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Sample records for recessive inheritance case

  1. Congenital vocal cord paralysis with possible autosomal recessive inheritance: Case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, R.; Friedman, S.; Fallet, S.

    1996-08-23

    We describe an infant with congenital vocal cord paralysis born to consanguineous parents. While autosomal dominant and X-linked inheritance have been previously reported in this condition, we conclude that the degree of parental consanguinity in this case strongly suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Although we cannot exclude X-linked inheritance, evidence from animal studies demonstrates autosomal recessive inheritance and provides a possible molecular basis for congenital vocal cord paralysis. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  2. A family with spondyloepimetaphyseal dwarfism: a 'new' dysplasia or Kniest disease with autosomal recessive inheritance?

    PubMed Central

    Farag, T I; Al-Awadi, S A; Hunt, M C; Satyanath, S; Zahran, M; Usha, R; Uma, R

    1987-01-01

    We present an Arab family with some features of Kniest disease. The proband was a six year old boy with rhizomelic short limbed dwarfism, 'dish-like' facies, cleft palate, deafness, and camptodactyly. Most radiological changes were compatible with Kniest disease. Two younger sibs, similarly affected, had died at a few months old, and the pedigree shows strong evidence of autosomal recessive inheritance, unlike previously reported cases of Kniest disease which have shown autosomal dominant inheritance. Images PMID:3681904

  3. Oculodentodigital dysplasia: study of ophthalmological and clinical manifestations in three boys with probably autosomal recessive inheritance.

    PubMed

    Frasson, Maria; Calixto, Nassim; Cronemberger, Sebastião; de Aguiar, Regina Amélia Lopes Pessoa; Leão, Letícia Lima; de Aguiar, Marcos José Burle

    2004-09-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a rare inherited disorder affecting the development of the face, eyes, teeth, and limbs. The majority of cases of ODDD are inherited as an autosomal dominant condition. There are few reports of probable autosomal recessive transmission. Affected patients exhibit a distinctive physiognomy with a narrow nose, hypoplastic alae nasi, and anteverted nostrils, bilateral microphthalmos, and microcornea. Sometimes iris anomalies and secondary glaucoma are present. There are malformations of the distal extremities such as syndactyly. In addition, there are defects in the dental enamel with hypoplasia and yellow discoloration of the teeth. Less common features include hypotrichosis, intracranial calcifications, and conductive deafness secondary to recurrent otitis media. We describe three brothers with ODDD. Their parents are first cousins and present no features of ODDD. These data are in favor of autosomal recessive inheritance and suggest genetic heterogeneity for this entity. PMID:15512999

  4. Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome in a large inbred Lebanese family: confirmation of autosomal recessive inheritance?

    PubMed

    Mégarbané, A; Desguerres, I; Rizkallah, E; Delague, V; Nabbout, R; Barois, A; Urtizberea, A

    2000-05-15

    Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome or pontobulbar palsy with deafness is a rare disorder characterized by bilateral nerve deafness, a variety of cranial nerve disorders usually involving the motor components of the 7th and 9th to 12th cranial nerves, and less commonly an involvement of spinal motor nerves and upper motor neurons. Familial and sporadic cases have been reported. Based on particular evidence, autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linked inheritance, as well as autoimmune origin have been considered. We report on a large inbred Lebanese family with four patients of both sexes, strongly suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:10797435

  5. TSHR is the main causative locus in autosomal recessively inherited thyroid dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Cangul, Hakan; Aycan, Zehra; Saglam, Halil; Forman, Julia R; Cetinkaya, Semra; Tarim, Omer; Bober, Ece; Cesur, Yasar; Kurtoglu, Selim; Darendeliler, Feyza; Bas, Veysel; Eren, Erdal; Demir, Korcan; Kiraz, Aslihan; Aydin, Banu K; Karthikeyan, Ambika; Kendall, Michaela; Boelaert, Kristien; Shaw, Nick J; Kirk, Jeremy; Högler, Wolfgang; Barrett, Timothy G; Maher, Eamonn R

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common neonatal endocrine disorder and results in mental retardation if untreated. Eighty-five percent of CH cases are due to disruptions in thyroid organogenesis and are mostly sporadic, but about 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, indicating the involvement of genetic factors in the aetiology of the disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the Mendelian (single-gene) causes of non-syndromic and non-goitrous congenital hypothyroidism (CHNG) in consanguineous or multi-case families. Here we report the results of the second part (n=105) of our large cohort (n=244), representing the largest such cohort in the literature, and interpret the overall results of the whole cohort. Additionally, 50 sporadic cases with thyroid dysgenesis and 400 unaffected control subjects were included in the study. In familial cases, first, we performed potential linkage analysis of four known genes causing CHNG (TSHR, PAX8, TSHB, and NKX2-5) using microsatellite markers and then examined the presence of mutations in these genes by direct sequencing. In addition, in silico analyses of the predicted structural effects of TSHR mutations were performed and related to the mutation specific disease phenotype. We detected eight new TSHR mutations and a PAX8 mutation but no mutations in TSHB and NKX2-5. None of the biallelic TSHR mutations detected in familial cases were present in the cohort of 50 sporadic cases. Genotype/phenotype relationships were established between TSHR mutations and resulting clinical presentations. Here we conclude that TSHR mutations are the main detectable cause of autosomal recessively inherited thyroid dysgenesis. We also outline a new genetic testing strategy for the investigation of suspected autosomal recessive non-goitrous CH. PMID:22876533

  6. Selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12 displays recessive Mendelian inheritance: Assignment of a locus to chromosome 10 by linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Aminoff, M.; Tahvanainen, E.; Chapelle, A. de la

    1995-10-01

    Juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12 has been considered a distinct condition displaying autosomal recessive inheritance. It appears to have a worldwide distribution, and comparatively high incidences were reported 30 years ago in Finland and Norway. More recently, the Mendelian inheritance of the condition has been questioned because almost no new cases have occurred in these populations. Here we report linkage studies assigning a recessive-gene locus for the disease to chromosome 10 in previously diagnosed multiplex families from Finland and Norway, proving the Mendelian mode of inheritance. The locus is tentatively assigned to the 6-cM interval between markers D10S548 and D10S466, with a multipoint maximum lod score (Z{sub max}) of 5.36 near marker D10S1477. By haplotype analysis, the healthy sibs in these families did not appear to constitute any examples of nonpenetrance. We hypothesize that the paucity of new cases in these populations is due either to a dietary effect on the gene penetrance that has changed with time, or to a drop in the birth rate in subpopulations showing enrichment of the mutation, or to both of these causes. 38 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Apparent autosomal recessive inheritance in families with proximal spinal muscular atrophy affecting individuals in two generations

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Zerres, K.; Hahnen, E.

    1996-11-01

    With the evidence that deletions in the region responsible for childhood- and juvenile-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are on chromosome 5 it is now possible to confirm autosomal recessive inheritance in most patients (denoted {open_quotes}SMA 5q{close_quotes}). Homozygous deletions in the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene can be detected in 95%-98% of patients with early-onset SMA (types I and II), whereas as many as 10%-20% of patients with the milder, juvenile-onset form (type III SMA) do not show deletions. In families with affected subjects in two generations, it is difficult to decide whether they are autosomal dominantly inherited or caused by three independent recessive mutations (pseudodominant inheritance). Given an incidence of >1/10,000 of SMA 5q, patients with autosomal recessive SMA have an {approximately}1% recurrence risk to their offspring. Although the dominant forms are not linked to chromosome 5q, pseudodominant families can now be identified by the presence of homozygous deletions in the SMN gene. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Van Maldergem syndrome: further characterisation and evidence for neuronal migration abnormalities and autosomal recessive inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Sahar; Swinkels, Marielle; Terhal, Paulien A; Wilson, Louise C; Rich, Philip; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Zwijnenburg, Petra JG; Hall, Christine M; Robertson, Stephen P; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    We present six patients from five unrelated families with a condition originally described by Van Maldergem et al and provide follow-up studies of the original patient. The phenotype comprises a distinctive facial appearance that includes blepharophimosis, maxillary hypoplasia, telecanthus, microtia and atresia of the external auditory meatus, intellectual disability, digital contractures and skeletal anomalies together with subependymal and subcortical neuronal heterotopia. Affected patients typically have neonatal hypotonia, chronic feeding difficulties and respiratory problems. In our cohort, we have observed one instance of sibling recurrence and parental consanguinity in three of the families, indicating that autosomal recessive inheritance is likely. PMID:22473091

  9. Probable autosomal recessive inheritance of polysplenia, situs inversus and cardiac defects in an Amish family.

    PubMed

    Arnold, G L; Bixler, D; Girod, D

    1983-09-01

    We report on an Amish family with five individuals in two generations with complex congenital heart disease. Autopsy findings in one and clinical examination in the others support the diagnosis of polysplenia "syndrome." In a mouse model, this spectrum of situs abnormalities and cardiovascular defects shows recessive inheritance with homozygotes having either situs solitus or situs inversus or ambiguous situs. The parents of the four affected sibs are fourth cousins. We think that the father of these four children is an affected but clinically normal homozygote, that his deceased sister was an affected homozygote, and it seems likely that they too had consanguinous parents. PMID:6638068

  10. A hypofunctional PAX1 mutation causes autosomal recessively inherited otofaciocervical syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Esther; Aykut, Ayca; Beleggia, Filippo; Karaca, Emin; Durmaz, Burak; Keupp, Katharina; Arslan, Esra; Palamar, Melis; Onay, Melis Palamar; Yigit, Gökhan; Özkinay, Ferda; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-11-01

    Otofaciocervical syndrome (OFCS) is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism, external ear anomalies with preauricular pits and hearing impairment, branchial cysts or fistulas, anomalies of the vertebrae and the shoulder girdle, and mild intellectual disability. In a large consanguineous family with OFCS from Turkey, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) of a single pooled DNA sample of four affected individuals. Filtering for variants with a percentage of alternate reads ≥ 90 % and a coverage of at least five reads identified only a single novel homozygous variant, c.497G>T, located in PAX1 that co-segregated with the disease in the family. PAX1 encodes a transcription factor with a critical role in pattern formation during embryogenesis in vertebrates. The mutation is predicted to substitute the glycine at position 166 to valine (p.G166V) within the highly conserved paired-box domain of the PAX1 protein. We performed a dual luciferase reporter assay to examine the transactivation of a regulatory sequence in the Nkx3-2 promoter region, which is a direct target of mouse Pax1 transcriptional regulation. We observed a significantly reduced transactivation in HEK293T cells overexpressing Pax1(G157V) in comparison to Pax1(WT) expressing cells, indicating a reduced DNA-binding affinity of the mutant protein. Taken together, our results show that the strategy of pooling DNA is a powerful, cost-effective application for WES in consanguineous families and establish PAX1 as a new disease-causing gene for OFCS and as part of the EYA-DACH-SIX-PAX network, important in early embryogenesis. PMID:23851939

  11. Sex-linked recessive

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked recessive; Genetics - sex-linked recessive; X-linked recessive ... X-linked recessive diseases usually occur in males. Males have only one X chromosome. A single recessive ...

  12. Looking the Cow in the Eye: Deletion in the NID1 Gene Is Associated with Recessive Inherited Cataract in Romagnola Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Calderoni, Valerio; Joechler, Monika; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    Cataract is a known condition leading to opacification of the eye lens causing partial or total blindness. Mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant or recessive inherited forms of cataracts in humans, mice, rats, guinea pigs and dogs. The use of large-sized animal models instead of those using mice for the study of this condition has been discussed due to the small size of rodent lenses. Four juvenile-onset cases of bilateral incomplete immature nuclear cataract were recently observed in Romagnola cattle. Pedigree analysis suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. In addition to the cataract, one of the cases displayed abnormal head movements. Genome-wide association and homozygosity mapping and subsequent whole genome sequencing of a single case identified two perfectly associated sequence variants in a critical interval of 7.2 Mb on cattle chromosome 28: a missense point mutation located in an uncharacterized locus and an 855 bp deletion across the exon 19/intron 19 border of the bovine nidogen 1 (NID1) gene (c.3579_3604+829del). RT-PCR showed that NID1 is expressed in bovine lenses while the transcript of the second locus was absent. The NID1 deletion leads to the skipping of exon 19 during transcription and is therefore predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.1164fs27X). The truncated protein lacks a C-terminal domain essential for binding with matrix assembly complexes. Nidogen 1 deficient mice show neurological abnormalities and highly irregular crystal lens alterations. This study adds NID1 to the list of candidate genes for inherited cataract in humans and is the first report of a naturally occurring mutation leading to non-syndromic catarct in cattle provides a potential large animal model for human cataract. PMID:25347398

  13. Novel mutation in TSPAN12 leads to autosomal recessive inheritance of congenital vitreoretinal disease with intra-familial phenotypic variability.

    PubMed

    Gal, Moran; Levanon, Erez Y; Hujeirat, Yasir; Khayat, Morad; Pe'er, Jacob; Shalev, Stavit

    2014-12-01

    Developmental malformations of the vitreoretinal vasculature are a heterogeneous group of conditions with various modes of inheritance, and include familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), persistent fetal vasculature (PFV), and Norrie disease. We investigated a large consanguineous kindred with multiple affected individuals exhibiting variable phenotypes of abnormal vitreoretinal vasculature, consistent with the three above-mentioned conditions and compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Exome sequencing identified a novel c.542G > T (p.C181F) apparently mutation in the TSPAN12 gene that segregated with the ocular disease in the family. The TSPAN12 gene was previously reported to cause dominant and recessive FEVR, but has not yet been associated with other vitreoretinal manifestations. The intra-familial clinical variability caused by a single mutation in the TSPAN12 gene underscores the complicated phenotype-genotype correlation of mutations in this gene, and suggests that there are additional genetic and environmental factors involved in the complex process of ocular vascularization during embryonic development. Our study supports considering PFV, FEVR, and Norrie disease a spectrum of disorders, with clinical and genetic overlap, caused by mutations in distinct genes acting in the Norrin/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:25250762

  14. Recessively inherited L-DOPA-responsive dystonia caused by a point mutation (Q381K) in the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Knappskog, P M; Flatmark, T; Mallet, J; Lüdecke, B; Bartholomé, K

    1995-07-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the conversion of L-tyrosine to L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of dopamine. Recently, we described a point mutation in hTH (Q381K) in a family of two siblings suffering from progressive L-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD), representing the first reported mutation in this gene. We here describe the cloning, expression and steady-state kinetic properties of the recombinant mutant enzyme. When expressed by a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system and in E. coli, the mutant enzyme represents a kinetic variant form, with a reduced affinity for L-tyrosine. The 'residual activity' of about 15% of the corresponding wild-type hTH (isoform hTH1), at substrate concentrations prevailing in vivo, is compatible with the clinical phenotype of the two Q381K homozygote patients carrying this recessively inherited mutation. PMID:8528210

  15. A Brazilian family with Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance.

    PubMed

    Malheiros, José Augusto; Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Oliveira, José Teotonio de; Cardoso, Francisco E C

    2007-03-01

    We report the first Brazilian family with Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome. The presence of consanguineous marriages and illness affecting three sisters and one niece support an autosomal recessive transmission. The age at onset of the illness ranged from 12 to 20 years old. The time interval between hearing loss and involvement of other cranial nerves varied from 3 to 12 years. MRI demonstrated bulbar atrophy and also high intensity signal at T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. PMID:17420823

  16. Recessively inherited multiple epiphyseal dysplasia with normal stature, club foot, and double layered patella caused by a DTDST mutation.

    PubMed

    Superti-Furga, A; Neumann, L; Riebel, T; Eich, G; Steinmann, B; Spranger, J; Kunze, J

    1999-08-01

    We have observed over 25 different mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulphate transporter gene (DTDST) in association with the recessive disorders achondrogenesis 1B, atelosteogenesis 2, and diastrophic dysplasia. The c862t (R279W) transition is the most common mutation in non-Finnish patients, but in these disorders it is usually combined with other DTDST mutations. We had not seen a case of homozygosity for c862t (R279W) until we analysed DNA from a 36 year old male with tall-normal stature (180 cm) who asked for genetic counselling for suspected multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. He was treated for club foot and hip dysplasia at birth. Skeletal changes consistent with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, with the peculiar finding of a double layered patella, were recognised during childhood. Cleft palate, swelling of the ear pinna, and hitch hiker thumb were absent. He was found to be homozygous, and both healthy parents heterozygous, for the R279W mutation in DTDST, and his fibroblasts showed a sulphate incorporation defect typical of DTDST disorders. Counselling was given for a recessive disorder, thereby considerably reducing the probability of affected offspring. Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia is more frequently caused by dominant mutations in the COMP (EDM1, McKusick 132400) and COL9A2 genes (EDM2, McKusick 600204). A few other patients and families with features similar to our proband have been described previously and considered to have autosomal recessive MED (EDM4, McKusick 226900). This observation confirms the existence of this entity and assigns it to the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations at the DTDST locus. PMID:10465113

  17. A frameshift mutation in GRXCR2 causes recessively inherited hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Ayesha; Kohrman, David C.; Naz, Sadaf

    2014-01-01

    More than 360 million humans are affected with some degree of hearing loss, either early or later in life. A genetic cause for the disorder is present in a majority of the cases. We mapped a locus (DFNB101) for hearing loss in humans to chromosome 5q in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Exome sequencing revealed an insertion mutation in GRXCR2 as the cause of moderate to severe and likely progressive hearing loss in the affected individuals of the family. The frameshift mutation is predicted to affect a conserved, cysteine-rich region of GRXCR2, and to result in an abnormal extension of the C-terminus. Functional studies by cell transfections demonstrated that the mutant protein is unstable and mislocalized relative to wild type GRXCR2, consistent with a loss of function mutation. Targeted disruption of Grxcr2 is concurrently reported to cause hearing loss in mice. The structural abnormalities in this animal model suggest a role for GRXCR2 in the development of stereocilia bundles, specialized structures on the apical surface of sensory cells in the cochlea that are critical for sound detection. Our results indicate that GRXCR2 should be considered in differential genetic diagnosis for individuals with early onset, moderate to severe and progressive hearing loss. PMID:24619944

  18. Autosomal Recessive Inheritance

    MedlinePlus

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  19. Case Report: Whole exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift deletion mutation p.G2254fs in COL7A1 associated with autosomal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Karuthedath Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen; Jayarajan, Rijith; Verma, Ankit; Nair, Sreelata; Ravi, Rowmika; Senthivel, Vigneshwar; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa simplex (DEB) is a phenotypically diverse inherited skin fragility disorder. It is majorly manifested by appearance of epidermal bullae upon friction caused either by physical or environmental trauma. The phenotypic manifestations also include appearance of milia, scarring all over the body and nail dystrophy. DEB can be inherited in a recessive or dominant form and the recessive form of DEB (RDEB) is more severe. In the present study, we identify a novel p.G2254fs mutation in COL7A1 gene causing a sporadic case of RDEB by whole exome sequencing (WES). Apart from adding a novel frameshift Collagen VII mutation to the repertoire of known mutations reported in the disease, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically characterized case of DEB from India. PMID:27408687

  20. Autosomal recessive MFN2-related Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with diaphragmatic weakness: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Christopher A; Rabideau, Marina; Blevins, Amy; Westbrook, Marjorie Jody; Ekstein, Tali; Nykamp, Keith; Deucher, Anne; Harper, Amy; Demmer, Laurie

    2016-06-01

    Pathogenic variants in the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT2) disease, which is typically characterized by axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. We report on a 7-month-old white female with hypotonia, motor delay, distal weakness, and motor/sensory axonal neuropathy in which next-generation sequencing analysis identified compound heterozygous pathogenic variants (c.2054_2069_1170del and c.392A>G) in MFN2. A review of the literature reveals that sporadic and familial cases of compound heterozygous or homozygous pathogenic MFN2 variants have been infrequently described, which indicates that MFN2 can also be inherited in a recessive manner. This case highlights several clinical findings not typically associated with MFN2 pathogenic variants, including young age of onset and rapidly progressing diaphragmatic paresis that necessitated tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation, and adds to the growing list of features identified in autosomal recessive MFN2-related CMT2. Our patient with MFN2-related CMT2 expands the clinical and mutational spectrum of individuals with autosomal recessive CMT2 and identifies a new clinical feature that warrants further observation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26955893

  1. Gingival Recession in a Child-Patient; Easily Missed Etiologies: Case Report with Video

    PubMed Central

    Nwhator, SO

    2014-01-01

    Gingival recession is commonly associated with plaque-induced inflammation and calculus. A high frenal attachment is more important in gingival recession in the child-patient. A healthy child-patient with impeccable oral hygiene presented with localized gingival recession without plaque-induced inflammation which led to the exploration of other possible etiologies. Multiple factors appeared to be acting in consonance (Concomitant multiple etiologies [CME]). The factors were a high frenal attachment, traumatic overbite and bruxism induced by premature tooth contacts. Pedodontists and periodontists should rule out CME in cases of gingival recession in the child-patient. PMID:25031899

  2. Erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. A recessive inherited ferrochelatase deficiency with anemia, photosensitivity, and liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tutois, S; Montagutelli, X; Da Silva, V; Jouault, H; Rouyer-Fessard, P; Leroy-Viard, K; Guénet, J L; Nordmann, Y; Beuzard, Y; Deybach, J C

    1991-01-01

    A viable autosomal recessive mutation (named fch, or ferrochelatase deficiency) causing jaundice and anemia in mice arose in a mutagenesis experiment using ethylnitrosourea. Homozygotes (fch/fch) display a hemolytic anemia, photosensitivity, cholestasis, and severe hepatic dysfunction. Protoporphyrin is found at high concentration in erythrocytes, serum, and liver. Ferrochelatase activity in various tissues is 2.7-6.3% of normal. Heterozygotes (+/fch) are not anemic and have normal liver function; they are not sensitive to light exposure; ferrochelatase activity is 45-65% of normal. Southern blot analysis using a ferrochelatase cDNA probe reveals no gross deletion of the ferrochelatase gene. This is the first spontaneous form of erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. Despite the presence in the mouse of clinical and biochemical features infrequent in the human, this mutation may represent a model for the human disease, especially in its severe form. Images PMID:1939658

  3. [Evidence for autosomal dominant inheritance through the maternal line in a case of primary ciliary diskinesia].

    PubMed

    Alvarez González, J; Busto Castañón, L; Nistal Serrano, M

    2006-01-01

    An atypical case of primary ciliary dyskinesia is presented in which the inheritance, rather than the classical autosomal recessive, appears to be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait through the maternal line. The case involves two brothers of 29 and 30 years of age, married without children, with a history of infertility, frequent episodes of sinusitis, and recurrent pulmonary infections. Their mother and sister have chronic bronchopathy of unknown etiology. Their father is healthy without pulmonary problems or sinusitis. At physical exam, both brothers, sister and mother presented with bronchial rhonchi at lung auscultation. Blood analysis and pulmonary function, liver and renal tests were all normal. The ultraestructual study of the sperm flagellum by electron microscopy revealed that both brothers have the same anomaly. Namely, in the majority of the cross-sections, both dynein arms are missing. The nexin filament was present, as well as the radial spokes and the central pair of microtubules. In some sperm, besides the absence of dynein arms, there was also absence of the central pair of microtubules. Neither anomalies of the fibrous sheath nor of the dense fibers were found. In approximately 50% of the spermatozoa, the midpiece had a decreased number of mitochondria and extra non-aligned mitochondria. Other findings included extra peripheral microtubules in the axoneme. PMID:17058621

  4. The megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: a fatal autosomal recessive condition.

    PubMed Central

    Penman, D G; Lilford, R J

    1989-01-01

    We report the cases of two sibs with the megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome. The parents are first cousins. These cases further support the view that this syndrome is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. PMID:2918532

  5. Inheritance of skewed X chromosome inactivation in a large family with an X-linked recessive deafness syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Orstavik, K.H.; Orstavik, R.E.; Eiklid, K.; Tranebjaerg, L.

    1996-07-12

    A new X-linked recessive deafness syndrome was recently reported and mapped to Xq22 (Mohr-Tranebjaeerg syndrome). In addition to deafness, the patients had visual impairment, dystonia, fractures, and mental deterioration. The female carriers did not have any significant manifestations of the syndrome. We examined X chromosome inactivation in 8 obligate and 12 possible carriers by using a polymerase chain reaction analysis of the methylation-dependent amplification of the polymorphic triplet repeat at the androgen receptor locus. Seven of 8 obligate carriers and 1 of 5 carriers by linkage analysis had an extremely skewed pattern in blood DNA not found in 30 normal females. The X inactivation pattern in fibroblast DNA from 2 of the carriers with the extremely skewed pattern was also skewed but to a lesser degree than in blood DNA. One obligate carrier had a random X inactivation pattern in both blood and fibroblast DNA. A selection mechanism for the skewed pattern is therefore not likely. The extremely skewed X inactivation in 8 females of 3 generations in this family may be caused by a single gene that influences skewing of X chromosome inactivation. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Esthetic dentistry for multiple gingival recession cases: Coronally advanced flap with bracket application.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Minkle; Saini, Ashish; Anand, Vishal; Govila, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of gingival recession is essential to rectify the esthetic and functional deficiencies of the patient and to combat further periodontal destruction. However, treating multiple recession cases is quite challenging, and therefore requires constant modifications of the prevalent treatment strategies as per the severity of the condition. The objective of this case report was to evaluate the effectiveness of coronally advanced flap (CAF) technique without vertical incisions using CAF brackets (CAF+B) for treating a patient presenting with class II gingival recession defects in relation to maxillary anteriors. Complete root coverage was observed, and the results were consistent even after 6 months. The current case report demonstrates good outcomes of the CAF + B technique without the use of any additional soft tissue grafts or vertical incisions, therefore, endorsing the promising potential of the CAF + B technique in multiple gingival recession cases. PMID:27143837

  7. Esthetic dentistry for multiple gingival recession cases: Coronally advanced flap with bracket application

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Saini, Ashish; Anand, Vishal; Govila, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of gingival recession is essential to rectify the esthetic and functional deficiencies of the patient and to combat further periodontal destruction. However, treating multiple recession cases is quite challenging, and therefore requires constant modifications of the prevalent treatment strategies as per the severity of the condition. The objective of this case report was to evaluate the effectiveness of coronally advanced flap (CAF) technique without vertical incisions using CAF brackets (CAF+B) for treating a patient presenting with class II gingival recession defects in relation to maxillary anteriors. Complete root coverage was observed, and the results were consistent even after 6 months. The current case report demonstrates good outcomes of the CAF + B technique without the use of any additional soft tissue grafts or vertical incisions, therefore, endorsing the promising potential of the CAF + B technique in multiple gingival recession cases. PMID:27143837

  8. Treatment of multiple gingival recessions with vista technique: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Sharma, Ena; Gundanavar, Gayatri; Subbaiah, Shobha Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Gingival recession is a common manifestation in most populations. Gingival recession is clinically manifested by an apical displacement of the gingival tissues, leading to root surface exposure. Gingival recession may be a concern for patients for a number of reasons such as root hypersensitivity, erosion, root caries, and esthetics (Wennstrom 1996). Recently, new techniques have been suggested for the surgical treatment of multiple adjacent recession type defects. These are mainly derived from the coronally advanced flap, a supraperiosteal envelope technique in combination with a subepithelial connective tissue graft, or its evolution as a tunnel technique. The current case reports introduce a novel, minimally invasive approach applicable for both isolated recession defects as well as multiple contiguous defects in the maxillary anterior region. Access to the surgical site is obtained by means of an approach referred to as vestibular incision subperiosteal tunnel access. PMID:26015680

  9. [New recurrent extended deletion, including GJB2 and GJB6 genes, results in isolated sensorineural hearing impairment with autosomal recessive type of inheritance].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Makienko, O N; Okuneva, E G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary hearing loss with the autosomal recessive type of inheritance of the DFNB 1 genetic type, caused by mutations in the GJB2 gene, is the main reason of innate non-syndromal hearing impairment in most developed countries of the world (including Russia). Intragenic point mutations prevail among the GJB2 gene defectors; however, extended deletions in the DFNB1 locus are also found with considerable frequency in some populations (for example, Spain, Great Britain, France, United States, and Brazil). Among the four known extended deletions, only one deletion affects directly the GJB2 gene sequence and was described in a single family. A new extended deletion in the GJB2 and GJB6 gene sequences (approximately 101 kb in size; NC_000013.10:g.20,757,021_20,858,394del), detected in three unrelated Russian patients, was described and characterized. Ingush origin of this mutation is assumed. If the new deletion is frequent, its detection is very important for the genetic consulting of families with hereditary hearing impairment. PMID:25715449

  10. Effects of Tip Clearance and Casing Recess on Heat Transfer and Stage Efficiency in Axial Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, A. A.; Steinthorsson, E.; Rigby, David L.

    1998-01-01

    Calculations were performed to assess the effect of the tip leakage flow on the rate of heat transfer to blade, blade tip and casing. The effect on exit angle and efficiency was also examined. Passage geometries with and without casing recess were considered. The geometry and the flow conditions of the GE-E 3 first stage turbine, which represents a modem gas turbine blade were used for the analysis. Clearance heights of 0%, 1%, 1.5% and 3% of the passage height were considered. For the two largest clearance heights considered, different recess depths were studied. There was an increase in the thermal load on all the heat transfer surfaces considered due to enlargement of the clearance gap. Introduction of recessed casing resulted in a drop in the rate of heat transfer on the pressure side but the picture on the suction side was found to be more complex for the smaller tip clearance height considered. For the larger tip clearance height the effect of casing recess was an orderly reduction in the suction side heat transfer as the casing recess height was increased. There was a marked reduction of heat load and peak values on the blade tip upon introduction of casing recess, however only a small reduction was observed on the casing itself. It was reconfirmed that there is a linear relationship between the efficiency and the tip gap height. It was also observed that the recess casing has a small effect on the efficiency but can have a moderating effect on the flow underturning at smaller tip clearances.

