating with signal peptide or basic domain mutations, and more devastating phenotypes resulting from C-terminal lesions. Ten hypomorphs and one null demonstrated wild-type coding potential, suggesting that they contain mutations elsewhere in the > or = 125-kb agouti locus that either reduce the level or alter the temporal/spatial distribution of agouti transcripts. Beyond the notable contributions to the field of mouse germ cell mutagenesis, analysis of this allelic series illustrates that complete abrogation of agouti function in vivo occurs most often through protein-coding lesions, whereas partial loss of function occurs slightly more frequently at the level of gene expression control. PMID:11861569

  6. Cepheid light curve demography via Bayesian functional data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hendry, Martin; Kowal, Daniel; Ruppert, David

    2016-01-01

    Synoptic time-domain surveys provide astronomers, not simply more data, but a different kind of data: large ensembles of multivariate, irregularly and asynchronously sampled light curves. We describe a statistical framework for light curve demography—optimal accumulation and extraction of information, not only along individual light curves as conventional methods do, but also across large ensembles of related light curves. We build the framework using tools from functional data analysis (FDA), a rapidly growing area of statistics that addresses inference from datasets that sample ensembles of related functions. Our Bayesian FDA framework builds hierarchical models that describe light curve ensembles using multiple levels of randomness: upper levels describe the source population, and lower levels describe the observation process, including measurement errors and selection effects. Roughly speaking, a particular object's light curve is modeled as the sum of a parameterized template component (modeling population-averaged behavior) and a peculiar component (modeling variability across the population), subsequently subjected to an observation model. A functional shrinkage adjustment to individual light curves emerges—an adaptive, functional generalization of the kind of adjustments made for Eddington or Malmquist bias in single-epoch photometric surveys. We describe ongoing work applying the framework to improved estimation of Cepheid variable star luminosities via FDA-based refinement and generalization of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation.

  7. Evaluating knickpoint recession along an active fault for paleoseismological analysis: The Huoshan Piedmont, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhanyu; Bi, Lisi; Xu, Yueren; He, Honglin

    2015-04-01

    Ground-rupturing earthquakes can generate tectonic knickpoints within upstream reaches of streams across active fault zones. These knickpoints are characteristic of upstream propagation of time-related process once generated by an earthquake, so analysis of knickpoint series in streams which cross fault zones can be used to infer paleoearthquake events. We studied the knickpoints along the Huoshan Piedmont Fault (HPF), which is an active normal fault in the Shanxi Faulted Basin zone, China, and demonstrate that analysis of knickpoints shows evidence for two paleoearthquakes in the HPF. First, we identified knickpoints in bedrock reaches upstream of the HPF using high-resolution DEMs derived from IRS-P5 stereo images and the stream-gradient method. After excluding non-faulting knickpoints, 47 knickpoints were identified in 23 bedrock reaches upstream from the HPF. Analysis of the most recent knickpoints caused by the 1303 CE Hongdong Earthquake allowed for local calibration of the retreat rates. Applying these retreat rates across the study area allows for the estimation of the age of other knickpoints, and constrains the age ranges of two knickpoint groups to be 2269-3336 a BP and 4504-5618 a BP. These ages constrain the ages of two paleoearthquake events at 2710 ± 102 and 4980 ± 646 a BP. The knickpoints along the HPF obey the parallel retreating model in which knickpoint morphology was roughly maintained during retreat, so the heights of knickpoints represent the coseismic vertical displacements generated by the earthquakes along the HPF. The vertical offsets for these three earthquake events are similar and are approximately 4 m, which indicates that the ruptures on the HPF obey a characteristic slip model with a similar slip distribution for several successive earthquakes. These results provide additional evidence of paleoearthquakes on the HPF and show that analysis of knickpoint recession along an active fault is a valuable tool for paleoseismology.

  8. Genetic analysis of loci that contribute to recessive polycystic kidney disease in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, D.R.; Dushkin, H.; Tobin, D.

    1994-09-01

    Identification of genes that play a role in the development of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a key to the better understanding of this disorder. We have discovered a new mutation in the mouse we call juvenile cystic kidney (jck) which predisposes to the development of ARPKD and is not allelic with any previously described mutations. In an effort to map and positionally clone the jck gene, an intraspecific intercross between B6/DBA jck/+F1 mice was established and over 100 affected progeny were identified. Genotype analysis using microsatellite markers was employed and the jck mutation has been mapped to a 1 cM interval on mouse chromosome 11. Positional cloning of this mutant locus by employing a YAC contig is in progress. Narrowing the region of interest has been facilitated by the utilization of SSCP analysis to develop informative markers from YAC sequence. In addition, it was noted that severity of disease in the intercross progeny (as measured by the degree of kidney enlargement) was more variable than that observed in the parental B6 strain. This suggested that a modifier locus introduced form the DBA background affects the expression of the jck phenotype. We have determined that two additional regions - one from DBA on distal chromosome 10 and a second from B6 on chromosome 1 - are strongly associated with inheritance of a more severe polycystic kidney disease phenotype. The finding of a highly significant association of a B6-related locus with kidney enlargement was completely unexpected, since the PKD phenotype in the original B6 background is not severe. This finding is unambiguous, with a maximal quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis LOD score of 15 for association with disease severity. We propose that it is the inheritance of both a homozygous B6 locus on chromosome 1 and a DBA gene that results in the severe phenotype, presumably as a consequence of an interaction between their protein products.

  9. Recession Vs Myotomy–Comparative Analysis of Two Surgical Procedures of Weakening Inferior Oblique Muscle Overaction

    PubMed Central

    Alajbegovic-Halimic, Jasmina; Zvizdic, Denisa; Sahbegovic-Holcner, Amra; Kulanic-Kuduzovic, Amira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Inferior oblique overaction (IOOA) can be primary or secondary, isolated or combined to other types of horizontal deviation, mostly with esotropias. Surgical weakening of IOOA means several techniques like; recession, myotomy, myectomy, anteroposition etc. Goals: we analyzed the effect of inferior oblique muscle surgical weakening comparing two groups of patients with primary hypertropia. Material and methods: In 5-years retrospective study, we observed 33 patients on which we did the surgical procedure of weakening inferior muscle overaction by two methods; recession and myotomy. Results: In total number of 33 patients, there were 57,6% male and 42,4% female patients with average age of 10,6±7,5 (in range of 4–36). There was 33,3% of isolated primary hypertropias, and 66,7% combined with esotropias. At 23 (69,9%) patients the recession surgical procedure was done, and with 10 (30,1%) myotomy. Better effect and binocularity was in 65,2% of patients in recession group which was statistically significant with significance level of p<0,0, χ2=5,705; p=0,021. Conclusion: Comparing of two surgical procedures of weakening inferior oblique muscles overaction, recession is better procedure than myotomy. PMID:26261384

  10. Testing Main Effects and Interactions in Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.; Willoughby, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    A key strength of latent curve analysis (LCA) is the ability to model individual variability in rates of change as a function of 1 or more explanatory variables. The measurement of time plays a critical role because the explanatory variables multiplicatively interact with time in the prediction of the repeated measures. However, this interaction…

  11. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Recessive Male Sterility (RGMS) in Sterile and Fertile Brassica napus Lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiyan; Liu, Chuan; Li, Jiana; Tang, Zhanglin; Xu, Xinfu; Qiu, Xiao; Wang, Rui; Lu, Kun

    2015-01-01

    The recessive genetic male sterility (RGMS) system plays a key role in the production of hybrid varieties in self-pollinating B. napus plants, and prevents negative cytoplasmic effects. However, the complete molecular mechanism of the male sterility during male-gametogenesis in RGMS remains to be determined. To identify transcriptomic changes that occur during the transition to male sterility in RGMS, we examined the male sterile line WSLA and male fertile line WSLB, which are near-isogenic lines (NILs) differing only in the fertility trait. We evaluated the phenotypic features and sterility stage using anatomical analysis. Comparative RNA sequencing analysis revealed that 3,199 genes were differentially expressed between WSLA and WSLB. Many of these genes are mainly involved in biological processes related to flowering, including pollen tube development and growth, pollen wall assembly and modification, and pollen exine formation and pollination. The transcript profiles of 93 genes associated with pollen wall and anther development were determined by quantitative RT-PCR in different flower parts, and classified into the following three major clades: 1) up-regulated in WSLA plants; 2) down-regulated in WSLA plants; and 3) down-regulated in buds, but have a higher expression in stigmas of WSLA than in WSLB. A subset of genes associated with sporopollenin accumulation were all up-regulated in WSLA. An excess of sporopollenin results in defective pollen wall formation, which leads to male sterility in WSLA. Some of the genes identified in this study are candidates for future research, as they could provide important insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying RGMS in WSLA. PMID:26656530

  12. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Recessive Male Sterility (RGMS) in Sterile and Fertile Brassica napus Lines.

    PubMed

    Qu, Cunmin; Fu, Fuyou; Liu, Miao; Zhao, Huiyan; Liu, Chuan; Li, Jiana; Tang, Zhanglin; Xu, Xinfu; Qiu, Xiao; Wang, Rui; Lu, Kun

    2015-01-01

    The recessive genetic male sterility (RGMS) system plays a key role in the production of hybrid varieties in self-pollinating B. napus plants, and prevents negative cytoplasmic effects. However, the complete molecular mechanism of the male sterility during male-gametogenesis in RGMS remains to be determined. To identify transcriptomic changes that occur during the transition to male sterility in RGMS, we examined the male sterile line WSLA and male fertile line WSLB, which are near-isogenic lines (NILs) differing only in the fertility trait. We evaluated the phenotypic features and sterility stage using anatomical analysis. Comparative RNA sequencing analysis revealed that 3,199 genes were differentially expressed between WSLA and WSLB. Many of these genes are mainly involved in biological processes related to flowering, including pollen tube development and growth, pollen wall assembly and modification, and pollen exine formation and pollination. The transcript profiles of 93 genes associated with pollen wall and anther development were determined by quantitative RT-PCR in different flower parts, and classified into the following three major clades: (1) up-regulated in WSLA plants; (2) down-regulated in WSLA plants; and 3) down-regulated in buds, but have a higher expression in stigmas of WSLA than in WSLB. A subset of genes associated with sporopollenin accumulation were all up-regulated in WSLA. An excess of sporopollenin results in defective pollen wall formation, which leads to male sterility in WSLA. Some of the genes identified in this study are candidates for future research, as they could provide important insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying RGMS in WSLA. PMID:26656530

  13. SurvCurv database and online survival analysis platform update

    PubMed Central

    Ziehm, Matthias; Ivanov, Dobril K.; Bhat, Aditi; Partridge, Linda; Thornton, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Understanding the biology of ageing is an important and complex challenge. Survival experiments are one of the primary approaches for measuring changes in ageing. Here, we present a major update to SurvCurv, a database and online resource for survival data in animals. As well as a substantial increase in data and additions to existing graphical and statistical survival analysis features, SurvCurv now includes extended mathematical mortality modelling functions and survival density plots for more advanced representation of groups of survival cohorts. Availability and implementation: The database is freely available at https://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/SurvCurv/. All data are published under the Creative Commons Attribution License. Contact: matthias.ziehm@ebi.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26249811

  14. Recession Rebound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2011-01-01

    A return to normal after a crisis is a good thing. Who doesn't want back what once seemed lost? The problem is it usually isn't a simple task figuring out how to patch together a scaled-back training program. When the recession hit in fall 2008, trainers were asked to scale down programming and make do with fewer resources. With a recovery in full…

  15. A Quantitative Analysis of Recessions and Financial Changes in Higher Education Institution Alumni Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dos Santos, Alves

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between recession and alumni contributions to institutions of higher education for operational expenses and capital expenditures that include property, buildings, and equipment. Identifying variables that may decrease alumni contributions is important because decreased state funding for higher education…

  16. Computational analysis of TRAPPC9: candidate gene for autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Khattak, Naureen Aslam; Mir, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Mental retardation (MR)/ intellectual disability (ID) is a neuro-developmental disorder characterized by a low intellectual quotient (IQ) and deficits in adaptive behavior related to everyday life tasks such as delayed language acquisition, social skills or self-help skills with onset before age 18. To date, a few genes (PRSS12, CRBN, CC2D1A, GRIK2, TUSC3, TRAPPC9, TECR, ST3GAL3, MED23, MAN1B1, NSUN1) for autosomal-recessive forms of non syndromic MR (NS-ARMR) have been identified and established in various families with ID. The recently reported candidate gene TRAPPC9 was selected for computational analysis to explore its potentially important role in pathology as it is the only gene for ID reported in more than five different familial cases worldwide. YASARA (12.4.1) was utilized to generate three dimensional structures of the candidate gene TRAPPC9. Hybrid structure prediction was employed. Crystal Structure of a Conserved Metalloprotein From Bacillus Cereus (3D19-C) was selected as best suitable template using position-specific iteration-BLAST. Template (3D19-C) parameters were based on E-value, Z-score and resolution and quality score of 0.32, -1.152, 2.30°A and 0.684 respectively. Model reliability showed 93.1% residues placed in the most favored region with 96.684 quality factor, and overall 0.20 G-factor (dihedrals 0.06 and covalent 0.39 respectively). Protein-Protein docking analysis demonstrated that TRAPPC9 showed strong interactions of the amino acid residues S(253), S(251), Y(256), G(243), D(131) with R(105), Q(425), W(226), N(255), S(233), its functional partner 1KBKB. Protein-protein interacting residues could facilitate the exploration of structural and functional outcomes of wild type and mutated TRAPCC9 protein. Actively involved residues can be used to elucidate the binding properties of the protein, and to develop drug therapy for NS-ARMR patients. PMID:24040793

  17. Gastrocnemius recession.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John G; Bohay, Donald R; Eller, Erik B; Witt, Bryan L

    2014-12-01

    The Grand Rapids Arch Collapse classifications create a novel system for categorizing and correlating numerous common foot and ankle conditions related to a falling arch. The algorithm for treating these conditions is exceptionally replicable and has excellent outcomes. Gastrocnemius equinus diagnosis plays a crucial role in the pathology of arch collapse. A contracture of the gastrocnemius muscle is increasingly recognized as the cause of several foot and ankle conditions. The authors have expanded their indications for gastrocnemius recession to include arch pain without radiographic abnormality, calcaneus apophysitis, plantar fasciitis/fibromas, Achilles tendonosis, early-onset diabetic Charcot arthropathy, and neuropathic forefoot ulcers. PMID:25456721

  18. Estimating catchment scale groundwater dynamics from recession analysis - enhanced constraining of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaugen, T.; Mengistu, Z.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we propose a new formulation of subsurface water storage dynamics for use in rainfall-runoff models. Under the assumption of a strong relationship between storage and runoff, the temporal distribution of storage is considered to have the same shape as the distribution of observed recessions (measured as the difference between the log of runoff values). The mean subsurface storage is estimated as the storage at steady-state, where moisture input equals the mean annual runoff. An important contribution of the new formulation is that its parameters are derived directly from observed recession data and the mean annual runoff and hence estimated prior to calibration. Key principles guiding the evaluation of the new subsurface storage routine have been (a) to minimize the number of parameters to be estimated through the, often arbitrary fitting to optimize runoff predictions (calibration) and (b) maximize the range of testing conditions (i.e. large-sample hydrology). The new storage routine has been implemented in the already parameter parsimonious Distance Distribution Dynamics (DDD) model and tested for 73 catchments in Norway of varying size, mean elevations and landscape types. Runoff simulations for the 73 catchments from two model structures; DDD with calibrated subsurface storage and DDD with the new estimated subsurface storage were compared. No loss in precision of runoff simulations was found using the new estimated storage routine. For the 73 catchments, an average of the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency criterion of 0.68 was found using the new estimated storage routine compared with 0.66 using calibrated storage routine. The average Kling-Gupta Efficiency criterion was 0.69 and 0.70 for the new and old storage routine, respectively. Runoff recessions are more realistically modelled using the new approach since the root mean square error between the mean of observed and simulated recessions was reduced by almost 50 % using the new storage routine.

  19. Functional analysis of FOXE3 mutations causing dominant and recessive ocular anterior segment disease.

    PubMed

    Islam, Lily; Kelberman, Daniel; Williamson, Laura; Lewis, Nicola; Glindzicz, Maria Bitner; Nischal, Ken K; Sowden, Jane C

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in FOXE3 are associated with both recessive and dominant inheritance of severe anterior ocular malformations and glaucoma. However, functional analyses of putative pathogenic mutations have not been performed. We tested the hypothesis that variations in FOXE3 activity underlie the different modes of inheritance and disease phenotype. In band shift assays, three recessive mutants showed loss-of-function, one retained DNA binding activity, whereas two dominant mutants showed altered activity. All six mutants showed reduced transactivation function compared with wild-type, and modeling the heterozygous state resulted in an intermediate level of activity providing no evidence for dominant negative action. Our in vitro data are consistent with loss-of-function below a dosage sensitive threshold as a mechanism of action for recessive mutations, but indicate an altered mutant protein function rather than a haploinsufficient mechanism for dominant mutations. This study provides the first functional evidence demonstrating that FOXE3 mutations identified in patients impair protein function with differential effects. PMID:25504734

  20. Instrumentation for automated acquisition and analysis of TLD glow curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, I. J.; Kennett, T. J.; Harvey, J. W.

    1991-04-01

    Instrumentation for the automated and complete acquisition of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) data from a Panasonic UD-702E TLD reader is reported. The system that has been developed consists of both hardware and software components and is designed to operate with an IBM-type personal computer. Acquisition of glow curve, timing, and heating data has been integrated with elementary numerical analysis to permit real-time validity and diagnostic assessments to be made. This allows the optimization of critical parameters such as duration of the heating cycles and the time window for the integration of the dosimetry peak. The form of the Li 2B 4O 7:Cu TLD glow curve has been studied and a mathematical representation devised to assist in the implementation of automated analysis. Differences in the shape of the curve can be used to identify dosimetry peaks due to artifacts or to identify failing components. Examples of the use of this system for quality assurance in the TLD monitoring program at McMaster University are presented.

  1. Multi-wavelength analysis of Ellerman Bomb Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlender, M.; Berlicki, A.

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength photometric analysis of Ellerman Bomb (EB) observations obtained from the Dutch Open Telescope. In our data we have found 6 EBs located in the super-penumbra of the main spot in the active region NOAA 10781. We present light curves of EB observed in the Hα line centre and wing +0.7 Å, in the Ca II H line centre and wing~+2.35 Å, in the G-band and in the TRACE 1600 Å filter. We have shown that EBs were visible in the G-band and moreover, there was a good correlation between the light curves in the G-band and in the Hα line wings. We also found quasi-periodic oscillations of EBs brightness in the G-band, CaII H line and TRACE 1600 Å filter.

  2. Stress analysis in curved composites due to thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, Jared Cornelius

    Many structures in aircraft, cars, trucks, ships, machines, tools, bridges, and buildings, consist of curved sections. These sections vary from straight line segments that have curvature at either one or both ends, segments with compound curvatures, segments with two mutually perpendicular curvatures or Gaussian curvatures, and segments with a simple curvature. With the advancements made in multi-purpose composites over the past 60 years, composites slowly but steadily have been appearing in these various vehicles, compound structures, and buildings. These composite sections provide added benefits over isotropic, polymeric, and ceramic materials by generally having a higher specific strength, higher specific stiffnesses, longer fatigue life, lower density, possibilities in reduction of life cycle and/or acquisition cost, and greater adaptability to intended function of structure via material composition and geometry. To be able to design and manufacture a safe composite laminate or structure, it is imperative that the stress distributions, their causes, and effects are thoroughly understood in order to successfully accomplish mission objectives and manufacture a safe and reliable composite. The objective of the thesis work is to expand upon the knowledge of simply curved composite structures by exploring and ascertaining all pertinent parameters, phenomenon, and trends in stress variations in curved laminates due to thermal loading. The simply curved composites consist of composites with one radius of curvature throughout the span of the specimen about only one axis. Analytical beam theory, classical lamination theory, and finite element analysis were used to ascertain stress variations in a flat, isotropic beam. An analytical method was developed to ascertain the stress variations in an isotropic, simply curved beam under thermal loading that is under both free-free and fixed-fixed constraint conditions. This is the first such solution to Author's best knowledge

  3. Dissection of the Hormetic Curve: Analysis of Components and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the dose of an effector and the biological response frequently is not described by a linear function and, moreover, in some cases the dose-response relationship may change from positive/adverse to adverse/positive with increasing dose. This complicated relationship is called “hormesis”. This paper provides a short analysis of the concept along with a description of used approaches to characterize hormetic relationships. The whole hormetic curve can be divided into three zones: I – a lag-zone where no changes are observed with increasing dose; II – a zone where beneficial/adverse effects are observed, and III – a zone where the effects are opposite to those seen in zone II. Some approaches are proposed to analyze the molecular components involved in the development of the hormetic character of dose-response relationships with the use of specific genetic lines or inhibitors of regulatory pathways. The discussion is then extended to suggest a new parameter (half-width of the hormetic curve at zone II) for quantitative characterization of the hormetic curve. The problems limiting progress in the development of the hormesis concept such as low reproducibility and predictability may be solved, at least partly, by deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormetic dose-effect relationship. PMID:25249836

  4. The great recession of 2007 and California nurses: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Michelle Sardenberg-Hersh; Neronde, Pamela; Wong, Sherly

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of the Recession of 2007 on nurses' wages, demographics, human capital, and work environment characteristics using data from the California Board of Registered Nursing Surveys of 2006, 2008 and 2010. Findings suggest that the labor force is maximized, with nurses working as much as they can on their primary nursing positions (51 weeks a year). As the economy recovers, the nurse shortage will resurge. Intense focus in three policy areas is recommended: education, faculty training, and recruitment and retention of African Americans, Hispanics, and older nurses. PMID:24036699

  5. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  6. FMRI Signal Analysis Using Empirical Mean Curve Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fan; Zhu, Dajiang; Lv, Jinglei; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series is non-linear and composed of components at multiple temporal scales, which presents significant challenges to its analysis. In the literature, significant effort has been devoted into model-based fMRI signal analysis, while much less attention has been directed to data-driven fMRI signal analysis. In this paper, we present a novel data-driven multi-scale signal decomposition framework named Empirical Mean Curve Decomposition (EMCD). Targeted on functional brain mapping, the EMCD optimizes mean envelopes from fMRI signals and iteratively extracts coarser-to-finer scale signal components. The EMCD framework was applied to infer meaningful low-frequency information from Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signals from resting state fMRI, task-based fMRI, and natural stimulus fMRI, and promising results are obtained. PMID:23047856

  7. Baseflow recession analysis in the inland Pacific Northwest of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Murillo, R.; Brooks, E. S.; Elliot, W. J.; Gazel, E.; Boll, J.

    2015-03-01

    The storage-discharge relationships of 26 watersheds in the inland Pacific Northwest of the United States were analyzed. Four fitting methods were used to obtain the baseflow coefficients: lower envelope, organic correlation, and ordinary and inverse least squares. Several climatic and terrain attributes were evaluated as predictors of baseflow coefficients. Watersheds dominated by basalt and flatter landscapes exhibited the smallest recession time scales ( K) (12.5-20.0 days). Greater K values (33.3-66.7 days) were obtained over catchments dominated by metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Mean basin slope and the aridity index were found to be the best estimators of baseflow coefficients. Baseflow in flat basalt landscapes, located in dry warm climates, decrease rapidly during summer months and are most sensitive to future droughts and warming climates. Groundwater systems feeding streams during the driest months can drop to less than 1 mm of effective storage in these sensitive systems. In contrast, the minimum annual storage in mountainous systems can have greater than 10 mm effective storage. By understanding the main factors controlling baseflow recession characteristics, environmental agencies could prioritize efforts in areas where future droughts and land use changes may affect ecological assemblages and socio-economic activities.

  8. Analysis of a modified recessed active tunneling field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, HuiJung; Choi, Seongwook; Yoo, NakWon; Rhee, SeungMan; Lee, Myoung Jin; Park, Young June

    2016-07-01

    To enhance the on-current (I ON) of a tunneling field-effect transistor (TFET), we investigated the structures of a TFET with a recessed active (RA) region, known as the “RA-TFET”, using three-dimensional (3D) simulation. The analyzed structure is different from the recessed dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) channel in terms of the positions of the source and drain. The benefit of this structure is that the tunneling length remains unchanged as the depth increases so that the current can be easily scaled up, thereby maintaining the subthreshold slope (SS) and active area. Using an RA-TFET with a 100 nm Si depth, a 9.45 × 10‑7 A I ON is achieved with a minimum SS of 35 mV/dec; in addition, we propose RA-TFET modifications to mitigate the ambipolar characteristics and reduce the capacitance between the gate and the drain (C GD) by up to 40%.

