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Sample records for recessive consanguineous pakistani

  1. Genetic dissection of two Pakistani families with consanguineous localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis (LAH)

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Seyyedha; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Khan, Shakir; Yousaf, Muhammad Jawad; Azeem, Zahid; Razak, Suhail; Qaiser, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Genetic analysis of two consanguineous Pakistani families with localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis was performed with the goal to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA extraction had been done from peripheral blood samples. Extracted DNA was then subjected to PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for amplification. Linkage analysis was performed using 8% polyacrylamide gel. Candidate gene was sequenced after gene linkage supported at highly polymorphic microsatellite markers of the diseased region. Results: Both families were initially tested for linkage to known genes, which were involved in human hereditary hypotrichosis, by genotyping Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. Family B showed partial linkage at P2RY5 gene on chromosome 13q14.11-q21.32; hence, all exonic regions and their introns boundaries were subjected to DNA sequencing for any pathogenic mutation. Conclusion: Both families were tested for linkage by genotyping polymorphic microsatellite markers linked to known alopecia loci. Family A excluded all known diseased regions that is suggestive of some novel chromosomal disorder. However, sequencing of P2RY5 gene in family B showed no pathogenic mutation. PMID:25429336

  2. Addressing key issues in the consanguinity-related risk of autosomal recessive disorders in consanguineous communities: lessons from a qualitative study of British Pakistanis.

    PubMed

    Darr, A; Small, N; Ahmad, W I U; Atkin, K; Corry, P; Modell, B

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no consensus regarding services required to help families with consanguineous marriages manage their increased genetic reproductive risk. Genetic services for communities with a preference for consanguineous marriage in the UK remain patchy, often poor. Receiving two disparate explanations of the cause of recessive disorders (cousin marriage and recessive inheritance) leads to confusion among families. Further, the realisation that couples in non-consanguineous relationships have affected children leads to mistrust of professional advice. British Pakistani families at-risk for recessive disorders lack an understanding of recessive disorders and their inheritance. Such an understanding is empowering and can be shared within the extended family to enable informed choice. In a three-site qualitative study of British Pakistanis, we explored family and health professional perspectives on recessively inherited conditions. Our findings suggest, firstly, that family networks hold strong potential for cascading genetic information, making the adoption of a family-centred approach an efficient strategy for this community. However, this is dependent on provision of high-quality and timely information from health care providers. Secondly, families' experience was of ill-coordinated and time-starved services, with few having access to specialist provision from Regional Genetics Services; these perspectives were consistent with health professionals' views of services. Thirdly, we confirm previous findings that genetic information is difficult to communicate and comprehend, further complicated by the need to communicate the relationship between cousin marriage and recessive disorders. A communication tool we developed and piloted is described and offered as a useful resource for communicating complex genetic information. PMID:26363620

  3. Nonsense mutation in MERTK causes autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a consanguineous Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    Shahzadi, Amber; Riazuddin, S Amer; Ali, Shahbaz; Li, David; Khan, Shaheen N; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Sieving, Paul A; Hejtmancik, J Fielding; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2012-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of the most common ophthalmic disorders affecting one in approximately 5000 people worldwide. A nuclear family was recruited from the Punjab province of Pakistan to study the genetic basis of autosomal recessive RP. Methods All affected individuals underwent a thorough ophthalmic examination and the disease was characterised based upon results for fundus photographs and electroretinogram recordings. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leucocytes. Exclusion studies were performed with short tandem repeat (STR) markers flanking reported autosomal recessive RP loci. Haplotypes were constructed and results were statistically evaluated. Results The results of exclusion analyses suggested that family PKRP173 was linked to chromosome 2q harbouring mer tyrosine kinase protooncogene (MERTK), a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive RP. Additional STR markers refined the critical interval and placed it in a 13.4 cM (17 Mb) region flanked by D2S293 proximally and D2S347 distally. Significant logarithm of odds (LOD) scores of 3.2, 3.25 and 3.18 at θ=0 were obtained with markers D2S1896, D2S2269 and D2S160. Sequencing of the coding exons of MERTK identified a mutation, c.718G→T in exon 4, which results in a premature termination of p.E240X that segregates with the disease phenotype in the family. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that the nonsense mutation in MERTK, leading to premature termination of the protein, is responsible for RP phenotype in the affected individuals of the Pakistani family. PMID:20538656

  4. A missense mutation in the PISA domain of HsSAS-6 causes autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in a large consanguineous Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muzammil A; Rupp, Verena M; Orpinell, Meritxell; Hussain, Muhammad S; Altmüller, Janine; Steinmetz, Michel O; Enzinger, Christian; Thiele, Holger; Höhne, Wolfgang; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Baig, Shahid M; Ansar, Muhammad; Nürnberg, Peter; Vincent, John B; Speicher, Michael R; Gönczy, Pierre; Windpassinger, Christian

    2014-11-15

    Asymmetric cell division is essential for normal human brain development. Mutations in several genes encoding centrosomal proteins that participate in accurate cell division have been reported to cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH). By homozygosity mapping including three affected individuals from a consanguineous MCPH family from Pakistan, we delineated a critical region of 18.53 Mb on Chromosome 1p21.3-1p13.1. This region contains the gene encoding HsSAS-6, a centrosomal protein primordial for seeding the formation of new centrioles during the cell cycle. Both next-generation and Sanger sequencing revealed a homozygous c.185T>C missense mutation in the HsSAS-6 gene, resulting in a p.Ile62Thr substitution within a highly conserved region of the PISA domain of HsSAS-6. This variant is neither present in any single-nucleotide polymorphism or exome sequencing databases nor in a Pakistani control cohort. Experiments in tissue culture cells revealed that the Ile62Thr mutant of HsSAS-6 is substantially less efficient than the wild-type protein in sustaining centriole formation. Together, our findings demonstrate a dramatic impact of the mutation p.Ile62Thr on HsSAS-6 function and add this component to the list of genes mutated in primary microcephaly. PMID:24951542

  5. Mutations in GRM6 identified in consanguineous Pakistani families with congenital stationary night blindness

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Gottsch, Alexander D. H.; Ullah, Inayat; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to investigate the causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Two consanguineous families with multiple individuals manifesting symptoms of stationary night blindness were recruited. Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination, including fundus examination and electroretinography. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Exclusion analyses were completed by genotyping closely spaced microsatellite markers, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons, along with the exon–intron boundaries of GRM6, were sequenced bidirectionally. Results According to the medical history available to us, affected individuals in both families had experienced night blindness from the early years of their lives. Fundus photographs of affected individuals in both the families appeared normal, with no signs of attenuated arteries or bone spicule pigmentation. The scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) response were absent in all of the affected individuals, while the photopic measurements show reduced b-waves. During exclusion analyses, both families localized to a region on chromosome 5q that harbors GRM6, a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive CSNB. Bidirectional sequencing of GRM6 identified homozygous single base pair changes, specifically c.1336C>T (p.R446X) and c.2267G>A (p.G756D) in families PKRP170 and PKRP172, respectively. Conclusions We identified a novel nonsense and a previously reported missense mutation in GRM6 that were responsible for autosomal recessive CSNB in patients of Pakistani decent. PMID:26628857

  6. Consanguinity related prenatal and postnatal mortality of the populations of seven Pakistani Punjab cities.

    PubMed Central

    Shami, S A; Schmitt, L H; Bittles, A H

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on prenatal and postnatal mortality among the populations of seven cities in the Pakistani province of Punjab. Consanguineous marriages were strongly favoured and the coefficients of inbreeding (F) for the present generation in each locality ranged from 0.0236 to 0.0286. There was a highly significant relationship between the degree of inbreeding and mortality, with most consanguinity related deaths reported in the neonatal, infantile, and childhood periods. The findings strongly suggest that consanguinity may play a major role in the high rates of postnatal mortality observed in Pakistani communities now resident in the United Kingdom. PMID:2716036

  7. Splice-site mutations identified in PDE6A responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous Pakistani families

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Shahbaz; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to localize and identify causal mutations associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in consanguineous familial cases of Pakistani origin. Methods Ophthalmic examinations that included funduscopy and electroretinography (ERG) were performed to confirm the affectation status. Blood samples were collected from all participating individuals, and genomic DNA was extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Sanger sequencing was performed to identify the causative variants. Subsequently, we performed whole exome sequencing to rule out the possibility of a second causal variant within the linkage interval. Sequence conservation was performed with alignment analyses of PDE6A orthologs, and in silico splicing analysis was completed with Human Splicing Finder version 2.4.1. Results A large multigenerational consanguineous family diagnosed with early-onset RP was ascertained. An ophthalmic clinical examination consisting of fundus photography and electroretinography confirmed the diagnosis of RP. A genome-wide scan was performed, and suggestive two-point LOD scores were observed with markers on chromosome 5q. Haplotype analyses identified the region; however, the region did not segregate with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequently, we performed a second genome-wide scan that excluded the entire genome except the chromosome 5q region harboring PDE6A. Next-generation whole exome sequencing identified a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 16: c.2028–1G>A, which was completely conserved in PDE6A orthologs and was absent in ethnically matched 350 control chromosomes, the 1000 Genomes database, and the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project. Subsequently, we investigated our entire cohort of RP familial cases and identified a second family who harbored a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 10: c.1408–2A>G. In silico analysis suggested that these

  8. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Saleha, Shamim; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jamil, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad; Hameed, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    AIM To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. METHODS A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH). To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype in this family, genomic DNA from blood sample of each individual was genotyped using microsatellite Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers for the known Usher syndrome loci. Then direct sequencing was performed to find out disease associated mutations in the candidate gene. RESULTS By genetic linkage analysis, the USH phenotype of this family was mapped to PCDH15 locus on chromosome 10q21.1. Three different point mutations in exon 11 of PCDH15 were identified and one of them, c.1304A>C was found to be segregating with the disease phenotype in Pakistani family with Usher phenotype. This, c.1304A>C transversion mutation predicts an amino-acid substitution of aspartic acid with an alanine at residue number 435 (p.D435A) of its protein product. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed conservation of aspartic acid at position 435 and predicated this change as pathogenic. CONCLUSION The identification of c.1304A>C pathogenic mutation in PCDH15 gene and its association with Usher syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family is the first example of a missense mutation of PCDH15 causing USH1 phenotype. In previous reports, it was hypothesized that severe mutations such as truncated protein of PCDH15 led to the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment. PMID:27275418

  9. Mutations in WDR62 gene in Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly is a disorder of neurogenic mitosis that causes reduction in brain size. It is a rare heterogeneous condition with seven causative genes reported to date. Mutations in WD repeat protein 62 are associated with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly with cortical malformations. This study was initiated to screen WDR62 mutations in four consanguineous Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. Methods As part of a large study to detect the genetic basis of primary microcephaly in Pakistan, homozygosity mapping and DNA sequencing was used to explore the genetic basis of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in four families. Results Four out of 100 families recruited in the study revealed linkage to the MCPH2 locus on chromosome 19, which harbor WDR62 gene. DNA sequencing in these MCPH2 linked families result in the identification of a novel nonsense mutation (p.Q648X) and three previously known mutations. Conclusion Our data indicate that WDR62 mutations cause about 4% of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in Pakistan. PMID:21961505

  10. In silico analysis of SIGMAR1 variant (rs4879809) segregating in a consanguineous Pakistani family showing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis without frontotemporal lobar dementia.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Muhammad Ikram; Ahmad, Arsalan; Raza, Syed Irfan; Amar, Ali; Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Attya; John, Peter; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Ahmad, Wasim; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord, resulting in fatal paralysis. It has been found to be associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In the present study, we have described homozygosity mapping and gene sequencing in a consanguineous autosomal recessive Pakistani family showing non-juvenile ALS without signs of FTLD. Gene mapping was carried out in all recruited family members using microsatellite markers, and linkage was established with sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) gene at chromosome 9p13.2. Gene sequencing of SIGMAR1 revealed a novel 3'-UTR nucleotide variation c.672*31A>G (rs4879809) segregating with disease in this family. The C9ORF72 repeat region in intron 1, previously implicated in a related phenotype, was excluded through linkage, and further confirmation of exclusion was obtained by amplifying intron 1 of C9ORF72 with multiple primers in affected individuals and controls. In silico analysis was carried out to explore the possible role of 3'-UTR variant of SIGMAR1 in ALS. The Regulatory RNA motif and Element Finder program revealed disturbance in miRNA (hsa-miR-1205) binding site due to this variation. ESEFinder analysis showed new SRSF1 and SRSF1-IgM-BRCA1 binding sites with significant scores due to this variation. Our results indicate that the 3'-UTR SIGMAR1 variant c.672*31A>G may have a role in the pathogenesis of ALS in this family. PMID:26205306

  11. Identification of two novel mutations in CDHR1 in consanguineous Spanish families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Corton, Marta; Lopez-Molina, Maria Isabel; Perez-Carro, Raquel; Bontadelli, Lara; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Zurita, Olga; Garcia-Sandoval, Blanca; Rivolta, Carlo; Ayuso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies present extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity, posing a challenge for patients’ molecular and clinical diagnoses. In this study, we wanted to clinically characterize and investigate the molecular etiology of an atypical form of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Spanish families. Affected members of the respective families exhibited an array of clinical features including reduced visual acuity, photophobia, defective color vision, reduced or absent ERG responses, macular atrophy and pigmentary deposits in the peripheral retina. Genetic investigation included autozygosity mapping coupled with exome sequencing in the first family, whereas autozygome-guided candidate gene screening was performed by means of Sanger DNA sequencing in the second family. Our approach revealed nucleotide changes in CDHR1; a homozygous missense variant (c.1720C > G, p.P574A) and a homozygous single base transition (c.1485 + 2T > C) affecting the canonical 5’ splice site of intron 13, respectively. Both changes co-segregated with the disease and were absent among cohorts of unrelated control individuals. To date, only five mutations in CDHR1 have been identified, all resulting in premature stop codons leading to mRNA nonsense mediated decay. Our work reports two previously unidentified homozygous mutations in CDHR1 further expanding the mutational spectrum of this gene. PMID:26350383

  12. Homozygosity mapping in consanguineous families reveals extreme heterogeneity of non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation and identifies 8 novel gene loci.

    PubMed

    Najmabadi, Hossein; Motazacker, Mohammad Mahdi; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kahrizi, Kimia; Tzschach, Andreas; Chen, Wei; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Hadavi, Valeh; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Vazifehmand, Reza; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Jamali, Payman; Falah, Masoumeh; Seifati, Seyed Morteza; Grüters, Annette; Lenzner, Steffen; Jensen, Lars R; Rüschendorf, Franz; Kuss, Andreas W; Ropers, H Hilger

    2007-03-01

    Autosomal recessive gene defects are arguably the most important, but least studied genetic causes of severe cognitive dysfunction. Homozygosity mapping in 78 consanguineous Iranian families with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation (NS-ARMR) has enabled us to determine the chromosomal localization of at least 8 novel gene loci for this condition. Our data suggest that in the Iranian population NS-ARMR is very heterogeneous, and they argue against the existence of frequent gene defects that account for more than a few percent of the cases. PMID:17120046

  13. Novel and recurrent AID mutations underlie prevalent autosomal recessive form of HIGM in consanguineous patients.

    PubMed

    Ouadani, Hanen; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Ben-ali, Meriem; Ben-khemis, Leila; Larguèche, Beya; Boussoffara, Raoudha; Maalej, Sonia; Fetni, Ilhem; Hassayoun, Saida; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid; Mellouli, Fethi; Yalaoui, Sadok; Masmoudi, Hatem; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-D) are characterized by normal or elevated serum IgM level and absence of IgG, IgA, and IgE. Most reported cases are due to X-linked CD40L deficiency. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency is the most frequent autosomal recessive form, whereas CD40 deficiency is more rare. Herein, we present the first North African study on hyper IgM (HIGM) syndrome including 16 Tunisian patients. Phenotypic and genetic studies allowed us to determine their molecular basis. Three CD40LG mutations have been identified including two novels (c.348_351dup and c.782_*2del) and one already reported mutation (g.6182G>A). No mutation has been found in another patient despite the lack of CD40L expression. Interestingly, three AICDA mutations have been identified in 11 patients. Two mutations were novel (c.91T>C and c.389A>C found in one and five patients respectively), and one previously reported splicing mutation (c.156+1T>G) was found in five patients. Only one CD40-deficient patient, bearing a novel mutation (c.109T>G), has been identified. Thus, unlike previous reports, AID deficiency is the most frequent underlying molecular basis (68%) of Ig-CSR-D in Tunisian patients. This finding and the presence of specific recurrent mutations are probably due to the critical role played by inbreeding in North African populations. PMID:26545377

  14. STIL mutation causes autosomal recessive microcephalic lobar holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Jamil; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Altmüller, Janine; Friedrich, Katrin; Barbi, Gotthold; Nürnberg, Peter; Kubisch, Christian; Dobyns, William B; Borck, Guntram

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous midline brain malformation associated with neurologic manifestations including developmental delay, intellectual disability and seizures. Although mutations in the sonic hedgehog gene SHH and more than 10 other genes are known to cause holoprosencephaly, many patients remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here we show that a homozygous truncating mutation of STIL not only causes severe autosomal recessive microcephaly, but also lobar holoprosencephaly in an extended consanguineous Pakistani family. STIL mutations have previously been linked to centrosomal defects in primary microcephaly at the MCPH7 locus. Our results thus expand the clinical phenotypes associated with biallellic STIL mutations to include holoprosencephaly. PMID:25218063

  15. AIPL1 implicated in the pathogenesis of two cases of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, David; Jin, Chongfei; Jiao, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Bushra, Tahmina; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Butt, Nadeem H.; Husnain, Tayyab; Sieving, Paul A.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To localize and identify the gene and mutations causing autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Consanguineous families from Pakistan were ascertained to be affected with autosomal recessive retinal degeneration. All affected individuals underwent thorough ophthalmologic examinations. Blood samples were collected, and genomic DNA was extracted using a salting out procedure. Genotyping was performed using microsatellite markers spaced at approximately 10 cM intervals. Two-point linkage analysis was performed with the lod score method. Direct DNA sequencing of amplified genomic DNA was performed for mutation screening of candidate genes. Results Genome-wide linkage scans yielded a lod score of 3.05 at θ=0 for D17S1832 and 3.82 at θ=0 for D17S938, localizing the disease gene to a 12.22 cM (6.64 Mb) region flanked by D17S1828 and D17S1852 for family 61032 and family 61227, which contains aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1), a gene previously implicated in recessive Leber congenital amaurosis and autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy. Sequencing of AIPL1 showed a homozygous c.773G>C (p.Arg258Pro) sequence change in all affected individuals of family 61032 and a homozygous c.465G>T (p.(H93_Q155del)) change in all affected members of family 61227. Conclusions The results strongly suggest that the c.773G>C (p.R258P) and c.465G>T (p.(H93_Q155del)) mutations in AIPL1 cause autosomal recessive retinal degeneration in these consanguineous Pakistani families. PMID:24426771

  16. Consanguinity and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T; Narayan, J

    1991-04-01

    Consanguinity among parents as a cause of mental retardation in their children is debatable. The present study was conducted to find out the effect of consanguinity on mental retardation where the causative factor is not established. A total of 517 mentally retarded persons and their families were studied out of which 160 were born of consanguineous marriage and 357 were of non-consanguineous marriage. The results indicated that, when there is a history of mental retardation in the family and if the parents are consanguineously married, the risk of mental retardation in the offspring is significantly high (chi 2 = 11.52; P less than 0.001). Among the consanguineously married families, the blood relationship of uncle-niece seems to have the highest risk of affecting the offsprings. The implications are discussed in detail. PMID:2072392

  17. A novel CHSY1 gene mutation underlies Temtamy preaxial brachydactyly syndrome in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Sher, Gulab; Naeem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Temtamy preaxial brachydactyly syndrome (TPBS) is an autosomal recessive rare disorder characterized by hyperphalangism of digits, facial dysmorphism, dental anomalies, sensorineural hearing loss, delayed motor and mental development, and growth retardation. Loss of function mutations have been recently reported in the CHSY1 gene to cause the TPBS. Here, we report a novel missense mutation (c.1897 G > A) in the CHSY1 gene in two TPBS patients from a consanguineous Pakistani family. The mutation predicted substitution of a highly conserved aspartate amino acid residue to asparagine at position 633 in the protein (D633N). Polyphen analysis supported the pathogenicity of D36N mutation. Our finding extends the body of recent evidence that supports the role of CHSY1 as a potential mediator of BMP signaling. PMID:24269551

  18. Association studies in consanguineous populations

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpous, F.

    1996-04-01

    To study the genetic determinism of multifactorial diseases in large panmictic populations, a strategy consists in looking for an association with markers closely linked to candidate genes. A distribution of marker genotypes different in patients and controls may indicate that the candidate gene is involved in the disease. In panmictic populations, the power to detect the role of a candidate gene depends on the gametic disequilibrium with the marker locus. In consanguineous populations, we show that it depends on the inbreeding coefficient F as well. Inbreeding increases the power to detect the role of a recessive or quasi-recessive disease-susceptibility factor. The gain in power turns out to be greater for small values of the gametic disequilibrium. Moreover, even in the absence of gametic disequilibrium, the presence of inbreeding may allow to detect the role of a recessive factor. Ignoring inbreeding when it exists may lead to reject falsely a recessive model if the mode of inheritance is inferred on the distribution of genotypes among patients. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The first case of CDK5RAP2-related primary microcephaly in a non-consanguineous patient identified by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Christopher A; Topper, Scott; Ward Melver, Catherine; Stein, Jennifer; Reeder, Amanda; Arndt, Kelly; Das, Soma

    2014-04-01

    Primary autosomal recessive microcephaly (MCPH) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by congenital microcephaly and intellectual disability. To date, 10 MCPH loci have been identified and due to the genetic heterogeneity of this condition, molecular testing for MCPH can be complicated. Our methods involved employing a next generation sequencing panel of MCPH-related genes allowing for the evaluation of multiple disease loci simultaneously. Next generation sequencing analysis of a 6 year old female with primary microcephaly identified novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.524_528del and c.4005-1G>A) in the CDK5RAP2 gene. A review of the published literature to date reveals that only three mutations have been previously reported in the CDK5RAP2 gene in the homozygous state in three Northern Pakistani and one Somali consanguineous MCPH families. Our patient represents the first non-consanguineous Caucasian individual to have been identified with CDK5RAP2-related MCPH. As only a handful of patients have been reported in the literature with CDK5RAP2-related MCPH, we anticipate the identification of individuals with CDK5RAP2 mutations from all ethnic backgrounds will continue. Our patient contributes to the ethnic and genotypic spectrum of CDK5RAP2-related MCPH and supports the occurrence of this genetic condition beyond that of consanguineous families of certain ethnic populations. Our results also highlight the utility of multi-gene sequencing panels to elucidate the etiology of genetically heterogeneous conditions. PMID:23726037

  20. Examining the family-centred approach to genetic testing and counselling among UK Pakistanis: a community perspective.

    PubMed

    Darr, A; Small, N; Ahmad, W I U; Atkin, K; Corry, P; Benson, J; Morton, R; Modell, B

    2013-01-01

    WHO advice suggests a family-centred approach for managing the elevated risk of recessively inherited disorders in consanguineous communities, whilst emerging policy recommends community engagement as an integral component of genetic service development. This paper explores the feasibility of the family-centred approach in the UK Pakistani origin community. The study took place within a context of debate in the media, professional and lay circles about cousin marriage causing disability in children. Using qualitative methods, a total of six single-sex focus group discussions (n = 50) were conducted in three UK cities with a high settlement of people of Pakistani origin. Tape-recorded transcripts were analysed using framework analysis. Kinship networks within Pakistani origin communities are being sustained and marriage between close blood relatives continues to take place alongside other marriage options. Study participants were critical of what was perceived as a prevalent notion that cousin marriage causes disability in children. They were willing to discuss cousin marriage and disability, share genetic information and engage with genetic issues. A desire for accurate information and a public informed about genetic issues was articulated whilst ineffective communication of genetic risk information undermined professionals in their support role. This study suggests a community that is embracing change, one in which kinship networks are still active and genetic information exchange is taking place. At the community level, these are conditions supportive of the family-centred approach to genetic testing and counselling. PMID:23086468

  1. Genetics of consanguineous marriage: Impact and importance of counseling

    PubMed Central

    Akrami, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Consanguineous marriage, marriage between close biological kin, especially that between first cousins, is socially favored in some parts of North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. An increased rate of congenital anomalies and autosomal recessive disorders are significantly associated with such practice. In such communities, misunderstanding and external attempts to discourage such marriage without proper genetic counseling seem to be inappropriate and unsuccessful. Update in knowledge of clinicians especially pediatricians is the aim of this paper regarding importance and issues behind consanguineous marriage.

  2. Homozygosity mapping reveals novel and known mutations in Pakistani families with inherited retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Ullah, Ehsan; Sher Khan, Falak; Iqbal, Jamila; Bibi, Rabia; Jarral, Afeefa; Sajid, Sundus; Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Venturini, Giulia; Ansar, Muhammad; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. This extensive heterogeneity poses a challenge when performing molecular diagnosis of patients, especially in developing countries. In this study, we applied homozygosity mapping as a tool to reduce the complexity given by genetic heterogeneity and identify disease-causing variants in consanguineous Pakistani pedigrees. DNA samples from eight families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies were subjected to genome wide homozygosity mapping (seven by SNP arrays and one by STR markers) and genes comprised within the detected homozygous regions were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. All families displayed consistent autozygous genomic regions. Sequence analysis of candidate genes identified four previously-reported mutations in CNGB3, CNGA3, RHO, and PDE6A, as well as three novel mutations: c.2656C > T (p.L886F) in RPGRIP1, c.991G > C (p.G331R) in CNGA3, and c.413-1G > A (IVS6-1G > A) in CNGB1. This latter mutation impacted pre-mRNA splicing of CNGB1 by creating a -1 frameshift leading to a premature termination codon. In addition to better delineating the genetic landscape of inherited retinal dystrophies in Pakistan, our data confirm that combining homozygosity mapping and candidate gene sequencing is a powerful approach for mutation identification in populations where consanguineous unions are common. PMID:25943428

  3. A novel homozygous ISPD gene mutation causing phenotype variability in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Giovanni; Saredi, Simona; Sansanelli, Serena; Savadori, Paolo; Canioni, Eleonora; Chiapparini, Luisa; Balestri, Paolo; Malandrini, Alessandro; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Within the group of muscular dystrophies, dystroglycanopathies represent an important subgroup of recessively inherited disorders. Their severity varies from the relatively mild forms of adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), to the severe congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) with cerebral and ocular involvement. We describe 2 consanguineous children of Pakistani origin, carrying a new homozygous missense mutation c.367G>A (p.Gly123Arg) in the ISPD gene. Mutations in this gene have been recently reported as a common cause of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Patient 1 is an 8-year-old female with an intermediate phenotype between CMD and early LGMD; patient 2 is a 20-month-old male and second cousin of patient 1, showing a CMD phenotype. Cognitive development, brain MRI, eye examination, electrocardiogram and echocardiogram were normal in both patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the co-occurrence of both a CMD/early LGMD intermediate phenotype and a CMD within the same family carrying a homozygous ISPD mutation. PMID:25444434

  4. Homozygous sequence variants in the FKBP10 gene underlie osteogenesis imperfecta in consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Umair, Muhammad; Hassan, Annum; Jan, Abid; Ahmad, Farooq; Imran, Muhammad; Samman, Muhammad I; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI, MIM 610968) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by bone fragility. It is one of the rare forms of skeletal deformity caused by sequence variants in at least 14 different genes, including FKBP10 (MIM 607063) encoding protein FKBP65. Here we present three consanguineous families of Pakistani origin segregating OI in an autosomal-recessive pattern. Genotyping using either single-nucleotide polymorphism markers by Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array or polymorphic microsatellite markers revealed a homozygous region, containing a candidate gene FKBP10, among affected members on chromosome 17q21.2. Sequencing the FKBP10 gene revealed a homozygous novel nonsense variant (c.1490G>A, p.Trp497*) in the family A and two previously reported variants, including a missense (c.344G>A, p.Arg115Gln), in the family B and duplication of a nucleotide C (c.831dupC, p.Gly278ArgfsX295) in the family C. Our findings further extend the body of evidence that supports the importance of FKBP10 gene in the development of skeletal system. PMID:26538303

  5. Effects of parental consanguinity on mortality and reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Lindelius, R

    1980-01-01

    A study of consanguinity effects on mortality and fertility was performed. The original series consisted of families selected on the basis of the birth of at least one child with a congenital, monohybrid, autosomal recessive disease. Biologically related families were compared with unrelated ones, the latter group being used as a natural control group. The results are discussed. PMID:7358407

  6. A missense mutation (p.G274R) in gene ASPA causes Canavan disease in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rashida; Daud, Shakeela; Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Adeel; Baloch, Abdul Hameed; Tareen, Abdul Malik; Kakar, Muhammad Azam; Ahmad, Jamil

    2012-05-01

    Canavan disease (OMIM 271900) is an autosomal recessive lethal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by spongy degeneration of the brain. A highly consanguineous Pakistani family with Canavan disease was enrolled on the basis of diagnosis. All the affected individuals have mental retardation, megalocephaly and degradation of motor skills, poor head control, partial vision loss, weakness of the muscles and raised urinary concentration of N-acetyl aspartic acid in the urine. Blood samples were collected from affected as well as normal siblings and processed for DNA purification. Linkage analysis was performed by typing three short tandem repeat markers D17S1583 (7.19 cM), D17S1828 (10.02 cM) and D17S919 (14.69 cM) for an already-reported gene/locus ASPA at chromosome 17p13.2 causing Canavan disease. During linkage analysis, all the affected individuals were homozygous for short tandem repeat markers while the normal siblings were heterozygous showing co-segregation of the disease. Gene ASPA (NM_000049) was undertaken to sequence for mutation analysis. As a result of sequence analysis, we found missense substitution 740A→G (p.G274R) in exon 6 of gene ASPA. To our knowledge, this is the first report about Canavan disease on a Pakistani family. PMID:22219087

  7. Identification of recurrent and novel mutations in TULP1 in Pakistani families with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ajmal, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Micheal, Shazia; Ahmed, Waqas; Shah, Ashfa; Venselaar, Hanka; Bokhari, Habib; Azam, Aisha; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Collin, Rob W.J.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Qamar, Raheel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defects underlying retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in Pakistani families. Methods Genome-wide high-density single-nucleotide-polymorphism microarray analysis was performed using the DNA of nine affected individuals from two large families with multiple consanguineous marriages. Data were analyzed to identify homozygous regions that are shared by affected sibs in each family. Sanger sequencing was performed for genes previously implicated in autosomal recessive RP and allied retinal dystrophies that resided in the identified homozygous regions. Probands from both families underwent fundus examination and electroretinogram measurements. Results The tubby-like protein 1 gene (TULP1) was present in the largest homozygous region in both families. Sequence analysis identified a previously reported mutation (c.1138A>G; p.Thr380Ala) in one family and a novel pathogenic variant (c.1445G>A; p.Arg482Gln) in the other family. Both variants were found to be present in a homozygous state in all affected individuals, were heterozygous present in the unaffected parents, and heterozygous present or absent in normal individuals. Affected individuals of both families showed an early-onset form of RP. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping, combined with candidate-gene analysis, successfully identified genetic defects in TULP1 in two large Pakistani families with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:22665969

  8. Consanguinity, human evolution, and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bittles, A. H.; Black, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    There is little information on inbreeding during the critical early years of human existence. However, given the small founding group sizes and restricted mate choices it seems inevitable that intrafamilial reproduction occurred and the resultant levels of inbreeding would have been substantial. Currently, couples related as second cousins or closer (F ≥ 0.0156) and their progeny account for an estimated 10.4% of the global population. The highest rates of consanguineous marriage occur in north and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and west, central, and south Asia. In these regions even couples who regard themselves as unrelated may exhibit high levels of homozygosity, because marriage within clan, tribe, caste, or biraderi boundaries has been a long-established tradition. Mortality in first-cousin progeny is ≈3.5% higher than in nonconsanguineous offspring, although demographic, social, and economic factors can significantly influence the outcome. Improving socioeconomic conditions and better access to health care will impact the effects of consanguinity, with a shift from infant and childhood mortality to extended morbidity. At the same time, a range of primarily social factors, including urbanization, improved female education, and smaller family sizes indicate that the global prevalence of consanguineous unions will decline. This shift in marriage patterns will initially result in decreased homozygosity, accompanied by a reduction in the expression of recessive single-gene disorders. Although the roles of common and rare gene variants in the etiology of complex disease remain contentious, it would be expected that declining consanguinity would also be reflected in reduced prevalence of complex diseases, especially in population isolates. PMID:19805052

  9. Effect of parental consanguinity on anthropometric measurements among the Sheikh Sunni Muslim boys of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Krishan, G

    1986-05-01

    The study of consanguineous marriage is an efficient way to elucidate the genetic structure of human populations. Such matings give an opportunity for recessive genes to manifest themselves by becoming homozygous. The present attempt examines the effects of parental consanguinity on various anthropometric measurements among the Sheikh Sunni Muslim boys of old Delhi between the ages of 11 and 16 years. A slight inbreeding depression has been observed for all eight anthropometric measurements, i.e., stature, span, sitting height, head length, head circumference, chest girth, and calf circumference. The results support earlier studies in regard to the effect of consanguinity on anthropometric measurements. PMID:3728657

  10. Recessive TBC1D24 Mutations Are Frequent in Moroccan Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Bakhchane, Amina; Charif, Majida; Salime, Sara; Boulouiz, Redouane; Nahili, Halima; Roky, Rachida

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TBC1D24 gene are responsible for four neurological presentations: infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile myoclonic epilepsy, DOORS (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation and seizures) and NSHL (non-syndromic hearing loss). For the latter, two recessive (DFNB86) and one dominant (DFNA65) mutations have so far been identified in consanguineous Pakistani and European/Chinese families, respectively. Here we report the results of a genetic study performed on a large Moroccan cohort of deaf patients that identified three families with compound heterozygote mutations in TBC1D24. Four novel mutations were identified, among which, one c.641G>A (p.Arg214His) was present in the three families, and has a frequency of 2% in control Moroccan population with normal hearing, suggesting that it acts as an hypomorphic variant leading to restricted deafness when combined with another recessive severe mutation. Altogether, our results show that mutations in TBC1D24 gene are a frequent cause (>2%) of NSHL in Morocco, and that due to its possible compound heterozygote recessive transmission, this gene should be further considered and screened in other deaf cohorts. PMID:26371875

  11. Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment Due to Rare Missense Variants within S1PR2.