  11. Late infantile autosomal recessive myotonia, mental retardation, and skeletal abnormalities: a new autosomal recessive syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Richieri-Costa, A; Garcia da Silva, S M; Frota-Pessoa, O

    1984-01-01

    Four sibs of non-consanguineous parents who had myotonia from late infancy are described. Mild to moderate mental retardation, severe bone abnormalities of the vertebral column (mainly in the thoracolumbar region), and short stature were also observed. Autosomal recessive inheritance is demonstrated. These cases are compared with reported cases of the Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Images PMID:6716408

  12. Implant-Related Gingival Recession: Pilot Case Series Presents Novel Technique and Scoring Template.

    PubMed

    El Askary, Abd El Salam; Ghallab, Noha A; Tan, Shuh-Chern; Rosen, Paul S; Shawkat, Ahmad

    2016-07-01

    This article introduces a novel protocol for the predictable treatment of Class II division 2 implantrelated gingival recession and presents an innovative acrylic template for scoring the peri-implant soft-tissue gain, used before and after treatment. Ten patients with Class II division 2 single-implant-related gingival recession received combined double-papillary flap approximation and rotated subepithelial connective tissue grafting from the palate, along with any preferred optimal grafting technique that suits the type of preexisting defect. Clinical gingival recession was recorded using a scoring template at 4, 6, and 9 months postoperatively. At the end of the 9-month follow-up period, 80% of the cases showed improved soft-tissue coverage; two patients showed significant wound complications that were related to poor home-care measures. The scoring method used can be considered a diagnostic and prognostic tool for better understanding of implant-related gingival recession. PMID:27548399

  13. A case of paternally inherited congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, M; Yamada, H; Higuchi, I; Kaminishi, Y; Miki, T; Johnson, K; Osame, M

    1994-01-01

    We report two sisters with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) born to a normal mother and an affected father. The congenitally affected daughters had symptoms from birth. The age of onset of DM in the father was 39 years. Analysis of the CTG trinucleotide expansion in this family showed increase in the repeat length with increasing severity, with the smallest expansion in the grandfather and the largest expansion in the younger of the two CDM sisters. This family shows that exceptionally it is possible for CDM to be inherited paternally and refutes the hypothesis that CDM is exclusively of maternal origin. This contradicts several of the previous hypotheses concerning the mechanisms by which the CDM phenotype arises. Images PMID:8064819

  14. Orofacial Manifestations of Autosomal Recessive Robinow's Syndrome: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mali, Santosh; Bansal, Neha; Dhokar, Amol; Yadav, Monica

    2016-03-01

    Robinow's syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder which bears a resemblance to a foetal face. It is characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, defects in vertebral segmentation and abnormalities in the head, face and external genitalia. It has a genetic heterogeneity with autosomal dominant and recessive forms which relates to the severity of phenotype presentation. A rare case of an autosomal recessive form of Robinow's syndrome is presented with emphasis on, characteristic craniofacial and intraoral manifestations to aid in diagnosis and dental management of this patient. PMID:27135013

  15. Orofacial Manifestations of Autosomal Recessive Robinow’s Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Santosh; Dhokar, Amol; Yadav, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Robinow’s syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder which bears a resemblance to a foetal face. It is characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, defects in vertebral segmentation and abnormalities in the head, face and external genitalia. It has a genetic heterogeneity with autosomal dominant and recessive forms which relates to the severity of phenotype presentation. A rare case of an autosomal recessive form of Robinow’s syndrome is presented with emphasis on, characteristic craniofacial and intraoral manifestations to aid in diagnosis and dental management of this patient. PMID:27135013

  16. Practice of Consanguinity and Unusual Cases of Inherited Familial Chromosome Abnormalities: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Debarshi; Bhairi, Vidya; S Kadandale, Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    We present 2 cases of likely rare event. In case 1, 3(rd) degree consanguineous marriage revealed inv(6) with same break points in parents who were found to be phenotypically normal. The same inv(6) being inherited in progeny but presented with low AMH (anti Mullerian hormone) and high level of FSH (follicular stimulating hormone) leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome/premature ovarian failure. In case 2, a couple was presented with 2(nd) degree consanguineous marriage and referred for 2 recurrent/ missed abortions. The amounts of shared genes are suggestive of more lethal genetic outcomes and inferred endogamy is a major driver to reproductive fiascoes, the ancestries of which are deeply tied at the meiotic level. PMID:27386439

  17. Practice of Consanguinity and Unusual Cases of Inherited Familial Chromosome Abnormalities: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Debarshi; Bhairi, Vidya; S Kadandale, Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    We present 2 cases of likely rare event. In case 1, 3rd degree consanguineous marriage revealed inv(6) with same break points in parents who were found to be phenotypically normal. The same inv(6) being inherited in progeny but presented with low AMH (anti Mullerian hormone) and high level of FSH (follicular stimulating hormone) leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome/premature ovarian failure. In case 2, a couple was presented with 2nd degree consanguineous marriage and referred for 2 recurrent/ missed abortions. The amounts of shared genes are suggestive of more lethal genetic outcomes and inferred endogamy is a major driver to reproductive fiascoes, the ancestries of which are deeply tied at the meiotic level.

  18. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  19. Alkaptonuria: A Case of Familial Inheritance from Hangarki Village in Dharwad District of Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Dhiraj J; Naik, Prashanth

    2016-07-01

    Alkaptonuria is a genetic disorder, unknown to the general public and ignored by general physicians due to lack of awareness of its high prevalence. Increasing incidences of familial inheritance are recorded. A 41 years 8 months male with the swollen knee, chronic mechanical pain, restricted limping walk and tingling sensation in the limb. Also, has a complaint of the stiffness of back in the morning, which gets relieved by movement. Mild hyper pigmentation of pinna and sclera of eye. X-ray report reveals osteoarthritis of the knee and thoracic kyphosis. After considering clinical finding, report of radiological investigation and Biochemical test results, patient was diagnosed as a case of Alkaptonuria. Screening of entire family revealed a typical case of familial inheritance. Hidden familial inheritance can be disclosed by mass screening of families and medical awareness. PMID:27382210

  20. Semilunar vestibular technique: A novel procedure for multiple recession coverage (a report of two cases)

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Nymphea; Pandit, Inder Kumar; Bali, Deepika; Jindal, Shaifi

    2015-01-01

    The procedures for root coverage have been greatly refined over the past few decades. Still as compared to the other periodontal surgical procedures, predictability of mucogingival procedures remains uncertain which is more in patients who present with multiple recessions or recession complicated with periodontal involvement. Techniques which claim success almost always involve a second surgical site. A novel technique avoiding second surgical site and good predictability for multiple recessions was described by Dr. P.D. Miller in a conference at Pune in 2011. A semilunar vestibular incision technique described by Dr. P.D Miller was performed on two patients who presented with multiple recessions in the maxillary anterior teeth. About 90–100% root coverage was observed when the patients were on a follow-up for 1-year with a significant increase in the vestibular depth. The semilunar vestibular incision technique used in two cases resulted in predictable root coverage with a good color blend, an esthetic marginal morphology and most importantly the avoidance of the second surgical site. PMID:26941524

  1. Mandibular Exostosis in Canine with Single Tooth Recession – A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rachna; Kapoor, Daljit; Sujay, J

    2014-01-01

    Buccal exostoses occur along the buccal aspect of the maxilla or mandible, usually in the premolar and molar areas. It has been suggested that the bony outgrowth represents a reaction to increased or abnormal occlusal stress to the teeth in the involved areas. Gingival recessions may occur without any symptoms but may give rise to the patient concern about poor esthetics, dentine hypersensitivity, inability to perform oral hygiene procedures, and loss of the tooth. This article presents a rare case of exostosis in the mandibular right canine region and single tooth recession in the mandibular left central incisor region which was successfully managed by a combination of osseous resective surgery done to treat exostosis and lateral pedicle technique for root coverage. PMID:25214741

  2. Resorbable barrier and envelope flap surgery in the treatment of human gingival recession defects. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Scabbia, A; Tatakis, D N; Checchi, L; Calura, G

    1998-01-01

    The present case report evaluates the treatment outcome following mucogingival surgery combined with a bioresorbable barrier in gingival recession defects in humans. A total of 11 buccal, Miller Class I or II, gingival recession defects in 6 patients were consecutively treated. The exposed root surface was ultrasonically scaled and conditioned with a tetracycline HCl solution (10 mg/ml) for 4 min. A buccal full/split thickness envelope flap was then elevated, and a bioresorbable matrix barrier was positioned to completely cover the exposed root surface and surrounding bone margins. A flap was then positioned at or slightly coronal to its original position. In all cases, a variable amount of membrane was intentionally left uncovered on the exposed root surface. Clinical recordings, assessed presurgery and at 6 months postsurgery, included defects-specific plaque and gingival scores, recession depth (RD), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and keratinized tissue width (KT). Immediately postsurgery, and at weeks 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 postsurgery, the location of gingival margin or granulation tissue covering the previously exposed root surface was recorded, as well as the extent of barrier exposure. Statistical analysis showed that RD decreased from 2.3+/-0.2 mm presurgery to 0.8+/-0.5 mm at 6 months postsurgery (p=0.001), representing a mean root coverage of 65% (range: 40-100%). CAL gain paralleled RD reduction (1.5+/-0.5 mm; p=0.0009), while KT showed a slight increase (0.3+/-0.6 mm) at 6 months postsurgery. Results indicate that clinical improvement of gingival recession defects may be achieved by means of a barrier-supported envelope technique. The bioresorbable matrix barrier represented an effective scaffold to support the reconstruction of the mucogingival unit. PMID:9477016

  3. Periodontal and Restorative Treatment of Gingival Recession Associated with Non-Carious Cervical Lesions: Case Study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Analice Giovani; Teixeira, Daniela Navarro Ribeiro; Soares, Michelle Pereira Costa Mundim; Gonzaga, Ramon Corrêa de Queiroz; Fernandes-Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Soares, Paulo Vinícius

    2016-01-01

    The association between the presence of gingival recession and non-carious cervical lesions is a common finding in dentistry. These diseases have multifactorial etiology and the treatment should be multidisciplinary. Although traditionally the majority of professionals treat non-carious cervical lesions only with conventional restorative procedures, in most cases a combination of periodontal and restorative treatments provides the best functional and esthetic results. Thus, the objective of this case report was to present a new option for treatment, which consists of a subepithelial connective tissue graft associated with a coronally advanced flap placed on dentin and non-carious cervical lesions restored with lithium disilicate partial veneers. A patient complaining about the esthetic aspects of her teeth and cervical dentin hypersensitivity was submitted to occlusal adjustments and daily diet analysis in order to manage etiologic factors. Experienced operators then performed restorative and surgical treatments. Periodontal clinical attachment level (probing depth + gingival margin), bleeding on probing, plaque index, and the integrity of the restorations were observed. During the monitoring period, the treatment was effective, with good functional and esthetic results. The hypersensitivity disappeared, and neither inflammatory characteristics in gingival tissue nor failures in restorations were noted. It might be concluded that treatment with a combination of techniques can be effective and predictable for patients with gingival recession and non-carious cervical lesions that may or may not require restorative procedures under controlled conditions. PMID:26764967

  4. Prenatal sex determination in suspicious cases of X-linked recessive diseases by the amelogenin gene

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Amir Abbas; Shahhosseiny, Mohammad Hassan; Ahangari, Ghasem; Izadi Mobarakeh, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): To determine the fetal discernment in suspected cases of sex linked recessive disease in the first trimester of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: After collection of 100 Chorionic Villi samples, the DNAs were extracted and baby gender was determined. Meanwhile, after increasing the sensitivity, the system was able to detect the sex of each cell which was obtained by biopsy. Results: Early fetal gender of 100 Chorionic Villi samples were assessed by PCR. After increasing sensitivity of the assay, the sexes in 13 fetuses that were in different cellular stages were detected. Morover, sexes were detected in two unfertilized and one fertilized ovum but without any division. Conclusion: Sex detection of fetus before delivery in the first trimester of pregnancy, will prevent babies with abnormalities being born. It can also be used in detection of recessive sex related diseases in In Vitro Fertilization cases for sex detection and to transfer female fetus to the mother. Our optimized molecular detection system was designed on the basis of amelogenin gene, which can determine the sex in blood, chorionic villi, and single cell in vitro fertilization with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:24711898

  5. Exome sequencing of case-unaffected-parents trios reveals recessive and de novo genetic variants in sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Karyn Meltz; Yu, Bing; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Pamphlett, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of genetic variants to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains largely unknown. Either recessive or de novo variants could result in an apparently sporadic occurrence of ALS. In an attempt to find such variants we sequenced the exomes of 44 ALS-unaffected-parents trios. Rare and potentially damaging compound heterozygous variants were found in 27% of ALS patients, homozygous recessive variants in 14% and coding de novo variants in 27%. In 20% of patients more than one of the above variants was present. Genes with recessive variants were enriched in nucleotide binding capacity, ATPase activity, and the dynein heavy chain. Genes with de novo variants were enriched in transcription regulation and cell cycle processes. This trio study indicates that rare private recessive variants could be a mechanism underlying some case of sporadic ALS, and that de novo mutations are also likely to play a part in the disease. PMID:25773295

  6. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  7. Autosomal recessive cystinuria caused by genome-wide paternal uniparental isodisomy in a patient with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Y; Higashimoto, K; Sasaki, K; Jozaki, K; Yoshinaga, H; Okamoto, N; Takama, Y; Kubota, A; Nakayama, M; Yatsuki, H; Nishioka, K; Joh, K; Mukai, T; Yoshiura, K-i; Soejima, H

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 20% of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) cases are caused by mosaic paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 11 (pUPD11). Although pUPD11 is usually limited to the short arm of chromosome 11, a small minority of BWS cases show genome-wide mosaic pUPD (GWpUPD). These patients show variable clinical features depending on mosaic ratio, imprinting status of other chromosomes, and paternally inherited recessive mutations. To date, there have been no reports of a mosaic GWpUPD patient with an autosomal recessive disease caused by a paternally inherited recessive mutation. Here, we describe a patient concurrently showing the clinical features of BWS and autosomal recessive cystinuria. Genetic analyses revealed that the patient has mosaic GWpUPD and an inherited paternal homozygous mutation in SLC7A9. This is the first report indicating that a paternally inherited recessive mutation can cause an autosomal recessive disease in cases of GWpUPD mosaicism. Investigation into recessive mutations and the dysregulation of imprinting domains is critical in understanding precise clinical conditions of patients with mosaic GWpUPD. PMID:25171146

  8. A Case Study of Teachers' Recess Practices Related to Students with Exceptional Learning Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Andrea E.

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate recess time for young students is an agent for healthy growth, development, and academic performance. Recess time for young students is dissipating due to increased pressure for higher test scores, problematic behaviors on the playground, and its inclusion within classroom discipline policies. Researchers have reported the majority…

  9. As little as needed: the extraordinary case of a mild recessive osteopetrosis owing to a novel splicing hypomorphic mutation in the TCIRG1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sobacchi, Cristina; Pangrazio, Alessandra; Lopez, Antonio González-Meneses; Gomez, Diego Pascual-Vaca; Caldana, Maria Elena; Susani, Lucia; Vezzoni, Paolo; Villa, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in the TCIRG1 gene, coding for a subunit of the osteoclast proton pump, are responsible for more than 50% of cases of human malignant autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO), a rare inherited bone disease with increased bone density owing to a failure in bone resorption. A wide variety of mutations has been described, including missense, nonsense, small deletions/insertions, splice-site mutations, and large genomic deletions, all leading to a similar severe presentation. So far, to the best of our knowledge, no report of a mild phenotype owing to recessive TCIRG1 mutations is present neither in our series of more than 100 TCIRG1-dependent ARO patients nor in the literature. Here we describe an 8-year-old patient referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of ARO, based on radiological findings; of note, no neurological or hematological defects were present in this girl. Surprisingly, we identified a novel nucleotide change in intron 15 of the TCIRG1 gene at the homozygous state, leading to the production of multiple aberrant transcripts, but also, more importantly, of a limited amount of the normal transcript. Our results show that a low level of normal TCIRG1 protein can dampen the clinical presentation of TCIRG1-dependent ARO. On this basis, a small amount of protein might be sufficient to rescue, at least partially, the severe ARO phenotype, and this is particularly important when gene therapy approaches are considered. In addition, we would also recommend that the TCIRG1 gene be included in the molecular diagnosis of mild forms of human ARO. PMID:24535816

  10. Application of an Acellular Dermal Matrix Allograft (CenoDerm) for Treatment of Multiple Gingival Recession Defects: A Case Report with One-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Neda; Heidari, Mohadeseh; Mousavi Jazi, Mahvash; Daneshmonfared, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    Several techniques and materials have been introduced for the treatment of gingival recession defects. This article reports the case of a 43-year old female patient with chief complaint of esthetic problem, presenting multiple gingival recession defects in anterior maxilla. CenoDerm combined with coronally positioned flap was used for management of six teeth with gingival recession. Complete root coverage was achieved in 66.6% of treated sites in one-year follow-up and the patient was satisfied with the esthetic result. The mean root coverage was 86.0%±22.3. The mean recession depth reduction and clinical attachment gain were 1.8±0.8 mm and 2.5±0.6 mm, respectively. According to the results obtained in this case, CenoDerm can be applied successfully in treatment of multiple gingival recession defects. PMID:25346839

  11. AIPL1 implicated in the pathogenesis of two cases of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, David; Jin, Chongfei; Jiao, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Bushra, Tahmina; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Butt, Nadeem H.; Husnain, Tayyab; Sieving, Paul A.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To localize and identify the gene and mutations causing autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Consanguineous families from Pakistan were ascertained to be affected with autosomal recessive retinal degeneration. All affected individuals underwent thorough ophthalmologic examinations. Blood samples were collected, and genomic DNA was extracted using a salting out procedure. Genotyping was performed using microsatellite markers spaced at approximately 10 cM intervals. Two-point linkage analysis was performed with the lod score method. Direct DNA sequencing of amplified genomic DNA was performed for mutation screening of candidate genes. Results Genome-wide linkage scans yielded a lod score of 3.05 at θ=0 for D17S1832 and 3.82 at θ=0 for D17S938, localizing the disease gene to a 12.22 cM (6.64 Mb) region flanked by D17S1828 and D17S1852 for family 61032 and family 61227, which contains aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1), a gene previously implicated in recessive Leber congenital amaurosis and autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy. Sequencing of AIPL1 showed a homozygous c.773G>C (p.Arg258Pro) sequence change in all affected individuals of family 61032 and a homozygous c.465G>T (p.(H93_Q155del)) change in all affected members of family 61227. Conclusions The results strongly suggest that the c.773G>C (p.R258P) and c.465G>T (p.(H93_Q155del)) mutations in AIPL1 cause autosomal recessive retinal degeneration in these consanguineous Pakistani families. PMID:24426771

  12. [Endoscopic removal of a dental foreign body from maxillary sinus via anterior prelacrimal recess approach: a case report].

    PubMed

    Song, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yongjin; Zhao, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    We present a rare case of dental foreign body from maxillary sinus in a 21-year woman who was hospitalized because of oral cavity and nasal sinus leak for 3 months when doing cheek-bulging action. Admission diagnosis :dental maxillary sinus"foreign body" (left); chronic maxillary sinusitis (left). Computed tomographic scan showed irregular high density shadow in the left maxillary sinus. The "foreign body" was removed via anteri- or prelacrimal recess approach, which was supposed to be the iatrogenic foreign body - alveolar bone. PMID:27382694

  13. Mendelian inheritance in Germany between 1900 and 1910. The case of Carl Correns (1864-1933).

    PubMed

    Rheinberger, H J

    2000-12-01

    Carl Correns (1864-1933) came to recognize Mendel's rules between 1894 and 1900 while trying to find out the mechanism of xenia, that is, the direct influence of the fertilizing pollen on the mother plant in maize and peas among other species. In this paper, I am concerned with the ten years of Correns' work after the annus mirabilis of 1900 until 1910, when the main outlines of the new science of genetics had been established. It is generally assumed that after 1900 Correns quickly began probing the limits of Mendelian inheritance, both as far as the explanatory force of formal transmission genetics and the generality of Mendel's laws are concerned. A careful examination of his papers however shows that he was much more interested in the scope of Mendelian inheritance than in its limits. Even his work with variegated Mirabilis plants, which historiographical folklore still presents as a result of Correns' growing interest in cytoplasmic inheritance, can be shown to have been conducted to corroborate just the opposite, namely, the validity of the nuclear paradigm. The paper will show that Correns' research results in those years (among them the Mendelian inheritance of sex in higher plants) were the outcome of a complex experimental program which involved breeding experiments with dozens of different species. PMID:11147095

  14. Complications associated with uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recession in a diabetic patient population: an observational case series.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Schweinberger, Monica H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to report the complications associated with uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recession for surgical treatment of pathologic soft tissue ankle equinus contracture in diabetic patients. This is an observational case series involving a retrospective review of prospectively collected data of 23 uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recessions used to treat pathologic soft tissue ankle equinus contracture in 18 consecutive diabetic patients between November 2006 and January 2009. Each patient underwent uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recession under general or spinal anesthesia with thigh tourniquet control in combination with soft tissue and/or osseous reconstructive foot and/or ankle surgery. Patients were kept non-weight bearing based on the index procedure and followed until clinical healing occurred or failure was declared. There were 9 male and 9 female patients with a mean age +/- SD of 69.0 +/- 7.4-years (range: 47.0 to 71.0 years). There were 11 right and 12 left lower limbs involved, with 5 procedures performed bilateral. Complications included 3 conversions to an open incision secondary to difficulty dissecting through excessive adipose tissue, delayed healing of 3 incision sites in patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus at the time of surgery, and 3 undercorrections in patients with spastic contractures. The remainder of the procedures were deemed successful with no saphenous nerve, sural nerve, or lesser saphenous vein related injuries occurring. When properly performed, uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recession represents a safe, reliable, and minimally invasive technique useful for correcting pathologic soft tissue ankle equinus contracture in patients with diabetes. A percutaneous tendo-Achilles lengthening should be performed in patients who have marginal arterial inflow that precludes tourniquet use or have a spastic contracture. An open rather than endoscopic gastrocnemius recession should be performed in

  15. Azygoesophageal recess.

    PubMed

    Ravenel, James G; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2002-07-01

    Knowledge of the normal radiologic appearance and manifestations of disease in the azygoesophageal recess can facilitate the detection and diagnosis of intrathoracic disease. The azygoesophageal recess is located lateral or posterior to the esophagus and anterior to the spine. It extends from the anterior turn of the azygous vein to the aortic hiatus. The configuration of the azygoesophageal recess is normally a smooth arc convex to the left. Because the right lung extends into the recess, pathology in this region can often be detected radiographically and typically manifests as increased opacity and/or as a contour abnormality. In adults, convexity directed to the right and immediately below the level of the azygous vein on a frontal radiograph is abnormal and requires further evaluation. PMID:12082374

  16. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  17. A case report: Autosomal recessive microcephaly caused by a novel mutation in MCPH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid; Gholami, Milad; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2015-10-15

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH-MIM 251200) is distinguished by congenital decrease in occipito-frontal head circumference (OFC) of at least 2 standard deviations (SD) below population average in addition to non-progressive mental retardation, without any prominent neurological disorder. Mutations in MCPH1, which encodes the protein microcephalin have been detected in this disorder. Here we report a consanguineous Iranian family with 2 children affected with microcephaly. Despite the severe mental retardation observed in the male patient, the female patient had normal intelligent with no delay in motor milestones or speech. A novel splice-acceptor site homozygous mutation has been detected in intron 4 of MCPH1 gene (c.322-2A>T) which results in an RNA processing defect with a 15-nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of the mRNA transcript (r.322_336del15, p.R108_Q112del5). This novel mutation has resulted in different phenotypes in affected male and female patients of this family. The sex-specific variations in gene regulation during brain development may partially explain such difference in phenotypes probably in addition to other mechanisms such as modifier genes. PMID:26192461

  18. A Lebanese family with autosomal recessive oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OAV) spectrum and review of the literature: is OAV a genetically heterogeneous disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Farra, Chantal; Yunis, Khaled; Yazbeck, Nadine; Majdalani, Marianne; Charafeddine, Lama; Wakim, Rima; Awwad, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OAV) spectrum summarizes a continuum of ocular, auricular, and vertebral anomalies. Goldenhar syndrome is a variant of this spectrum and is characterized by pre-auricular skin tags, microtia, facial asymmetry, ocular abnormalities, and vertebral anomalies of different sizes and shapes. Most cases are thought to be sporadic. However, a few families were reported to have an autosomal recessive inheritance and other families’ presentation of the syndrome strongly supported an autosomal dominant inheritance. We report OAV in a female infant presenting with tracheomalacia, diaphragmatic hernia, encephalomeningocele, sacral neural tube defect, and cardiac defect and her brother having no more than dysmorphic features. The mode of inheritance in this family supports an autosomal recessive inheritance where the transmission was from normal first-degree consanguineous parents to one of the sons and to the daughter. This report further broadens the clinical presentation and symptoms of OAV and supports the hypothesis advancing OAV as a genetically heterogeneous disorder. PMID:23776370

  19. Autosomal recessive

    MedlinePlus

    Feero WG, Zazove P, Chen F. Clinical genomics. In: Rakel RE, Rakel D, eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 43. Groden J, Gocha AS, Croce CM. Human basic genetics and patterns of inheritance. In: Creasy ...

  20. [Inherited thrombopathia in Simmental cattle].

    PubMed

    Aebi, M; Wiedemar, N; Drögemüller, C; Zanolari, R

    2016-02-01

    During the years 2012 to 2014, a total of 5 affected Simmental cattle showing persistent bleeding after minor or unknown trauma, were presented at the Clinic for Ruminants or at the Institute for Genetics of the Vetsuisse-Faculty, University of Berne. The homozygous mutation RASGRP2, initially reported in 2007, was present in all these cases and all available parents were heterozygous carriers thus confirming the recessive mode of inheritance. Three affected animals died as a result of persistent bleeding. One animal was stabilized at the Clinic for Ruminants and was slaughtered one month later. Another case showing persistent bleeding and several hematomas was euthanized after genotyping. A frequency of 10% carriers for the associated mutation was detected in a sample of 145 Simmental sires which were used 2013 for artificial insemination in Switzerland. These bulls are designated as TP carriers and should not be used uncontrolled. Breeding organizations in Switzerland make use of the gene test to select bulls which do not carry the mutation. PMID:27145685

  1. Dropped-head in recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Matteo; Pennisi, Elena Maria; Bruttini, Mirella; Bizzarri, Veronica; Bucci, Elisabetta; Morino, Stefania; Talerico, Caterina; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Renieri, Alessandra; Antonini, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented a dropped head, caused by severe neck extensor weakness that had started two years before. She had also developed a mild degree of dysphagia, rhinolalia, eyelid ptosis and proximal limb weakness during the last months. EMG revealed myopathic changes. Muscle MRI detected fatty infiltration in the posterior neck muscles and tongue. Muscle biopsy revealed fiber size variations, sporadic rimmed vacuoles, small scattered angulated fibers and a patchy myofibrillar network. Genetic analysis revealed homozygous (GCN)11 expansions in the PABPN1 gene that were consistent with recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). There are a few reports of the recessive form, which has a later disease onset with milder symptoms and higher clinical variability than the typical dominantly inherited form. This patient, who is the first Italian and the eighth worldwide reported case of recessive OPMD, is also the first case of OPMD with dropped-head syndrome, which thus expands the clinical phenotype of recessive OPMD. PMID:26494409

  2. Recession Rebound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2011-01-01

    A return to normal after a crisis is a good thing. Who doesn't want back what once seemed lost? The problem is it usually isn't a simple task figuring out how to patch together a scaled-back training program. When the recession hit in fall 2008, trainers were asked to scale down programming and make do with fewer resources. With a recovery in full…

  3. Maternally inherited architecture in tertiary leaf beetles: paleoichnology of cryptocephaline fecal cases in Dominican and Baltic amber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboo, Caroline S.; Engel, Michael S.; Chamorro-Lacayo, Maria Lourdes

    2009-09-01

    Complex ethological adaptations and intraspecific interactions leave few fossil traces. We document three Dominican (20 million years old [myo]) and Baltic (45 myo) amber fossils that exhibit firm evidence of highly integrated interactions between mothers and offspring in the diverse camptosomate lineage of beetles (Chrysomelidae, leaf beetles). As in contemporary species, these hard cases were initially constructed by mothers, then inherited and retained by offspring, which then elaborate this protective domicile with an unusual but economical building material, their feces. The three fossils are classified in the Subfamily Cryptocephalinae; two are classified in the tribe Chlamisini based on morphological evidence—the flattened head lacking a sharp keel and long legs with simple recurved untoothed claws. These diagnostic features are not clearly visible in the third specimen to permit more refined identification. These fossils provide more precise paleontological dating of tribal nodes within the cryptocephaline radiation of leaf beetles. These fossils are the first and earliest evidence of mother-offspring interaction, building behavior, and fecal recycling in Camptosomata beetles and of inheritance of architectural structures in beetles.

  4. Rift inheritance in orogenes: a case study from the Western Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, E.; Manatschal, G.; Tugend, J.; Kusznir, N. J.; Flament, J.