  9. Comprehensive Analysis of Deafness Genes in Families with Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Tahir; Onay, Huseyin; Aykut, Ayca; Bademci, Guney; Kirazli, Tayfun; Tekin, Mustafa; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive genetic testing has the potential to become the standard of care for individuals with hearing loss. In this study, we investigated the genetic etiology of autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in a Turkish cohort including individuals with cochlear implant, who had a pedigree suggestive of an autosomal recessive inheritance. A workflow including prescreening of GJB2 and a targeted next generation sequencing panel (Illumına TruSightTM Exome) covering 2761 genes that we briefly called as mendelian exome sequencing was used. This panel includes 102 deafness genes and a number of genes causing Mendelian disorders. Using this approach, we identified causative variants in 21 of 29 families. Three different GJB2 variants were present in seven families. Remaining 14 families had 15 different variants in other known NSHL genes (MYO7A, MYO15A, MARVELD2, TMIE, DFNB31, LOXHD1, GPSM2, TMC1, USH1G, CDH23). Of these variants, eight are novel. Mutation detection rate of our workflow is 72.4%, confirming the usefulness of targeted sequencing approach in NSHL. PMID:26561413

  10. Nonlinear thermoelastic stress analysis of spherically curved solar panels

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhan, C.V.G.; Vungutur, K.; Selvam, R.P.

    1984-10-01

    Spherically curved glass panels are used to concentrate solar energy onto a line focus in fixed mirror distributed focus type solar collectors. These solar panels consists of thin flat glass plates bent to form a spherical surface, glued onto a paper honeycomb backing, and covered with steel plate at the back and with plastic strips on the sides. Stresses are produced in the glass plates as they are formed into spherical surfaces. In addition, when the solar receiver is not in focus relative to the bowl and the sun, a mirror hot spot condition is developed, resulting in large thermally induced stresses within glass plates. The curved glass panel is modeled as a plate on elastic foundation in order to represent the behavior of the plate in relation to other panel components. Since lateral deflections of these plates are large compared to their thickness, nonlinear von Karman plate equations are used in the analysis. A computer model has been prepared to assist in the nonlinear analysis of stresses using finite difference method. The model has flexibility to analyze a variety of rectangular plate geometries subjected to thermal and other applied loads.

  11. Rapid Diagnosis of α-Thalassemia by Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Munkongdee, Thongperm; Vattanaviboon, Phantip; Thummarati, Parichut; Sewamart, Paijit; Winichagoon, Pranee; Fucharoen, Suthat; Svasti, Saovaros

    2010-01-01

    α-Thalassemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder that results from defective synthesis of α-globin protein. Couples who both carry the α-thalassemia-1 gene are at risk of having a fetus with Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis. Rapid and accurate screening for individuals carrying the α-thalassemia-1 gene is the most effective strategy to prevent and control this severe form of thalassemia. In this study, a new and accurate method for α-thalassemia diagnosis was developed by genotyping α-thalassemia-1, the Southeast Asian type (−−SEA) and Thai type (−−THAI) deletions, using multiplex PCR followed by a melting curve analysis. Primers were designed to specifically amplify two deletion fragments, the −−SEA and −−THAI deletions and two normal fragments, ψζ- and α2-globin gene. The primers were capable of distinguishing α-thalassemia 1 heterozygotes from α-thalassemia 2 homozygotes, which are unable to be diagnosed by standard hematological data and hemoglobin typing. The melting temperatures of the −−THAI, −−SEA, ψζ-globin, and α2-globin gene fragments were 79.9 ± 0.2, 89.4 ± 0.5, 92.8 ± 0.2, and 85.0 ± 0.2°C, respectively. Melting curve analysis was performed in 130 subjects in parallel with conventional gap-PCR analysis, and results showed 100% concordance. This method eliminates the post-PCR electrophoresis process, which is laborious, and allows high throughput screening suitable for large population screening for prevention and control of thalassemia. PMID:20190015

  12. An item response curves analysis of the Force Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Gary A.; Harshman, Nathan; Branum-Martin, Lee; Mazur, Eric; Mzoughi, Taha; Baker, Stephen D.

    2012-09-01

    Several years ago, we introduced the idea of item response curves (IRC), a simplistic form of item response theory (IRT), to the physics education research community as a way to examine item performance on diagnostic instruments such as the Force Concept Inventory (FCI). We noted that a full-blown analysis using IRT would be a next logical step, which several authors have since taken. In this paper, we show that our simple approach not only yields similar conclusions in the analysis of the performance of items on the FCI to the more sophisticated and complex IRT analyses but also permits additional insights by characterizing both the correct and incorrect answer choices. Our IRC approach can be applied to a variety of multiple-choice assessments but, as applied to a carefully designed instrument such as the FCI, allows us to probe student understanding as a function of ability level through an examination of each answer choice. We imagine that physics teachers could use IRC analysis to identify prominent misconceptions and tailor their instruction to combat those misconceptions, fulfilling the FCI authors' original intentions for its use. Furthermore, the IRC analysis can assist test designers to improve their assessments by identifying nonfunctioning distractors that can be replaced with distractors attractive to students at various ability levels.

  13. Testing main effects and interactions in latent curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Curran, Patrick J; Bauer, Daniel J; Willoughby, Michael T

    2004-06-01

    A key strength of latent curve analysis (LCA) is the ability to model individual variability in rates of change as a function of 1 or more explanatory variables. The measurement of time plays a critical role because the explanatory variables multiplicatively interact with time in the prediction of the repeated measures. However, this interaction is not typically capitalized on in LCA because the measure of time is rather subtly incorporated via the factor loading matrix. The authors' goal is to demonstrate both analytically and empirically that classic techniques for probing interactions in multiple regression can be generalized to LCA. A worked example is presented, and the use of these techniques is recommended whenever estimating conditional LCAs in practice. PMID:15137890

  14. Comparative proteomic analysis suggests that mitochondria are involved in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Wei; Lu, Xiao-Yan; You, Yong; Sun, Huan; Liu, Xin-Yu; Ai, Jian-Zhong; Tan, Rui-Zhi; Chen, Tie-Lin; Chen, Mian-Zhi; Wang, Hong-Lian; Wei, Yu-Quan; Zhou, Qin

    2012-08-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), characterized by ectatic collecting duct, is an infantile form of PKD occurring in 1 in 20 000 births. Despite having been studied for many years, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In the current study, we employed, for the first time, a MS-based comparative proteomics approach to investigate the differently expressed proteins between kidney tissue samples of four ARPKD and five control individuals. Thirty two differently expressed proteins were identified and six of the identified protein encoding genes performed on an independent group (three ARPKD subjects, four control subjects) were verified by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and part of them were further validated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, similar alteration tendency was detected after downregulation of PKHD1 by small interfering RNA in HEK293T cell. Interestingly, most of the identified proteins are associated with mitochondria. This implies that mitochondria may be implicated in ARPKD. Furthermore, the String software was utilized to investigate the biological association network, which is based on known and predicted protein interactions. In conclusion, our findings depicted a global understanding of ARPKD progression and provided a promising resource of targeting protein, and shed some light further investigation of ARPKD. PMID:22718539

  15. Baseflow recession analysis across the Eagle Ford shale play (Texas, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega, Saul; Brena-Naranjo, Agustin; Hernandez-Espriu, Jose Antonio; Pedrozo-Acuña, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Baseflow is an important process of the hydrological cycle as it can be related to aquatic ecosystem health and groundwater recharge. The temporal and spatial dynamics of baseflow are typically governed by fluctuations in the water table of shallow aquifers hence groundwater pumping and return flow can greatly modify baseflow patterns. More recently, in some regions of the world the exploitation of gas trapped in shale formations by means of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) has raised major concerns on the quantitative and qualitative groundwater impacts. Although fracking implies massive amounts of groundwater withdrawals, its contribution on baseflow decline has not yet been fully investigated. Furthermore, its impact with respect to other human activities or climate extremes such as irrigation or extreme droughts, respectively, remain largely unknown. This work analyzes baseflow recession time-space patterns for a set of watersheds located across the largest shale producer in the world, the Eagle Ford shale play in Texas (USA). The period of study (1985-2014) includes a pre-development and post-development period. The dataset includes 56 hydrometric time series located inside and outside the shale play. Results show that during the development and expansion of the Eagle Ford play, around 70 % of the time series displayed a significant decline wheras no decline was observed during the pre-development)

  16. Detailed analysis of retinal function and morphology in a patient with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy (ARB).

    PubMed

    Gerth, Christina; Zawadzki, Robert J; Werner, John S; Héon, Elise

    2009-06-01

    The objective of the paper is to study the retinal microstructure and function in a patient with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy (ARB). Retinal function and morphology assessment in a patient diagnosed with a biallelic mutation in the BEST1 gene (heterozygote mutations: Leu88del17 and A195V) included: full-field electroretinogram (ffERG) and multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG), electro-oculogram (EOG) testing, and imaging with a high-resolution Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (Fd-OCT) system (UC Davis Medical Center; axial resolution: 4.5 microm, acquisition speed: 9 frames/s, 1,000 A-scans/frame) combined with a flexible scanning head (Bioptigen Inc.). The 11-year old asymptomatic boy showed a well-demarcated retinopathy with deposits. Functional assessment revealed normal visual acuity, reduced central mfERG responses, delayed rod and rod-cone b-wave ffERG responses, and reduced light rise in the EOG. Fd-OCT demonstrated RPE deposits, photoreceptor detachment, elongated and thickened photoreceptor outer segments, but preserved inner retinal layers. In conclusion, ARB associated retinal dystrophy shows functional and morphological changes that overlap with classic Best disease. For the first time, high-resolution imaging provided in vivo evidence of RPE and photoreceptor involvement in ARB. PMID:18985398

  17. Analysis of selected Kepler Mission planetary light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Budding, E.

    2014-06-01

    We have modified the graphical user interfaced close binary system analysis program CurveFit to the form WinKepler and applied it to 16 representative planetary candidate light curves found in the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA) at the Caltech website http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu, with an aim to compare different analytical approaches. WinKepler has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity-brightening and structural parameters derived from the relevant Radau equation. We tested our best-fitting parameter-sets for formal determinacy and adequacy. A primary aim is to compare our parameters with those listed in the NEA. Although there are trends of agreement, small differences in the main parameter values are found in some cases, and there may be some relative bias towards a 90∘ value for the NEA inclinations. These are assessed against realistic error estimates. Photometric variability from causes other than planetary transits affects at least 6 of the data-sets studied; with small pulsational behaviour found in 3 of those. For the false positive KOI 4.01, we found that the eclipses could be modelled by a faint background classical Algol as effectively as by a transiting exoplanet. Our empirical checks of limb-darkening, in the cases of KOI 1.01 and 12.01, revealed that the assigned stellar temperatures are probably incorrect. For KOI 13.01, our empirical mass-ratio differs by about 7 % from that of Mislis and Hodgkin (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 422:1512, 2012), who neglected structural effects and higher order terms in the tidal distortion. Such detailed parameter evaluation, additional to the usual main geometric ones, provides an additional objective for this work.

  18. Learning curve analysis of a patient lift-assist device.

    PubMed

    Reid, Stephanie A; Mirka, Gary A

    2007-11-01

    One of the challenges facing ergonomists in the implementation of an ergonomic solution is addressing the concerns related to their impact on productivity. The focus of the current study was to (1) apply standard learning curve analysis to the learning that takes place as an individual works with a patient handling device and (2) compare the effects of two different training protocols on measures of learning. Eighteen subjects completed 11 replications of a patient transfer task after participating in either an "interactive" training protocol or "see-one-do-one" training protocol. The results show that the learning rate for this task was 83% with no difference as a function of training protocol. The results do indicate that the effect of Training Method was significant (p<0.05) for time to complete the first patient lift task (370s for the interactive training vs. 475s for see-one-do-one training). The results of the analysis of the survey data supported the objective results in that the only measure that was responsive to training type (p<0.05) was related to comfort level in performing the patient lift task for the first time. The results emphasize the importance in considering learning when introducing an intervention in the workplace, and showed that in this instance, training type had an immediate impact on productivity, but that this effect diminished over time. PMID:17194439

  19. Growth curve analysis for plasma profiles using smoothing splines

    SciTech Connect

    Imre, K.

    1993-05-01

    We are developing a profile analysis code for the statistical estimation of the parametric dependencies of the temperature and density profiles in tokamaks. Our code uses advanced statistical techniques to determine the optimal fit, i.e. the fit which minimized the predictive error. For a forty TFTR Ohmic profile dataset, our preliminary results indicate that the profile shape depends almost exclusively on q[sub a][prime] but that the shape dependencies are not Gaussian. We are now comparing various shape models on the TFTR data. In the first six months, we have completed the core modules of the code, including a B-spline package for variable knot locations, a data-based method to determine the optimal smoothing parameters, self-consistent estimation of the bias errors, and adaptive fitting near the plasma edge. Visualization graphics already include three dimensional surface plots, and discharge by discharge plots of the predicted curves with error bars together with the actual measurements values, and plots of the basis functions with errors.

  20. Three-Dimensional Postbuckling Analysis of Curved Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, P. Frank; Lee, Seung-Yoon

    2002-01-01

    Presented here is a method of solving highly flexible curved beam undergoing huge static or quasi-static deformations. A geometrically exact beam theory based on the use of Jaumann stresses and strains and exact coordinate transformation is presented in terms of 17 first-order ordinary differential equations, and a multiple shooting method is used to solve the corresponding nonlinear two-point boundary value problems. The geometrically exact beam theory accounts far large rotations, large displacements, initial curvatures, extensionality, and transverse shear strains. Four examples are used to demonstrate this method, including a rotating clamped-free beam under the influence of gravity and centrifugal forces, an L-frame subjected to an in-plane tip load, a circular arch subjected to a concentrated load, and a clamped-hinged helical spring subjected to an axial displacement. Results show that the combination of the multiple shooting method and the geometrically exact beam theory works very well. Moreover, the obtained numerically exact solutions can be used to verify the accuracy of nonlinear finite element codes for nonlinear analysis of complex structures.

  1. Functional nanoparticles translocation into cell and adhesion force curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haisung; Veerapandian, Murugan; Kim, Byung Tae; Yun, Kyusik; Seo, Soo-Won

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the cell translocation of two functional nanoparticles (barium sulfate (BaSO4NPs), europium (III) doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (Gd2O3@EuNPs)) into A549 cells by Bio-Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Successful cell translocation of these two nanoparticles are ensured from the measurement of changes in the cell surface roughness and interaction (extension), retraction forces from the vertical deflection of tip towards substrate surfaces through force-distance curve slope analysis. Measurement of typical adhesion forces (i.e., extension and retraction) between the tip-substrate (0.0963 and 1.155 nN), tip-A549 cell substrate (0.1177 and 2.468 nN), tip-Gd2O3@EuNPs/A549 substrate (0.0785 and 0.4276 nN) and tip-BaSO4NPs/A549 substrate (0.518 and 6.838 nN) confirms the successful cell translocation of functional nanoparticles into A549 cells. Further the nanoscale resolution of topographical height and 3D images evinces the surface characteristics of normal A549 cells and nanoparticles translocated A549 cells. PMID:23421137

  2. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. On the Design and Analysis of Modified Koch Curve Fractal Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, S.; Singh, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    A comparative study of the conventional and modified Koch curve antennas has been analyzed. The geometries of the antennas are obtained by an iterative function system algorithm for fractal curve generation. It has been observed that by keeping height and width of curve constant the modified Koch curve antenna provide more resonant frequencies with better return loss in comparison with conventional Koch curve antenna. The presented analysis quantifies the advantages provided by the modified Koch curve antenna and is validated by simulations and experimental results.

  4. Towards fully automated genotyping: use of an X linked recessive spastic paraplegia family to test alternative analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Matise, T C; Perlin, M W; Marks, H G; Hoffman, E P

    1995-05-01

    Advances in dinucleotide-based genetic maps open possibilities for large scale genotyping at high resolution. The current rate-limiting steps in use of these dense maps is data interpretation (allele definition), data entry, and statistical calculations. We have recently reported automated allele identification methods. Here we show that a 10-cM framework map of the human X chromosome can be analyzed on two lanes of an automated sequencer per individual (10-12 loci per lane). We use this map and analysis strategy to generate allele data for an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family with a known PLP mutation. We analyzed 198 genotypes in a single gel and used the data to test three methods of data analysis: manual meiotic breakpoint mapping, automated concordance analysis, and whole chromosome multipoint linkage analysis. All methods pinpointed the correct location of the gene. We propose that multipoint exclusion mapping may permit valid inflation of LOD scores using the equation max LOD-(next best LOD). PMID:7759066

  5. Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

    2014-06-03

    A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

  6. Optical analysis of miniature lenses with curved imaging surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reshidko, Dmitry; Sasian, Jose

    2015-10-01

    Miniature cameras for consumer electronics and mobile phones have been, and continue to be, in fast development. The system level requirements, such as manufacturing cost, packaging, and sensor characteristics, impose unique challenges for optical designers. In this paper, we discuss the potential optical benefits of having a curved image surface rather than a flat one. We show that curved sensor technology allows for optically faster lens solutions. We discuss trade-offs of several relevant characteristics, such as packaging, chief ray angle, image quality, and tolerance sensitivity. A comparison of a benchmark flat field lens, and an evaluation design imaging on a curved surface and working at f/1.6, provides useful specific insights. For a given image quality, departing from a flat imaging surface does not allow significantly reducing the total length of a lens. PMID:26479656

  7. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  8. Does Gingival Recession Require Surgical Treatment?

    PubMed

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; MacEachern, Mark; Oates, Thomas W

    2015-10-01

    Gingival recession represents a clinical condition in adults frequently encountered in the general dental practice. Clinicians often face dilemmas of whether or not to treat such a condition surgically. An initial condensed literature search was performed using a combination of gingival recession and surgery controlled terms and keywords. An analysis of the search results highlights the limited understanding of the factors that guide the treatment of gingival recession. Understanding the cause, prognosis, and treatment of gingival recession continues to offer many unanswered questions and challenges in periodontics as we strive to provide the best care possible for our patients. PMID:26427577

  9. Estimated hydrologic characteristics of shallow aquifer systems in the Valley and Ridge, the Blue Ridge, and the Piedmont physiographic provinces based on analysis of streamflow recession and base flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutledge, A.T.; Mesko, T.O.

    1996-01-01

    Inferences are drawn about properties of aquifer systems from the interpretation of streamflow records in the Appalachian Valley and Ridge, Piedmont, and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces. The analysis is divided into two parts--analysis of streamflow recession and base-flow analysis. Analysis of recession yields information about aquifer diffusivity and variation in specific yield. Base-flow analysis is used to develop water balances for representative basins in the study area.

  10. Mediation Analysis in a Latent Growth Curve Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Soest, Tilmann; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents several longitudinal mediation models in the framework of latent growth curve modeling and provides a detailed account of how such models can be constructed. Logical and statistical challenges that might arise when such analyses are conducted are also discussed. Specifically, we discuss how the initial status (intercept) and…

  11. Developmental Trajectories of Adolescent Popularity: A Growth Curve Modelling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Borch, Casey

    2006-01-01

    Growth curve modelling was used to examine developmental trajectories of sociometric and perceived popularity across eight years in adolescence, and the effects of gender, overt aggression, and relational aggression on these trajectories. Participants were 303 initially popular students (167 girls, 136 boys) for whom sociometric data were…

  12. Unsupervised Transient Light Curve Analysis via Hierarchical Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, N. E.; Betancourt, M.; Soderberg, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    Historically, light curve studies of supernovae (SNe) and other transient classes have focused on individual objects with copious and high signal-to-noise observations. In the nascent era of wide field transient searches, objects with detailed observations are decreasing as a fraction of the overall known SN population, and this strategy sacrifices the majority of the information contained in the data about the underlying population of transients. A population level modeling approach, simultaneously fitting all available observations of objects in a transient sub-class of interest, fully mines the data to infer the properties of the population and avoids certain systematic biases. We present a novel hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for population level modeling of transient light curves, and discuss its implementation using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. As a test case, we apply this model to the Type IIP SN sample from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, consisting of 18,837 photometric observations of 76 SNe, corresponding to a joint posterior distribution with 9176 parameters under our model. Our hierarchical model fits provide improved constraints on light curve parameters relevant to the physical properties of their progenitor stars relative to modeling individual light curves alone. Moreover, we directly evaluate the probability for occurrence rates of unseen light curve characteristics from the model hyperparameters, addressing observational biases in survey methodology. We view this modeling framework as an unsupervised machine learning technique with the ability to maximize scientific returns from data to be collected by future wide field transient searches like LSST.

  13. Analysis of growth curves of fowl. III. Geese.

    PubMed

    Knízetová, H; Hyánek, J; Veselský, A

    1994-07-01

    1. Growth curves of two lines (S,D) and their reciprocal hybrids (in total,. n = 344) were evaluated by the Richards function. Geese were weighed at 7 d intervals to the ninth week, and then at 92, 154, 192 and 217 d of age. Food and water were supplied ad libitum. 2. The accuracy of curve fit measured by the coefficient of determination (R2) for different genetic groups ranged from 0.9840 to 0.9918. The highest percentage deviations between observed and estimated live weights were recorded at hatching (on average 15.1%), while at the others points of curve they were significantly lower (from 0.6 to 6.8%). 3. The geese are characterised by an early maturing rate. The peak of the absolute growth rate (the inflection point of the curve) occurred at 18.7 to 23.5 d of age (t+). The degree of maturity at a slaughter age of 63 d (u63 = y63/A) ranged from 0.69 to 0.76. Fitting the inflection point at the beginning of the linear growth phase significantly affects the maturing rate (k) and the ratio between the inflection (y+) and the asymptotic (A) weights. The values of these correlated parameters were very low (y+/A = 0.233 to 0.294, k = 0.0281 to 0.0373 ln theta/d). 4. The live weights of geese from 28 d of age and the parameters of the Richards function were significantly higher (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) in th sire line (S) than in the dam line (D). A low negative heterosis was observed at all points of the growth curves (-0.01 to -9.7%). The results indicated the effect of sex-linked growth genes. 5. The phenotypic correlations between parameters of the Richards function within genetic groups are discussed. PMID:7953778

  14. UNSUPERVISED TRANSIENT LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS VIA HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN INFERENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Betancourt, M.

    2015-02-10

    Historically, light curve studies of supernovae (SNe) and other transient classes have focused on individual objects with copious and high signal-to-noise observations. In the nascent era of wide field transient searches, objects with detailed observations are decreasing as a fraction of the overall known SN population, and this strategy sacrifices the majority of the information contained in the data about the underlying population of transients. A population level modeling approach, simultaneously fitting all available observations of objects in a transient sub-class of interest, fully mines the data to infer the properties of the population and avoids certain systematic biases. We present a novel hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for population level modeling of transient light curves, and discuss its implementation using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. As a test case, we apply this model to the Type IIP SN sample from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, consisting of 18,837 photometric observations of 76 SNe, corresponding to a joint posterior distribution with 9176 parameters under our model. Our hierarchical model fits provide improved constraints on light curve parameters relevant to the physical properties of their progenitor stars relative to modeling individual light curves alone. Moreover, we directly evaluate the probability for occurrence rates of unseen light curve characteristics from the model hyperparameters, addressing observational biases in survey methodology. We view this modeling framework as an unsupervised machine learning technique with the ability to maximize scientific returns from data to be collected by future wide field transient searches like LSST.