    PubMed

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Faridi, Rabia; Rehman, Atteeq U; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Wang, Xin; Morell, Robert J; Isaacson, Rivka; Belyantseva, Inna A; Dai, Hang; Acharya, Anushree; Qaiser, Tanveer A; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Rana Amjad; Shams, Sulaiman; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Raza, Syed Irfan; Bashir, Zil-E-Huma; Smith, Joshua D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmad, Wasim; Friedman, Thomas B; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-02-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are a well-studied class of transmembrane G protein-coupled sphingolipid receptors that mediate multiple cellular processes. However, S1PRs have not been previously reported to be involved in the genetic etiology of human traits. S1PR2 lies within the autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus DFNB68 on 19p13.2. From exome sequence data we identified two pathogenic S1PR2 variants, c.323G>C (p.Arg108Pro) and c.419A>G (p.Tyr140Cys). Each of these variants co-segregates with congenital profound hearing impairment in consanguineous Pakistani families with maximum LOD scores of 6.4 for family DEM4154 and 3.3 for family PKDF1400. Neither S1PR2 missense variant was reported among ∼120,000 chromosomes in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, in 76 unrelated Pakistani exomes, or in 720 Pakistani control chromosomes. Both DNA variants affect highly conserved residues of S1PR2 and are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools. Molecular modeling predicts that these variants affect binding of sphingosine-1-phosphate (p.Arg108Pro) and G protein docking (p.Tyr140Cys). In the previously reported S1pr2(-/-) mice, stria vascularis abnormalities, organ of Corti degeneration, and profound hearing loss were observed. Additionally, hair cell defects were seen in both knockout mice and morphant zebrafish. Family PKDF1400 presents with ARNSHI, which is consistent with the lack of gross malformations in S1pr2(-/-) mice, whereas family DEM4154 has lower limb malformations in addition to hearing loss. Our findings suggest the possibility of developing therapies against hair cell damage (e.g., from ototoxic drugs) through targeted stimulation of S1PR2. PMID:26805784

  12. Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment Due to Rare Missense Variants within S1PR2

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Faridi, Rabia; Rehman, Atteeq U.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Wang, Xin; Morell, Robert J.; Isaacson, Rivka; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Dai, Hang; Acharya, Anushree; Qaiser, Tanveer A.; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Rana Amjad; Shams, Sulaiman; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Raza, Syed Irfan; Bashir, Zil-e-Huma; Smith, Joshua D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmad, Wasim; Friedman, Thomas B.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are a well-studied class of transmembrane G protein-coupled sphingolipid receptors that mediate multiple cellular processes. However, S1PRs have not been previously reported to be involved in the genetic etiology of human traits. S1PR2 lies within the autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus DFNB68 on 19p13.2. From exome sequence data we identified two pathogenic S1PR2 variants, c.323G>C (p.Arg108Pro) and c.419A>G (p.Tyr140Cys). Each of these variants co-segregates with congenital profound hearing impairment in consanguineous Pakistani families with maximum LOD scores of 6.4 for family DEM4154 and 3.3 for family PKDF1400. Neither S1PR2 missense variant was reported among ∼120,000 chromosomes in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, in 76 unrelated Pakistani exomes, or in 720 Pakistani control chromosomes. Both DNA variants affect highly conserved residues of S1PR2 and are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools. Molecular modeling predicts that these variants affect binding of sphingosine-1-phosphate (p.Arg108Pro) and G protein docking (p.Tyr140Cys). In the previously reported S1pr2−/− mice, stria vascularis abnormalities, organ of Corti degeneration, and profound hearing loss were observed. Additionally, hair cell defects were seen in both knockout mice and morphant zebrafish. Family PKDF1400 presents with ARNSHI, which is consistent with the lack of gross malformations in S1pr2−/− mice, whereas family DEM4154 has lower limb malformations in addition to hearing loss. Our findings suggest the possibility of developing therapies against hair cell damage (e.g., from ototoxic drugs) through targeted stimulation of S1PR2. PMID:26805784

  13. A Common Ancestral Mutation in CRYBB3 Identified in Multiple Consanguineous Families with Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Arif O.; Wang, Qiwei; Li, David; Khan, Asma A.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to investigate the genetic determinants of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in large consanguineous families. Methods Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination and slit-lamp photographs of the cataractous lenses were obtained. An aliquot of blood was collected from all participating family members and genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells. Initially, a genome-wide scan was performed with genomic DNAs of family PKCC025 followed by exclusion analysis of our familial cohort of congenital cataracts. Protein-coding exons of CRYBB1, CRYBB2, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 were sequenced bidirectionally. A haplotype was constructed with SNPs flanking the causal mutation for affected individuals in all four families, while the probability that the four familial cases have a common founder was estimated using EM and CHM-based algorithms. The expression of Crybb3 in the developing murine lens was investigated using TaqMan assays. Results The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals had nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analysis localized the causal phenotype in family PKCC025 to chromosome 22q with statistically significant two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores. Subsequently, we localized three additional families, PKCC063, PKCC131, and PKCC168 to chromosome 22q. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing identified a missense variation: c.493G>C (p.Gly165Arg) in CRYBB3 that segregated with the disease phenotype in all four familial cases. This variation was not found in ethnically matched control chromosomes, the NHLBI exome variant server, or the 1000 Genomes or dbSNP databases. Interestingly, all four families harbor a unique disease haplotype that strongly suggests a common founder of the causal mutation (p<1.64E-10). We observed expression of Crybb3 in the mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 (E15), and expression remained relatively steady throughout

  14. Deficient T Cell Receptor Excision Circles (TRECs) in autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome caused by DOCK8 mutation: implications for pathogenesis and potential detection by newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Dasouki, Majed; Okonkwo, Kingsley C; Ray, Abhishek; Folmsbeel, Caspian K; Gozales, Diana; Keles, Sevgi; Puck, Jennifer M; Chatila, Talal

    2011-11-01

    Loss of function of DOCK8 is the major cause of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome, a primary immunodeficiency with adaptive and innate immune dysfunction. Patients affected with ARHIES have atopic dermatitis and recurrent, potentially life-threatening viral and bacterial infections. Three consanguineous Pakistani siblings presented with severe atopic dermatitis and superinfection. Direct sequencing of DOCK8 in all three affected siblings demonstrated homozygosity for a deleterious, novel exon 14 frame shift mutation. Current newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID) and related T cell disorders relies on the quantitation of T Cell Receptor Excision Cells (TRECs) in dried blood spots (DBS). Significantly, both older affected siblings had undetectable TRECs, and TREC copy number was reduced in the youngest sibling. These findings suggest that AR-HIES may be detected by TREC newborn screening, and this diagnosis should be considered in the evaluation of newborns with abnormal TRECs who do not have typical SCID. PMID:21763205

  15. Benign muscular dystrophy: risk calculation in families with consanguinity.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, G; Müller, C R; Grimm, T

    1989-01-01

    This report concerns two families in which the index patients are sporadic cases of a benign form of muscular dystrophy. In both families the sisters of the patients have married a close relative. The respective risks for a child of these consanguineous marriages being affected with either X linked Becker muscular dystrophy or autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy is calculated using pedigree information, results of serum creatine kinase determinations, and also, in one family, results of DNA typing using RFLPs from the short arm of the X chromosome. PMID:2732990

  16. Mutations in the Beta Propeller WDR72 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hypomaturation Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Walid; Parry, David A.; Shore, Roger C.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Al Harasi, Sharifa; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Healthy dental enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized human tissue. Though acellular, nonvital, and without capacity for turnover or repair, it can nevertheless last a lifetime. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective term for failure of normal enamel development, covering diverse clinical phenotypes that typically show Mendelian inheritance patterns. One subset, known as hypomaturation AI, is characterised by near-normal volumes of organic enamel matrix but with weak, creamy-brown opaque enamel that fails prematurely after tooth eruption. Mutations in genes critical to enamel matrix formation have been documented, but current understanding of other key events in enamel biomineralization is limited. We investigated autosomal-recessive hypomaturation AI in a consanguineous Pakistani family. A whole-genome SNP autozygosity screen identified a locus on chromosome 15q21.3. Sequencing candidate genes revealed a point mutation in the poorly characterized WDR72 gene. Screening of WDR72 in a panel of nine additional hypomaturation AI families revealed the same mutation in a second, apparently unrelated, Pakistani family and two further nonsense mutations in Omani families. Immunohistochemistry confirmed intracellular localization in maturation-stage ameloblasts. WDR72 function is unknown, but as a putative β propeller is expected to be a scaffold for protein-protein interactions. The nearest homolog, WDR7, is involved in vesicle mobilization and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis at synapses. Vesicle trafficking is important in maturation-stage ameloblasts with respect to secretion into immature enamel and removal of cleaved enamel matrix proteins via endocytosis. This raises the intriguing possibility that WDR72 is critical to ameloblast vesicle turnover during enamel maturation. PMID:19853237

  17. Consanguinity among the Saudi Arabian population.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hazmi, M A; al-Swailem, A R; Warsy, A S; al-Swailem, A M; Sulaimani, R; al-Meshari, A A

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted on 3212 Saudi families to investigate the prevalence of consanguineous marriages. The families were interviewed and the information on the relationship between the husband and wife was obtained. The overall rate of consanguinity shows that 57.7% of the families screened were consanguineous. The most frequent were first cousin marriages (28.4%) followed by distant relative marriages (15.2%) and second cousin marriages (14.6%). The families were grouped according to the province of their origin and the consanguinity rates were calculated accordingly. There were slight differences in the consanguinity rates in the five provinces, which ranged from 52.1% to 67.7%. In each province first cousin marriages were the most frequently encountered pattern, ranging from 17.9% to 40.9%. The inbreeding coefficient (F) was calculated for each province and ranged from 0.020 to 0.030. Within each province, there were several significant differences among the populations in the different areas. The highest rate of consanguinity was 80.6% in Samtah and the lowest rate was around 34% in Abha in the South Western province. These results place Saudi Arabia among the countries of the world with a high rate of consanguinity. The possible consequences of increased consanguinity are presented and discussed. PMID:7473654

  18. Frequent detection of parental consanguinity in children with developmental disorders by a combined CGH and SNP microarray

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic microarrays have been used as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and/or multiple congenital anomalies. The use of SNP arrays has revealed regions of homozygosity in the genome which can lead to identification of uniparental disomy and parental consanguinity in addition to copy number variations. Consanguinity is associated with an increased risk of birth defects and autosomal recessive disorders. However, the frequency of parental consanguinity in children with developmental disabilities is unknown, and consanguineous couples may not be identified during doctor’s visit or genetic counseling without microarray. Results We studied 607 proband pediatric patients referred for developmental disorders using a 4 × 180 K array containing both CGH and SNP probes. Using 720, 360, 180, and 90 Mb as the expected sizes of homozygosity for an estimated coefficient of inbreeding (F) 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, parental consanguinity was detected in 21cases (3.46%). Conclusion Parental consanguinity is not uncommon in children with developmental problems in our study population, and can be identified by use of a combined CGH and SNP chromosome microarray. Identification of parental consanguinity in such cases can be important for further diagnostic testing. PMID:24053112

  19. Organ donation consanguinity or universality.

    PubMed

    Kishore, R R

    1996-01-01

    1. Neither the "Diseased Persons" nor the "Genetic Relations" provide an answer to "trading" in human body parts. 2. Live human body constitutes a vital source of supply of organs and tissues and the possibilities of optimum utilisation should be explored. 3. There is no scope for dogmatic postures and open-mindedness should be the approach while dealing with the issue of Organ Transplantation. 4. Society owes a duty to save the file of a dying man and in the event of failure to do so, it is absolutely immoral to interfere with his own arrangements by making unrealistic laws. No immorality is involved if an individual disposes of his spare body parts for a valid consideration to a needy person. 5. The scarcity needs to be urgently overcome otherwise unwarranted trade and crime are liable to thrive. 6. Families are not unconnected or antagonistic fragments of humanity. After thousands of years of continuous efforts the individuals on this earth have attained the stage of organic and functional integration. Atomisation of society on the basis of consanguineous proximities amounts to reversing this holistic trend. Organ transplantation is a functional expression of a highly evolved pursuit with inherent and intimate interaction in the form of organic exchange at the individual level, independent of consanguineous inducements or motivations. As such there is absolutely no scope for restricting organ donations by strangers. 7. Commercialisation should be curbed by making the enforcement agencies more efficient and not by depriving a needy person of his genuine requirements. Legislative craftsmanship lies in providing an answer without curtailing the freedom of the people. PMID:8692005

  20. Consanguinity: A Risk Factor for Preterm Birth at Less Than 33 Weeks’ Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Ghina; Nassar, Anwar H.; Mahfoud, Ziyad; El-Khamra, Akaber; Al-Choueiri, Nathalie; Adra, Abdallah; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Zalloua, Pierre; Yunis, Khalid A.

    2010-01-01

    Consanguinity promotes homozygosity of recessive susceptibility gene variants and can be used to investigate a recessive component in diseases whose inheritance is uncertain. The objective of this study was to assess the association between consanguinity and preterm birth (PTB), stratified by gestational age and clinical presentation (spontaneous vs. medically indicated). Data were collected on 39,745 singleton livebirths without major birth defects, admitted to 19 hospitals in Lebanon, from September 2003 to December 2007. Deliveries before completed 33 weeks’ gestation and deliveries at 33–36 weeks’ gestation were compared, with respect to cousin marriage, with those after completed 36 weeks’ gestation by using multinomial multiple logistic regression. Overall, infants of consanguineous parents had a statistically significant 1.6-fold net increased risk of being born at less than 33 weeks’ gestation compared with infants of unrelated parents. This association was statistically significant only with spontaneous PTB. There was no increased risk of being born at 33–36 weeks’ gestation associated with consanguinity for both clinical presentations of PTB. Our findings support a genetic contribution to early onset PTB and suggest that early PTB should be targeted in future genetic studies rather than the classic lumping of all births less than 37 weeks’ gestation. PMID:20978088

  1. Consanguineous marriage and reproductive risk: attitudes and understanding of ethnic groups practising consanguinity in Western society.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Loukili, Ghariba; Bartels, Edien Ac; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-04-01

    Consanguineous couples should be adequately informed about their increased reproductive risk and possibilities for genetic counselling. Information may only be effective if it meets the needs of the target group. This study aimed to gain more insight into: (1) attitudes of people belonging to ethnic groups in Western society towards consanguinity and their understanding of risk for offspring; and (2) their attitudes regarding reproductive information targeted at consanguineous couples. Dutch Moroccans and Turks were invited to complete an online questionnaire by snowball sampling and by placing a link on two popular Dutch Moroccan/Turkish forum websites between September and October 2011. The questionnaire was completed by 201 individuals who were, on average, neither positive nor negative towards consanguinity. Respondents with a consanguineous partner were more positive, estimated the risk for the offspring lower and were less positive about the provision of risk information to consanguineous couples when compared with respondents without a consanguineous partner. Participants of Turkish origin had a more negative attitude towards consanguinity and estimated the reproductive risk higher than Moroccan participants. More than half of the respondents thought that information should be given before marriage, whereas only 10% thought it should never be provided. The general practitioner was most often mentioned (54%) as the designated professional to inform people. Information about genetic risks related to consanguinity should be offered early, preferably before marriage. The diversity of the target population requires various strategies to disseminate information and reach consanguineous couples with the offer of genetic counselling. PMID:23921534

  2. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Arrays and Unexpected Consanguinity: Considerations for Clinicians When Returning Results to Families

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Fernanda; Tabor, Holly K.; Chow, Penny M.; Conta, Jessie H.; Feldman, Kenneth W.; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Beck, Anita E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The broad use of SNP microarrays has increased identification of unexpected consanguinity. Therefore, guidelines to address reporting of consanguinity have been published for clinical laboratories. Because no such guidelines exist for clinicians, we describe a case and present recommendations for clinicians to disclose unexpected consanguinity to families. Methods In a boy with multiple endocrine abnormalities and structural birth defects, SNP array analysis revealed ~23% autosomal homozygosity suggestive of a 1st-degree parental relationship. We assembled an interdisciplinary healthcare team, planned the most appropriate way to discuss results of the SNP array with the adult mother including the possibility of multiple autosomal recessive disorders in her child, and finally met with her as a team. Results From these discussions, we developed four major considerations for clinicians returning results of unexpected consanguinity, all guided by the child’s best interests: 1) ethical and legal obligations for reporting possible abuse, 2) preservation of the clinical relationship, 3) attention to justice and psychosocial challenges, and 4) utilization of the SNP array results to guide further testing. Conclusion As SNP arrays become a common clinical diagnostic tool, clinicians can use this framework to return results of unexpected consanguinity to families in a supportive and productive manner. PMID:25232848

  3. Late infantile autosomal recessive myotonia, mental retardation, and skeletal abnormalities: a new autosomal recessive syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Richieri-Costa, A; Garcia da Silva, S M; Frota-Pessoa, O

    1984-01-01

    Four sibs of non-consanguineous parents who had myotonia from late infancy are described. Mild to moderate mental retardation, severe bone abnormalities of the vertebral column (mainly in the thoracolumbar region), and short stature were also observed. Autosomal recessive inheritance is demonstrated. These cases are compared with reported cases of the Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Images PMID:6716408

  4. Congenital vocal cord paralysis with possible autosomal recessive inheritance: Case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, R.; Friedman, S.; Fallet, S.

    1996-08-23

    We describe an infant with congenital vocal cord paralysis born to consanguineous parents. While autosomal dominant and X-linked inheritance have been previously reported in this condition, we conclude that the degree of parental consanguinity in this case strongly suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Although we cannot exclude X-linked inheritance, evidence from animal studies demonstrates autosomal recessive inheritance and provides a possible molecular basis for congenital vocal cord paralysis. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Mutations in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta from consanguineous Indian families.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Joshi; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Dalal, Ashwin; Shukla, Anju; Shah, Hitesh; Srivastava, Priyanka; Kornak, Uwe; Phadke, Shubha R

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a spectrum of genetic disorders with decreased bone density and bone fragility. Most of the cases of OI are inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2 genes. Over last few years, twelve genes for autosomal recessive OI have been identified. In this study we have evaluated seven patients with OI from consanguineous Indian families. Homozygosity mapping using SNP microarray was done and selected candidate genes were sequenced. Candidate genes were identified in four out of seven patients studied. Four mutations, namely; a homozygous non-sense (p.Q178*) and a deletion (p.F277del) mutations in SERPINF1 gene, a missense mutation (p.M101K) in PPIB gene and a nonsense mutation (p.E45*) in CRTAP gene were identified. In three patients for whom the regions of homozygosity did not reveal any known autosomal recessive OI genes, exome sequencing was performed and we identified a known missense mutation (p.G1012S) in COL1A2 gene in one of the patients. As WNT1 gene was not properly covered in exome sequencing in one patient, the gene was sequenced and a homozygous in-frame deletion of four amino acids (p.Phe176_Leu179del) was identified. In one of the three cases the exome sequencing did not reveal a mutation in any known OI genes, suggesting the possibility of mutations in an unidentified gene. The phenotypes of all the cases are described. This work proves the power of homozygosity mapping followed by candidate gene sequencing approach for clinical application in consanguineous families. PMID:25450603

  6. Homozygosity mapping reveals mutations of GRXCR1 as a cause of autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Schraders, Margit; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Oostrik, Jaap; Huygen, Patrick L M; Ali, Ghazanfar; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Veltman, Joris A; Cremers, Frans P M; Basit, Sulman; Ansar, Muhammad; Cremers, Cor W R J; Kunst, Henricus P M; Ahmad, Wasim; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Leal, Suzanne M; Kremer, Hannie

    2010-02-12

    We identified overlapping homozygous regions within the DFNB25 locus in two Dutch and ten Pakistani families with sensorineural autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI). Only one of the families, W98-053, was not consanguineous, and its sibship pointed toward a reduced critical region of 0.9 Mb. This region contained the GRXCR1 gene, and the orthologous mouse gene was described to be mutated in the pirouette (pi) mutant with resulting hearing loss and circling behavior. Sequence analysis of the GRXCR1 gene in hearing-impaired family members revealed splice-site mutations in two Dutch families and a missense and nonsense mutation, respectively, in two Pakistani families. The splice-site mutations are predicted to cause frameshifts and premature stop codons. In family W98-053, this could be confirmed by cDNA analysis. GRXCR1 is predicted to contain a GRX-like domain. GRX domains are involved in reversible S-glutathionylation of proteins and thereby in the modulation of activity and/or localization of these proteins. The missense mutation is located in this domain, whereas the nonsense and splice-site mutations may result in complete or partial absence of the GRX-like domain or of the complete protein. Hearing loss in patients with GRXCR1 mutations is congenital and is moderate to profound. Progression of the hearing loss was observed in family W98-053. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in some but not all affected individuals. Quantitative analysis of GRXCR1 transcripts in fetal and adult human tissues revealed a preferential expression of the gene in fetal cochlea, which may explain the nonsyndromic nature of the hearing impairment. PMID:20137778

  7. Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH): clinical manifestations, genetic heterogeneity and mutation continuum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH) is a rare disorder of neurogenic mitosis characterized by reduced head circumference at birth with variable degree of mental retardation. In MCPH patients, brain size reduced to almost one-third of its original volume due to reduced number of generated cerebral cortical neurons during embryonic neurogensis. So far, seven genetic loci (MCPH1-7) for this condition have been mapped with seven corresponding genes (MCPH1, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CEP152, ASPM, CENPJ, and STIL) identified from different world populations. Contribution of ASPM and WDR62 gene mutations in MCPH World wide is more than 50%. By and large, primary microcephaly patients are phenotypically indistinguishable, however, recent studies in patients with mutations in MCPH1, WDR62 and ASPM genes showed a broader clinical and/or cellular phenotype. It has been proposed that mutations in MCPH genes can cause the disease phenotype by disturbing: 1) orientation of mitotic spindles, 2) chromosome condensation mechanism during embryonic neurogenesis, 3) DNA damage-response signaling, 4) transcriptional regulations and microtubule dynamics, 5) certain unknown centrosomal mechanisms that control the number of neurons generated by neural precursor cells. Recent discoveries of mammalian models for MCPH have open up horizons for researchers to add more knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of MCPH. High incidence of MCPH in Pakistani population reflects the most probable involvement of consanguinity. Genetic counseling and clinical management through carrier detection/prenatal diagnosis in MCPH families can help reducing the incidence of this autosomal recessive disorder. PMID:21668957

  8. Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH): clinical manifestations, genetic heterogeneity and mutation continuum.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Saqib; Ahmad, Wasim; Hassan, Muhammad J

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH) is a rare disorder of neurogenic mitosis characterized by reduced head circumference at birth with variable degree of mental retardation. In MCPH patients, brain size reduced to almost one-third of its original volume due to reduced number of generated cerebral cortical neurons during embryonic neurogensis. So far, seven genetic loci (MCPH1-7) for this condition have been mapped with seven corresponding genes (MCPH1, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CEP152, ASPM, CENPJ, and STIL) identified from different world populations. Contribution of ASPM and WDR62 gene mutations in MCPH World wide is more than 50%. By and large, primary microcephaly patients are phenotypically indistinguishable, however, recent studies in patients with mutations in MCPH1, WDR62 and ASPM genes showed a broader clinical and/or cellular phenotype. It has been proposed that mutations in MCPH genes can cause the disease phenotype by disturbing: 1) orientation of mitotic spindles, 2) chromosome condensation mechanism during embryonic neurogenesis, 3) DNA damage-response signaling, 4) transcriptional regulations and microtubule dynamics, 5) certain unknown centrosomal mechanisms that control the number of neurons generated by neural precursor cells. Recent discoveries of mammalian models for MCPH have open up horizons for researchers to add more knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of MCPH. High incidence of MCPH in Pakistani population reflects the most probable involvement of consanguinity. Genetic counseling and clinical management through carrier detection/prenatal diagnosis in MCPH families can help reducing the incidence of this autosomal recessive disorder. PMID:21668957

  9. Consanguinity and genetic diseases in North Africa and immigrants to Europe.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Wagida A; Khyatti, Meriem; Hemminki, Kari

    2014-08-01

    Endemic diseases are caused by environmental and genetic factors. While in this special issue several chapters deal with environmental factors, including infections, the present focus is on genetic causes of disease clustering due to inbreeding and recessive disease mechanisms. Consanguinity is implying sharing of genetic heritage because of marriage between close relatives originating from a common ancestor. With limited natural selection, recessive genes may become more frequent in an inbred compared with an outbred population. Consanguinity is common in North Africa (NA), and the estimates range from 40 to 49% of all marriages in Tunisia and 29-33% in Morocco. As a consequence, recessive disorders are common in the NA region, and we give some examples. Thalassaemia and sickle cell disease/anaemia constitute the most common inherited recessive disorders globally and they are common in NA, but with immigration they have spread to Europe and to other parts of the world. Another example is familial Mediterranean fever, which is common in the Eastern Mediterranean area. With immigrantion from that area to Sweden, it has become the most common hereditary autoinflammatory disease in that country, and there is no evidence that any native Swede would have been diagnosed with this disease. The examples discussed in this chapter show that the historic movement of populations and current immigration are influencing the concept of 'endemic' disease. PMID:25107999

  10. Consanguinity Mapping of Congenital Heart Disease in a South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Tracy L.; Misri, Amit; Bartlett, Jackie; Orabona, Guilherme; Friedman, Richard D.; Sexton, David; Maheshwari, Sunita; Morgan, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Parental consanguinity is a risk factor for congenital heart disease (CHD) worldwide, suggesting that a recessive inheritance model may contribute substantially to CHD. In Bangalore, India, uncle-niece and first cousin marriages are common, presenting the opportunity for an international study involving consanguinity mapping of structural CHD. We sought to explore the recessive model of CHD by conducting a genome-wide linkage analysis utilizing high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and enrolling 83 CHD probands born to unaffected consanguineous parents. Methodology/Principal Findings In this linkage scan involving single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, the threshold for genome-wide statistical significance was set at the standard log-of-odds (LOD) score threshold of 3.3, corresponding to 1995∶1 odds in favor of linkage. We identified a maximal single-point LOD score of 3.76 (5754∶1 odds) implicating linkage of CHD with the major allele (G) of rs1055061 on chromosome 14 in the HOMEZ gene, a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor containing leucine zipper as well as zinc finger motifs. Re-sequencing of HOMEZ exons did not reveal causative mutations in Indian probands. In addition, genotyping of the linked allele (G) in 325 U.S. CHD cases revealed neither genotypic nor allele frequency differences in varied CHD cases compared to 605 non-CHD controls. Conclusions/Significance Despite the statistical power of the consanguinity mapping approach, no single gene of major effect could be convincingly identified in a clinically heterogeneous sample of Indian CHD cases born to consanguineous parents. However, we are unable to exclude the possibility that noncoding regions of HOMEZ may harbor recessive mutations leading to CHD in the Indian population. Further research involving large multinational cohorts of patients with specific subtypes of CHD is needed to attempt replication of the observed linkage peak on chromosome 14. In addition, we

  11. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in Arab children.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Al, Y K; Shabani, I S; Lubani, M M; al-Ghawabi, M A; Ibrahim, M D; al-Mohtaseb, S; Duodin, K I

    1994-01-01

    Nineteen Arab children including six boys and 13 girls in ten sibships were diagnosed as having osteopetrosis over a 5-year period in various hospitals in Kuwait. Eighteen patients had an isolated autosomal recessive form and one had autosomal recessive osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis. The mean age of diagnosis was 24 months. Parental consanguinity was high amongst them (68%). Anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, failure to thrive, recurrent infections and neurological manifestations were common. Associated congenital abnormalities were found in 26%. Deafness, hydrocephalus and dental caries were relatively less common. A high mortality (37%) owing to infection was noted. The medical management and recommendations for patient care are discussed briefly. PMID:7516136

  12. Isotretinoin treatment of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis complicated by coexisting dysferlinopathy.