    2012-12-01

    In plate tectonics, there is a general assumption that rifted margins represent most of the former material accreted into collisional orogenic prisms. In this regard, the former architecture, structures and composition of rifted margins, i.e. the pre-orogenic inheritances, play undoubtedly a major role during tectonic inversion. Studies have shown that rifted margins are more complex than a succession of tilted blocks. Indeed, the discovery of hyper-extended domains, where low-angle detachments replace high-angle normal faults and mantle material is exhumed to the seafloor implies a revision of the margin's template used in orogenic models. Because of overprint, the role of rift inheritance in orogenes remains often underestimated. The Pyrenees, located along the Iberian-European plate boundary, can be considered as one of the best places to study the reactivation of hyper-extended rifts. In this orogen, the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary convergence overprints a Latest Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous intracontinental rift linked with the opening of the North Atlantic. There, Albian hyper-extended rift basins developed where deep crustal and mantle rocks were exhumed along low-angle detachments to the seafloor. In this work we discuss the example of the Mauléon-Arzacq domain, which escaped from the most pervasive deformation because of its specific location between the western termination of the chain and the Bay of Biscay oceanic domain. Combining field study with subsurface geophysical and drillhole data, we show that the overall rift domain is asymmetric. The northern European upper plate is on the hangingwall of low-angle detachment systems affecting the southern Iberian Lower plate. The upper plate records depth-dependent crustal thinning and the development of a syn-rift sag basin. In contrast, the lower plate resulted from the hyper-extension of Iberian continental crust accommodated at the surface by two diachronous top-basement detachment systems. The first

  5. Gastrocnemius recession.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John G; Bohay, Donald R; Eller, Erik B; Witt, Bryan L

    2014-12-01

    The Grand Rapids Arch Collapse classifications create a novel system for categorizing and correlating numerous common foot and ankle conditions related to a falling arch. The algorithm for treating these conditions is exceptionally replicable and has excellent outcomes. Gastrocnemius equinus diagnosis plays a crucial role in the pathology of arch collapse. A contracture of the gastrocnemius muscle is increasingly recognized as the cause of several foot and ankle conditions. The authors have expanded their indications for gastrocnemius recession to include arch pain without radiographic abnormality, calcaneus apophysitis, plantar fasciitis/fibromas, Achilles tendonosis, early-onset diabetic Charcot arthropathy, and neuropathic forefoot ulcers. PMID:25456721

  6. Why is There so Much Controversy Regarding the Population Health Impact of the Great Recession? Reflections on Three Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupe, Amaia; Shahidi, Faraz Vahid; Muntaner, Carles; Martín, Unai; Borrell, Carme

    2016-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Great Recession, public health scholars have grown increasingly interested in studying the health consequences of macroeconomic change. Reflecting existing debates on the nature of this relationship, research on the effects of the recent economic crisis has sparked considerable controversy. On the one hand there is evidence to support the notion that macroeconomic downturns are associated with positive health outcomes. On the other hand, a growing number of studies warn that the current economic crisis can be expected to pose serious problems for the public's health. This article contributes to this debate through a review of recent evidence from three case studies: Iceland, Spain, and Greece. It shows that the economic crisis has negatively impacted some population health indicators (e.g., mental health) in all three countries, but especially in Greece. Available evidence defies deterministic conclusions, including increasingly "conventional" claims about economic downturns improving life expectancy and reducing mortality. While our results echo previous research in finding that the relationship between economic crises and population health is complex, they also indicate that this complexity is not arbitrary. On the contrary, changing social and political contexts provide meaningful, if partial, explanations for the perplexing nature of recent empirical findings. PMID:26536911

  7. Using a dermal skin substitute in the treatment of chronic wounds secondary to recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, R Gary; Zuker, Ron; Coutts, Patricia; Coelho, Sunita; Williamson, Diane; Queen, Douglas

    2005-11-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a family of genetic disorders that cause blistering and shearing of the skin from even the mildest trauma. Care generally focuses on preventing infection, protecting the skin against trauma, attending to nutritional deficiencies and dietary complications, minimizing deformities and contractures, and providing psychological support for the entire family. One approach to the treatment of chronic wounds in Epidermolysis bullosa involves tissue engineering, where cells similar to those of the skin, grown on a three-dimensional scaffold, are used to induce healing. Charts of six young people (ages 8 years to 23 years; four girls, two boys) with recessive dystrophic Epidermolysis bullosa who received applications of a dermal skin substitute to persistent erosions at multiple body sites (55) at successive clinic visits were reviewed. Each patient received between seven and 32 skin substitute applications to between six and 19 sites; patients were followed for at least 8 weeks. At weeks 1 to 2, epidermal coverage ranged between 80% and 100%. Some sites had persistent coverage but others experienced breakdown. Four patients had hand surgery and the living skin substitute was used postsurgically to provide coverage for the epidermal defects. Overall in these six cases, the dermal skin substitute proved advantageous to wound protection, healing, and symptom relief. Compassionate care combined with optimal wound care and advancing technology may offer an effective antidote to the wounding and pain of this devastating disease. PMID:16319445

  8. Gingival Recession: Review and Strategies in Treatment of Recession

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Koppolu; Rajababu, Palaparthy; Satyanarayana, Durvasula; Sagar, Vidya

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common esthetic concerns associated with the periodontal tissues is gingival recession. Gingival recession is the exposure of root surfaces due to apical migration of the gingival tissue margins; gingival margin migrates apical to the cementoenamel junction. Although it rarely results in tooth loss, marginal tissue recession is associated with thermal and tactile sensitivity, esthetic complaints, and a tendency toward root caries. This paper reviews etiology, consequences, and the available surgical procedures for the coverage of exposed root surfaces, including three case reports. PMID:23082256

  9. Adverse effects associated with a bioabsorbable guided tissue regeneration device in the treatment of human gingival recession defects. A clinicopathologic case report.

    PubMed

    Tatakis, D N; Trombelli, L

    1999-05-01

    This clinicopathologic case report documents an adverse effect associated with the use of a polylactic acid-based barrier in the treatment of human gingival recession defects. A total of 27 consecutively treated patients, in whom guided tissue regeneration with a polylactic acid barrier was used to correct gingival recession defects, were evaluated. This adverse effect consisted of a midradicular-apical swelling, generally asymptomatic, with no apparent predilection for gender, age, tooth type or location (maxilla/mandible), or surgical procedure. It was observed in 14 of 27 (52%) patients and 22 of 41 (54%) defects. The swelling decreased in size over time and in most cases, it completely resolved within 12 months postsurgery. Histopathologic evaluation of a 14-week specimen indicated characteristics (multinucleated giant cells, foamy macrophages) consistent with a foreign body reaction. These findings suggest that patients undergoing GTR procedures with synthetic absorbable devices for the treatment of gingival recession defects should be advised of the possible occurrence of such an adverse effect. PMID:10368059

  10. Impacts of Scheduling Recess before Lunch in Elementary Schools: A Case Study Approach of Plate Waste and Perceived Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohbehn, Catherine H.; Strohbehn, Garth W.; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine; Litchfield, Ruth A.; Scheidel, Carrie; Delger, Patti

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Recess Before Lunch (RBL) for elementary students is considered a best practice related to increased nutrient intakes at lunch, decreased afternoon behavioral issues, and increased afternoon learning efficiency; however, school characteristics, such as amount of time for lunch, offer vs. serve, and scheduling factors can…

  11. Global Carrier Rates of Rare Inherited Disorders Using Population Exome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Exome sequencing has revealed the causative mutations behind numerous rare, inherited disorders, but it is challenging to find reliable epidemiological values for rare disorders. Here, I provide a genetic epidemiology method to identify the causative mutations behind rare, inherited disorders using two population exome sequences (1000 Genomes and NHLBI). I created global maps of carrier rate distribution for 18 recessive disorders in 16 diverse ethnic populations. Out of a total of 161 mutations associated with 18 recessive disorders, I detected 24 mutations in either or both exome studies. The genetic mapping revealed strong international spatial heterogeneities in the carrier patterns of the inherited disorders. I next validated this methodology by statistically evaluating the carrier rate of one well-understood disorder, sickle cell anemia (SCA). The population exome-based epidemiology of SCA [African (allele frequency (AF) = 0.0454, N = 2447), Asian (AF = 0, N = 286), European (AF = 0.000214, N = 4677), and Hispanic (AF = 0.0111, N = 362)] was not significantly different from that obtained from a clinical prevalence survey. A pair-wise proportion test revealed no significant differences between the two exome projects in terms of AF (46/48 cases; P > 0.05). I conclude that population exome-based carrier rates can form the foundation for a prospectively maintained database of use to clinical geneticists. Similar modeling methods can be applied to many inherited disorders. PMID:27219052

  12. Global Carrier Rates of Rare Inherited Disorders Using Population Exome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Exome sequencing has revealed the causative mutations behind numerous rare, inherited disorders, but it is challenging to find reliable epidemiological values for rare disorders. Here, I provide a genetic epidemiology method to identify the causative mutations behind rare, inherited disorders using two population exome sequences (1000 Genomes and NHLBI). I created global maps of carrier rate distribution for 18 recessive disorders in 16 diverse ethnic populations. Out of a total of 161 mutations associated with 18 recessive disorders, I detected 24 mutations in either or both exome studies. The genetic mapping revealed strong international spatial heterogeneities in the carrier patterns of the inherited disorders. I next validated this methodology by statistically evaluating the carrier rate of one well-understood disorder, sickle cell anemia (SCA). The population exome-based epidemiology of SCA [African (allele frequency (AF) = 0.0454, N = 2447), Asian (AF = 0, N = 286), European (AF = 0.000214, N = 4677), and Hispanic (AF = 0.0111, N = 362)] was not significantly different from that obtained from a clinical prevalence survey. A pair-wise proportion test revealed no significant differences between the two exome projects in terms of AF (46/48 cases; P > 0.05). I conclude that population exome-based carrier rates can form the foundation for a prospectively maintained database of use to clinical geneticists. Similar modeling methods can be applied to many inherited disorders. PMID:27219052

  13. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  14. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  15. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Santoso, Sentot; Zieger, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Inherited platelet disorders may be the cause of bleeding symptoms of varying severity as platelets fail to fulfil their haemostatic role after vessel injury. Platelet disorders may be difficult to diagnose (and are likely to be misdiagnosed) and raise problems in therapy and management. This review explores the clinical and molecular genetic phenotype of several inherited disorders. Inherited platelet disorders can be classified according to their platelet defects: receptor defects (adhesion or aggregation), secretion disorder, and cytoskeleton defects. The best characterized platelet receptor defects are Glanzmann thrombasthenia (integrin αIIbβ3 defect) and Bernard-Soulier syndrome (defect of GPIb/IX/V). Detailed case reports of patients suffering from Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) or Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) showing the bleeding diathesis as well as investigation of platelet aggregation/agglutination and platelet receptor expression will complement this review. In addition, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) as an important defect of δ-granule secretion is extensively described together with a case report of a patient suffering from HPS type 1. PMID:25707719

  16. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease caused by deletion at a dinucleotide repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Casimir, C.M.; Bu-Ghanim, H.N.; Rowe, P.; Segal, A.W. ); Rodaway, A.R.F.; Bentley, D.L. )

    1991-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited condition rendering neutrophils incapable of killing invading pathogens. This condition is due to the failure of a multicomponent microbicidal oxidase that normally yields a low-midpoint-potential b cytochrome (cytochrome b{sub 245}). Although defects in the X chromosome-linked cytochrome account for the majority of CGD patients, as many as 30% of CGD cases are due to an autosomal recessive disease. Of these, {gt}90% have been shown to be defective in the synthesis of a 47-kDa cytosolic component of the oxidase. The authors demonstrate here in three unrelated cases of autosomal recessive CGD that the identical underlying molecular lesion is a dinucleotide deletion at a GTGT tandem repeat, corresponding to the acceptor site of the first intron - exon junction. Slippage of the DNA duplex at this site may contribute to the high frequency of defects in this gene.

  17. Malignant skin tumours in patients with inherited ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Natsuga, K; Akiyama, M; Shimizu, H

    2011-08-01

    Inherited ichthyoses are rare genodermatoses caused by mutations in the genes involved in epidermal development. Although there have been case reports on patients with ichthyosis who developed skin malignancies, it is still unknown whether or not patients with ichthyosis have an increased risk of skin malignancies. Here, we review case series of skin malignancies in patients with ichthyosis and show biological findings which might lead to cancer susceptibility. A survey of the literature revealed 28 cases of inherited ichthyoses with skin malignancy, including 12 cases of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome, seven of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, three of Netherton syndrome and six of miscellaneous ichthyosis. Twenty-four of the 28 cases developed single or multiple squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). The age at diagnosis of the first skin malignancy ranged from 15 to 54 years. As patients with these particular subtypes of ichthyosis seem to be prone to skin malignancies, including SCC, at an unusually young age, routine cancer surveillance of these patients is strongly recommended. PMID:21517795

  18. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life. PMID:19820803

  19. On estimation and identifiability issues of sex-linked inheritance with a case study of pigmentation in Swiss barn owl (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Larsen, Camilla T; Holand, Anna M; Jensen, Henrik; Steinsland, Ingelin; Roulin, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    Genetic evaluation using animal models or pedigree-based models generally assume only autosomal inheritance. Bayesian animal models provide a flexible framework for genetic evaluation, and we show how the model readily can accommodate situations where the trait of interest is influenced by both autosomal and sex-linked inheritance. This allows for simultaneous calculation of autosomal and sex-chromosomal additive genetic effects. Inferences were performed using integrated nested Laplace approximations (INLA), a nonsampling-based Bayesian inference methodology. We provide a detailed description of how to calculate the inverse of the X- or Z-chromosomal additive genetic relationship matrix, needed for inference. The case study of eumelanic spot diameter in a Swiss barn owl (Tyto alba) population shows that this trait is substantially influenced by variation in genes on the Z-chromosome ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). Further, a simulation study for this study system shows that the animal model accounting for both autosomal and sex-chromosome-linked inheritance is identifiable, that is, the two effects can be distinguished, and provides accurate inference on the variance components. PMID:24967075

  20. On estimation and identifiability issues of sex-linked inheritance with a case study of pigmentation in Swiss barn owl (Tyto alba)

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Camilla T; Holand, Anna M; Jensen, Henrik; Steinsland, Ingelin; Roulin, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Genetic evaluation using animal models or pedigree-based models generally assume only autosomal inheritance. Bayesian animal models provide a flexible framework for genetic evaluation, and we show how the model readily can accommodate situations where the trait of interest is influenced by both autosomal and sex-linked inheritance. This allows for simultaneous calculation of autosomal and sex-chromosomal additive genetic effects. Inferences were performed using integrated nested Laplace approximations (INLA), a nonsampling-based Bayesian inference methodology. We provide a detailed description of how to calculate the inverse of the X- or Z-chromosomal additive genetic relationship matrix, needed for inference. The case study of eumelanic spot diameter in a Swiss barn owl (Tyto alba) population shows that this trait is substantially influenced by variation in genes on the Z-chromosome ( and ). Further, a simulation study for this study system shows that the animal model accounting for both autosomal and sex-chromosome-linked inheritance is identifiable, that is, the two effects can be distinguished, and provides accurate inference on the variance components. PMID:24967075

  1. Autosomal recessive hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with mental retardation, optic atrophy and pyramidal signs.

    PubMed Central

    MacDermot, K D; Walker, R W

    1987-01-01

    A syndrome is described, consisting of severe neurogenic distal wasting, generalised muscle weakness, absent ankle reflexes, pyramidal signs, mental retardation, optic atrophy and retinal colloid bodies. A sural nerve biopsy from one case showed loss of nerve fibres suggesting the diagnosis of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. Progression of the disorder was very slow, all patients still being able to walk more than 20 years after the onset. The persons affected with this syndrome were two brothers and their female cousin from a large Gujerati pedigree where consanguinity was high. Autosomal recessive inheritance is therefore suggested. Images PMID:3479531

  2. Combined periodontal and restorative approach to the treatment of gingival recessions with noncarious cervical lesions: a case treated with acellular dermal matrix allograft and compomer restorations.

    PubMed

    Efeoğlu, Ahmet; Hanzade, Mete; Sari, Esra; Alpay, Hande; Karakaş, Ozan; Koray, Fatma

    2012-08-01

    Treatment of gingival recessions has become one of the most challenging procedures in periodontal plastic surgery. Various surgical options with predictable outcomes are available, but in cases with cervical lesions or restorations, optimal functional and esthetic results may require the combination of periodontal and restorative procedures. In this case report, one patient treated with acellular dermal matrix allograft and a coronally positioned flap in combination with compomer cervical restorations is presented. Clinical parameters were recorded immediately prior to surgery and after 12 months. Postoperatively, significant root coverage, reductions in probing depths, and gains in clinical attachment were observed. The final clinical results, esthetics, color match, and tissue contours were acceptable to both the patient and clinicians. PMID:22577650

  3. Glacial recession in the Tropical Andes from the Little Ice Age: the case of Ampato Volcanic Complex (Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    Data published over the last decade reveal substantial glacial recession in the tropical Andes since the Little Ice Age (LIA), (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Rabatel, et al., 2005; Rabatel, et al., 2008; Vuille, et al., 2008; Hastenrath, 2009; Jomelli, et al., 2009), and a growing rate of recession since the 1980’s caused by global warming (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Vuille, et al., 2008). Today there is great interest in the evolution of these ice masses due to heightened awareness of climate change and of the strategic importance that glaciers have as a hydrologic resource for communities in arid climate zones in the tropical Andes (Mark, 2008; Vuille et al., 2008). Cordillera Blanca forms part of the Andes Mountains of northern Peru, and is a chosen site for many studies on glacier evolution. Vuille et al. 2008 determined that a considerable area of ice mass was lost at Huascarán-Chopicalqui glacier (18% from 1920-1970) and Astesonraju glacier (20% from 1962-2003). Studies at Coropuna volcano, which has the most extensive glacier field in the western range of southern Peru, also report a strong melting trend that began with only minimal recession from 1955-1986 (4%), but increased to 14% from 1986-2007 (Úbeda et al., 2009). Only a few of the Andes glaciers are consistently monitored, and the most comprehensive data are for Chacaltaya and Zongo glaciers (16º S) in Bolivia. Since the maximum LIA, Chacaltaya has lost 89% of its surface area, particularly in recent years. By 1983, the totaled loss was five times the shrinkage for the period 1940-1963 (Ramirez, et al., 2001). Zongo glacier maintained equilibrium from 1956-1975, but later experienced a period dominated by continuous recession (Soruco, et al., 2009). This study expands current knowledge of glacier evolution since the LIA in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ; 14º - 27º S) (Stern, 2004) of the Andes. The study site was chosen in an area that had never been used for preliminary research of this type, concretely

  4. Recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and cataract associated with novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA1

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JINHO; JUNG, SUNG-CHUL; HONG, YOUNG BIN; YOO, JEONG HYUN; KOO, HEASOO; LEE, JA HYUN; HONG, HYUN DAE; KIM, SANG-BEOM; CHUNG, KI WHA; CHOI, BYUNG-OK

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) are associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and 20% of patients demonstrate extra-ocular manifestations. In addition to these autosomal dominant cases, only a few syndromic cases have been reported thus far with compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations, suggestive of either recessive or semi-dominant patterns of inheritance. The majority of these patients were diagnosed with Behr syndrome, characterized by optic atrophy, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The present study describes a 10-year-old boy with Behr syndrome presenting with early-onset severe optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy, ataxia and congenital cataracts. He had optic atrophy and was declared legally blind at six years old. Electrophysiological, radiological, and histopathological findings were compatible with axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. At birth, he presented with a congenital cataract, which has not been previously described in patients with OPA1 mutations. Whole exome sequencing indicated a pair of novel compound heterozygous mutations: p.L620fs*13 (c.1857–1858delinsT) and p.R905Q (c.G2714A). Neither mutation was observed in controls (n=300), and thus, they were predicted to be pathogenic by multiple in silico analyses. The mutation sites were highly conserved throughout different vertebrate species. The patients parents did not have any ophthalmic or neurologic symptoms and the results of electrophysiological studies were normal, suggestive of an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The present study identified novel compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations in a patient with recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and congenital cataracts, indicating an expansion of the clinical spectrum of pathologies associated with OPA1 mutations. Thus, OPA1 gene screening is advisable in the workup of patients with recessive optic atrophy, particularly with Behr syndrome and cataracts. PMID:27150940

  5. Recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and cataract associated with novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinho; Jung, Sung-Chul; Hong, Young Bin; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Lee, Ja Hyun; Hong, Hyun Dae; Kim, Sang-Beom; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) are associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and 20% of patients demonstrate extra-ocular manifestations. In addition to these autosomal dominant cases, only a few syndromic cases have been reported thus far with compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations, suggestive of either recessive or semi‑dominant patterns of inheritance. The majority of these patients were diagnosed with Behr syndrome, characterized by optic atrophy, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The present study describes a 10-year-old boy with Behr syndrome presenting with early‑onset severe optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy, ataxia and congenital cataracts. He had optic atrophy and was declared legally blind at six years old. Electrophysiological, radiological, and histopathological findings were compatible with axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. At birth, he presented with a congenital cataract, which has not been previously described in patients with OPA1 mutations. Whole exome sequencing indicated a pair of novel compound heterozygous mutations: p.L620fs*13 (c.1857‑1858delinsT) and p.R905Q (c.G2714A). Neither mutation was observed in controls (n=300), and thus, they were predicted to be pathogenic by multiple in silico analyses. The mutation sites were highly conserved throughout different vertebrate species. The patients parents did not have any ophthalmic or neurologic symptoms and the results of electrophysiological studies were normal, suggestive of an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The present study identified novel compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations in a patient with recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and congenital cataracts, indicating an expansion of the clinical spectrum of pathologies associated with OPA1 mutations. Thus, OPA1 gene screening is advisable in the workup of patients with recessive optic atrophy, particularly with Behr syndrome and cataracts. PMID:27150940

  6. Small operator outwits recession

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.

    1982-12-01

    Explains how Rockcastle, Inc., one of the smallest surface coal mine operators in the West, maintains production during the recession by concentrating on short-term contracts and spot sales to industrial and commercial users. The mining company has selected well established coal brokers to market its product to users such as sugar beet and cement plants, a brewery, steel mill, utility, and a molybdenum mill. Rockcastle produces, on a two-shift schedule, about 1,200 tpd of coal with a total workforce of 20, or approximately 30 tons per manshift. A fleet of 4 scrapers, with dozer-assist in most cases, is capable of removing 5,000 to 6,000 cu yd of overburden and interburden per shift.

  7. Role of tectonic inheritance in the instauration of Tunisian Atlassic fold-and-thrust belt: Case of Bouhedma - Boudouaou structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Mohamed Abdelhamid; Ghanmi, Mohamed; Aridhi, Sabri; Ben Salem, Mohamed Sadok; Zargouni, Fouad

    2016-07-01

    Tectonic inversion in the Bouhedma-Boudouaou Mountains was investigated through recent field work and seismic lines interpretation calibrated with petroleum well data. Located to the Central-Southern Atlas of Tunisia, this area signed shortened intra-continental fold-and-thrust belts. Two dissymmetric anticlines characterize Bouhedma - Boudouaou major fold. These structures show a strong virgation respectively from E-W to NNE-SSW as a response to the interference between both tectonic inversion and tectonic inheritance. This complex geometry is driven by Mesozoic rifting, which marked an extensional inherited regime. A set of late Triassic-Early Jurassic E-W and NW-SE normal faults dipping respectively to the North and to the East seems to widely affect the overall geodynamic evolution of this domain. They result in major thickness changes across the hanging wall and the footwall blocks in response with the rifting activity. Tectonic inversion is inferred from convergence between African and European plates since late Cretaceous. During Serravalian - Tortonian event, NW-SE trending paroxysm led to: 1) folding of pre-inversion and syn-inversion strata, 2) reactivation of pre-existing normal faults to reverse ones and 3) orogeny of the main structures with NE-SW and E-W trending. The compressional feature still remains active during Quaternary event (Post-Villafranchian) with N-S trending compression. Contraction during inversion generates folding and internal deformation as well as Fault-Propagation-Fold and folding related strike.

  8. Perinatal Autopsy Findings in a Case of De Novo Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Nagaraju, Smitha; Kangle, Rajit; Gosavi, Mansi

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia are group of inherited disorders involving the developmental defects of ectodermal structures like hair, teeth, nails, sweat glands, and others. X-linked recessive inheritance is most common. Here we describe perinatal autopsy findings in a case of de novo ectodermal dysplasia in a female fetus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first fetal autopsy description in a case of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:26417167

  9. [Gingival recessions and orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Renkema, A M; Padmos, J A D; de Quincey, G de

    2015-11-01

    Gingival recessions represent the most visible periodontal disease. The prevalence of gingival recessions is high. The root surface is literally exposed to negative influences such as erosion, abrasion, discoloration and decay. Moreover, gingival recessions can affect the quality of life by increased thermal sensitivity and reduced dento-gingival aesthetics. The aetiology of gingival recessions is complex and considered to be multifactorial. In order to prevent the development of gingival recessions during and after orthodontic treatment, several factors should be taken into account, among which maintenance of optimal oral hygiene and respect for the 'biological envelope' are decisive. Once gingival recessions have developed, orthodontic therapy can play a positive role in their treatment. PMID:26569002

  10. Novel PRRT2 mutations in paroxysmal dyskinesia patients with variant inheritance and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Liu, X-R; Wu, M; He, N; Meng, H; Wen, L; Wang, J-L; Zhang, M-P; Li, W-B; Mao, X; Qin, J-M; Li, B-M; Tang, B; Deng, Y-H; Shi, Y-W; Su, T; Yi, Y-H; Tang, B-S; Liao, W-P

    2013-03-01

    Paroxysmal dyskinesias (PDs) are a group of episodic movement disorders with marked variability in clinical manifestation and potential association with epilepsy. PRRT2 has been identified as a causative gene for PDs, but the phenotypes and inheritance patterns of PRRT2 mutations need further clarification. In this study, 10 familial and 21 sporadic cases with PDs and PDs-related phenotypes were collected. Genomic DNA was screened for PRRT2 mutations by direct sequencing. Seven PRRT2 mutations were identified in nine (90.0%) familial cases and in six (28.6%) sporadic cases. Five mutations are novel: two missense mutations (c.647C>G/p.Pro216Arg and c.872C>T/p.Ala291Val) and three truncating mutations (c.117delA/p.Val41TyrfsX49, c.510dupT/p.Leu171SerfsX3 and c.579dupA/p.Glu194ArgfsX6). Autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance was observed in most of the familial cases. In the sporadic cases, inheritance was heterogeneous including recessive inheritance with compound heterozygous mutations, inherited mutations with incomplete parental penetrance and de novo mutation. Variant phenotypes associated with PRRT2 mutations, found in 36.0% of the affected cases, included febrile convulsions, epilepsy, infantile non-convulsive seizures (INCS) and nocturnal convulsions (NC). All patients with INCS or NC, not reported previously, displayed abnormalities on electroencephalogram (EEG). No EEG abnormalities were recorded in patients with classical infantile convulsions and paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA)/paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD). Our study further confirms that PRRT2 mutations are the most common cause of familial PDs, displaying both dominant and recessive inheritance. Epilepsy may occasionally occur in ICCA/PKD patients with PRRT2 mutations. Variant phenotypes INCS or NC differ from classical ICCA/PKD clinically and electroencephalographically. They have some similarities with, but not identical to epilepsy, possibly represent an overlap between

  11. Complex mode of inheritance in holoprosencephaly revealed by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mouden, C; Dubourg, C; Carré, W; Rose, S; Quelin, C; Akloul, L; Hamdi-Rozé, H; Viot, G; Salhi, H; Darnault, P; Odent, S; Dupé, V; David, V

    2016-06-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common congenital cerebral malformation, characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been associated with HPE and are often inherited from an unaffected parent, underlying complex genetic bases. It is now emerging that HPE may result from a combination of multiple genetic events, rather than from a single heterozygous mutation. To explore this hypothesis, we undertook whole exome sequencing and targeted high-throughput sequencing approaches to identify mutations in HPE subjects. Here, we report two HPE families in which two mutations are implicated in the disease. In the first family presenting two foetuses with alobar and semi-lobar HPE, we found mutations in two genes involved in HPE, SHH and DISP1, inherited respectively from the father and the mother. The second reported case is a family with a 9-year-old girl presenting lobar HPE, harbouring two compound heterozygous mutations in DISP1. Together, these cases of digenic inheritance and autosomal recessive HPE suggest that in some families, several genetic events are necessary to cause HPE. This study highlights the complexity of HPE inheritance and has to be taken into account by clinicians to improve HPE genetic counselling. PMID:26748417

  12. Isolated mucosal fenestration with localized gingival recession: Closure with an acellular dermal graft. A rare case report with two years' follow-up.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, SaravanaKarthikeyan; Singh, Vishal; Bhat, G Subraya; Acharya, Shashi Rashmi; Nidambur Ballal, Vasudev; Saraswathi, Vidya; Vinayachanan, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal fenestrations are rarely encountered in clinical practice, and as such their management is not often reported. Their treatment might be further complicated due to a communication with the oral environment, making them more susceptible to accumulation of debris, plaque, and calculus, thereby reducing the probability of mucosal renewal. The aim of the present case report is to highlight one such rare clinical scenario and its apt and effective management. Surgical management of an uncommon presentation of concomitant gingival recession with an isolated mucosal fenestration in an atypical location, with an allograft matrix is presented here with 2 years' follow-up. A review of the literature reveals no previous application of AlloDerm graft for the management of a similar situation. PMID:26824083