  15. Comprehensive Analysis via Exome Sequencing Uncovers Genetic Etiology in Autosomal Recessive Non-Syndromic Deafness in a Large Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bademci, Guney; Foster, Joseph; Mahdieh, Nejat; Bonyadi, Mortaza; Duman, Duygu; Cengiz, F.Basak; Menendez, Ibis; Horta, Oscar Diaz; Shirkavand, Atefeh; Zeinali, Sirous; Subasioglu, Asli; Tokgoz-Yilmaz, Suna; Hernandez, Fabiola Huesca; de la Luz Arenas Sordo, Maria; Dominguez-Aburto, Juan; Hernandez-Zamora, Edgar; Montenegro, Paola; Paredes, Rosario; Moreta, Germania; Vinueza, Rodrigo; Villegas, Franklin; Mendoza Benitez, Santiago; Guo, Shengru; Bozan, Nazim; Tos, Tulay; Incesulu, Armagan; Sennaroglu, Gonca; Blanton, Susan H.; Ozturkmen Akay, Hatice; Yildirim-Baylan, Muzeyyen; Tekin, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness (ARNSD) is characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity with reported mutations in 58 different genes. This study was designed to detect deafness causing variants in a multiethnic cohort with ARNSD by using whole-exome sequencing (WES). Methods After excluding mutations in the most common gene, GJB2, we performed WES in 160 multiplex families with ARNSD from Turkey, Iran, Mexico, Ecuador and Puerto Rico to screen for mutations in all known ARNSD genes. Results We detected ARNSD-causing variants in 90 (56%) families, 54% of which had not been previously reported. Identified mutations were located in 31 known ARNSD genes. The most common genes with mutations were MYO15A (13%), MYO7A (11%), SLC26A4 (10%), TMPRSS3 (9%), TMC1 (8%), ILDR1 (6%) and CDH23 (4%). Nine mutations were detected in multiple families with shared haplotypes suggesting founder effects. Conclusion We report on a large multiethnic cohort with ARNSD in which comprehensive analysis of all known ARNSD genes identifies causative DNA variants in 56% of the families. In the remaining families, WES allows us to search for causative variants in novel genes, thus improving our ability to explain the underlying etiology in more families. PMID:26226137

  16. Update on autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: mRNA analysis using hair samples is a powerful tool for genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Akiyama, Masashi

    2015-07-01

    Research on the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) has advanced considerably and several causative genes and molecules underlying the disease have been identified. Three major ARCI phenotypes are harlequin ichthyosis (HI), lamellar ichthyosis (LI), and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). Skin barrier defects are involved in the pathogenesis of ARCI. In this review, the causative genes of ARCI and its phenotypes as well as recent advances in the field are summarized. The known causative molecules underlying ARCI include ABCA12, TGM1, ALOXE3, ALOX12B, NIPAL4, CYP4F22, PNPLA1, CERS3, and LIPN. It is important to examine genetic associations and to elucidate the pathomechanisms of ARCI to establish effective therapies and beneficial genetic counseling. Next-generation sequencing is a promising method that enables the detection of causative disease mutations, even in cases of unexpected concomitant genetic diseases. For genetic diagnosis, obtaining mRNA from hair follicle epithelial cells, which are analogous to keratinocytes in the interfollicular epidermis, is convenient and minimally invasive in patients with ARCI. We confirmed that our mRNA analysis method using hair follicle samples can be applied not only to keratinization disorders, but also to other genetic diseases in the dermatology field. Studies that suggest potential next-generation therapies using ARCI model mice are also reviewed. PMID:25982146

  17. Analysis of growth curves of fowl. I. Chickens.

    PubMed

    Knízetová, H; Hyánek, J; Kníze, B; Roubícek, J

    1991-12-01

    1. The Richards function was used to describe the growth curves (n = 989) of 9 broiler lines. Chickens were fed ad libitum and body weight was recorded every second week from hatching to 26 weeks of age. 2. The accuracy of curve fit measured by the coefficient of determination (R2) was better for males than for females (0.9986-0.9995 vs 0.9972-0.9988, respectively). 3. The estimation of the asymptotic final weight (A) for different lines enabled the degree of maturity (ut = yt/A) to be determined at any fixed point of the curve. At the age of 7 weeks this had a value of 0.318-0.369 for cockerels and 0.325-0.377 for pullets and represented the slaughter maturity of individual lines. The ratio of inflection/asymptotic weight (y+/A = 0.370-0.388) indicated that in some cases chicken growth can be described approximately by the Gompertz function (y+/A = 0.368). 4. It was found that the age at the inflection point of curves (t+ 48.2-55.7 d for cockerels and t+ = 47.8-52.8 d for pullets) roughly corresponds to the slaughter age of the chickens. 5. The interline differences in the parameters of maturation rate for weight (y+/A, k, t+, u7) are low in comparison with the differences in body weight (A, y+, y7) and absolute growth rate (v, v+). 6. The intragroup phenotypic correlation among growth parameters and the importance of the mathematical models are discussed. PMID:1786568

  18. Curved Thermopiezoelectric Shell Structures Modeled by Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2000-01-01

    "Smart" structures composed of piezoelectric materials may significantly improve the performance of aeropropulsion systems through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. The development of analytical models for piezoelectric smart structures is an ongoing, in-house activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field focused toward the experimental characterization of these materials. Research efforts have been directed toward developing analytical models that account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. Current work revolves around implementing thermal effects into a curvilinear-shell finite element code. This enhances capabilities to analyze curved structures and to account for coupling effects arising from thermal effects and the curved geometry. The current analytical model implements a unique mixed multi-field laminate theory to improve computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. The mechanics can model both the sensory and active behavior of piezoelectric composite shell structures. Finite element equations are being implemented for an eight-node curvilinear shell element, and numerical studies are being conducted to demonstrate capabilities to model the response of curved piezoelectric composite structures (see the figure).

  19. Thermoluminescence glow curve analysis and CGCD method for erbium doped CaZrO3 phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ratnesh; Chopra, Seema

    2016-05-01

    The manuscript report the synthesis, thermoluminescence study at fixed concentration of Er3+ (1 mol%) doped CaZrO3 phosphor. The phosphors were prepared by modified solid state reaction method. The powder sample was characterized by thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve analysis. In TL glow curve the optimized concentration in 1mol% for UV irradiated sample. The kinetic parameters were calculated by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) techniaue. Trapping parameters gives the information of dosimetry loss in prepared phosphor and its usability in environmental monitoring and for personal monitoring. CGCD is the advance tool for analysis of complicated TL glow curves.

  20. [Gingival recessions and orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Renkema, A M; Padmos, J A D; de Quincey, G de

    2015-11-01

    Gingival recessions represent the most visible periodontal disease. The prevalence of gingival recessions is high. The root surface is literally exposed to negative influences such as erosion, abrasion, discoloration and decay. Moreover, gingival recessions can affect the quality of life by increased thermal sensitivity and reduced dento-gingival aesthetics. The aetiology of gingival recessions is complex and considered to be multifactorial. In order to prevent the development of gingival recessions during and after orthodontic treatment, several factors should be taken into account, among which maintenance of optimal oral hygiene and respect for the 'biological envelope' are decisive. Once gingival recessions have developed, orthodontic therapy can play a positive role in their treatment. PMID:26569002

  1. Analysis of growth curves of fowl. II. Ducks.

    PubMed

    Knízetová, H; Hyánek, J; Kníze, B; Procházková, H

    1991-12-01

    1. Growth curves of nine selected lines and one random-bred control population (in total, n = 1070) were evaluated by the Richards function. The ducks were weighed at 7-d intervals and, after the tenth week, every second week (up to 18 weeks). Food and water were supplied ad libitum. 2. The predicted curves closely fitted the weight data points (R2 = 0.9991-0.9997). 3. The ducks are characterized by early maturity rate. The peak of the absolute growth rate (the inflection point of the curve) occurred at 24.1-27.6 d of age (t+). A higher ratio of the inflection to the asymptotic weights (y+/A = 0.380-0.424) was found in comparison to those from the Gompertz-type function of growth (y+/A = 0.368). 4. In the selected lines the degree of maturity at a slaughter age of 7 weeks (u7 = y7/A) ranged from 0.784 to 0.835 for males and from 0.819 to 0.889 for females. 5. Ducks within the non-selected control line had a significantly lower maturing rate than the selected lines. 6. Sexual dimorphism was recorded for all growth parameters analysed. Females have faster maturation rate than males (higher values of y+/A, u7, k and a shorter auto-acceleration phase of growth). 7. High interline differences were found for body weight (A, y+, y7) and for absolute growth rate (v, v+) and smaller ones for parameters of the maturation rate (y+/A, u7, k and t+). 8. The intragroup phenotype correlation between growth parameters and the use of weight data only up to 7 weeks of age for the estimation of parameters of the Richards function are discussed. PMID:1786569

  2. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/∼eprice.

  3. The first light curve analysis of eclipsing binary NR Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakkoli, F.; Hasanzadeh, A.; Poro, A.

    2015-05-01

    New observations of the eclipsing binary system NR Cam were carried out using a CCD in B, V, and R filters and new times of light minimum and new ephemeris were obtained. The B, V, and R light curves were analyzed using both the Binary Maker 3.0 and PHOEBE 0.31 programs to determine some geometrical and physical parameters of the system. These results show that NR Cam is an overcontact binary and that both components are Main Sequence stars. The O'Connell effect on NR Cam was studied and some variations in spot parameters were obtained over the different years.

  4. Analysis on the Long Term Effect of Trial Test Road Constructed on Batu Pahat Soft Clay (BPSC) at Recess UTHM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrus, M. M. M.; Edayu, A. E.; Adnan, Z.; Ismail, B.

    2016-07-01

    The reinforcement used in soil for construction of roads on the soft clay is very important as it will determine the level of service of the road after it was built. Damage or defects on the road surface to be an indicator of the level of the road has dropped and shows the deformation of the road. For this research, an analysis has carried out on the long-term effect of trial test road constructed on Batu Pahat Soft Clay (BPSC) at RECESS UTHM. Through this research, the reinforcement using Rawell Geosynthetic Clay Liner (RGCL) was the best with the stability is 14964 N, a low flow is 2.69mm, stiffness modulus is 1766 MPa, the peak load is 739.4 N and a lower horizontal deformation which is 1.71 µm compared Woven Geotextile section and section without geotextile [1] [9]. In terms of deformation can be seen clearly from physical observations that section without geotextile suffered significant damage than others. Settlement of road can also be analyzed by a longitudinal section that plotted based on the result of leveling work. After that, settlements are more visible way on the right side of the road trial. Through lab tests conducted, it indicate that the coring samples obtained from sites of each section meets the specifications set by the Jabatan Kerja Raya (JKR) in terms of stability, flow and stiffness [1]. Through this study, a trial road built on soft soil can be used as a test site because of the uniqueness of these roads which has three different types of reinforcements.

  5. Analysis of gene expression profile in pollen development of recessive genic male sterile Brassica napus L. line S45A.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuning; Lei, Shaolin; Zhou, Zhengfu; Zeng, Fangqin; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2009-09-01

    Male sterility in a near-isogenic line S45AB after 25 generations of subcrossing is controlled by two pairs of duplicate genes. The genotype of S45A is Bnms1Bnms1Bnms2Bnms2, and that of S45B is BnMs1Bnms1Bnms2Bnms2, respectively. Histological observations revealed that abnormal anther development appeared in the tapetum and pollen exine during the tetrad stage. This male sterility was characterized by hypertrophy of the tapetal cells at the tetrad stage and a complete lack of microspore exine after the release of microspores from the tetrads. To elucidate the mechanism of this recessive genic male sterility, the flower bud expression profiles of the S45A and S45B lines were analyzed using an Arabidopsis thaliana ATH1 oligonucleotide array. When compared with the S45B line, 69 genes were significantly downregulated, and 46 genes were significantly upregulated in the S45A line. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was then used to verify the results of the microarray analysis, and the majority of the downregulated genes in the S45A line were abundantly and specifically expressed in the anther. The results of the real-time PCR suggest that Bnms1 might be involved in the metabolism of lipid/fatty acids, and the homologous mutation of Bnms1 may either block the biosynthesis of sporopollenin or block sporopollenin from being deposited on the microspore surface, thus, preventing pollen exine formation. The role of Bnms1 in the regulatory network of exine formation is also discussed as well. PMID:19562345

  6. Starving for Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patt, Mary Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Every weekday, millions of American schoolchildren throw away their half-eaten cafeteria lunches so that they can run outside to play. The traditional placement of lunch before recess, coupled with the recent decline in overall recess time to meet academic time constraints, forces children to choose between two essential needs: (1) food; and (2)…

  7. Recess--It's Indispensable!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Olga; Waite-Stupiansky, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    The demise of recess in many elementary schools--and of outdoor play in general--is an issue of great concern to many members of the Play, Policy, and Practice Interest Forum. Most people remember recess as an important part of the school day. It was a time to be outdoors; to organize games; to play on the swings, slides, and other playground…

  8. More Recess Time, Please!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Rong; Coward, Fanni Liu

    2015-01-01

    Students in Shanghai, China, get much more recess time than their U.S. counterparts throughout their education. As U.S. education reform efforts seek ways of raising achievement, they have begun replacing recess with academic time. The lesson from Shanghai is that this may not be the best strategy. But whether the Shanghai system of more and…

  9. Recess Makes Kids Smarter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    Recess has been scaled back or cut altogether in a number of schools around the country. The trend can be traced back to the late eighties and was accelerated under No Child Left Behind. Districts under pressure to show academic progress began to squeeze as much instruction into the day as possible. Others eliminated recess because of concerns…

  10. Recession in the Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plant, Helen

    2009-01-01

    National policy stresses the key role of adult learning and skills in securing economic recovery. This close linking of adult learning policy to the recession agenda raises important questions. How has the recession impacted on the implementation of adult learning policy? What has it meant for service delivery? And what have been the consequences…

  11. 23. DETAIL OF TRELLIS BEAMS SHOWING RECESSED LIGHTING FIXTURES, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. DETAIL OF TRELLIS BEAMS SHOWING RECESSED LIGHTING FIXTURES, WITH ONE BEAM CURVED TO FIT AROUND TRUNK OF FORMER TREE. - Fallingwater, State Route 381 (Stewart Township), Ohiopyle, Fayette County, PA

  12. GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF KOI-977: SPECTROSCOPY, ASTEROSEISMOLOGY, AND PHASE-CURVE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sato, Bun'ei; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Masuda, Kento; Benomar, Othman; Takeda, Yoichi; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki

    2015-01-20

    We present a global analysis of KOI-977, one of the planet host candidates detected by Kepler. The Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) reports that KOI-977 is a red giant, for which few close-in planets have been discovered. Our global analysis involves spectroscopic and asteroseismic determinations of stellar parameters (e.g., mass and radius) and radial velocity (RV) measurements. Our analyses reveal that KOI-977 is indeed a red giant, possibly in the red clump, but its estimated radius (≳ 20 R {sub ☉} = 0.093 AU) is much larger than KOI-977.01's orbital distance (∼0.027 AU) estimated from its period (P {sub orb} ∼ 1.35 days) and host star's mass. RV measurements show a small variation, which also contradicts the amplitude of ellipsoidal variations seen in the light curve folded with KOI-977.01's period. Therefore, we conclude that KOI-977.01 is a false positive, meaning that the red giant, for which we measured the radius and RVs, is different from the object that produces the transit-like signal (i.e., an eclipsing binary). On the basis of this assumption, we also perform a light curve analysis including the modeling of transits/eclipses and phase-curve variations, adopting various values for the dilution factor D, which is defined as the flux ratio between the red giant and eclipsing binary. Fitting the whole folded light curve as well as individual transits in the short cadence data simultaneously, we find that the estimated mass and radius ratios of the eclipsing binary are consistent with those of a solar-type star and a late-type star (e.g., an M dwarf) for D ≳ 20.

  13. Climate change and storage response in alpine geologic endmember catchments using integrated modeling and baseflow recession analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovich, K. H.; Fogg, G. E.; Maxwell, R. M.; Arumi, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Runoff generation in snowmelt-dominated alpine systems predominantly occurs in subsurface, be it in the soil, saprolite, or fractured bedrock zone, and shifts in timing and amount of runoff due to climate change remains an open topic of research. Furthermore, the degree to which subsurface storage offsets the loss of snow storage in porous and fractured alpine terrains, i.e., the hydrogeologic buffering capacity, is still largely unknown. The snowmelt-dominated alpine watersheds in California and Chile are particularly vulnerable to climate change due to their Mediterranean climate, where winter snowpack sustains the demand of urban and agricultural needs during the dry summers. The streams draining the western slope of the Sierra Nevada and Andes mountains show a decline in snowmelt runoff, with an earlier shift in spring pulse and center of mass timing over the past 50 years. Following the snowmelt period, summer low flows are sustained by groundwater, and interbasin baseflow trends have been shown to correlate with geology, and to some extent, soil thickness in less permeable basins. However, the interannual (intrabasin) baseflow trends have not been explored with respect to climate change impacts to storage-discharge relationships. Here we estimate long-term groundwater storage trends via baseflow recession analysis for two geologically distinct alpine basins: the granitic Middle Fork Kaweah in the southern Sierra Nevada, California (640 masl, 264.2 km2 with daily data back to 1949) and the volcanic Diguillín in the central Andes, Bío Bío Region, Chile (670 masl and 334 km2 with daily data back to 1959). We employ a simple linear reservoir model for estimating storage from baseflow, and investigate the sensitivity to watershed characteristics, such as depth of groundwater circulation and storage on the results. We supplement these results with numerical experiments conducted using ParFlow-CLM, a fully-integrated hydrologic model coupled to a land surface

  14. Parent involvement and science achievement: A latent growth curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ursula Yvette

    This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Class of 1998--1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day kindergarten class in 1998--1999. The present study's sample (N = 8,070) was based on students that had a sampling weight available from the public-use data file. Students were assessed in science achievement at third, fifth, and eighth grades and parents of the students were surveyed at the same time points. Analyses using latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates in an SEM framework revealed a positive relationship between science achievement and parent involvement at eighth grade. Furthermore, there were gender and racial/ethnic differences in parents' school involvement as a predictor of science achievement. Findings indicated that students with lower initial science achievement scores had a faster rate of growth across time. The achievement gap between low and high achievers in earth, space and life sciences lessened from elementary to middle school. Parents' involvement with school usually tapers off after elementary school, but due to parent school involvement being a significant predictor of eighth grade science achievement, later school involvement may need to be supported and better implemented in secondary schooling.

  15. A Brief Review: The Z-curve Theory and its Application in Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Chun-Ting

    2014-01-01

    In theoretical physics, there exist two basic mathematical approaches, algebraic and geometrical methods, which, in most cases, are complementary. In the area of genome sequence analysis, however, algebraic approaches have been widely used, while geometrical approaches have been less explored for a long time. The Z-curve theory is a geometrical approach to genome analysis. The Z-curve is a three-dimensional curve that represents a given DNA sequence in the sense that each can be uniquely reconstructed given the other. The Z-curve, therefore, contains all the information that the corresponding DNA sequence carries. The analysis of a DNA sequence can then be performed through studying the corresponding Z-curve. The Z-curve method has found applications in a wide range of areas in the past two decades, including the identifications of protein-coding genes, replication origins, horizontally-transferred genomic islands, promoters, translational start sides and isochores, as well as studies on phylogenetics, genome visualization and comparative genomics. Here, we review the progress of Z-curve studies from aspects of both theory and applications in genome analysis. PMID:24822026

  16. Understanding Recession and Self-Rated Health with the Partial Proportional Odds Model: An Analysis of 26 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Adam; Foster, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Self-rated health is demonstrated to vary substantially by both personal socio-economic status and national economic conditions. However, studies investigating the combined influence of individual and country level economic indicators across several countries in the context of recent global recession are limited. This paper furthers our knowledge of the effect of recession on health at both the individual and national level. Methods Using the Life in Transition II study, which provides data from 19,759 individuals across 26 European nations, we examine the relationship between self-rated health, personal economic experiences, and macro-economic change. Data analyses include, but are not limited to, the partial proportional odds model which permits the effect of predictors to vary across different levels of our dependent variable. Results Household experiences with recession, especially a loss of staple good consumption, are associated with lower self-rated health. Most individual-level experiences with recession, such as a job loss, have relatively small negative effects on perceived health; the effect of individual or household economic hardship is strongest in high income nations. Our findings also suggest that macroeconomic growth improves self-rated health in low-income nations but has no effect in high-income nations. Individuals with the greatest probability of “good” self-rated health reside in wealthy countries ($23,910 to $50, 870 GNI per capita). Conclusion Both individual and national economic variables are predictive of self-rated health. Personal and household experiences are most consequential for self-rated health in high income nations, while macroeconomic growth is most consequential in low-income nations. PMID:26513660

  17. What mainly controls recession flows in river basins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Basudev; Nagesh Kumar, D.

    2014-03-01

    The ubiquity of the power law relationship between dQ/dt and Q for recession periods (-dQ/dt=kQα,Q being discharge at the basin outlet at time t) clearly hints at the existence of a dominant recession flow process that is common to all real basins. It is commonly assumed that a basin, during recession events, functions as a single phreatic aquifer resting on a impermeable horizontal bed or the Dupuit-Boussinesq (DB) aquifer, and with time different aquifer geometric conditions arise that give different values of α and k. The recently proposed alternative model, geomorphological recession flow model, however, suggests that recession flows are controlled primarily by the dynamics of the active drainage network (ADN). In this study we use data for several basins and compare the above two contrasting recession flow models in order to understand which of the above two factors dominates during recession periods in steep basins. Particularly, we do the comparison by selecting three key recession flow properties: (1) power law exponent α, (2) dynamic dQ/dt-Q relationship (characterized by k) and (3) recession timescale (time period for which a recession event lasts). Our observations suggest that neither drainage from phreatic aquifers nor evapotranspiration significantly controls recession flows. Results show that the value of α and recession timescale are not modeled well by DB aquifer model. However, the above mentioned three recession curve properties can be captured satisfactorily by considering the dynamics of the ADN as described by geomorphological recession flow model, possibly indicating that the ADN represents not just phreatic aquifers but the organization of various sub-surface storage systems within the basin.

  18. Analysis and Recognition of Curve Type as The Basis of Object Recognition in Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Nurma; Madenda, Sarifuddin; Indarti, Dina; Dewi Agushinta, R.; pre="and">Ernastuti,

    2016-06-01

    An object in an image when analyzed further will show the characteristics that distinguish one object with another object in an image. Characteristics that are used in object recognition in an image can be a color, shape, pattern, texture and spatial information that can be used to represent objects in the digital image. The method has recently been developed for image feature extraction on objects that share characteristics curve analysis (simple curve) and use the search feature of chain code object. This study will develop an algorithm analysis and the recognition of the type of curve as the basis for object recognition in images, with proposing addition of complex curve characteristics with maximum four branches that will be used for the process of object recognition in images. Definition of complex curve is the curve that has a point of intersection. By using some of the image of the edge detection, the algorithm was able to do the analysis and recognition of complex curve shape well.

  19. A light-curve distortion-wave analysis of eight RS Canum Venaticorum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A program of differential U,B,V photometry of 14 RS CVn systems carried out at Rosemary Hill Observatory in 1978 - 1981 is described, and an analysis of the light curves for the characteristic distortion wave for eight of the systems is presented. The V light curves of the systems are shown. Significant waves were observed in RS CVn, RZ Eri, and RW UMa. No significant waves were found in UX Com, GK Hya, AR Lac, LX Per, or TY Pyx. Unusual light curve distortions were observed in UX Com and AR Lac.

  20. Monoexponential analysis of /sup 133/Xe clearance curves for regional cerebral blood flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, E.

    1984-06-01

    The theoretical properties of a monoexponential flow index, analogous to the one used earlier by other investigators for regional CBF (rCBF) measured after intraarterial injection, were investigated after the administration of /sup 133/Xe intraarterially, intravenously, and by inhalation under high and low flow conditions. The sensitivity of the flow index to changes in fast flow components or changes in the weight ratio between the fast and the slow flow compartments was found to be dependent on whichever part of the /sup 133/Xe clearance curve was used for the flow calculation and on the shape of the input function for /sup 133/Xe. Since biexponential analysis of the clearance curves includes a monoexponential approximation for each of the two components of the clearance curve corresponding to the high and the low flow ''families'' in the brain, the limitations of the monoexponential flow index observed are in principle also valid for the results of biexponential analysis of the clearance curves.

  1. WTF- and A- Stars: Spectroscopic Analysis of Kepler Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grae Short, Miona; Soderblom, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of Kepler data in 2012 found that in a sample of about 2000 A- and F- stars, 1% of them seemed to exhibit white light flares. However, such stars are not thought to have the convective envelopes needed to produce the magnetic dynamos that yield flares. We use the same Kepler data but examine the flaring stars more comprehensively by analyzing the pixel data in order to predict whether this flare-like behavior may be caused by smaller, less luminous M dwarfs exhibiting genuine flares in the line of sight of the A- and F-stars. The implications of finding verifiable flare activity in a subset of these stars would be enough to incite further investigation of the physical processes that allow this to take place. Yet, if that were not the case, this project would further be able to demonstrate the steps necessary to correct for false-positives in finding flares in A- and F- stars.