    PubMed

    Mashiah, J; Harel, A; Bitterman, O; Sagi, L; Gat, A; Fellig, Y; Ben-Shachar, S; Sprecher, E

    2016-06-01

    Consanguinity is known to be associated with an increase in the prevalence of autosomal recessive disorders such as autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). ARCI often responds well to retinoid treatment. We describe a patient with ARCI who improved under isotretinoin treatment. The patient subsequently developed elevated levels of serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), which led to the diagnosis of a second autosomal recessive disorder, dysferlinopathy, a rare myopathy characterized by muscle weakness, decreased tendon reflexes and marked elevation of CPK levels. This report demonstrates the need for physicians to remain alert to the possible coexistence of rare and mutually relevant disorders in populations with a high rate of consanguinity. PMID:26620441

  13. Comments on "Consanguineous Marriages in Pakistan".

    PubMed

    Hakim, A

    1994-01-01

    Some critical comments are made on a paper entitled "Consanguineous Marriages in Pakistan." Most studies have considered early age at marriage, rural or extended family setup and low socioeconomic status when investigating the issue. The background demographic variables and behavioral aspects of consanguinity were studied only by a few, therefore a lack of data exists on pertinent social, cultural, and behavioral dynamics. In Pakistan over 60% of marriages are between first or second cousins. The highest rates of such marriages have been reported in rural areas, among individuals with low educational level, and among the poorest. However, cousin unions are also common among landowning families. In addition to socioeconomic reasons, these marriages are socially acceptable because they facilitate prenuptial negotiations and provide more compatibility between the husband and wife as well as the bride and the mother-in-law. The evidence on consanguinity and fertility is conflicting. The effect of inbreeding on fertility has been demonstrated by most studies. The effect of consanguinity on mortality is also wrought with ambiguities because of methodological flaws. Although the present authors used limited bivariate analysis, they could not account for increased fertility and mortality in consanguineous matings by examining socioeconomic differences and background demographic variables. There is a need to indicate clearly to what extent the genetic effect is responsible for the excess fertility and mortality after controlling for maternal, sociodemographic, and behavioral characteristics. The article made a contribution to elucidating the impact of cousin marriages, a well entrenched custom, on fertility, mortality, and the status of women. PMID:12346200

  14. Attitude of Saudi Arabian adults towards consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Omar A.; Al-Shaia, Walaa A.; Al-Hamam, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Marzoug, Hala M.; Ahmed, Anwar E.; Bagha, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on the attitudes of Saudi adults towards consanguinity is scarce. The study aimed to explore the attitudes towards consanguinity and its associations with socio-demographic characteristics in a sample of Saudi adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 386 outpatient waiting-area attendees at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City-Riyadh were included. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristics, attitude towards consanguinity and the reasons behind this. Results: The positive attitude towards consanguinity among the study respondents was 48.1% with 95% confidence interval (42.91–53.33%). Social and traditional culture (59.9%) were found to be the predominant reasons for favoring consanguinity in Saudi Arabia. Evidence against a positive attitude towards consanguinity was noted in respondents who received medical information about consanguinity versus those who had not received medical information (42.3% vs. 57%, p-value = 0.008). According to the multivariate logistic model, the odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 2 times higher for males (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.147, 4.290) and 4.1 times higher in respondents in consanguineous marriages (aOR: 4.1; 95% CI: 2.350, 7.156). The odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 50% less in respondents who received health information on consanguinity compared to those who had not received health information about consanguinity (aOR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.253, 0.863). Conclusion: One in every two Saudi adults favors consanguinity however, Saudi men and women differ in their attitudes towards consanguinity. Receiving health information on consanguinity was associated with a negative attitude towards this practice. PMID:26835408

  15. The Genetic Basis of Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in Indian and Pakistani Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Denise; Kannan-Sundhari, Abhiraami; Vishwanath, Subramanian; Qing, Jie; Mittal, Rahul; Kameswaran, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Deafness encompasses a series of etiologically heterogeneous disorders with mutations in more than 400 independent genes. However, several studies indicate that a large proportion of both syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of deafness in the racially diverse Indian and Pakistani populations are caused by defects in just a few genes. In these countries, there is a strong cultural preference for consanguineous marriage and an associated relatively high prevalence of genetic disorders. The current Indian population is approximately 1.2 billion and it is estimated that 30,000 infants are born with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (HL) each year. The estimated rate of profound bilateral HL is 1.6 per 1000 in Pakistan and 70% of this HL arises in consanguineous families. Knowledge of the genetic cause of deafness within a distinct population is important for accurate genetic counseling and early diagnosis for timely intervention and treatment options. Many sources and technologies are now available for the testing of hearing efficiency. Population-based screening has been proposed as one of the major strategies for translating genetic and genomic advances into population health gains. This review of the genetics of deafness in Indian and Pakistani populations deals with the major causes of deafness in these countries and prospectives for reducing the incidence of inherited deafness. PMID:26186295

  16. Azygoesophageal recess.

    PubMed

    Ravenel, James G; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2002-07-01

    Knowledge of the normal radiologic appearance and manifestations of disease in the azygoesophageal recess can facilitate the detection and diagnosis of intrathoracic disease. The azygoesophageal recess is located lateral or posterior to the esophagus and anterior to the spine. It extends from the anterior turn of the azygous vein to the aortic hiatus. The configuration of the azygoesophageal recess is normally a smooth arc convex to the left. Because the right lung extends into the recess, pathology in this region can often be detected radiographically and typically manifests as increased opacity and/or as a contour abnormality. In adults, convexity directed to the right and immediately below the level of the azygous vein on a frontal radiograph is abnormal and requires further evaluation. PMID:12082374

  17. Consanguinity and hereditary hearing loss in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Giorgia; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Abdulhadi, Khalid; Vuckovic, Dragana; Vozzi, Diego; Khalifa Alkowari, Moza; Gasparini, Paolo; Badii, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Qatar is a sovereign state located on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula in the Persian Gulf. Its native population consists of 3 major subgroups: people of Arabian origin or Bedouins, those from an Eastern or Persian ancestry and individuals with African admixture. Historically, all types of consanguineous marriages have been and still are common in the Qatari population, particularly among first and double-first cousins. Thus, there is a higher risk for most inherited diseases including hereditary hearing loss (HHL). In particular, a hearing loss prevalence of 5.2% has been reported in Qatar, with parental consanguinity being more common among affected individuals as compared with unaffected ones. Our recent molecular results confirm a high homogeneity and level of inbreeding in Qatari HHL patients. Among all HHL genes, GJB2, the major player worldwide, accounts for a minor proportion of cases and at least 3 additional genes have been found to be mutated in Qatari patients. Interestingly, one gene, BDP1, has been described to cause HHL only in this country. These results point towards an unexpected level of genetic heterogeneity despite the high level of inbreeding. This review provides an up-to-date picture of HHL in Qatar and of the impact of consanguinity on this disease. PMID:25060281

  18. SNP Analysis and Whole Exome Sequencing: Their Application in the Analysis of a Consanguineous Pedigree Segregating Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Sarah L.; Marquis-Nicholson, Renate; Claxton, Karen; Ashton, Fern; Leong, Ivone U. S.; Prosser, Debra O.; Love, Jennifer M.; George, Alice M.; Taylor, Graham; Wilson, Callum; McKinlay Gardner, R. J.; Love, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia encompasses a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. We employed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis and whole exome sequencing to investigate a consanguineous Maori pedigree segregating ataxia. We identified a novel mutation in exon 10 of the SACS gene: c.7962T>G p.(Tyr2654*), establishing the diagnosis of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). Our findings expand both the genetic and phenotypic spectrum of this rare disorder, and highlight the value of high-density SNP analysis and whole exome sequencing as powerful and cost-effective tools in the diagnosis of genetically heterogeneous disorders such as the hereditary ataxias.

  19. Epidemiology, major risk factors and genetic predisposition for breast cancer in the Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Uzma; Ismail, Muhammad; Mehmood, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of breast cancer is related to genetic as well as cultural, environmental and life-style factors. Variations in diversity of these factors among different ethnic groups and geographical areas emphasize the immense need for studies in all racial-ethnic populations. The incidence of breast cancer in Pakistan is highest in Asians after Jews in Israel and 2.5 times higher than that in neighboring countries like Iran and India, accounting for 34.6% of female cancers. The Pakistani population is deficient in information regarding breast cancer etiology and epidemiology, but efforts done so far had suggested consanguinity as a major risk factor for frequent mutations leading to breast cancer and has also shed light on genetic origins in different ethnic groups within Pakistan. World-wide research efforts on different ethnicities have enhanced our understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer but despite these discoveries, 75% of the familial risk of breast cancer remains unexplained, highlighting the fact that the majority of breast cancer susceptibility genes remain unidentified. For this purpose Pakistani population provides a strong genetic pool to elucidate the genetic etiology of breast cancer because of cousin marriages. In this review, we describe the known breast cancer predisposition factors found in the local Pakistani population and the epidemiological research work done to emphasize the importance of exploring factors/variants contributing to breast cance, in order to prevent, cure and decrease its incidence in our country. PMID:24289553

  20. Sex-linked recessive

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked recessive; Genetics - sex-linked recessive; X-linked recessive ... X-linked recessive diseases usually occur in males. Males have only one X chromosome. A single recessive ...

  1. Chromosome abnormality rate among Iranian patients with idiopathic mental retardation from consanguineous marriages

    PubMed Central

    Behjati, Farkhondeh; Ghasemi Firouzabadi, Saghar; Kahrizi, Kimia; Kariminejad, Roxana; Bagherizadeh, Iman; Ansari, Javad; Fallah, Masoumeh; Mojtahedi, Forough; Darvish, Hossein; Bahrami Monajemi, Gholamreza; Abedini, S. Sedigheh; Jamali, Payman; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Zadeh-Vakili, Azita; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mental retardation (MR) has heterogeneous aetiology mostly with genetic causes. Chromosomal aberrations are one of the most common causes of MR. Reports on chromosome abnormality rate among consanguineous families are sparse. In order to identify the chromosome abnormality rate in idiopathic mental retardation from consanguineous marriages, a total of 322 Iranian families with positive family history for MR were investigated in the Genetics Research Center. Material and methods In the majority of families (92%) at least two sibs were affected with MR and none had specific chromosomal syndromes such as Down syndrome. Standard cytogenetic techniques using high resolution GTG banding were carried out on all the patients. Results The overall chromosome abnormality rate contributing to mental retardation was 1.24% (4 cases), which comprised 46,XY,der(18)t(4;18)(q31.1;q23)mat; 45,XY,-21,-22,+der(22)t(21;22)(q21.1;q13.33)mat; 46,XY,rec(2)dup(2p)inv(2)(p25.1q37.3)pat, and 46,XY,der(11)t(10;11)(q25.2;q25)pat. Conclusions Although the most likely genetic cause of mental retardation in patients with consanguineous parents is autosomal recessive, the fact that 1.24% of our patients had chromosomal abnormalities emphasizes the importance of cytogenetic investigation as the first laboratory genetic tests for all MR patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the rate of chromosome abnormality among patients with idiopathic mental retardation from consanguineous marriages. PMID:22291774

  2. Analysis of CYP7B1 in non-consanguineous cases of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Schüle, Rebecca; Brandt, Elisabeth; Karle, Kathrin N; Tsaousidou, Maria; Klebe, Stephan; Klimpe, Sven; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Crosby, Andrew H; Hübner, Christian A; Schöls, Ludger; Deufel, Thomas; Beetz, Christian

    2009-04-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a neurodegenerative condition defined clinically by lower limb spasticity and weakness. Homozygous mutations in CYP7B1 have been identified in several consanguineous families that represented HSP type 5 (SPG5), one of the many genetic forms of the disease. We used direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to screen for CYP7B1 alterations in apparently sporadic HSP patients (n = 12) as well as index patients from non-consanguineous families with recessive (n = 8) and dominant (n = 8) transmission of HSP. One sporadic patient showing HSP as well as optic atrophy carried a homozygous nonsense mutation. Compound heterozygosity was observed in a recessive family with a clinically pure phenotype. A heterozygous missense change segregated in a small dominant family. We also found a significant association of a known coding polymorphism with cerebellar signs complicating a primary HSP phenotype. Our findings suggest CYP7B1 alterations to represent a rather frequent cause of HSP that should be considered in patients with various clinical presentations. PMID:18855023

  3. Recession Rebound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2011-01-01

    A return to normal after a crisis is a good thing. Who doesn't want back what once seemed lost? The problem is it usually isn't a simple task figuring out how to patch together a scaled-back training program. When the recession hit in fall 2008, trainers were asked to scale down programming and make do with fewer resources. With a recovery in full…

  4. Unexpected genetic heterogeneity in a large consanguineous Brazilian pedigree presenting deafness.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Pardono, Eliete; de Mello Auricchio, Maria T B; de Carvalho E Silva, Fernando L; Lopes, Juliana J; Abreu-Silva, Ronaldo S; Romanos, Jihane; Batissoco, Ana C; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2008-01-01

    Nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness accounts for 80% of hereditary deafness. To date, 52 loci responsible for autosomal recessive deafness have been mapped and 24 genes identified. Here, we report a large inbred Brazilian pedigree with 26 subjects affected by prelingual deafness. Given the extensive consanguinity found in this pedigree, the most probable pattern of inheritance is autosomal recessive. However, our linkage and mutational analysis revealed, instead of an expected homozygous mutation in a single gene, two different mutant alleles and a possible third undetected mutant allele in the MYO15A gene (DFNB3 locus), as well as evidence for other causes for deafness in the same pedigree. Among the 26 affected subjects, 15 were homozygous for the novel c.10573delA mutation in the MYO15A gene, 5 were compound heterozygous for the mutation c.10573delA and the novel deletion c.9957_9960delTGAC and one inherited only a single c.10573delA mutant allele, while the other one could not be identified. Given the extensive consanguinity of the pedigree, there might be at least one more deafness locus segregating to explain the condition in some of the subjects whose deafness is not clearly associated with MYO15A mutations, although overlooked environmental causes could not be ruled out. Our findings illustrate a high level of etiological heterogeneity for deafness in the family and highlight some of the pitfalls of genetic analysis of large genes in extended pedigrees, when homozygosity for a single mutant allele is expected. PMID:17851452

  5. Mutations in the Alpha 1,2-Mannosidase Gene, MAN1B1, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Kuss, Andreas W.; Puettmann, Lucia; Noor, Abdul; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Ali, Ghazanfar; Hu, Hao; Kerio, Nadir Ali; Xiang, Yong; Garshasbi, Masoud; Khan, Muzammil Ahmad; Ishak, Gisele E.; Weksberg, Rosanna; Ullmann, Reinhard; Tzschach, Andreas; Kahrizi, Kimia; Mahmood, Khalid; Naeem, Farooq; Ayub, Muhammad; Moremen, Kelley W.; Vincent, John B.; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Ansar, Muhammad; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    We have used genome-wide genotyping to identify an overlapping homozygosity-by-descent locus on chromosome 9q34.3 (MRT15) in four consanguineous families affected by nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive intellectual disability (NS-ARID) and one in which the patients show additional clinical features. Four of the families are from Pakistan, and one is from Iran. Using a combination of next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing, we have identified mutations in the gene MAN1B1, encoding a mannosyl oligosaccharide, alpha 1,2-mannosidase. In one Pakistani family, MR43, a homozygous nonsense mutation (RefSeq number NM_016219.3: c.1418G>A [p.Trp473∗]), segregated with intellectual disability and additional dysmorphic features. We also identified the missense mutation c. 1189G>A (p.Glu397Lys; RefSeq number NM_016219.3), which segregates with NS-ARID in three families who come from the same village and probably have shared inheritance. In the Iranian family, the missense mutation c.1000C>T (p.Arg334Cys; RefSeq number NM_016219.3) also segregates with NS-ARID. Both missense mutations are at amino acid residues that are conserved across the animal kingdom, and they either reduce kcat by ∼1300-fold or disrupt stable protein expression in mammalian cells. MAN1B1 is one of the few NS-ARID genes with an elevated mutation frequency in patients with NS-ARID from different populations. PMID:21763484

  6. Gastrocnemius recession.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John G; Bohay, Donald R; Eller, Erik B; Witt, Bryan L

    2014-12-01

    The Grand Rapids Arch Collapse classifications create a novel system for categorizing and correlating numerous common foot and ankle conditions related to a falling arch. The algorithm for treating these conditions is exceptionally replicable and has excellent outcomes. Gastrocnemius equinus diagnosis plays a crucial role in the pathology of arch collapse. A contracture of the gastrocnemius muscle is increasingly recognized as the cause of several foot and ankle conditions. The authors have expanded their indications for gastrocnemius recession to include arch pain without radiographic abnormality, calcaneus apophysitis, plantar fasciitis/fibromas, Achilles tendonosis, early-onset diabetic Charcot arthropathy, and neuropathic forefoot ulcers. PMID:25456721

  7. Consanguineous marriages in the province of Antalya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Alper, O M; Erengin, H; Manguoğlu, A E; Bilgen, T; Cetin, Z; Dedeoğlu, N; Lüleci, G

    2004-01-01

    To assess the trends in the frequency and the medical effects of consanguinity in the south coast of Turkish population using local and national data in the last 11 years. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Manavgat province, which is a major tourism center on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. The authors studied consanguineous marriages in rural and urban population in the Mediterranean coast, Manavgat province, Turkey, via a 1500 random survey sample of married couples. There has been a significant increase in the incidence of consanguineous marriages in rural areas (40.7%) since 1989 in the southern population of Turkey. The results showed that the most frequent type of marriage was between the first cousins. It is found that there is no statistically significant difference between the consanguineous and non-consanguineous marriages in the different age groups. The results were discussed on the basis of educational status, reasons for having consanguineous marriages and the general medical effects as well as with the relation of congenital malformations. The custom of consanguineous unions in the Mediterranean population of Turkey is still extremely high, and preventive measures should be done to decrease its frequency and associated complications. PMID:15183745

  8. Loss of function mutations in RP1 are responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Firoz; Ullah, Inayat; Ali, Shahbaz; Gottsch, Alexander D.H.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous families. Methods Large consanguineous families were ascertained from the Punjab province of Pakistan. An ophthalmic examination consisting of a fundus evaluation and electroretinography (ERG) was completed, and small aliquots of blood were collected from all participating individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells, and a genome-wide linkage or a locus-specific exclusion analysis was completed with polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs). Two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated, and all coding exons and exon–intron boundaries of RP1 were sequenced to identify the causal mutation. Results The ophthalmic examination showed that affected individuals in all families manifest cardinal symptoms of RP. Genome-wide scans localized the disease phenotype to chromosome 8q, a region harboring RP1, a gene previously implicated in the pathogenesis of RP. Sanger sequencing identified a homozygous single base deletion in exon 4: c.3697delT (p.S1233Pfs22*), a single base substitution in intron 3: c.787+1G>A (p.I263Nfs8*), a 2 bp duplication in exon 2: c.551_552dupTA (p.Q185Yfs4*) and an 11,117 bp deletion that removes all three coding exons of RP1. These variations segregated with the disease phenotype within the respective families and were not present in ethnically matched control samples. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that these mutations in RP1 are responsible for the retinal phenotype in affected individuals of all four consanguineous families. PMID:27307693

  9. Deletion mutation in BSCL2 gene underlies congenital generalized lipodystrophy in a Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) also known as Berardinelli-Seip Congenital Lipodystrophy (BSCL) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by loss of adipose tissues, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus, muscular hypertrophy, hepatomegaly and hypertriglyceridemia. There are four subclinical phenotypes of CGL (CGL1-4) and mutations in four genes AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF have been assigned to each type. Methods The study included clinical and molecular investigations of CGL disease in a consanguineous Pakistani family. For mutation screening all the coding exons including splice junctions of AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF genes were PCR amplified and sequenced directly using an automated DNA sequencer ABI3730. Results Sequence analysis revealed a single base pair deletion mutation (c.636delC; p.Tyr213ThrfsX20) in exon 5 of BSCL2 gene causing a frame shift and premature termination codon. Conclusion Mutation identified here in BSCL2 gene causing congenital generalized lipodystrophy is the first report in Pakistani population. The patients exhibited characteristic features of generalized lipodystrophy, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1913913076864247. PMID:23659685

  10. Whole exome sequencing unravels disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Fahiminiya, S; Almuriekhi, M; Nawaz, Z; Staffa, A; Lepage, P; Ali, R; Hashim, L; Schwartzentruber, J; Abu Khadija, K; Zaineddin, S; Gamal, H; Majewski, J; Ben-Omran, T

    2014-08-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has greatly facilitated the identification of causal mutations for diverse human genetic disorders. We applied WES as a molecular diagnostic tool to identify disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar. Seventeen consanguineous families with diverse disorders were recruited. Initial mutation screening of known genes related to the clinical diagnoses did not reveal the causative mutations. Using WES approach, we identified the definitive disease-causing mutations in four families: (i) a novel nonsense homozygous (c.1034C>G) in PHKG2 causing glycogen storage disease type 9C (GSD9C) in a male with initial diagnosis of GSD3; (ii) a novel homozygous 1-bp deletion (c.915del) in NSUN2 in a male proband with Noonan-like syndrome; (iii) a homozygous SNV (c.1598C>G) in exon 11 of IDUA causing Hurler syndrome in a female proband with unknown clinical diagnosis; (iv) a de novo known splicing mutation (c.1645+1G>A) in PHEX in a female proband with initial diagnosis of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets. Applying WES as a diagnostic tool led to the unambiguous identification of disease-causing mutations in phenotypically complex disorders or correction of the initial clinical diagnosis in ˜25% of our cases. PMID:24102521

  11. Consanguinity and increased risk for schizophrenia in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Hader; Fathi, Warda; Klei, Lambertus; Wood, Joel; Chowdari, Kodavali; Watson, Annie; Eissa, Ahmed; Elassy, Mai; Ali, Ibtihal; Salah, Hala; Yassin, Amal; Tobar, Salwa; El-Boraie, Hala; Gaafar, Hanan; Ibrahim, Nahed E.; Kandil, Kareem; El-Bahaei, Wafaa; El-Boraie, Osama; Alatrouny, Mohamed; El-Chennawi, Farha; Devlin, Bernie; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Consanguinity has been suggested as a risk factor for psychsoses in some Middle Eastern countries, but adequate control data are unavailable. Our recent studies in Egypt have shown elevated parental consanguinity rates among patients with bipolar I disorder (BP1), compared with controls. We have now extended our analyses to Schizophrenia (SZ) in the same population. Methods A case-control study was conducted at Mansoura University Hospital, Mansoura, Egypt (SZ, n = 75; controls, n = 126, and their available parents). The prevalence of consanguinity was estimated from family history data (‘self report’), followed by DNA analysis using short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs, n = 63) (‘DNA-based’ rates). Results Self reported consanguinity was significantly elevated among the patients (SZ: 46.6%, controls: 19.8%, OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.88, 6.64; p = 0.000058, 1 d.f.). These differences were confirmed using DNA based estimates for coefficients of inbreeding (inbreeding coefficients as means ± standard error, cases: 0.058 ± 0.007, controls: 0.022 ± 0.003). Conclusions Consanguinity rates are signifcantly elevated among Egyptian SZ patients in the Nile delta region. The associations are similar to those observed with BP1 in our earlier study. If replicated, the substantial risk associated with consanguinity raises public health concerns. They may also pave the way for gene mapping studies. PMID:20435442

  12. Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by a novel ADCK3 mutation that elongates the protein: clinical, genetic and biochemical characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yo-Tsen; Hersheson, Joshua; Plagnol, Vincent; Fawcett, Katherine; Duberley, Kate E C; Preza, Elisavet; Hargreaves, Iain P; Chalasani, Annapurna; Laurá, Matilde; Wood, Nick W; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Background The autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The large number of ARCA genes leads to delay and difficulties obtaining an exact diagnosis in many patients and families. Ubiquinone (CoQ10) deficiency is one of the potentially treatable causes of ARCAs as some patients respond to CoQ10 supplementation. The AarF domain containing kinase 3 gene (ADCK3) is one of several genes associated with CoQ10 deficiency. ADCK3 encodes a mitochondrial protein which functions as an electron-transfer membrane protein complex in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Methods We report two siblings from a consanguineous Pakistani family who presented with cerebellar ataxia and severe myoclonus from adolescence. Whole exome sequencing and biochemical assessment of fibroblasts were performed in the index patient. Results A novel homozygous frameshift mutation in ADCK3 (p.Ser616Leufs*114), was identified in both siblings. This frameshift mutation results in the loss of the stop codon, extending the coding protein by 81 amino acids. Significant CoQ10 deficiency and reduced MRC enzyme activities in the index patient's fibroblasts suggested that the mutant protein may reduce the efficiency of mitochondrial electron transfer. CoQ10 supplementation was initiated following these genetic and biochemical analyses. She gained substantial improvement in myoclonic movements, ataxic gait and dysarthric speech after treatment. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of diagnosing ADCK3 mutations and the potential benefit of treatment for patients. The identification of this new mutation broadens the phenotypic spectrum associated with ADCK3 mutations and provides further understanding of their pathogenic mechanism. PMID:24218524

  13. The Perils of SNP Microarray Testing: Uncovering Unexpected Consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Tarini, Beth A.; Konczal, Laura; Goldenberg, Aaron J.; Goldman, Edward B.; McCandless, Shawn E.

    2013-01-01

    Background While single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chromosomal microarrays identify areas of small genetic deletions/duplications, they can also reveal regions of homozygosity indicative of consanguinity. As more non-geneticists order SNP microarrays, they must prepare for the potential ethical, legal and social issues that result from revelation of unanticipated consanguinity. Patient An infant with multiple congenital anomalies underwent SNP microarray testing. Results The results of the SNP microarray revealed several large regions of homozygosity that indicated identity by descent most consistent with a second or third degree relative mating (e.g., uncle/ niece, half brother/sister, first cousins). Mother was not aware of the test's potential to reveal consanguinity. When informed of the test results, she reluctantly admitted to being raped by her half-brother around the time of conception. Conclusions During the pre-testing consent process, providers should inform parents that SNP microarray testing could reveal consanguinity. Providers must also understand the psychological implications, as well as the legal and moral obligations, that accompany SNP microarray results that indicate consanguinity. PMID:23827427

  14. Consanguinity and susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Emily J.; Frodsham, Angela J.; Zhang, Lyna; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Amos, William

    2009-01-01

    Studies of animal populations suggest that low genetic heterozygosity is an important risk factor for infection by a diverse range of pathogens, but relatively little research has looked to see whether similar patterns exist in humans. We have used microsatellite genome screen data for tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis and leprosy to test the hypothesis that inbreeding depression increases risk of infection. Our results indicate that inbred individuals are more common among our infected cases for TB and hepatitis, but only in populations where consanguineous marriages are common. No effect was found either for leprosy, which is thought to be oligogenic, or for hepatitis in Italy where consanguineous marriages are rare. Our results suggest that consanguinity is an important risk factor in susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans. PMID:19324620

  15. Thomsen or Becker myotonia? A novel autosomal recessive nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene associated with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Senkevics, Adriano S; Zilbersztajn-Gotlieb, Dinorah; Yamamoto, Lydia U; Muniz, Viviane P; Pavanello, Rita C M; Oliveira, Acary B; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2012-02-01

    We describe a large Brazilian consanguineous kindred with 3 clinically affected patients with a Thomsen myotonia phenotype. They carry a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene (K248X). None of the 6 heterozygote carriers show any sign of myotonia on clinical evaluation or electromyography. These findings confirm the autosomal recessive inheritance of the novel mutation in this family, as well as the occurrence of phenotypic variability in the autosomal recessive forms of myotonia. PMID:22246887

  16. The Religification of Pakistani-American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaffar-Kucher, Ameena

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a cultural production process called religification, in which religious affiliation, rather than race or ethnicity, has become the core category of identity for working-class Pakistani-American youth in the United States. In this dialectical process, triggered by political changes following the September 11 terrorist…

  17. Journalism Education in the Pakistani Borderlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintak, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Students brave roadside bombs and Taliban threats while on class assignments. Professors are kidnapped and killed. Campus radio stations get regular visits from military intelligence. Welcome to journalism education in Pakistan's tribal areas. The region is off-limits to most outsiders, so students find themselves reporting for Pakistani and…

  18. Recurrent mutation in CDMP1 in a family with Grebe chondrodysplasia: broadening the phenotypic manifestation of syndrome in Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Sara; Riaz, Hafiza Fizzah; Touseef, Mohammad; Basit, Sulman; Faiyaz Ul Haque, Muhammad; Malik, Sajid

    2015-01-01

    Grebe syndrome (OMIM-200700) is a very rare type of acromesomelic dysplasia with autosomal recessive inheritance. We studied a Pakistani family with two affected individuals having typical features of Grebe chondrodysplasia. Patients were observed with short and deformed limbs having a proximo-distal gradient of severity. Hind-limbs were more severely affected than fore-limbs. Digits on autopods were very short and nonfunctional. Index subject also had nearsightedness. However, symptoms in the craniofacial and axial skeleton were minimal. Genetic analysis revealed four base pair insertion mutation (c.1114insGAGT) in gene coding cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1 (CDMP1). This mutation was predicted to cause premature stop codon. The clinical presentation in this study broadens the range of phenotypes associated with CDMP1 mutation in Pakistani population. PMID:26870132

  19. Recurrent mutation in CDMP1 in a family with Grebe chondrodysplasia: broadening the phenotypic manifestation of syndrome in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sara; Riaz, Hafiza Fizzah; Touseef, Mohammad; Basit, Sulman; Haque, Muhammad Faiyaz Ul; Malik, Sajid

    2015-01-01

    Grebe syndrome (OMIM-200700) is a very rare type of acromesomelic dysplasia with autosomal recessive inheritance. We studied a Pakistani family with two affected individuals having typical features of Grebe chondrodysplasia. Patients were observed with short and deformed limbs having a proximo-distal gradient of severity. Hind-limbs were more severely affected than fore-limbs. Digits on autopods were very short and nonfunctional. Index subject also had nearsightedness. However, symptoms in the craniofacial and axial skeleton were minimal. Genetic analysis revealed four base pair insertion mutation (c.1114insGAGT) in gene coding cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1 (CDMP1). This mutation was predicted to cause premature stop codon. The clinical presentation in this study broadens the range of phenotypes associated with CDMP1 mutation in Pakistani population. PMID:26870132

  20. Classic Case Report of Donohue Syndrome (Leprechaunism; OMIM *246200): The Impact of Consanguineous Mating.

    PubMed

    Nijim, Yousif; Awni, Youssef; Adawi, Amin; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2016-02-01

    Donohue syndrome ([DS]; leprechaunism) describes a genetic autosomal recessive disorder that results from the presence of homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the insulin receptor gene (INSR; 19p13.3-p13.2).Donohue syndrome is associated with a fatal congenital form of dwarfism with features of intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, exaggerated hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinism and dysmorphic abnormalities.We present a case of DS owing to the rarity of this syndrome (1 case in every million births). We discuss how the disease presents, its genetic underpinning, and its prevention.The case was encountered in an Arab male born on 1 September, 2014, for consanguineous parents. The delivery was via cesarean section at 37 weeks gestation due to severe intrauterine growth restriction and nonprogress labor term. The patient was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit due to infection, and jaundice. Dysmorphic features, abnormalities of the craniofacial region, low birth weight, skin abnormalities, abdominal distension and hypertrichosis were observed. Laboratory examinations showed, hyperinsulinism, increased C-peptide, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, and anemia.The diagnosis of DS was done based on the combinations of typical dysmorphic characteristics, clinical evaluation, supported by genetic analysis and exaggerated biochemical results. Genetic diagnosis of DS was performed through analysis of DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A qualitative real-time PCR was used, to monitor the amplification of a targeted DNA molecule during the PCR. Other technique using sequencing of the INSR gene, which permits genetic diagnosis, counseling, and antenatal diagnoses in subsequent pregnancies, were also performed.Treatment of DS is supportive and requires the combined efforts of a multidisciplinary team, which include pediatricians, endocrinologists, dermatologists, and other health care professionals. Currently, treatment with recombinant insulin

  1. Consanguinity and Birth Defects in the Jerusalem Perinatal Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Harlap, S.; Kleinhaus, K.; Perrin, M.C.; Calderon-Margalit, R.; Paltiel, O.; Deutsch, L.; Manor, O.; Tiram, E.; Yanetz, R.; Friedlander, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background While parental consanguinity is known to increase the risk of birth defects in offspring, it is hard to quantify this risk in populations where consanguinity is prevalent. Methods To support ongoing studies of cancer and of psychiatric disease, we studied relationships of consanguinity to 1,053 major birth defects in 29,815 offspring, born in 1964–1976. To adjust for confounding variables (geographic origin, social class and hospital), we constructed logistic regression models, using GEE to take into account correlations between sibs. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence limits were estimated in comparison to a reference group of offspring with grandfathers born in different countries. Results With 10.1% of offspring having consanguineous parents, the adjusted OR for major birth defect was 1.41 (1.12–1.74). Offspring of marriages between uncles-nieces, first cousins and more distant relatives showed adjusted ORs of 2.36 (0.98–5.68), 1.59 (1.22–2.07) and 1.20 (0.89–1.59) respectively. For descendents of grandfathers born in the same country, but not known to be related, the OR was 1.05 (0.91–1.21); these showed increased risk associated with ancestries in Western Asia (1.27, 1.04–1.55, p < 0.02) or Europe (1.13, 0.79–1.80). Conclusions A strong association of consanguinity with poverty and low education points to the need to avoid exposure to environmental hazards in these families. PMID:18493143