  13. Fryns Syndrome Associated with Recessive Mutations in PIGN in two Separate Families.

    PubMed

    McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Harris, Jessica E; Gattas, Michael; Peach, Elizabeth E; Sinnott, Stephen; Dudding-Byth, Tracy; Rajagopalan, Sulekha; Barnett, Christopher P; Anderson, Lisa K; Wheeler, Lawrie; Brown, Matthew A; Leo, Paul J; Wicking, Carol; Duncan, Emma L

    2016-07-01

    Fryns syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), dysmorphic facial features, distal digital hypoplasia, and other associated malformations, and is the most common syndromic form of CDH. No gene has been associated with this condition. Whole-exome sequence data from two siblings and three unrelated individuals with Fryns syndrome were filtered for rare, good quality, coding mutations fitting a recessive inheritance model. Compound heterozygous mutations in PIGN were identified in the siblings, with appropriate parental segregation: a novel STOP mutation (c.1966C>T: p.Glu656X) and a rare (minor allele frequency <0.001) donor splice site mutation (c.1674+1G>C) causing skipping of exon 18 and utilization of a cryptic acceptor site in exon 19. A further novel homozygous STOP mutation in PIGN (c.694A>T: p.Lys232X) was detected in one unrelated case. All three variants affected highly conserved bases. The two remaining cases were negative for PIGN mutations. Mutations in PIGN have been reported in cases with multiple congenital anomalies, including one case with syndromic CDH. Fryns syndrome can be caused by recessive mutations in PIGN. Whether PIGN affects other syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CDH warrants investigation. PMID:27038415

  14. To b = 1 or not to b = 1. Numerical, conceptual, hydraulic and geometric explanations for observed streamflow recession behaviour - a case of being right for which reason?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaart, Patrick; Rupp, David; Selker, John; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-05-01

    Recession discharge from hillslopes and catchments is commonly summarized by the top-down Brutsaert and Nieber (1977) analysis in which a power law of the form -dQ/dt = aQb is fitted through recession data. In many cases exponent b is found to be within the range 1 to 2. A key question in hillslope and catchment hydrology is how this range can be explained from underlying bottom-up physical theory and system properties. A common approach in hillslope hydrology is to apply the Boussinesq equation, either in it's original nonlinear form, or a a linearized simplification, in concert with assumptions like thin soils of uniform hydraulic conductivity. We found that the nonlinear Boussinesq equation in this setting leads to b = 0, and thus is inconsistent with observations. Careless interpretation of the recession response from a Boussinesq model could lead to an erroneous conclusion of b = 1. We demonstrate how this artifactual model response arises from the internal numerics of spatially distributed PDE models that hinder complete drying out. We demonstrate how this trait - models that can't dry out - by necessity lead to b ≥ 1 behaviour. Some commonly used model approaches share this trait: As described above, numerical implementations of the nonlinear Boussinesq equation retain the last bits of water, and therefore suggest b = 1 (which is shown to be an artifact) Both analytical and numerical solutions to the linearized Boussinesq equation are unable to move the drainage front downhill (as explained earlier by Stagnitti et al. (2004)), which causes retainment of water, leading to b = 1 at all times. Vertically decreasing hydraulic conductivity, e.g. a power-law or exponential profile, leads to b = 1 to 2. Based on the reasoning that the linearized Boussinesq equation (as a meta-model) is only valid if it adequately mimics the essential dynamics of the nonlinear Boussinesq equation (as a reference model) we conclude that explanations of observed b = 1 based on the

  15. Starving for Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patt, Mary Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Every weekday, millions of American schoolchildren throw away their half-eaten cafeteria lunches so that they can run outside to play. The traditional placement of lunch before recess, coupled with the recent decline in overall recess time to meet academic time constraints, forces children to choose between two essential needs: (1) food; and (2)…

  16. Recess--It's Indispensable!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Olga; Waite-Stupiansky, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    The demise of recess in many elementary schools--and of outdoor play in general--is an issue of great concern to many members of the Play, Policy, and Practice Interest Forum. Most people remember recess as an important part of the school day. It was a time to be outdoors; to organize games; to play on the swings, slides, and other playground…

  17. More Recess Time, Please!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Rong; Coward, Fanni Liu

    2015-01-01

    Students in Shanghai, China, get much more recess time than their U.S. counterparts throughout their education. As U.S. education reform efforts seek ways of raising achievement, they have begun replacing recess with academic time. The lesson from Shanghai is that this may not be the best strategy. But whether the Shanghai system of more and…

  18. Recess Makes Kids Smarter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    Recess has been scaled back or cut altogether in a number of schools around the country. The trend can be traced back to the late eighties and was accelerated under No Child Left Behind. Districts under pressure to show academic progress began to squeeze as much instruction into the day as possible. Others eliminated recess because of concerns…

  19. Recession in the Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plant, Helen

    2009-01-01

    National policy stresses the key role of adult learning and skills in securing economic recovery. This close linking of adult learning policy to the recession agenda raises important questions. How has the recession impacted on the implementation of adult learning policy? What has it meant for service delivery? And what have been the consequences…

  20. Autosomal-dominant inheritance of the prothrombin gene mutation in a Puerto Rican family: A case study.

    PubMed

    Morales-Borges, Raúl H

    2012-12-01

    Splenic infarction is rare and the prothrombin gene mutation (PGM) is not commonly observed in Puerto Rico. PGM is present in 1% of the general population, and in 7% of the people with deep venous thrombosis (DVT); it is found in up to 40% of patients with splenic-portal-mesenteric thrombosis. Our study has identified a Puerto Rican family of four generations whose members all have inherited PGM in an autosomal dominant manner. The eldest member of the family, an 82-year-old male, presented with DVT of the lower extremity. The man's 62-year-old daughter had suffered a splenic infarction; his 37-year-old grandson presented with superficial and deep vein thrombosis (SDVT), and his great-grandson of 8 years was asymptomatic at the time of the report. This is the second report of PGM as the cause of a hypercoagulable state and the first reported PGM-related splenic infarction in Puerto Rico. We need to test for genetic hypercoagulable states in the members of Puerto Rican families with thromboembolism. Once testing has revealed the existence of such states in a given family, it is important that the family members receive genetic counseling. PMID:23844473

  1. A novel PIGN mutation and prenatal diagnosis of inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Taku; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Murakami, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Emoto, Tomomi; Satake, Wataru; Nishiyama, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Daisaku; Morisada, Naoya; Takada, Satoshi; Tairaku, Shinya; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Morioka, Ichiro; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Toda, Tatsushi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors tether proteins to the extracellular face of eukaryotic plasma membranes. Defects in the human GPI anchor biosynthetic pathway cause inherited GPI deficiencies (IGDs) characterized by multiple congenital anomalies: dysmorphic faces, developmental delay, hypotonia, and epilepsy. We report the case of a 6-year-old boy with severe psychomotor developmental delay, epilepsy, and decreased granulocyte surface expression of GPI-anchored protein that suggested autosomal recessive GPI deficiency. The case underwent target exome sequencing to screen for IGDs. Target exome sequencing of the proband identified an apparently homozygous c.808T > C (p.Ser270Pro) mutation in PIGN, a gene involved in the GPI anchor biosynthetic pathway. As his parents were expecting another child, genetic carrier screening was conducted for the parents. Direct sequencing of the parents identified a heterozygous c.808T > C PIGN mutation in the father but none in the mother. To identify the mother's mutation, we performed semi-quantitative real-time PCR of the PIGN exons and long PCR, identifying a microdeletion in PIGN (del exons 2-14). The proband had inherited this microdeletion from his mother. Prenatal diagnosis of the fetus revealed that it was a heterozygous carrier of the mother's pathogenic allele. Here, we report a sporadic case of inherited GPI deficiency with a PIGN mutation and the first case of prenatal diagnosis for GPI deficiency. PMID:26419326

  2. Inherited BCL10 deficiency impairs hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; García-Gómez, Sonia; Mazariegos, Marina S; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Rholvarez, Rita; Jiménez-Reinoso, Anaïs; del Pino, Lucia; Rodríguez-Pena, Rebeca; Ferreira, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Unzueta-Roch, José L; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Regueiro, Jose R; López-Granados, Eduardo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca

    2014-12-01

    Heterotrimers composed of B cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1), and caspase recruitment domain-containing (CARD) family adaptors play a role in NF-κB activation and have been shown to be involved in both the innate and the adaptive arms of immunity in murine models. Moreover, individuals with inherited defects of MALT1, CARD9, and CARD11 present with immunological and clinical phenotypes. Here, we characterized a case of autosomal-recessive, complete BCL10 deficiency in a child with a broad immunodeficiency, including defects of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. The patient died at 3 years of age and was homozygous for a loss-of-expression, loss-of-function BCL10 mutation. The effect of BCL10 deficiency was dependent on the signaling pathway, and, for some pathways, the cell type affected. Despite the noted similarities to BCL10 deficiency in mice, including a deficient adaptive immune response, human BCL10 deficiency in this patient resulted in a number of specific features within cell populations. Treatment of the patient's myeloid cells with a variety of pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) elicited a normal response; however, NF-κB-mediated fibroblast functions were dramatically impaired. The results of this study indicate that inherited BCL10 deficiency should be considered in patients with combined immunodeficiency with B cell, T cell, and fibroblast defects. PMID:25365219

  3. Inherited BCL10 deficiency impairs hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; García-Gómez, Sonia; Mazariegos, Marina S.; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; ρlvarez, Rita; Jiménez-Reinoso, Anaïs; del Pino, Lucia; Rodríguez-Pena, Rebeca; Ferreira, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Unzueta-Roch, José L.; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Regueiro, Jose R.; López-Granados, Eduardo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimers composed of B cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1), and caspase recruitment domain–containing (CARD) family adaptors play a role in NF-κB activation and have been shown to be involved in both the innate and the adaptive arms of immunity in murine models. Moreover, individuals with inherited defects of MALT1, CARD9, and CARD11 present with immunological and clinical phenotypes. Here, we characterized a case of autosomal-recessive, complete BCL10 deficiency in a child with a broad immunodeficiency, including defects of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. The patient died at 3 years of age and was homozygous for a loss-of-expression, loss-of-function BCL10 mutation. The effect of BCL10 deficiency was dependent on the signaling pathway, and, for some pathways, the cell type affected. Despite the noted similarities to BCL10 deficiency in mice, including a deficient adaptive immune response, human BCL10 deficiency in this patient resulted in a number of specific features within cell populations. Treatment of the patient’s myeloid cells with a variety of pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) elicited a normal response; however, NF-κB–mediated fibroblast functions were dramatically impaired. The results of this study indicate that inherited BCL10 deficiency should be considered in patients with combined immunodeficiency with B cell, T cell, and fibroblast defects. PMID:25365219

  4. Overview of Inherited Zinc Deficiency in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Taiho; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Ishida, Riko; Miyazaki, Shiho

    2015-01-01

    Zinc nutrition is of special practical importance in infants and children. Poor zinc absorption causes zinc deficiency, which leads to a broad range of consequences such as alopecia, diarrhea, skin lesions, taste disorders, loss of appetite, impaired immune function and neuropsychiatric changes and growth retardation, thus potentially threatening life in infants and children. In addition to dietary zinc deficiency, inherited zinc deficiency, which rarely occurs, is found during the infant stage and early childhood. Recent molecular genetic studies have identified responsible genes for two inherited zinc deficiency disorders, acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) and transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD), clarifying the pathological mechanisms. Both of these zinc deficiencies are caused by mutations of zinc transporters, although the mechanisms are completely different. AE is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the ZIP4 gene, consequently resulting in defective absorption of zinc in the small intestine. In contrast, TNZD is a disorder caused by mutations of the ZnT2 gene, which results in low zinc breast milk in the mother, consequently causing zinc deficiency in the breast-fed infant. In both cases, zinc deficiency symptoms are ameliorated by a daily oral zinc supplementation for the patients. Zinc is definitely one of the key factors for the healthy growth of infants and children, and thus zinc nutrition should receive much attention. PMID:26598882

  5. Validation of a clinical practice-based algorithm for the diagnosis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias based on NGS identified cases.

    PubMed

    Mallaret, Martial; Renaud, Mathilde; Redin, Claire; Drouot, Nathalie; Muller, Jean; Severac, Francois; Mandel, Jean Louis; Hamza, Wahiba; Benhassine, Traki; Ali-Pacha, Lamia; Tazir, Meriem; Durr, Alexandra; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Mignot, Cyril; Charles, Perrine; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Chamard, Ludivine; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Laugel, Vincent; Burglen, Lydie; Calvas, Patrick; Fleury, Marie-Céline; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu; Koenig, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Establishing a molecular diagnosis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) is challenging due to phenotype and genotype heterogeneity. We report the validation of a previously published clinical practice-based algorithm to diagnose ARCA. Two assessors performed a blind analysis to determine the most probable mutated gene based on comprehensive clinical and paraclinical data, without knowing the molecular diagnosis of 23 patients diagnosed by targeted capture of 57 ataxia genes and high-throughput sequencing coming from a 145 patients series. The correct gene was predicted in 61 and 78 % of the cases by the two assessors, respectively. There was a high inter-rater agreement [K = 0.85 (0.55-0.98) p < 0.001] confirming the algorithm's reproducibility. Phenotyping patients with proper clinical examination, imaging, biochemical investigations and nerve conduction studies remain crucial for the guidance of molecular analysis and to interpret next generation sequencing results. The proposed algorithm should be helpful for diagnosing ARCA in clinical practice. PMID:27142713

  6. Sex-linked recessive

    MedlinePlus

    ... through families through one of the X or Y chromosomes. X and Y are sex chromosomes. Dominant inheritance ... that X chromosome will cause the disease. The Y chromosome is the other half of the XY gene ...

  7. The trauma of a recession.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S M; Kieran, I; Shaughnessy, M O

    2011-09-01

    Employment in construction in Ireland fell by 10% from nearly 282,000 in the second quarter of 2007 to 255,000 in the same period of 2008. Our study looks at the differences in soft tissue upper limb trauma dynamics of a pre- and post-recession Ireland. Construction accounted for 330 patients (27%) of all hand injuries in 2006, but only 18 (3%) in 2009. Our data shows a significant drop in hand injuries related to the construction industry, and more home/DIY cases and deliberate self-harm presenting in their stead. PMID:21431394

  8. Lamellar Icthyosis – A case Report

    PubMed Central

    B.V, Thimma Reddy; V, Daneswari; Deshmukh, Sudhanwan N

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis is a heterogenous group of disorders that are present at birth with generalized involvement of skin and lack of other organ systems. Clinical presentation, pattern of inheritance, and laboratory evaluation may establish a precise diagnosis, which can assist in prognosis and genetic counseling. There is a little knowledge about the oral manifestations of these disorders.This case report presents management and complete oral rehabilitation of a rare case of lamellar ichthyosis. PMID:25584329

  9. Inherited mitochondrial neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) occasionally manifest as polyneuropathy either as the dominant feature or as one of many other manifestations (inherited mitochondrial neuropathy). MIDs in which polyneuropathy is the dominant feature, include NARP syndrome due to the transition m.8993T>, CMT2A due to MFN2 mutations, CMT2K and CMT4A due to GDAP1 mutations, and axonal/demyelinating neuropathy with external ophthalmoplegia due to POLG1 mutations. MIDs in which polyneuropathy is an inconstant feature among others is the MELAS syndrome, MERRF syndrome, LHON, Mendelian PEO, KSS, Leigh syndrome, MNGIE, SANDO; MIRAS, MEMSA, AHS, MDS (hepato-cerebral form), IOSCA, and ADOA syndrome. In the majority of the cases polyneuropathy presents in a multiplex neuropathy distribution. Nerve conduction studies may reveal either axonal or demyelinated or mixed types of neuropathies. If a hereditary neuropathy is due to mitochondrial dysfunction, the management of these patients is at variance from non-mitochondrial hereditary neuropathies. Patients with mitochondrial hereditary neuropathy need to be carefully investigated for clinical or subclinical involvement of other organs or systems. Supportive treatment with co-factors, antioxidants, alternative energy sources, or lactate lowering agents can be tried. Involvement of other organs may require specific treatment. Mitochondrial neuropathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies. PMID:21402391

  10. The myotubular myopathies: differential diagnosis of the X linked recessive, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive forms and present state of DNA studies.

    PubMed Central

    Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Clarke, A; Samson, F; Fardeau, M; Dubowitz, V; Moser, H; Grimm, T; Barohn, R J; Barth, P G

    1995-01-01

    Clinical differences exist between the three forms of myotubular myopathy. They differ regarding age at onset, severity of the disease, and prognosis, and also regarding some of the clinical characteristics. The autosomal dominant form mostly has a later onset and milder course than the X linked form, and the autosomal recessive form is intermediate in both respects. These differences are, however, quantitative rather than qualitative. Muscle biopsy studies of family members are useful in some cases, and immunohistochemical staining of desmin and vimentin may help distinguish between the X linked and autosomal forms. Determining the mode of inheritance and prognosis in individual families, especially those with a single male patient, still poses a problem. Current molecular genetic results indicate that the gene for the X linked form is located in the proximal Xq28 region. Further molecular genetic studies are needed to examine the existence of genetic heterogeneity in myotubular myopathy and to facilitate diagnosis. Images PMID:8544184

  11. Genotyping confirms inheritance of the rare At(a−) type in a case of haemolytic disease of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    McBean, Rhiannon; Liew, Yew‐Wah; Wilson, Brett; Kupatawintu, Pawinee; Emthip, Morakot; Hyland, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Ata blood group antigen (now AUG2 in the Augustine system) is a high‐frequency antigen with negative phenotype At(a−) found only in individuals of African ancestry. In a twin pregnancy, the fifth pregnancy in a woman of African origin, serological investigations confirmed that the mother was At(a−) and anti‐Ata was detected. DNA samples were exome sequenced and alignment was performed to allow variant calling. It was confirmed that the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs45458701, within the SLC29A1 gene encoding the ENT1 protein, recently reported to be a basis of the At(a−) phenotype was also the basis of the phenotype in this family. The reagents for serological analysis required to identify the rare blood type present in this mother are held in only a few reference laboratories worldwide. This case highlights the utility of genetic methods in resolving complex investigations involving blood grouping and demonstrates that genotyping of variants associated with blood types present in specific ethnic groups may be the fastest method available for identification of the basis of fetomaternal incompatibilities.

  12. Genotyping confirms inheritance of the rare At(a-) type in a case of haemolytic disease of the newborn.

    PubMed

    McBean, Rhiannon; Liew, Yew-Wah; Wilson, Brett; Kupatawintu, Pawinee; Emthip, Morakot; Hyland, Catherine; Flower, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The At(a) blood group antigen (now AUG2 in the Augustine system) is a high-frequency antigen with negative phenotype At(a-) found only in individuals of African ancestry. In a twin pregnancy, the fifth pregnancy in a woman of African origin, serological investigations confirmed that the mother was At(a-) and anti-At(a) was detected. DNA samples were exome sequenced and alignment was performed to allow variant calling. It was confirmed that the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs45458701, within the SLC29A1 gene encoding the ENT1 protein, recently reported to be a basis of the At(a-) phenotype was also the basis of the phenotype in this family. The reagents for serological analysis required to identify the rare blood type present in this mother are held in only a few reference laboratories worldwide. This case highlights the utility of genetic methods in resolving complex investigations involving blood grouping and demonstrates that genotyping of variants associated with blood types present in specific ethnic groups may be the fastest method available for identification of the basis of fetomaternal incompatibilities. PMID:27499913

  13. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolić, Ivica

    2015-07-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair.

  14. Impact of Transgene Inheritance on the Mitigation of Gene Flow Between Crops and Their Wild Relatives: The Example of Foxtail Millet

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yunsu; Wang, TianYu; Li, Yu; Darmency, Henri

    2008-01-01

    Developing genetically modified crop plants that are biologically contained could reduce significantly the potential spread of transgenes to conventional and organic crop plants and to wild or weedy relatives. Among several strategies, the hereditary mode of transmission of transgenes, whether dominant, recessive, or maternal, could play a major role in interspecific gene flow. Here we report on the gene flow between foxtail millet (Setaria italica), an autogamous crop, and its weedy relative, S. viridis, growing within or beside fields containing the three kinds of inherited herbicide resistance. Over the 6-year study, in the absence of herbicide selection, the maternal chloroplast-inherited resistance was observed at a 2 × 10−6 frequency in the weed populations. Resistant weed plants were observed 60 times as often, at 1.2 × 10−4 in the case of the nuclear recessive resistance, and 190 times as often, at 3.9 × 10−4 in the case of the dominant resistance. Because the recessive gene was not expressed in the first-generation hybrids, it should be more effective than dominant genes in reducing gene flow under normal agricultural conditions where herbicides are sprayed because interspecific hybrids cannot gain from beneficial genes. PMID:18780732

  15. The Recess Renaissance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2015-01-01

    The author tells of his work around the country and world on transforming how schools do recess, free play, and outside time by transforming their outdoor spaces to match. Instead of a playground of fixed structures like traditional school grounds, newer spaces are filled with loose materials that children can use to build forts, dens, and tree…

  16. Educational Finance in Recession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Keith

    1986-01-01

    Discusses two interacting sources limiting educational expenditures in developing nations in light of the impact of the global economic recession: (1) factors affecting overall levels of public expenditures and (2) factors affecting educational priority in the national budget. Offers requirements for an effective response to these challenges. (TRS)

  17. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.C.; Teague, P.W.; Barber, A.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a severe retinal dystrophy characterized by night blindness, progressive constriction of the visual fields and loss of central vision in the fourth or fifth decades. The frequency of this form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) varies in different populations. Mutations within the rhodopsin, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase-{beta} subunit and cGMP-gated channel genes have been reported in some arRP families. The genetic loci responsible for the majority of cases have yet to be identified. Genetic heterogeneity is likely to be extensive. In order to minimize the amount of genetic heterogenity, a set of arRP families was ascertained within the South-Central Sardinian population, in which 81% of families with a known mode of inheritance show an autosomal recessive form of RP. The Sardinian population is an ethnic {open_quotes}outlier{close_quotes}, having remained relatively isolated from mainland and other cultures. Genetic linkage data has been obtained in a set of 11 Sardinian arRP kindreds containing 26 affected members. Under the assumption of genetic homogeneity, no evidence of linkage was found in the arRP kindreds using 195 markers, which excluded 62% of the genome (Z<-2). Positive lod scores were obtained with D14S80 which showed no recombination in a subset of 5 families. Heterogeneity testing using D14S80 and arRP showed no significant evidence of heterogeneity (p=0.18) but evidence of linkage ({chi}{sup 2}=3.64, p=0.028). We are currently screening the neural retina-specific leucine zipper gene (NRL) in 14q11 for mutations as a candidate locus.

  18. Dominant and Recessive Forms of Fibrochondrogenesis Resulting from Mutations at a Second Locus, COL11A2

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Stuart W.; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Miki, Rika; Funari, Tara; Funari, Vincent A.; Nevarez, Lisette; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, recessively inherited skeletal dysplasia shown to result from mutations in the gene encoding the proα1(XI) chain of type XI collagen, COL11A1. The first of two cases reported here was the affected offspring of first cousins and sequence analysis excluded mutations in COL11A1. Consequently, whole-genome SNP genotyping was performed to identify blocks of homozygosity, identical-by-descent, wherein the disease locus would reside. COL11A1 was not within a region of homozygosity, further excluding it as the disease locus, but the gene encoding the proα2(XI) chain of type XI collagen, COL11A2, was located within a large region of homozygosity. Sequence analysis identified homozygosity for a splice donor mutation in intron 18. Exon trapping demonstrated that the mutation resulted in skipping of exon 18 and predicted deletion of 18 amino acids from the triple helical domain of the protein. In the second case, heterozygosity for a de novo 9 bp deletion in exon 40 of COL11A2 was identified, indicating that there are autosomal dominant forms of fibrochondrogenesis. These findings thus demonstrate that fibrochondrogenesis can result from either recessively- or dominantly-inherited mutations in COL11A2. PMID:22246659

  19. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  20. Gene therapies for inherited skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Qasim, Waseem; McGrath, John A

    2014-06-01

    Skin is an amenable organ for gene replacement and gene editing therapeutics. Its accessibility makes it well-suited for direct topical gene delivery, grafting of genetically corrected cells, and monitoring of possible adverse events. Monogenic recessive disorders with a clinically severe or life-threatening phenotype provide the best candidate diseases for the introduction of a single normal copy of the gene into the target cell, usually keratinocytes. Preclinical studies have shown impressive results in terms of gene correction using both in vivo and ex vivo approaches. The clinical application of gene replacement or genomic editing as potential therapies for inherited skin disorders, however, has been held back by the inadequacy of delivery vectors and concerns from regulatory agencies regarding safety; thus translation to clinical trials has been slow. Over the past 15 years, cell culture and animal models have shown efficient gene correction techniques as preludes to treat inherited skin disorders such as junctional epidermolysis bullosa, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, xeroderma pigmentosum, lamellar ichthyosis and Netherton syndrome, but so far only one patient has been treated in a clinical trial. This article reviews the current status of gene therapies for patients with inherited skin diseases and explores future perspectives. PMID:25085667

  1. Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Antenatal Diagnosis and Histopathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Rajanna, Dayananda Kumar; Reddy, Anjani; Srinivas, Naren Satya; Aneja, Ankur

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is one of the most common inheritable disease manifesting in infancy and childhood with a frequency of 1:6,000 to 1:55,000 births. The patient in her second trimester presented with a history of amenorrhea. Ultrasound examination revealed bilateral, enlarged, hyperechogenic kidneys, placentomegaly, and severe oligohydramnios. The pregnancy was terminated. An autopsy was performed on the fetus. Both the kidneys were found to be enlarged and the cut surface showed numerous cysts. The liver sections showed changes due to fibrosis. The final diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease was made based on these findings. In this article, we correlate the ante-natal ultrasound and histopathological findings in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23814685

  2. Nevada, the Great Recession, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstegen, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the Great Recession and its aftermath has been devastating in Nevada, especially for public education. This article discusses the budget shortfalls and the impact of the economic crisis in Nevada using case study methodology. It provides a review of documents, including Governor Gibbon's proposals for the public K-12 education system…

  3. Glacier recession in Iceland and Austria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Bayr, Klaus J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been possible to measure glacier recession on the basis of Landsat data, in conjunction with comparisons of the magnitude of recession of a glacier margin with in situ measurements at fixed points along the same margin. Attention is presently given to the cases of Vatnajokull ice cap, in Iceland, and the Pasterze Glacier, in Austria, on the basis of satellite data from 1973-1987 and 1984-1990, respectively. Indications of a trend toward negative mass balance are noted. Nevertheless, while most of the world's small glaciers have been receding, some are advancing either due to local climate or the tidewater glacier cycle.

  4. Glacier recession in Iceland and Austria

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S. Jr.; Bayr, K.J. USGS, Reston, VA Keene State College, NH )

    1992-03-01

    It has been possible to measure glacier recession on the basis of Landsat data, in conjunction with comparisons of the magnitude of recession of a glacier margin with in situ measurements at fixed points along the same margin. Attention is presently given to the cases of Vatnajokull ice cap, in Iceland, and the Pasterze Glacier, in Austria, on the basis of satellite data from 1973-1987 and 1984-1990, respectively. Indications of a trend toward negative mass balance are noted. Nevertheless, while most of the world's small glaciers have been receding, some are advancing either due to local climate or the tidewater glacier cycle. 21 refs.

  5. [Netherton syndrome--a rare form of inherited ichtyosis].