  2. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA LIGHT-CURVE INFERENCE: HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS IN THE NEAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Friedman, Andrew S.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael

    2009-10-10

    We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of the properties of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves in the near-infrared using recent data from Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope and the literature. We construct a hierarchical Bayesian framework, incorporating several uncertainties including photometric error, peculiar velocities, dust extinction, and intrinsic variations, for principled and coherent statistical inference. SN Ia light-curve inferences are drawn from the global posterior probability of parameters describing both individual supernovae and the population conditioned on the entire SN Ia NIR data set. The logical structure of the hierarchical model is represented by a directed acyclic graph. Fully Bayesian analysis of the model and data is enabled by an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm exploiting the conditional probabilistic structure using Gibbs sampling. We apply this framework to the JHK{sub s} SN Ia light-curve data. A new light-curve model captures the observed J-band light-curve shape variations. The marginal intrinsic variances in peak absolute magnitudes are sigma(M{sub J}) = 0.17 +- 0.03, sigma(M{sub H}) = 0.11 +- 0.03, and sigma(M{sub Ks}) = 0.19 +- 0.04. We describe the first quantitative evidence for correlations between the NIR absolute magnitudes and J-band light-curve shapes, and demonstrate their utility for distance estimation. The average residual in the Hubble diagram for the training set SNe at cz > 2000kms{sup -1} is 0.10 mag. The new application of bootstrap cross-validation to SN Ia light-curve inference tests the sensitivity of the statistical model fit to the finite sample and estimates the prediction error at 0.15 mag. These results demonstrate that SN Ia NIR light curves are as effective as corrected optical light curves, and, because they are less vulnerable to dust absorption, they have great potential as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  3. TTF HOM Data Analysis with Curve Fitting Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, S.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Bane, K.; Smith, J.; /SLAC

    2009-07-14

    To investigate the possibility of using HOM signals induced in SC cavities as beam and cavity diagnostics, narrow band (20 MHz) data was recorded around the strong TE111-6(6{pi}/9-like) dipole modes (1.7 GHz) in the 40 L-band (1.3 GHz) cavities at the DESY TTF facility. The analyses of these data have so far focused on using a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) technique to correlate the signals with each other and data from conventional BPMs to show the dipole signals provide an alternate means of measuring the beam trajectory. However, these analyses do not extract the modal information (i.e., frequencies and Q's of the nearly degenerate horizontal and vertical modes). In this paper, we described a method to fit the signal frequency spectrum to obtain this information, and then use the resulting mode amplitudes and phases together with conventional BPM data to determine the mode polarizations and relative centers and tilts. Compared with the SVD analysis, this method is more physical, and can also be used to obtain the beam position and trajectory angle.

  4. Rapid genotyping of beak and feather disease virus using high-resolution DNA melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2014-11-01

    Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) is a significant pathogen both for wild and captive psittacine birds globally. Genotypic differentiation of BFDV isolates is crucial to establish effective control strategies for the conservation of endangered species and epidemiological investigations of disease outbreaks. The technique developed in this study is a simple, rapid and inexpensive genotyping method for BFDV using PCR and subsequent high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis. This was achieved using PCR amplification of the conserved Rep gene in the presence of a fluorescent DNA intercalating dye (SYTO9). HRM curve analysis of the resultant amplicon could readily differentiate between reference strain (92-SR14) and 18 other BFDV isolates used in this study. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the amplicon from each isolate revealed that each melt curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The potential of the PCR-HRM curve analysis to differentiate inter-host genetic variation among critically endangered orange-bellied parrots, lorikeets and cockatoos was also evaluated. Phylogenetic tree topology based on partial Rep gene sequences used in this study showed that BFDV Rep gene sequence patterns were correlated with the results of HRM curve analysis. The results presented in this study indicate that this technique could be used in both clinical research and differentiation of BFDV isolates in a fraction of time without further nucleotide sequencing and provides a novel approach for the genetic screening of BFDV in clinical virology laboratories. PMID:25102431

  5. Development of synthetic flood damage curve by explicit costs analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, Mario; Molinari, Daniela; Dottori, Francesco; Scorzini, Annarita

    2015-04-01

    characteristics. Such functions were developed using a what-if analysis using data collected after the 2012 flood in the Umbria Region in Central Italy, as well as authors' experience, as reference to understand damage mechanisms. Observed damage data were also used to calibrate the functions.

  6. Evaluating the influence of watershed moisture storage on variations in base flow recession rates during prolonged rain-free periods in medium-sized catchments in New York and Illinois, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Stephen B.; McHardy, Theodore M.; Riha, Susan J.

    2013-09-01

    When dQ/dt-Q plots of stream recession are constructed for individual recession events, the slopes of the dQ/dt-Q curves are near constant in log space, but the intercepts vary seasonally. Because the intercepts increase during the summer (indicating an increase in the recession rate at a given discharge), it has often been assumed that increased evapotranspiration (ET) leads to increased recession rates. To test this assumption, we related the intercepts of dQ/dt-Q curves from 72 recession events to the concurrent ET and watershed moisture storage as determined from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) data set. The analysis suggests that at least for the nine watersheds from Illinois and New York we studied, shifts in recession rate during prolonged rain-free periods had little linkage to concurrent ET. Instead, we observe that the shifting has a moderately strong linkage to watershed moisture storage during the recession event. While this seeming lack of dependence on ET during these prolonged rain-free periods is not necessarily reflective of more normal conditions, we suggest it provides some insight into underlying subsurface controls at the watershed scale. In particular, we hypothesize that the shift in intercept in dQ/dt-Q curves results from spatial heterogeneities in watershed surficial geology; under dryer conditions near-stream subsurface zones with high hydraulic conductivities contribute most streamflow but under wetter conditions subsurface zones in upland areas with lower hydraulic conductivities also contribute.

  7. A new methodology for free wake analysis using curved vortex elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Teske, Milton E.; Quackenbush, Todd R.

    1987-01-01

    A method using curved vortex elements was developed for helicopter rotor free wake calculations. The Basic Curve Vortex Element (BCVE) is derived from the approximate Biot-Savart integration for a parabolic arc filament. When used in conjunction with a scheme to fit the elements along a vortex filament contour, this method has a significant advantage in overall accuracy and efficiency when compared to the traditional straight-line element approach. A theoretical and numerical analysis shows that free wake flows involving close interactions between filaments should utilize curved vortex elements in order to guarantee a consistent level of accuracy. The curved element method was implemented into a forward flight free wake analysis, featuring an adaptive far wake model that utilizes free wake information to extend the vortex filaments beyond the free wake regions. The curved vortex element free wake, coupled with this far wake model, exhibited rapid convergence, even in regions where the free wake and far wake turns are interlaced. Sample calculations are presented for tip vortex motion at various advance ratios for single and multiple blade rotors. Cross-flow plots reveal that the overall downstream wake flow resembles a trailing vortex pair. A preliminary assessment shows that the rotor downwash field is insensitive to element size, even for relatively large curved elements.

  8. Light curve morphology analysis of contact binaries observed with the Kepler satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debski, Bartłomiej; Zoła, Stanisław

    2014-09-01

    Light-curve morphology analysis of contact binaries provides model-independent insight into the short-term evolution of the system activity. Light-curve morphology applied to the Kepler data of contact binaries reveals directly the migration spot connection to the light curve's intrinsic rapid changes. Since the flat-bottom secondary minima cannot be studied in the way Tran et al. (2013) or Conroy et al. (2014) did, we measure the actual light-curve minimum, instead of the presumed mid-eclipse time. This, combined with the study of the minimum depth, allowed us to uncover the direction of the spot migration for particular binaries. At the same time, the O'Connell effect evolution and the maxima separation confronted with modeling based on the Wilson-Devinney code agree with polar dark spots. The combined results of this new approach offer constraints on the star spots size, temperature and latitude at high precision.

  9. Numerical analysis of curved frequency selective surface by finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin-yi; Wang, Jian-bo; Chen, Gui-bo; Sun, Guan-cheng; Lu, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Frequency selective surface is a monolayer or multilayer 2D periodic structure which is composed of multiple resonance units scattering by a two-dimensional periodic array on dielectric layer. FSS can't absorb radio frequency energy, but can filter the frequency which is therefore applied in microwave technique or stealth technology. The relative research on curved FSS is relatively scarce since the curved FSS structure can be obtained only when FSS is attached on the materials surfaces of curved structures in engineering application. However, curved FSS is widely applied in practical engineering; therefore, the research on curved FSS structure has important significance. In this paper, a curved FSS structure model of Y-pore unit is established and numerical simulated by means of FDTD. The influence of curvature on FSS transmission characteristics is studied according to the analysis on the changing of radar cross section (RCS). The results show: the center frequency point of the plane band pass FSS structure drifts after the curve surface deformation of the structure; the center frequency point of the curved band pass FSS structure drifts with the changing of the curvature radius, i. e. with the decreasing of curvature radius, the frequency point drifts towards high points and the transmittance decreases. The design of FSS radome demands of accurate and stable center resonance frequency; therefore, the actual situation of curved surface should be considered in practical engineering application when band pass FSS is made into frequency selection filtering radome. The curvature radius should be long enough to avoid center frequency drifting and transmittance deceasing.

  10. Analysis and comparison of sigmoidal curves: application to dose-response data.

    PubMed

    Meddings, J B; Scott, R B; Fick, G H

    1989-12-01

    A number of physiological or pharmacological studies generate sigmoidal dose-response curves. Ideally, data analysis should provide numerical solutions for curve parameters. In addition, for curves obtained under different experimental conditions, testing for significant differences should be easily performed. We have reviewed the literature over the past 3 years in six journals publishing papers in the field of gastrointestinal physiology and established the curve analysis technique used in each. Using simulated experimental data of known error structure, we have compared these techniques with nonlinear regression analysis. In terms of their ability to provide accurate estimates of ED50 and maximal response, none approached the accuracy and precision of nonlinear regression. This technique is as easily performed as the classic methods and additionally provides an opportunity for rigorous statistical analysis of data. We present a method of determining the significance of differences found in the ED50 and maximal response under different experimental conditions. The method is versatile and applicable to a variety of different physiological and pharmacological dose-response curves. PMID:2610264

  11. New method for calculating a mathematical expression for streamflow recession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutledge, Albert T.

    1991-01-01

    An empirical method has been devised to calculate the master recession curve, which is a mathematical expression for streamflow recession during times of negligible direct runoff. The method is based on the assumption that the storage-delay factor, which is the time per log cycle of streamflow recession, varies linearly with the logarithm of streamflow. The resulting master recession curve can be nonlinear. The method can be executed by a computer program that reads a data file of daily mean streamflow, then allows the user to select several near-linear segments of streamflow recession. The storage-delay factor for each segment is one of the coefficients of the equation that results from linear least-squares regression. Using results for each recession segment, a mathematical expression of the storage-delay factor as a function of the log of streamflow is determined by linear least-squares regression. The master recession curve, which is a second-order polynomial expression for time as a function of log of streamflow, is then derived using the coefficients of this function.

  12. Fractal analysis of light curves for the microquasar GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosvetov, A. V.; Grebenev, S. A.

    2014-11-01

    Results of a fractal analysis of the X-ray light curves from accreting black holes in low-mass binary systems are presented for the object GX 339-4 as an example. The fractal dimension of the light curves is shown to be strongly dependent on the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the observations. A correlation between the fractal dimension of the light curves and the frequency of the QPO peak has been revealed. A method supplementary to a Fourier analysis that allows the pattern of accretion disk emission as a function of time scales to be investigated is proposed. The results of this analysis can be explained if the accretion disk is separated by the QPO region into two zones with different emission parameters.

  13. Etiology and occurrence of gingival recession - An epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Sarpangala; Arunkumar, Suryanarayan Maiya; Hegde, Shashikanth; Rajesh, Shanker Kashyap; Munaz, Mohamed; Ashwin, Devasya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Gingival recession is the term used to characterize the apical shift of the marginal gingiva from its normal position on the crown of the tooth. It is frequently observed in adult subjects. The occurrence and severity of the gingival recession present considerable differences between populations. To prevent gingival recession from occurring, it is essential to detect the underlying etiology. The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of gingival recession and to identify the most common factor associated with the cause of gingival recession. Methods: A total of 710 subjects aged between 15 years to 60 years were selected. Data were collected by an interview with the help of a proforma and then the dental examination was carried out. The presence of gingival recession was recorded using Miller's classification of gingival recession. The Silness and Loe Plaque Index, Loe and Silness gingival index, community periodontal index were recorded. The data thus obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using Chi-square test and Student's unpaired t-test. Results: Of 710 subjects examined, 291 (40.98%) subjects exhibited gingival recession. The frequency of gingival recession was found to increase with age. High frequency of gingival recession was seen in males (60.5%) compared to females (39.5%). Gingival recession was commonly seen in mandibular incisors (43.0%). Miller's class I gingival recession was more commonly seen. The most common cause for gingival recession was dental plaque accumulation (44.1%) followed by faulty toothbrushing (42.7%). Conclusion: Approximately half of the subjects examined exhibited gingival recession. The etiology of gingival recession is multifactorial, and its appearance is always the result of more than one factor acting together. PMID:26941519

  14. AtomicJ: An open source software for analysis of force curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanowicz, Paweł; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava; Gabryś, Halina

    2014-06-01

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  15. AtomicJ: An open source software for analysis of force curves

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanowicz, Paweł Gabryś, Halina; Sarna, Michał; Burda, Kvetoslava

    2014-06-15

    We present an open source Java application for analysis of force curves and images recorded with the Atomic Force Microscope. AtomicJ supports a wide range of contact mechanics models and implements procedures that reduce the influence of deviations from the contact model. It generates maps of mechanical properties, including maps of Young's modulus, adhesion force, and sample height. It can also calculate stacks, which reveal how sample's response to deformation changes with indentation depth. AtomicJ analyzes force curves concurrently on multiple threads, which allows for high speed of analysis. It runs on all popular operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  16. Specific yield as determined by type-curve analysis of aquifer-test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, Allen F.

    1994-01-01

    The commonly used analytical solution developed by Neuman for a homogeneous, water-table aquifer assumes that the drainage of pores in the zone above the water table due to lowering of the water table occurs instantaneously. Noninstantaneous drainage of pores in the unsaturated zone accounts for the finding that both type-curve analysis and volume-balance calculations yield values of specific yield that are slightly less than those obtained from laboratory column-drainage experiments. It may also account for a slight underestimation of vertical hydraulic conductivity as obtained by type-curve analysis.

  17. Retrospective North American CFL Experience Curve Analysis and Correlation to Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sarah J.; Wei, Max; Sohn, Michael D.

    2015-07-01

    Retrospective experience curves are a useful tool for understanding historic technology development, and can contribute to investment program analysis and future cost estimation efforts. This work documents our development of an analysis approach for deriving retrospective experience curves with a variable learning rate, and its application to develop an experience curve for compact fluorescent lamps for the global and North American markets over the years 1990-2007. Uncertainties and assumptions involved in interpreting data for our experience curve development are discussed, including the processing and transformation of empirical data, the selection of system boundaries, and the identification of historical changes in the learning rate over the course of 15 years. In the results that follow, we find that that the learning rate has changed at least once from 1990-2007. We also explore if, and to what degree, public deployment programs may have contributed to an increased technology learning rate in North America. We observe correlations between the changes in the learning rate and the initiation of new policies, abrupt technological advances, including improvements to ballast technology, and economic and political events such as trade tariffs and electricity prices. Finally, we discuss how the findings of this work (1) support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective analysis and (2) may imply that investments in technological research and development have contributed to a change in market adoption and penetration.

  18. The appended curve technique for deconvolutional analysis--method and validation.

    PubMed

    Juni, J E; Thrall, J H; Froelich, J W; Wiggins, R C; Campbell, D A; Tuscan, M

    1988-01-01

    Deconvolutional analysis (DCA) is useful in correction of organ time activity curves (response function) for variations in blood activity (input function). Despite enthusiastic reports of applications of DCA in renal and cardiac scintigraphy, routine use has awaited an easily implemented algorithm which is insensitive to statistical noise. The matrix method suffers from the propagation of errors in early data points through the entire curve. Curve fitting or constraint methods require prior knowledge of the expected form of the results. DCA by Fourier transforms (FT) is less influenced by single data points but often suffers from high frequency artifacts which result from the abrupt termination of data acquisition at a nonzero value. To reduce this artifact, we extend the input (i) and response curves to three to five times the initial period of data acquisition (P) by appending a smooth low frequency curve with a gradual taper to zero. Satisfactory results have been obtained using a half cosine curve of length 2-3P. The FTs of the input and response I and R, are computed and R/I determined. The inverse FT is performed and the curve segment corresponding to the initial period of acquisition (P) is retained. We have validated this technique in a dog model by comparing the mean renal transit times of 131I-iodohippuran by direct renal artery injection to that calculated by deconvolution of an intravenous injection. The correlation was excellent (r = 0.97, P less than 0.005). The extension of the data curves by appending a low frequency "tail" before DCA reduces the data termination artifact. This method is rapid, simple, and easily implemented on a microcomputer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3181190

  19. Testing and analysis of flat and curved panels with multiple cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broek, David; Jeong, David Y.; Thomson, Douglas

    1994-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of multiple cracking in various types of test specimens is described in this paper. The testing phase is comprised of a flat unstiffened panel series and curved stiffened and unstiffened panel series. The test specimens contained various configurations for initial damage. Static loading was applied to these specimens until ultimate failure, while loads and crack propagation were recorded. This data provides the basis for developing and validating methodologies for predicting linkup of multiple cracks, progression to failure, and overall residual strength. The results from twelve flat coupon and ten full scale curved panel tests are presented. In addition, an engineering analysis procedure was developed to predict multiple crack linkup. Reasonable agreement was found between predictions and actual test results for linkup and residual strength for both flat and curved panels. The results indicate that an engineering analysis approach has the potential to quantitatively assess the effect of multiple cracks in the arrest capability of an aircraft fuselage structure.

  20. Soil hydraulic properties estimate based on numerical analysis of disc infiltrometer three-dimensional infiltration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Borja; Peña-Sancho, Carolina; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafaël; Moret-Fernández, David

    2015-04-01

    Measurement of soil hydraulic properties is of paramount importance in fields such as agronomy, hydrology or soil science. Fundamented on the analysis of the Haverkamp et al. (1994) model, the aim of this paper is to explain a technique to estimate the soil hydraulic properties (sorptivity, S, and hydraulic conductivity, K) from the full-time cumulative infiltration curves. The method (NSH) was validated by means of 12 synthetic infiltration curves generated with HYDRUS-3D from known soil hydraulic properties. The K values used to simulate the synthetic curves were compared to those estimated with the proposed method. A procedure to identify and remove the effect of the contact sand layer on the cumulative infiltration curve was also developed. A sensitivity analysis was performed using the water level measurement as uncertainty source. Finally, the procedure was evaluated using different infiltration times and data noise. Since a good correlation between the K used in HYDRUS-3D to model the infiltration curves and those estimated by the NSH method was obtained, (R2 =0.98), it can be concluded that this technique is robust enough to estimate the soil hydraulic conductivity from complete infiltration curves. The numerical procedure to detect and remove the influence of the contact sand layer on the K and S estimates seemed to be robust and efficient. An effect of the curve infiltration noise on the K estimate was observed, which uncertainty increased with increasing noise. Finally, the results showed that infiltration time was an important factor to estimate K. Lower values of K or smaller uncertainty needed longer infiltration times.

  1. Taxometrics, Polytomous Constructs, and the Comparison Curve Fit Index: A Monte Carlo Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Glenn D.; McGrath, Robert E.; Knight, Raymond A.

    2010-01-01

    The taxometric method effectively distinguishes between dimensional (1-class) and taxonic (2-class) latent structure, but there is virtually no information on how it responds to polytomous (3-class) latent structure. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that the mean comparison curve fit index (CCFI; Ruscio, Haslam, & Ruscio, 2006) obtained with 3…

  2. A Latent Growth Curve Analysis of Reading Achievement for an At-Risk Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beecher, Constance C.

    2011-01-01

    The development of reading skills from age seven until age 19 was investigated for children who were referred for special education preschool intervention using latent growth curve analysis (n=206). Approximately one-third of the study sample did not require special education services after preschool, providing a natural comparison group. Reading…

  3. Computational Tools for Probing Interactions in Multiple Linear Regression, Multilevel Modeling, and Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the…

  4. Policy Effectiveness and the Slopes of IS and LM Curves: A Graphical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revier, Charles F.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the IS-LM model providing a graphical analysis designed to clarify the confusion induced by misleading statements in several major macroeconomics textbooks concerning the connection between policy effectiveness and the slopes of the IS and LM curves. Includes references. (CMK)

  5. Aptitude-Treatment Interaction Effects on Explicit Rule Learning: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwu, Fenfang; Pan, Wei; Sun, Shuyan

    2014-01-01

    Finding the match between individuals and educational treatments is the aim of both educators and the aptitude-treatment interaction research paradigm. Using the latent growth curve analysis, the present study investigates the interaction between the type of explicit instructional approaches (deductive vs. explicit-inductive) and the level of…

  6. A Novel Representation for Riemannian Analysis of Elastic Curves in ℝn

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shantanu H.; Klassen, Eric; Srivastava, Anuj; Jermyn, Ian

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel representation of continuous, closed curves in ℝn that is quite efficient for analyzing their shapes. We combine the strengths of two important ideas - elastic shape metric and path-straightening methods -in shape analysis and present a fast algorithm for finding geodesics in shape spaces. The elastic metric allows for optimal matching of features while path-straightening provides geodesics between curves. Efficiency results from the fact that the elastic metric becomes the simple 2 metric in the proposed representation. We present step-by-step algorithms for computing geodesics in this framework, and demonstrate them with 2-D as well as 3-D examples. PMID:21311729

  7. The Recess Renaissance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2015-01-01

    The author tells of his work around the country and world on transforming how schools do recess, free play, and outside time by transforming their outdoor spaces to match. Instead of a playground of fixed structures like traditional school grounds, newer spaces are filled with loose materials that children can use to build forts, dens, and tree…

  8. Educational Finance in Recession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Keith

    1986-01-01

    Discusses two interacting sources limiting educational expenditures in developing nations in light of the impact of the global economic recession: (1) factors affecting overall levels of public expenditures and (2) factors affecting educational priority in the national budget. Offers requirements for an effective response to these challenges. (TRS)

  9. Analysis of survival curve configuration is relevant for determining pathogenesis and causation.

    PubMed

    Klinge, U; Fiebeler, A

    2009-05-01

    Improving technology helps us to identify more and more defects at the level of genes or proteins (event) as potential sources of a disease (effect), hopefully allowing more targeted cures with a "magic bullet". However, the complex interference of genes by the environment hinders the detection of strict causal relationships between defect and disease. We consider causality as temporal relationship between event and effect, thus causation is reflected by the configuration of "survival" curves. This is indicated by several survival curves of diseases with known causal relation. Furthermore, we discuss three theoretical models: a causal chain model, a causal field concept and a causal chain model with variable order, and present three assumptions about the specific consequences for configuration of outcome curves. Clinical examples of diseases that are caused by single hits reveal an S-shaped curve of cumulative incidence. In contrast, for diseases with numerous interacting pathogenetic effectors the superposition of all contributions results in widely linear cumulative incidence curves. The rare S-shaped deformation in the survival curves in patients with recurrent cancer is in conflict with our current view of recurrent cancer as mainly being a consequence of residual tumour cell load. The assumption of a "web of causation" instead of a "causal chain" reflects a more real situation for many clinical problems and can explain the widely seen absence of decisive, causally relevant conditions. As consequences for our current treatment of cancer is not insignificant, a careful analysis of the configuration of outcome curves with recognition of an S-shape may either help to identify causal therapies or may encourage more comprehensive approaches that consider the complexity of the disease. PMID:19201546

  10. A general geomorphological recession flow model for river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Basudev; Nagesh Kumar, D.

    2013-08-01

    Recession flows in a basin are controlled by the temporal evolution of its active drainage network (ADN). The geomorphological recession flow model (GRFM) assumes that both the rate of flow generation per unit ADN length (q) and the speed at which ADN heads move downstream (c) remain constant during a recession event. Thereby, it connects the power law exponent of -dQ/dt versus Q (discharge at the outlet at time t) curve, α, with the structure of the drainage network, a fixed entity. In this study, we first reformulate the GRFM for Horton-Strahler networks and show that the geomorphic α (αg) is equal to D/>(D-1>), where D is the fractal dimension of the drainage network. We then propose a more general recession flow model by expressing both q and c as functions of Horton-Strahler stream order. We show that it is possible to have α =α g for a recession event even when q and c do not remain constant. The modified GRFM suggests that α is controlled by the spatial distribution of subsurface storage within the basin. By analyzing streamflow data from 39 U.S. Geological Survey basins, we show that α is having a power law relationship with recession curve peak, which indicates that the spatial distribution of subsurface storage varies across recession events.

  11. Effects of variable recruitment on catch-curve analysis for crappie populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Catch-curve analysis is frequently used to estimate total annual mortality (A) of exploited fishes, but the method assumes constant recruitment. Because populations of crappie Pomoxis spp. have exhibited large fluctuations in recruitment, I conducted simulations to assess the amount of variability in recruitment that precludes the use of a catch curve and compared results to recruitment dynamics in six crappie populations. Coefficients of variation (CV = 100 ?? SD/mean) in recruitment to age 1 ranged from 55% to 84% among the six crappie populations. Simulations suggested that recruitment variability in these ranges would likely allow estimation of A within ?? 10%, but the probability of obtaining estimates of A that were ??5% or more of the true A would exceed 0.15. I suggest that catch curves may be used to approximate A in crappie populations but that managers should consider the effects on management recommendations if A were ??10% of the estimated A.