  2. Increased Probability of Co-Occurrence of Two Rare Diseases in Consanguineous Families and Resolution of a Complex Phenotype by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Dennis; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Toliat, Mohammad R.; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Kamrath, Clemens; Schänzer, Anne; Sander, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Nothnagel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing of whole genomes and exomes has facilitated a direct assessment of causative genetic variation, now enabling the identification of genetic factors involved in rare diseases (RD) with Mendelian inheritance patterns on an almost routine basis. Here, we describe the illustrative case of a single consanguineous family where this strategy suffered from the difficulty to distinguish between two etiologically distinct disorders, namely the co-occurrence of hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets (HRR) and congenital myopathies (CM), by their phenotypic manifestation alone. We used parametric linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping and whole exome-sequencing to identify mutations underlying HRR and CM. We also present an approximate approach for assessing the probability of co-occurrence of two unlinked recessive RD in a single family as a function of the degree of consanguinity and the frequency of the disease-causing alleles. Linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping yielded elusive results when assuming a single RD, but whole-exome sequencing helped to identify two mutations in two genes, namely SLC34A3 and SEPN1, that segregated independently in this family and that have previously been linked to two etiologically different diseases. We assess the increase in chance co-occurrence of rare diseases due to consanguinity, i.e. under circumstances that generally favor linkage mapping of recessive disease, and show that this probability can increase by several orders of magnitudes. We conclude that such potential co-occurrence represents an underestimated risk when analyzing rare or undefined diseases in consanguineous families and should be given more consideration in the clinical and genetic evaluation. PMID:26789268

  3. Increased Probability of Co-Occurrence of Two Rare Diseases in Consanguineous Families and Resolution of a Complex Phenotype by Next Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lal, Dennis; Neubauer, Bernd A; Toliat, Mohammad R; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Kamrath, Clemens; Schänzer, Anne; Sander, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Nothnagel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing of whole genomes and exomes has facilitated a direct assessment of causative genetic variation, now enabling the identification of genetic factors involved in rare diseases (RD) with Mendelian inheritance patterns on an almost routine basis. Here, we describe the illustrative case of a single consanguineous family where this strategy suffered from the difficulty to distinguish between two etiologically distinct disorders, namely the co-occurrence of hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets (HRR) and congenital myopathies (CM), by their phenotypic manifestation alone. We used parametric linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping and whole exome-sequencing to identify mutations underlying HRR and CM. We also present an approximate approach for assessing the probability of co-occurrence of two unlinked recessive RD in a single family as a function of the degree of consanguinity and the frequency of the disease-causing alleles. Linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping yielded elusive results when assuming a single RD, but whole-exome sequencing helped to identify two mutations in two genes, namely SLC34A3 and SEPN1, that segregated independently in this family and that have previously been linked to two etiologically different diseases. We assess the increase in chance co-occurrence of rare diseases due to consanguinity, i.e. under circumstances that generally favor linkage mapping of recessive disease, and show that this probability can increase by several orders of magnitudes. We conclude that such potential co-occurrence represents an underestimated risk when analyzing rare or undefined diseases in consanguineous families and should be given more consideration in the clinical and genetic evaluation. PMID:26789268

  4. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome Is the Most Common Genetic Cause of Permanent Neonatal Diabetes in Consanguineous Families

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Patch, Ann-Marie; Minton, Jayne A. L.; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Edghill, Emma L.; Hussain, Khalid; Balafrej, Amina; Deeb, Asma; Buchanan, Charles R.; Jefferson, Ian G.; Mutair, Angham; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ellard, Sian

    2009-01-01

    Context and Objective: Mutations in EIF2AK3 cause Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS), a rare recessive disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes, skeletal abnormalities, and liver dysfunction. Although early diagnosis is important for clinical management, genetic testing is generally performed after the full clinical picture develops. We aimed to identify patients with WRS before any other abnormalities apart from diabetes are present and study the overall frequency of WRS among patients with permanent neonatal diabetes. Research Design and Methods: The coding regions of EIF2AK3 were sequenced in 34 probands with infancy-onset diabetes with a clinical phenotype suggestive of WRS (n = 28) or homozygosity at the WRS locus (n = 6). Results: Twenty-five probands (73.5%) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for mutations in EIF2AK3. Twenty of the 26 mutations identified were novel. Whereas a diagnosis of WRS was suspected before genetic testing in 22 probands, three patients with apparently isolated diabetes were diagnosed after identifying a large homozygous region encompassing EIF2AK3. In contrast to nonconsanguineous pedigrees, mutations in EIF2AK3 are the most common known genetic cause of diabetes among patients born to consanguineous parents (24 vs. < 2%). Age at diabetes onset and birth weight might be used to prioritize genetic testing in the latter group. Conclusions: WRS is the most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus in consanguineous pedigrees. In addition to testing patients with a definite clinical diagnosis, EIF2AK3 should be tested in patients with isolated neonatal diabetes diagnosed after 3 wk of age from known consanguineous families, isolated populations, or countries in which inbreeding is frequent. PMID:19837917

  5. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene in Indo-Pakistani patients with type I (tyrosinase-deficient) oculocutaneous albinsm (OCA)

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, R.K.; Droetto, S.; Strunk, K.M.; Holmes, S.A.; Spritz, R.A. ); Bundey, S.; Musarella, M.A.

    1993-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by deficient synthesis of melanin pigment. Type I (tyrosinase-deficient) OCA results from mutations of the tyrosinase gene (TYR gene) encoding tyrosinase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first two steps of melanin biosynthesis. Mutations of the TYR gene have been identified in a large number of patients, most of Caucasian ethnic origin, with various forms of type I OCA. The authors present an analysis of the TYR gene in eight Indo-Pakistani patients with type I OCA. The authors describe four novel TYR gene mutations and a fifth mutation previously observed in a Caucasian patient. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  6. An Investigation of Generic Structures of Pakistani Doctoral Thesis Acknowledgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rofess, Sakander; Mahmood, Muhammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates Pakistani doctoral thesis acknowledgements from genre analysis perspective. A corpus of 235 PhD thesis acknowledgements written in English was taken from Pakistani doctoral theses collected from eight different disciplines. HEC Research Repository of Pakistan was used as a data sources. The theses written by Pakistani…

  7. Novel mutations in WWOX, RARS2, and C10orf2 genes in consanguineous Arab families with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Asem M; Aburahma, Samah K; Habbab, Wesal; Thompson, I Richard

    2016-08-01

    Intellectual disability is a heterogeneous disease with many genes and mutations influencing the phenotype. Consanguineous families constitute a rich resource for the identification of rare variants causing autosomal recessive disease, due to the effects of inbreeding. Here, we examine three consanguineous Arab families, recruited in a quest to identify novel genes/mutations. All the families had multiple offspring with non-specific intellectual disability. We identified homozygosity (autozygosity) intervals in those families through SNP genotyping and whole exome sequencing, with variants filtered using Ingenuity Variant Analysis (IVA) software. The families showed heterogeneity and novel mutations in three different genes known to be associated with intellectual disability. These mutations were not found in 514 ethnically matched control chromosomes. p.G410C in WWOX, p.H530Y in RARS2, and p.I69F in C10orf2 are novel changes that affect protein function and could give new insights into the development and function of the central nervous system. PMID:27121845

  8. [Gingival recessions and orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Renkema, A M; Padmos, J A D; de Quincey, G de

    2015-11-01

    Gingival recessions represent the most visible periodontal disease. The prevalence of gingival recessions is high. The root surface is literally exposed to negative influences such as erosion, abrasion, discoloration and decay. Moreover, gingival recessions can affect the quality of life by increased thermal sensitivity and reduced dento-gingival aesthetics. The aetiology of gingival recessions is complex and considered to be multifactorial. In order to prevent the development of gingival recessions during and after orthodontic treatment, several factors should be taken into account, among which maintenance of optimal oral hygiene and respect for the 'biological envelope' are decisive. Once gingival recessions have developed, orthodontic therapy can play a positive role in their treatment. PMID:26569002

  9. Exome sequencing in a consanguineous family clinically diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease identifies a homozygous CTSF mutation.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Djaldetti, Ruth; Alves, Ana Margarida; Mead, Simon; Darwent, Lee; Lleo, Alberto; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Blesa, Rafael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Clarimon, Jordi; Guerreiro, Rita

    2016-10-01

    We have previously reported the whole genome genotyping analysis of 2 consanguineous siblings clinically diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this analysis, we identified several large regions of homozygosity shared between both affected siblings, which we suggested could be candidate loci for a recessive genetic lesion underlying the early onset AD in these cases. We have now performed exome sequencing in one of these siblings and identified the potential cause of disease: the CTSF c.1243G>A:p.Gly415Arg mutation in homozygosity. Biallelic mutations in this gene have been shown to cause Type B Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with some cases resembling the impairment seen in AD. PMID:27524508

  10. Consanguinity Associated With Increased Risk for Bipolar I Disorder in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Hader; Klei, Lambertus; Wood, Joel; Talkowski, Michael; Chowdari, Kodavali; Fathi, Warda; Eissa, Ahmed; Yassin, Amal; Salah, Hala; Tobar, Salwa; El-Boraie, Hala; Gaafar, Hanan; Elassy, Mai; Ibrahim, Nahed E.; El-Bahaei, Wafaa; Elsayed, Mohamed; Shahda, Mohamed; Sheshtawy, Eman El; El-Boraie, Osama; El-Chennawi, Farha; Devlin, Bernie; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to contrast rates of consanguinity among patients with bipolar I disorder (BP1) and controls in a population with customary consanguineous marriages (i.e., marriage between related individuals). Consanguinity increases risk for numerous monogenic and polygenic diseases. Whether the risk for BP1 increases with consanguinity has not been investigated systematically. Two independent studies were conducted in Egypt: (1) Case–control study 93 patients with BP1, 90 screened adult control individuals, and available parents. The inbreeding coefficient/consanguinity rate was estimated in two ways: using 64 DNA polymorphisms (“DNA-based” rate); and from family history data (“self report”); (2) Epidemiological survey: total of 1,584 individuals were screened, from whom self-reported consanguinity data were obtained for identified BP1 cases (n=35) and 150 randomly selected, unaffected control individuals. DNA-based consanguinity rates showed significant case–control control differences (P=0.0039). Self-reported consanguinity rates were also elevated among BP1 patients in both samples (Study #1 OR=2.66, 95% confidence intervals, CI: 1.34, 5.29; Study #2: OR=4.64, 95% CI: 2.01, 10.34). In conclusion, two independent, systematic studies indicate increased consanguinity among Egyptian BP1 patients in the Nile delta region. Self-reported estimates of consanguinity are bolstered by DNA-based estimates, and both show significant case–control differences for BP1. PMID:19152378

  11. HACE1 deficiency causes an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hollstein, Ronja; Parry, David A; Nalbach, Lisa; Logan, Clare V; Strom, Tim M; Hartill, Verity L; Carr, Ian M; Korenke, Georg C; Uppal, Sandeep; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Wieland, Thomas; Markham, Alexander F; Bennett, Christopher P; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Sheridan, Eamonn G; Kaiser, Frank J; Bonthron, David T

    2015-01-01

    Background The genetic aetiology of neurodevelopmental defects is extremely diverse, and the lack of distinctive phenotypic features means that genetic criteria are often required for accurate diagnostic classification. We aimed to identify the causative genetic lesions in two families in which eight affected individuals displayed variable learning disability, spasticity and abnormal gait. Methods Autosomal recessive inheritance was suggested by consanguinity in one family and by sibling recurrences with normal parents in the second. Autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, respectively, were used to identify the causative gene. Results In both families, biallelic loss-of-function mutations in HACE1 were identified. HACE1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates the activity of cellular GTPases, including Rac1 and members of the Rab family. In the consanguineous family, a homozygous mutation p.R219* predicted a truncated protein entirely lacking its catalytic domain. In the other family, compound heterozygosity for nonsense mutation p.R748* and a 20-nt insertion interrupting the catalytic homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus (HECT) domain was present; western blot analysis of patient cells revealed an absence of detectable HACE1 protein. Conclusion HACE1 mutations underlie a new autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies have implicated HACE1 as a tumour suppressor gene; however, since cancer predisposition was not observed either in homozygous or heterozygous mutation carriers, this concept may require re-evaluation. PMID:26424145

  12. A clinical variant in SCN1A inherited from a mosaic father cosegregates with a novel variant to cause Dravet syndrome in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Feyza N; Gormez, Zeliha; Calik, Mustafa; Altiokka Uzun, Gunes; Sagiroglu, Mahmut S; Yuceturk, Betul; Yuksel, Bayram; Baykan, Betul; Bebek, Nerses; Iscan, Akin; Ugur Iseri, Sibel A; Ozbek, Ugur

    2015-07-01

    A consanguineous family from Turkey having two children with intellectual disability exhibiting myoclonic, febrile and other generalized seizures was recruited to identify the genetic origin of these phenotypes. A combined approach of SNP genotyping and exome sequencing was employed both to screen genes associated with Dravet syndrome and to detect homozygous variants. Analysis of exome data was extended further to identify compound heterozygosity. Herein, we report identification of two paternally inherited genetic variants in SCN1A (rs121917918; p.R101Q and p.I1576T), one of which was previously implicated in Dravet syndrome. Interestingly, the previously reported clinical variant (rs121917918; p.R101Q) displayed mosaicism in the blood and saliva of the father. The study supported the genetic diagnosis of affected children as Dravet syndrome possibly due to the combined effect of one clinically associated (rs121917918; p.R101Q) and one novel (p.I1576T) variants in SCN1A gene. This finding is important given that heterozygous variants may be overlooked in standard exome scans of consanguineous families. Thus, we are presenting an interesting example, where the inheritance of the condition may be misinterpreted as recessive and identical by descent due to consanguinity and mosaicism in one of the parents. PMID:25986186

  13. Starving for Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patt, Mary Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Every weekday, millions of American schoolchildren throw away their half-eaten cafeteria lunches so that they can run outside to play. The traditional placement of lunch before recess, coupled with the recent decline in overall recess time to meet academic time constraints, forces children to choose between two essential needs: (1) food; and (2)…

  14. Recess--It's Indispensable!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Olga; Waite-Stupiansky, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    The demise of recess in many elementary schools--and of outdoor play in general--is an issue of great concern to many members of the Play, Policy, and Practice Interest Forum. Most people remember recess as an important part of the school day. It was a time to be outdoors; to organize games; to play on the swings, slides, and other playground…

  15. More Recess Time, Please!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Rong; Coward, Fanni Liu

    2015-01-01

    Students in Shanghai, China, get much more recess time than their U.S. counterparts throughout their education. As U.S. education reform efforts seek ways of raising achievement, they have begun replacing recess with academic time. The lesson from Shanghai is that this may not be the best strategy. But whether the Shanghai system of more and…

  16. Recess Makes Kids Smarter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    Recess has been scaled back or cut altogether in a number of schools around the country. The trend can be traced back to the late eighties and was accelerated under No Child Left Behind. Districts under pressure to show academic progress began to squeeze as much instruction into the day as possible. Others eliminated recess because of concerns…

  17. Recession in the Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plant, Helen

    2009-01-01

    National policy stresses the key role of adult learning and skills in securing economic recovery. This close linking of adult learning policy to the recession agenda raises important questions. How has the recession impacted on the implementation of adult learning policy? What has it meant for service delivery? And what have been the consequences…

  18. Mutation of ATF6 causes autosomal recessive achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Zulfiqar, Fareeha; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ashraf, Naeem Mahmood; Ullah, Ehsan; Wang, Xin; Sajid, Sundus; Khan, Falak Sher; Amin-ud-Din, Muhammad; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hameed, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Ahmed, Zubair M; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-09-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an early-onset retinal dystrophy characterized by photophobia, nystagmus, color blindness and severely reduced visual acuity. Currently mutations in five genes CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2, PDE6C and PDE6H have been implicated in ACHM. We performed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis in a consanguineous Pakistani ACHM family and mapped the locus to a 15.12-Mb region on chromosome 1q23.1-q24.3 with a maximum LOD score of 3.6. A DNA sample from an affected family member underwent exome sequencing. Within the ATF6 gene, a single-base insertion variant c.355_356dupG (p.Glu119Glyfs*8) was identified, which completely segregates with the ACHM phenotype within the family. The frameshift variant was absent in public variant databases, in 130 exomes from unrelated Pakistani individuals, and in 235 ethnically matched controls. The variant is predicted to result in a truncated protein that lacks the DNA binding and transmembrane domains and therefore affects the function of ATF6 as a transcription factor that initiates the unfolded protein response during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Immunolabeling with anti-ATF6 antibodies showed localization throughout the mouse neuronal retina, including retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor cells, inner nuclear layer, inner and outer plexiform layers, with a more prominent signal in retinal ganglion cells. In contrast to cytoplasmic expression of wild-type protein, in heterologous cells ATF6 protein with the p.Glu119Glyfs*8 variant is mainly confined to the nucleus. Our results imply that response to ER stress as mediated by the ATF6 pathway is essential for color vision in humans. PMID:26063662

  19. Effect of consanguinity on Argentinean Angus beef DNA traceability.

    PubMed

    Baldo, A; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Prando, A; Mello Cesar, A S; Lirón, J P; Sorarrain, N; Ramelli, P; Posik, D M; Pofcher, E; Ripoli, M V; Beretta, E; Peral-García, P; Vaca, R; Mariani, P; Giovambattista, G

    2010-08-01

    Since the 1990s several authors have envisaged the use of DNA to certify meat origin. Two major parameters must be assessed before a DNA based traceability protocol can be implemented in the food chain: (i) the information content of a DNA marker set in a specific livestock breed or group of breeds; (ii) the minimum number of DNA markers needed to obtain a statistically acceptable match probability. The objective of the present work was to establish the effect of different levels of inbreeding in the matching efficiency, and the minimum number of microsatellite markers needed, in a DNA based meat traceability program, starting from an 11-microsatellite marker panel. Samples were obtained from beef production farms in South America, where animals are typically bred under pasture-based extensive conditions. Three groups of animals with different consanguinity rates were sampled. Exclusion power (Q) was higher than 0.999998 and match probability lower than 3.01E-08, for the whole set of markers within each group. Both values were affected by consanguinity. To reach a two mismatch criteria exclusion power (Q(2)) of 99.99, six markers were needed in unrelated animals whereas seven markers were needed in related animals. To reach Q(2)=99.9999, 8 and 10 microsatellite markers, respectively, were needed. In general, one or two more microsatellite markers were needed to identify consanguineous animals. This study proved the DNA marker set used to be suitable for the identification of the meat from all slaughtered animals in Argentina, per week, month, and year. PMID:20416796

  20. Suicidal ideation in Pakistani college students.

    PubMed

    Khokher, Sehar; Khan, Murad M

    2005-01-01

    Suicidal behavior includes ideation, attempts and completed suicides. Information on suicidal behavior from Pakistan, a conservative South Asian Islamic country, is lacking. To address the issue, a pilot study was carried out to assess the prevalence of suicidal ideation in Pakistani college students. Suicidal ideation was assessed on the basis of responses to four questions contained in the depression subscale of the General Health Questionnaire-28. Of the total 217 completed questionnaires, the overall rate of suicidal ideation was 31.4%. While there was no significant difference between genders, more females (33%) than males (29.2%) responded positively. Respondents belonging to single parent families and those living at home, compared to those using hostel facilities, reported higher rates. The reported rate in our sample is higher than similar studies conducted elsewhere. There is the need for more information in this important area of suicidal behavior, including studying such feelings in school going children as well as in a larger community sample. The findings of such studies can contribute to our understanding of the suicidal process in the Pakistani population and to address it at various levels. PMID:16276755

  1. Consanguinity profile in the Gaza Strip of Palestine: large-scale community-based study.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, Mahmoud M

    2014-02-01

    Consanguineous marriages which have been practiced throughout history continue to be practiced within different ethnic, religious and social groups to varying degrees with highest prevalences in North Africa, Middle East and central and south Asia. In the Gaza Strip of Palestine, little is known about the consanguinity profile, so the present large-scale study aims to explore the consanguinity profile of two generations using data from the β-thalassemia premarital screening program. Sociodemographic data analysis included 156,635 (141,200 males and 15,435 females) persons and their parents, representing 141,200 couples who were referred to the Thalassemia and Hemophilia Center for premarital testing. In addition, the consanguinity characteristics of parents of 217 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemic non-sibling patients were analyzed. Results revealed a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of consanguineous (first- and second-cousin) marriages between the previous (fathers') generation (45.2%) and the current (groom/bride) generation (39.9%). Among the five governorates of the Gaza Strip, records of Gaza Governorate revealed the lowest occurrence (36.9% current generation and 42.1% previous generation) of consanguineous marriages, as compared to all others. Consanguineous marriages are significantly higher in semi-urban areas (41.6%) than in urban areas (39.1%) in the current generation (previous generation, 46.4% vs 44.7%, respectively). Compound consanguinity (two generation) and a single level of consanguinity were seen in 20.7% and 43.7%, respectively, of the cases. The average age of those with first-cousin marriages is significantly lower (22.4±4.4 years) than those with second-cousin marriages (24.3±6.1 years) and the non-consanguineous (26.5±8.2 years). The rate of consanguineous marriages among never married people (42.2%) is significantly much higher than the rate of people with multiple marriages (18.1%). About 74.7% of the non

  2. Mutations in the lipase-H gene causing autosomal recessive hypotrichosis and woolly hair.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Sabba; Jan, Abid; Muhammad, Dost; Ahmad, Farooq; Mir, Hina; Younus, Muhammad; Ali, Ghazanfar; Ayub, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2015-08-01

    Hypotrichosis is characterised by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, or absence of hair from other parts of the body. In few cases, the condition is associated with tightly curled woolly scalp hair. The present study searched for disease-causing sequence variants in the genes in four Pakistani lineal consanguineous families exhibiting features of hypotrichosis or woolly hair. A haplotype analysis established links in all four families to the LIPH gene located on chromosome 3q27.2. Subsequently, sequencing LIPH identified a novel non-sense mutation (c.328C>T; p.Arg110*) in one and a previously reported 2-bp deletion mutation (c.659_660delTA, p.Ile220ArgfsX29) in three other families. PMID:24628704

  3. Acceptability of GM foods among Pakistani consumers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhter; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    In Pakistan majority of the consumers do not have information about genetically modified (GM) foods. In developing countries particularly in Pakistan few studies have focused on consumers' acceptability about GM foods. Using comprehensive primary dataset collected from 320 consumers in 2013 from Pakistan, this study analyzes the determinants of consumers' acceptability of GM foods. The data was analyzed by employing the bivariate probit model and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD) models. The empirical results indicated that urban consumers are more aware of GM foods compared to rural consumers. The acceptance of GM foods was more among females' consumers as compared to male consumers. In addition, the older consumers were more willing to accept GM food compared to young consumers. The acceptability of GM foods was also higher among wealthier households. Low price is the key factor leading to the acceptability of GM foods. The acceptability of the GM foods also reduces the risks among Pakistani consumers. PMID:27494790

  4. The frequency of consanguinity in Konya, Turkey, and its medical effects.

    PubMed

    Demirel, S; Kaplanoğlu, N; Acar, A; Bodur, S; Paydak, F

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted in the town of Konya, Turkey, on 1120 randomly selected women to find out the overall rate of consanguineous marriages among couples. The frequency of consanguineous marriages was found to be 23.2%. It was found that 14.6% of this figure was first cousin marriages and the rest was 8.6%. Consanguineous marriages were higher among women born in villages compared to those born in provinces and the town center. Based on the findings, it was not too difficult to say: the higher the level of education of women, the lower the rate of consanguineous marriages. The number of children with an abnormality was high in consanguineous marriages, while the frequency of spontaneous abortion, still-birth and infant death remained the same. PMID:9457498

  5. HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles and haplotypes in first-generation Pakistani immigrants in Norway.

    PubMed

    Rønningen, K S; Yap, S E; Brandal, K; Stormyr, A; Lie, B A; Rasmussen, T; Stray-Pedersen, B; Akselsen, H E

    2012-04-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphisms among immigrants from Pakistan have not been well investigated. Immigration to Norway started in the late 1960s for working purposes. From 1975, immigration was mainly for marriages and family reunion. When recruiting couples for a birth cohort study, we ended up with 65.5% of the 374 parents genotyped being closely related. This was also reflected in that 21% of newborns were homozygotes for their DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 genotype. For being able to study HLA class II genes frequencies among unrelated individuals, we had to exclude 195 of the parents from data analysis. High-resolution typing for the DRB1 locus, low/intermediate for the DQA1 locus and resolution genotyping for the DQB1 locus were performed in all the 179 parents and their newborns from the Punjab province of Pakistan. We identified 25 DRB1, nine DQA1 and 14 DRB1 alleles in the 179 unrelated parents included in our analysis. The most frequent alleles were DRB1*03:01:01 (15.9%) and DRB1*07:01:01 (15.9%), DQA1*01:03 (22.1%) and DQB1*02:01:01 (26.0%). Forty-one haplotypes were identified, including DRB1*13:02:01-DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:03:01, not earlier reported. Supported by the few earlier reports on Pakistani groups living in Pakistan, it appears that alleles found among those living in Norway are of Indo-European or mixed ethnic origin. This study provides the first comprehensive report of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in Norwegian Pakistani immigrants. When the unrelated parents were compared with all parents genotyped, there were, however, no significant differences in allele frequencies, confirming that consanguineous marriages are usual in Pakistan. PMID:22171671

  6. Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 responsible for retinitis pigmentosa identified in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Inayat; Kabir, Firoz; Iqbal, Muhammad; Gottsch, Clare Brooks S.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify pathogenic mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Seven large familial cases with multiple individuals diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa were included in the study. Affected individuals in these families underwent ophthalmic examinations to document the symptoms and confirm the initial diagnosis. Blood samples were collected from all participating members, and genomic DNA was extracted. An exclusion analysis with microsatellite markers spanning the TULP1 locus on chromosome 6p was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons along with the exon–intron boundaries of TULP1 were sequenced bidirectionally. We constructed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype for the four familial cases harboring the K489R allele and estimated the likelihood of a founder effect. Results The ophthalmic examinations of the affected individuals in these familial cases were suggestive of RP. Exclusion analyses confirmed linkage to chromosome 6p harboring TULP1 with positive two-point LOD scores. Subsequent Sanger sequencing identified the single base pair substitution in exon14, c.1466A>G (p.K489R), in four families. Additionally, we identified a two-base deletion in exon 4, c.286_287delGA (p.E96Gfs77*); a homozygous splice site variant in intron 14, c.1495+4A>C; and a novel missense variation in exon 15, c.1561C>T (p.P521S). All mutations segregated with the disease phenotype in the respective families and were absent in ethnically matched control chromosomes. Haplotype analysis suggested (p<10−6) that affected individuals inherited the causal mutation from a common ancestor. Conclusions Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 are responsible for the RP phenotype in seven familial cases with a common ancestral mutation responsible for the disease phenotype in four of the seven families. PMID:27440997

  7. Infantile variant of Bartter syndrome and sensorineural deafness: A new autosomal recessive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, D.; Shalev, H.; Carmi, Rivka; Ohaly, M.

    1995-12-04

    The infantile variant of Bartter syndrome (IBS) is usually associated with maternal polyhydramnios, premature birth, postnatal polyuria and hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and a typical appearance. IBS is thought to be an autosomal recessive trait. Several congenital tubular defects are associated with sensorineural deafness (SND). However, an association between the IBS and SND has not been reported so far. Here we describe 5 children of an extended consanguineous Bedouin family with IBS and SND. In 3 of the cases, the typical electrolyte imbalance and facial appearance were detected neonatally. SND was detected as early as age 1 month, suggesting either coincidental homozygotization of 2 recessive genes or a pleiotropic effect of one autosomal recessive gene. This association suggests that evaluation of SND is warranted in every case of IBS. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Homozygosity mapping: a way to map human recessive traits with the DNA of inbred children

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, E.S.; Botstein, D.

    1987-06-19

    An efficient strategy for mapping human genes that cause recessive traits has been devised that uses mapped restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and the DNA of affected children from consanguineous marriages. The method involves detection of the disease locus by virtue of the fact that the adjacent region will preferentially be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. A single affected child of a first-cousin marriage is shown to contain the same total information about linkage as a nuclear family with three affected children. Calculations show that it should be practical to map a recessive disease gene by studying DNA from fewer than a dozen unrelated, affected inbred children, given a complete RFLP linkage map. The method should make it possible to map many recessive diseases for which it is impractical or impossible to collect adequate numbers of families with multiple affected offspring.

  9. Pentalogy of Cantrell: report of a case with consanguineous parents.

    PubMed

    Pachajoa, Harry; Barragán, Arelis; Potes, Angela; Torres, Javier; Isaza, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Pentalogy of Cantrell is a syndrome evidencing five anomalies: a midline, upper abdominal wall abnormality; lower sternal defect; anterior diaphragmatic defect; diaphragmatic pericardial defect, and congenital abnormalities of the heart. Its prevalence is one in every 65,000 live births and a survival rate that is low if the fall the five defects are present or the gravity of the cardiac anomalies. It may be diagnosed during the first trimester obstetric ultrasound. For postnatal care, emission-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is recommended for a clear definition of the extent of the defect and to design a course of corrective surgery. Herein, a case of pentology of Cantrell is reported for a child offspring of consanguineous parents. PMID:21713350

  10. A novel DFNB31 mutation associated with Usher type 2 syndrome showing variable degrees of auditory loss in a consanguineous Portuguese family.