    PubMed

    Marttila, Riitta; Tuomiranta, Mirja

    2012-01-01

    Netherton syndrome is a rare skin disease classified into ichtyoses. It has a recessive pattern of inheritance. It is associated with scaly erythrodermia, bamboo hair defect, immunological abnormalities of varying severity, IgE-mediated allergic reactions, infections and defective temperature regulation that often leads to retarded growth and development of a newborn. The phenotype of the disease varies from mild skin symptoms to lethal forms of the disease. We describe two Finnish families, whose children were diagnosed with this disease. PMID:22312831

  6. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  7. Inherited interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Christine Kim; Raghu, Ganesh

    2004-09-01

    This article focuses on recent advances in the identification of genes and genetic polymorphisms that have been implicated in the development of human interstitial lung diseases. It focuses on the inherited mendelian diseases in which pulmonary fibrosis is part of the clinical phenotype and the genetics of familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other rare inherited interstitial lung diseases. The article also reviews the association studies that have been published to date regarding the genetics of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The reader is directed to recent reviews on human genetic predisposition of sarcoidosis, environmental-related, drug-related, connective tissue related pulmonary fibrosis, and genetic predisposition of fibrosis in animal models. PMID:15331184

  8. Reduced Toxicity Conditioning and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplantation for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Mark B; Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Giller, Roger; Umegaki, Noriko; Harel, Sivan; Kiuru, Maija; Morel, Kimberly D; LeBoeuf, Nicole; Kandel, Jessica; Bruckner, Anna; Fabricatore, Sandra; Chen, Mei; Woodley, David; McGrath, John; Baxter-Lowe, LeeAnn; Uitto, Jouni; Christiano, Angela M; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2015-09-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a severe, incurable, inherited blistering disease caused by COL7A1 mutations. Emerging evidence suggests hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) can be reprogrammed into skin; HPC-derived cells can restore COL7 expression in COL7-deficient mice. We report two children with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa treated with reduced-toxicity conditioning and HLA-matched HPC transplantation. PMID:26148662

  9. A recessive homozygous p.Asp92Gly SDHD mutation causes prenatal cardiomyopathy and a severe mitochondrial complex II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Ceccatelli Berti, Camilla; Blakely, Emma L; Oláhová, Monika; He, Langping; McMahon, Colin J; Olpin, Simon E; Hargreaves, Iain P; Nolli, Cecilia; McFarland, Robert; Goffrini, Paola; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; Taylor, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a crucial metabolic enzyme complex that is involved in ATP production, playing roles in both the tricarboxylic cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (complex II). Isolated complex II deficiency is one of the rarest oxidative phosphorylation disorders with mutations described in three structural subunits and one of the assembly factors; just one case is attributed to recessively inherited SDHD mutations. We report the pathological, biochemical, histochemical and molecular genetic investigations of a male neonate who had left ventricular hypertrophy detected on antenatal scan and died on day one of life. Subsequent postmortem examination confirmed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular non-compaction. Biochemical analysis of his skeletal muscle biopsy revealed evidence of a severe isolated complex II deficiency and candidate gene sequencing revealed a novel homozygous c.275A>G, p.(Asp92Gly) SDHD mutation which was shown to be recessively inherited through segregation studies. The affected amino acid has been reported as a Dutch founder mutation p.(Asp92Tyr) in families with hereditary head and neck paraganglioma. By introducing both mutations into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we were able to confirm that the p.(Asp92Gly) mutation causes a more severe oxidative growth phenotype than the p.(Asp92Tyr) mutant, and provides functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of the patient's SDHD mutation. This is only the second case of mitochondrial complex II deficiency due to inherited SDHD mutations and highlights the importance of sequencing all SDH genes in patients with biochemical and histochemical evidence of isolated mitochondrial complex II deficiency. PMID:26008905

  10. Comprehensive carrier screening and molecular diagnostic testing for recessive childhood diseases.

    PubMed

    Kingsmore, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Of 7,028 disorders with suspected Mendelian inheritance, 1,139 are recessive and have an established molecular basis. Although individually uncommon, Mendelian diseases collectively account for ~20% of infant mortality and ~18% of pediatric hospitalizations. Molecular diagnostic testing is currently available for only ~300 recessive disorders. Preconception screening, together with genetic counseling of carriers, has resulted in remarkable declines in the incidence of several severe recessive diseases including Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis. However, extension of preconception screening and molecular diagnostic testing to most recessive disease genes has hitherto been impractical. Recently, we reported a preconception carrier screen / molecular diagnostic test for 448 recessive childhood diseases. The current status of this test is reviewed here. Currently, this reports analytical validity of the comprehensive carrier test. As the clinical validity and clinical utility in the contexts described is ascertained, this article will be updated. PMID:22872815

  11. Comprehensive Carrier Screening and Molecular Diagnostic Testing for Recessive Childhood Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kingsmore, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Of 7,028 disorders with suspected Mendelian inheritance, 1,139 are recessive and have an established molecular basis. Although individually uncommon, Mendelian diseases collectively account for ~20% of infant mortality and ~18% of pediatric hospitalizations. Molecular diagnostic testing is currently available for only ~300 recessive disorders. Preconception screening, together with genetic counseling of carriers, has resulted in remarkable declines in the incidence of several severe recessive diseases including Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis. However, extension of preconception screening and molecular diagnostic testing to most recessive disease genes has hitherto been impractical. Recently, we reported a preconception carrier screen / molecular diagnostic test for 448 recessive childhood diseases. The current status of this test is reviewed here. Currently, this reports analytical validity of the comprehensive carrier test. As the clinical validity and clinical utility in the contexts described is ascertained, this article will be updated. PMID:22872815

  12. Inheritance of egusi seed type in watermelon.

    PubMed

    Gusmini, G; Wehner, T C; Jarret, R L

    2004-01-01

    An unusual seed mutant in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) has seeds with a fleshy pericarp, commonly called egusi seeds. The origin of the phenotype is unknown, but it is widely cultivated in Nigeria for the high protein and carbohydrate content of the edible seeds. Egusi seeds have a thick, fleshy pericarp that appears during the second to third week of fruit development. We studied the inheritance of this phenotype in crosses of normal seeded Charleston Gray and Calhoun Gray with two plant introduction accessions, PI 490383w and PI 560006, having the egusi seed type. We found that the egusi seed type is controlled by a single recessive gene, and the symbol eg was assigned. PMID:15220396

  13. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  14. Inherited 1q21.1q21.2 duplication and 16p11.2 deletion: a two-hit case with more severe clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Sophie; Capri, Yline; Briand-Suleau, Audrey; Tosca, Lucie; Gras, Domitille; Fauret-Amsellem, Anne-Laure; Pineau, Dominique; Saada, Julien; Ortonne, Valérie; Verloes, Alain; Goossens, Michel; Tachdjian, Gérard; Métay, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    We report paternally inherited duplication of 1q12q21.2 of 5.8 Mb associated with maternally inherited deletion of 16p11.2 of 545 Kb, this latter first identified in a fetus exhibiting an absent nasal bone detected during pregnancy. During the neonatal period, the young boy presented developmental delay, epilepsy, congenital anomalies and overweight. The clinical features of the proband with two rearrangements were more severe than in either of the parents carrying only one or the other mutation. Thus our data support a two-hit model in which the concomitant presence of these two copy-number variations exacerbates the neurodevelopmental phenotype. PMID:26162704

  15. Inherited Oral Cancer: A Rare Reality.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Sarode, Sachin C; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-01-01

    Majority of oral cancers (around 90-95%) found today are caused by various environmental factors. These generally include the chemical and physical carcinogens, like tobacco, diet, microorganisms, radiations, etc. The remaining 5% of the cases are caused by inherited mutated genes carrying the defect. PMID:27018035

  16. Fractional populations in sex-linked inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo Lee, Seung; Chung, Myung-Hoon; Koo Kim, Chul; Nahm, Kyun

    2001-03-01

    We study the fractional populations in chromosome inherited diseases. The governing equations for the fractional populations are found and solved in the presence of mutation and selection. The physical fixed points obtained are used to discuss the cases of color blindness and hemophilia.

  17. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa: clinical and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Boeira, Vanessa Lys Simas Yamakawa; Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rêgo, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida; Follador, Ivonise

    2013-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that present with skin and, in some cases, mucosal fragility, predisposing patients to the development of blisters and/or erosions after minimal trauma or friction. Children with a recurrent history of these kinds of lesions or neonates that present them in the absence of another reasonable explanation should be investigated. Diagnosis must be based on clinical and histopathological findings. To date, management of inherited EB basically consists in avoiding traumas that trigger lesions, as well as preventing infection and facilitating healing of the wounds with the systematic use of bandages. PMID:23739692

  18. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  19. Fort Play Children Recreate Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase…

  20. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  1. Inherited cobalamin malabsorption. Mutations in three genes reveal functional and ethnic patterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inherited malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) causes hematological and neurological abnormalities that can be fatal. Three genes have been implicated in Cbl malabsorption; yet, only about 10% of ~400-500 reported cases have been molecularly studied to date. Recessive mutations in CUBN or AMN cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (IGS), while recessive mutations in GIF cause Intrinsic Factor Deficiency (IFD). IGS and IFD differ in that IGS usually presents with proteinuria, which is not observed in IFD. The genetic heterogeneity and numerous differential diagnoses make clinical assessment difficult. Methods We present a large genetic screening study of 154 families or patients with suspected hereditary Cbl malabsorption. Patients and their families have been accrued over a period spanning >12 years. Systematic genetic testing of the three genes CUBN, AMN, and GIF was accomplished using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA and RNA sequencing. In addition, six genes that were contenders for a role in inherited Cbl malabsorption were studied in a subset of these patients. Results Our results revealed population-specific mutations, mutational hotspots, and functionally distinct regions in the three causal genes. We identified mutations in 126/154 unrelated cases (82%). Fifty-three of 126 cases (42%) were mutated in CUBN, 45/126 (36%) were mutated in AMN, and 28/126 (22%) had mutations in GIF. We found 26 undescribed mutations in CUBN, 19 in AMN, and 7 in GIF for a total of 52 novel defects described herein. We excluded six other candidate genes as culprits and concluded that additional genes might be involved. Conclusions Cbl malabsorption is found worldwide and genetically complex. However, our results indicate that population-specific founder mutations are quite common. Consequently, targeted genetic testing has become feasible if ethnic ancestry is considered. These results will facilitate clinical and molecular genetic testing of

  2. Pathognomonic oral profile of Enamel Renal Syndrome (ERS) caused by recessive FAM20A mutations.

    PubMed

    de la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Quentric, Mickael; Yamaguti, Paulo Marcio; Acevedo, Ana-Carolina; Mighell, Alan J; Vikkula, Miikka; Huckert, Mathilde; Berdal, Ariane; Bloch-Zupan, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects. Commonly described as an isolated trait, it may be observed concomitantly with other orodental and/or systemic features such as nephrocalcinosis in Enamel Renal Syndrome (ERS, MIM#204690), or gingival hyperplasia in Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Fibromatosis Syndrome (AIGFS, MIM#614253). Patients affected by ERS/AIGFS present a distinctive orodental phenotype consisting of generalized hypoplastic AI affecting both the primary and permanent dentition, delayed tooth eruption, pulp stones, hyperplastic dental follicles, and gingival hyperplasia with variable severity and calcified nodules. Renal exam reveals a nephrocalcinosis which is asymptomatic in children affected by ERS. FAM20A recessive mutations are responsible for both syndromes. We suggest that AIGFS and ERS are in fact descriptions of the same syndrome, but that the kidney phenotype has not always been investigated fully in AIGFS. The aim of this review is to highlight the distinctive and specific orodental features of patients with recessive mutations in FAM20A. We propose ERS to be the preferred term for all the phenotypes arising from recessive FAM20A mutations. A differential diagnosis has to be made with other forms of AI, isolated or syndromic, where only a subset of the clinical signs may be shared. When ERS is suspected, the patient should be assessed by a dentist, nephrologist and clinical geneticist. Confirmed cases require long-term follow-up. Management of the orodental aspects can be extremely challenging and requires the input of multi-disciplinary specialized dental team, especially when there are multiple unerupted teeth. PMID:24927635

  3. Phenotypic characterization of recessive gene knockout rat models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kuldip D; De Silva, Shehan; Sheth, Niketa P; Ramboz, Sylvie; Beck, Melissa J; Quang, Changyu; Switzer, Robert C; Ahmad, Syed O; Sunkin, Susan M; Walker, Dan; Cui, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Daniel A; McCoy, Aaron M; Gamber, Kevin; Ding, Xiaodong; Goldberg, Matthew S; Benkovic, Stanley A; Haupt, Meredith; Baptista, Marco A S; Fiske, Brian K; Sherer, Todd B; Frasier, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    Recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1(Pink1), DJ-1 (Park7) and Parkin (Park2) genes are linked to familial cases of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). As part of its strategy to provide more tools for the research community, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) funded the generation of novel rat models with targeted disruption ofPink1, DJ-1 or Parkin genes and determined if the loss of these proteins would result in a progressive PD-like phenotype. Pathological, neurochemical and behavioral outcome measures were collected at 4, 6 and 8months of age in homozygous KO rats and compared to wild-type (WT) rats. Both Pink1 and DJ-1 KO rats showed progressive nigral neurodegeneration with about 50% dopaminergic cell loss observed at 8 months of age. ThePink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats also showed a two to three fold increase in striatal dopamine and serotonin content at 8 months of age. Both Pink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats exhibited significant motor deficits starting at 4months of age. However, Parkin KO rats displayed normal behaviors with no neurochemical or pathological changes. These results demonstrate that inactivation of the Pink1 or DJ-1 genes in the rat produces progressive neurodegeneration and early behavioral deficits, suggesting that these recessive genes may be essential for the survival of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). These MJFF-generated novel rat models will assist the research community to elucidate the mechanisms by which these recessive genes produce PD pathology and potentially aid in therapeutic development. PMID:24969022

  4. Pathognomonic oral profile of Enamel Renal Syndrome (ERS) caused by recessive FAM20A mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects. Commonly described as an isolated trait, it may be observed concomitantly with other orodental and/or systemic features such as nephrocalcinosis in Enamel Renal Syndrome (ERS, MIM#204690), or gingival hyperplasia in Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Fibromatosis Syndrome (AIGFS, MIM#614253). Patients affected by ERS/AIGFS present a distinctive orodental phenotype consisting of generalized hypoplastic AI affecting both the primary and permanent dentition, delayed tooth eruption, pulp stones, hyperplastic dental follicles, and gingival hyperplasia with variable severity and calcified nodules. Renal exam reveals a nephrocalcinosis which is asymptomatic in children affected by ERS. FAM20A recessive mutations are responsible for both syndromes. We suggest that AIGFS and ERS are in fact descriptions of the same syndrome, but that the kidney phenotype has not always been investigated fully in AIGFS. The aim of this review is to highlight the distinctive and specific orodental features of patients with recessive mutations in FAM20A. We propose ERS to be the preferred term for all the phenotypes arising from recessive FAM20A mutations. A differential diagnosis has to be made with other forms of AI, isolated or syndromic, where only a subset of the clinical signs may be shared. When ERS is suspected, the patient should be assessed by a dentist, nephrologist and clinical geneticist. Confirmed cases require long-term follow-up. Management of the orodental aspects can be extremely challenging and requires the input of multi-disciplinary specialized dental team, especially when there are multiple unerupted teeth. PMID:24927635

  5. Mutations in the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger gene AE1 cause autosomal dominant but not autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Karet, F. E.; Gainza, F. J.; Györy, A. Z.; Unwin, R. J.; Wrong, O.; Tanner, M. J. A.; Nayir, A.; Alpay, H.; Santos, F.; Hulton, S. A.; Bakkaloglu, A.; Ozen, S.; Cunningham, M. J.; di Pietro, A.; Walker, W. G.; Lifton, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    Primary distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is characterized by reduced ability to acidify urine, variable hyperchloremic hypokalemic metabolic acidosis, nephrocalcinosis, and nephrolithiasis. Kindreds showing either autosomal dominant or recessive transmission are described. Mutations in the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger AE1 have recently been reported in four autosomal dominant dRTA kindreds, three of these altering codon Arg589. We have screened 26 kindreds with primary dRTA for mutations in AE1. Inheritance was autosomal recessive in seventeen kindreds, autosomal dominant in one, and uncertain due to unknown parental phenotype or sporadic disease in eight kindreds. No mutations in AE1 were detected in any of the autosomal recessive kindreds, and analysis of linkage showed no evidence of linkage of recessive dRTA to AE1. In contrast, heterozygous mutations in AE1 were identified in the one known dominant dRTA kindred, in one sporadic case, and one kindred with two affected brothers. In the dominant kindred, the mutation Arg-589/Ser cosegregated with dRTA in the extended pedigree. An Arg-589/His mutation in the sporadic case proved to be a de novo mutation. In the third kindred, affected brothers both have an intragenic 13-bp duplication resulting in deletion of the last 11 amino acids of AE1. These mutations were not detected in 80 alleles from unrelated normal individuals. These findings underscore the key role of Arg-589 and the C terminus in normal AE1 function, and indicate that while mutations in AE1 cause autosomal dominant dRTA, defects in this gene are not responsible for recessive disease. PMID:9600966

  6. Fine genetic mapping of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 6p21

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, Yin Y.; Banerjee, P.; Knowles, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The inherited retinal degenerations known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by mutations at many different loci and can be inherited as an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked recessive trait. Two forms of autosomal recessive (arRP) have been reported to cosegregate with mutations in the rhodopsin gene and the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase on chromosome 4p. Genetic linkage has been reported on chromosomes 6p and 1q. In a large Dominican family, we reported an arRp gene near the region of the peripherin/RDS gene. Four recombinations were detected between the disease locus and an intragenic marker derived from peripherin/RDS. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Inheritance of Cytosine Methylation.

    PubMed

    Tillo, Desiree; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Vinson, Charles

    2016-11-01

    There are numerous examples of parental transgenerational inheritance that is epigenetic. The informational molecules include RNA, chromatin modifications, and cytosine methylation. With advances in DNA sequencing technologies, the molecular and epigenetic mechanisms mediating these effects are now starting to be uncovered. This mini-review will highlight some of the examples of epigenetic inheritance, the establishment of cytosine methylation in sperm, and recent genomic studies linking sperm cytosine methylation to epigenetic effects on offspring. A recent paper examining changes in diet and sperm cytosine methylation from pools of eight animals each, found differences between a normal diet, a high fat diet, and a low protein diet. However, epivariation between individuals within a group was greater than the differences between groups obscuring any potential methylation changes linked to diet. Learning more about epivariation may help unravel the mechanisms that regulate cytosine methylation. In addition, other experimental and genetic systems may also produce more dramatic changes in the sperm methylome, making it easier to unravel potential transgenerational phenomena. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2346-2352, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26910768

  8. Inherited mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Though inherited mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are most well known for their syndromic forms, for which widely known acronyms (MELAS, MERRF, NARP, LHON etc.) have been coined, the vast majority of inherited MIDs presents in a non-syndromic form. Since MIDs are most frequently multisystem disorders already at onset or during the disease course, a MID should be suspected if there is a combination of neurological and non-neurological abnormalities. Neurological abnormalities occurring as a part of a MID include stroke-like episodes, epilepsy, migraine-like headache, movement disorders, cerebellar ataxia, visual impairment, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, dementia, psychosis, hypopituitarism, aneurysms, or peripheral nervous system disease, such as myopathy, neuropathy, or neuronopathy. Non-neurological manifestations concern the ears, the endocrine organs, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, the kidneys, the bone marrow, and the skin. Whenever there is an unexplained combination of neurological and non-neurological disease in a patient or kindred, a MID should be suspected and appropriate diagnostic measures initiated. Genetic testing should be guided by the phenotype, the biopsy findings, and the biochemical results. PMID:22399423

  9. Ventricular arrhythmias in Rhodesian Ridgebacks with a family history of sudden death and results of a pedigree analysis for potential inheritance patterns.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Weidman, Jess A; Rosenthal, Steven L; Lahmers, Kevin K; Friedenberg, Steven G

    2016-05-15

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate a group of related Rhodesian Ridgebacks with a family history of sudden death for the presence of arrhythmia and to identify possible patterns of disease inheritance among these dogs. DESIGN Prospective case series and pedigree investigation. ANIMALS 25 Rhodesian Ridgebacks with shared bloodlines. PROCEDURES Pedigrees of 4 young dogs (1 female and 3 males; age, 7 to 12 months) that died suddenly were evaluated, and owners of closely related dogs were asked to participate in the study. Dogs were evaluated by 24-hour Holter monitoring, standard ECG, echocardiography, or some combination of these to assess cardiac status. Necropsy reports, if available, were reviewed. RESULTS 31 close relatives of the 4 deceased dogs were identified. Of 21 dogs available for examination, 8 (2 males and 6 females) had ventricular tachyarrhythmias (90 to 8,700 ventricular premature complexes [VPCs]/24 h). No dogs had clinical signs of cardiac disease reported. Echocardiographic or necropsy evaluation for 7 of 12 dogs deemed affected (ie, with frequent or complex VPCs or sudden death) did not identify structural lesions. Five of 6 screened parents of affected dogs had 0 to 5 VPCs/24 h (all singlets), consistent with a normal reading. Pedigree evaluation suggested an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, but autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance could not be ruled out. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Holter monitoring of Rhodesian Ridgebacks with a family history of an arrhythmia or sudden death is recommended for early diagnosis of disease. An autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance in the studied dogs was likely, and inbreeding should be strongly discouraged. PMID:27135669

  10. [Etiology of gingival recessions].

    PubMed

    Kleber, B M; Schenk, H J

    1989-11-01

    About every third patient of our department suffers from gingival recessions (g. r.): 1980, 1985, 1986, 1987 altogether 1039 patients from 4022. People at the age of 20-25 years are mainly affected: 44.4% of these patients in the age-group of 20-25 years suffer from g. r., 28.3% of patients suffering from l.P.a. are 20-25 years old. Patients diseased with g. r. (N = 60) show functional disturbances (79% at the 1st bicuspid, 72% at the 2nd bicuspid) during their occlusion movements to a great extent. Patients afflected by g.r. (N = 20) show in comparison to healthy people a smaller diameter of the canin's apical basis both in upper and lower jaw, a smaller circumference of the alveolar crest as well as an upper canin-crown which is turned out from the teeth arcus in a more labial direction. Prevention of g. r. involves individual oral health education to protect the vestibular gingiva from chronic brushing-trauma, an early follow-up, and a functional adjustment. PMID:2638999

  11. Caroli's syndrome with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Prithi; Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Shanbag, Preeti; Bhongade, Swapnil

    2014-07-01

    Caroli's syndrome (CS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple segmental cystic or saccular dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts and congenital hepatic fibrosis. We report a 9-year-old boy who was diagnosed with CS and autosomal recessive poly-cystic kidney disease. On screening, his 5-month-old asymptomatic sister had multiple dilated biliary radicals with multiple bilateral renal cystic lesions. Both the patient and the affected sibling have been advised regular follow-up for monitoring the progression of the disease. In conclusion, patients with CS should be screened for renal cystic lesions and vice versa even if they are asymptomatic. Also, as the disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, it is important to screen family members for early diagnosis and management. PMID:24969198

  12. Harlequin ichthyosis: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Salehin, Shahrbanoo; Azizimoghadam, Ahmad; Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Babaeipour-Divshali, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Harlequin fetus is a rare and the most severe form of the congenital ichthyosis with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Incidence of the disease is nearly 1 in 3,00,000 live births. The disease might be lethal at birth and the affected babies are often premature. Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is marked by severe keratinized and alligator-like horned skin. The present study reports a new case with HI and adds to the collective knowledge of this rare skin disorder. HI has been linked to mutation in the ABCA12 gene; therefore, genetic counseling and mutation screening of this gene should be considered. PMID:24520234

  13. Inherited renal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Akira; Young, Scott W; Takahashi, Naoki; King, Bernard F; Atwell, Thomas D

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary forms of kidney carcinoma account for 5-8% of all malignant kidney neoplasms. The renal tumors are often multiple and bilateral and occur at an earlier age. Each of the hereditary kidney carcinoma syndromes is associated with specific gene mutations as well as a specific histologic type of kidney carcinoma. The presence of associated extrarenal manifestations may suggest a hereditary kidney cancer syndrome. Radiology is most commonly used to screen and manage patients with hereditary kidney cancer syndromes. This manuscript reviews the clinical and imaging findings of well-defined inherited kidney cancer syndromes including von Hippel-Lindau disease, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, hereditary papillary renal carcinoma syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and RCC syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, and Lynch syndrome. PMID:27108134

  14. Thomsen or Becker myotonia? A novel autosomal recessive nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene associated with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Senkevics, Adriano S; Zilbersztajn-Gotlieb, Dinorah; Yamamoto, Lydia U; Muniz, Viviane P; Pavanello, Rita C M; Oliveira, Acary B; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2012-02-01

    We describe a large Brazilian consanguineous kindred with 3 clinically affected patients with a Thomsen myotonia phenotype. They carry a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene (K248X). None of the 6 heterozygote carriers show any sign of myotonia on clinical evaluation or electromyography. These findings confirm the autosomal recessive inheritance of the novel mutation in this family, as well as the occurrence of phenotypic variability in the autosomal recessive forms of myotonia. PMID:22246887

  15. Ataxias with autosomal, X-chromosomal or maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-07-01

    Heredoataxias are a group of genetic disorders with a cerebellar syndrome as the leading clinical manifestation. The current classification distinguishes heredoataxias according to the trait of inheritance into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and maternally inherited heredoataxias. The autosomal dominant heredoataxias are separated into spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1-8, 10-15, 17-23, 25-30, and dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy), episodic ataxias (EA1-7), and autosomal dominant mitochondrial heredoataxias (Leigh syndrome, MIRAS, ADOAD, and AD-CPEO). The autosomal recessive ataxias are separated into Friedreich ataxia, ataxia due to vitamin E deficiency, ataxia due to Abeta-lipoproteinemia, Refsum disease, late-onset Tay-Sachs disease, cerebrotendineous xanthomatosis, spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia telangiectasia-like disorder, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 and 2, spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, Cayman ataxia, Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, and autosomal recessive mitochondrial ataxias (AR-CPEO, SANDO, SCAE, AHS, IOSCA, MEMSA, LBSL CoQ-deficiency, PDC-deficiency). Only two of the heredoataxias, fragile X/tremor/ataxia syndrome, and XLSA/A are transmitted via an X-linked trait. Maternally inherited heredoataxias are due to point mutations in genes encoding for tRNAs, rRNAs, respiratory chain subunits or single large scale deletions/duplications of the mitochondrial DNA and include MELAS, MERRF, KSS, PS, MILS, NARP, and non-syndromic mitochondrial disorders. Treatment of heredoataxias is symptomatic and supportive and may have a beneficial effect in single patients. **Please see page 424 for abbreviation list. PMID:19650351

  16. Frequent de novo mutations of the ANK1 gene mimic a recessive mode of transmission in hereditary spherocytosis: three new ANK1 variants: ankyrins Bari, Napoli II and Anzio.

    PubMed

    Randon, J; Miraglia del Giudice, E; Bozon, M; Perrotta, S; De Vivo, M; Iolascon, A; Delaunay, J; Morle, L

    1997-03-01

    A subset of spherocytosis cases associated with mutations of the ANK1 gene present an apparently recessive inheritance pattern on a clinical and haematological basis. We identified three novel out-of-frame deletions in the ANK1 gene: allele Bari (1361delG), Napoli II (2883delC) and Anzio (3032delCA) in three Italian patients, two of whom have been splenectomized. Analysis of the cDNA showed small or trace amounts of ankyrin mRNAs in Bari, Napoli II and Anzio. The parents were normal clinically and haematologically and did not carry the mutations exhibited by their children. We confirmed the de novo character of the HS mutations based on paternity testing. Recessive HS associated with the ANK1 gene is probably rarer than initially thought, and spherocytosis may often be due to de novo mutations. PMID:9054656

  17. The foundation of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Rudolf

    2010-03-01

    In 1909 two papers by Correns and by Baur published in volume 1 of Zeitschrift für induktive Abstammungs- und Vererbungslehre (now Molecular Genetics and Genomics) reported on the non-Mendelian inheritance of chlorophyll deficiencies. These papers, reporting the very first cases of extranuclear inheritance, laid the foundation for a new field: non-Mendelian or extranuclear genetics. Correns observed a purely maternal inheritance (in Mirabilis), whereas Baur found a biparental inheritance (in Pelargonium). Correns suspected the non-Mendelian factors in the cytoplasm, while Baur believed that the plastids carry these extranuclear factors. In the following years, Baur's hypothesis was proved to be correct. Baur subsequently developed the theory of plastid inheritance. In many genera the plastids are transmitted only uniparentally by the mother, while in a few genera there is a biparental plastid inheritance. Commonly there is random sorting of plastids during ontogenetic development. Renner and Schwemmle as well as geneticists in other countries added additional details to this theory. Pioneering studies on mitochondrial inheritance in yeast started in 1949 in the group of Ephrussi and Slonimski; respiration-deficient cells (petites in yeast, poky in Neurospora) were demonstrated to be due to mitochondrial mutations. Electron microscopical and biochemical studies (1962-1964) showed that plastids and mitochondria contain organelle-specific DNA molecules. These findings laid the molecular basis for the two branches of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics. PMID:20140454

  18. Deep Dermatophytosis and Inherited CARD9 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Quentin B.; Liu, Luyan; Cypowyj, Sophie; Prando, Carolina; Migaud, Mélanie; Taibi, Lynda; Ammar-Khodja, Aomar; Stambouli, Omar Boudghene; Guellil, Boumediene; Jacobs, Frederique; Goffard, Jean-Christophe; Schepers, Kinda; del Marmol, Véronique; Boussofara, Lobna; Denguezli, Mohamed; Larif, Molka; Bachelez, Hervé; Michel, Laurence; Lefranc, Gérard; Hay, Rod; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Fraitag, Sylvie; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Boudia, Merad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deep dermatophytosis is a severe and sometimes life-threatening fungal infection caused by dermatophytes. It is characterized by extensive dermal and subcutaneous tissue invasion and by frequent dissemination to the lymph nodes and, occasionally, the central nervous system. The condition is different from common superficial dermatophyte infection and has been reported in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Patients are mostly from North African, consanguineous, multiplex families, which strongly suggests a mendelian genetic cause. METHODS We studied the clinical features of deep dermatophytosis in 17 patients with no known immunodeficiency from eight unrelated Tunisian, Algerian, and Moroccan families. Because CARD9 (caspase recruitment domain–containing protein 9) deficiency has been reported in an Iranian family with invasive fungal infections, we also sequenced CARD9 in the patients. RESULTS Four patients died, at 28, 29, 37, and 39 years of age, with clinically active deep dermatophytosis. No other severe infections, fungal or otherwise, were reported in the surviving patients, who ranged in age from 37 to 75 years. The 15 Algerian and Tunisian patients, from seven unrelated families, had a homozygous Q289X CARD9 allele, due to a founder effect. The 2 Moroccan siblings were homozygous for the R101C CARD9 allele. Both alleles are rare deleterious variants. The familial segregation of these alleles was consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance and complete clinical penetrance. CONCLUSIONS All the patients with deep dermatophytosis had autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency. Deep dermatophytosis appears to be an important clinical manifestation of CARD9 deficiency. (Funded by Agence Nationale pour la Recherche and others.) PMID:24131138

  19. Remote Recession Sensing of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Gonzales, Gregory Lewis; Ho, Thanh

    2014-01-01

    Material recession and charring are two major processes determining the performance of ablative heat shield materials. Even in ground testing, the characterization of these two mechanisms relies on measurements of material thickness before and after testing, thus providing only information integrated over the test time. For recession measurements, optical methods such as imaging the sample surface during testing are under investigation but require high alignment and instrument effort, therefore being not established as a standard measurement method. For char depth measurements, the most common method so far consists in investigation of sectioned samples after testing or in the case of Stardust where core extractions were performed to determine char information. In flight, no reliable recession measurements are available, except total recession after recovering the heat shield on ground. Developments of mechanical recession sensors have been started but require substantial on board instrumentation adding mass and complexity. In this work, preliminary experiments to evaluate the feasibility of remote sensing of material recession and possibly char depth through optically observing the emission signatures of seeding materials in the post shock plasma is investigated. It is shown that this method can provide time resolved recession measurements without the necessity of accurate alignment procedures of the optical set-up and without any instrumentation on board of a spacecraft. Furthermore, recession data can be obtained without recovering flight hardware which would be a huge benefit for inexpensive heat shield material testing on board of small re-entry probes, e.g. on new micro-satellite re-entry probes as a possible future application of Cubesats or RBR

  20. What role does structural inheritance play in controlling the geometry of rifted basins during multiple phases of extension? A case study from the Northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazli Khani, H.; Fossen, H.; Gawthorpe, R.; Faleide, J. I.; Bell, R. E.; Rotevatn, A.; Jackson, C. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    In multiphase rift systems pre-existing crustal structures, which typically lie within crystalline basement, may influence the nucleation, growth and linkage of overlying normal faults. However, our understanding of the physical and kinematic linkage between basement and cover structures is limited, since deep structures are commonly poorly imaged in seismic reflection data. The North Sea Rift is an ideal natural laboratory to study the role of structural inheritance on the geometry of rifts, having undergone multiple phases of contractional (Ordovician-Devonian) and extensional (Devonian, Permian-Triassic and Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) deformation. In this study we constrain the influence of pre-existing crustal structures on the evolution of Permian-Triassic and Middle Jurassic-to-Early Cretaceous normal fault systems. To achieve this we utilize 2D and 3D seismic reflection and borehole data from the Northern North Sea, covering the eastern margin of North Viking Graben. We show that pre-existing basement structures control the first-order rift geometry, including the location and the strike of the main Permian-Triassic bounding faults and intrabasement highs. In detail, however, the link is more complex, with some Permian-Triassic rift-related normal faults seemingly unrelated in terms of location or strike to intrabasement structures. Similar complexity is observed between Permian-Triassic and Middle Jurassic-to-Early Cretaceous rift related faults. We show that the importance of pre-existing structures on rift geometry decreases over time, with these structures having a major influence on the geometry of Permian-Triassic rift basin, but a more subdued influence on the Middle Jurassic-to-Early Cretaceous rift.