  12. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  13. Complexity analysis of the temperature curve: new information from body temperature.

    PubMed

    Varela, Manuel; Jimenez, Leticia; Fariña, Rosa

    2003-05-01

    An attempt was made to develop a truly quantitative approach to temperature, based on models derived from nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory. Three different procedures for measuring the degree of complexity of the temperature curve were compared, and the possible correlations between these measurements and certain physiopathologically relevant parameters in healthy subjects were examined. Twenty-three healthy subjects (10 males, 13 females) between 18 and 85 years of age had their temperature measured every 10 min for at least 30 h. These time series were used to determine the approximate entropy (ApEn), a detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), and the fractal dimension by the compass method (FD(c)). There was good correlation between the different methods of measuring the complexity of the curve [ r=-0.603 for ApEn vs. DFA ( p=0.002), r=0.438 for ApEn vs. FDc ( p=0.04) and r=-0.647 for DFA vs. FDc ( p=0.0008)]. Both the fractal dimension and the approximate entropy were inversely correlated with age [ r=-0.637 ( p=0.001) and r=-0.417 ( p=0.03), respectively], while the DFA increased with age ( r=0.413, p=0.04). The results thus suggest that complexity of the temperature curve decreases with age. The complexity of the temperature curve can be quantified in a consistent fashion. Age is associated with lower complexity of the temperature curve. PMID:12736830

  14. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. PMID:26952004

  15. Analytical Problems and Suggestions in the Analysis of Behavioral Economic Demand Curves.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jihnhee; Liu, Liu; Collins, R Lorraine; Vincent, Paula C; Epstein, Leonard H

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral economic demand curves (Hursh, Raslear, Shurtleff, Bauman, & Simmons, 1988) are innovative approaches to characterize the relationships between consumption of a substance and its price. In this article, we investigate common analytical issues in the use of behavioral economic demand curves, which can cause inconsistent interpretations of demand curves, and then we provide methodological suggestions to address those analytical issues. We first demonstrate that log transformation with different added values for handling zeros changes model parameter estimates dramatically. Second, demand curves are often analyzed using an overparameterized model that results in an inefficient use of the available data and a lack of assessment of the variability among individuals. To address these issues, we apply a nonlinear mixed effects model based on multivariate error structures that has not been used previously to analyze behavioral economic demand curves in the literature. We also propose analytical formulas for the relevant standard errors of derived values such as P max, O max, and elasticity. The proposed model stabilizes the derived values regardless of using different added increments and provides substantially smaller standard errors. We illustrate the data analysis procedure using data from a relative reinforcement efficacy study of simulated marijuana purchasing. PMID:26741176

  16. Learning Factors Transfer Analysis: Using Learning Curve Analysis to Automatically Generate Domain Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Philip I. Jr.; Cen, Hao; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to create a quantitative model of an educational content domain of related practice item-types using learning curves. By using a pairwise test to search for the relationships between learning curves for these item-types, we show how the test results in a set of pairwise transfer relationships that can be…

  17. ATWS Analysis with an Advanced Boiling Curve Approach within COBRA 3-CP

    SciTech Connect

    Gensler, A.; Knoll, A.; Kuehnel, K.

    2007-07-01

    In 2005 the German Reactor Safety Commission issued specific requirements on core coolability demonstration for PWR ATWS (anticipated transients without scram). Thereupon AREVA NP performed detailed analyses for all German PWRs. For a German KONVOI plant the results of an ATWS licensing analysis are presented. The plant dynamic behavior is calculated with NLOOP, while the hot channel analysis is performed with the thermal hydraulic computer code COBRA 3-CP. The application of the fuel rod model included in COBRA 3-CP is essential for this type of analysis. Since DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) occurs, the advanced post DNB model (advanced boiling curve approach) of COBRA 3-CP is used. The results are compared with those gained with the standard BEEST model. The analyzed ATWS case is the emergency power case 'loss of main heat sink with station service power supply unavailable'. Due to the decreasing coolant flow rate during the transient the core attains film boiling conditions. The results of the hot channel analysis strongly depend on the performance of the boiling curve model. The BEEST model is based on pool boiling conditions whereas typical PWR conditions - even in most transients - are characterized by forced flow for which the advanced boiling curve approach is particularly suitable. Compared with the BEEST model the advanced boiling curve approach in COBRA 3-CP yields earlier rewetting, i.e. a shorter period in film boiling. Consequently, the fuel rod cladding temperatures, that increase significantly due to film boiling, drop back earlier and the high temperature oxidation is significantly diminished. The Baker-Just-Correlation was used to calculate the value of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR), i.e. the reduction of cladding thickness due to corrosion throughout the transient. Based on the BEEST model the ECR value amounts to 0.4% whereas the advanced boiling curve only leads to an ECR value of 0.2%. Both values provide large margins to the 17

  18. Are we thinking straight about groundwater recession?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbert, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    By exploring what governs the form of groundwater head recession in idealised and real aquifers, it will be shown that the analysis of groundwater recessions is a powerful but underused way of gaining insight into the hydrologic functioning of an aquifer from local to regional scales. It is commonly assumed that groundwater head recession in aquifers will take exponential form. However, here it is demonstrated that ideal regional aquifers should, given enough time between recharge events, actually develop through three distinct phases of recession: (1) in early times the groundwater recession should take an almost straight line form with a rate approximately equal to the long term recharge rate divided by the specific yield. The length of this phase can be estimated from a new analytical expression, which depends on the aquifer diffusivity, length scale and the position of the monitoring point, (2) a transitional phase then leads to, (3) an exponential phase after some critical time which is described by an existing analytical expression which is independent of the position of the monitoring point. Further analysis reveals that major aquifers in a state of periodic quasi-steady state are expected to have rates of net groundwater drainage which deviate little from the average rate of groundwater recharge. To back up these theoretical considerations, a range of real groundwater hydrographs will be presented which demonstrate the characteristic behaviour and interactions of groundwater flow systems interacting at local to regional scales. Where groundwater declines are observed in nature to have a quasi-exponential form, this may be diagnostic of particular types of aquifer properties and/or boundary effects such as: storage changes due to pumping, proximity to drainage boundaries, variations in transmissivity with hydraulic head, and variations in specific yield with depth. Furthermore, 'non-equilibrium' flow at a range of spatial and temporal scales helps explain

  19. Large-scale actuating performance analysis of a composite curved piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soon Wan; Hwang, In Seong; Kim, Seung Jo

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, the electromechanical displacements of curved piezoelectric actuators composed of PZT ceramic and laminated composite materials are calculated on the basis of high performance computing technology and the optimal configuration of the composite curved actuator is examined. To accurately predict the local pre-stress in the device due to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion, carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy as well as PZT ceramic are numerically modelled by using hexahedral solid elements. Because the modeling of these thin layers increases the number of degrees of freedom, large-scale structural analyses are performed using the PEGASUS supercomputer, which is installed in our laboratory. In the first stage, the curved shape of the actuator and the internal stress in each layer are obtained by cured curvature analysis. Subsequently, the displacement due to the piezoelectric force (which results from the applied voltage) is also calculated. The performance of the composite curved actuator is investigated by comparing the displacements obtained by variation of the thickness and the elastic modulus of laminated composite layers. In order to consider the finite deformation in the first stage of the analysis and include the pre-stress due to the curing process in the second stage, nonlinear finite element analyses are carried out.

  20. GCAFIT—A new tool for glow curve analysis in thermoluminescence nanodosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Hafez, A. I.; Yasin, M. N.; Sadek, A. M.

    2011-05-01

    Glow curve analysis is widely used for dosimetric studies and applications. Therefore, a new computer program, GCAFIT, for deconvoluting first-order kinetics thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves and evaluating the activation energy for each glow peak in the glow curve has been developed using the MATLAB technical computing language. A non-linear function describing a single glow peak is fitted to experimental points using the Levenberg-Marquardt least-square method. The developed GCAFIT software was used to analyze the glow curves of TLD-100, TLD-600, and TLD-700 nanodosimeters. The activation energy E obtained by the developed GCAFIT software was compared with that obtained by the peak shape methods of Grossweiner, Lushchik, and Halperin-Braner. The frequency factor S for each glow peak was also calculated. The standard deviations are discussed in each case and compared with those of other investigators. The results show that GCAFIT is capable of accurately analyzing first-order TL glow curves. Unlike other software programs, the developed GCAFIT software does not require activation energy as an input datum; in contrast, activation energy for each glow peak is given in the output data. The resolution of the experimental glow curve influences the results obtained by the GCAFIT software; as the resolution increases, the results obtained by the GCAFIT software become more accurate. The values of activation energy obtained by the developed GCAFIT software a in good agreement with those obtained by the peak shape methods. The agreement with the Halperin-Braner and Lushchik methods is better than with that of Grossweiner. High E and S values for peak 5 were observed; we believe that these values are not real because peak 5 may in fact consist of two or three unresolved peaks. We therefore treated E and S for peak 5 as an effective activation energy, Eeff, and an effective frequency factor, Seff. The temperature value for peak 5 was also treated as an effective quantity

  1. Better P-curves: Making P-curve analysis more robust to errors, fraud, and ambitious P-hacking, a Reply to Ulrich and Miller (2015).

    PubMed

    Simonsohn, Uri; Simmons, Joseph P; Nelson, Leif D

    2015-12-01

    When studies examine true effects, they generate right-skewed p-curves, distributions of statistically significant results with more low (.01 s) than high (.04 s) p values. What else can cause a right-skewed p-curve? First, we consider the possibility that researchers report only the smallest significant p value (as conjectured by Ulrich & Miller, 2015), concluding that it is a very uncommon problem. We then consider more common problems, including (a) p-curvers selecting the wrong p values, (b) fake data, (c) honest errors, and (d) ambitiously p-hacked (beyond p < .05) results. We evaluate the impact of these common problems on the validity of p-curve analysis, and provide practical solutions that substantially increase its robustness. PMID:26595842

  2. Differentiating between monozygotic twins through DNA methylation-specific high-resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Leander; Evans, Neil; Bexon, Kimberley J; van der Meer, Dieudonne J; Williams, Graham A

    2015-05-01

    Although short tandem repeat profiling is extremely powerful in identifying individuals from crime scene stains, it is unable to differentiate between monozygotic (MZ) twins. Efforts to address this include mutation analysis through whole genome sequencing and through DNA methylation studies. Methylation of DNA is affected by environmental factors; thus, as MZ twins age, their DNA methylation patterns change. This can be characterized by bisulfite treatment followed by pyrosequencing. However, this can be time-consuming and expensive; thus, it is unlikely to be widely used by investigators. If the sequences are different, then in theory the melting temperature should be different. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess whether high-resolution melt curve analysis can be used to differentiate between MZ twins. Five sets of MZ twins provided buccal swabs that underwent extraction, quantification, bisulfite treatment, polymerase chain reaction amplification and high-resolution melting curve analysis targeting two markers, Alu-E2F3 and Alu-SP. Significant differences were observed between all MZ twins targeting Alu-E2F3 and in four of five MZ twins targeting Alu-SP (P<0.05). Thus, it has been demonstrated that bisulfite treatment followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis could be used to differentiate between MZ twins. PMID:25677265

  3. First-order reversal curve analysis of graded anisotropy FePtCu films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanni, Valentina; Fang, Yeyu; Dumas, Randy K.; Zha, Chaolin; Bonetti, Stefano; Nogués, Josep; Åkerman, Johan

    2010-11-01

    The reversal mechanisms of graded anisotropy FePtCu films have been investigated by alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements with first-order reversal curve (FORC) techniques. The AGM-FORC analysis, which clearly shows the presence of soft and hard components, is unable to resolve how these phases are distributed throughout the film thickness. MOKE-FORC measurements, which preferentially probe the surface of the film, reveal that the soft components are indeed located toward the top surface. Combining AGM-FORC with the inherent surface sensitivity of MOKE-FORC analysis allows for a comprehensive analysis of heterogeneous systems such as graded materials.

  4. Drainage-system development in consecutive melt seasons at a polythermal, Arctic glacier, evaluated by flow-recession analysis and linear-reservoir simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkins, Richard; Cooper, Richard; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma

    2013-01-01

    [1] The drainage systems of polythermal glaciers play an important role in high-latitude hydrology, and are determinants of ice flow rate. Flow-recession analysis and linear-reservoir simulation of runoff time series are here used to evaluate seasonal and inter-annual variability in the drainage system of the polythermal Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, in 1999 and 2000. Linear-flow recessions are pervasive, with mean coefficients of a fast reservoir varying from 16 (1999) to 41 h (2000), and mean coefficients of an intermittent, slow reservoir varying from 54 (1999) to 114 h (2000). Drainage-system efficiency is greater overall in the first of the two seasons, the simplest explanation of which is more rapid depletion of the snow cover. Reservoir coefficients generally decline during each season (at 0.22 h d−1 in 1999 and 0.52 h d−1 in 2000), denoting an increase in drainage efficiency. However, coefficients do not exhibit a consistent relationship with discharge. Finsterwalderbreen therefore appears to behave as an intermediate case between temperate glaciers and other polythermal glaciers with smaller proportions of temperate ice. Linear-reservoir runoff simulations exhibit limited sensitivity to a relatively wide range of reservoir coefficients, although the use of fixed coefficients in a spatially lumped model can generate significant subseasonal error. At Finsterwalderbreen, an ice-marginal channel with the characteristics of a fast reservoir, and a subglacial upwelling with the characteristics of a slow reservoir, both route meltwater to the terminus. This suggests that drainage-system components of significantly contrasting efficiencies can coexist spatially and temporally at polythermal glaciers. PMID:25598557

  5. Radial Velocity and Light Curves Analysis of the Contact Binary V839 Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazhouhesh, R.; Edalati, M. T.

    2003-09-01

    Complete UBV light curves of the W Ursae Majoris binary V839 Oph obtained in the year 2000 are presented. The available spectroscopic data of V839 Oph is new and we used the first radial velocity data of this system obtained by Rucinski and Lu (1999) for analysis. The radial velocity and light curves analysis was made with the latest version of Wilson programme (1998) and the geometric and physical elements of the system are derived. By searching the simultaneous solutions of the system we have determined the masses and radii of the components: 1.61Msolar and 1.49402Rsolar for the primary component; 0.50Msolar and 0.90147Rsolar for the secondary component. We estimated effective temperatures of 6650+/-18 (K) for the primary and 6554+/-15 (K) for the secondary component.

  6. Transcriptome analysis of genetic mechanism of growth curve inflection point using a pig model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Linyuan; Zhang, Shunhua; Zhu, Li

    2015-12-01

    Animal growth curves play an important role for animal breeders to optimize feeding and management strategies (De Lange et al., 2001 [1]; Brossard et al., 2009 [2]; Strathe et al., 2010 [3]). However, the genetic mechanism of the phenotypic difference between the inflection point and noninflection points of the growth curve remains unclear. Here, we report the differentially expressed gene pattern in pig longissimus dorsi among three typical time points of the growth curve, inflection point (IP), before inflection point (BIP) and after inflection point (AIP). The whole genome RNA-seq data was deposited at GenBank under the accession number PRJNA2284587. The RNA-seq libraries generated 117 million reads of 5.89 gigabases in length. Totals of 21,331, 20,996 and 20,139 expressed transcripts were identified in IP, UIP and AIP, respectively. Furthermore, we identified 757 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between IP and UIP, and 271 DEGs between AIP and IP. Function enrichment analysis of DEGs found that the highly expressed genes in IP were mainly enriched in energy metabolism, global transcriptional activity and bone development intensity. This study contributes to reveal the genetic mechanism of growth curve inflection point. PMID:26697358

  7. Analysis of Atomic Force Curve Data for Mapping of Surface Properties in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirghi, Lucel; Nakagiri, Nobuyuki; Sugimura, Hiroyuki; Takai, Osamu

    2001-03-01

    This paper presents an analysis of atomic force versus distance curves for a silicon nitride probe and a silicon sample immersed in water. A custom-built atomic force microscope (AFM) was adapted for working in water by building a water cell from a liquid drop caught between a glass lamella fixed on the top of the cantilever base and the sample surface. An algorithm for processing of force curve data for long- and short-range forces is described. The force curve data taken for a sample consisting of a silicon wafer Si(111) patterned with V-shaped grooves and a silicon nitride cantilever in water were digitally acquired and automatically processed for mapping of surface properties. A weak repulsive double layer force with no relevant dependence on sample topography was observed on the force curves taken during approach movement of the cantilever. On the other hand, the attractive hydration force showed a strong dependence on the sample topography. Large hydration force values were noticed on the inclined faces of the V-shaped grooves while small hydration force values were noticed outside the grooves. The result was explained by the dependence of the tip curvature radius at the contact region on the tilt of the sample surface.

  8. Cooling curve analysis - international and national standard development: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Totten, G.E.; Webster, G.M.; Tensi, H.M.

    1996-12-31

    After many years of development, the ISO 9950 standard describing cooling curve analysis of quench oils without agitation has been issued. There is also a related standard being balloted within ASTM. The next step of this ongoing work, within both the IFHT and ASM Quenching and Cooling Committees to develop standards for cooling curve analysis of vaporizable quenchants with agitation. This will involve the development of two different standards. One will expand on ISO 9950 and provide for cooling curve analysis using the {open_quote}Wolfson Probe{close_quotes}, 12.5 x 60 mm INCONEL 600 with a Type K thermocouple inserted into the geometric center The second method to be developed will measure the surface rewetting properties of a quenchant by measuring the variation of conductance of a {open_quotes}standard{close_quote} probe. This paper will provide an overview of currently existing national standards and describe the experimental procedures for the new standards incorporating agitation which are being developed.

  9. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deliano, Matthias; Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  10. Efficient curve-skeleton computation for the analysis of biomedical 3d images - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Brun, Francesco; Dreossi, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Advances in three dimensional (3D) biomedical imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT), make it easy to reconstruct high quality 3D models of portions of human body and other biological specimens. A major challenge lies in the quantitative analysis of the resulting models thus allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the object under investigation. An interesting approach is based on curve-skeleton (or medial axis) extraction, which gives basic information concerning the topology and the geometry. Curve-skeletons have been applied in the analysis of vascular networks and the diagnosis of tracheal stenoses as well as a 3D flight path in virtual endoscopy. However curve-skeleton computation is a crucial task. An effective skeletonization algorithm was introduced by N. Cornea in [1] but it lacks in computational performances. Thanks to the advances in imaging techniques the resolution of 3D images is increasing more and more, therefore there is the need for efficient algorithms in order to analyze significant Volumes of Interest (VOIs). In the present paper an improved skeletonization algorithm based on the idea proposed in [1] is presented. A computational comparison between the original and the proposed method is also reported. The obtained results show that the proposed method allows a significant computational improvement making more appealing the adoption of the skeleton representation in biomedical image analysis applications. PMID:20467122

  11. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  12. Bayesian analysis of stage-fall-discharge rating curves and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansanarez, Valentin; Le Coz, Jérôme; Renard, Benjamin; Lang, Michel; Pierrefeu, Gilles; Le Boursicaud, Raphaël; Pobanz, Karine

    2016-04-01

    Stage-fall-discharge (SFD) rating curves are traditionally used to compute streamflow records at sites where the energy slope of the flow is variable due to variable backwater effects. Building on existing Bayesian approaches, we introduce an original hydraulics-based method for developing SFD rating curves used at twin gauge stations and estimating their uncertainties. Conventional power functions for channel and section controls are used, and transition to a backwater-affected channel control is computed based on a continuity condition, solved either analytically or numerically. The difference between the reference levels at the two stations is estimated as another uncertain parameter of the SFD model. The method proposed in this presentation incorporates information from both the hydraulic knowledge (equations of channel or section controls) and the information available in the stage-fall-discharge observations (gauging data). The obtained total uncertainty combines the parametric uncertainty and the remnant uncertainty related to the model of rating curve. This method provides a direct estimation of the physical inputs of the rating curve (roughness, width, slope bed, distance between twin gauges, etc.). The performance of the new method is tested using an application case affected by the variable backwater of a run-of-the-river dam: the Rhône river at Valence, France. In particular, a sensitivity analysis to the prior information and to the gauging dataset is performed. At that site, the stage-fall-discharge domain is well documented with gaugings conducted over a range of backwater affected and unaffected conditions. The performance of the new model was deemed to be satisfactory. Notably, transition to uniform flow when the overall range of the auxiliary stage is gauged is correctly simulated. The resulting curves are in good agreement with the observations (gaugings) and their uncertainty envelopes are acceptable for computing streamflow records. Similar

  13. Prediction of Cooling Curves for Squeeze Cast Al/SiCp Composites Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurusamy, P.; Balasivanandha Prabu, S.; Paskaramoorthy, R.

    2015-04-01

    This paper reports the experimental and finite element analyses of the solidification behavior of Al/SiCp composites, fabricated by the squeeze casting technique. Experiments were carried out by varying the melt temperatures for cylindrical-shaped composite castings. The composite samples were produced at the following constant temperatures: melt—1023 K, 1073 K, 1123 K, and 1173 K (750 °C, 800 °C, 850 °C, and 900 °C); and die—673 K (400 °C). The pressure applied throughout the experiment is 100 MPa. The melt temperature shows significant influence on the solidification behavior of the metal matrix composite. It was observed that the solidification time was 40 seconds when the melt temperature was 1023 K (750 °C) but it increased to 51 seconds when the melt temperature was at 1173 K (900 °C). The results also showed that the cooling rate decreased on increasing the melt temperature. Cooling curves for our system, squeeze cast composites, were predicted using the finite element software ANSYS. K-type thermocouples were interfaced to the die and the microcomputer from which the experimental cooling curves were constructed. The experimental and predicted cooling curves were then compared. While both show similar trends, the finite element analysis consistently under-predicts the temperature. In addition, finite element stress analysis reveals that both radial and tangential thermal stresses increase with the melt temperature.

  14. An analysis of the massless planet approximation in transit light curve models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Ruch, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    Many extrasolar planet transit light curve models use the approximation of a massless planet. They approximate the planet as orbiting elliptically with the host star at the orbit’s focus instead of depicting the planet and star as both orbiting around a common center of mass. This approximation should generally be very good because the transit is a small fraction of the full-phase curve and the planet to stellar mass ratio is typically very small. However, to fully examine the legitimacy of this approximation, it is useful to perform a robust, all-parameter space-encompassing statistical comparison between the massless planet model and the more accurate model.Towards this goal, we establish two questions: (1) In what parameter domain is the approximation invalid? (2) If characterizing an exoplanetary system in this domain, what is the error of the parameter estimates when using the simplified model? We first address question (1). Given each parameter vector in a finite space, we can generate the simplified and more complete model curves. Associated with these model curves is a measure of the deviation between them, such as the root mean square (RMS). We use Gibbs sampling to generate a sample that is distributed according to the RMS surface. The high-density regions in the sample correspond to a large deviation between the models. To determine the domains of these high-density areas, we first employ the Ordering Points to Identify the Clustering Structure (OPTICS) algorithm. We then characterize the subclusters by performing the Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) on the transformed Principal Component spaces of each cluster. This process yields descriptors of the parameter domains with large discrepancies between the models.To consider question (2), we start by generating synthetic transit curve observations in the domains specified by the above analysis. We then derive the best-fit parameters of these synthetic light curves according to each model and examine

  15. Who Suffers during Recessions? NBER Working Paper No. 17951

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoynes, Hilary W.; Miller, Douglas L.; Schaller, Jessamyn

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we examine how business cycles affect labor market outcomes in the United States. We conduct a detailed analysis of how cycles affect outcomes differentially across persons of differing age, education, race, and gender, and we compare the cyclical sensitivity during the Great Recession to that in the early 1980s recession. We present…

  16. Radial Velocity and Light Curve Analysis of the Eclipsing Binary Nn Vir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazhouhesh, R.; Melendo, E. G.

    2005-04-01

    The eclipsing binary NN Vir is a short period system showing an EW-type light curve. Photometric observations of NN Vir were done by Gomez Ferrellad and Garcia Melendo (1997) at Esteve Duran Observatory. The first spectroscopic observations of this system were obtained by Rucinski and Lu (1999). The radial velocity and light curves analysis was made with the latest version of the Wilson program (1998), and the geometric and physical elements of the system are derived. From the simultaneous solutions of the system, we determined the masses and radii of the components: 1.89 M ⊙ and 1.65 R ⊙ for the primary component; 0.93 M ⊙ and 1.23 R ⊙ for the secondary component. We estimated effective temperatures of 7030 K for the primary and 6977 K for the secondary component.