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Tronche, Sophie; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Germain, Aurore; Lonjou, Christine; Carpentier, Wassila; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Zeitz, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defect of a consanguineous Portuguese family with rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of decreased audition. Methods A detailed ophthalmic and auditory examination was performed on a Portuguese patient with severe autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy. Known genetic defects were excluded by performing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) genotyping microarray analysis and by Sanger sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of eyes shut homolog–drosophila (EYS) and chromosome 2 open reading frame 71 (C2orf71). Subsequently, genome-wide homozygosity mapping was performed in DNA samples from available family members using a 700K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Candidate genes present in the significantly large homozygous regions were screened for mutations using Sanger sequencing. Results The largest homozygous region (~11 Mb) in the affected family members was mapped to chromosome 9, which harbors deafness, autosomal recessive 31 (DFNB31; a gene previously associated with Usher syndrome). Mutation analysis of DFNB31 in the index patient identified a novel one-base-pair deletion (c.737delC), which is predicted to lead to a truncated protein (p.Pro246HisfsX13) and co-segregated with the disease in the family. Ophthalmic examination of the index patient and the affected siblings showed severe rod-cone dystrophy. Pure tone audiometry revealed a moderate hearing loss in the index patient, whereas the affected siblings were reported with more profound and early onset hearing impairment. Conclusions We report a novel truncating mutation in DFNB31 associated with severe rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of hearing impairment in a consanguineous family of Portuguese origin. This is the second report of DFNB31 implication in Usher type 2. PMID:21738389

  11. Autosomal recessive disorders among Arabs: an overview from Kuwait.

    PubMed Central

    Teebi, A S

    1994-01-01

    Kuwait has a cosmopolitan population of 1.7 million, mostly Arabs. This population is a mosaic of large and small minorities representing most Arab communities. In general, Kuwait's population is characterized by a rapid rate of growth, large family size, high rates of consanguineous marriages within the Arab communities with low frequency of intermarriage between them, and the presence of genetic isolates and semi-isolates in some extended families and Bedouin tribes. Genetic services have been available in Kuwait for over a decade. During this time it has become clear that Arabs have a high frequency of genetic disorders, and in particular autosomal recessive traits. Their pattern is unique and some disorders are relatively common. Examples are Bardet-Biedl and Meckel syndromes, phenylketonuria, and familial Mediterranean fever. A relatively large number of new syndromes and variants have been delineated in Kuwait's population, many being the result of homozygosity for autosomal recessive genes that occurred because of inbreeding. Some of these syndromes have subsequently been found in other parts of the world, negating the concept of the private syndrome. This paper provides an overview of autosomal recessive disorders among the Arabs in Kuwait from a personal perspective and published studies, and highlights the need for genetic services in Arab countries with the goal of prevention and treatment of genetic disorders. PMID:8014972

  12. Association among Education Level, Occupation Status, and Consanguinity in Tunisia and Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Kerkeni, Emna; Monastiri, Kamel; Saket, Besma; Rudan, Diana; Zgaga, Lina; Ben Cheikh, Hassen

    2006-01-01

    Aim To investigate the association between education level, occupation status (a proxy for socio-economic status), and consanguinity in 2 large data sets from Tunisia and Croatia countries with different attitudes toward consanguinity. Methods The sample of 1016 students, attending 5 university institutions in Monastir, Tunisia, were interviewed about the educational level and occupation status of their parents and the degree of parental relatedness. In Croatia, a sample of 1001 examinees from 9 isolated island populations was interviewed about their own educational level, occupation status, and consanguinity. Results Prevalence of consanguinity (offspring of second cousins or closer) among 1016 Tunisian students was 20.1%, and 9.3% among 1001 Croatian isolates. In Tunisia, the association between consanguinity and both parental degree of education and parental occupation status was highly significant in women (P<0.001), but not significant in men. In Croatia, no statistically significant associations were noted, although there was a consistent trend of increased prevalence of consanguinity with lower education level or occupation status in both genders, but more pronounced in women. Conclusion Association between education level, socio-economic status, and consanguinity needs to be taken into account in inbreeding studies in human populations. The relationship may be specific for each studied population and highly dependent on the cultural context. It is generally more pronounced among women in most settings. PMID:16912991

  13. Consanguinity as a determinant of reproductive behaviour and mortality in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Grant, J C; Shami, S A

    1993-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of consanguineous marriages and estimate the effects of consanguinity on reproductive behaviour and mortality, household and hospital-based surveys were conducted in 11 cities in the Pakistan province of Punjab between 1979 and 1985. The 9520 women interviewed reported 44,474 pregnancies, with data collected on maternal and paternal ages at marriage, abortions/miscarriages, stillbirths and deaths in the first month, at 2-12 months and 2-8/10 years. Six categories of consanguineous marriage were included: double first cousin, first cousin, first cousin once removed/double second cousin, second cousin, bradari (brotherhood) and non-consanguineous. Marriages contracted between spouses related as second cousins or closer accounted for 50.3% of the total, equivalent to an average coefficient of kinship (alpha = sigma piFi) of 0.0280. Unions between close biological relatives were characterized by younger maternal and paternal ages at marriage and reduced spousal age difference, but a longer time to first delivery. Overall, they exhibited greater fertility than non-consanguineous couples. Antenatal and postnatal mortality were assessed by consanguinity and age interval. Consanguinity-associated deaths were consistently higher in the neonatal, infant and childhood periods. The consequences of these outcomes on the health of the present and future generations is assessed. PMID:8359962

  14. Effects of consanguineous marriages on fertility among three endogamous groups of Andhra Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P G

    1987-01-01

    To assess interrelationships between consanguineous marriage and fertility, 3 caste groups in Andhra Pradesh--the Desuri Kapu, an affluent agricultural caste; the Devanga, an artisan caste in the middle range of the hierarchy; and the Mala, a scheduled caste at the bottom--were selected for field study. Consanguineous marriages are an essential part of the social structure in this area of southern India. A total of 2524 marriages were analyzed, of which 46% were consanguineous. 19% of consanguineous marriages were between uncle and niece, 22% were between 1st cousins, and 5% were between more distant cousins. The Devanga had the highest rate of related marriages (48%), followed by the Desuri Kapu (47%) and the Mala (41%). Higher caste individuals, and wealthier persons within each caste, are more likely to marry relatives so they can avoid splitting their properties through dowry of bride price. The consanguineous unions as a whole were significantly more fertile than nonconsanguineous unions. The mean number of pregnancies, live births, and surviving offspring was 4.85, 4.44, and 2.99, respectively, among consanguineous couples compared with 3.41, 3.32, and 2.87, respectively, among nonconsanguineous couples. Although the number of pregnancies and live births was significantly higher among consanguineous couples in all 3 castes compared with nonconsanguineous couples, the difference in the number of surviving children between consanguineous and nonconsanguineous unions was not significant among the wealthier castes. This suggests that child mortality is higher among the offspring of consanguineous unions, despite their greater wealth. PMID:3686072

  15. Clinical and pathological features of an autosomal recessive neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, T W; Riley, E; Hall, C D; Swift, M

    1980-06-01

    Two siblings are described, ages 49 and 45 years, having a distinct hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) with severe peroneal nerve involvement. The neuropathic symptoms began in childhood. Both patients have sensorineural deafness. The proband was found to have a cardiac conduction abnormality in the absence of known ischemic heart disease. Electrodiagnostic studies were consistent with a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The presence of parental consanguinity and absence of affected individuals in succeeding or preceding generations suggested that the sensorimotor neuropathy in this family is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The sural nerve of the proband had significant loss of myelinated fibers and demyelination but few regenerating myelinated fibers and no onion-bulbs. The pathological findings, while nonspecific, are not characteristic of the hypertrophic, neuronal or intermediate types of HMSN. PMID:6247456

  16. Diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia: a novel recessive brain malformation.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Maha S; Saleem, Sahar N; Dobyns, William B; Barkovich, A James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-08-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic 'butterfly'-like contour of the midbrain on axial sections. Additional imaging features included variable degrees of supratentorial ventricular dilatation and hypoplasia to complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging showed diffuse hypomyelination and lack of an identifiable corticospinal tract. All patients displayed severe cognitive impairment, post-natal progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, spastic quadriparesis and seizures. Autistic features were noted in older cases. Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in two families. One of the patients required shunting for hydrocephalus; however, this yielded no change in ventricular size suggestive of dysplasia rather than obstruction. We propose the term 'diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia' to characterize this autosomal recessive malformation. PMID:22822038

  17. Exploring Identity in Muslim Moroccan and Pakistani Immigrant Women

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Cristina; Tagliabue, Semira

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a qualitative investigation of how Muslim Moroccan and Pakistani female immigrants living in Italy conceptualize their cultural identity. Ten Moroccan and 10 Pakistani (adolescent and adult) women were interviewed through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The interviewees expressed a strong attachment to their culture of origin: their religion is a crucial aspect of their identity, along with certain cultural rules and traditional values. At the same time, both Moroccan and Pakistani participants were ambivalent toward and experienced difficulties in developing a connection to the host country, although the two groups exhibit their lack of connection to their host country in different ways: Moroccans’ self-representation is marked by a sense of foreignness and by a lack of an emotional connection with places where they are living while Pakistanis tend to express cultural distance and conflict with the host culture’s values. For both the Moroccan and Pakistani groups, the challenge of integration and biculturalism seems demanding in the Italian context and is marked by a deep feeling of emptiness, a lack of an emotional bond with the new country, and a strong cultural ambivalence. Finally, narrative themes are articulated across four interrelated dimensions (cultural, religious, gendered, spatial), revealing interesting differences based on national origin and generation. PMID:27247642

  18. Exploring Identity in Muslim Moroccan and Pakistani Immigrant Women.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Cristina; Tagliabue, Semira

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a qualitative investigation of how Muslim Moroccan and Pakistani female immigrants living in Italy conceptualize their cultural identity. Ten Moroccan and 10 Pakistani (adolescent and adult) women were interviewed through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The interviewees expressed a strong attachment to their culture of origin: their religion is a crucial aspect of their identity, along with certain cultural rules and traditional values. At the same time, both Moroccan and Pakistani participants were ambivalent toward and experienced difficulties in developing a connection to the host country, although the two groups exhibit their lack of connection to their host country in different ways: Moroccans' self-representation is marked by a sense of foreignness and by a lack of an emotional connection with places where they are living while Pakistanis tend to express cultural distance and conflict with the host culture's values. For both the Moroccan and Pakistani groups, the challenge of integration and biculturalism seems demanding in the Italian context and is marked by a deep feeling of emptiness, a lack of an emotional bond with the new country, and a strong cultural ambivalence. Finally, narrative themes are articulated across four interrelated dimensions (cultural, religious, gendered, spatial), revealing interesting differences based on national origin and generation. PMID:27247642

  19. The Recess Renaissance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2015-01-01

    The author tells of his work around the country and world on transforming how schools do recess, free play, and outside time by transforming their outdoor spaces to match. Instead of a playground of fixed structures like traditional school grounds, newer spaces are filled with loose materials that children can use to build forts, dens, and tree…

  20. Educational Finance in Recession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Keith

    1986-01-01

    Discusses two interacting sources limiting educational expenditures in developing nations in light of the impact of the global economic recession: (1) factors affecting overall levels of public expenditures and (2) factors affecting educational priority in the national budget. Offers requirements for an effective response to these challenges. (TRS)

  1. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  2. A 5-year survey of biopsy proven kidney diseases in Lebanon: significant variation in prevalence of primary glomerular diseases by age, population structure and consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Karnib, Hussein H.; Gharavi, Ali G.; Aftimos, Georges; Mahfoud, Ziyad; Saad, Reem; Gemayel, Elias; Masri, Badiaa; Assaad, Shafika; Badr, Kamal F.; Ziyadeh, Fuad N.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Differences in epidemiology of kidney disease across the Middle East may arise from variations in indication for biopsy, environmental exposure and socio-economic status. The Lebanese population is composed of different ethnicities, with distinct ancestry and religion, enabling comparison of their effect on the prevalence of kidney disease within a confined geographic setting and uniform practices. Here we report 5 years’ detailed epidemiology of renal diseases, based on histological diagnosis, in a sample from three large pathology centres in Lebanon. Methods. Records of renal biopsies analysed at the American University of Beirut Medical Center, Hotel Dieu de France Hospital and the Institut National de Pathologie from January 2003 till December 2007 were retrospectively examined. We recorded the following data for each patient: age, gender, indication for renal biopsy and histopathological diagnosis. Religious affiliation and parents’ consanguinity were recorded when feasible. Results. The mean age at renal biopsy was 36.76 ± 20 years (range 1–84). The most common diagnosis was mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (GN; 20%), followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (13.2%). While there were no differences in age, gender or indications for biopsy among different religious affiliations, mesangioproliferative GN was significantly more frequent among Muslims (P = 0.039) and offspring of consanguineous unions (P = 0.036). On the other hand, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was most prevalent in Christians (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Variation in the distribution of diagnoses between Muslim and Christian groups likely reflects differences in population structure and ancestry. In particular, the increased prevalence of mesangioproliferative GN among offspring of consanguineous unions in Muslims suggests a recessive genetic component to this disease which may be identified via homozygosity mapping. These findings have important

  3. Nutritional composition of Pakistani wheat varieties.

    PubMed

    Ikhtiar, Khan; Alam, Zeb

    2007-08-01

    Pakistani wheat varieties are grown over a wide agro-climatic range and as such are anticipated to exhibit yield and quality differences. It is therefore necessary to investigate the nutritional status of wheat varieties in terms of biochemical and physiochemical characteristics available for food and nutritional purposes in Pakistan. The result shows that wheat grains of different varieties contain a net protein level of 9.15%-10.27%, 2.15%-2.55% total fats, 1.72%-1.85% dietary fibers, 77.65x10(-6)-84.25x10(-6) of potassium and 7.70x10(-6)-35.90x10(-6) of sodium ions concentration, 0.24x10(-6)-0.84x10(-6) of phosphorus, 1.44%-2.10% ash, 31.108-43.602 g of thousand grain mass (TGM) and 8.38%-9.67% moisture contents. This study is significant in providing an opportunity to explore the available wheat varieties and to further improve their nutritional excellence and also essential for setting nutritional regulations for domestic and export purposes. PMID:17657856

  4. The Use of High-Density SNP Array to Map Homozygosity in Consanguineous Families to Efficiently Identify Candidate Genes: Application to Woodhouse-Sakati Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Molly B.; Wohler, Elizabeth; Batista, Denise A. S.; Applegate, Carolyn; Hoover-Fong, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Two consanguineous Qatari siblings presented for evaluation: a 17-4/12-year-old male with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, alopecia, intellectual disability, and microcephaly and his 19-year-old sister with primary amenorrhea, alopecia, and normal cognition. Both required hormone treatment to produce secondary sex characteristics and pubertal development beyond Tanner 1. SNP array analysis of both probands was performed to detect shared regions of homozygosity which may harbor homozygous mutations in a gene causing their common features of abnormal pubertal development, alopecia, and variable cognitive delay. Our patients shared multiple homozygous genomic regions; ten shared regions were >1 Mb in length and constituted 0.99% of the genome. DCAF17, encoding a transmembrane nuclear protein of uncertain function, was the only gene identified in a homozygous region known to cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. DCAF17 mutations are associated with Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by alopecia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, and extrapyramidal movements. Sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of DCAF17 in the proband revealed homozygosity for a previously described founder mutation (c.436delC). Targeted DCAF17 sequencing of his affected sibling revealed the same homozygous mutation. This family illustrates the utility of SNP array testing in consanguineous families to efficiently and inexpensively identify regions of genomic homozygosity in which genetic candidates for recessive conditions can be identified. PMID:26664771

  5. A Homozygous TPO Gene Duplication (c.1184_1187dup4) Causes Congenital Hypothyroidism in Three Siblings Born to a Consanguineous Family.

    PubMed

    Cangul, Hakan; Aydin, Banu K; Bas, Firdevs

    2015-12-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common neonatal endocrine disease, and germ-line mutations in the TPO gene cause the inherited form of the disease. Our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of congenital hypothyroidism in three affected children coming from a consanguineous Turkish family. Because CH is usually inherited in autosomal recessive manner in consanguineous/multicase families, we adopted a two-stage strategy of genetic linkage studies and targeted sequencing of the candidate genes. First, we investigated the potential genetic linkage of the family to any known CH locus, using microsatellite markers, and then screened for mutations in linked-gene by conventional sequencing. The family showed potential linkage to the TPO gene and we detected a homozygous duplication (c.1184_1187dup4) in all cases. The mutation segregated with disease status in the family. This study confirms the pathogenicity of the c.1184_1187dup4 mutation in the TPO gene and helps establish a genotype/phenotype correlation associated with this mutation. It also highlights the importance of molecular genetic studies in the definitive diagnosis and accurate classification of CH. PMID:27617131

  6. Vici syndrome in siblings born to consanguineous parents.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Cayır, Atilla; Yuce, Ihsan; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-01-01

    Vici syndrome (OMIM 242840) is a rare syndrome and since its initial description by Vici et al. [1988], only 29 cases have been reported. We describe two brothers from healthy consanguineous Turkish parents with psychomotor delay, congenital bilateral cataracts, high palate, long philtrum, micrognathia, fair hair, and skin. They both had general hypotonia and elevated muscle enzymes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain confirmed agenesis of corpus callosum in both patients. Secundum type atrial septal defect (in Patient 1) and mild mitral, tricuspid, and pulmonary insufficiency (in Patient 2) were detected by echocardiographic examination. Immunological studies were normal, as were chromosome karyotype analyses (46, XY). Both children had bilateral cutaneous syndactyly between second and third toes and also bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Patient 1 had poor feeding and regurgitation necessitating a feeding tube; mild laryngomalacia was subsequently detected by bronchoscopy. Mutation analysis in patient 2 showed a homozygous p.R2483* (c.7447C > T) mutation in EPG5 gene. We report a summary of the clinical findings in our patients and 29 cases from the literature. PMID:26395118

  7. Genetic analysis of consanguineous families presenting with congenital ocular defects.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ehsan; Nadeem Saqib, Muhammad Arif; Sajid, Sundus; Shah, Neelam; Zubair, Muhammad; Khan, Muzammil Ahmad; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Ali, Ghazanfar; Dutta, Atanu Kumar; Danda, Sumita; Lao, Richard; Ling-Fung Tang, Paul; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Ansar, Muhammad; Slavotinek, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (A/M) are a group of rare developmental disorders that affect the size of the ocular globe. A/M may present as the sole clinical feature, but are also frequently found in a variety of syndromes. A/M is genetically heterogeneous and can be caused by chromosomal aberrations, copy number variations and single gene mutations. To date, A/M has been caused by mutations in at least 20 genes that show different modes of inheritance. In this study, we enrolled eight consanguineous families with A/M, including seven from Pakistan and one from India. Sanger and exome sequencing of DNA samples from these families identified three novel mutations including two mutations in the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family Member A3 (ALDH1A3) gene, [c.1310_1311delAT; p.(Tyr437Trpfs*44) and c.964G > A; p.(Val322Met)] and a single missense mutation in Forkhead Box E3 (FOXE3) gene, [c.289A > G p.(Ile97Val)]. Additionally two previously reported mutations were identified in FOXE3 and in Visual System Homeobox 2 (VSX2). This is the first comprehensive study on families with A/M from the Indian subcontinent which provides further evidence for the involvement of known genes with novel and recurrent mutations. PMID:26995144

  8. Consanguinity and recurrence risk of stillbirth and infant death.

    PubMed Central

    Stoltenberg, C; Magnus, P; Skrondal, A; Lie, R T

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to estimate the recurrence risk for stillbirth and infant death and compare results for offspring of first-cousin parents with results for offspring of unrelated parents. METHODS: The study population consisted of all single births with a previous sibling born in Norway between 1967 and 1994. Altogether, 629,888 births were to unrelated parents, and 3466 births were to parents who were first cousins. The risk of stillbirth and infant death was estimated for subsequent siblings contingent on parental consanguinity and survival of the previous sibling. RESULTS: For unrelated parents, the risk of early death (stillbirth plus infant death) for the subsequent sibling was 17 of 1000 if the previous child survived and 67 of 1000 if the previous child died before 1 year of age. For parents who were first cousins, the risk of early death for the subsequent sibling was 29 of 1000 if the previous child survived and 116 of 1000 if the previous child died. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of recurrence of stillbirth and infant death is higher for offspring of first-cousin parents compared with offspring of unrelated parents. PMID:10191794

  9. Van Maldergem syndrome: further characterisation and evidence for neuronal migration abnormalities and autosomal recessive inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Sahar; Swinkels, Marielle; Terhal, Paulien A; Wilson, Louise C; Rich, Philip; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Zwijnenburg, Petra JG; Hall, Christine M; Robertson, Stephen P; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    We present six patients from five unrelated families with a condition originally described by Van Maldergem et al and provide follow-up studies of the original patient. The phenotype comprises a distinctive facial appearance that includes blepharophimosis, maxillary hypoplasia, telecanthus, microtia and atresia of the external auditory meatus, intellectual disability, digital contractures and skeletal anomalies together with subependymal and subcortical neuronal heterotopia. Affected patients typically have neonatal hypotonia, chronic feeding difficulties and respiratory problems. In our cohort, we have observed one instance of sibling recurrence and parental consanguinity in three of the families, indicating that autosomal recessive inheritance is likely. PMID:22473091

  10. A Brazilian family with Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance.

    PubMed

    Malheiros, José Augusto; Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Oliveira, José Teotonio de; Cardoso, Francisco E C

    2007-03-01

    We report the first Brazilian family with Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome. The presence of consanguineous marriages and illness affecting three sisters and one niece support an autosomal recessive transmission. The age at onset of the illness ranged from 12 to 20 years old. The time interval between hearing loss and involvement of other cranial nerves varied from 3 to 12 years. MRI demonstrated bulbar atrophy and also high intensity signal at T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. PMID:17420823

  11. Probable autosomal recessive inheritance of polysplenia, situs inversus and cardiac defects in an Amish family.

    PubMed

    Arnold, G L; Bixler, D; Girod, D

    1983-09-01

    We report on an Amish family with five individuals in two generations with complex congenital heart disease. Autopsy findings in one and clinical examination in the others support the diagnosis of polysplenia "syndrome." In a mouse model, this spectrum of situs abnormalities and cardiovascular defects shows recessive inheritance with homozygotes having either situs solitus or situs inversus or ambiguous situs. The parents of the four affected sibs are fourth cousins. We think that the father of these four children is an affected but clinically normal homozygote, that his deceased sister was an affected homozygote, and it seems likely that they too had consanguinous parents. PMID:6638068

  12. Autosomal recessive hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with mental retardation, optic atrophy and pyramidal signs.

    PubMed Central

    MacDermot, K D; Walker, R W

    1987-01-01

    A syndrome is described, consisting of severe neurogenic distal wasting, generalised muscle weakness, absent ankle reflexes, pyramidal signs, mental retardation, optic atrophy and retinal colloid bodies. A sural nerve biopsy from one case showed loss of nerve fibres suggesting the diagnosis of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. Progression of the disorder was very slow, all patients still being able to walk more than 20 years after the onset. The persons affected with this syndrome were two brothers and their female cousin from a large Gujerati pedigree where consanguinity was high. Autosomal recessive inheritance is therefore suggested. Images PMID:3479531

  13. Comparison of Consanguinity between Parents of Hearing Impaired and Public School Children with Estimation of Risk.

    PubMed

    Sattar, M A; Sultana, M T

    2015-10-01

    Deafness is the hidden disability and the most common human sensory defects which lead to poor educational and employment prospects of childhood. Is there any association of consanguinity and hearing loss or are there any difference of association of consanguinity and hearing loss in specialized and public school children and how much risk is associated?--were the research questions of this study. Total 428 participants have been selected randomly. Hearing impaired were 186 participants and 242 participants were normal hearing school boy. This was a case control, analytical, hypotheses testing study. In normal public school children group, consanguinity was present in 2.5% parents. The rest were married with non relatives. In parents of hearing impaired children group, consanguinity was very high (17.2%). Pearson chi-square test and Odds ratio analysis was done. The value was less than 0.05 and ratio was 8.173. The 'p' value of Pearson chi-square test was less than 0.05. So, the test was highly significant at 95% confidence interval. Odds ratio showed that the risk of profound sensorineural hearing loss in the baby of parents of consanguineous marriages 8.173 times higher than that of non consanguineous marriages. PMID:26620013

  14. Accelerating novel candidate gene discovery in neurogenetic disorders via whole-exome sequencing of prescreened multiplex consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Alazami, Anas M; Patel, Nisha; Shamseldin, Hanan E; Anazi, Shamsa; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Alzahrani, Fatema; Hijazi, Hadia; Alshammari, Muneera; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Salih, Mustafa A; Faqeih, Eissa; Alhashem, Amal; Bashiri, Fahad A; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Kentab, Amal Y; Sogaty, Sameera; Al Tala, Saeed; Temsah, Mohamad-Hani; Tulbah, Maha; Aljelaify, Rasha F; Alshahwan, Saad A; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Alhadid, Adnan A; Aldhalaan, Hesham; AlQallaf, Fatema; Kurdi, Wesam; Alfadhel, Majid; Babay, Zainab; Alsogheer, Mohammad; Kaya, Namik; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Al-Sannaa, Nouriya; Al Mutairi, Fuad; El Khashab, Heba Y; Bohlega, Saeed; Jia, Xiaofei; Nguyen, Henry C; Hammami, Rakad; Adly, Nouran; Mohamed, Jawahir Y; Abdulwahab, Firdous; Ibrahim, Niema; Naim, Ewa A; Al-Younes, Banan; Meyer, Brian F; Hashem, Mais; Shaheen, Ranad; Xiong, Yong; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Aldeeri, Abdulrahman A; Monies, Dorota M; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-01-13

    Our knowledge of disease genes in neurological disorders is incomplete. With the aim of closing this gap, we performed whole-exome sequencing on 143 multiplex consanguineous families in whom known disease genes had been excluded by autozygosity mapping and candidate gene analysis. This prescreening step led to the identification of 69 recessive genes not previously associated with disease, of which 33 are here described (SPDL1, TUBA3E, INO80, NID1, TSEN15, DMBX1, CLHC1, C12orf4, WDR93, ST7, MATN4, SEC24D, PCDHB4, PTPN23, TAF6, TBCK, FAM177A1, KIAA1109, MTSS1L, XIRP1, KCTD3, CHAF1B, ARV1, ISCA2, PTRH2, GEMIN4, MYOCD, PDPR, DPH1, NUP107, TMEM92, EPB41L4A, and FAM120AOS). We also encountered instances in which the phenotype departed significantly from the established clinical presentation of a known disease gene. Overall, a likely causal mutation was identified in >73% of our cases. This study contributes to the global effort toward a full compendium of disease genes affecting brain function. PMID:25558065

  15. Novel homozygous PANK2 mutation identified in a consanguineous Chinese pedigree with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Fang; Li, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Wu, Ji-Min

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene mutations. It is clinically characterized by early onset of extrapyramidal symptoms, with or without pigmentary retinopathy, optic atrophy and acanthocytosis. The specific radiographic appearance of PKAN is the eye-of-the-tiger sign. However, there are few studies regarding PKAN patients of Chinese Han ancestry. In the present study, a Chinese 20-year-old female with an 8-year history of unsteady walking and involuntary movements is described. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed eye-of-the-tiger sign. Following sequencing of PANK2, a novel homozygous c.863C>T (p.P288L) mutation was identified in the patient and heterozygous c.863C>T was identified in her consanguineous parents. The absence of this mutation in the 1000 Genomes database, The Exome Aggregation Consortium, and 200 controls demonstrated that this mutation was probably pathogenic for PKAN in this family. In addition, the PANK2 c.863C>T mutation was predicted to be deleterious by SIFT, disease causing by Mutation Taster and probably damaging by PolyPhen2. PMID:27446545

  16. Workplace Learning in Pakistani Schools: A Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawab, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Literature on workplace learning emphasizes that learning should be continually generated and negotiated in the workplace. How does this concept unfold in the developing context? This paper aims at understanding teachers' workplace learning and the conditions which influence such learning in a private school of Pakistani context.…

  17. Entrepreneurial Attributes among Postgraduate Students of a Pakistani University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Akhtar; Topping, Keith J.; Tariq, Riaz H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores entrepreneurial attributes among the students of The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, a public sector Pakistani university. Multistage sampling was employed to maximize the representation. Five hundred and twenty one master's level students from thirty departments returned completed questionnaires. Three factors emerged: self…

  18. An Estimate of the Average Number of Recessive Lethal Mutations Carried by Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ziyue; Waggoner, Darrel; Stephens, Matthew; Ober, Carole; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-01-01

    The effects of inbreeding on human health depend critically on the number and severity of recessive, deleterious mutations carried by individuals. In humans, existing estimates of these quantities are based on comparisons between consanguineous and nonconsanguineous couples, an approach that confounds socioeconomic and genetic effects of inbreeding. To overcome this limitation, we focused on a founder population that practices a communal lifestyle, for which there is almost complete Mendelian disease ascertainment and a known pedigree. Focusing on recessive lethal diseases and simulating allele transmissions, we estimated that each haploid set of human autosomes carries on average 0.29 (95% credible interval [0.10, 0.84]) recessive alleles that lead to complete sterility or death by reproductive age when homozygous. Comparison to existing estimates in humans suggests that a substantial fraction of the total burden imposed by recessive deleterious variants is due to single mutations that lead to sterility or death between birth and reproductive age. In turn, comparison to estimates from other eukaryotes points to a surprising constancy of the average number of recessive lethal mutations across organisms with markedly different genome sizes. PMID:25697177

  19. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  20. Bombay blood group: Is prevalence decreasing with urbanization and the decreasing rate of consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Sujata; Kotasthane, Dhananjay S.; Chowdhury, Puskar S.; Sarkar, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    Context: Bombay blood group although rare is found to be more prevalent in the Western and Southern states of India, believed to be associated with consanguineous marriage. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of the Bombay blood group (Oh) in the urban population of Puducherry. To find the effect of urbanization on consanguineous marriage and to establish whether consanguinity plays a part in the prevalence of Oh group. To compare Oh group prevalence with that of other neighboring states, where population is not predominantly urban. Settings and Design: This is a descriptive study in a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry, over a period of 6 years. Materials and Methods: All blood samples showing ‘O’ group were tested with anti-H lectin. Specialized tests like Adsorption Elution Technique, inhibition assay for determination of secretor status were performed on Oh positive cases. Any history of consanguineous marriage was recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: All variables were categorical variable and percentage and proportions were calculated manually. Results: Analysis of the results of 35,497 study subjects showed that the most common group was ‘O’ group constituting 14,164 (39.90%) of subjects. Only three “Oh” that is, Bombay phenotype (0.008%) were detected. Consanguinity was observed in two cases (66.66%). Conclusions: This study shows the prevalence of Bombay blood group representing the urban population of Puducherry, to be high (0.008%) and associated with consanguineous marriage (66.66%). Thus, consanguinity is still an important risk factor present, even in an urban population in Southern India. PMID:26420929

  1. Deep sequencing reveals 50 novel genes for recessive cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Najmabadi, Hossein; Hu, Hao; Garshasbi, Masoud; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Chen, Wei; Hosseini, Masoumeh; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Haas, Stefan; Jamali, Payman; Zecha, Agnes; Mohseni, Marzieh; Püttmann, Lucia; Vahid, Leyla Nouri; Jensen, Corinna; Moheb, Lia Abbasi; Bienek, Melanie; Larti, Farzaneh; Mueller, Ines; Weissmann, Robert; Darvish, Hossein; Wrogemann, Klaus; Hadavi, Valeh; Lipkowitz, Bettina; Esmaeeli-Nieh, Sahar; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kariminejad, Roxana; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Cohen, Monika; Fattahi, Zohreh; Rost, Imma; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Hertzberg, Christoph; Dehghan, Atefeh; Rajab, Anna; Banavandi, Mohammad Javad Soltani; Hoffer, Julia; Falah, Masoumeh; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kuss, Andreas Walter; Tzschach, Andreas; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ropers, H Hilger

    2011-10-01

    Common diseases are often complex because they are genetically heterogeneous, with many different genetic defects giving rise to clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. This has been amply documented for early-onset cognitive impairment, or intellectual disability, one of the most complex disorders known and a very important health care problem worldwide. More than 90 different gene defects have been identified for X-chromosome-linked intellectual disability alone, but research into the more frequent autosomal forms of intellectual disability is still in its infancy. To expedite the molecular elucidation of autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we have now performed homozygosity mapping, exon enrichment and next-generation sequencing in 136 consanguineous families with autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from Iran and elsewhere. This study, the largest published so far, has revealed additional mutations in 23 genes previously implicated in intellectual disability or related neurological disorders, as well as single, probably disease-causing variants in 50 novel candidate genes. Proteins encoded by several of these genes interact directly with products of known intellectual disability genes, and many are involved in fundamental cellular processes such as transcription and translation, cell-cycle control, energy metabolism and fatty-acid synthesis, which seem to be pivotal for normal brain development and function. PMID:21937992

  2. Profiling β Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  3. THE PREVALENCE OF CONSANGUINEOUS MARRIAGES AND AFFECTING FACTORS IN TURKEY: A NATIONAL SURVEY.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sena; Pinar, Gul; Kaplan, Bekir; Aslantekin, Filiz; Karabulut, Erdem; Ayar, Banu; Dilmen, Ugur

    2016-09-01

    This study was carried out by the Turkish Republic Ministry of Health to determine the prevalence of consanguineous marriage and its correlates with socio-demographic and obstetric risk factors in women in Turkey. The cross-sectional, national-level study was carried out from October to December 2013. The study population was composed of women between the ages of 15 and 65 years living in Turkey. The sample size was calculated as 9290 houses within Turkey's 81 provinces so as to improve the Turkish rural-urban expectations by means of systematic stack sampling according to the Turkish Statistical Institute's address-based vital statistics system. The target sample size was 6364, but only eligible 4913 women, who had been married, were included in the study. The consanguineous marriage frequency in the sample was found to be 18.5%, and of these 57.8% were first cousin marriages. Women living in an extended family and whose education level and first marriage ages were low, and whose perceived economic status was poor, had higher frequencies of consanguineous marriage (p<0.001). Consanguineous marriage frequencies were higher (p<0.001) for women who had spontaneous abortions and stillbirths or who had given birth to infants with a congenital abnormality. In this context, it is important to develop national policies and strategies to prevent consanguineous marriages in Turkey. PMID:26892044

  4. Profiling β Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  5. Social structure and consanguinity in a French mountain Population (1550-1849).