  1. Inheritance of Jurassic rifted margin architecture into the Apennines Neogene mountain building: a case history from the Lucretili Mts. (Latium, Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollati, Andrea; Corrado, Sveva; Marino, Maurizio

    2012-06-01

    The western Lucretili Mts. in the central Apennines (Latium, Italy) have been recently re-mapped in great detail and are the subject of combined stratigraphic, sedimentological and structural investigations. In this paper, we present a new stratigraphic interpretation of the Jurassic paleogeography of western Lucretili Mts., where a rift-derived intrabasinal paleo-high of the Alpine Tethys has been identified for the first time by means of facies analysis and biostratigraphic dating. Recognised facies associations, combined with dated stratigraphic sections, allow to define the morphology of the structural paleo-high and to identify the associated gravity-driven deposits (olistoliths) accumulated in the surrounding basin. Furthermore, we investigated the modes of interaction between Jurassic extensional structures and the subsequent contractional patterns developed during the Tertiary mountain building. In detail, the role played during Apennines tectonics by the paleo-escarpments bounding the paleo-high and by the surrounding olistoliths has been analysed. The paleo-escarpments either acted as focussing features for ENE-directed frontal thrust ramp localisation and were offset with small shortening amounts or reactivated as NNE striking high angle transpressional faults or preserved the original geometries as a result of variable orientation of paleo-escarpments with respect to the Neogene compressive stress field (with ENE oriented sigma1). Newly formed ENE striking tear faults connect these either inherited or neo-formed discontinuities. This complex stratigraphic and structural pattern is substantially different from the previous interpretations of this portion of the central Apennines based on a hypothesised layer-cake stratigraphy deformed by neo-formed Neogene thrusts. This contribution strengthens the importance of integrating facies analyses and structural investigations to detect the influence of pre-orogenic structures on compressive structural patterns

  2. Inherited CARD9 Deficiency in 2 Unrelated Patients With Invasive Exophiala Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Barbati, Elisa; Meinzer, Ulrich; Liu, Luyan; Pedergnana, Vincent; Migaud, Mélanie; Héritier, Sébastien; Chomton, Maryline; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Galeotti, Caroline; Romana, Serge; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Angoulvant, Adela; Bidault, Valeska; Canioni, Danielle; Lachenaud, Julie; Mansouri, Davood; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Adimi, Parvaneh; Mansouri, Nahal; Jamshidi, Mahin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Abel, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Blanche, Stéphane; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background. Exophiala species are mostly responsible for skin infections. Invasive Exophiala dermatitidis disease is a rare and frequently fatal infection, with 42 cases reported. About half of these cases had no known risk factors. Similarly, invasive Exophiala spinifera disease is extremely rare, with only 3 cases reported, all in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency has recently been reported in otherwise healthy patients with severe fungal diseases caused by Candida species, dermatophytes, or Phialophora verrucosa. Methods. We investigated an 8-year-old girl from a nonconsanguineous Angolan kindred, who was born in France and developed disseminated E. dermatitidis disease and a 26 year-old woman from an Iranian consaguineous kindred, who was living in Iran and developed disseminated E. spinifera disease. Both patients were otherwise healthy. Results. We sequenced CARD9 and found both patients to be homozygous for loss-of-function mutations (R18W and E323del). The first patient had segmental uniparental disomy of chromosome 9, carrying 2 copies of the maternal CARD9 mutated allele. Conclusions. These are the first 2 patients with inherited CARD9 deficiency and invasive Exophiala disease to be described. CARD9 deficiency should thus be considered in patients with unexplained invasive Exophiala species disease, even in the absence of other infections. PMID:25057046

  3. A bird's eye view of a deleterious recessive allele.

    PubMed

    Ekblom, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In the endangered Scottish chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) population, a lethal blindness syndrome is found to be caused by a deleterious recessive allele. Photo: Gordon Yates. In Focus: Trask, A.E., Bignal, E.M., McCracken, D.I., Monaghan, P., Piertney, S.B. & Reid, J.M. (2016) Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern. Journal of Animal Ecology, 85, 879-891. In this issue of Journal of Animal Ecology, Trask et al. () report on a strange, lethal, blindness that regularly affects chicks of an endangered bird population. The authors show that the inheritance mode of this blindness disease precisely matches the expectations of a recessive deleterious mutation. Intriguingly, there is also an indication that the disease-causing variant might be maintained in the population by balancing selection, due to a selective advantage for heterozygotes. Could this finding have consequences for conservation actions implemented for the population? PMID:27279331

  4. Fine genetic mapping of Cp, a recessive gene for compact (dwarf) plant architecture in cucumber, cucumis sativus L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The compact or dwarf plant architecture is an important trait in cucumber breeding. Compact cucumber has the potential to be used in once-over mechanical harvest of pickling cucumber production. Compact growth habit is controlled by a simply inherited recessive gene. To facilitate markers assisted s...

  5. Autosomal recessive primary microcephalies (MCPH).

    PubMed

    Kaindl, Angela M

    2014-07-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by a pronounced reduction in volume of otherwise architectonical normal brains and intellectual deficit. Here, we summarize the genetic causes of MCPH types 1-12 known to date. PMID:24780602

  6. Algebra, Home Mortgages, and Recessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariner, Jean A. Miller; Miller, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    The current financial crisis and recession in the United States present an opportunity to discuss relevant applications of some topics in typical first-and second-year algebra and precalculus courses. Real-world applications of percent change, exponential functions, and sums of finite geometric sequences can help students understand the problems…

  7. Firms Still Training Despite Recession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felstead, Alan; Green, Francis; Jewson, Nick

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that company training is one of the first casualties in times of recession. Falling recruitment, pressures to cut costs and a focus on short-term survival force businesses to put training on the backburner. Expecting the worst, the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), the Confederation of British Industry (CBI)…

  8. A recessive mutation in the APP gene with dominant-negative effect on amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Morbin, Michela; Rossi, Giacomina; Suardi, Silvia; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Merlin, Marco; Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Prioni, Sara; Erbetta, Alessandra; Falcone, Chiara; Gobbi, Marco; Colombo, Laura; Bastone, Antonio; Beeg, Marten; Manzoni, Claudia; Francescucci, Bruna; Spagnoli, Alberto; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena; Levy, Efrat; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2009-03-13

    beta-Amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations cause familial Alzheimer's disease with nearly complete penetrance. We found an APP mutation [alanine-673-->valine-673 (A673V)] that causes disease only in the homozygous state, whereas heterozygous carriers were unaffected, consistent with a recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance. The A673V mutation affected APP processing, resulting in enhanced beta-amyloid (Abeta) production and formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro. Co-incubation of mutated and wild-type peptides conferred instability on Abeta aggregates and inhibited amyloidogenesis and neurotoxicity. The highly amyloidogenic effect of the A673V mutation in the homozygous state and its anti-amyloidogenic effect in the heterozygous state account for the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and have implications for genetic screening and the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19286555

  9. A Recessive Mutation in the APP Gene with Dominant-Negative Effect on Amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Morbin, Michela; Rossi, Giacomina; Suardi, Silvia; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Merlin, Marco; Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Prioni, Sara; Erbetta, Alessandra; Falcone, Chiara; Gobbi, Marco; Colombo, Laura; Bastone, Antonio; Beeg, Marten; Manzoni, Claudia; Francescucci, Bruna; Spagnoli, Alberto; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena; Levy, Efrat; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    β-Amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations cause familial Alzheimer’s disease with nearly complete penetrance. We found an APP mutation [alanine-673→valine-673 (A673V)] that causes disease only in the homozygous state, whereas heterozygous carriers were unaffected, consistent with a recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance. The A673V mutation affected APP processing, resulting in enhanced β-amyloid (Aβ) production and formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro. Co-incubation of mutated and wild-type peptides conferred instability on Aβ aggregates and inhibited amyloidogenesis and neurotoxicity. The highly amyloidogenic effect of the A673V mutation in the homozygous state and its anti-amyloidogenic effect in the heterozygous state account for the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and have implications for genetic screening and the potential treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19286555

  10. The efficacy of microarray screening for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    van Huet, Ramon A. C.; Pierrache, Laurence H.M.; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; de Wijs, Ilse J.; Collin, Rob W. J.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of multiple versions of a commercially available arrayed primer extension (APEX) microarray chip for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). Methods We included 250 probands suspected of arRP who were genetically analyzed with the APEX microarray between January 2008 and November 2013. The mode of inheritance had to be autosomal recessive according to the pedigree (including isolated cases). If the microarray identified a heterozygous mutation, we performed Sanger sequencing of exons and exon–intron boundaries of that specific gene. The efficacy of this microarray chip with the additional Sanger sequencing approach was determined by the percentage of patients that received a molecular diagnosis. We also collected data from genetic tests other than the APEX analysis for arRP to provide a detailed description of the molecular diagnoses in our study cohort. Results The APEX microarray chip for arRP identified the molecular diagnosis in 21 (8.5%) of the patients in our cohort. Additional Sanger sequencing yielded a second mutation in 17 patients (6.8%), thereby establishing the molecular diagnosis. In total, 38 patients (15.2%) received a molecular diagnosis after analysis using the microarray and additional Sanger sequencing approach. Further genetic analyses after a negative result of the arRP microarray (n = 107) resulted in a molecular diagnosis of arRP (n = 23), autosomal dominant RP (n = 5), X-linked RP (n = 2), and choroideremia (n = 1). Conclusions The efficacy of the commercially available APEX microarray chips for arRP appears to be low, most likely caused by the limitations of this technique and the genetic and allelic heterogeneity of RP. Diagnostic yields up to 40% have been reported for next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques that, as expected, thereby outperform targeted APEX analysis. PMID:25999674

  11. Obstruction of adaptation in diploids by recessive, strongly deleterious alleles

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, Zoe June; Petrov, Dmitri A.; Blundell, Jamie R.

    2015-01-01

    Recessive deleterious mutations are common, causing many genetic disorders in humans and producing inbreeding depression in the majority of sexually reproducing diploids. The abundance of recessive deleterious mutations in natural populations suggests they are likely to be present on a chromosome when a new adaptive mutation occurs, yet the dynamics of recessive deleterious hitchhikers and their impact on adaptation remains poorly understood. Here we model how a recessive deleterious mutation impacts the fate of a genetically linked dominant beneficial mutation. The frequency trajectory of the adaptive mutation in this case is dramatically altered and results in what we have termed a “staggered sweep.” It is named for its three-phased trajectory: (i) Initially, the two linked mutations have a selective advantage while rare and will increase in frequency together, then (ii), at higher frequencies, the recessive hitchhiker is exposed to selection and can cause a balanced state via heterozygote advantage (the staggered phase), and (iii) finally, if recombination unlinks the two mutations, then the beneficial mutation can complete the sweep to fixation. Using both analytics and simulations, we show that strongly deleterious recessive mutations can substantially decrease the probability of fixation for nearby beneficial mutations, thus creating zones in the genome where adaptation is suppressed. These mutations can also significantly prolong the number of generations a beneficial mutation takes to sweep to fixation, and cause the genomic signature of selection to resemble that of soft or partial sweeps. We show that recessive deleterious variation could impact adaptation in humans and Drosophila. PMID:25941393

  12. Improving the management of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies by targeted sequencing of a population-specific gene panel

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Gil, Nereida; Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; Romero-Pérez, Laura; González-del Pozo, María; Rodríguez-de la Rúa, Enrique; Dopazo, Joaquín; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has overcome important limitations to the molecular diagnosis of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies (IRD) such as the high clinical and genetic heterogeneity and the overlapping phenotypes. The purpose of this study was the identification of the genetic defect in 32 Spanish families with different forms of IRD. With that aim, we implemented a custom NGS panel comprising 64 IRD-associated genes in our population, and three disease-associated intronic regions. A total of 37 pathogenic mutations (14 novels) were found in 73% of IRD patients ranging from 50% for autosomal dominant cases, 75% for syndromic cases, 83% for autosomal recessive cases, and 100% for X-linked cases. Additionally, unexpected phenotype-genotype correlations were found in 6 probands, which led to the refinement of their clinical diagnoses. Furthermore, intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability was observed in two cases. Moreover, two cases unsuccessfully analysed by exome sequencing were resolved by applying this panel. Our results demonstrate that this hypothesis-free approach based on frequently mutated, population-specific loci is highly cost-efficient for the routine diagnosis of this heterogeneous condition and allows the unbiased analysis of a miscellaneous cohort. The molecular information found here has aid clinical diagnosis and has improved genetic counselling and patient management. PMID:27032803

  13. Improving the management of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies by targeted sequencing of a population-specific gene panel.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Gil, Nereida; Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; Romero-Pérez, Laura; González-del Pozo, María; Rodríguez-de la Rúa, Enrique; Dopazo, Joaquín; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has overcome important limitations to the molecular diagnosis of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies (IRD) such as the high clinical and genetic heterogeneity and the overlapping phenotypes. The purpose of this study was the identification of the genetic defect in 32 Spanish families with different forms of IRD. With that aim, we implemented a custom NGS panel comprising 64 IRD-associated genes in our population, and three disease-associated intronic regions. A total of 37 pathogenic mutations (14 novels) were found in 73% of IRD patients ranging from 50% for autosomal dominant cases, 75% for syndromic cases, 83% for autosomal recessive cases, and 100% for X-linked cases. Additionally, unexpected phenotype-genotype correlations were found in 6 probands, which led to the refinement of their clinical diagnoses. Furthermore, intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability was observed in two cases. Moreover, two cases unsuccessfully analysed by exome sequencing were resolved by applying this panel. Our results demonstrate that this hypothesis-free approach based on frequently mutated, population-specific loci is highly cost-efficient for the routine diagnosis of this heterogeneous condition and allows the unbiased analysis of a miscellaneous cohort. The molecular information found here has aid clinical diagnosis and has improved genetic counselling and patient management. PMID:27032803

  14. Compositional Inheritance: Comparison of Self-assembly and Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng; Higgs, Paul G.

    2008-10-01

    Genetic inheritance in modern cells is due to template-directed replication of nucleic acids. However, the difficulty of prebiotic synthesis of long information-carrying polymers like RNA raises the question of whether some other form of heredity is possible without polymers. As an alternative, the lipid world theory has been proposed, which considers non-covalent assemblies of lipids, such as micelles and vesicles. Assemblies store information in the form of a non-random molecular composition, and this information is passed on when the assemblies divide, i.e . the assemblies show compositional inheritance. Here, we vary several important assumptions of previous lipid world models and show that compositional inheritance is relevant more generally than the context in which it was originally proposed. Our models assume that interaction occurs between nearest neighbour molecules only, and account for spatial segregation of molecules of different types within the assembly. We also draw a distinction between a self-assembly model, in which the composition is determined by mutually favourable interaction energies between the molecules, and a catalytic model, in which the composition is determined by mutually favourable catalysis. We show that compositional inheritance occurs in both models, although the self-assembly case seems more relevant if the molecules are simple lipids. In the case where the assemblies are composed of just two types of molecules, there is a strong analogy with the classic two-allele Moran model from population genetics. This highlights the parallel between compositional inheritance and genetic inheritance.

  15. A novel homozygous mutation in HSF4 causing autosomal recessive congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Behnam, Mahdiyeh; Imagawa, Eri; Chaleshtori, Ahmad Reza Salehi; Ronasian, Firooze; Salehi, Mansoor; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-02-01

    Cataract is defined as opacity in the crystalline lens and congenital cataract occurs during the first year of life. Until now, mutations of more than 50 genes in congenital cataract have been reported with various modes of inheritance. Among them, HSF4 mutations have been reported in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and age-related forms of cataract. The inheritance patterns of these mutations depend on their mutational positions in HSF4: autosomal dominant or recessive mutations are respectively found either in a DNA-binding domain or in (or downstream of) hydrophobic repeats. Here we report a novel homozygous HSF4 mutation (c.521T>C, p.Leu174Pro) in two affected sibs of an Iranian consanguineous family using whole exome sequencing. The mutation is predicted as highly pathogenic by in silico analysis (SIFT, Polyphen2 and MutationTaster) and is not found in any of control databases. This mutation is located in a hydrophobic repeat of the HSF4 protein, which is consistent with the mode of inheritance as an autosomal recessive trait. PMID:26490182

  16. [Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes comprise a series of disorders caused by various gene mutations. Genetic tests were formerly difficult to perform because of the large size and number of causative genes. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing has enabled simultaneous testing of all causative genes to be performed at an acceptable cost. We collaboratively conducted a series of whole-exome sequencing studies of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes and discovered RPS27/RPL27 and FANCT as causative genes of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Fanconi anemia, respectively. Furthermore, we established a target gene sequencing system to cover 189 genes associated with pediatric blood diseases to assist genetic diagnoses in clinical practice. In this review, discovery of new causative genes and possible roles of next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are discussed. PMID:26935625

  17. Inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liatsikos, Spyros A.; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Manav, Bachar; Csorba, Roland; von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich; Galazios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its established role in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), inherited thrombophilia has been proposed as a possible cause of pregnancy loss and vascular gestational complications. There is a lot of controversy in the literature on the relationship between inherited prothrombotic defects and these obstetric complications. This is a review of the literature on inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and protein S deficiency seem to be associated with late and recurrent early pregnancy loss, while their impact on other pregnancy complications is conflicting. No definite association has been established between protein C and antithrombin deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcome, primarily due to their low prevalence. Screening is suggested only for women with early recurrent loss or late pregnancy loss. Anticoagulant treatment during pregnancy should be considered for women with complications who were tested positive for thrombophilia. PMID:27026779

  18. Inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Liatsikos, Spyros A; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Manav, Bachar; Csorba, Roland; von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich; Galazios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its established role in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), inherited thrombophilia has been proposed as a possible cause of pregnancy loss and vascular gestational complications. There is a lot of controversy in the literature on the relationship between inherited prothrombotic defects and these obstetric complications. This is a review of the literature on inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and protein S deficiency seem to be associated with late and recurrent early pregnancy loss, while their impact on other pregnancy complications is conflicting. No definite association has been established between protein C and antithrombin deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcome, primarily due to their low prevalence. Screening is suggested only for women with early recurrent loss or late pregnancy loss. Anticoagulant treatment during pregnancy should be considered for women with complications who were tested positive for thrombophilia. PMID:27026779

  19. Nongenetic inheritance and transgenerational epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The idea that inherited genotypes define phenotypes has been paramount in modern biology. The question remains, however, whether stable phenotypes could be also inherited from parents independently of the genetic sequence per se. Recent data suggest that parental experiences can be transmitted behaviorally, through in utero exposure of the developing fetus to the maternal environment, or through either the male or female germline. The challenge is to delineate a plausible mechanism. In the past decade it has been proposed that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in multigenerational transmission of phenotypes and transgenerational inheritance. The prospect that ancestral experiences are written in our epigenome has immense implications for our understanding of human behavior, health, and disease. PMID:25601643

  20. Surgical correction of gingival recessions associated with radicular carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Urbani, G; Lombardo, G; Castellarin, M; Santi, E; Abitbol, T

    1996-04-01

    In this clinical report, six cases are presented in which radicular carious lesions and gingival recessions were treated concurrently. The combined treatment included the removal of caries, radicular planing, and various surgical techniques for root coverage. Traditional procedures, as well as newer procedures, such as guided tissue regeneration, showed successful results. PMID:9051969

  1. Inherited peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, J; Codron, P; Funalot, B

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are frequently responsible for neuropathies with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PNP) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. The last years have seen a growing list of evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics might be dysfunctional in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), and these mechanisms might present a common link between dissimilar CMT2-causing genes. PMID:24768438

  2. Basic mechanisms of monogenic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, A

    1999-01-01

    To revive the appreciation of the importance of genetic studies for the understanding of neurologic diseases inherited in a monogenic fashion. After a description of the basic patterns of monogenic inheritance, the importance of linkage studies for the mapping of a disease gene is mentioned. Furthermore, the term linkage disequilibrium is introduced. Finally, several procedures used in current linkage analyses are briefly mentioned, with the aim of identifying the disease gene. The importance of genetic studies of disease families with many members, preferably from isolated surroundings to favor homogeneity, is stressed. However, such analyses can be performed only as a consequence of a close cooperation between clinicians and research scientists. PMID:10446743

  3. Geomorphological origin of recession curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Basudev; Marani, Marco

    2010-12-01

    We identify a previously undetected link between the river network morphology and key recession curves properties through a conceptual-physical model of the drainage process of the riparian unconfined aquifer. We show that the power-law exponent, α, of -dQ/dt vs. Q curves is related to the power-law exponent of N(l) vs. G(l) curves (which we show to be connected to Hack's law), where l is the downstream distance from the channel heads, N(l) is the number of channel reaches exactly located at a distance l from their channel head, and G(l) is the total length of the network located at a distance greater or equal to l from channel heads. Using Digital Terrain Models and daily discharge observations from 67 US basins we find that geomorphologic α estimates match well the values obtained from recession curves analyses. Finally, we argue that the link between recession flows and network morphology points to an important role of low-flow discharges in shaping the channel network.

  4. Inferior oblique recession in thyroid-related orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Salchow, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid-related orbitopathy is a form of orbital inflammation associated with thyroid dysfunction, developing in many patients with Graves disease. Fibrosis of the inferior rectus muscle can lead to restricted elevation and vertical ocular misalignment, which may be improved by recessing this muscle. In some patients, vertical misalignment persists after surgical weakening of one or more vertical rectus muscles. In this case series, unilateral inferior oblique recession as a secondary procedure after inferior rectus recession reduced hypertropia in primary gaze from 9(Δ) ± 3(Δ) to 1.3(Δ) ± 1.5(Δ) (mean ± standard deviation) and largest hypertropia in side gaze from 18.3 ± 2.1(Δ) to 3.3(Δ) ± 1.5(Δ). Postoperatively, all 3 patients were diplopia free in primary and downgaze. PMID:26059675

  5. Comparison of the clinical applicability of Miller's classification system to Kumar and Masamatti's classification system of gingival recession

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Geeti; Puri, Komal; Bansal, Mansi; Jain, Deept; Khatri, Manish; Masamatti, Sujata Surendra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aims of the present study were to (i) Find the percentage of recession cases that could be classified by application of Miller's and/or Kumar and Masamatti's classification of gingival recession, and (ii) compare the percentage of clinical applicability of Miller's criteria and Kumar and Masamatti's criteria to the total recessions present. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 patients (1089 recession cases) were included in the study wherein they were classified using both Miller's and Kumar and Masamatti's classification systems of gingival recession. Percentage comparison of the application of both classification systems was done. Results: Data analysis showed that though all the cases of the recession were classified by Kumar and Masamatti's classification, only 34.61% cases were classified by Miller's classification. 19.10% cases were completely (having only labial/buccal recession) classified. In 15.51% (out of 34.61%) cases, only buccal recession was classified according to Miller's criteria and included in this category, although these cases had both buccal and lingual/palatal recessions. Furthermore, 29.75% cases of recession with interdental loss and marginal tissue loss coronal to mucogingival junction (MGJ) remained uncategorized by Miller's classification; categorization of palatal/lingual recession was possible with Kumar and Masamatti's classification. Conclusion: The elaborative evaluation of both buccal and palatal/lingual recession by the Kumar and Masamatti's classification system can be used to overcome the limitations of Miller's classification system, especially the cases with interdental loss and having marginal tissue loss coronal to MGJ. PMID:26644724

  6. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness genes: a review

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Duygu; Tekin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    More than 50 percent of prelingual hearing loss is genetic in origin, and of these up to 93 percent are monogenic autosomal recessive traits. Some forms of genetic deafness can be recognized by their associated syndromic features, but in most cases, hearing loss is the only finding and is referred to as nonsyndromic deafness. To date, more than 700 different mutations have been identified in one of 42 genes in individuals with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). Reported mutations in GJB2, encoding connexin 26, makes this gene the most common cause of hearing loss in many populations. Other relatively common deafness genes include SLC26A4, MYO15A, OTOF, TMC1, CDH23, and TMPRSS3. In this report we summarize genes and mutations reported in families with ARNSHL. Founder effects were demonstrated for some recurrent mutations but the most significant findings are the extreme locus and allelic heterogeneity and different spectrum of genes and mutations in each population. PMID:22652773

  7. Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: a dominantly inherited isolated defect.