  17. Ice shelf structure derived from dispersion curve analysis of ambient seismic noise, Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, A.; Bromirski, P. D.; Gerstoft, P.; Stephen, R. A.; Anthony, R. E.; Aster, R. C.; Cai, C.; Nyblade, A.; Wiens, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    An L-configured, three-component short period seismic array was deployed on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica during November 2014. Polarization analysis of ambient noise data from these stations shows linearly polarized waves for frequency bands between 0.2 and 2 Hz. A spectral peak at about 1.6 Hz is interpreted as the resonance frequency of the water column and is used to estimate the water layer thickness below the ice shelf. The frequency band from 4 to 18 Hz is dominated by Rayleigh and Love waves propagating from the north that, based on daily temporal variations, we conclude were generated by field camp activity. Frequency-slowness plots were calculated using beamforming. Resulting Love and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves were inverted for the shear wave velocity profile within the firn and ice to ˜150 m depth. The derived density profile allows estimation of the pore close-off depth and the firn-air content thickness. Separate inversions of Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves give different shear wave velocity profiles within the firn. We attribute this difference to an effective anisotropy due to fine layering. The layered structure of firn, ice, water and the seafloor results in a characteristic dispersion curve below 7 Hz. Forward modelling the observed Rayleigh wave dispersion curves using representative firn, ice, water and sediment structures indicates that Rayleigh waves are observed when wavelengths are long enough to span the distance from the ice shelf surface to the seafloor. The forward modelling shows that analysis of seismic data from an ice shelf provides the possibility of resolving ice shelf thickness, water column thickness and the physical properties of the ice shelf and underlying seafloor using passive-source seismic data.

  18. Ice shelf structure derived from dispersion curve analysis of ambient seismic noise, Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, A.; Bromirski, P. D.; Gerstoft, P.; Stephen, R. A.; Anthony, R. E.; Aster, R.; Cai, C.; Nyblade, A.; Wiens, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    An L-configured, three-component short period seismic array was deployed on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica during November 2014. Polarization analysis of ambient noise data from these stations shows linearly polarized waves for frequency bands between 0.2-2 Hz. A spectral peak at about 1.6 Hz is interpreted as the resonance frequency of the water column, and is used to estimate the water layer thickness below the ice shelf. The frequency band from 4 to 18 Hz is dominated by Rayleigh and Love waves propagating from the north that, based on daily temporal variations, we conclude were generated by field camp activity. Frequency-slowness plots were calculated using beamforming. Resulting Love and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves were inverted for the shear wave velocity profile within the firn and ice to ˜150 m depth. The derived density profile allows estimation of the pore close-off depth and the firn-air content thickness. Separate inversions of Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves gives different shear-wave velocity profiles within the firn. We attribute this difference to an effective anisotropy due to fine layering. The layered structure of firn, ice, water, and the seafloor results in a characteristic dispersion curve below 7 Hz. Forward modeling the observed Rayleigh wave dispersion curves using representative firn, ice, water, sediment structures indicates that Rayleigh waves are observed when wavelengths are long enough to span the distance from the ice shelf surface to the seafloor. The forward modeling shows that analysis of seismic data from an ice shelf provides the possibility of resolving ice shelf thickness, water column thickness, and the physical properties of the ice shelf and underlying seafloor using passive-source seismic data.

  19. Learning curve for double-balloon enteroscopy: Findings from an analysis of 282 procedures

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Hoi-Poh; How, Soon-Hin; Kaffes, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the learning curves for antegrade double-balloon enteroscopy (aDBE) and retrograde DBE (rDBE) by analyzing the technical success rates. METHODS: A retrospective analysis in a tertiary referral center. This study reviewed all cases from June 2006 to April 2011 with a target lesion in the small-bowel identified by either capsule endoscopy or computed tomography scan posted for DBE examinations. Main outcome measurements were: (1) Technical success of aDBE defined by finding or excluding a target lesion after achieving sufficient length of small bowel intubation; and (2) Technical success for rDBE was defined by either finding the target lesion or achieving stable overtube placement in the ileum. RESULTS: Two hundred and eighty two procedures fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. These procedures were analyzed by blocks of 30 cases. There was no distinct learning curve for aDBE. Technical success rates for rDBE continued to rise over time, although on logistic regression analysis testing for trend, there was no significance (P = 0.09). The odds of success increased by a factor of 1.73 (95% CI: 0.93-3.22) for rDBE. For these data, it was estimated that at least 30-35 cases of rDBE under supervision were needed to achieve a good technical success of more than 75%. CONCLUSION: There was no learning curve for aDBE. Technical success continued to increase over time for rDBE, although a learning curve could not be proven statistically. Approximately 30-35 cases of rDBE will be required for stable overtube intubation in ileum. PMID:22912911

  20. 3D combinational curves for accuracy and performance analysis of positive biometrics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yingzi; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-06-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve has been widely used as an evaluation criterion to measure the accuracy of biometrics system. Unfortunately, such an ROC curve provides no indication of the optimum threshold and cost function. In this paper, two kinds of 3D combinational curves are proposed: the 3D combinational accuracy curve and the 3D combinational performance curve. The 3D combinational accuracy curve gives a balanced view of the relationships among FAR (false alarm rate), FRR (false rejection rate), threshold t, and Cost. Six 2D curves can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve: the conventional 2D ROC curve, 2D curve of (FRR, t), 2D curve of (FAR, t), 2D curve of (FRR, Cost), 2D curve of (FAR, Cost), and 2D curve of ( t, Cost). The 3D combinational performance curve can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve which can give a balanced view among Security, Convenience, threshold t, and Cost. The advantages of using the proposed 3D combinational curves are demonstrated by iris recognition systems where the experimental results show that the proposed 3D combinational curves can provide more comprehensive information of the system accuracy and performance.

  1. Improved Protocol for Rapid Identification of Certain Spa Types Using High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T.; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  2. Improved protocol for rapid identification of certain spa types using high resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  3. Spectrophotometric analysis of gamma-ray burst afterglow extinction curves with X-Shooter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japelj, J.; Covino, S.; Gomboc, A.; Vergani, S. D.; Goldoni, P.; Selsing, J.; Cano, Z.; D'Elia, V.; Flores, H.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hammer, F.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kaper, L.; Kopač, D.; Krühler, T.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N. R.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Watson, D.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-07-01

    We use gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra observed with the VLT/X-Shooter spectrograph to measure rest-frame extinction in GRB lines-of-sight by modelling the broadband near-infrared (NIR) to X-ray afterglow spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Our sample consists of nine Swift GRBs, of which eight belong to the long-duration and one to the short-duration class. Dust is modelled using the average extinction curves of the Milky Way and the two Magellanic Clouds. We derive the rest-frame extinction of the entire sample, which fall in the range 0 ≲ AV ≲ 1.2. Moreover, the SMC extinction curve is the preferred extinction curve template for the majority of our sample, a result that is in agreement with those commonly observed in GRB lines of sights. In one analysed case (GRB 120119A), the common extinction curve templates fail to reproduce the observed extinction. To illustrate the advantage of using the high-quality, X-Shooter afterglow SEDs over the photometric SEDs, we repeat the modelling using the broadband SEDs with the NIR-to-UV photometric measurements instead of the spectra. The main result is that the spectroscopic data, thanks to a combination of excellent resolution and coverage of the blue part of the SED, are more successful in constraining extinction curves and therefore dust properties in GRB hosts with respect to photometric measurements. In all cases but one the extinction curve of one template is preferred over the others. We show that themodelled values of the extinction AV and the spectral slope, obtained through spectroscopic and photometric SED analysis, can differ significantly for individual events, though no apparent trend in the differences is observed. Finally we stress that, regardless of the resolution of the optical-to-NIR data, the SED modelling gives reliable results only when the fit is performed on a SED covering a broader spectral region (in our case extending to X-rays). Based on observations collected at the European

  4. Assessing the Classification Accuracy of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures Using Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laracy, Seth D.; Hojnoski, Robin L.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2016-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to investigate the ability of early numeracy curriculum-based measures (EN-CBM) administered in preschool to predict performance below the 25th and 40th percentiles on a quantity discrimination measure in kindergarten. Areas under the curve derived from a sample of 279 students ranged…

  5. In-plane vibration analysis of curved carbon nanotubes conveying fluid embedded in viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Rafiei, Masoud; Daneshmand, Farhang

    2011-05-01

    The effect of the induced vibrations in the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arising from the internal fluid flow is a critical issue in the design of CNT-based fluidic devices. In this study, in-plane vibration analysis of curved CNTs conveying fluid embedded in viscoelastic medium is investigated. The CNT is modeled as a linear elastic cylindrical tube where the internal moving fluid is characterized by steady flow velocity and mass density of fluid. A modified-inextensible theory is used in formulation and the steady-state initial forces due to the centrifugal and pressure forces of the internal fluid are also taken into account. The finite element method is used to discretize the equation of motion and the frequencies are obtained by solving a quadratic eigenvalue problem. The effects of CNT opening angle, the elastic modulus and the damping factor of the viscoelastic surrounded medium and fluid velocity on the resonance frequencies are elucidated. It is shown that curved CNTs are unconditionally stable even for a system with sufficiently high flow velocity. The most results presented in this investigation have been absent from the literature for fluid-induced vibration of curved CNTs embedded in viscoelastic foundations.

  6. A historical light curve of ON 231 and its periodic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F. K.; Xie, G. Z.; Bai, J. M.

    1995-03-01

    All data in the B band for BL Lac object ON 231 have been compiled into a light curve from twenty-six publications, dating back to 1982; 560 values are available. The light curve shows that ON 231 is very active and exhibits very complicated non-sinusoidal variations. The light curve probably consists of three kinds of behaviors. The first may be non-periodic or with a period at least longer than the duration of historical observations. In this case, the source seems to maintain two states of intensities, changing in mean behavior from a bright level with mean B magnitude 15.45 to a faint level with about 16.45 mag between 1969 and 1972. After detailed Jurkevich V2m test analysis, we found that the second is periodic, with a period of 13.6 +/- 1.3 years (or 26.6 +/- 0.8 years) with outburst structure of one magnitude with total width of about 6 years. The third one is sporadic, superposing on the previous two behaviors. The periods of 0.981 +/- 0.005 years (or 2.02, 3.01, ... years) and of a few days are not significant and may be spurious.

  7. The SuperNovae Analysis Application (SNAP): A new tool for rapid analysis of SNe light curves and model verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayless, Amanda J.; SNAP Development Team

    2016-01-01

    The SuperNovae Analysis Application (SNAP) is a new tool for the analysis of SNe observations and validation of SNe models. SNAP consists of two data bases, an observational light curve data base and a theoretical light curve model data base, statistical comparison software, and a web interface available to the community. The observational light curves are primarily Swift UVOT core-collapse SNe and include all available observations from these observed SNe. The currently available theoretical models were developed at LANL. The web interface allows approved users to upload new SNe models or new SNe observations. The comparison software will validate new models against available SNe observations or rapidly give constraints on parameters for newly discovered SNe. With the advent of large computing abilities, more sophisticated SNe models are being developed. SNAP will be a tool to determine the accuracy of these new models. SNAP will also be a useful tool in the era of large surveys where thousands of SNe are discovered annually. Frequently, the parameter space of a new SNe event is unbounded. SNAP will be a resource to constrain parameters and determine if an event needs follow up without spending resources to create new light curve models from scratch.

  8. Optimized curve design for image analysis using localized geodesic distance transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, Billy; Niska, Harri; Pöllänen, Irene; Ikonen, Tiia; Haataja, Keijo; Toivanen, Pekka; Tolonen, Teemu

    2015-03-01

    We consider geodesic distance transformations for digital images. Given a M × N digital image, a distance image is produced by evaluating local pixel distances. Distance Transformation on Curved Space (DTOCS) evaluates shortest geodesics of a given pixel neighborhood by evaluating the height displacements between pixels. In this paper, we propose an optimization framework for geodesic distance transformations in a pattern recognition scheme, yielding more accurate machine learning based image analysis, exemplifying initial experiments using complex breast cancer images. Furthermore, we will outline future research work, which will complete the research work done for this paper.

  9. Circular Helix-Like Curve: An Effective Tool of Biological Sequence Analysis and Comparison.

    PubMed

    Li, Yushuang; Xiao, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    This paper constructed a novel injection from a DNA sequence to a 3D graph, named circular helix-like curve (CHC). The presented graphical representation is available for visualizing characterizations of a single DNA sequence and identifying similarities and differences among several DNAs. A 12-dimensional vector extracted from CHC, as a numerical characterization of CHC, was applied to analyze phylogenetic relationships of 11 species, 74 ribosomal RNAs, 48 Hepatitis E viruses, and 18 eutherian mammals, respectively. Successful experiments illustrated that CHC is an effective tool of biological sequence analysis and comparison. PMID:27403205

  10. [Aging Process of Puer Black Tea Studied by FTIR Spectroscopy Combined with Curve-Fitting Analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-yu; Shi, You-ming; Yi, Shi Lai

    2015-07-01

    For better determination of the chemical components in the Puer black tea, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for obtaining vibrational spectra of Puer black tea at different aging time. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated that the chemical components had change in Puer black tea at different aging time. The leaf of Puer black tea was a complex system, its Fourier transform infrared spectrum showed a total overlap of each absorption spectrum of various components. Each band represented an overall overlap of some characteristic absorption peaks of functional groups in the Puer black tea. In order to explore the change of characteristic absorption peaks of functional groups with aging time, the prediction positions and the number of second peaks in the range of 1900-900 cm(-1) were determined by Fourier self-deconvolution at first, and later the curve fitting analysis was performed in this overlap band. At different aging time of Puer black tea, the wave number of second peaks of amide II, tea polyphenol, pectin and polysaccharides at overlap band were assigned by curve fitting analysis. The second peak at 1520 cm(-1) was characteristic absorption band of amide II, the second peaks of tea polyphenol and pectin appeared at 1278 and 1103 cm(-1) respectively. Two second peaks at 1063 and 1037 cm(-1), corresponds mainly to glucomannan and arabinan. The relative area of these second peaks could be indicated the content of protein, tea polyphenol, pectin and polysaccharides in the Puer black tea. The results of curve fitting analysis showed that the relative area of amide II was increasing first and then decreasing, it indicated the change of protein in Puer black tea. At the same time, the content of tea polyphenol and pectin were decreased with the increase of aging time, but the glucomannan and arabinan were increased in reverse. It explained that the bitter taste was become weak and a sweet taste appeared in the tea with the increase of

  11. Circular Helix-Like Curve: An Effective Tool of Biological Sequence Analysis and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yushuang

    2016-01-01

    This paper constructed a novel injection from a DNA sequence to a 3D graph, named circular helix-like curve (CHC). The presented graphical representation is available for visualizing characterizations of a single DNA sequence and identifying similarities and differences among several DNAs. A 12-dimensional vector extracted from CHC, as a numerical characterization of CHC, was applied to analyze phylogenetic relationships of 11 species, 74 ribosomal RNAs, 48 Hepatitis E viruses, and 18 eutherian mammals, respectively. Successful experiments illustrated that CHC is an effective tool of biological sequence analysis and comparison. PMID:27403205

  12. Determining the nucleation rate curve for lithium disilicate glass by differential thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Day, Delbert E.

    1990-01-01

    The crystallization of lithium disilicate (Li2O+2SiO2) glass nucleated at various temperatures was studied by differential thermal analysis (DTA). A plot of the DTA crystallization peak height versus nucleation temperature closely resembles the classical nucleation rate curve for lithium disilicate glass whose maximum is at 453 C. The glass becomes saturated with internal nuclei when heated at 453 C for 10 h. The activation energy for crystallization and the heat of crystallization are independent of the concentration of nuclei and are 249 + or - 10 and 67 + or - 3 kJ/mol, respectively. The Avrami exponent, n, depends strongly on the concentration of nuclei in the glass.

  13. On the Analysis and Construction of the Butterfly Curve Using "Mathematica"[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geum, Y. H.; Kim, Y. I.

    2008-01-01

    The butterfly curve was introduced by Temple H. Fay in 1989 and defined by the polar curve r = e[superscript cos theta] minus 2 cos 4 theta plus sin[superscript 5] (theta divided by 12). In this article, we develop the mathematical model of the butterfly curve and analyse its geometric properties. In addition, we draw the butterfly curve and…

  14. Asymptotic analysis of a newtonian fluid in a curved pipe with moving walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiñeira, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, José M.

    2016-06-01

    This communication is devoted to the presentation of our recent results regarding the asymptotic analysis of a viscous flow in a tube with elastic walls. This study can be applied, for example, to the blood flow in an artery. With this aim, we consider the dynamic problem of the incompressible flow of a viscous fluid through a curved pipe with a smooth central curve. Our analysis leads to the obtention of an one dimensional model via singular perturbation of the Navier-Stokes system as ɛ, a non dimensional parameter related to the radius of cross-section of the tube, tends to zero. We allow the radius depend on tangential direction and time, so a coupling with an elastic or viscoelastic law on the wall of the pipe is possible. To perform the asymptotic analysis, we do a change of variable to a reference domain where we assume the existence of asymptotic expansions on ɛ for both velocity and pressure which, upon substitution on Navier-Stokes equations, leads to the characterization of various terms of the expansion. This allows us to obtain an approximation of the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  15. Improved factor analysis of dynamic PET images to estimate arterial input function and tissue curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Mitra, Debasis; Pan, Hui; Jagust, William; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-03-01

    Factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) is a methodology of extracting time-activity curves (TACs) for corresponding different tissue types from noisy dynamic images. The challenges of FADS include long computation time and sensitivity to the initial guess, resulting in convergence to local minima far from the true solution. We propose a method of accelerating and stabilizing FADS application to sequences of dynamic PET images by adding preliminary cluster analysis of the time activity curves for individual voxels. We treat the temporal variation of individual voxel concentrations as a set of time-series and use a partial clustering analysis to identify the types of voxel TACs that are most functionally distinct from each other. These TACs provide a good initial guess for the temporal factors for subsequent FADS processing. Applying this approach to a set of single slices of dynamic 11C-PIB images of the brain allows identification of the arterial input function and two different tissue TACs that are likely to correspond to the specific and non-specific tracer binding-tissue types. These results enable us to perform direct classification of tissues based on their pharmacokinetic properties in dynamic PET without relying on a compartment-based kinetic model, without identification of the reference region, or without using any external methods of estimating the arterial input function, as needed in some techniques.

  16. Computer programs for describing the recession of ground-water discharge and for estimating mean ground-water recharge and discharge from streamflow records-update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutledge, A.T.

    1998-01-01

    The computer programs included in this report can be used to develop a mathematical expression for recession of ground-water discharge and estimate mean ground-water recharge and discharge. The programs are intended for analysis of the daily streamflow record of a basin where one can reasonably assume that all, or nearly all, ground water discharges to the stream except for that which is lost to riparian evapotranspiration, and where regulation and diversion of flow can be considered to be negligible. The program RECESS determines the master reces-sion curve of streamflow recession during times when all flow can be considered to be ground-water discharge and when the profile of the ground-water-head distribution is nearly stable. The method uses a repetitive interactive procedure for selecting several periods of continuous recession, and it allows for nonlinearity in the relation between time and the logarithm of flow. The program RORA uses the recession-curve displacement method to estimate the recharge for each peak in the streamflow record. The method is based on the change in the total potential ground-water discharge that is caused by an event. Program RORA is applied to a long period of record to obtain an estimate of the mean rate of ground-water recharge. The program PART uses streamflow partitioning to estimate a daily record of base flow under the streamflow record. The method designates base flow to be equal to streamflow on days that fit a requirement of antecedent recession, linearly interpolates base flow for other days, and is applied to a long period of record to obtain an estimate of the mean rate of ground-water discharge. The results of programs RORA and PART correlate well with each other and compare reasonably with results of the corresponding manual method.

  17. Composite beam analysis linear analysis of naturally curved and twisted anisotropic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borri, Marco; Ghiringhelli, Gian L.; Merlini, Teodoro

    1992-05-01

    The aim of this report is to present a consistent theory for the deformation of a naturally curved and twisted anisotropic beam. The proposed formulation naturally extends the classical Saint-Venant approach to the case of curved and twisted anisotropic beams. The mathematical model developed under the assumption of span-wise uniform cross-section, curvature and twist, can take into account any kind of elastic coupling due to the material properties and the curved geometry. The consistency of the presented math-model and its generality about the cross-sectional shape, make it a useful tool even in a preliminary design optimization context such as the aeroelastic tailoring of helicopter rotor blades. The advantage of the present procedure is that it only requires a two-dimensional discretization; thus, very detailed analyses can be performed and interlaminar stresses between laminae can be evaluated. Such analyses would be extremely time consuming if performed with standard finite element codes: that prevents their recursive use as for example when optimizing a beam design. Moreover, as a byproduct of the proposed formulation, one obtains the constitutive law of the cross-section in terms of stress resultant and moment and their conjugate strain measures. This constitutive law takes into account any kind of elastic couplings, e.g., torsion-tension, tension-shear, bending-shear, and constitutes a fundamental input in aeroelastic analyses of helicopter blades. Four simple examples are given in order to show the principal features of the method.

  18. Small operator outwits recession

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.

    1982-12-01

    Explains how Rockcastle, Inc., one of the smallest surface coal mine operators in the West, maintains production during the recession by concentrating on short-term contracts and spot sales to industrial and commercial users. The mining company has selected well established coal brokers to market its product to users such as sugar beet and cement plants, a brewery, steel mill, utility, and a molybdenum mill. Rockcastle produces, on a two-shift schedule, about 1,200 tpd of coal with a total workforce of 20, or approximately 30 tons per manshift. A fleet of 4 scrapers, with dozer-assist in most cases, is capable of removing 5,000 to 6,000 cu yd of overburden and interburden per shift.

  19. A Scientific Analysis of Galaxy Tangential Speed of Revolution Curves III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taff, Laurence

    2015-04-01

    I last reported on my preliminary analysis of 350 + spiral, lenticular, irregular, polar ring, ring, and dwarf elliptical galaxies' tangential speed of revolution curves [TSRCs; and not rotation (sic) curves]. I now know that the consensus opinion in the literature--for which I can find no geometrical, numerical, statistical, nor scientific testing in 2,500 + publications--that the TSRC, vB(r), in the central bulges of these galaxies, is a linear function of the radial distance from the minor axis of symmetry r--is false. For the majority (>98%) vB(r) is rarely well represented by vB(r) = ωB r (for which the unique material model is an homogeneous, oblate, spheroid). Discovered via a scientific analysis of the gravitational potential energy computed directly from the observational data, vB(r) is almost exactly given by vB2(r) = (ωB r)2(1 + η r2) with | η | < 10-2 and frequently orders of magnitude less. The corresponding mass model is the simplest generalization: a two component homoeoid. The set of possible periodic orbits, based on circular trigonometric functions, becomes a set of periodic orbits based on the Jacobian elliptic functions. Once again it is possible to prove that the mass-to-light ratio can neither be a constant nor follow the de Vaucouleurs R1/4 rule.

  20. Nonlinear Analysis and Post-Test Correlation for a Curved PRSEUS Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Kevin; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn; Neal, Albert L.; Linton, Kim, A.; Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, developed by The Boeing Company, has been extensively studied as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA s) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program. The PRSEUS concept provides a light-weight alternative to aluminum or traditional composite design concepts and is applicable to traditional-shaped fuselage barrels and wings, as well as advanced configurations such as a hybrid wing body or truss braced wings. Therefore, NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and The Boeing Company partnered in an effort to assess the performance and damage arrestments capabilities of a PRSEUS concept panel using a full-scale curved panel in the FAA Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility. Testing was conducted in the FASTER facility by subjecting the panel to axial tension loads applied to the ends of the panel, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure loadings. Additionally, reactive hoop loads were applied to the skin and frames of the panel along its edges. The panel successfully supported the required design loads in the pristine condition and with a severed stiffener. The panel also demonstrated that the PRSEUS concept could arrest the progression of damage including crack arrestment and crack turning. This paper presents the nonlinear post-test analysis and correlation with test results for the curved PRSEUS panel. It is shown that nonlinear analysis can accurately calculate the behavior of a PRSEUS panel under tension, pressure and combined loading conditions.