    PubMed

    Rabino-Massa, Emma; Prost, Michel; Boëtsch, Gilles

    2005-04-01

    Sociocultural factors play a crucial role in the variation of consanguinity in a population. The choice of specific matrimonial strategies can favor the closure or opening of the group to the outside, whereas differential fertility affects the gene flow from one generation to another. In the present study we analyzed the role of socioprofessional groups in the maintenance of endogamy and consanguinity in a French Alpine valley: Vallouise in the Briançon area. In mountain environments, where the reproductive space is limited and quickly saturated, the autochthonous families adopt diversified matrimonial strategies. These marriage practices tend to prevent fragmentation of agricultural property. We analyzed the matrimonial behavior in the two main social groups of this population (décideurs and farmers) from 1550 to 1849. To better understand the behavior of the two social groups, we considered the two components of consanguinity, close and distant. Our study showed that the two groups had similar behavior regarding consanguinity. The way to prevent fragmentation of the patrimony was to choose a consanguineous spouse. This type of strategy inevitably leads to a high percentage of endogamy, which in this region of the Alps exceeded 90% through many centuries. PMID:16201137

  6. Importance of Genetic Studies in Consanguineous Populations for the Characterization of Novel Human Gene Functions

    PubMed Central

    Shihab, Hashem A.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Gaunt, Tom R.; Day, Ian N.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Consanguineous offspring have elevated levels of homozygosity. Autozygous stretches within their genome are likely to harbour loss of function (LoF) mutations which will lead to complete inactivation or dysfunction of genes. Studying consanguineous offspring with clinical phenotypes has been very useful for identifying disease causal mutations. However, at present, most of the genes in the human genome have no disorder associated with them or have unknown function. This is presumably mostly due to the fact that homozygous LoF variants are not observed in outbred populations which are the main focus of large sequencing projects. However, another reason may be that many genes in the genome—even when completely “knocked out,” do not cause a distinct or defined phenotype. Here, we discuss the benefits and implications of studying consanguineous populations, as opposed to the traditional approach of analysing a subset of consanguineous families or individuals with disease. We suggest that studying consanguineous populations “as a whole” can speed up the characterisation of novel gene functions as well as indicating nonessential genes and/or regions in the human genome. We also suggest designing a single nucleotide variant (SNV) array to make the process more efficient. PMID:27000383

  7. Effects of consanguineous marriage on reproductive outcome in an Arab community in Israel.

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, L; Merlob, P; Gabriel, R; Shohat, M

    1997-01-01

    Intrafamilial marriage is favoured by the Arab community in Israel, almost all of whom live in villages populated by a few (< 20) founding families. A previous study in Taibe, a large Arab village located 30 km from Tel Aviv, showed a significantly high malformation rate among infants of consanguineous parents. The present study examines the reproductive consequences of parental consanguinity in 610 families from the same village, selected retrospectively through infants routinely seen in the local well baby clinic. All mothers were interviewed with regard to previous pregnancy outcomes, including abortions, stillbirths, and neonatal or infant deaths, as well as the degree of consanguinity. In addition, we analysed the anthropometric measurements of the probands. The incidence of infant deaths was significantly higher in the inbred group (p < 0.001). No significant increase in fetal loss between the inbred and outbred groups was observed. There were no differences in anthropometric features, except for a lower birth weight in the consanguineous group (p < 0.035). This study, combined with our previous studies of the same population, indicates a prominent public health problem associated with consanguineous marriage in the Arab community and a need for specific genetic counselling. PMID:9429142

  8. COL11A2 mutation associated with autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome: molecular and clinical overlap with otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED).

    PubMed

    Harel, Tamar; Rabinowitz, Ronen; Hendler, Netta; Galil, Aharon; Flusser, Hagit; Chemke, Juan; Gradstein, Libe; Lifshitz, Tova; Ofir, Rivka; Elbedour, Khalil; Birk, Ohad S

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome (WZS) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by rhizomelic dwarfism and severe hearing loss. Mutations in the COL11A2 gene have been implicated in causing the autosomal dominant form of this syndrome as well as non-ocular Stickler syndrome and the autosomal recessive syndrome otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED). In a consanguineous Bedouin tribe living in Southern Israel, five individuals affected by autosomal recessive WZS were available for genetic analysis. Homozygosity of a mutation in the COL11A2 gene was found in all affected individuals. This finding lends molecular support to the clinical notion that autosomal recessive WZS and OSMED are a single entity. PMID:15558753

  9. Small operator outwits recession

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.

    1982-12-01

    Explains how Rockcastle, Inc., one of the smallest surface coal mine operators in the West, maintains production during the recession by concentrating on short-term contracts and spot sales to industrial and commercial users. The mining company has selected well established coal brokers to market its product to users such as sugar beet and cement plants, a brewery, steel mill, utility, and a molybdenum mill. Rockcastle produces, on a two-shift schedule, about 1,200 tpd of coal with a total workforce of 20, or approximately 30 tons per manshift. A fleet of 4 scrapers, with dozer-assist in most cases, is capable of removing 5,000 to 6,000 cu yd of overburden and interburden per shift.

  10. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  11. Fort Play Children Recreate Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase…

  12. The changing pattern of consanguinity in a selected region of the Israeli Arab community.

    PubMed

    Sharkia, Rajach; Zaid, Muhamad; Athamna, Abed; Cohen, Dani; Azem, Abdussalam; Zalan, Abdelnaser

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of consanguinity within the Israeli Arab community is relatively high, and is associated with high rates of inherited disorders that lead to a high frequency of morbidity and mortality. Data on consanguinity between couples were recorded during two periods (1980-1985 and 2000-2004) in relation to socioeconomic status of 4 selected villages. Two of the villages (A and B) are known to have high socioeconomic status, and the other two (C and D) are known to have low socioeconomic status. The average incidence of consanguineous marriages has slightly decreased from 33.1% in the first period to 25.9% in the second period (P = 0.0218) in all of the 4 villages. Marriages between first cousins showed a more significant decrease, from 23.9% in the first period to 13.6% in the second period (P < 0.0001). The average consanguinity rates of villages A and B were found to decrease from 22.3 to 16.2% respectively (P < 0.001) between the two observation periods, whereas those of villages C and D were found to decrease from 42.3 to 37.2%, (P < 0.001) during the same two periods. Thus, there has been a change in the pattern of consanguinity within the selected Israeli Arab villages, between the two study periods. This change seems to correlate with the sociodemographic status of the villages. Therefore, improving the socioeconomic status of the villages, as well as implementation of proper health education programs, is expected to have a positive effect in reducing consanguinity. PMID:17941037

  13. Novel SIL1 nonstop mutation in a Chinese consanguineous family with Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome and Dandy-Walker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gai, Nan; Jiang, Chen; Zou, Yong-Yi; Zheng, Yu; Liang, De-Sheng; Wu, Ling-Qian

    2016-07-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which is characterized by congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, progressive muscle weakness, and delayed psychomotor development. SIL1, which is located at 5q31.2, is the only gene known to cause MSS. Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is defined by hypoplasia, upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis, and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle; however, its genetic pathogeny remains unclear. Here, we report a Chinese consanguineous family with MSS and DWS. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel nonstop mutation in SIL1. Sanger sequencing revealed that the mutation was segregated in this family according to a recessive mode of inheritance. We found that the mutation changed a stop codon (TGA) to an arginine codon (CGA), and no in-frame termination codon in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of SIL1 could be found. The mRNA levels of SIL1 were decreased by 56.6% and 37.5% in immortalized lymphoblasts of the patients respectively; the protein levels of SIL1 were substantially decreased. This case study is the first report on Chinese MSS patients, MSS complicated by DWS, and a nonstop mutation in SIL1. Our findings imply the pathogenetic association between DWS and MSS. PMID:27106665

  14. Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L.; DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J.; Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M.

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m{sup 3} internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h{sup {minus}1} was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

  15. Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L. ); DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J. ); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M. )

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m[sup 3] internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h[sup [minus]1] was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO[sub 2], and NO[sub x]. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

  16. Gingival Recession: Review and Strategies in Treatment of Recession

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Koppolu; Rajababu, Palaparthy; Satyanarayana, Durvasula; Sagar, Vidya

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common esthetic concerns associated with the periodontal tissues is gingival recession. Gingival recession is the exposure of root surfaces due to apical migration of the gingival tissue margins; gingival margin migrates apical to the cementoenamel junction. Although it rarely results in tooth loss, marginal tissue recession is associated with thermal and tactile sensitivity, esthetic complaints, and a tendency toward root caries. This paper reviews etiology, consequences, and the available surgical procedures for the coverage of exposed root surfaces, including three case reports. PMID:23082256

  17. The Effect of Inbreeding on the Distribution of Compound Heterozygotes: A Lesson from Lipase H Mutations in Autosomal Recessive Woolly Hair/Hypotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Petukhova, Lynn; Shimomura, Yutaka; Wajid, Muhammad; Gorroochurn, Prakash; Hodge, Susan E.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2009-01-01

    Autozygosity mapping in consanguineous families has proven to be a powerful method for identifying recessive disease genes. Using this technique with whole genome SNP data generated from low density mapping arrays, we previously identified two genes that underlie autosomal recessive woolly hair (ARWH/hypotrichosis; OMIM278150), specifically P2RY5 and Lipase H (LIPH). In the current study, we sought to identify a novel disease locus for ARWH/hypotrichosis by analyzing two large consanguineous families from Pakistan who had initially been excluded for mutations at either of these disease loci by haplotype analysis with microsatellite markers. A genome-wide analysis of 10 members from each of the two families failed to identify significant regions of autozygosity or linkage. Upon genotyping an additional 10 family members in one of the families, parametric linkage analysis identified a region on chromosome 3q27 with evidence for linkage (Z = 2.5). Surprisingly, this region contains the LIPH gene. Microsatellite markers located within the LIPH gene were used for haplotype analysis and demonstrated that not one, but two haplotypes were segregating with the phenotype in each of these families. DNA sequencing identified two distinct LIPH mutations (280_369dup90 and 659_660delTA). Each affected individual (n = 38) was either homozygous for one mutation (n = 7 and 16 respectively), or compound heterozygous (n = 15). A review of the literature identified several reports of compound heterozygotes in consanguineous families. Prompted by this finding, we derived the probability that a patient affected with a recessive disease is carrying two mutations at the disease locus. We suggest that the validity of the IBD assumption may be challenged in large consanguineous families. PMID:19365138

  18. Map of autosomal recessive genetic disorders in Saudi Arabia: concepts and future directions.

    PubMed

    Al-Owain, Mohammed; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair

    2012-10-01

    Saudi Arabia has a population of 27.1 million. Prevalence of many autosomal recessive disorders is higher than in other known populations. This is attributable to the high rate of consanguineous marriages (56%), the tribal structure, and large family size. Founder mutations have been recognized in many autosomal recessive disorders, many of which are overrepresented within certain tribes. On the other hand, allelic heterogeneity is also observed among common and rare autosomal recessive conditions. With the adoption of more advanced molecular techniques in the country in recent years in conjunction with international collaboration, the mapping of various autosomal recessive disorders has increased dramatically. Different genetic concepts pertinent to this highly inbred population are discussed here. Addressing such genetic disorders at the national level will become a cornerstone of strategic health care initiatives in the 21st century. Current efforts are hampered by many socio-cultural and health care related factors. Education about genetic diseases, establishment of a "national registry" and mutational database, and enhanced healthcare access are crucial for success of any preventative campaign. PMID:22903695

  19. [Etiology of gingival recessions].

    PubMed

    Kleber, B M; Schenk, H J

    1989-11-01

    About every third patient of our department suffers from gingival recessions (g. r.): 1980, 1985, 1986, 1987 altogether 1039 patients from 4022. People at the age of 20-25 years are mainly affected: 44.4% of these patients in the age-group of 20-25 years suffer from g. r., 28.3% of patients suffering from l.P.a. are 20-25 years old. Patients diseased with g. r. (N = 60) show functional disturbances (79% at the 1st bicuspid, 72% at the 2nd bicuspid) during their occlusion movements to a great extent. Patients afflected by g.r. (N = 20) show in comparison to healthy people a smaller diameter of the canin's apical basis both in upper and lower jaw, a smaller circumference of the alveolar crest as well as an upper canin-crown which is turned out from the teeth arcus in a more labial direction. Prevention of g. r. involves individual oral health education to protect the vestibular gingiva from chronic brushing-trauma, an early follow-up, and a functional adjustment. PMID:2638999

  20. Consanguinity and the sib-pair method: An approach using identity by descent between and within individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpoux, F.

    1996-11-01

    To test for linkage between a trait and a marker, one can consider identical marker alleles in related individuals, for instance, sibs. For recessive diseases, it has been shown that some information may be gained from the identity by descent (IBD) of the two alleles of an affected inbred individual at the marker locus. The aim of this paper is to extend the sib-pair method of linkage analysis to the situation of sib pairs sampled from consanguineous populations. This extension takes maximum advantage of the information provided by both the IBD pattern between sibs and allelic identity within each sib of the pair. This is possible through the use of the condensed identity coefficients. Here, we propose a new test of linkage based on a {Chi}{sup 2}. We compare the performance of this test with that of the classical {Chi}{sup 2} test based on the distribution of sib pairs sharing 0, 1, or 2 alleles IBD. For sib pairs from first-cousin matings, the proposed test can better detect the role of a disease-susceptibility (DS) locus. Its power is shown to be greater than that of the classical test, especially for models where the DS allele may be common and incompletely penetrant; that is to say for situations that may be encountered in multifactorial diseases. A study of the impact of inbreeding on the expected proportions of sib pairs sharing 0, 1, or 2 alleles IBD is also performed here. Ignoring inbreeding, when in fact inbreeding exists, increases the rate of type I errors in tests of linkage. 21 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Molecular characterisation of congenital glaucoma in a consanguineous Canadian community: a step towards preventing glaucoma related blindness.

    PubMed

    Martin, S N; Sutherland, J; Levin, A V; Klose, R; Priston, M; Héon, E

    2000-06-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in Canada. Congenital glaucoma usually manifests during the first years of life and is characterised by severe visual loss and autosomal recessive inheritance. Two disease loci, on chromosomes 1p36 and 2p21, have been associated with various forms of congenital glaucoma. A branch of a large six generation family from a consanguineous Amish community in south western Ontario was affected with congenital glaucoma and was studied by linkage and mutational analysis to identify the glaucoma related genetic defects. Linkage analysis using the MLINK component of the LINKAGE package (v 5.1) showed evidence of linkage to the 2p21 region (Zmax=3.34, theta=0, D2S1348 and D2S1346). Mutational analysis of the primary candidate gene, CYP1B1, was done by direct cycle sequencing, dideoxy fingerprinting analysis, and fragment analysis. Two different disease causing mutations in exon 3, 1410del13 and 1505G-->A, both segregated with the disease phenotype. The two different combinations of these alleles appeared to result in a variable expressivity of the phenotype. The compound heterozygote appeared to have a milder phenotype when compared to the homozygotes for the 13 bp deletion. The congenital glaucoma phenotype for this large inbred Amish family is the result of mutations in CYP1B1 (2p21). The molecular information derived from this study will be used to help identify carriers of the CYP1B1 mutation in this community and optimise the management of those at risk of developing glaucoma. PMID:10851252

  2. An analysis of consanguineous marriage in the Muslim population of India at regional and state levels.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Hussain, R

    2000-01-01

    Consanguineous marriage is widely favoured in a large majority of the world's Islamic populations. According to recent estimates, the resident Muslim population of India is over 100 million. However, apart from a few numerically small or geographically defined surveys, little is known about their patterns of marriage preferences since partition of the Indian Subcontinent in 1947. This study seeks to determine the prevalence and patterns of consanguineous marriages contracted among Indian Muslims at regional and state levels during the last two generations. Data from the 1992/93 Indian National Family Health Survey (NFHS) were used in the analysis. The NFHS was a nationally-representative survey of ever-married women aged 13-49 years, conducted across 25 states of India. Of the initial 9845 respondents, 8436 were included in the final weighted analysis sample. Overall, 22.0% of marriages were found to be contracted between spouses related as second cousins or closer, ranging from 15.9% in the eastern states to 32.9% in the western states of India. In all parts of the country first cousin marriages were the preferred form of consanguineous union, and in four of the five regions paternal first cousin marriages predominated. Despite predictions to the contrary, there was no evidence of a significant change in the prevalence of consanguineous unions over the course of the study period, which extended from the late 1950s to the early 1990s. PMID:10768421

  3. The Effect of Consanguineous Marriage on Reading Disability in the Arab Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Rabia, Salim; Maroun, Lateefeh

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of consanguineous marriage in the Arab community on reading disabilities of offspring. It examined whether the rate of reading disabilities was higher among offspring of first-cousin parents than offspring of unrelated parents; and whether reading-disabled children of first-cousin parents were more disabled in…

  4. The Study of Workplace Learning and Performance Competencies among Pakistani Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwani, Naseem Saeed

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Pakistani Workplace Learning and Performance (WLP) practitioners' perceptions of the importance of WLP competencies at the present time and in the next five years. The goals were to: (1) identify and characterize a profile of Pakistani WLP practitioners; (2) analyze perceptions of the current and future…

  5. Pakistani Students' Perceptions about Use of the Internet in Their Academic Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Zarqa S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore Pakistani university students' use of the Internet in their studies and their perceptions of online academic life. Findings show that Internet use for academic purposes has both positive and negative aspects. There is a gender difference in Pakistani students' perceptions about the use of the Internet…

  6. Routes Into Education and Employment for Young Pakistani and Bangladeshi Women in the UK. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Angela; Shaheen, Nusrat; Kalra, Virinder; Fieldhouse, E.

    Routes into education and employment for young Pakistani and Bangladeshi women in Oldham, England, were examined. The data sources were as follows: group discussions with Pakistani and Bangladeshi young people at different stages in the educational system and at an early stage of labor market participation; interviews with public and voluntary…

  7. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families

    PubMed Central

    Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N.; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 – 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992

  8. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S.

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  9. A frameshift mutation in GRXCR2 causes recessively inherited hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Ayesha; Kohrman, David C.; Naz, Sadaf

    2014-01-01

    More than 360 million humans are affected with some degree of hearing loss, either early or later in life. A genetic cause for the disorder is present in a majority of the cases. We mapped a locus (DFNB101) for hearing loss in humans to chromosome 5q in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Exome sequencing revealed an insertion mutation in GRXCR2 as the cause of moderate to severe and likely progressive hearing loss in the affected individuals of the family. The frameshift mutation is predicted to affect a conserved, cysteine-rich region of GRXCR2, and to result in an abnormal extension of the C-terminus. Functional studies by cell transfections demonstrated that the mutant protein is unstable and mislocalized relative to wild type GRXCR2, consistent with a loss of function mutation. Targeted disruption of Grxcr2 is concurrently reported to cause hearing loss in mice. The structural abnormalities in this animal model suggest a role for GRXCR2 in the development of stereocilia bundles, specialized structures on the apical surface of sensory cells in the cochlea that are critical for sound detection. Our results indicate that GRXCR2 should be considered in differential genetic diagnosis for individuals with early onset, moderate to severe and progressive hearing loss. PMID:24619944

  10. Consanguineous Marital Union Resulting in a Progeny of Whistling-face Syndrome and Hemophilia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Vivek; Gurjar, Minal

    2015-04-01

    Many different types of genetic disorders are noted to be prevalent among consanguineous progeny. Although the most common type of consanguineous union in all major societies is between first cousins, the importance of customary influences is apparent from variations in the specific types of first-cousin marriages contracted. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of whistling-face syndrome (WFS) are not available, but less than a hundred cases reported in the literature are noted. We are presenting a case where a consanguineous marriage resulted in two of their children presenting with WFS and one with hemophilia. PMID:25954077

  11. Missense Mutations in CRYAB Are Liable for Recessive Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Arif O.; Wang, Qiwei; Kabir, Firoz; Khan, Asma A.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was initiated to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological and clinical examination, and slit-lamp photographs were ascertained for affected individuals who have not yet been operated for the removal of the cataractous lens. Blood samples were obtained, and genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells. A genome-wide scan was completed with short tandem repeat (STR) markers, and the logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Protein coding exons of CRYAB were sequenced, bi-directionally. Evolutionary conservation was investigated by aligning CRYAB orthologues, and the expression of Cryab in embryonic and postnatal mice lens was investigated with TaqMan probe. Results The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals had nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analysis suggested a potential region on chromosome 11q23 harboring CRYAB. DNA sequencing identified a missense variation: c.34C>T (p.R12C) in CRYAB that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequent interrogation of our entire cohort of familial cases identified a second familial case localized to chromosome 11q23 harboring a c.31C>T (p.R11C) mutation. In silico analyses suggested that the mutations identified in familial cases, p.R11C and p.R12C will not be tolerated by the three-dimensional structure of CRYAB. Real-time PCR analysis identified the expression of Cryab in mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 (E15) that increased significantly until postnatal day 6 (P6) with steady level of expression thereafter. Conclusion Here, we report two novel missense mutations, p.R11C and p.R12C, in CRYAB associated with autosomal recessive congenital nuclear cataracts. PMID:26402864

  12. Counting Pakistanis in the Middle East: problems and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Stahl, C W; Farooq-i-azam

    1990-01-01

    "Using Pakistan as a case study, this article focuses on the difficulties of measuring both the outflow of workers over time and the stock abroad at any particular time. The various estimates of the number of Pakistanis in the Middle East are evaluated and an alternative estimate is provided based on hitherto unused data from two major surveys of returning workers. The alternative estimate differs substantially from the others, the difference being attributed principally to clandestine worker immigration. The concluding section discusses the policy implications of inaccurate information about the numbers of workers abroad and the likely effects of the current Persian Gulf crisis on Pakistan's economy." PMID:12283581

  13. Diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia: a novel recessive brain malformation

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction with a characteristic ‘butterfly’-like contour of the midbrain on axial sections. Additional imaging features included variable degrees of supratentorial ventricular dilatation and hypoplasia to complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging showed diffuse hypomyelination and lack of an identifiable corticospinal tract. All patients displayed severe cognitive impairment, post-natal progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, spastic quadriparesis and seizures. Autistic features were noted in older cases. Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in two families. One of the patients required shunting for hydrocephalus; however, this yielded no change in ventricular size suggestive of dysplasia rather than obstruction. We propose the term ‘diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia’ to characterize this autosomal recessive malformation. PMID:22822038

  14. Mutations in HPCA Cause Autosomal-Recessive Primary Isolated Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Angelova, Plamena R.; Bartolomé-Robledo, Fernando; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Daniah; Stamelou, Maria; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Reports of primary isolated dystonia inherited in an autosomal-recessive (AR) manner, often lumped together as “DYT2 dystonia,” have appeared in the scientific literature for several decades, but no genetic cause has been identified to date. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous kindred affected by AR isolated dystonia, we identified homozygous mutations in HPCA, a gene encoding a neuronal calcium sensor protein found almost exclusively in the brain and at particularly high levels in the striatum, as the cause of disease in this family. Subsequently, compound-heterozygous mutations in HPCA were also identified in a second independent kindred affected by AR isolated dystonia. Functional studies suggest that hippocalcin might play a role in regulating voltage-dependent calcium channels. The identification of mutations in HPCA as a cause of AR primary isolated dystonia paves the way for further studies to assess whether “DYT2 dystonia” is a genetically homogeneous condition or not. PMID:25799108

  15. Ethnic disparity in 21-hydroxylase gene mutations identified in Pakistani congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by defects in the steroid 21 hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2). We studied the spectrum of mutations in CYP21A2 gene in a multi-ethnic population in Pakistan to explore the genetics of CAH. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted for the identification of mutations CYP21A2 and their phenotypic associations in CAH using ARMS-PCR assay. Results Overall, 29 patients were analyzed for nine different mutations. The group consisted of two major forms of CAH including 17 salt wasters and 12 simple virilizers. There were 14 phenotypic males and 15 females representing all the major ethnic groups of Pakistan. Parental consanguinity was reported in 65% cases and was equally distributed in the major ethnic groups. Among 58 chromosomes analyzed, mutations were identified in 45 (78.6%) chromosomes. The most frequent mutation was I2 splice (27%) followed by Ile173Asn (26%), Arg 357 Trp (19%), Gln319stop, 16% and Leu308InsT (12%), whereas Val282Leu was not observed in this study. Homozygosity was seen in 44% and heterozygosity in 34% cases. I2 splice mutation was found to be associated with SW in the homozygous. The Ile173Asn mutation was identified in both SW and SV forms. Moreover, Arg357Trp manifested SW in compound heterozygous state. Conclusion Our study showed that CAH exists in our population with ethnic difference in the prevalence of mutations examined. PMID:21329531

  16. Practice of Consanguinity and Unusual Cases of Inherited Familial Chromosome Abnormalities: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Debarshi; Bhairi, Vidya; S Kadandale, Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    We present 2 cases of likely rare event. In case 1, 3(rd) degree consanguineous marriage revealed inv(6) with same break points in parents who were found to be phenotypically normal. The same inv(6) being inherited in progeny but presented with low AMH (anti Mullerian hormone) and high level of FSH (follicular stimulating hormone) leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome/premature ovarian failure. In case 2, a couple was presented with 2(nd) degree consanguineous marriage and referred for 2 recurrent/ missed abortions. The amounts of shared genes are suggestive of more lethal genetic outcomes and inferred endogamy is a major driver to reproductive fiascoes, the ancestries of which are deeply tied at the meiotic level. PMID:27386439

  17. Institutional protocol to manage consanguinity detected by genetic testing in pregnancy in a minor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Laura P; Beck, Anita E; Tsuchiya, Karen D; Chow, Penny M; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Wiester, Rebecca T; Feldman, Kenneth W

    2015-03-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and other types of genetic tests have the potential to detect first-degree consanguinity and uncover parental rape in cases of minor teenage pregnancy. We present 2 cases in which genetic testing identified parental rape of a minor teenager. In case 1, single-nucleotide polymorphism array in a patient with multiple developmental abnormalities demonstrated multiple long stretches of homozygosity, revealing parental rape of a teenage mother. In case 2, a vague maternal sexual assault history and diagnosis of Pompe disease by direct gene sequencing identified parental rape of a minor. Given the medical, legal, and ethical implications of such revelations, a protocol was developed at our institution to manage consanguinity identified via genetic testing. PMID:25687148

  18. Institutional Protocol to Manage Consanguinity Detected by Genetic Testing in Pregnancy in a Minor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Laura P.; Beck, Anita E.; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Chow, Penny M.; Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Wiester, Rebecca T.

    2015-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and other types of genetic tests have the potential to detect first-degree consanguinity and uncover parental rape in cases of minor teenage pregnancy. We present 2 cases in which genetic testing identified parental rape of a minor teenager. In case 1, single-nucleotide polymorphism array in a patient with multiple developmental abnormalities demonstrated multiple long stretches of homozygosity, revealing parental rape of a teenage mother. In case 2, a vague maternal sexual assault history and diagnosis of Pompe disease by direct gene sequencing identified parental rape of a minor. Given the medical, legal, and ethical implications of such revelations, a protocol was developed at our institution to manage consanguinity identified via genetic testing. PMID:25687148

  19. Practice of Consanguinity and Unusual Cases of Inherited Familial Chromosome Abnormalities: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Debarshi; Bhairi, Vidya; S Kadandale, Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    We present 2 cases of likely rare event. In case 1, 3rd degree consanguineous marriage revealed inv(6) with same break points in parents who were found to be phenotypically normal. The same inv(6) being inherited in progeny but presented with low AMH (anti Mullerian hormone) and high level of FSH (follicular stimulating hormone) leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome/premature ovarian failure. In case 2, a couple was presented with 2nd degree consanguineous marriage and referred for 2 recurrent/ missed abortions. The amounts of shared genes are suggestive of more lethal genetic outcomes and inferred endogamy is a major driver to reproductive fiascoes, the ancestries of which are deeply tied at the meiotic level.

  20. Ascorbic acid contents of Pakistani fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M Perwaiz; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Mehboobali, Naseema

    2006-10-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are good sources of vitamin C which is known for its antioxidant and immune-enhancing effects. The objective of this study was to determine ascorbic acid (vitamin C) contents of regularly consumed fruits and vegetables available in Pakistani markets. Most commonly used fresh fruits and vegetables were homogenized in 5% trichloroacetic acid, and ascorbic acid contents in the extracts were determined using a spectrophotometric method. Banana, custard apple, orange, lemon, guava and papaya were found to be very rich in ascorbic acid. Among vegetables, capsicum (green sweet pepper), cauliflower, bittergourd, roundgourd, beetroot, spinach, cabbage and radish contained high concentrations of ascorbic acid. Chikoo, grapes, pear, apricot, peach, carrot, cucumber, lettuce and "kakri" were found to be poor sources of ascorbic acid. Several Pakistani fruits and vegetables (pear, melon, onion, sweet green pepper, spinach, cucumber) had ascorbic acid values similar to those reported by US Department of Agriculture in these fruits and vegetables in USA. However, wide differences in vitamin C contents were also observed in certain other fruits and vegetables from these two countries. This indicates that regional varieties of fruits and vegetables could vary in their ascorbic acid contents. Since subclinical deficiency of vitamin C appears to be quite common in developing countries like Pakistan, there is a need to develop awareness among masses to consume fresh fruits and vegetables with high contents of vitamin C. PMID:17105704

  1. Genetic polymorphisms in Pakistani women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liaqat, Irfana; Jahan, Nusrat; Krikun, Graciela; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the major cause of anovulatory infertility. Although the genetic basis of PCOS is not well understood, it is a common metabolic and endocrine disorder. This study investigates the possible genomic variants associated with PCOS in Pakistani women from the Punjab region. DNA samples from 96 patients with genetically unrelated PCOS and 96 controls were analyzed by direct sequencing to determine the polymorphisms of different loci on follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (fshr), follicle-stimulating hormone β (fshrβ), luteinizing hormone chorionic gonadotropin (lhcgr), luteinizing hormone β (lhβ), estrogen receptor α (esr1), and estrogen receptor β (esr2) genes. Significant associations were observed within the genotype frequencies, allele frequencies, and multi-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype analysis of most polymorphisms studied. This study identified new SNPs at positions 605+52 Del/T in lhcgr genes occurring in this particular subpopulation. The strong r (2) value suggests that polymorphisms in the fshr and esr1 genes were in linkage disequilibrium. Our study provides evidence of statistically significant associations between susceptibility to PCOS in Pakistani women and the gene polymorphisms mentioned earlier. This suggests that the susceptible loci for PCOS lie within or very close to the chromosomal regions spanning these genes. PMID:25100445

  2. Sickness, dreams and moral selfhood among migrant Pakistani Muslims.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Kaveri

    2010-12-01

    This paper draws from two years of fieldwork investigating the social course of illness among Pakistani Muslims in East London, exploring how chronic illness is communicated and negotiated in local worlds disrupted by migrancy. It examines episodic short stories about dreams, premonitions and uncanny coincidences that were prominent within the illness narratives of migrant Pakistani Muslims, recalling and throwing light on complex questions concerning subjective constructions of misfortune, the personal and social meanings of illness and the relationships between narrative and selfhood. The ethnography identifies a strong normative context of communication about ill health and bad news, within which revelation through the mode of the supernatural takes on added significance. Recurrent motifs in the dreams emphasize the connectedness between family members scattered across migratory contexts, and the reawakening of moral obligations in families. Whilst medical anthropology has understood descriptions of dreams and other uncanny experiences as 'subjunctivising tactics' serving to maintain alternative plots about the source and outcome of illness, in the Islamic context the narrating of supernatural encounters can have transformative effects, re-organising praxis and conferring legitimacy to certain forms of moral selfhood. The paper therefore argues that the notion of the 'subjunctive mode' imposes the analysts' own system of logic and that there is a need to understand the interpretive frameworks present in the illness narratives in their own terms. PMID:21153962

  3. A novel homozygous mutation in HSF4 causing autosomal recessive congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Behnam, Mahdiyeh; Imagawa, Eri; Chaleshtori, Ahmad Reza Salehi; Ronasian, Firooze; Salehi, Mansoor; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-02-01

    Cataract is defined as opacity in the crystalline lens and congenital cataract occurs during the first year of life. Until now, mutations of more than 50 genes in congenital cataract have been reported with various modes of inheritance. Among them, HSF4 mutations have been reported in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and age-related forms of cataract. The inheritance patterns of these mutations depend on their mutational positions in HSF4: autosomal dominant or recessive mutations are respectively found either in a DNA-binding domain or in (or downstream of) hydrophobic repeats. Here we report a novel homozygous HSF4 mutation (c.521T>C, p.Leu174Pro) in two affected sibs of an Iranian consanguineous family using whole exome sequencing. The mutation is predicted as highly pathogenic by in silico analysis (SIFT, Polyphen2 and MutationTaster) and is not found in any of control databases. This mutation is located in a hydrophobic repeat of the HSF4 protein, which is consistent with the mode of inheritance as an autosomal recessive trait. PMID:26490182

  4. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. New Recessive Syndrome of Microcephaly, Cerebellar Hypoplasia, and Congenital Heart Conduction Defect

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Maha S; Salam, Ghada M H Abdel; Saleem, Sahar N; Dobyns, William B; Issa, Mahmoud Y; Sattar, Shifteh; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    We identified a two-branch consanguineous family in which four affected members (three females and one male) presented with constitutive growth delay, severe psychomotor retardation, microcephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, and second-degree heart block. They also shared distinct facial features and similar appearance of their hands and feet. Childhood-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus developed in one affected child around the age of 9 years. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such as PTF1A, EIF2AK3, EOMES, and WDR62. This condition appears to be unique of other known conditions, suggesting a unique clinical entity of autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22002884

  6. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I: phenotypic variability within a large consanguineous Bedouin family associated with a novel FKRP mutation.