    PubMed

    Braddock, S R; Jones, K L; Bird, L M; Villegas, I; Jones, M C

    1995-02-13

    We present a sporadic case of nonsyndromal anterior cervical hypertrichosis and review the literature. Based on prior documentation of dominant inheritance it is suggested that this case may be the result of a fresh mutation associated with older paternal age. PMID:7762594

  8. Congenital keratoconjunctivitis sicca and ichthyosiform dermatosis in 25 Cavalier King Charles spaniel dogs. Part I: clinical signs, histopathology, and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Claudia; Donaldson, David; Smith, Ken C; Henley, William; Lewis, Tom W; Blott, Sarah; Mellersh, Cathryn; Barnett, Keith C

    2012-09-01

    The clinical presentation and progression (over 9 months to 13 years) of congenital keratoconjunctivitis sicca and ichthyosiform dermatosis (CKCSID) in the Cavalier King Charles spaniel dog are described for six new cases and six previously described cases. Cases presented with a congenitally abnormal (rough/curly) coat and signs of KCS from eyelid opening. Persistent scale along the dorsal spine and flanks with a harsh frizzy and alopecic coat was evident in the first few months of life. Ventral abdominal skin was hyperpigmented and hyperkeratinized in adulthood. Footpads were hyperkeratinized from young adulthood with nail growth abnormalities and intermittent sloughing. Long-term follow-up of cases (13/25) is described. Immunomodulatory/lacrimostimulant treatment had no statistically significant effect on Schirmer tear test results, although subjectively, this treatment reduced progression of the keratitis. Histopathological analysis of samples (skin/footpads/lacrimal glands/salivary glands) for three new cases was consistent with an ichthyosiform dermatosis, with no pathology of the salivary or lacrimal glands identified histologically. Pedigree analysis suggests the syndrome is inherited by an autosomal recessive mode. PMID:22212237

  9. A heterozygous 21-bp deletion in CAPN3 causes dominantly inherited limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Vissing, John; Barresi, Rita; Witting, Nanna; Van Ghelue, Marijke; Gammelgaard, Lise; Bindoff, Laurence A; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hudson, Judith; Wahl, Christoph M; Arnardottir, Snjolaug; Dahlbom, Kathe; Jonsrud, Christoffer; Duno, Morten

    2016-08-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A is the most common limb girdle muscular dystrophy form worldwide. Although strict recessive inheritance is assumed, patients carrying a single mutation in the calpain 3 gene (CAPN3) are reported. Such findings are commonly attributed to incomplete mutation screening. In this investigation, we report 37 individuals (age range: 21-85 years, 21 females and 16 males) from 10 families in whom only one mutation in CAPN3 could be identified; a 21-bp, in-frame deletion (c.643_663del21). This mutation co-segregated with evidence of muscle disease and autosomal dominant transmission in several generations. Evidence of muscle disease was indicated by muscle pain, muscle weakness and wasting, significant fat replacement of muscles on imaging, myopathic changes on muscle biopsy and loss of calpain 3 protein on western blotting. Thirty-one of 34 patients had elevated creatine kinase or myoglobin. Muscle weakness was generally milder than observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but affected the same muscle groups (proximal leg, lumbar paraspinal and medial gastrocnemius muscles). In some cases, the weakness was severely disabling. The 21-bp deletion did not affect mRNA maturation. Calpain 3 expression in muscle, assessed by western blot, was below 15% of normal levels in the nine mutation carriers in whom this could be tested. Haplotype analysis in four families from three different countries suggests that the 21-bp deletion is a founder mutation. This study provides strong evidence that heterozygosity for the c.643_663del21 deletion in CAPN3 results in a dominantly inherited muscle disease. The normal expression of mutated mRNA and the severe loss of calpain 3 on western blotting, suggest a dominant negative effect with a loss-of-function mechanism affecting the calpain 3 homodimer. This renders patients deficient in calpain 3 as in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, albeit in a milder form in most cases. Based on findings

  10. Germline recessive mutations in PI4KA are associated with perisylvian polymicrogyria, cerebellar hypoplasia and arthrogryposis

    PubMed Central

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Howard, Malcolm F.; Wisniewski, Eva; Popitsch, Niko; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Keays, David A.; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Cox, Helen; Cox, Phillip; Balla, Tamas; Taylor, Jenny C.; Kini, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG) is a structural brain abnormality involving the cerebral cortex that results from impaired neuronal migration and although several genes have been implicated, many cases remain unsolved. In this study, exome sequencing in a family where three fetuses had all been diagnosed with PMG and cerebellar hypoplasia allowed us to identify regions of the genome for which both chromosomes were shared identical-by-descent, reducing the search space for causative variants to 8.6% of the genome. In these regions, the only plausibly pathogenic mutations were compound heterozygous variants in PI4KA, which Sanger sequencing confirmed segregated consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. The paternally transmitted variant predicted a premature stop mutation (c.2386C>T; p.R796X), whereas the maternally transmitted variant predicted a missense substitution (c.5560G>A; p.D1854N) at a conserved residue within the catalytic domain. Functional studies using expressed wild-type or mutant PI4KA enzyme confirmed the importance of p.D1854 for kinase activity. Our results emphasize the importance of phosphoinositide signalling in early brain development. PMID:25855803

  11. Panel-based NGS Reveals Novel Pathogenic Mutations in Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Carro, Raquel; Corton, Marta; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Zurita, Olga; Sanchez-Bolivar, Noelia; Sánchez-Alcudia, Rocío; Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Aller, Elena; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel Angel; López-Molina, Mª Isabel; Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Gilissen, Christian; Millan, Jose M; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Ayuso, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited progressive retinal dystrophies (RD) characterized by photoreceptor degeneration. RP is highly heterogeneous both clinically and genetically, which complicates the identification of causative genes and mutations. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been demonstrated to be an effective strategy for the detection of mutations in RP. In our study, an in-house gene panel comprising 75 known RP genes was used to analyze a cohort of 47 unrelated Spanish families pre-classified as autosomal recessive or isolated RP. Disease-causing mutations were found in 27 out of 47 cases achieving a mutation detection rate of 57.4%. In total, 33 pathogenic mutations were identified, 20 of which were novel mutations (60.6%). Furthermore, not only single nucleotide variations but also copy-number variations, including three large deletions in the USH2A and EYS genes, were identified. Finally seven out of 27 families, displaying mutations in the ABCA4, RP1, RP2 and USH2A genes, could be genetically or clinically reclassified. These results demonstrate the potential of our panel-based NGS strategy in RP diagnosis. PMID:26806561

  12. Transgenerational Inheritance of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stegemann, Rachel; Buchner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disease encompasses several disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Recently, the incidence of metabolic disease has drastically increased, driven primarily by a worldwide obesity epidemic. Transgenerational inheritance remains controversial, but has been proposed to contribute to human metabolic disease risk based on a growing number of proof-of-principle studies in model organisms ranging from C. elegans to M. musculus to S. scrofa. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that heritable risk is epigenetically transmitted from parent to offspring over multiple generations in the absence of a continued exposure to the triggering stimuli. A diverse assortment of initial triggers can induce transgenerational inheritance including high-fat or high-sugar diets, low-protein diets, various toxins, and ancestral genetic variants. Although the mechanistic basis underlying the transgenerational inheritance of disease risk remains largely unknown, putative molecules mediating transmission include small RNAs, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. Due to the considerable impact of metabolic disease on human health, it is critical to better understand the role of transgenerational inheritance of metabolic disease risk to open new avenues for therapeutic intervention and improve upon the current methods for clinical diagnoses and treatment. PMID:25937492

  13. Genetics of inherited cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Daniel; McKenna, William J.

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, numerous disease-causing genes for different cardiomyopathies have been identified. These discoveries have led to better understanding of disease pathogenesis and initial steps in the application of mutation analysis in the evaluation of affected individuals and their family members. As knowledge of the genetic abnormalities, and insight into cellular and organ biology has grown, so has appreciation of the level of complexity of interaction between genotype and phenotype across disease states. What were initially thought to be one-to-one gene-disease correlates have turned out to display important relational plasticity dependent in large part on the genetic and environmental backgrounds into which the genes of interest express. The current state of knowledge with regard to genetics of cardiomyopathy represents a starting point to address the biology of disease, but is not yet developed sufficiently to supplant clinically based classification systems or, in most cases, to guide therapy to any significant extent. Future work will of necessity be directed towards elucidation of the biological mechanisms of both rare and common gene variants and environmental determinants of plasticity in the genotype–phenotype relationship with the ultimate goal of furthering our ability to identify, diagnose, risk stratify, and treat this group of disorders which cause heart failure and sudden death in the young. PMID:21810862

  14. The Challenge of Prenatal Diagnostic Work-Up of Maternally Inherited X-Linked Opitz G/BBB: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Marialuigia; Sica, Carmine; Novelli, Antonio; Di Meglio, Letizia; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Background. Prenatal diagnosis of Optiz G/BBB syndrome (OS) is challenging because the characteristic clinical features, such as facial and genitourinary anomalies, may be subtle at sonography and rather unspecific. Furthermore, molecular testing of the disease gene is not routinely performed, unless a specific diagnosis is suggested. Method. Both familial and ultrasound data were used to achieve the diagnosis of X-linked OS (XLOS), which was confirmed by molecular testing of MID1 gene (Xp22.3) at birth. Results. Sequencing of MID1 gene disclosed the nucleotide change c.1285 +1 G>T, previously associated with XLOS. Conclusions. This case illustrates current challenges of the prenatal diagnostic work-up of XLOS and exemplifies how clinical investigation, including family history, and accurate US foetal investigations can lead to the correct diagnosis. PMID:26064728

  15. The first familial case of inherited 2q37.3 interstitial deletion with isolated skeletal abnormalities including brachydactyly type E and short stature.

    PubMed

    Jean-Marçais, Nolwenn; Decamp, Matthieu; Gérard, Marion; Ribault, Virginie; Andrieux, Joris; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Plessis, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO)-like syndrome is also known as brachydactyly-mental retardation syndrome (BDMR; OMIM 60040). This disorder includes intellectual disability in all patients, skeletal abnormalities, including brachydactyly E (BDE) in approximately half, obesity, and facial dysmorphism. Patients with 2q37 microdeletion or HDAC4 mutation are defined as having an AHO-like phenotype with normal stimulatory G (Gs) function. HDAC4 is involved in neurological, cardiac, and skeletal function. This paper reports the first familial case of 2q37.3 interstitial deletion affecting two genes, HDAC4 and TWIST2. Patients presented with BDE and short stature without intellectual disability, showing that haploinsufficiency of the HDAC4 critical region may lead to a spectrum of phenotypes, ranging from isolated brachydactyly type E to BDMR. PMID:25402011

  16. Vanishing lung syndrome in one family: five cases with a 20-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xichun; Wang, Haiying; Gou, Kaihong; Huang, Baosheng; Xia, Dongzhou; Wu, Xiuli; Wei, Ming; Zheng, Shengxi; Ma, Shan; He, Juanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Vanishing lung syndrome, also known as idiopathic giant bullous emphysema, is a rare disease characterized by giant emphysematous bullae. The disease is diagnosed by radiological findings of giant bullae in one, or both, of the upper lobes of the lung, occupying at least one-third of the hemithorax. There have been several reports of vanishing lung syndrome, however it remains to be determined whether genetic inheritance is associated with the disease. In the present study, five patients within one family, with vanishing lung syndrome, were reported during a follow-up period of ~ 20 years. All of the patients were diagnosed by radiological findings, which showed diffuse bullae in the lungs, which were of varying size and asymmetrical distribution, and the occurrence of pneumothorax or emphysema. The Medical Ethics Committee of the People's Hospital of Zhangye Municipality (Zhangye, China) approved this study, and all subjects gave their informed consent During the follow-up period of 20 years, bullae in these patients were shown to progressively increase, and no other pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, tuberculosis, pneumoconiosis and chronic bronchitis were observed. Autosomal dominant inheritance was observed in five cases, and autosomal recessive inheritance was observed in one case. The present study suggests that vanishing lung syndrome may be associated with autosomal dominant and recessive genetic inheritance. PMID:25322795

  17. Clinical and pathological features of an autosomal recessive neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, T W; Riley, E; Hall, C D; Swift, M

    1980-06-01

    Two siblings are described, ages 49 and 45 years, having a distinct hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) with severe peroneal nerve involvement. The neuropathic symptoms began in childhood. Both patients have sensorineural deafness. The proband was found to have a cardiac conduction abnormality in the absence of known ischemic heart disease. Electrodiagnostic studies were consistent with a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The presence of parental consanguinity and absence of affected individuals in succeeding or preceding generations suggested that the sensorimotor neuropathy in this family is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The sural nerve of the proband had significant loss of myelinated fibers and demyelination but few regenerating myelinated fibers and no onion-bulbs. The pathological findings, while nonspecific, are not characteristic of the hypertrophic, neuronal or intermediate types of HMSN. PMID:6247456

  18. A study of the inheritance of a bleeding disorder in Simmental cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Mapletoft, R J; Schmutz, S M; Searcy, G P

    2000-01-01

    A study was designed to determine the inheritance pattern of a blood platelet aggregation disorder in Simmental cattle utilizing embryo transfer technology. A Simmental donor cow that had previously produced a calf with the platelet aggregation disorder was superovulated and mated to a bull that had also produced affected offspring. Twenty-seven calves were produced from the 63 (42.9%) embryos transferred. This somewhat lower than expected pregnancy rate is suggestive of an increased rate of embryo loss. Twenty-three of 25 (92%) calves had normal platelet aggregation patterns and 2 failed to show any evidence of platelet aggregation. Data are suggestive that inheritance is not simple Mendelian recessive. A more likely scenario is that the defect is the result of the inheritance of at least 2 genes, which is also consistent with the sporadic incidence reported in the population at large. PMID:11062837

  19. Using lod-score differences to determine mode of inheritance: A simple, robust method even in the presence of heterogeneity and reduced penetrance

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, D.A.; Berger, B.

    1994-10-01

    Determining the mode of inheritance is often difficult under the best of circumstances, but when segregation analysis is used, the problems of ambiguous ascertainment procedures, reduced penetrance, heterogeneity, and misdiagnosis make mode-of-inheritance determinations even more unreliable. The mode of inheritance can also be determined using a linkage-based method and association-based methods, which can overcome many of these problems. In this work, we determined how much information is necessary to reliably determine the mode of inheritance from linkage data when heterogeneity and reduced penetrance are present in the data set. We generated data sets under both dominant and recessive inheritance with reduced penetrance and with varying fractions of linked and unlinked families. We then analyzed those data sets, assuming reduced penetrance, both dominant and recessive inheritance, and no heterogeneity. We investigated the reliability of two methods for determining the mode of inheritance from the linkage data. The first method examined the difference ({Delta}) between the maximum lod scores calculated under the two mode-of-inheritance assumptions. We found that if {Delta} was >1.5, then the higher of the two maximum lod scores reflected the correct mode of inheritance with high reliability and that a {Delta} of 2.5 appeared to practically guarantee a correct mode-of-inheritance inference. Furthermore, this reliability appeared to be virtually independent of {alpha}, the fraction of linked families in the data set. The second method we tested was based on choosing the higher of the two maximum lod scores calculated under the different mode-of-inheritance assumptions. This method became unreliable as {alpha} decreased. These results suggest that the mode of inheritance can be inferred from linkage data with high reliability, even in the presence of heterogeneity and reduced penetrance. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. I-cell disease. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Y; Tsuda, K; Isomura, S; Sugiura, Y; Nogami, H

    1975-09-01

    Clinical, radiological, histochemical, ultrastructural, and biochemical studies were conducted on three cases of I-cell disease. I-cell disease can be readily distinguished from Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis I) by the presence of hypertrophic gums, vacuolated lymphocytes in peripheral blood, and a normal level of urinary mucopolysaccharides. Accumulation of proteoglycans was more prominent in the inclusion bodies of I-cell chondrocytes in comparison to cultured fibroblasts, which contained a large amount of glycolipids and a small amount of proteoglycans. An autosomal recessive mode of inheritance was suggested in two of the cases. PMID:1190182

  1. Epigenetic Inheritance in Rice Plants

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Keiko; Katakami, Hatsue; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ogawa, Emiko; Sano, Cecile M.; Wada, Yuko; Sano, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Epigenetics is defined as mechanisms that regulate gene expression without base sequence alteration. One molecular basis is considered to be DNA cytosine methylation, which reversibly modifies DNA or chromatin structures. Although its correlation with epigenetic inheritance over generations has been circumstantially shown, evidence at the gene level has been limited. The present study aims to find genes whose methylation status directly correlates with inheritance of phenotypic changes. Methods DNA methylation in vivo was artificially reduced by treating rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) seeds with 5-azadeoxycytidine, and the progeny were cultivated in the field for > 10 years. Genomic regions with changed methylation status were screened by the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphysm (MSAP) method, and cytosine methylation was directly scanned by the bisulfite mapping method. Pathogen infection with Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, race PR2 was performed by the scissors-dip method on mature leaf blades. Key Results The majority of seedlings were lethal, but some survived to maturity. One line designated as Line-2 showed a clear marker phenotype of dwarfism, which was stably inherited by the progeny over nine generations. MSAP screening identified six fragments, among which two were further characterized by DNA blot hybridization and direct methylation mapping. One clone encoding a retrotransposon gag–pol polyprotein showed a complete erasure of 5-methylcytosines in Line-2, but neither translocation nor expression of this region was detectable. The other clone encoded an Xa21-like protein, Xa21G. In wild-type plants, all cytosines were methylated within the promoter region, whereas in Line-2, corresponding methylation was completely erased throughout generations. Expression of Xa21G was not detectable in wild type but was constitutive in Line-2. When infected with X. oryzae pv. oryzae, against which Xa21 confers resistance in a gene

  2. HACE1 deficiency causes an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hollstein, Ronja; Parry, David A; Nalbach, Lisa; Logan, Clare V; Strom, Tim M; Hartill, Verity L; Carr, Ian M; Korenke, Georg C; Uppal, Sandeep; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Wieland, Thomas; Markham, Alexander F; Bennett, Christopher P; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Sheridan, Eamonn G; Kaiser, Frank J; Bonthron, David T

    2015-01-01

    Background The genetic aetiology of neurodevelopmental defects is extremely diverse, and the lack of distinctive phenotypic features means that genetic criteria are often required for accurate diagnostic classification. We aimed to identify the causative genetic lesions in two families in which eight affected individuals displayed variable learning disability, spasticity and abnormal gait. Methods Autosomal recessive inheritance was suggested by consanguinity in one family and by sibling recurrences with normal parents in the second. Autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, respectively, were used to identify the causative gene. Results In both families, biallelic loss-of-function mutations in HACE1 were identified. HACE1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates the activity of cellular GTPases, including Rac1 and members of the Rab family. In the consanguineous family, a homozygous mutation p.R219* predicted a truncated protein entirely lacking its catalytic domain. In the other family, compound heterozygosity for nonsense mutation p.R748* and a 20-nt insertion interrupting the catalytic homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus (HECT) domain was present; western blot analysis of patient cells revealed an absence of detectable HACE1 protein. Conclusion HACE1 mutations underlie a new autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies have implicated HACE1 as a tumour suppressor gene; however, since cancer predisposition was not observed either in homozygous or heterozygous mutation carriers, this concept may require re-evaluation. PMID:26424145

  3. [Inherited amino acid transport disorders].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Y; Tada, K

    1992-07-01

    Disorders due to inherited amino acids transport defect are reviewed. The disorders were categorized into three types of transport defects, namely, brush-border membrane of epithelial cells of small intestine and kidney tubules (Hartnup disease, blue diaper syndrome, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria and lysine malabsorption syndrome), basolateral membrane (lysinuric protein intolerance) and membrane of intracellular organelles (cystinosis and hyperornitinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome). Pathogenesis, clinical feature, laboratory findings, diagnosis, genetics and treatment of these disorders are described, briefly. There is not much data for the transport systems themselves, so that further investigation in molecular and gene levels for transport systems is necessary to clarify the characteristics of the transport and heterogeneity of phenotypes in inherited amino acids transport disorders. PMID:1404888

  4. CRTAP AND LEPRE1 MUTATIONS IN RECESSIVE OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA

    PubMed Central

    Baldridge, Dustin; Schwarze, Ulrike; Morello, Roy; Lennington, Jennifer; Bertin, Terry K.; Pace, James M.; Pepin, Melanie G.; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David R.; Walsh, Jennifer; Lambert, Deborah; Green, Andrew; Robinson, Haynes; Michelson, Melonie; Houge, Gunnar; Lindman, Carl; Martin, Judith; Ward, Jewell; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Mitchell, John J.; Krakow, Deborah; Rimoin, David L.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Byers, Peter H.; Lee, Brendan

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by mutations in the genes (COL1A1 or COL1A2) encoding the chains of type I collagen. Recently, dysregulation of hydroxylation of a single proline residue at position 986 of both the triple-helical domains of type I collagen α1(I) and type II collagen α1(II) chains has been implicated in the pathogenesis of recessive forms of OI. Two proteins, CRTAP, or cartilage-associated protein, and prolyl-3-hydroxylase-1 (P3H1, encoded by the LEPRE1 gene) form a complex that performs the hydroxylation and brings the prolyl cis-trans isomerase cyclophilin-B (CYPB) to the unfolded collagen. In our screen of 78 subjects diagnosed with OI type II or III, we identified three probands with mutations in CRTAP and sixteen with mutations in LEPRE1. The latter group includes a mutation in patients from the Irish Traveller population, a genetically isolated community with increased incidence of OI. The clinical features resulting from CRTAP or LEPRE1 loss of function mutations were difficult to distinguish at birth. Infants in both groups had multiple fractures, decreased bone modeling (affecting especially the femurs), and extremely low bone mineral density. Interestingly, “popcorn” epiphyses may reflect underlying cartilaginous and bone dysplasia in this form of OI. These results expand the range of CRTAP/LEPRE1 mutations that result in recessive OI and emphasize the importance of distinguishing recurrence of severe OI of recessive inheritance from those that result from parental germline mosaicism for COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutations. PMID:18566967

  5. Inherited disorders of GABA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Cabalza, Jessica L; Taylor, Jacob; Gibson, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    The inherited disorders of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism require an increased index of clinical suspicion. The known genetic disorders are GABA-transaminase deficiency, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency and homocarnosinosis. A recent link has also been made between impaired GABA synthesis and nonsyndromic cleft lip, with or without cleft palate. SSADH deficiency is the most commonly occurring of the inherited disorders of neurotransmitters. The disorder has a nonspecific phenotype with myriad neurological and psychiatric manifestations, and usually has a nonprogressive temporal course. Diagnosis is made by the detection of γ-hydroxybutyrate excretion on urine organic acid testing. The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging abnormality is an increased signal in the globus pallidus. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated the first example of increased endogenous GABA in human brain parenchyma in this disorder. GABA-transaminase deficiency and homocarnosinosis appear to be very rare, but require cerebrospinal fluid for detection, thus allowing for the possibility that these entities, as in the other inherited neurotransmitter disorders, are under-recognized. PMID:23842532

  6. Utilizing inheritance in requirements engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaindl, Hermann

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the utilization of inheritance for requirements specification, i.e., the tasks of analyzing and modeling the domain, as well as forming and defining requirements. Our approach and the tool supporting it are named RETH (Requirements Engineering Through Hypertext). Actually, RETH uses a combination of various technologies, including object-oriented approaches and artificial intelligence (in particular frames). We do not attempt to exclude or replace formal representations, but try to complement and provide means for gradually developing them. Among others, RETH has been applied in the CERN (Conseil Europeen pour la Rechereche Nucleaire) Cortex project. While it would be impossible to explain this project in detail here, it should be sufficient to know that it deals with a generic distributed control system. Since this project is not finished yet, it is difficult to state its size precisely. In order to give an idea, its final goal is to substitute the many existing similar control systems at CERN by this generic approach. Currently, RETH is also tested using real-world requirements for the Pastel Mission Planning System at ESOC in Darmstadt. First, we outline how hypertext is integrated into a frame system in our approach. Moreover, the usefulness of inheritance is demonstrated as performed by the tool RETH. We then summarize our experiences of utilizing inheritance in the Cortex project. Lastly, RETH will be related to existing work.

  7. Genetics of inherited primary arrhythmia disorders

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Danna A; Gollob, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    A sudden unexplained death is felt to be due to a primary arrhythmic disorder when no structural heart disease is found on autopsy, and there is no preceding documentation of heart disease. In these cases, death is presumed to be secondary to a lethal and potentially heritable abnormality of cardiac ion channel function. These channelopathies include congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, and short QT syndrome. In certain cases, genetic testing may have an important role in supporting a diagnosis of a primary arrhythmia disorder, and can also provide prognostic information, but by far the greatest strength of genetic testing lies in the screening of family members, who may be at risk. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic genetic and molecular pathophysiology of the primary inherited arrhythmia disorders, and to outline a rational approach to genetic testing, management, and family screening. PMID:26425105

  8. Does Gingival Recession Require Surgical Treatment?

    PubMed

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; MacEachern, Mark; Oates, Thomas W

    2015-10-01

    Gingival recession represents a clinical condition in adults frequently encountered in the general dental practice. Clinicians often face dilemmas of whether or not to treat such a condition surgically. An initial condensed literature search was performed using a combination of gingival recession and surgery controlled terms and keywords. An analysis of the search results highlights the limited understanding of the factors that guide the treatment of gingival recession. Understanding the cause, prognosis, and treatment of gingival recession continues to offer many unanswered questions and challenges in periodontics as we strive to provide the best care possible for our patients. PMID:26427577

  9. [Spondylocostal dysostosis. Report of 5 cases including siblings and an atypical case].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, R A; Hansen, H G; Böwing, B; Tietze, U

    1983-01-01

    Spondylocostal Dysostosis (sp. c. D.) is characterized by multiple morphological anomalies of the vertebrae and ribs which are frequently fused. This is due to malsegmentation of the axial skeleton probably before the 20th day of embryonic development. There are severe and moderate forms. The etiology is heterogeneous since dominant, and more frequently recessive inheritance has been noted and phenocopies should be expected. Sp. c. D. may be part of a genetic malformation syndrome. Five observations are reported, three typical including sibs, and two atypical ones. The sixth case demonstrates rachischisis anterior (et posterior) of the entire spine. PMID:6835216

  10. “United Pedicle Flap” for management of multiple gingival recessions

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Aditi; Sivaraman, Karthik; Bhat, Subraya Giliyar

    2016-01-01

    Numerous surgical procedures have evolved and are being modified with time to treat gingival recession by manipulating gingival or mucosal tissues in various ways. However, the decision to choose the most appropriate technique for a given recession site still remains a challenging task for clinicians. Mucogingival deformities such as shallow vestibule, frenal pull, or inadequate attached gingiva complicate the decision and limit the treatment options to an invasive procedure involving soft tissue grafts. The situation is further comprised if there is a nonavailability of adequate donor tissue and patients' unwillingness for procedures involving a second surgical site. In such situations, the recession either remains untreated or has poor treatment outcomes. This case report presents a modified pedicle graft technique for treatment of multiple gingival recessions with shallow vestibule and inadequate attached gingiva. The technique is a promising therapeutic alternative to invasive surgical procedures such as soft tissue grafts for treatment of multiple gingival recessions. PMID:27563212

  11. Functional analysis of FOXE3 mutations causing dominant and recessive ocular anterior segment disease.

    PubMed

    Islam, Lily; Kelberman, Daniel; Williamson, Laura; Lewis, Nicola; Glindzicz, Maria Bitner; Nischal, Ken K; Sowden, Jane C

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in FOXE3 are associated with both recessive and dominant inheritance of severe anterior ocular malformations and glaucoma. However, functional analyses of putative pathogenic mutations have not been performed. We tested the hypothesis that variations in FOXE3 activity underlie the different modes of inheritance and disease phenotype. In band shift assays, three recessive mutants showed loss-of-function, one retained DNA binding activity, whereas two dominant mutants showed altered activity. All six mutants showed reduced transactivation function compared with wild-type, and modeling the heterozygous state resulted in an intermediate level of activity providing no evidence for dominant negative action. Our in vitro data are consistent with loss-of-function below a dosage sensitive threshold as a mechanism of action for recessive mutations, but indicate an altered mutant protein function rather than a haploinsufficient mechanism for dominant mutations. This study provides the first functional evidence demonstrating that FOXE3 mutations identified in patients impair protein function with differential effects. PMID:25504734

  12. The Crucial Role of Recess in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramstetter, Catherine L.; Murray, Robert; Garner, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting optimal child development and well-being. Reallocating time to accentuate academic concerns is a growing trend and has put recess at risk. Conversely, pressure to increase activity in school has come from efforts to combat childhood obesity. The purpose…

  13. Strategies for Supporting Recess in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Recess provides students with a needed break from their structured school day. It can improve children's physical, social, and emotional well-being, and enhance learning. Recess helps children meet the goal of 60 minutes of physical activity (PA) each day, as recommended by the US Department of Health and Human Services. National…

  14. Recess for Elementary School Students. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) that all elementary school children should be provided with at least one daily period of recess of at least 20 minutes in length. Recess is an essential component of a comprehensive school physical activity program and of the total education experience for…

  15. Targeted next generation sequencing identifies novel mutations in RP1 as a relatively common cause of autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy.

    PubMed

    El Shamieh, Said; Boulanger-Scemama, Elise; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Démontant, Vanessa; Condroyer, Christel; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Zeitz, Christina

    2015-01-01

    We report ophthalmic and genetic findings in families with autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy (arRCD) and RP1 mutations. Detailed ophthalmic examination was performed in 242 sporadic and arRCD subjects. Genomic DNA was investigated using our customized next generation sequencing panel targeting up to 123 genes implicated in inherited retinal disorders. Stringent filtering coupled with Sanger sequencing and followed by cosegregation analysis was performed to confirm biallelism and the implication of the most likely disease causing variants. Sequencing identified 9 RP1 mutations in 7 index cases. Eight of the mutations were novel, and all cosegregated with severe arRCD phenotype, found associated with additional macular changes. Among the identified mutations, 4 belong to a region, previously associated with arRCD, and 5 others in a region previously associated with adRCD. Our prevalence studies showed that RP1 mutations account for up to 2.5% of arRCD. These results point out for the necessity of sequencing RP1 when genetically investigating sporadic and arRCD. It further highlights the interest of unbiased sequencing technique, which allows investigating the implication of the same gene in different modes of inheritance. Finally, it reports that different regions of RP1 can also lead to arRCD. PMID:25692139

  16. The crucial role of recess in school.

    PubMed

    Murray, Robert; Ramstetter, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting the optimal development of the whole child. A growing trend toward reallocating time in school to accentuate the more academic subjects has put this important facet of a child's school day at risk. Recess serves as a necessary break from the rigors of concentrated, academic challenges in the classroom. But equally important is the fact that safe and well-supervised recess offers cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits that may not be fully appreciated when a decision is made to diminish it. Recess is unique from, and a complement to, physical education--not a substitute for it. The American Academy of Pediatrics believes that recess is a crucial and necessary component of a child's development and, as such, it should not be withheld for punitive or academic reasons. PMID:23277311

  17. Inherited Disorders of Bilirubin Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-01-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective 1) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, 2) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g. Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), 3) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or 4) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  18. Characterization of an Early-Onset, Autosomal Recessive, Progressive Retinal Degeneration in Bengal Cats

    PubMed Central

    Ofri, Ron; Reilly, Christopher M.; Maggs, David J.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Shilo-Benjamini, Yael; Good, Kathryn L.; Grahn, Robert A.; Splawski, Danielle D.; Lyons, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A form of retinal degeneration suspected to be hereditary was discovered in a family of Bengal cats. A breeding colony was established to characterize disease progression clinically, electrophysiologically, and morphologically, and to investigate the mode of inheritance. Methods Affected and related cats were donated by owners for breeding trials and pedigree analysis. Kittens from test and complementation breedings underwent ophthalmic and neuro-ophthalmic examinations and ERG, and globes were evaluated using light microscopy. Results Pedigree analysis, along with test and complementation breedings, indicated autosomal recessive inheritance and suggested that this disease is nonallelic to a retinal degeneration found in Persian cats. Mutation analysis confirmed the disease is not caused by CEP290 or CRX variants found predominantly in Abyssinian and Siamese cats. Ophthalmoscopic signs of retinal degeneration were noted at 9 weeks of age and became more noticeable over the next 4 months. Visual deficits were behaviorally evident by 1 year of age. Electroretinogram demonstrated reduced rod and cone function at 7 and 9 weeks of age, respectively. Rod responses were mostly extinguished at 14 weeks of age; cone responses were minimal by 26 weeks. Histologic degeneration was first observed at 8 weeks, evidenced by reduced photoreceptor numbers, then rapid deterioration of the photoreceptor layer and, subsequently, severe outer retinal degeneration. Conclusions A recessively inherited primary photoreceptor degeneration was characterized in the Bengal cat. The disease is characterized by early onset, with histologic, ophthalmoscopic, and electrophysiological signs evident by 2 months of age, and rapid progression to blindness. PMID:26258614

  19. A recessive genetic model and runs of homozygosity in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Power, Robert A; Keller, Matthew C; Ripke, Stephan; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Wray, Naomi R; Sullivan, Patrick F; Breen, Gerome

    2014-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of major depressive disorder (MDD) have yet to identify variants that surpass the threshold for genome-wide significance. A recent study reported that runs of homozygosity (ROH) are associated with schizophrenia, reflecting a novel genetic risk factor resulting from increased parental relatedness and recessive genetic effects. Here, we explore the possibility of such a recessive model in MDD. In a sample of 9,238 cases and 9,521 controls reported in a recent mega-analysis of 9 GWAS we perform an analysis of ROH and common variants under a recessive model. Since evidence for association with ROH could reflect a recessive mode of action at loci, we also conducted a genome-wide association analyses under a recessive model. The genome-wide association analysis using a recessive model found no significant associations. Our analysis of ROH suggested that there was significant heterogeneity of effect across studies in effect (P = 0.001), and it was associated with genotyping platform and country of origin. The results of the ROH analysis show that differences across studies can lead to conflicting systematic genome-wide differences between cases and controls that are unaccounted for by traditional covariates. They highlight the sensitivity of the ROH method to spurious associations, and the need to carefully control for potential confounds in such analyses. We found no strong evidence for a recessive model underlying MDD. PMID:24482242

  20. Congenital Recessive Methemoglobinemia Revealed in Adulthood: Description of a New Mutation in Cytochrome b5 Reductase Gene.