  1. Single fluorophore melting curve analysis for detection of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Angione, Stephanie L; Croote, Derek; Leung, Joshua W; Mermel, Leonard A; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel detection assay able to identify and subtype strains of Clostridium difficile. Primers carefully designed for melting curve analysis amplify DNA from three C. difficile genes, tcdB, tcdC and cdtB, during quantitative (q)PCR. The tcdB gene allows for confirmation of organism presence, whilst the tcdC and cdtB genes allow for differentiation of virulence status, as deletions in the tcdC gene and the concurrent presence of the cdtB gene, which produces binary toxin, are associated with hypervirulence. Following qPCR, subtyping is then achieved by automated, inline melting curve analysis using only a single intercalating dye and verified by microchip electrophoresis. This assay represents a novel means of distinguishing between toxigenic and hypervirulent C. difficile strains NAP1/027/BI and 078 ribotype, which are highly prevalent hypervirulent strains in humans. This methodology can help rapidly detect and identify C. difficile strains that impose a significant health and economic burden in hospitals and other healthcare settings. PMID:26516039

  2. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  3. Fort Play Children Recreate Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase…

  4. Chemical Gradient-mediated Melting Curve Analysis for Genotyping of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Russom, Aman; Irimia, Daniel; Toner, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a microfluidic solid-phase Chemical Gradient-mediated Melting Curve Analysis (CGMCA) method for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. The method is based on allele-specific denaturation to discriminate mismatched (MM) from perfectly matched (PM) DNA duplexes upon exposure to linear chemical gradient. PM and MM DNA duplexes conjugated on beads are captured in a microfluidic gradient generator device designed with dams, keeping the beads trapped perpendicular to a gradient generating channel. Two denaturants, formamide and urea, were tested for their ability to destabilize the DNA duplex by competing with Watson-Crick pairing. Upon exposure to the chemical gradient, rapid denaturing profile was monitored in real time using fluorescence microscopy. The results show that the two duplexes exhibit different kinetics of denaturation profiles, enabling discrimination of MM from PM DNA duplexes to score SNP. PMID:19593749

  5. Spectral analysis of stellar light curves by means of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, R.; Ciaramella, A.; Milano, L.; Barone, F.; Longo, G.

    1999-06-01

    Periodicity analysis of unevenly collected data is a relevant issue in several scientific fields. In astrophysics, for example, we have to find the fundamental period of light or radial velocity curves which are unevenly sampled observations of stars. Classical spectral analysis methods are unsatisfactory to solve the problem. In this paper we present a neural network based estimator system which performs well the frequency extraction in unevenly sampled signals. It uses an unsupervised Hebbian nonlinear neural algorithm to extract, from the interpolated signal, the principal components which, in turn, are used by the MUSIC frequency estimator algorithm to extract the frequencies. The neural network is tolerant to noise and works well also with few points in the sequence. We benchmark the system on synthetic and real signals with the Periodogram and with the Cramer-Rao lower bound. This work was been partially supported by IIASS, by MURST 40\\% and by the Italian Space Agency.

  6. Predicting the in-situ stress state for deep wells using differential strain curve analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, F.G.; Ren, N.K.

    1980-01-01

    Recent developments in energy exploration at depths of 5000 to 25,000 ft have made it necessary to quickly and reliably determine the in situ stresses acting on the well bore. Differential strain analysis (DSA) is being investigated as a technique applied to core samples to indirectly determine the in situ stress state. Testing is being pursued in 3 steps. First, field measurements of strain are made in situ as the core is pulled out of the well. Second, the cores are brought to the lab and DSA is performed under in situ hydrostatic conditions. Third, the rock is examined microscopically. It appears favorable that a reasonably accurate estimate of the 3-dimensional stress state can be obtained using the strain curve analysis method. 12 references.

  7. The composition-explicit distillation curve technique: Relating chemical analysis and physical properties of complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Thomas J; Ott, Lisa S; Lovestead, Tara M; Huber, Marcia L

    2010-04-16

    The analysis of complex fluids such as crude oils, fuels, vegetable oils and mixed waste streams poses significant challenges arising primarily from the multiplicity of components, the different properties of the components (polarity, polarizability, etc.) and matrix properties. We have recently introduced an analytical strategy that simplifies many of these analyses, and provides the added potential of linking compositional information with physical property information. This aspect can be used to facilitate equation of state development for the complex fluids. In addition to chemical characterization, the approach provides the ability to calculate thermodynamic properties for such complex heterogeneous streams. The technique is based on the advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology, which separates a complex fluid by distillation into fractions that are sampled, and for which thermodynamically consistent temperatures are measured at atmospheric pressure. The collected sample fractions can be analyzed by any method that is appropriate. The analytical methods we have applied include gas chromatography (with flame ionization, mass spectrometric and sulfur chemiluminescence detection), thin layer chromatography, FTIR, corrosivity analysis, neutron activation analysis and cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. By far, the most widely used analytical technique we have used with the ADC is gas chromatography. This has enabled us to study finished fuels (gasoline, diesel fuels, aviation fuels, rocket propellants), crude oils (including a crude oil made from swine manure) and waste oils streams (used automotive and transformer oils). In this special issue of the Journal of Chromatography, specifically dedicated to extraction technologies, we describe the essential features of the advanced distillation curve metrology as an analytical strategy for complex fluids. PMID:20004402

  8. Learning curve analysis of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for gynecologic oncologists without open counterpart experience

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Tae-Wook; Paek, Jiheum; Park, Hyogyeong; Kang, Seong Woo; Ryu, Hee-Sug

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the learning curve of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (LRH) for gynecologic oncologists who underwent residency- and fellowship-training on laparoscopic surgery without previous experience in performing abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 84 patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage IB cervical cancer who underwent LRH (Piver type III) between April 2006 and March 2014. The patients were divided into two groups (surgeon A group, 42 patients; surgeon B group, 42 patients) according to the surgeon with or without ARH experience. Clinico-pathologic data were analyzed between the 2 groups. Operating times were analyzed using the cumulative sum technique. Results The operating time in surgeon A started at 5 to 10 standard deviations of mean operating time and afterward steeply decreased with operative experience (Pearson correlation coefficient=-0.508, P=0.001). Surgeon B, however, showed a gentle slope of learning curve within 2 standard deviations of mean operating time (Pearson correlation coefficient=-0.225, P=0.152). Approximately 18 cases for both surgeons were required to achieve surgical proficiency for LRH. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size (>4 cm) was significantly associated with increased operating time (P=0.027; odds ratio, 4.667; 95% confidence interval, 1.187 to 18.352). Conclusion After completing the residency- and fellowship-training course on gynecologic laparoscopy, gynecologic oncologists, even without ARH experience, might reach an acceptable level of surgical proficiency in LRH after approximately 20 cases and showed a gentle slope of learning curve, taking less effort to initially perform LRH. PMID:26430662

  9. Gingival Recession: Review and Strategies in Treatment of Recession

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Koppolu; Rajababu, Palaparthy; Satyanarayana, Durvasula; Sagar, Vidya

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common esthetic concerns associated with the periodontal tissues is gingival recession. Gingival recession is the exposure of root surfaces due to apical migration of the gingival tissue margins; gingival margin migrates apical to the cementoenamel junction. Although it rarely results in tooth loss, marginal tissue recession is associated with thermal and tactile sensitivity, esthetic complaints, and a tendency toward root caries. This paper reviews etiology, consequences, and the available surgical procedures for the coverage of exposed root surfaces, including three case reports. PMID:23082256

  10. Design, analysis and test of composite curved frames for helicopter fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.; Lowry, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Curved beam effects in composite frame structures representative of a light helicopter airframe are examined, and currently available analytical methods for studying these effects are briefly reviewed. A finite element study of curved composite frames is then reported, and it is shown that the curved frame effects must be accurately accounted for to avoid premature fracture. The finite element method is shown to be accurate to within 10 percent in accounting for the curved beam effects in composite structures.

  11. High-Throughput Analysis of Molecular Orientation on Surfaces by NEXAFS Imaging of Curved Sample Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy provides detailed information about the orientation and alignment of thin films. NEXAFS is a synchrotron-based technique—the availability of beam-time per user is typically limited to no more than a few weeks per year. The limited availability is currently a true barrier for using NEXAFS in combinatorial studies of molecular alignment. We have recently demonstrated how large area full field NEXAFS imaging allows users to pursue combinatorial studies of surface chemistry. Now we report an extension of this approach which allows the acquisition of orientation information from a single NEXAFS image. An array with 80 elements (samples), containing eight series of different surface modifications, was mounted on a curved substrate allowing the collection of NEXAFS spectra with a range of orientations with respect to the X-ray beam. Images collected from this array show how hyperspectral NEXAFS data collected from curved surfaces can be used for high-throughput molecular orientation analysis. PMID:25046426

  12. Determination of secondary flow morphologies by wavelet analysis in a curved artery model with physiological inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Hussain, Shadman; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Secondary flow vortical patterns in arterial curvatures have the potential to affect several cardiovascular phenomena, e.g., progression of atherosclerosis by altering wall shear stresses, carotid atheromatous disease, thoracic aortic aneurysms and Marfan's syndrome. Temporal characteristics of secondary flow structures vis-à-vis physiological (pulsatile) inflow waveform were explored by continuous wavelet transform (CWT) analysis of phase-locked, two-component, two-dimensional particle image velocimeter data. Measurements were made in a 180° curved artery test section upstream of the curvature and at the 90° cross-sectional plane. Streamwise, upstream flow rate measurements were analyzed using a one-dimensional antisymmetric wavelet. Cross-stream measurements at the 90° location of the curved artery revealed interesting multi-scale, multi-strength coherent secondary flow structures. An automated process for coherent structure detection and vortical feature quantification was applied to large ensembles of PIV data. Metrics such as the number of secondary flow structures, their sizes and strengths were generated at every discrete time instance of the physiological inflow waveform. An autonomous data post-processing method incorporating two-dimensional CWT for coherent structure detection was implemented. Loss of coherence in secondary flow structures during the systolic deceleration phase is observed in accordance with previous research. The algorithmic approach presented herein further elucidated the sensitivity and dependence of morphological changes in secondary flow structures on quasiperiodicity and magnitude of temporal gradients in physiological inflow conditions.

  13. Learning curves for single incision and conventional laparoscopic right hemicolectomy: a multidimensional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoonah; Yong, Yuen Geng; Jung, Kyung Uk; Huh, Jung Wook; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to compare the learning curves and early postoperative outcomes for conventional laparoscopic (CL) and single incision laparoscopic (SIL) right hemicolectomy (RHC). Methods This retrospective study included the initial 35 cases in each group. Learning curves were evaluated by the moving average of operative time, mean operative time of every five consecutive cases, and cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis. The learning phase was considered overcome when the moving average of operative times reached a plateau, and when the mean operative time of every five consecutive cases reached a low point and subsequently did not vary by more than 30 minutes. Results Six patients with missing data in the CL RHC group were excluded from the analyses. According to the mean operative time of every five consecutive cases, learning phase of SIL and CL RHC was completed between 26 and 30 cases, and 16 and 20 cases, respectively. Moving average analysis revealed that approximately 31 (SIL) and 25 (CL) cases were needed to complete the learning phase, respectively. CUSUM analysis demonstrated that 10 (SIL) and two (CL) cases were required to reach a steady state of complication-free performance, respectively. Postoperative complications rate was higher in SIL than in CL group, but the difference was not statistically significant (17.1% vs. 3.4%). Conclusion The learning phase of SIL RHC is longer than that of CL RHC. Early oncological outcomes of both techniques were comparable. However, SIL RHC had a statistically insignificant higher complication rate than CL RHC during the learning phase. PMID:25960990

  14. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in symptomatic patients and detection of clarithromycin resistance using melting curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Ayse Demet; Öztürk, C. Elif; Akcan, Yusuf; Behçet, Mustafa; Karakoç, A. Esra; Yücel, Mihriban; Mısırlıoglu, Müge; Tuncer, Serdar

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background: Clarithromycin is often a component of combination therapies for Helicobacter pylori eradication; however, increases in resistance rates have decreased the success of the treatment. Objective: This study was designed to determine the prevalence of H pylori infection in symptomatic patients and to detect clarithromycin resistance rates using melting curve analysis. Methods: Patients scheduled for upper endoscopy at the Endoscopy Unit of the Department of Gastroenterology, Duzce University, Medical Faculty Hospital, Konuralp/Duzce, Turkey, were assessed for enrollment in the study. Two pairs of gastric biopsy specimens (antrum and corpus) were obtained from each study patient. Histopathologic examination, rapid urease test, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the specimens were used to identify H pylori infection. Clarithromycin resistance was detected using melting curve analysis. Results: Seventy-five patients (41 women, 34 men; mean [SD]age, 42.6 [14.5] years [range, 17–70 years]) were included in the study. Using histopathology and rapid urease test, H pylori was detected in 40 (53.3%) of the 75 specimens. H pylori was detected using PCR in 40 (53.3%) specimens and by culture in 10 (13.3%) specimens. The specificity and sensitivity of PCR and culture were interpreted by comparing them with the results of histopathologic examination and urease tests. The specificity and sensitivity of PCR were 68.6% and 72.5%, respectively, and the specificity and sensitivity of culture were 97.1% and 22.5%, respectively. Of the 40 isolates, 21 (52.5%) were susceptible to clarithromycin, 12 (30.0%) were resistant, and a mixed susceptibility pattern was detected in 7 (17.5%) specimens. H pylori isolates from 19 (79.2%) of the 24 patients who had formerly used clarithromycin showed clarithromycin resistance. Conclusions: The prevalence of H pylori infection was 53.3% for the symptomatic patients in this study, and 47.5% of the isolates showed

  15. [Etiology of gingival recessions].

    PubMed

    Kleber, B M; Schenk, H J

    1989-11-01

    About every third patient of our department suffers from gingival recessions (g. r.): 1980, 1985, 1986, 1987 altogether 1039 patients from 4022. People at the age of 20-25 years are mainly affected: 44.4% of these patients in the age-group of 20-25 years suffer from g. r., 28.3% of patients suffering from l.P.a. are 20-25 years old. Patients diseased with g. r. (N = 60) show functional disturbances (79% at the 1st bicuspid, 72% at the 2nd bicuspid) during their occlusion movements to a great extent. Patients afflected by g.r. (N = 20) show in comparison to healthy people a smaller diameter of the canin's apical basis both in upper and lower jaw, a smaller circumference of the alveolar crest as well as an upper canin-crown which is turned out from the teeth arcus in a more labial direction. Prevention of g. r. involves individual oral health education to protect the vestibular gingiva from chronic brushing-trauma, an early follow-up, and a functional adjustment. PMID:2638999

  16. Multivariate curve resolution for hyperspectral image analysis :applications to microarray technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Sinclair, Michael B.; Haaland, David Michael; Martinez, M. Juanita (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Aragon, Anthony D. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) using constrained alternating least squares algorithms represents a powerful analysis capability for a quantitative analysis of hyperspectral image data. We will demonstrate the application of MCR using data from a new hyperspectral fluorescence imaging microarray scanner for monitoring gene expression in cells from thousands of genes on the array. The new scanner collects the entire fluorescence spectrum from each pixel of the scanned microarray. Application of MCR with nonnegativity and equality constraints reveals several sources of undesired fluorescence that emit in the same wavelength range as the reporter fluorphores. MCR analysis of the hyperspectral images confirms that one of the sources of fluorescence is due to contaminant fluorescence under the printed DNA spots that is spot localized. Thus, traditional background subtraction methods used with data collected from the current commercial microarray scanners will lead to errors in determining the relative expression of low-expressed genes. With the new scanner and MCR analysis, we generate relative concentration maps of the background, impurity, and fluorescent labels over the entire image. Since the concentration maps of the fluorescent labels are relatively unaffected by the presence of background and impurity emissions, the accuracy and useful dynamic range of the gene expression data are both greatly improved over those obtained by commercial microarray scanners.

  17. Multivariate Curve Resolution Applied to Hyperspectral Imaging Analysis of Chocolate Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; de Juan, Anna; Tauler, Romà

    2015-08-01

    This paper shows the application of Raman and infrared hyperspectral imaging combined with multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to the analysis of the constituents of commercial chocolate samples. The combination of different spectral data pretreatment methods allowed decreasing the high fluorescent Raman signal contribution of whey in the investigated chocolate samples. Using equality constraints during MCR analysis, estimations of the pure spectra of the chocolate sample constituents were improved, as well as their relative contributions and their spatial distribution on the analyzed samples. In addition, unknown constituents could be also resolved. White chocolate constituents resolved from Raman hyperspectral image indicate that, at macro scale, sucrose, lactose, fat, and whey constituents were intermixed in particles. Infrared hyperspectral imaging did not suffer from fluorescence and could be applied for white and milk chocolate. As a conclusion of this study, micro-hyperspectral imaging coupled to the MCR method is confirmed to be an appropriate tool for the direct analysis of the constituents of chocolate samples, and by extension, it is proposed for the analysis of other mixture constituents in commercial food samples. PMID:26162693

  18. Vibration analysis and transient response of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhu; Jin, Guoyong; Ye, Tiangui

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a unified solution for free and transient vibration analyses of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions within the framework of Timoshenko beam theory. The formulation is derived by means of the variational principle in conjunction with a modified Fourier series which consists of standard Fourier cosine series and supplemented functions. The mechanical and electrical properties of functionally graded piezoelectric materials (FGPMs) are assumed to vary continuously in the thickness direction and are estimated by Voigt’s rule of mixture. The convergence, accuracy and reliability of the present formulation are demonstrated by comparing the present solutions with those from the literature and finite element analysis. Numerous results for FGPM beams with different boundary conditions, geometrical parameters as well as material distributions are given. Moreover, forced vibration of the FGPM beams subjected to dynamic loads and general boundary conditions are also investigated.

  19. Single-channel multiplexing without melting curve analysis in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jo; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kihoon; Chun, Jong-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex real-time PCR with quantification of targets in a single fluorescence channel has been the demand in biotechnology industry. Here, we develop a novel analytical real-time PCR technique to detect multiple targets in a single fluorescence channel without melting curve analysis. In this technique, we show the intensity of the fluorescence signals of two discrete Tm targets is different at certain temperatures called detection temperatures, by which a high Tm target can be detected regardless of a low Tm target. We then identify the low Tm target by utilizing a change of the fluorescence signals between two different detection temperatures. Furthermore, it enables us to determine quantification of each target in a single channel, possibly facilitating convenient patient care for drug treatment in clinics. PMID:25501038

  20. Recurrence plot analysis of nonstationary data: The understanding of curved patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, A.; Kantz, H.; Tiezzi, E.

    2005-08-01

    Recurrence plots of the calls of the Nomascus concolor (Western black crested gibbon) and Hylobates lar (White-handed gibbon) show characteristic circular, curved, and hyperbolic patterns superimposed to the main temporal scale of the signal. It is shown that these patterns are related to particular nonstationarities in the signal. Some of them can be reproduced by artificial signals like frequency modulated sinusoids and sinusoids with time divergent frequency. These modulations are too faint to be resolved by conventional time-frequency analysis with similar precision. Therefore, recurrence plots act as a magnifying glass for the detection of multiple temporal scales in slightly modulated signals. The detected phenomena in these acoustic signals can be explained in the biomechanical context by taking in account the role of the muscles controlling the vocal folds.

  1. Magnetostatic interaction in soft magnetic bilayer ribbons unambiguously identified by first-order reversal curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, M.; Martínez-García, J. C.; Škorvánek, I.; Marcin, J.; Švec, P.; Gorria, P.

    2015-09-01

    Monolithic amorphous Fe73.5Nb3Si13.5B9Cu1/Fe74.5Nb3Si13.5B9 bilayer ribbons were obtained by double-nozzle melt-spinning and subsequently annealed to produce a composite with a tailored nano/micro-crystalline structure. The overall magnetic behavior is characterized by butterfly-shaped high field hysteresis loops and positively biased low field ones. The main questions we wish to address here are whether the global magnetic behavior of the bilayer can be separated into the individual contributions of each layer and the magneto-coupling between them can be well understood. For that purpose, we performed first-order reversal curve analysis, which enabled us to distinctly identify two phases, of ultra-soft and semi-soft magnetic natures, whose mutual predominant interaction is the magnetostatic coupling.

  2. Single-channel multiplexing without melting curve analysis in real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Jo; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kihoon; Chun, Jong-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex real-time PCR with quantification of targets in a single fluorescence channel has been the demand in biotechnology industry. Here, we develop a novel analytical real-time PCR technique to detect multiple targets in a single fluorescence channel without melting curve analysis. In this technique, we show the intensity of the fluorescence signals of two discrete Tm targets is different at certain temperatures called detection temperatures, by which a high Tm target can be detected regardless of a low Tm target. We then identify the low Tm target by utilizing a change of the fluorescence signals between two different detection temperatures. Furthermore, it enables us to determine quantification of each target in a single channel, possibly facilitating convenient patient care for drug treatment in clinics. PMID:25501038

  3. Correlation Analysis of Optical and Radio Light Curves for a Large Sample of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, S. D.; Smith, A. G.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.

    1995-08-01

    The Rosemary Hill Observatory has accumulated internally consistent light curves extending over as much as 26 years for a large sample of active galactic nuclei. Forty-six of these optical records have been compared with similar radio records from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory and the Algonquin Radio Observatory. For 18 objects, pairs of records were sufficiently long and unconfused to allow reliable application of the Discrete Correlation Function analysis; this group included 8 BL Lacertids, 8 quasars, and 2 Seyfert galaxies. Nine of the 18 sources showed positive radio-optical correlations, with the radio events lagging the optical by intervals ranging from 0 to 14 months. Consistent with the relativistic beaming model of the BL Lacertids, the group displaying correlations was dominated by this type of object.

  4. Kepler light-curve analysis of the blazar W2R 1926+42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Bachev, Rumen; Strigachev, Anton

    2016-02-01

    We study the long term Kepler light curve of the blazar W2R 1926+42 (˜1.6 yr) which indicates a variety of variability properties during different intervals of observation. The normalized excess variance, Fvar ranges from 1.8 per cent in the quiescent phase and 43.3 per cent in the outburst phase. We find no significant deviation from linearity in the Fvar-flux relation. Time series analysis is conducted using the Fourier power spectrum and the wavelet analysis methods to study the power spectral density (PSD) shape, infer characteristic time-scales and statistically significant quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). A bending power law with an associated time-scale of T_B = 6.2^{+6.4}_{-3.1} hours is inferred in the PSD analysis. We obtain a black hole mass of M• = (1.5-5.9) × 107 M⊙ for the first time using Fvar and the bend time-scale for this source. From a mean outburst lifetime of days, we infer a distance from the jet base r ≤ 1.75 pc indicating that the outburst originates due to a shock. A possible QPO peaked at 9.1 d and lasting 3.4 cycles is inferred from the wavelet analysis. Assuming that the QPO is a true feature, r = (152-378)GM•/c2 and supported by the other timing analysis products such as a weighted mean PSD slope of -1.5 ± 0.2 from the PSD analysis, we argue that the observed variability and the weak and short duration QPO could be due to jet based processes including orbital features in a relativistic helical jet and others such as shocks and turbulence.

  5. Modal analysis of a three-span curved steel girder bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Bryant G.; Womack, Kevin C.; Halling, Marvin W.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the application of modal analysis to ascertain changes in the boundary conditions (or structural damage) of a complicated bridge structure. Reconstruction of the Interstate 15 corridor through Salt Lake City, Utah had provided an opportunity for destructive testing to be conducted on a three-span, continuous curved steel girder bridge. Forced Vibration testing using an eccentric mass shaker was conducted on the bridge in three phases. Each phase represented a change in boundary conditions. The initial testing was done with the bridge in the as-built condition with the continuous deck at the abutments and frozen bronze bearings. The second phase of testing occurred after the bridge deck was cut way from the approach slabs. For the third phase of testing, the bearings at the ends of the girders were replaced with teflon pads and the bearings over the two intermediate piers were jacked up and greased. The results of the study show that modal analysis is capable of determining changes in a structure's natural frequencies and mode shapes due to a change in the boundary conditions. By extrapolation this would indicate that modal analysis would work as an effective non-destructive evaluation tool.