    PubMed

    Harel, Tamar; Goldberg, Yael; Shalev, Stavit A; Chervinski, Ilana; Ofir, Rivka; Birk, Ohad S

    2004-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) represent a group of diseases characterized mainly by muscle wasting of the upper and lower limbs, with a wide range of clinical severity. The clinical heterogeneity is paralleled by molecular heterogeneity; each of the 10 forms of autosomal-recessive LGMD recognized to date is caused by mutations in a distinct gene. In a large consanguineous Bedouin tribe living in northern Israel, 15 individuals affected by LGMD demonstrate an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. A genome-wide screen followed by fine mapping in this family revealed linkage to a region on chromosome 19 harboring the fukutin-related protein gene (FKRP), with a maximal LOD score of 4.8 for D19S902. FKRP, encoding a putative glycosyltransferase, has been implicated in causing congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C), and has recently been shown to be mutated in LGMD2I. We identified a novel missense mutation in exon 4 of the FKRP gene in all the patients studied. Although all affected individuals were homozygous for the same mutation, a marked phenotypic variability was apparent within the family. This finding may suggest a role of modifier genes and environmental factors in LGMD2I. Moreover, the demonstration that an identical, novel mutation in the FKRP gene can cause a muscle disease of either a congenital onset or of a later onset within a single family provides clinical support to the molecular evidence, suggesting that MDC1C and LGMD2I are overlapping ends of one and the same entity. PMID:14523375

  7. Autosomal recessive primary microcephalies (MCPH).

    PubMed

    Kaindl, Angela M

    2014-07-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by a pronounced reduction in volume of otherwise architectonical normal brains and intellectual deficit. Here, we summarize the genetic causes of MCPH types 1-12 known to date. PMID:24780602

  8. Algebra, Home Mortgages, and Recessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariner, Jean A. Miller; Miller, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    The current financial crisis and recession in the United States present an opportunity to discuss relevant applications of some topics in typical first-and second-year algebra and precalculus courses. Real-world applications of percent change, exponential functions, and sums of finite geometric sequences can help students understand the problems…

  9. Firms Still Training Despite Recession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felstead, Alan; Green, Francis; Jewson, Nick

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that company training is one of the first casualties in times of recession. Falling recruitment, pressures to cut costs and a focus on short-term survival force businesses to put training on the backburner. Expecting the worst, the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), the Confederation of British Industry (CBI)…

  10. The alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO) gene previously involved in autism also causes a novel syndromic form of primary microcephaly in a consanguineous Saudi family.

    PubMed

    Alrayes, Nuha; Mohamoud, Hussein Sheikh Ali; Ahmed, Saleem; Almramhi, Mona Mohammad; Shuaib, Taghreed Mohammad; Wang, Jun; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Everett, Kate; Nasir, Jamal; Jelani, Musharraf

    2016-04-15

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders in which patients exhibit a marked decrease in occipitofrontal head circumference at birth and a variable degree of intellectual disability. To date, 18 genes have been reported for MCPH worldwide. We enrolled a consanguineous family from Saudi Arabia presenting with primary microcephaly, developmental delay, short stature and intellectual disability. Whole exome sequencing (WES) with 100× coverage was performed on two affected siblings after defining common regions of homozygosity through genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping. WES data analysis, confirmed by subsequent Sanger sequence validation, identified a novel homozygous deletion mutation (c.967delA; p.Glu324Lysfs12*) in exon 10 of the alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO) gene on chromosome 7p21.2. Population screening of 178 ethnically matched control chromosomes and consultation of the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, containing 60,706 individuals' exomes worldwide, confirmed that this mutation was not present outside the family. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence of an AGMO mutation underlying primary microcephaly and intellectual disability in humans. Our findings further expand the genetic heterogeneity of MCPH in familial cases. PMID:27000257

  11. Whole exome sequencing identifies causative mutations in the majority of consanguineous or familial cases with childhood-onset increased renal echogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Halbritter, Jan; Gee, Heon Yung; Porath, Jonathan D.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Airik, Rannar; Shril, Shirlee; Allen, Susan J.; Stein, Deborah; Al Kindy, Adila; Beck, Bodo B.; Cengiz, Nurcan; Moorani, Khemchand N.; Ozaltin, Fatih; Hashmi, Seema; Sayer, John A.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Soliman, Neveen A.; Otto, Edgar A.; Lifton, Richard P.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Chronically increased echogenicity on renal ultrasound is a sensitive early finding of chronic kidney disease that can be detected before manifestation of other symptoms. Increased echogenicity, however, is not specific for a certain etiology of chronic kidney disease. Here, we performed whole exome sequencing in 79 consanguineous or familial cases of suspected nephronophthisis in order to determine the underlying molecular disease cause. In 50 cases, there was a causative mutation in a known monogenic disease gene. In 32 of these cases whole exome sequencing confirmed the diagnosis of a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy. In 8 cases it revealed the diagnosis of a renal tubulopathy. The remaining 10 cases were identified as Alport syndrome (4), autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease (2), congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (3), and APECED syndrome (1). In 5 families, in whom mutations in known monogenic genes were excluded, we applied homozygosity mapping for variant filtering, and identified 5 novel candidate genes (RBM48, FAM186B, PIAS1, INCENP, and RCOR1) for renal ciliopathies. Thus, whole exome sequencing allows the detection of the causative mutation in 2/3 of affected individuals, thereby presenting the etiologic diagnosis and allows identification of novel candidate genes. PMID:26489029

  12. Whole exome sequencing identifies causative mutations in the majority of consanguineous or familial cases with childhood-onset increased renal echogenicity.

    PubMed

    Braun, Daniela A; Schueler, Markus; Halbritter, Jan; Gee, Heon Yung; Porath, Jonathan D; Lawson, Jennifer A; Airik, Rannar; Shril, Shirlee; Allen, Susan J; Stein, Deborah; Al Kindy, Adila; Beck, Bodo B; Cengiz, Nurcan; Moorani, Khemchand N; Ozaltin, Fatih; Hashmi, Seema; Sayer, John A; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Soliman, Neveen A; Otto, Edgar A; Lifton, Richard P; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2016-02-01

    Chronically increased echogenicity on renal ultrasound is a sensitive early finding of chronic kidney disease that can be detected before manifestation of other symptoms. Increased echogenicity, however, is not specific for a certain etiology of chronic kidney disease. Here, we performed whole exome sequencing in 79 consanguineous or familial cases of suspected nephronophthisis in order to determine the underlying molecular disease cause. In 50 cases, there was a causative mutation in a known monogenic disease gene. In 32 of these cases whole exome sequencing confirmed the diagnosis of a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy. In 8 cases it revealed the diagnosis of a renal tubulopathy. The remaining 10 cases were identified as Alport syndrome (4), autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease (2), congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (3), and APECED syndrome (1). In 5 families, in whom mutations in known monogenic genes were excluded, we applied homozygosity mapping for variant filtering and identified 5 novel candidate genes (RBM48, FAM186B, PIAS1, INCENP, and RCOR1) for renal ciliopathies. Thus, whole exome sequencing allows the detection of the causative mutation in 2/3 of affected individuals, thereby presenting the etiologic diagnosis, and allows identification of novel candidate genes. PMID:26489029

  13. Molecular genetics of MARVELD2 and clinical phenotype in Pakistani and Slovak families segregating DFNB49 hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Varga, Lukas; Trincot, Claire; Shahzad, Mohsin; Friedman, Penelope L.; Klimes, Iwar; Greinwald, John H.; Riazuddin, S Amer; Masindova, Ivica; Profant, Milan; Khan, Shaheen N.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Gasperikova, Daniela; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations of MARVELD2, encoding tricellulin, a tricelluar tight junction protein, cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB49) in families of Pakistan and Czech Roma origin. In fact, they are a significant cause of prelingual hearing loss in the Czech Roma, second only to GJB2 variants. Previously, we reported that mice homozygous for p.Arg497* variant of Marveld2 had a broad phenotypic spectrum, where defects were observed in the inner ear, heart, mandibular salivary gland, thyroid gland and olfactory epithelium. The current study describes the types and frequencies of MARVELD2 alleles and clinically reexamines members of DFNB49 families. We found that MARVELD2 variants are responsible for about 1.5% (95% CI: 0.8 – 2.6) of non-syndromic hearing loss in our cohort of 800 Pakistani families. The c.1331+2T>C allele is recurrent. In addition, we identified a novel large deletion in a single family, which appears to have resulted from non-allelic homologous recombination between two similar Alu short interspersed elements. Finally, we observed no other clinical manifestations co-segregating with hearing loss in DFNB49 human families, and hypothesize that the additional abnormalities in the Marveld2 mutant mouse indicates a critical non-redundant function for tricellulin in other organ systems. PMID:25666562

  14. CHARACTERIZING THE SPECTRUM OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE HEREDITARY HEARING LOSS IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Sloan-Heggen, Christina M; Babanejad, Mojgan; Beheshtian, Maryam; Simpson, Allen C; Booth, Kevin T; Ardalani, Fariba; Frees, Kathy L; Mohseni, Marzieh; Mozafari, Reza; Mehrjoo, Zohreh; Jamali, Leila; Vaziri, Saeideh; Akhtarkhavari, Tara; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Nikzat, Nooshin; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Sabbagh, Farahnaz; Otukesh, Hasan; Seifati, Seyed Morteza; Khodaei, Hossein; Taghdiri, Maryam; Meyer, Nicole C; Daneshi, Ahmad; Farhadi, Mohammad; Kahrizi, Kimia; Smith, Richard JH; Azaiez, Hela; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Countries with culturally accepted consanguinity provide a unique resource for the study of rare recessively inherited genetic diseases. Although hereditary hearing loss (HHL) is not uncommon, it is genetically heterogeneous, with over 85 genes causally implicated in non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL). This heterogeneity makes many gene-specific types of NSHL exceedingly rare. We sought to define the spectrum of autosomal recessive HHL in Iran by investigating both common and rarely diagnosed deafness-causing genes. Design Using a custom targeted genomic enrichment (TGE) panel we simultaneously interrogating all known genetic causes of NSHL in a cohort of 302 GJB2-negative Iranian families. Results We established a genetic diagnosis for 67% of probands and their families, with over half of all diagnoses attributable to variants in five genes: SLC26A4, MYO15A, MYO7A, CDH23, and PCDH15. As a reflection of the power of consanguinity mapping, 26 genes were identified as causative for NSHL in the Iranian population for the first time. In total, 179 deafness-causing variants were identified in 40 genes in 201 probands, including 110 novel single nucleotide or small insertion-deletion variants and 3 novel copy number variations. Several variants represent founder mutations. Conclusion This study attests to the power of TGE and massively parallel sequencing (TGE+MPS) as a diagnostic tool for the evaluation of hearing loss in Iran, and expands on our understanding of the genetics of HHL in this country. Families negative for variants in the genes represented on this panel represent an excellent cohort for novel gene discovery. PMID:26445815

  15. Discovery of four recessive developmental disorders using probabilistic genotype and phenotype matching among 4,125 families.

    PubMed

    Akawi, Nadia; McRae, Jeremy; Ansari, Morad; Balasubramanian, Meena; Blyth, Moira; Brady, Angela F; Clayton, Stephen; Cole, Trevor; Deshpande, Charu; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Foulds, Nicola; Francis, Richard; Gabriel, George; Gerety, Sebastian S; Goodship, Judith; Hobson, Emma; Jones, Wendy D; Joss, Shelagh; King, Daniel; Klena, Nikolai; Kumar, Ajith; Lees, Melissa; Lelliott, Chris; Lord, Jenny; McMullan, Dominic; O'Regan, Mary; Osio, Deborah; Piombo, Virginia; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Sifrim, Alejandro; Smith, Audrey; Swaminathan, Ganesh J; Turnpenny, Peter; Whitworth, James; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lo, Cecilia W; FitzPatrick, David R; Hurles, Matthew E

    2015-11-01

    Discovery of most autosomal recessive disease-associated genes has involved analysis of large, often consanguineous multiplex families or small cohorts of unrelated individuals with a well-defined clinical condition. Discovery of new dominant causes of rare, genetically heterogeneous developmental disorders has been revolutionized by exome analysis of large cohorts of phenotypically diverse parent-offspring trios. Here we analyzed 4,125 families with diverse, rare and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorders and identified four new autosomal recessive disorders. These four disorders were identified by integrating Mendelian filtering (selecting probands with rare, biallelic and putatively damaging variants in the same gene) with statistical assessments of (i) the likelihood of sampling the observed genotypes from the general population and (ii) the phenotypic similarity of patients with recessive variants in the same candidate gene. This new paradigm promises to catalyze the discovery of novel recessive disorders, especially those with less consistent or nonspecific clinical presentations and those caused predominantly by compound heterozygous genotypes. PMID:26437029

  16. Chance for India to stop the Pakistani bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, L.S.

    1987-11-01

    India would be far better off it, by adopting cautious restraints on its own nuclear activities, it could obtain firm limits on Pakistan's. Moreover, since the US has been long seeking such restraints from India, New Delhi might be able to strike a bargain under which the United States, in return for India's gesture, would withhold the sale of certain conventional weapon systems to Pakistan that India finds threatening. Thus India could improve its position on both the nuclear and conventional fronts. In November 1986, Brazil invited Argentine nuclear technicians to visit a key classified nuclear installation in Sao Paulo. This July, Argentina reciprocated by permitting Brazilian President Jose Sarney to visit its most sensitive nuclear facility. These events demonstrate that, with far-sighted statesmanship, regional nuclear rivalries need not be irreversible. Indo-Pakistani nuclear tensions could be greatly eased if Prime Minister Gandhi and President Zia seize the opportunity now at hand.

  17. PACOM net assessment: Pakistani and Indian nuclear perceptions. Volume 1. Main report. Final report, 31 January-31 August 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.

    1983-08-31

    This study evaluates the significance of nuclear proliferation as seen from the perspective of the Indian and Pakistani political-military leaderships, and speculates three hypothetical 1985 scenarios.

  18. Geomorphological origin of recession curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Basudev; Marani, Marco

    2010-12-01

    We identify a previously undetected link between the river network morphology and key recession curves properties through a conceptual-physical model of the drainage process of the riparian unconfined aquifer. We show that the power-law exponent, α, of -dQ/dt vs. Q curves is related to the power-law exponent of N(l) vs. G(l) curves (which we show to be connected to Hack's law), where l is the downstream distance from the channel heads, N(l) is the number of channel reaches exactly located at a distance l from their channel head, and G(l) is the total length of the network located at a distance greater or equal to l from channel heads. Using Digital Terrain Models and daily discharge observations from 67 US basins we find that geomorphologic α estimates match well the values obtained from recession curves analyses. Finally, we argue that the link between recession flows and network morphology points to an important role of low-flow discharges in shaping the channel network.

  19. Phenotypes of Recessive Pediatric Cataract in a Cohort of Children with Identified Homozygous Gene Mutations (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif O.; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess for phenotype-genotype correlations in families with recessive pediatric cataract and identified gene mutations. Methods: Retrospective review (2004 through 2013) of 26 Saudi Arabian apparently nonsyndromic pediatric cataract families referred to one of the authors (A.O.K.) and for which recessive gene mutations were identified. Results: Fifteen different homozygous recessive gene mutations were identified in the 26 consanguineous families; two genes and five families are novel to this study. Ten families had a founder CRYBB1 deletion (all with bilateral central pulverulent cataract), two had the same missense mutation in CRYAB (both with bilateral juvenile cataract with marked variable expressivity), and two had different mutations in FYCO1 (both with bilateral posterior capsular abnormality). The remaining 12 families each had mutations in 12 different genes (CRYAA, CRYBA1, AKR1E2, AGK, BFSP2, CYP27A1, CYP51A1, EPHA2, GCNT2, LONP1, RNLS, WDR87) with unique phenotypes noted for CYP27A1 (bilateral juvenile fleck with anterior and/or posterior capsular cataract and later cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis), EPHA2 (bilateral anterior persistent fetal vasculature), and BFSP2 (bilateral flecklike with cloudy cortex). Potential carrier signs were documented for several families. Conclusions: In this recessive pediatric cataract case series most identified genes are noncrystallin. Recessive pediatric cataract phenotypes are generally nonspecific, but some notable phenotypes are distinct and associated with specific gene mutations. Marked variable expressivity can occur from a recessive missense CRYAB mutation. Genetic analysis of apparently isolated pediatric cataract can sometimes uncover mutations in a syndromic gene. Some gene mutations seem to be associated with apparent heterozygous carrier signs. PMID:26622071

  20. Genetic Counseling and Screening of Consanguineous Couples and Their Offspring: Recommendations of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Robin L; Motulsky, Arno G; Bittles, Alan; Hudgins, Louanne; Uhrich, Stefanie; Doyle, Debra Lochner; Silvey, Kerry; Scott, C Ronald; Cheng, Edith; McGillivray, Barbara; Steiner, Robert D; Olson, Debra

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this document is to provide recommendations for genetic counseling and screening for consanguineous couples (related as second cousins or closer) and their offspring with the goals of1. providing preconception reproductive options2. improving pregnancy outcome and identifying reproductive choices3. reducing morbidity and mortality in the 1st years of life, and4. respecting psychosocial and multicultural issues.The recommendations are the opinions of a multicenter working group (the Consanguinity Working Group (CWG)) with expertise in genetic counseling, medical genetics, biochemical genetics, genetic epidemiology, pediatrics, perinatology, and public health genetics, which was convened by the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC). The consensus of the CWG and NSGC reviewers is that beyond a thorough medical family history with follow-up of significant findings, no additional preconception screening is recommended for consanguineous couples. Consanguineous couples should be offered similar genetic screening as suggested for any couple of their ethnic group. During pregnancy, consanguineous couples should be offered maternal-fetal serum marker screening and high-resolution fetal ultrasonography. Newborns should be screened for impaired hearing and detection of treatable inborn errors of metabolism. These recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of management, nor does use of such recommendations guarantee a particular outcome. The professional judgment of a health care provider, familiar with the facts and circumstances of a specific case, will always supersede these recommendations. PMID:26141656

  1. Nonsense mutations in the hairless gene underlie APL in five families of Pakistani origin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunmi; Wajid, Muhammad; Kraemer, Liv; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    (1) Background Atrichia with papular lesions (APL) is a rare autosomal recessive form of inherited alopecia. Affected individuals present with a distinct pattern of total hair loss on the scalp, axilla and body shortly after birth and are essentially devoid of eyelashes and eyebrows. This form of hair loss is irreversible and the histology is consistent with an absence of mature hair follicles. In addition to total atrichia, APL patients also present with papules and follicular cysts filled with cornified material. Mutations in the Hairless (HR) gene have been shown to underlie APL. (2) Objective Here, we studied five unrelated large Pakistani families with clinical manifestations of APL. (3) Methods Based on previous reports of HR mutations in APL, we performed direct DNA sequencing analysis. (4) Results DNA sequencing of the HR gene in APL patients revealed three novel nonsense mutations in five unrelated families. All affected individuals were homozygous for a nonsense mutation due to C-to-T transitions at different positions in the amino acid sequence. Two families carry the mutation Q323X (CAG-TAG) in exon 3, two families harbor the mutation Q502X (CAG-TAG) in exon 6, and one family had a mutation at R940X (CGA-TGA) in exon 14. Haplotype analysis revealed that all affected individuals of both APL1 and APL16 families were homozygous for the same haplotype, and likewise, the mutation in families APL2 and APL19 was on the the same haplotype. (5) Conclusions We report three novel nonsense mutations in the HR gene in APL. Two of the newly identified mutations, Q323X and Q502X, were found to be shared between unrelated families and marker analysis confirmed an identical homozygous haplotype for APL1 and APL16, and for APL2 and APL19. These findings suggest that Q323X and Q502X did not arise independently, but instead appear to have been propagated in the population. Collectively, these findings contribute further evidence for the involvement of hairless mutations in

  2. In-silico analysis of putative HCV epitopes against Pakistani human leukocyte antigen background: An approach towards development of future vaccines for Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Naeem Mahmood; Bilal, Muhammad; Mahmood, Malik Siddique; Hussain, Aadil; Mehboob, Muhammad Zubair

    2016-09-01

    Mounting burden of HCV-infected individuals and soaring cost of treatment is a serious source of unease for developing countries. Numbers of various approaches have been anticipated to develop a vaccine against HCV but the majority of them proved ineffective. Development of vaccine by considering geographical distribution of HCV genotypes and host genetics shows potential. In this research article, we have tried to predict most putative HCV epitopes which are efficiently restricted by most common HLA alleles in Pakistani population through different computational algorithms. Thirteen selected, experimentally identified epitopes sequences were used to derived consensus sequences in all genotypes of HCV. Obtained consensus sequences were used to predict their binding affinities with most prevalent HLA alleles in Pakistani population. Two Class-I epitopes from NS4B region, one from Class-I epitope from NS5A and one Class-II epitope from NS3 region showed effective binding and proved to be highly putative to boost immune response. A cocktail of these four have been checked for population coverage and they gave 75.53% for Pakistani Asian and 70.77% for Pakistani Mixed populations with no allergenic response. Computational algorithms are robust way to shortlist potential candidate epitopes for vaccine development but further, in vivo and in-vitro studies are required to confirm their immunogenic properties. PMID:27166094

  3. Tuberous sclerosis complex: neonatal deaths in three of four children of consanguineous, non-expressing parents.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, M; Carbonara, C; Magro, G; Migone, N; Grasso, S; Tinè, A; Pavone, L; Gomez, M R

    1997-03-01

    We describe here four sibs, born to consanguineous, healthy, asymptomatic parents. Three of these infants had a rapidly fatal course in the neonatal period; death was attributed to congestive heart failure with radiographic evidence of cardiomegaly in all of them. Necropsy was done in only one of them and showed the typical findings of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in the central nervous system (CNS), kidneys, heart, and liver. The fourth sib, currently 2 years old, also has typical signs of TSC, namely hypomelanotic skin macules and calcified subependymal nodules. Both parents and a living maternal grandmother had appropriate examination, which included skin inspection under Wood's lamp, dental examination, fundoscopy, echocardiography, abdominal and renal ultrasound, and head CT and MRI scans, and no signs of TSC were found in either parent or in the only living grandmother. By history alone there is no other relative with signs or symptoms suggestive of TSC. Linkage analysis and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) investigations on a variety of lesions obtained from postmortem and tissue or blood specimens from all available family members studied failed to identify a microdeletion in the chromosomal regions where TSC genes are located. It is very unusual that in a single TSC family there were three consecutive neonatal deaths, and very likely that all had cardiac rhabdomyomas. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of TSC families with more than one affected sib, unusually severe manifestations of the disease, and completely normal, consanguineous parents. PMID:9132502

  4. The trauma of a recession.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S M; Kieran, I; Shaughnessy, M O

    2011-09-01

    Employment in construction in Ireland fell by 10% from nearly 282,000 in the second quarter of 2007 to 255,000 in the same period of 2008. Our study looks at the differences in soft tissue upper limb trauma dynamics of a pre- and post-recession Ireland. Construction accounted for 330 patients (27%) of all hand injuries in 2006, but only 18 (3%) in 2009. Our data shows a significant drop in hand injuries related to the construction industry, and more home/DIY cases and deliberate self-harm presenting in their stead. PMID:21431394

  5. TRAPPC9-related autosomal recessive intellectual disability: report of a new mutation and clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marangi, Giuseppe; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Manti, Filippo; Lattante, Serena; Orteschi, Daniela; Pecile, Vanna; Neri, Giovanni; Zollino, Marcella

    2013-02-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) with autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance is believed to be common; however, very little is known about causative genes and genotype-phenotype correlations. The broad genetic heterogeneity of AR-ID, and its usually nonsyndromic nature make it difficult to pool multiple pedigrees with the same underlying genetic defect to achieve consistent nosology. Nearly all autosomal genes responsible for recessive cognitive disorders have been identified in large consanguineous families from the Middle East, and nonsense mutations in TRAPPC9 have been reported in a total of 5. Although several recurrent phenotypic abnormalities are described in some of these patients, the associated phenotype is usually referred to as nonsyndromic. By means of single-nucleotide polymorphism-array first and then by exome sequencing, we identified a new pathogenic mutation in TRAPPC9 in two Italian sisters born to healthy and apparently nonconsanguineous parents. It consists of a homozygous splice site mutation causing exon skipping with frameshift and premature termination, as confirmed by mRNA sequencing. By detailed phenotypic analysis of our patients, and by critical literature review, we found that homozygous TRAPPC9 loss-of-function mutations cause a distinctive phenotype, characterized by peculiar facial appearance, obesity, hypotonia (all signs resembling a Prader-Willi-like phenotype), moderate-to-severe ID, and consistent brain abnormalities. PMID:22549410

  6. A recessive Nav1.4 mutation underlies congenital myasthenic syndrome with periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Habbout, Karima; Poulin, Hugo; Rivier, François; Giuliano, Serena; Sternberg, Damien; Fontaine, Bertrand; Eymard, Bruno; Morales, Raul Juntas; Echenne, Bernard; King, Louise; Hanna, Michael G.; Männikkö, Roope; Chahine, Mohamed; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the molecular basis of a complex phenotype of congenital muscle weakness observed in an isolated but consanguineous patient. Methods: The proband was evaluated clinically and neurophysiologically over a period of 15 years. Genetic testing of candidate genes was performed. Functional characterization of the candidate mutation was done in mammalian cell background using whole cell patch clamp technique. Results: The proband had fatigable muscle weakness characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome with acute and reversible attacks of most severe muscle weakness as observed in periodic paralysis. We identified a novel homozygous SCN4A mutation (p.R1454W) linked to this recessively inherited phenotype. The p.R1454W substitution induced an important enhancement of fast and slow inactivation, a slower recovery for these inactivated states, and a frequency-dependent regulation of Nav1.4 channels in the heterologous expression system. Conclusion: We identified a novel loss-of-function mutation of Nav1.4 that leads to a recessive phenotype combining clinical symptoms and signs of congenital myasthenic syndrome and periodic paralysis, probably by decreasing channel availability for muscle action potential genesis at the neuromuscular junction and propagation along the sarcolemma. PMID:26659129

  7. Expanding the spectrum of PEX10-related peroxisomal biogenesis disorders: slowly progressive recessive ataxia.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Mathilde; Guissart, Claire; Mallaret, Martial; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Cheillan, David; Drouot, Nathalie; Muller, Jean; Claustres, Mireille; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu; Koenig, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs) consist of a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive diseases, in which peroxisome assembly and proliferation are impaired leading to severe multisystem disease and early death. PBDs include Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs) with a relatively mild clinical phenotype caused by PEX1, (MIM# 602136), PEX2 (MIM# 170993), PEX6 (MIM# 601498), PEX10 (MIM# 602859), PEX12 (MIM# 601758), and PEX16 (MIM# 603360) mutations. Three adult patients are reported belonging to a non-consanguineous French family affected with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, axonal neuropathy, and pyramidal signs. Mental retardation and diabetes mellitus were optional. The age at onset was in childhood or in adolescence (3-15 years). Brain MRI showed marked cerebellar atrophy. Biochemical blood analyses suggested a mild peroxisomal defect. With whole exome sequencing, two mutations in PEX10 were found in the three patients: c.827G>T (novel) causing the missense change p.Cys276Phe and c.932G>A causing the missense change p.Arg311Gln. The phenotypic spectrum related to PEX10 mutations includes slowly progressive, syndromic recessive ataxia. PMID:27230853

  8. A GLRA1 null mutation in recessive hyperekplexia challenges the functional role of glycine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.; Saul, M.; Becker, C.M.

    1996-05-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the human glycine receptor (GlyR) {alpha}1 subunit gene (GLRA1) give rise to hereditary hyperekplexia. These mutations impair agonist affinities and change conductance states of expressed mutant channels, resulting in a partial loss of function. In a recessive case of hyperekplexia, we found a deletion of exons 1-6 of the GLRA1 gene. Born to consanguineous parents, the affected child is homozygous for this GLRA1{sup null} allele consistent with a complete loss of gene function. The child displayed exaggerated startle responses and pronounced head-retraction jerks reflecting a disinhibition of vestigial brain-stem reflexes. In contrast, proprio- and exteroceptive inhibition of muscle activity previously correlated to glycinergic mechanisms were not affected. This case demonstrates that, in contrast to the lethal effect of a null allele in the recessive mouse mutant oscillator (Glra1{sup spd-ot}), the loss of the GlyR {alpha}1 subunit is effectively compensated in man. 38 refs.

  9. Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Radner, Franz P W; Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Kirchmeier, Peter; Kim, Gwang-Jin; Ribierre, Florence; Kamoun, Bourane; Abid, Leila; Leipoldt, Michael; Turki, Hamida; Schempp, Werner; Heilig, Roland; Lathrop, Mark; Fischer, Judith

    2013-06-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3) and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289). Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3) and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis. PMID:23754960

  10. A GLRA1 null mutation in recessive hyperekplexia challenges the functional role of glycine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brune, W.; Weber, R. G.; Saul, B.; von Knebel Doeberitz, M.; Grond-Ginsbach, C.; Kellerman, K.; Meinck, H. M.; Becker, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the human glycine receptor (GlyR) alpha 1 subunit gene (GLRA1) give rise to hereditary hyperekplexia. These mutations impair agonist affinities and change conductance states of expressed mutant channels, resulting in a partial loss of function. In a recessive case of hyperekplexia, we found a deletion of exons 1-6 of the GLRA1 gene. Born to consanguineous parents, the affected child is homozygous for this GLRA1(null) allele consistent with a complete loss of gene function. The child displayed exaggerated startle responses and pronounced head-retraction jerks reflecting a disinhibition of vestigial brain-stem reflexes. In contrast, proprio- and exteroceptive inhibition of muscle activity previously correlated to glycinergic mechanisms were not affected. This case demonstrates that, in contrast to the lethal effect of a null allele in the recessive mouse mutant oscillator (Glra1 spd-ot), the loss of the GlyR alpha 1 subunit is effectively compensated in man. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8651283

  11. Pakistani and Bangladeshi Young Men: Re-Racialization, Class and Masculinity within the Neo-Liberal School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac an Ghaill, Mairtin; Haywood, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article explores Pakistani and Bangladeshi young men's experiences of schooling to examine what inclusion/exclusion means to them. Qualitative research was undertaken with 48 Pakistani and Bangladeshi young men living in areas of the West Midlands, England. The young men highlighted three key areas: the emergence of a schooling regime…

  12. Rickets and Osteomalacia in the Glasgow Pakistani Community, 1961-71

    PubMed Central

    Ford, J. A.; Colhoun, E. M.; McIntosh, W. B.; Dunnigan, M. G.