    PubMed

    Forestier, Alexandra; Pissard, Serge; Cretet, Justine; Mambie, Adeline; Pascal, Laurent; Cliquennois, Manuel; Cambier, Nathalie; Rose, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Methemoglobinemia can be acquired (oxidizing drugs or chemicals products) or inherited either by mutations affecting globin chains [M hemoglobins (M Hbs)] or by defects in the enzymatic system involved in the reduction of spontaneous Hb oxidation: nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-cytochrome b5 reductase. It is encoded by the CYB5R3 gene: there are two phenotypes of autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia, in type II CYB5R deficiency is generalized and affects all cells, leading to an early onset, whereas in type I, the enzyme deficiency is restricted to erythrocytes, usually discovered in infancy but not exclusively. We report a new case of methemoglobinemia discovered in a patient from Bahrain who exhibited an unknown dyspnea at the age of 37 years without trigger events or oxidizing products. We discovered a new mutation in the CYB5R3 gene: exon 9, codon 266 (delGAG) (GLU) (CYB5R3: c.726_729delGAG) in the homozygous state. Appearance of methemoglobinemia in an adult usually suggests an acquired cause but our case illustrated that it could also reveal a type I mutation of cytochrome b5 reductase. PMID:26291966

  1. The Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Chirnomas, S. Deborah; Kupfer, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the rarity of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS), they represent diseases for which the molecular pathogenesis may be elucidated. Their study and presentation of the details of their molecular biology and biochemistry is warranted not only for appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients but also because they lend clues to the normal physiology of the normal hematopoiesis and, in many cases, mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Several themes have emerged within each subsection of IBMFS, including the ribosomopathies that entail both ribosome assembly as well as ribosomal RNA processing. The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway itself has become interdigitated with the familial breast cancer syndromes. The sections that follow present a more detailed analysis of the diseases that account for the majority of IBMFS diagnoses. PMID:24237972

  2. Frontometaphyseal dysplasia: evidence for autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed

    Kassner, E G; Haller, J O; Reddy, V H; Mitarotundo, A; Katz, I

    1976-12-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia is a syndrome that encompasses cranial hyperostosis, abnormal tubulation of cylindrical bones, and other skeletal and extraskeletal abnormalities. The most striking features are overgrowth of the supraorbital ridges which results in a Mephistophelian facial appearance and a radiographic configuration of the skull that has been likened to a soldier's helmet. Most patients have severe hearing loss, defective dentition, poorly developed musculature, and joint contractures. Dominant inheritance has been suggested in previous reports, but an appropriate pedigree has been documented in only one family. This paper describes three additional patients in two unrelated families: (1) an 8-year-old boy whose mother has mild metaphyseal dysplasia and several minor skeletal abnormalities that have occurred in patients with the syndrome; and (2) two maternal half-brothers. These cases provide additional evidence that frontometaphyseal dysplasia is an autosomal dominant trait with variable penetrance. PMID:998829

  3. Economic recession and fertility in the developed world.

    PubMed

    Sobotka, Tomáš; Skirbekk, Vegard; Philipov, Dimiter

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews research on the effects of economic recessions on fertility in the developed world. We study how economic downturns, as measured by various indicators, especially by declining GDP levels, falling consumer confidence, and rising unemployment, were found to affect fertility. We also discuss particular mechanisms through which the recession may have influenced fertility behavior, including the effects of economic uncertainty, falling income, changes in the housing market, and rising enrollment in higher education, and also factors that influence fertility indirectly such as declining marriage rates. Most studies find that fertility tends to be pro-cyclical and often rises and declines with the ups and downs of the business cycle. Usually, these aggregate effects are relatively small (typically, a few percentage points) and of short durations; in addition they often influence especially the timing of childbearing and in most cases do not leave an imprint on cohort fertility levels. Therefore, major long-term fertility shifts often continue seemingly uninterrupted during the recession—including the fertility declines before and during the Great Depression of the 1930s and before and during the oil shock crises of the 1970s. Changes in the opportunity costs of childbearing and fertility behavior during economic downturn vary by sex, age, social status, and number of children; childless young adults are usually most affected. Furthermore, various policies and institutions may modify or even reverse the relationship between recessions and fertility. The first evidence pertaining to the recent recession falls in line with these findings. In most countries, the recession has brought a decline in the number of births and fertility rates, often marking a sharp halt to the previous decade of rising fertility rates. PMID:22066128

  4. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable. PMID:26501689

  5. Digenic inheritance in medical genetics

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2013-01-01

    Digenic inheritance (DI) is the simplest form of inheritance for genetically complex diseases. By contrast with the thousands of reports that mutations in single genes cause human diseases, there are only dozens of human disease phenotypes with evidence for DI in some pedigrees. The advent of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has made it simpler to identify monogenic disease causes and could similarly simplify proving DI because one can simultaneously find mutations in two genes in the same sample. However, through 2012, I could find only one example of human DI in which HTS was used; in that example, HTS found only the second of the two genes. To explore the gap between expectation and reality, I tried to collect all examples of human DI with a narrow definition and characterise them according to the types of evidence collected, and whether there has been replication. Two strong trends are that knowledge of candidate genes and knowledge of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have been helpful in most published examples of human DI. By contrast, the positional method of genetic linkage analysis, has been mostly unsuccessful in identifying genes underlying human DI. Based on the empirical data, I suggest that combining HTS with growing networks of established PPIs may expedite future discoveries of human DI and strengthen the evidence for them. PMID:23785127

  6. Ricci inheritance collineations in Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tahir; Musharaf, Aisha; Khan, Suhail

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate Ricci Inheritance Collineations (RICs) in Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes. RICs are discussed in detail when Ricci tensor is degenerate and nondegenerate. In both the cases, RICs are obtained and it turns out that the dimension of Lie algebra of RICs is finite when Ricci tensor is nondegenerate. In the case when Ricci tensor is degenerate, we get finite as well as infinite dimensional group of RICs.

  7. Ricci inheritance collineations in Bianchi type II spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tahir; Akhtar, Sumaira Saleem; Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Khan, Suhail

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a complete classification of Bianchi type II spacetime according to Ricci inheritance collineations (RICs). The RICs are classified considering cases when the Ricci tensor is both degenerate as well as non-degenerate. In case of non-degenerate Ricci tensor, it is found that Bianchi type II spacetime admits 4-, 5-, 6- or 7-dimensional Lie algebra of RICs. In the case when the Ricci tensor is degenerate, majority cases give rise to infinitely many RICs, while remaining cases admit finite RICs given by 4, 5 or 6.

  8. Detection of New Paternal Dystrophin Gene Mutations in Isolated Cases of Dystrophinopathy in Females

    PubMed Central

    Pegoraro, Elena; Schimke, R. Neil; Arahata, Kiichi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Stern, Harvey; Marks, Harold; Glasberg, Mark R.; Carroll, James E.; Taber, Joseph W.; Wessel, Henry B.; Bauserman, Steven C.; Marks, Warren A.; Toriello, Helga V.; Higgins, James V.; Appleton, Staci; Schwartz, Lisa; Garcia, Carlos A.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    1994-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders and is caused by dystrophin deficiency. The disease is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait; however, recent biochemical and clinical studies have shown that many girls and women with a primary myopathy have an underlying dystrophinopathy, despite a negative family history for Duchenne dystrophy. These isolated female dystrophinopathy patients carried ambiguous diagnoses with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance (limbgirdle muscular dystrophy) prior to biochemical detection of dystrophin abnormalities in their muscle biopsy. It has been assumed that these female dystrophinopathy patients are heterozygous carriers who show preferential inactivation of the X chromosome harboring the normal dystrophin gene, although this has been shown for only a few X:autosome translocations and for two cases of discordant monozygotic twin female carriers. Here we study X-inactivation patterns of 13 female dystrophinopathy patients—10 isolated cases and 3 cases with a positive family history for Duchenne dystrophy in males. We show that all cases have skewed X-inactivation patterns in peripheral blood DNA. Of the nine isolated cases informative in our assay, eight showed inheritance of the dystrophin gene mutation from the paternal germ line. Only a single case showed maternal inheritance. The 10-fold higher incidence of paternal transmission of dystrophin gene mutations in these cases is at 30-fold variance with Bayesian predictions and gene mutation rates. Thus, our results suggest some mechanistic interaction between new dystrophin gene mutations, paternal inheritance, and skewed X inactivation. Our results provide both empirical risk data and a molecular diagnostic test method, which permit genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of this new category of patients. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:8198142

  9. Detection of new paternal dystrophin gene mutations in isolated cases of dystrophinopathy in females

    SciTech Connect

    Pegoraro, E.; Wessel, H.B.; Schwartz, L.; Hoffman, E.P. ); Schimke, R.N. ); Arahata, Kiichi; Hayashi, Yukiko ); Stern, H. ); Marks, H. ); Glasberg, M.R. )

    1994-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders and is caused by dystrophin deficiency. The disease is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait; however, recent biochemical and clinical studies have shown that many girls and women with a primary myopathy have an underlying dystrophinopathy, despite a negative family history for Duchenne dystrophy. These isolated female dystrophinopathy patients carried ambiguous diagnoses with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy) prior to biochemical detection of dystrophin abnormalities in their muscle biopsy. It has been assumed that these female dystrophinopathy patients are heterozygous carries who show preferential inactivation of the X chromosome harboring the normal dystrophin gene, although this has been shown for only a few X:autosome translocations and for two cases of discordant monozygotic twin female carriers. Here the authors study X-inactivation patterns of 13 female dystrophinopathy patients - 10 isolated cases and 3 cases with a positive family history for Duchenne dystrophy in males. They show that all cases have skewed X-inactivation patterns in peripheral blood DNA. Of the nine isolated cases informative in the assay, eight showed inheritance of the dystrophin gene mutation from the paternal germ line. Only a single case showed maternal inheritance. The 10-fold higher incidence of paternal transmission of dystrophin gene mutations in these cases is at 30-fold variance with Bayesian predictions and gene mutation rates. Thus, the results suggest some mechanistic interaction between new dystrophin gene mutations, paternal inheritance, and skewed X inactivation. The results provide both empirical risk data and a molecular diagnostic test method, which permit genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of this new category of patients. 58 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Epigenetic Inheritance: A Contributor to Species Differentiation?

    PubMed Central

    Boffelli, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Multiple epigenetic states can be associated with the same genome, and transmitted through the germline for generations, to create the phenomenon of epigenetic inheritance. This form of inheritance is mediated by complex and highly diverse components of the chromosome that associate with DNA, control its transcription, and are inherited alongside it. But, how extensive, and how stable, is the information carried in the germline by the epigenome? Several known examples of epigenetic inheritance demonstrate that it has the ability to create selectable traits, and thus to mediate Darwinian evolution. Here we discuss the possibility that epigenetic inheritance is responsible for some stable characteristics of species, focusing on a recent comparison of the human and chimpanzee methylomes which reveals that somatic methylation states are related to methylation states in the germline. Interpretation of this finding highlights the potential significance of germline epigenetic states, as well as the challenge of investigating a form of inheritance with complex and unfamiliar rules. PMID:22966965

  11. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  12. Event-based Recession Analysis across Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrograph recessions have long been a window to investigate hydrological processes and their interactions. The authors conducted an exploratory analysis of about 1000 individual hydrograph recessions in a period of around 15 years (1995-2010) from time series of hourly discharge (USGS IDA stream flow data set) at 27 USGS gauges located in Iowa and Cedar River basins with drainage area ranging from 6.7 to around 17000 km2. They calculated recession exponents with the same recession length but different time lags from the hydrograph peak ranging from ~0 to 96 hours, and then plotted them against time lags to construct the evolution of recession exponent. The result shows that, as recession continues, the recession exponent in first increases quickly, then decreases quickly, and finally stays constant. Occasionally and for different reasons, the decreasing portion is missing due to negligible contribution from soil water storage. The increasing part of the evolution of can be related to fast response to rainfall including overland flow and quick subsurface flow through macropores (or tiles), and the decreasing portion can be connected to the delayed soil water response. Lastly, the constant segment can be attributed to the groundwater storage with the slowest response. The points where recession exponent reaches its maximum and begins to plateau are the times that fast response and soil water response end, respectively. The authors conducted further theoretical analysis by combining mathematical derivation and literature results to explain the observed evolution path of the recession exponent . Their results have a direct application in hydrograph separation and important implications for dynamic basin storage-discharge relation analysis and hydrological process understanding across scales.

  13. A Novel Autosomal Recessive GJA1 Missense Mutation Linked to Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying; Chen, I-Ping; de Almeida, Salome; Tiziani, Valdenize; Do Amaral, Cassio M. Raposo; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Reichenberger, Ernst J.

    2013-01-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare sclerosing skeletal disorder with progressive hyperostosis of craniofacial bones. CMD can be inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD) trait or occur after de novo mutations in the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. Although the autosomal recessive (AR) form of CMD had been mapped to 6q21-22 the mutation has been elusive. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing for one subject with AR CMD and identified a novel missense mutation (c.716G>A, p.Arg239Gln) in the C-terminus of the gap junction protein alpha-1 (GJA1) coding for connexin 43 (Cx43). We confirmed this mutation in 6 individuals from 3 additional families. The homozygous mutation cosegregated only with affected family members. Connexin 43 is a major component of gap junctions in osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Gap junctions are responsible for the diffusion of low molecular weight molecules between cells. Mutations in Cx43 cause several dominant and recessive disorders involving developmental abnormalities of bone such as dominant and recessive oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD; MIM #164200, 257850) and isolated syndactyly type III (MIM #186100), the characteristic digital anomaly in ODDD. However, characteristic ocular and dental features of ODDD as well as syndactyly are absent in patients with the recessive Arg239Gln Cx43 mutation. Bone remodeling mechanisms disrupted by this novel Cx43 mutation remain to be elucidated. PMID:23951358

  14. Recessive mutations in RYR1 are a common cause of congenital fiber type disproportion.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Nigel F; Waddell, Leigh B; Cooper, Sandra T; Perry, Margaret; Smith, Robert L L; Kornberg, Andrew J; Muntoni, Francesco; Lillis, Suzanne; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Guglieri, Michela; King, Mary D; Farrell, Michael A; Marty, Isabelle; Lunardi, Joel; Monnier, Nicole; North, Kathryn N

    2010-07-01

    The main histological abnormality in congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) is hypotrophy of type 1 (slow twitch) fibers compared to type 2 (fast twitch) fibers. To investigate whether mutations in RYR1 are a cause of CFTD we sequenced RYR1 in seven CFTD families in whom the other known causes of CFTD had been excluded. We identified compound heterozygous changes in the RYR1 gene in four families (five patients), consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. Three out of five patients had ophthalmoplegia, which may be the most specific clinical indication of mutations in RYR1. Type 1 fibers were at least 50% smaller, on average, than type 2 fibers in all biopsies. Recessive mutations in RYR1 are a relatively common cause of CFTD and can be associated with extreme fiber size disproportion. PMID:20583297

  15. Highly effective SNP-based association mapping and management of recessive defects in livestock.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Carole; Coppieters, Wouter; Rollin, Frédéric; Desmecht, Daniel; Agerholm, Jorgen S; Cambisano, Nadine; Carta, Eloisa; Dardano, Sabrina; Dive, Marc; Fasquelle, Corinne; Frennet, Jean-Claude; Hanset, Roger; Hubin, Xavier; Jorgensen, Claus; Karim, Latifa; Kent, Matthew; Harvey, Kirsten; Pearce, Brian R; Simon, Patricia; Tama, Nico; Nie, Haisheng; Vandeputte, Sébastien; Lien, Sigbjorn; Longeri, Maria; Fredholm, Merete; Harvey, Robert J; Georges, Michel

    2008-04-01

    The widespread use of elite sires by means of artificial insemination in livestock breeding leads to the frequent emergence of recessive genetic defects, which cause significant economic and animal welfare concerns. Here we show that the availability of genome-wide, high-density SNP panels, combined with the typical structure of livestock populations, markedly accelerates the positional identification of genes and mutations that cause inherited defects. We report the fine-scale mapping of five recessive disorders in cattle and the molecular basis for three of these: congenital muscular dystony (CMD) types 1 and 2 in Belgian Blue cattle and ichthyosis fetalis in Italian Chianina cattle. Identification of these causative mutations has an immediate translation into breeding practice, allowing marker assisted selection against the defects through avoidance of at-risk matings. PMID:18344998

  16. A rare case report of Ellis Van Creveld syndrome in an Indian patient and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Prashanth; Shetty, Deepthi; Priyadarshana, P.S.; Bhat, Smitha

    2015-01-01

    Ellis Van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare genetic disorder having autosomal recessive inheritance affecting the Amish population of Pennsylvania in USA with incidence of 1:244,000 for the general population. This syndrome consists of characteristic features such as bilateral postaxial polydactyly, chondroectodermal dysplasia, congenital heart defects and hypoplastic nails and teeth. There are few case reports of this syndrome reported in dental literature. We report a case of a 17 year old female presenting typical features of this syndrome and the oral findings of this patient which are the key diagnostic features. PMID:26258022

  17. [The megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: apropos of a case with prolonged survival].

    PubMed

    Magaña Pintiado, M I; Al-Kassam Martínez, M; Bousoño García, C; Ramos Polo, E; Gómez Alvarez, M E

    2008-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a severe congenital disease with autosomal recessive inheritance, characterized by vesical distension and intestinal hypoperistalsis what causes intestinal obstruction in newborn, with other abnormalities associated. It presents a low incidence, about a hundred cases are reported in the bibliography. Life expectancy doesn't reach a year because of the sepsis failure generally. In our study the survival is higher than the majority of the cases reported, with good cuality of life and acceptable ponderal development. Home parenteral nutrition with the following and multidisciplinary collaboration in a strict way, establish the success' key in this pathology. PMID:19160903

  18. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families

    PubMed Central

    Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N.; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 – 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992

  19. Ulcerative colitis associated with chronic granulomatous disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Imanzade, Farid; Sayarri, Aliakbar; Tajik, Pantea

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited primary immunodeficiency disease which increases the body's susceptibility to infections caused by certain bacteria and fungi. CGD is a rare disease, caused by four genes, one type is 1X linked and the other three are "autosomal recessive". Although clinical presentation is variable, but characteristic features are recurrent pneumonia, lymphadenitis, hepatic or other abscesses. Gastrointestinal tract symptoms are common in x-linked recessive form of CGD. These include gastric and esophageal obstruction and inflammatory bowel disease. GI involvement including small and large intestines, the findings of luminal narrowing and the presence of granuloma can make it difficult to distinguish from Crohn's disease. On the other hands according to the literature ulcerative colitis is rarely reported in patients with CGD. Our case presented with ulcerative colitis with CGD. PMID:26328046

  20. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26411603

  1. Serous retinal detachment after trabeculectomy in angle recession glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Avik Kumar; Padhy, Debananda

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with 360 degree angle recession after blunt trauma in his right eye developed uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) despite four antiglaucoma medications (AGM) with advancing disc damage. He underwent trabeculectomy with intraoperative mitomycin-c (MMC) application. There was an intraoperative vitreous prolapse which was managed accordingly. On post-surgery day 1, he had shallow choroidal detachment superiorly with non-recordable IOP. This was deteriorated 1 week postoperatively as choroidal detachment proceeded to serous retinal detachment. He was started with systemic steroid in addition to topical route. The serous effusions subsided within 2 weeks time. At the last follow up at 3 months, he was enjoying good visual acuity, deep anterior chamber, diffuse bleb, an IOP in low teens off any AGM and attached retina. This case highlights the rare occurrence of serous retinal detachment after surgical management of angle recession glaucoma.

  2. [Clinical study of the relationship between the lateral recesses and the nerve roots].

    PubMed

    Lian, P; Sun, R; Jia, L

    1997-04-01

    To explicate the relationship and the clinical signification between the normal or narrow lateral recesses and the nerve roots, we measured the diameter of the entrans zone of the lateral recess, the interval between the upper articular processes and the interval between the nerve root and ab line on 50 normal cases, 43 narrow cases and 32 stenosis cases with VIDS image analysis system. The results showed that the nerve root was in the center side of the ab line in the normal station, with the degrees of the degeneration and cohesion ncreasing, the nerve root was in the lateral recess side of the ab line, and was compressed by the lateral recess. The authors considered that the real clinical signification of the entrance zone of the lateral recess was danger to the nerve root, but the deciding factors were the degrees of the degeneration and cohesion of the upper articular processes. The pathological conditions that resulted in the stenosis of the lateral recess and dangered the nerve root such as disc, flavum ligament and posterior port of the fibra ring were discussed in the article. PMID:10374545

  3. Systematic review of suicide in economic recession

    PubMed Central

    Oyesanya, Mayowa; Lopez-Morinigo, Javier; Dutta, Rina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide a systematic update of the evidence concerning the relationship between economic recession and suicide. METHODS: A keyword search of Ovid Medline, Embase, Embase Classic, PsycINFO and PsycARTICLES was performed to identify studies that had investigated the association between economic recession and suicide. RESULTS: Thirty-eight studies met predetermined selection criteria and 31 of them found a positive association between economic recession and increased suicide rates. Two studies reported a negative association, two articles failed to find such an association, and three studies were inconclusive. CONCLUSION: Economic recession periods appear to increase overall suicide rates, although further research is warranted in this area, particularly in low income countries. PMID:26110126

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hypotrichosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... erythema), itchiness (pruritus), or missing patches of skin (erosions) on the scalp. In areas of poor hair ... recessive hypotrichosis with monilethrix hairs and congenital scalp erosions. J Invest Dermatol. 2006 Jun;126(6):1286- ...

  5. Graduated recession of the superior oblique muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, J A

    1975-01-01

    Recession of the superior oblique was performed bilaterally in 12 patients with the A phenomenon and unilaterally in four patients with vertical imbalance. The results are discussed. Images PMID:1191613

  6. The Great Recession's impact on children.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Charles N

    2011-07-01

    Since that first day of the millennium the United States has experienced two recessions. The first recession began in 2001 and lasted for 10 months. The second, now referred to as the Great Recession, began in December of 2007, was approximately 18 months in duration and was followed by a weak and jobless recovery that has persisted into the second decade of this century. This commentary will examine how low-income children have fared in regard to economic security, food insecurity and housing instability as a result of the Great Recession and recent economic downturn. It concludes with a call to action for a renewed investment in our children through a Children's Recovery and Stimulus Initiative. PMID:21528399

  7. Novel Mutation in the PKHD1 Gene Diagnosed Prenatally in a Fetus with Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Pankaj; Speer, Paul; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    We report a 29-year-old gravida 2, para 0100, who presented at 19 weeks and 4 days of gestation for ultrasound to assess fetal anatomy. Routine midtrimester fetal anatomy ultrasound revealed enlarged, hyperechoic fetal kidneys and normal amniotic fluid index. Follow-up ultrasound at 23 weeks and 5 days revealed persistently enlarged, hyperechoic fetal kidneys. Progressive oligohydramnios was not evident until 29 weeks of gestation, with anhydramnios noted by 35 weeks of gestation. Amniocentesis was performed for karyotype and to search for mutations in the PKHD1 for the presumptive diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). In our patient, a maternally inherited, previously reported pathogenic missense mutation in the PKHD1 gene, c.10444C>T, was identified. A second, previously unreported de novo mutation, c.5909-2delA, was also identified. This mutation affects the canonical splice site and is most likely pathogenic. Our case highlights PKHD1 allelic heterogeneity and the importance of genetic testing in the prenatal setting where many other genetic etiologies can phenocopy ARPKD. PMID:25114813

  8. Cerebro-retinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts due to recessive mutations in the CTC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Bisserbe, A; Tertian, G; Buffet, C; Turhan, A; Lambotte, O; Nasser, G; Alvin, P; Tardieu, M; Riant, F; Bergametti, F; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Denier, C

    2015-05-01

    Cerebro-retinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC) or Coats plus syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder affecting the eyes, brain, bone and gastrointestinal tract. Its primary pathogenesis involves small vessel obliterative microangiopathy. Recently, autosomal recessively inherited mutations in CTC1 have been reported in CRMCC patients. We herein report an adolescent referred to our hospital following new seizures in a context of an undefined multisystem disorder. Cerebral imaging disclosed asymmetrical leukopathy, intracranial calcifications and cysts. In addition, he presented other typical CRMCC features i.e. a history of intrauterine growth retardation, skeletal demineralization and osteopenia, bilateral exudative vitreo-retinopathy reminiscent of Coats disease, recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhages secondary to watermelon stomach and variceal bleeding of the esophagus due to idiopathic portal hypertension and telangiectatic and angiodysplasic changes in the small intestine and colon, and anemia due to recurrent bleeding and bone marrow abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with Coats plus syndrome. CTC1 gene screening confirmed the diagnosis with the identification of heterozygous deleterious mutations. CRMCC due to CTC1 mutations has a broad clinical expressivity. Our case report illustrates the main possible associated phenotypes and their complications, demonstrating the need for a careful etiological search in order to initiate appropriate therapeutic and preventive measures. PMID:25843205

  9. Mutations in NR2E3 can cause dominant or recessive retinal degenerations in a same family

    PubMed Central

    Escher, Pascal; Gouras, Peter; Roduit, Raphaël; Tiab, Leila; Bolay, Sylvain; Delarive, Tania; Chen, Shiming; Tsai, Chih-Cheng; Hayashi, Masanori; Zernant, Jana; Merriam, Joanna E.; Mermod, Nicolas; Allikmets, Rando; Munier, Francis L.; Schorderet, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    NR2E3 (PNR), a nuclear receptor specifically expressed in photoreceptors, represses cone-specific genes and activates several rod-specific genes. In humans, mutations in NR2E3 have been associated with the recessively inherited enhanced short wavelength sensitive (S-) cone syndrome (ESCS) and, recently, with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). In the present work, we describe two additional families affected by adRP that carry a heterozygous c.166G>A (p.G56R) mutation in the NR2E3 gene. Functional analysis determined dominant negative activity of the p.G56R mutant protein as the molecular mechanism of adRP. Interestingly, in one pedigree, the most common causal variant for ESCS (p.R311Q) co-segregated with the adRP-linked p.G56R mutation, and, the compound heterozygotes exhibited an ESCS-like phenotype, which in one of the 2 cases was strikingly “milder” than the patients carrying the p.G56R mutation alone. Impaired repression of cone-specific genes by the corepressors atrophin-1 (dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy DRPLA gene product) and atrophin-2 (RERE repeat protein) appeared to be a molecular mechanism mediating the beneficial effect of the p.R311Q mutation. Finally, the functional dominance of the p.R311Q to the p.G56R mutation is discussed. PMID:19006237

  10. Congenital Cutis Laxa Type 2 Associated With Recurrent Aspiration Pneumonia and Growth Delay: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Mohammadbagher; Yazdanparast, Maryam; Jahanshahi, Keramatallah; Zakeri, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a connective tissue disorder caused by deficiency of fibro elastic plexus, which can involve multiple organs. It is inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked. Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2, which appears to compromise a spectrum of disorders, starts with severe wrinkly skin syndrome and leads to more severe diseases related to growth and developmental delays and skeletal anomalies. The clinical manifestations in some of cases of Cutis laxa consist of redundant loose skin, pre-and post-natal growth deficiency, mental retardation, large fontanels, and dislocation of the hips. The authors present the case of a female patient with involved internal organ disorder and delay in growth in addition to skin laxity in which gene sequence analysis of PYCR1 indicated C.797G>A mutation. PMID:26516448