  6. Analysis of Surface Plasmon Resonance Curves with a Novel Sigmoid-Asymmetric Fitting Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jang, Daeho; Chae, Geunhyoung; Shin, Sehyun

    2015-01-01

    The present study introduces a novel curve-fitting algorithm for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) curves using a self-constructed, wedge-shaped beam type angular interrogation SPR spectroscopy technique. Previous fitting approaches such as asymmetric and polynomial equations are still unsatisfactory for analyzing full SPR curves and their use is limited to determining the resonance angle. In the present study, we developed a sigmoid-asymmetric equation that provides excellent curve-fitting for the whole SPR curve over a range of incident angles, including regions of the critical angle and resonance angle. Regardless of the bulk fluid type (i.e., water and air), the present sigmoid-asymmetric fitting exhibited nearly perfect matching with a full SPR curve, whereas the asymmetric and polynomial curve fitting methods did not. Because the present curve-fitting sigmoid-asymmetric equation can determine the critical angle as well as the resonance angle, the undesired effect caused by the bulk fluid refractive index was excluded by subtracting the critical angle from the resonance angle in real time. In conclusion, the proposed sigmoid-asymmetric curve-fitting algorithm for SPR curves is widely applicable to various SPR measurements, while excluding the effect of bulk fluids on the sensing layer. PMID:26437414

  7. Analysis of Surface Plasmon Resonance Curves with a Novel Sigmoid-Asymmetric Fitting Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Daeho; Chae, Geunhyoung; Shin, Sehyun

    2015-01-01

    The present study introduces a novel curve-fitting algorithm for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) curves using a self-constructed, wedge-shaped beam type angular interrogation SPR spectroscopy technique. Previous fitting approaches such as asymmetric and polynomial equations are still unsatisfactory for analyzing full SPR curves and their use is limited to determining the resonance angle. In the present study, we developed a sigmoid-asymmetric equation that provides excellent curve-fitting for the whole SPR curve over a range of incident angles, including regions of the critical angle and resonance angle. Regardless of the bulk fluid type (i.e., water and air), the present sigmoid-asymmetric fitting exhibited nearly perfect matching with a full SPR curve, whereas the asymmetric and polynomial curve fitting methods did not. Because the present curve-fitting sigmoid-asymmetric equation can determine the critical angle as well as the resonance angle, the undesired effect caused by the bulk fluid refractive index was excluded by subtracting the critical angle from the resonance angle in real time. In conclusion, the proposed sigmoid-asymmetric curve-fitting algorithm for SPR curves is widely applicable to various SPR measurements, while excluding the effect of bulk fluids on the sensing layer. PMID:26437414

  8. Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus strains using real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; O'Rourke, Denise; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) strains is crucial for effective vaccination programs and epidemiological investigations. In this study, a combination of real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of IBDV strains/isolates. The hypervariable region of VP2 gene was amplified from several IBDV strains and subjected to HRM curve analysis. The method could readily differentiate between classical vaccines/isolates and variants. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the amplicons from each strain revealed that each melt curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The real-time RT-PCR HRM curve analysis was also able to differentiate IBDV strains/isolates directly in bursal tissues from field submissions and from vaccinated commercial flocks. The differences between melting peaks generated from IBDV strains were significantly different (P<0.0001) demonstrating the high discriminatory power of this technique. The results presented in this study indicated that real-time RT-PCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid and robust technique for genotyping IBDV isolates/strains and can contribute to effective control of IBDV outbreaks. PMID:21111004

  9. Differentiation of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Using Multiplex-PCR and High Resolution Melt Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Banowary, Banya; Dang, Van Tuan; Sarker, Subir; Connolly, Joanne H.; Chenu, Jeremy; Groves, Peter; Ayton, Michelle; Raidal, Shane; Devi, Aruna; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Ghorashi, Seyed A.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans in developed countries. Among Campylobacter spp. Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and C. coli are the most common causes of human infection. In this study, a multiplex PCR (mPCR) and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis were optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of C. jejuni and C. coli isolates. A segment of the hippuricase gene (hipO) of C. jejuni and putative aspartokinase (asp) gene of C. coli were amplified from 26 Campylobacter isolates and amplicons were subjected to HRM curve analysis. The mPCR-HRM was able to differentiate between C. jejuni and C. coli species. All DNA amplicons generated by mPCR were sequenced. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences from each isolate revealed that the HRM curves were correlated with the nucleotide sequences of the amplicons. Minor variation in melting point temperatures of C. coli or C. jejuni isolates was also observed and enabled some intraspecies differentiation between C. coli and/or C. jejuni isolates. The potential of PCR-HRM curve analysis for the detection and speciation of Campylobacter in additional human clinical specimens and chicken swab samples was also confirmed. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were found to be 100% and 92%, respectively. The results indicated that mPCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid (8 hours) technique for differentiation between C. jejuni and C. coli isolates. PMID:26394042

  10. [Application of calibration curve method and partial least squares regression analysis to quantitative analysis of nephrite samples using XRF].

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Su, Bo-min; Li, Qing-hui; Gan, Fu-xi

    2015-01-01

    The authors tried to find a method for quantitative analysis using pXRF without solid bulk stone/jade reference samples. 24 nephrite samples were selected, 17 samples were calibration samples and the other 7 are test samples. All the nephrite samples were analyzed by Proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) quantitatively. Based on the PIXE results of calibration samples, calibration curves were created for the interested components/elements and used to analyze the test samples quantitatively; then, the qualitative spectrum of all nephrite samples were obtained by pXRF. According to the PIXE results and qualitative spectrum of calibration samples, partial least square method (PLS) was used for quantitative analysis of test samples. Finally, the results of test samples obtained by calibration method, PLS method and PIXE were compared to each other. The accuracy of calibration curve method and PLS method was estimated. The result indicates that the PLS method is the alternate method for quantitative analysis of stone/jade samples. PMID:25993858

  11. Biological analysis of Jeffrey nanofluid in a curved channel with heat dissipation.

    PubMed

    Maraj, E N; Akbar, Noreen Sher; Nadeem, S

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a curved channel. The governing equations of Jeffrey nanofluid model for curved channel are derived including the effects of curvature. The highly nonlinear partial differential equations are simplified by using the long wave length and low Reynolds number assumptions. The reduced nonlinear partial differential equations are solved analytically with the help of homotopy perturbation method. The expression for pressure rise is computed through numerical integration. The physical features of pertinent parameters have been discussed by plotting the graphs of pressure rise, velocity, temperature, nanoparticle volume fraction and stream functions. It is observed that the curve-ness of the channel decreases the pressure rise in the peristaltic pumping region. Moreover, curve-ness of the channel effects the fluid flow by decreasing the fluid velocity near inner wall and increasing the velocity near the outer wall of the channel. PMID:25122841

  12. A new approach to the analysis of vessel residence time distribution curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Sergio P.; Principe, R. Javier; Goldschmit, Marcela B.

    2001-12-01

    Mathematical models for the evaluation of residence time distribution (RTD) curves on a large variety of vessels are presented. These models have been constructed by combination of different tanks or volumes. In order to obtain a good representation of RTD curves, a new volume (called convection diffusion volume) is introduced. The convection-diffusion volume allows the approximation of different experimental or numerical RTD curves with very simple models. An algorithm has been developed to calculate the parameters of the models for any given set of RTD curve experimental points. Validation of the models is carried out by comparison with experimental RTD curves taken from the literature and with a numerical RTD curve obtained by three-dimensional simulation of the flow inside a tundish.

  13. Decline Curve Analysis of Production Data from the Geysers Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ripperda, M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1987-01-20

    Production data for over two hundred wells at The Geysers geothermal field were compiled and analysed. Decline curves for groups of wells with 5, 10, and 40 acre spacing are presented and compared to curves published previously by Budd (1972) and Dykstra (1981). Decline curves for several individual wells and leases are discussed to illustrate the effects of well spacing and location, as well as the heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. 6 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  14. The BVRI Light Curves And Period Analysis Of The Beta Lyrae System XX Leonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.; Svoboda, P.

    2007-08-01

    The contact eclipsing binary system XX Leonis (P = 0.97 days, sp A8) has been analysed using the PHOEBE programme, based on the Wilson Devinney code. The BVRI light curves were obtained during spring 2006 using the 20-cm telescope and ST-7 CCD detector. The effective temperature of the primary component determined from the photometric analysis is T=(7889±61)K, the inclination of the orbit is i=(89.98±2.45)deg and the photometric mass ratio q=(0.41±0.01). Also the third body hypothesis was suggested, based on the period analysis using 57 minimum times and resulting the period of the third body p3= (52.96±0.01)yr, amplitude A=(0.057±0.029)d and eccentricity e=(0.79±0.08) which gives the minimum mass m3,min=(3.6±0.8)M_sun.

  15. The XMM-Newton/EPIC X-Ray Light Curve Analysis of WR 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Oskinova, L. M.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-09-01

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  16. Impact Analysis of Embedded Delamination Location in Hybrid Curved Laminated Composite Stiffened Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naini, Jeevan Kumar; P, Ramesh Babu

    2016-02-01

    Modern, aero structures are predominantly of curved construction characterized by a skin and stiffeners. The latest generation of large passenger aircraft also uses mostly composite material in their primary structure and there is trend towards the utilization of bonding of subcomponents. The presence of delamination is a major problem in composite laminated panels and so, it is of great concern to both the academic and aeronautical industrial worlds Indeed delamination can strongly affect the material strength and, sometimes, can cause their breaking up in service. A Pre-damaged configuration is loaded to study the delamination location and mode for delamination initiation and propagation. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effect of the location of the delamination propagation when delamination is embedded inbetween plies of the skin-stiffener interface, with the cases i) delamination located at front and inbetween plies of the skin-stiffener interface ii) delamination located in middle and inbetween plies of the skin-stiffener interface iii) delamination located at the end and inbetween plies of the skin- stiffener interface. Further the influence of the location of the delamination on load carrying capacity of the panel is investigated. The effect of location of debonds on crack growth and collapse behavior is analyzed using analysis tool. An analysis tool is applied that includes an approach for predicting interlaminar damage initiation and interlaminar damage growth as well as in-plane damage mechanisms to predict the design of defect free panel.

  17. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-09-20

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds.

  18. Impact Analysis of Embedded Delamination Location in Hybrid Curved Laminated Composite Stiffened Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naini, Jeevan Kumar; P, Ramesh Babu

    2016-08-01

    Modern, aero structures are predominantly of curved construction characterized by a skin and stiffeners. The latest generation of large passenger aircraft also uses mostly composite material in their primary structure and there is trend towards the utilization of bonding of subcomponents. The presence of delamination is a major problem in composite laminated panels and so, it is of great concern to both the academic and aeronautical industrial worlds Indeed delamination can strongly affect the material strength and, sometimes, can cause their breaking up in service. A Pre-damaged configuration is loaded to study the delamination location and mode for delamination initiation and propagation. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effect of the location of the delamination propagation when delamination is embedded inbetween plies of the skin-stiffener interface, with the cases i) delamination located at front and inbetween plies of the skin-stiffener interface ii) delamination located in middle and inbetween plies of the skin-stiffener interface iii) delamination located at the end and inbetween plies of the skin- stiffener interface. Further the influence of the location of the delamination on load carrying capacity of the panel is investigated. The effect of location of debonds on crack growth and collapse behavior is analyzed using analysis tool. An analysis tool is applied that includes an approach for predicting interlaminar damage initiation and interlaminar damage growth as well as in-plane damage mechanisms to predict the design of defect free panel.

  19. A uniform analysis of HD 209458b Spitzer/IRAC light curves with Gaussian process models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Thomas M.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Gibson, Neale; Barstow, Joanna K.; Amundsen, David S.; Tremblin, Pascal; Mourier, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    We present an analysis of Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera primary transit and secondary eclipse light curves measured for HD 209458b, using Gaussian process models to marginalize over the intrapixel sensitivity variations in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels and the ramp effect in the 5.8 and 8.0 μm channels. The main advantage of this approach is that we can account for a broad range of degeneracies between the planet signal and systematics without actually having to specify a deterministic functional form for the latter. Our results do not confirm a previous claim of water absorption in transmission. Instead, our results are more consistent with a featureless transmission spectrum, possibly due to a cloud deck obscuring molecular absorption bands. For the emission data, our values are not consistent with the thermal inversion in the dayside atmosphere that was originally inferred from these data. Instead, we agree with another re-analysis of these same data, which concluded a non-inverted atmosphere provides a better fit. We find that a solar-abundance clear-atmosphere model without a thermal inversion underpredicts the measured emission in the 4.5 μm channel, which may suggest the atmosphere is depleted in carbon monoxide. An acceptable fit to the emission data can be achieved by assuming that the planet radiates as an isothermal blackbody with a temperature of 1484 ± 18 K.

  20. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  1. Imaging the shallow subsurface with surface waves: dispersion curve analysis versus full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés Pérez Solano, Carlos; Donno, Daniela; Strobbia, Claudio; Chauris, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Seismic surface wave analysis is a standard tool in geotechnical engineering for imaging the shallow subsurface. Most current surface wave analysis methods assume a horizontally layered medium, and estimate the near-surface shear velocity profile from dispersion curves, which are picked on frequency-wavenumber (f-k) gathers and then inverted using 1D modelling approaches. Media containing high velocity contrasts and irregular lateral variations might be difficult to be handled with the local 1D approximation. For 2D model estimation, full waveform inversion (FWI) is an alternative and can estimate high resolution models. The classical FWI objective function consists of the least-squares misfit between observed and modelled shot gathers (Tarantola, 1986). Classical FWI needs an accurate initial model for achieving convergence. Data sets containing surface waves could be inverted, without falling into secondary minima, if the data contains sufficiently low frequencies and large offsets such that multi-scale and time windowing approaches can be applied. We propose to invert surface waves with an alternative FWI-based approach that uses a modified objective function. It is based on the least-squares misfit between the absolute value of the f-k transform of windowed shot gathers. We refer to this approach as the windowed-Amplitude Waveform Inversion (w-AWI). Some secondary minima problems are mitigated: the choice of an initial model is easier in w-AWI than in FWI. The alternative objective function is intermediary between the one used in the 1D inversion approach (dispersion curves) and classical FWI. As most of the phase information is neglected in w-AWI, we use it as a first step before classical FWI. This sequential inversion approach using w-AWI followed by classical FWI aims at estimating a high-resolution near-surface velocity model, by explaining the complete elastic wavefield, even when the initial velocity model is far from the exact one. The proposed approach

  2. An analysis of watershed hydrological double mass curve based on elasticity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzhao; Ning, Tingting; Lin, Wen; Cheng, Liping; Han, Xiaoyang

    2016-04-01

    The method of double mass curve (DMC) is often used in the analysis of the consistency of hydro-meteorological factors and their inter-annual variations. The trend and slope of DMC are the focus of general concern. By taking the DMC of annual precipitation-runoff in a watershed as an example, this paper analyzed the characteristics of DMC variations by means of the elasticity index obtained by the curve slope divided by the ratio of accumulated runoff to accumulated precipitation at corresponding location. Using a year as a time step, the index was further simplified to be the ratio of annual runoff coefficient to the runoff coefficient averaged over the period from starting year to computing year. An elasticity index greater than, less than, or equal to one indicated rising, decline, or stability of average annual runoff coefficient, respectively. Variation trend of elasticity index was analyzed to extract the information on the years with significant change and then, dominant factors and their impacts could be enquired further. The Jinghe River is located in the middle reaches of the Yellow River, being the largest tributary of the Weihe River. The elasticity index was used to analyze the DMC of annual precipitation-runoff on the scale of water year for the Jinghe River watershed from 1961 to 2012 and the two years of 1971 and 1997 were first chosen as the years showing abrupt changes. The elasticity indices in three periods separated by the two years in the past 50 years averaged 1.08, 0.89 and 0.64 and annual runoff coefficients, 0.08, 0.07 and 0.05, respectively. The human activities disturbing underlying surface were found to be the important factor responsible for the remarkable decline of runoff coefficient. The large-scale comprehensive control of soil erosion and the adjustment of landuse structure had made some achievements in the recent twenty years. However, their disturbing effects on underlying surface interacted with the impacts of climate change

  3. Modeling and regression analysis of semiochemical dose-response curves of insect antennal reception and behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response curves with semiochemicals are reported in many articles in insect chemical ecology regarding neurophysiology and behavioral bioassays. Most such curves are shown in figures where the x-axis has order of magnitude increases in dosages versus responses on the y-axis represented by point...

  4. The role of Soil Water Retention Curve in slope stability analysis in unsaturated and heterogeneous soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinoro, Chiara; Arnone, Elisa; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of rainwater infiltration causing slope instability had been analyzed and reviewed in many scientific works. Rainwater infiltration into unsaturated soil increases the degree of saturation, hence affecting the shear strength properties and thus the probability of slope failure. It has been widely proved that the shear strength properties change with the soil water suction in unsaturated soils; therefore, the accuracy to predict the relationship between soil water content and soil water suction, parameterized by the soil-water characteristic curve, has significant effects on the slope stability analysis. The aim of this study is to investigate how the characterization of SWRC of differently structured unsaturated soils affects the slope stability on a simple infinite slope. In particular, the unimodal and bimodal distributions of the soil pore size were compared. Samples of 40 soils, highly different in terms of structure and texture, were collected and used to calibrate two bimodal SWRCs, i.e. Ross and Smettem (1993) and Dexter et al., (2008). The traditional unimodal van Genuchten (1980) model was also applied for comparison. Slope stability analysis was conducted in terms of Factor of Safety (FS) by applying the infinite slope model for unsaturated soils. In the used formulation, the contribution of the suction effect is tuned by a parameter 'chi' in a rate proportional to the saturation conditions. Different parameterizations of this term were also compared and analyzed. Results indicated that all three SWRC models showed good overall performance in fitting the sperimental SWRCs. Both the RS and DE models described adequately the water retention data for soils with a bimodal behavior confirmed from the analysis of pore size distribution, but the best performance was obtained by DE model confirmed. In terms of FS, the tree models showed very similar results as soil moisture approached to the saturated condition; however, within the residual zone

  5. BEER Analysis of Kepler and CoRoT Light Curves. II. Evidence for Superrotation in the Phase Curves of Three Kepler Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed the Kepler light curves of four transiting hot Jupiter systems—KOI-13, HAT-P-7, TrES-2, and Kepler-76, which show BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection (BEER) phase modulations. The mass of the four planets can be estimated from either the beaming or the ellipsoidal amplitude, given the mass and radius of their parent stars. For KOI-13, HAT-P-7, and Kepler-76 we find that the beaming-based planetary mass estimate is larger than the mass estimated from the ellipsoidal amplitude, consistent with previous studies. This apparent discrepancy may be explained by equatorial superrotation of the planet atmosphere, which induces an angle shift of the planet reflection/emission phase modulation, as was suggested for Kepler-76 in the first paper of this series. We propose a modified BEER model that supports superrotation, assuming either a Lambertian or geometric reflection/emission phase function, and provides a photometry-consistent estimate of the planetary mass. Our analysis shows that for Kepler-76 and HAT-P-7, the Lambertian superrotation BEER model is highly preferable over an unshifted null model, while for KOI-13 it is preferable only at a 1.4σ level. For TrES-2 we do not find such preference. For all four systems the Lambertian superrotation model mass estimates are in excellent agreement with the planetary masses derived from, or constrained by, radial velocity measurements. This makes the Lambertian superrotation BEER model a viable tool for estimating the masses of hot Jupiters from photometry alone. We conclude that hot Jupiter superrotation may be a common phenomenon that can be detected in the visual light curves of Kepler.

  6. BEER ANALYSIS OF KEPLER AND CoRoT LIGHT CURVES. II. EVIDENCE FOR SUPERROTATION IN THE PHASE CURVES OF THREE KEPLER HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-02-10

    We analyzed the Kepler light curves of four transiting hot Jupiter systems—KOI-13, HAT-P-7, TrES-2, and Kepler-76, which show BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection (BEER) phase modulations. The mass of the four planets can be estimated from either the beaming or the ellipsoidal amplitude, given the mass and radius of their parent stars. For KOI-13, HAT-P-7, and Kepler-76 we find that the beaming-based planetary mass estimate is larger than the mass estimated from the ellipsoidal amplitude, consistent with previous studies. This apparent discrepancy may be explained by equatorial superrotation of the planet atmosphere, which induces an angle shift of the planet reflection/emission phase modulation, as was suggested for Kepler-76 in the first paper of this series. We propose a modified BEER model that supports superrotation, assuming either a Lambertian or geometric reflection/emission phase function, and provides a photometry-consistent estimate of the planetary mass. Our analysis shows that for Kepler-76 and HAT-P-7, the Lambertian superrotation BEER model is highly preferable over an unshifted null model, while for KOI-13 it is preferable only at a 1.4σ level. For TrES-2 we do not find such preference. For all four systems the Lambertian superrotation model mass estimates are in excellent agreement with the planetary masses derived from, or constrained by, radial velocity measurements. This makes the Lambertian superrotation BEER model a viable tool for estimating the masses of hot Jupiters from photometry alone. We conclude that hot Jupiter superrotation may be a common phenomenon that can be detected in the visual light curves of Kepler.

  7. Analysis of Curved Sandwich Panels Subjected to Combined Temperature Gradient and Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a detailed study of the nonlinear response of curved sandwich panels with composite face sheets and subjected to a temperature gradient through-the-thickness combined with mechanical loadings are presented. The analysis is based on a first-order shear-deformation Sanders-Budiansky type theory with the effects of large displacements, moderate rotations, transverse shear deformation and laminated anisotropic material behavior included. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the panel. The nonlinear displacements, strain energy, principal strains, transverse shear stresses, transverse shear strain energy density, and their hierarchical sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The hierarchical sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the nonlinear response to variations in the panel parameters, the effective properties of the face sheet layers and the core, and the micromechanical parameters. Numerical results are presented for cylindrical panels subjected to combined pressure loading, edge shortening or extension, edge shear and a temperature gradient through the thickness. The results show the effects of variations in the loading and the panel aspect ratio, on the nonlinear response and its sensitivity to changes in the various panel, effective layer and micromechanical parameters.

  8. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis for Identification of Pasteurellaceae Species in Experimental Animal Facilities.

    PubMed

    Miller, Manuel; Zorn, Julia; Brielmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurellaceae are among the most prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated from mice housed in experimental animal facilities. Reliable detection and differentiation of Pasteurellaceae are essential for high-quality health monitoring. In this study, we combined a real-time PCR assay amplifying a variable region in the 16S rRNA sequence with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) to identify and differentiate among the commonly isolated species Pasteurella pneumotropica biotypes "Jawetz" and "Heyl", Actinobacillus muris, and Haemophilus influenzaemurium. We used a set of six reference strains for assay development, with the melting profiles of these strains clearly distinguishable due to DNA sequence variations in the amplicon. For evaluation, we used real-time PCR/HRM to test 25 unknown Pasteurellaceae isolates obtained from an external diagnostic laboratory and found the results to be consistent with those of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The real-time PCR/HRM method provides a sensitive, rapid, and closed-tube approach for Pasteurellaceae species identification for health monitoring of laboratory mice. PMID:26556281

  9. M DWARFS IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY STRIPE 82: PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES AND FLARE RATE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Becker, Andrew C.; Sesar, Branimir; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.

    2009-08-15

    We present a flare rate analysis of 50,130 M dwarf light curves in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. We identified 271 flares using a customized variability index to search {approx}2.5 million photometric observations for flux increases in the u and g bands. Every image of a flaring observation was examined by eye and with a point-spread function-matching and image subtraction tool to guard against false positives. Flaring is found to be strongly correlated with the appearance of H{alpha} in emission in the quiet spectrum. Of the 99 flare stars that have spectra, we classify eight as relatively inactive. The flaring fraction is found to increase strongly in stars with redder colors during quiescence, which can be attributed to the increasing flare visibility and increasing active fraction for redder stars. The flaring fraction is strongly correlated with |Z| distance such that most stars that flare are within 300 pc of the Galactic plane. We derive flare u-band luminosities and find that the most luminous flares occur on the earlier-type m dwarfs. Our best estimate of the lower limit on the flaring rate (averaged over Stripe 82) for flares with {delta}u {>=} 0.7 mag on stars with u < 22 is 1.3 flares hr{sup -1} deg{sup -2} but can vary significantly with the line of sight.

  10. M Dwarfs in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82: Photometric Light Curves and Flare Rate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Becker, Andrew C.; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Sesar, Branimir

    2009-08-01

    We present a flare rate analysis of 50,130 M dwarf light curves in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. We identified 271 flares using a customized variability index to search ~2.5 million photometric observations for flux increases in the u and g bands. Every image of a flaring observation was examined by eye and with a point-spread function-matching and image subtraction tool to guard against false positives. Flaring is found to be strongly correlated with the appearance of Hα in emission in the quiet spectrum. Of the 99 flare stars that have spectra, we classify eight as relatively inactive. The flaring fraction is found to increase strongly in stars with redder colors during quiescence, which can be attributed to the increasing flare visibility and increasing active fraction for redder stars. The flaring fraction is strongly correlated with |Z| distance such that most stars that flare are within 300 pc of the Galactic plane. We derive flare u-band luminosities and find that the most luminous flares occur on the earlier-type m dwarfs. Our best estimate of the lower limit on the flaring rate (averaged over Stripe 82) for flares with Δu >= 0.7 mag on stars with u < 22 is 1.3 flares hr-1 deg-2 but can vary significantly with the line of sight. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.