    1972-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was reassessed in April and May 1971, 10 years after the discovery of widespread late rickets and osteomalacia in the Glasgow Pakistani community. Evidence of vitamin D deficiency was found in 28 out of 115 adults and children examined (24%). Children at the age of puberty were most severely affected by rickets, whereas most infants and younger children in the survey were protected by vitamin D supplements. Mild biochemical osteomalacia was common in Pakistani women. A total of 21 Pakistani and Indian children with rickets were admitted to Glasgow hospitals during 1968-70. These comprised 10 children with infantile rickets and 11 with late rickets. Four of the latter group required osteotomy for severe rachitic deformity. Late rickets and osteomalacia in Pakistani and Indian immigrants are not primarily due to nutritional deficiency of vitamin D, though the high phytate content of their diet may be of aetiological importance. A combination of environmental, social, and endogenous factors, the relative importance of which is not at present clear, may also be involved. Advice on the prophylaxis of vitamin D deficiency should be given to all Pakistani and Indian communities in the United Kingdom. PMID:5031709

  13. A Lebanese family with autosomal recessive oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OAV) spectrum and review of the literature: is OAV a genetically heterogeneous disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Farra, Chantal; Yunis, Khaled; Yazbeck, Nadine; Majdalani, Marianne; Charafeddine, Lama; Wakim, Rima; Awwad, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OAV) spectrum summarizes a continuum of ocular, auricular, and vertebral anomalies. Goldenhar syndrome is a variant of this spectrum and is characterized by pre-auricular skin tags, microtia, facial asymmetry, ocular abnormalities, and vertebral anomalies of different sizes and shapes. Most cases are thought to be sporadic. However, a few families were reported to have an autosomal recessive inheritance and other families’ presentation of the syndrome strongly supported an autosomal dominant inheritance. We report OAV in a female infant presenting with tracheomalacia, diaphragmatic hernia, encephalomeningocele, sacral neural tube defect, and cardiac defect and her brother having no more than dysmorphic features. The mode of inheritance in this family supports an autosomal recessive inheritance where the transmission was from normal first-degree consanguineous parents to one of the sons and to the daughter. This report further broadens the clinical presentation and symptoms of OAV and supports the hypothesis advancing OAV as a genetically heterogeneous disorder. PMID:23776370

  14. Does Gingival Recession Require Surgical Treatment?

    PubMed

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; MacEachern, Mark; Oates, Thomas W

    2015-10-01

    Gingival recession represents a clinical condition in adults frequently encountered in the general dental practice. Clinicians often face dilemmas of whether or not to treat such a condition surgically. An initial condensed literature search was performed using a combination of gingival recession and surgery controlled terms and keywords. An analysis of the search results highlights the limited understanding of the factors that guide the treatment of gingival recession. Understanding the cause, prognosis, and treatment of gingival recession continues to offer many unanswered questions and challenges in periodontics as we strive to provide the best care possible for our patients. PMID:26427577

  15. Oligohydramnios in a pregnant Pakistani woman with Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the Western world, the diagnosis and management of Plasmodium vivax malaria in pregnant women can be challenging, and the pathogenesis of adverse outcomes for both the mother and the foetus is still poorly known. The authors describe the case of a 29-year-old Pakistani woman at the 29th week of her second pregnancy, who was admitted to the Hospital following the abrupt onset of fever. At the time of admission, she had been living in Italy without travelling to any malaria-endemic areas for eight months. She was diagnosed with vivax malaria after a thin blood smear revealed the presence of plasmodial trophozoites and gametocytes and treated accordingly. Due to the onset of oligohydramnios, she underwent caesarian section at the 31st week of pregnancy with no further complications. Histological examination of the placenta showed no evidence of plasmodial infection, but was inconclusive. It is unclear whether oligohydramnios is a complication of pregnancy-related Plasmodium vivax malaria. Given the long latency of hypnozoites, every febrile pregnant patient with a previous stay in an endemic area should be screened for malaria with a thick and a thin blood smear. PMID:24758193

  16. Antinociceptive, antioxidant and phytochemical studies of Pakistani medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Ghias; Rauf, Abdur; Siddiqui, Bina Shaheen; Khan, Haroon; Barkatullah; Ullah, Rooh

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the selected Pakistani medicinal plants (Chenopodium botrys, Micromeria biflora and Teucrium stocksianum) in-vivo followed by their antioxidant potential against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhidrazyl (DPPH) in-vitro. The results demonstrated profound antinociceptive effect of both the crude methanolic extract of Chenopodium botrys (CBM) and subsequent aqueous fraction (CBW) of C. botrys with 80.76% and 84% pain relief in acetic acid induced writhing test at 100 mg/kg i.p respectively. Similarly the crude methanolic extract of Micromeria biflora (MBM) and its subsequent aqueous fraction (MBW) with 66.46% 78.08% pain reversal in acetic acid induced writhing test respectively at 100mg/kg i.p. However, the crude methanolic extract and isolated water fraction of Teucrium stocksianum (TS) did not show any significant effect at test doses. Both the crude extracts and aqueous fractions of selected medicinal plants exhibited marked scavenging effects on DPPH and therefore strongly support the antinociceptive activity. Phytochemical analysis indicated the presence of various classes of natural products (alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids etc.) and thus the current finding can be attributed to the presence of these compounds. In short, our findings provide a strong scientific background to the folk uses C. botrys and M. biflora in the management of various painful conditions. PMID:27166536

  17. Autosomal-recessive SASH1 variants associated with a new genodermatosis with pigmentation defects, palmoplantar keratoderma and skin carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Courcet, Jean-Benoît; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Duplomb, Laurence; Tajir, Mariam; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Thevenon, Julien; Gigot, Nadège; Marle, Nathalie; Aral, Bernard; Duffourd, Yannis; Sarasin, Alain; Naim, Valeria; Courcet-Degrolard, Emilie; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Martin, Laurent; Abrid, Jamal Eddin; Thauvin, Christel; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Vabres, Pierre; Faivre, Laurence

    2015-07-01

    SASH1 (SAM and SH3 domain-containing protein 1) is a tumor suppressor gene involved in the tumorigenesis of a spectrum of solid cancers. Heterozygous SASH1 variants are known to cause autosomal-dominant dyschromatosis. Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were performed in a consanguineous Moroccan family with two affected siblings presenting an unclassified phenotype associating an abnormal pigmentation pattern (hypo- and hyperpigmented macules of the trunk and face and areas of reticular hypo- and hyperpigmentation of the extremities), alopecia, palmoplantar keratoderma, ungueal dystrophy and recurrent spinocellular carcinoma. We identified a homozygous variant in SASH1 (c.1849G>A; p.Glu617Lys) in both affected individuals. Wound-healing assay showed that the patient's fibroblasts were better able than control fibroblasts to migrate. Following the identification of SASH1 heterozygous variants in dyschromatosis, we used reverse phenotyping to show that autosomal-recessive variants of this gene could be responsible for an overlapping but more complex phenotype that affected skin appendages. SASH1 should be added to the list of genes responsible for autosomal-dominant and -recessive genodermatosis, with no phenotype in heterozygous patients in the recessive form, and to the list of genes responsible for a predisposition to skin cancer. PMID:25315659

  18. The tumour suppressor gene WWOX is mutated in autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with epilepsy and mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Mallaret, Martial; Synofzik, Matthis; Lee, Jaeho; Sagum, Cari A.; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Sharkia, Rajech; Drouot, Nathalie; Renaud, Mathilde; Klein, Fabrice A. C.; Anheim, Mathieu; Tranchant, Christine; Mignot, Cyril; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Bedford, Mark; Bauer, Peter; Salih, Mustafa A.; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Aldaz, C. Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    We previously localized a new form of recessive ataxia with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation to a 19 Mb interval in 16q21-q23 by homozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Saudi Arabian family. We now report the identification by whole exome sequencing of the missense mutation changing proline 47 into threonine in the first WW domain of the WW domain containing oxidoreductase gene, WWOX, located in the linkage interval. Proline 47 is a highly conserved residue that is part of the WW motif consensus sequence and is part of the hydrophobic core that stabilizes the WW fold. We demonstrate that proline 47 is a key amino acid essential for maintaining the WWOX protein fully functional, with its mutation into a threonine resulting in a loss of peptide interaction for the first WW domain. We also identified another highly conserved homozygous WWOX mutation changing glycine 372 to arginine in a second consanguineous family. The phenotype closely resembled the index family, presenting with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy, mental retardation and ataxia, but also included prominent upper motor neuron disease. Moreover, we observed that the short-lived Wwox knock-out mouse display spontaneous and audiogenic seizures, a phenotype previously observed in the spontaneous Wwox mutant rat presenting with ataxia and epilepsy, indicating that homozygous WWOX mutations in different species causes cerebellar ataxia associated with epilepsy. PMID:24369382

  19. Responding to the increased genetic risk associated with customary consanguineous marriage among minority ethnic populations: lessons from local innovations in England.

    PubMed

    Salway, Sarah; Ali, Parveen; Ratcliffe, Giles; Such, Elizabeth; Khan, Nasaim; Kingston, Helen; Quarrell, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Populations practising customary consanguineous marriage have a higher incidence of autosomal recessive genetic disorders than those in which reproductive partners are usually unrelated. In the absence of any national-level response, English service developments to address the additional needs of families living with or at risk of such disorders have been locally led. These interventions remain in their infancy here, as elsewhere in Europe, and important questions remain regarding how appropriate, effective and sustainable responses can be operationalised in practice. This formative service review employed four local case studies together with wider consultation exercises over a 4-year period (2011-2015) to document recent responses to this area of need, issues arising and lessons to inform future work. Service components included the following: enhancements to genetic services to provide family-centred, culturally competent approaches to counselling and testing; community genetic literacy approaches; and capacity development among health professionals. Local approaches were, however, very varied in their detail, scope, level of investment and longevity. The provisions of culturally competent genetic counselling services and community-level genetic literacy interventions were generally well received by those who accessed them. Coordinated action across all service components appeared important for an effective service, but healthcare professionals, particularly general practitioners, were often difficult to engage in this agenda. An evaluative culture and engagement in a wider community of practice had supported service development across sites. However, sustaining investment was challenging, particularly where new services were not well integrated into core provision and where commissioning was driven by expectations of short-term reductions in infant mortality and disability. PMID:27311843

  20. Only a Touch of the Flu? The Simultaneous Manifestation of Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy in Two Consanguineous Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, C.; Suter, B.; Fischmann, A.; Gensicke, H.; Rüegg, S.; Weisser, M.

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the simultaneous manifestation of acute necrotizing encephalopathy in 2 consanguineous patients after infection with influenza B based on the autosomal dominant missense mutation of the RANBP2-gene. Differential diagnosis of acute encephalopathy, clinical and radiological clues, and treatment strategies are outlined. PMID:26110162

  1. Rare CFTR mutation 1525-1G>A in a Pakistani patient.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Abdul; Al Thani, G; Dawod, S T; Kambouris, M; Al Hamed, M

    2004-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is rare in non-Caucasian populations, and in such populations little is known about the spectrum of mutations and polymorphisms in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance (CFTR) gene. We report the detection of a very rare CFTR mutation 1525-1G>A in intron 9 in a 5-year-old Pakistani child with typical clinical features of CF. It remains to be seen whether mutation 1525-1G>A is characteristic of Pakistani ethnicity with CF or associated with severe phenotypic features. PMID:15088804

  2. XRCC1 and XPD DNA repair gene polymorphisms: A potential risk factor for glaucoma in the Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, Sajeela; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Micheal, Shazia; Akhtar, Farah; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Mahmood; Lall, Pramila; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Ahmed, Asifa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was designed to determine the association of polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (c.1316G>A [rs25487]) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) (c.2298A>C [rs13181]) with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary closed-angle glaucoma (PCAG). Methods In this prospective case-control study, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to study the association of XRCC1 and XPD with 160 POAG patients, 163 PCAG patients, and 193 unaffected controls. Results XRCC1 rs25487 was found to be significantly associated specifically with male POAG patients (χ2=13.2 [p=0.001]), only for the dominant model (odds ratio [OR]=2.65 [95% confidence interval [CI]=1.44–4.85], p<0.005). In addition XPD rs13181 was also found to be associated with male POAG patients (χ2=12.1 [p<0.005]), for both dominant (OR=2.44 [95% CI=1.33–4.47], p<0.005) as well as recessive model (OR=3.62 [95% CI=1.45–9.01], p<0.01). Combined genotypes of both the genes revealed that the heterozygote AC/GA was significantly associated with the male POAG patients (z=3.00 [p<0.001]). The AA/GG genotype was present at a higher frequency in the male controls and the AA/GA in the female controls and could thus have a protective role in males and females, respectively. Conclusions We postulate that defects in the DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XPD may possibly be associated with the progression of POAG in male patients of Pakistani origin. PMID:21617750

  3. Syndrome Keratitis-Ichtyosis-Deafness (KID) chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin

    PubMed Central

    Kombaté, Koussak; Saka, Bayaki; Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Mouhari-Toure, Abass; Akakpo, Séfako; Belei, Eric; Gnassingbé, Wanguena; Djibril, Mohaman Awalou; Tchangaï-Walla, Kissem; Pitché, Palokinam

    2015-01-01

    Le syndrome KID est une affection génétique rare associant kératite, ichtyose et surdité. Nous rapportons un cas dont la surdité s'est compliquée de mutisme chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin.Il s'agissait d'une fillette de 9 ans admise en dermatologie pour une peau sèche et une kératodermie palmoplantaire évoluant depuis l'enfance, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total évoluant depuis la naissance. Il n'y avait pas d'histoire familiale connue de syndrome KID. Les parents de cet enfant sont des cousins germains. A l'examen, on notait une kératodermie palmoplantaire typique en cuir grossier, une peau sèche ichtyosiforme finement squameuse avec un aspect pachydermique aux genoux et un aspect arlequin aux jambes. L'examen ophtalmologique avait noté une blépharo-conjonctivite, une xérophtalmie, une photophobie et une absence de sourcils. L'examen ORL avait objectivé une hypotrophie des pavillons des oreilles, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total. La particularité de cette observation réside dans la sévérité de l'atteinte auditive qui s'est compliquée de mutisme. Notre enfant étant née de parents consanguins sains, sans histoire familiale de KID, nous pensons que le mode de transmission est probablement sporadique. Une étude moléculaire du cas index et de ses parents, non réalisée à cause de notre plateau technique limité aurait pu le confirmer. PMID:26664520

  4. A hypofunctional PAX1 mutation causes autosomal recessively inherited otofaciocervical syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Esther; Aykut, Ayca; Beleggia, Filippo; Karaca, Emin; Durmaz, Burak; Keupp, Katharina; Arslan, Esra; Palamar, Melis; Onay, Melis Palamar; Yigit, Gökhan; Özkinay, Ferda; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-11-01

    Otofaciocervical syndrome (OFCS) is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism, external ear anomalies with preauricular pits and hearing impairment, branchial cysts or fistulas, anomalies of the vertebrae and the shoulder girdle, and mild intellectual disability. In a large consanguineous family with OFCS from Turkey, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) of a single pooled DNA sample of four affected individuals. Filtering for variants with a percentage of alternate reads ≥ 90 % and a coverage of at least five reads identified only a single novel homozygous variant, c.497G>T, located in PAX1 that co-segregated with the disease in the family. PAX1 encodes a transcription factor with a critical role in pattern formation during embryogenesis in vertebrates. The mutation is predicted to substitute the glycine at position 166 to valine (p.G166V) within the highly conserved paired-box domain of the PAX1 protein. We performed a dual luciferase reporter assay to examine the transactivation of a regulatory sequence in the Nkx3-2 promoter region, which is a direct target of mouse Pax1 transcriptional regulation. We observed a significantly reduced transactivation in HEK293T cells overexpressing Pax1(G157V) in comparison to Pax1(WT) expressing cells, indicating a reduced DNA-binding affinity of the mutant protein. Taken together, our results show that the strategy of pooling DNA is a powerful, cost-effective application for WES in consanguineous families and establish PAX1 as a new disease-causing gene for OFCS and as part of the EYA-DACH-SIX-PAX network, important in early embryogenesis. PMID:23851939

  5. Mutations in zinc finger 407 [ZNF407] cause a unique autosomal recessive cognitive impairment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A consanguineous Arab family is affected by an apparently novel autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cognitive impairment, failure-to-thrive, hypotonia and dysmorphic features including bilateral ptosis and epicanthic folds, synophrys, midface hypoplasia, downturned mouth corners, thin upper vermillion border and prominent ears, bilateral 5th finger camptodactyly, bilateral short 4th metatarsal bones, and limited knee mobility bilaterally. Methods The family was studied by homozygosity mapping, candidate gene mutation screening and whole Exome Next Generation Sequencing of a single affected member to identify the offending gene and mutation. The mutated gene product was studied by structural bioinformatics methods. Results A damaging c.C5054G mutation affecting an evolutionary highly conserved amino acid p.S1685W was identified in the ZNF407 gene at 18q23. The Serine to Tryptophane mutation affects two of the three ZNF407 isoforms and is located in the last third of the protein, in a linker peptide adjoining two zinc-finger domains. Structural analyses of this mutation shows disruption of an H-bond that locks the relative spatial position of the two fingers, leading to a higher flexibility of the linker and thus to a decreased probability of binding to the target DNA sequence essentially eliminating the functionality of downstream domains and interfering with the expression of various genes under ZNF407 control during fetal brain development. Conclusions ZNF407 is a transcription factor with an essential role in brain development. When specific and limited in number homozygosity intervals exist that harbor the offending gene in consanguineous families, Whole Exome Sequencing of a single affected individual is an efficient approach to gene mapping and mutation identification. PMID:24907849

  6. Exome sequencing identifies recessive CDK5RAP2 variants in patients with isolated agenesis of corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Jouan, Loubna; Ouled Amar Bencheikh, Bouchra; Daoud, Hussein; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Spiegelman, Dan; Rochefort, Daniel; Hince, Pascale; Szuto, Anna; Lassonde, Maryse; Barbelanne, Marine; Tsang, William Y; Dion, Patrick A; Théoret, Hugo; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-04-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is a common brain malformation which can be observed either as an isolated condition or as part of numerous congenital syndromes. Therefore, cognitive and neurological involvements in patients with ACC are variable, from mild linguistic and behavioral impairments to more severe neurological deficits. To date, the underlying genetic causes of isolated ACC remains elusive and causative genes have yet to be identified. We performed exome sequencing on three acallosal siblings from the same non-consanguineous family and identified compound heterozygous variants, p.[Gly94Arg];[Asn1232Ser], in the protein encoded by the CDK5RAP2 gene, also known as MCPH3, a gene previously reported to cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. Our findings suggest a novel role for this gene in the pathogenesis of isolated ACC. PMID:26197979

  7. The Crucial Role of Recess in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramstetter, Catherine L.; Murray, Robert; Garner, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting optimal child development and well-being. Reallocating time to accentuate academic concerns is a growing trend and has put recess at risk. Conversely, pressure to increase activity in school has come from efforts to combat childhood obesity. The purpose…

  8. Strategies for Supporting Recess in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Recess provides students with a needed break from their structured school day. It can improve children's physical, social, and emotional well-being, and enhance learning. Recess helps children meet the goal of 60 minutes of physical activity (PA) each day, as recommended by the US Department of Health and Human Services. National…

  9. Recess for Elementary School Students. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) that all elementary school children should be provided with at least one daily period of recess of at least 20 minutes in length. Recess is an essential component of a comprehensive school physical activity program and of the total education experience for…

  10. The crucial role of recess in school.

    PubMed

    Murray, Robert; Ramstetter, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting the optimal development of the whole child. A growing trend toward reallocating time in school to accentuate the more academic subjects has put this important facet of a child's school day at risk. Recess serves as a necessary break from the rigors of concentrated, academic challenges in the classroom. But equally important is the fact that safe and well-supervised recess offers cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits that may not be fully appreciated when a decision is made to diminish it. Recess is unique from, and a complement to, physical education--not a substitute for it. The American Academy of Pediatrics believes that recess is a crucial and necessary component of a child's development and, as such, it should not be withheld for punitive or academic reasons. PMID:23277311

  11. Autosomal recessive mental retardation: homozygosity mapping identifies 27 single linkage intervals, at least 14 novel loci and several mutation hotspots.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Andreas Walter; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kahrizi, Kimia; Tzschach, Andreas; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Darvish, Hossein; Abbasi-Moheb, Lia; Puettmann, Lucia; Zecha, Agnes; Weissmann, Robert; Hu, Hao; Mohseni, Marzieh; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Rajab, Anna; Hertzberg, Christoph; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Ullmann, Reinhard; Ghasemi-Firouzabadi, Saghar; Banihashemi, Susan; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Hadavi, Valeh; Bahrami-Monajemi, Gholamreza; Kasiri, Mahboubeh; Falah, Masoumeh; Nikuei, Pooneh; Dehghan, Atefeh; Sobhani, Masoumeh; Jamali, Payman; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-02-01

    Mental retardation (MR) has a worldwide prevalence of around 2% and is a frequent cause of severe disability. Significant excess of MR in the progeny of consanguineous matings as well as functional considerations suggest that autosomal recessive forms of MR (ARMR) must be relatively common. To shed more light on the causes of autosomal recessive MR (ARMR), we have set out in 2003 to perform systematic clinical studies and autozygosity mapping in large consanguineous Iranian families with non-syndromic ARMR (NS-ARMR). As previously reported (Najmabadi et al. in Hum Genet 121:43-48, 2007), this led us to the identification of 12 novel ARMR loci, 8 of which had a significant LOD score (OMIM: MRT5-12). In the meantime, we and others have found causative gene defects in two of these intervals. Moreover, as reported here, tripling the size of our cohort has enabled us to identify 27 additional unrelated families with NS-ARMR and single-linkage intervals; 14 of these define novel loci for non-syndromic ARMR. Altogether, 13 out of 39 single linkage intervals observed in our cohort were found to cluster at 6 different loci on chromosomes, i.e., 1p34, 4q27, 5p15, 9q34, 11p11-q13 and 19q13, respectively. Five of these clusters consist of two significantly overlapping linkage intervals, and on chr 1p34, three single linkage intervals coincide, including the previously described MRT12 locus. The probability for this distribution to be due to chance is only 1.14 × 10(-5), as shown by Monte Carlo simulation. Thus, in contrast to our previous conclusions, these novel data indicate that common molecular causes of NS-ARMR do exist, and in the Iranian population, the most frequent ones may well account for several percent of the patients. These findings will be instrumental in the identification of the underlying genes. PMID:21063731

  12. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Young Pakistani Muslim Women's Reflections on Difference, Future, and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidi, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation employs data collected from multiple sites in Southern California over a period of nine months. Several in-depth ethnographic interviews and participant observations were conducted with Pakistani Muslim women (age 17-22) and their parents in an effort to better understand the influence that parents and ethno-religious communities…

  14. Drug Issues Affecting Chinese, Indian and Pakistani People Living in Greater Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, A. J.; Heim, D.; Bakshi, N.; Davies, J. B.; Flatley, K. J.; Hunter, S. C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes research on drug issues affecting Chinese, Indian and Pakistani people living in Greater Glasgow. There were two strands: (i) a questionnaire-based survey of young people and focus groups; (ii) interviews with young people and adults. The primary aims were to gather prevalence data and to investigate perceptions about current…

  15. Obesity and Minority--Changing Meanings of Big Bodies among Young Pakistani Obesity Patients in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wathne, Kjetil; Mburu, Christina Brux; Middelthon, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Globally, paediatric obesity causes widespread concern, and the role of ethnicity is an important focus. Investigating how culture can mediate health-related behaviour through ideas about bodies, food and physical activity, while addressing a notion that the Pakistani community in Norway is particularly conservative and slow to change, this…

  16. Willingness to Communicate in English as a Second Language: A Case Study of Pakistani Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukhari, Syeda Farzana; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Khan, Salman Ali

    2015-01-01

    Willingness to communicate (WTC) construct plays an important role in second language (L2) teaching and learning. Almost any second language learner is likely to respond to a direct question, but many will not continue or initiate communication. The present study investigates Pakistani undergraduate students' perception of their willingness to…

  17. Role of ICT in Shaping the Future of Pakistani Higher Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaikh, Zaffar Ahmed; Khoja, Shakeel Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the challenges faced by the Pakistani higher education system (HES) in integrating information and communication technology (ICT); it aimed at understanding ICT needs, measuring the increase in ICT demand, determining the relationship between ICT and HES performance, and understanding how the HES copes with the challenges of…

  18. Continuing Bonds in Bereaved Pakistani Muslims: Effects of Culture and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhail, Kausar; Jamil, Naila; Oyebode, Jan; Ajmal, Mohammad Asir

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the bereavement process and continuing bond in Pakistani Muslims with the focus on how culture and religion influence these processes. Ten participants were interviewed and their transcribed interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Three main domains were identified from the narratives expressed by the…

  19. Pakistani Government Secondary Schools Students' Attitudes towards Communicative Language Teaching and Grammar Translation in Quetta, Balochistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhammad, Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    Students' attitudes towards an English language teaching approach play an important role for its implementation success or failure. This study measured Pakistani government school students' attitudes towards Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) and Grammar Translation (GT). A survey instrument was used to assess students' attitudes. Data were…

  20. PACOM net assessment: Pakistani and Indian nuclear perceptions. Volume 2. Appendix. Sanitized. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, S.

    1983-08-31

    The conclusions of a number of the commentators in the documents from which this information was derived are that the Pakistani and Indian nuclear weapons programs are stimulated by their rivalry and fueled by the weapons aid and aid to nuclear-power programs supplied to each country by the U.S. and the USSR.

  1. Attitudes of Pakistani Community Members and Staff toward People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patka, Mazna; Keys, Christopher B.; Henry, David B.; McDonald, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance and inclusion of persons with intellectual disability can vary across cultures, and understanding attitudes can provide insight into such variation. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored attitudes toward people with intellectual disability among Pakistani community members and disability service providers. We administered…

  2. Relation of Home Chaos to Cognitive Performance and Behavioral Adjustment of Pakistani Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamama-tus-Sabah, Syeda; Gilani, Nighat; Wachs, Theodore D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings from Western developed countries have linked home chaos to children's cognitive performance and behavioral problems. In the present paper we test whether the same pattern of associations can be replicated in a non-Western developing country. Our sample was 203 Pakistani primary school children. To assess home chaos the Confusion,…

  3. Comparative Study of Suicide Potential among Pakistani and American Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farooqi, Yasmin Nilofer

    2004-01-01

    This study compared suicide potential and suicide attempts in 50 Pakistani and 50 American psychiatric patients all of whom reported a positive history of suicide attempts during the past 1-5 years. It further explored the role of nationality, gender, diagnosis, and marital status in respondents' potential for suicide and suicide attempts. The…

  4. The Impact of Educational Change on School Leaders: Experiences of Pakistani School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razzaq, Jamila; Forde, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Pakistani education system, like many other countries across the world, is going through a phase of concerted change in the first decade of the 21st century and school leaders are expected to play a crucial role in the management of this change programme. This article considers the impact of educational change on a group of school leaders who…

  5. Event-based Recession Analysis across Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrograph recessions have long been a window to investigate hydrological processes and their interactions. The authors conducted an exploratory analysis of about 1000 individual hydrograph recessions in a period of around 15 years (1995-2010) from time series of hourly discharge (USGS IDA stream flow data set) at 27 USGS gauges located in Iowa and Cedar River basins with drainage area ranging from 6.7 to around 17000 km2. They calculated recession exponents with the same recession length but different time lags from the hydrograph peak ranging from ~0 to 96 hours, and then plotted them against time lags to construct the evolution of recession exponent. The result shows that, as recession continues, the recession exponent in first increases quickly, then decreases quickly, and finally stays constant. Occasionally and for different reasons, the decreasing portion is missing due to negligible contribution from soil water storage. The increasing part of the evolution of can be related to fast response to rainfall including overland flow and quick subsurface flow through macropores (or tiles), and the decreasing portion can be connected to the delayed soil water response. Lastly, the constant segment can be attributed to the groundwater storage with the slowest response. The points where recession exponent reaches its maximum and begins to plateau are the times that fast response and soil water response end, respectively. The authors conducted further theoretical analysis by combining mathematical derivation and literature results to explain the observed evolution path of the recession exponent . Their results have a direct application in hydrograph separation and important implications for dynamic basin storage-discharge relation analysis and hydrological process understanding across scales.

  6. An intronic deletion in the PROM1 gene leads to autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Eidinger, Osnat; Leibu, Rina; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Perlman, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in a consanguineous Israeli Jewish family. Methods Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation, including eye examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electrophysiological tests, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared among two of the affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico and in vitro analyses were used to predict the effect of the identified mutation on splicing. Results The affected family members are three siblings who have various degrees of progressive visual deterioration, glare, color vision abnormalities, and night vision difficulties. Visual field tests revealed central scotomas of different extension. Cone and rod ERG responses were reduced, with cones more severely affected. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among two of the affected individuals. One included the PROM1 gene. Sequence analysis of the 26 coding exons of PROM1 in one affected individual revealed no mutations in the coding sequence or in intronic splice sites. However, in intron 21, proximate to the intron–exon junction, we observed a homozygous 10 bp deletion between positions −26 and −17 (c.2281–26_-17del). The deletion was linked to a known SNP, c.2281–6C>G. The deletion cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in public databases or in 101 ethnically-matched control individuals. In silico analysis predicted that this deletion would lead to altered intron 21 splicing. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that a recognition site for the SRSF2 splicing factor is located within the deleted sequence. The in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that c.2281–26_-17del leads to

  7. She stands alone: Pakistani woman film director, Shireen Pasha.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, A

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the activities of film director Shireen Pasha in promoting truth in the mass media in Pakistan. Pasha is described as one who finds it inexcusable in a state-subsidized system that national problems of poverty are not aired openly. Pasha has pursued the goal of exposing the real lives of Pakistanis on film in contrast to the publicly aired segments of "pretty girls in nice drawing rooms." Foreign channels available through satellite communications technology are viewed by Pasha as inappropriate with regard to people's needs and uncreative. Pakistan began with one channel, PTV, which recently refused to air her documentary on living conditions in Pakistan's rural areas "The Travelogue Pakistan." "The Walled City of Lahore" was her film about life in the old city. Both films poetically depicted the honor of humans and their struggle to stay alive. Some of her documentaries are made to show the value of indigenous skills, centuries old know-how, and traditions, regardless of the poverty. Pasha is described as fighting with PTV management over use of resources. Pasha desires to invest in training people to do documentaries or be more field-oriented rather than investing in equipment. Pasha joined PTV in 1975 and left in 1990. Pasha is recognized for her isolation as a woman in the business world, her commitment to exposing remote cultures and truth, and the odds she must confront in attaining her goals. Pasha is committed to doing extensive research, usually conducted during the summer months, in order to construct a credible story line that is produced usually during the winter months. One model of film story line is defined as one where women are portrayed as starting from an indigenous skill or knowledge and shifting to a greater position of power and control over their lives. Pasha believes that people who make films have the responsibility to evoke a reaction in people and to offer solutions. Two acclaimed films, which were supported by

  8. Systematic review of suicide in economic recession

    PubMed Central

    Oyesanya, Mayowa; Lopez-Morinigo, Javier; Dutta, Rina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide a systematic update of the evidence concerning the relationship between economic recession and suicide. METHODS: A keyword search of Ovid Medline, Embase, Embase Classic, PsycINFO and PsycARTICLES was performed to identify studies that had investigated the association between economic recession and suicide. RESULTS: Thirty-eight studies met predetermined selection criteria and 31 of them found a positive association between economic recession and increased suicide rates. Two studies reported a negative association, two articles failed to find such an association, and three studies were inconclusive. CONCLUSION: Economic recession periods appear to increase overall suicide rates, although further research is warranted in this area, particularly in low income countries. PMID:26110126

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hypotrichosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... erythema), itchiness (pruritus), or missing patches of skin (erosions) on the scalp. In areas of poor hair ... recessive hypotrichosis with monilethrix hairs and congenital scalp erosions. J Invest Dermatol. 2006 Jun;126(6):1286- ...

  10. Graduated recession of the superior oblique muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, J A

    1975-01-01

    Recession of the superior oblique was performed bilaterally in 12 patients with the A phenomenon and unilaterally in four patients with vertical imbalance. The results are discussed. Images PMID:1191613