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Sample records for recognition complex subunit

  1. A subunit of the oligosaccharyltransferase complex is required for interspecific gametophyte recognition in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Lena M.; Lindner, Heike; Pires, Nuno D.; Gagliardini, Valeria; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    Species-specific gamete recognition is a key premise to ensure reproductive success and the maintenance of species boundaries. During plant pollen tube (PT) reception, gametophyte interactions likely allow the species-specific recognition of signals from the PT (male gametophyte) by the embryo sac (female gametophyte), resulting in PT rupture, sperm release, and double fertilization. This process is impaired in interspecific crosses between Arabidopsis thaliana and related species, leading to PT overgrowth and a failure to deliver the sperm cells. Here we show that ARTUMES (ARU) specifically regulates the recognition of interspecific PTs in A. thaliana. ARU, identified in a genome-wide association study (GWAS), exclusively influences interspecific—but not intraspecific—gametophyte interactions. ARU encodes the OST3/6 subunit of the oligosaccharyltransferase complex conferring protein N-glycosylation. Our results suggest that glycosylation patterns of cell surface proteins may represent an important mechanism of gametophyte recognition and thus speciation. PMID:26964640

  2. Site-specific DNA binding of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe origin recognition complex is determined by the Orc4 subunit.

    PubMed

    Kong, D; DePamphilis, M L

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism by which origin recognition complexes (ORCs) identify replication origins was investigated using purified Orc proteins from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Orc4p alone bound tightly and specifically to several sites within S. pombe replication origins that are genetically required for origin activity. These sites consisted of clusters of A or T residues on one strand but were devoid of either alternating A and T residues or GC-rich sequences. Addition of a complex consisting of Orc1, -2, -3, -5, and -6 proteins (ORC-5) altered neither Orc4p binding to origin DNA nor Orc4p protection of specific sequences. ORC-5 alone bound weakly and nonspecifically to DNA; strong binding required the presence of Orc4p. Under these conditions, all six subunits remained bound to chromatin isolated from each phase of the cell division cycle. These results reveal that the S. pombe ORC binds to multiple, specific sites within replication origins and that site selection, at least in vitro, is determined solely by the Orc4p subunit. PMID:11689699

  3. A model of EcoRII restriction endonuclease action: the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Shabarova, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interaction of restriction endonuclease EcoRII with DNA, we studied by native gel electrophoresis the binding of this endonuclease to a set of synthetic DNA-duplexes containing the modified or canonical recognition sequence 5'-d(CCA/TGG)-3'. All binding substrate or substrate analogues tested could be divided into two major groups: (i) duplexes that, at the interaction with endonuclease EcoRII, form two types of stable complexes on native gel in the absence of Mg2+ cofactor; (ii) duplexes that form only one type of complex, observed both in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Unlike the latter, duplexes under the first group can be hydrolyzed by endonuclease. Data obtained suggest that the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition sequence. A model of EcoRII endonuclease action is presented.

  4. Structural basis for the recognition of tyrosine-based sorting signals by the μ3A subunit of the AP-3 adaptor complex.

    PubMed

    Mardones, Gonzalo A; Burgos, Patricia V; Lin, Yimo; Kloer, Daniel P; Magadán, Javier G; Hurley, James H; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2013-03-29

    Tyrosine-based signals fitting the YXXØ motif mediate sorting of transmembrane proteins to endosomes, lysosomes, the basolateral plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells, and the somatodendritic domain of neurons through interactions with the homologous μ1, μ2, μ3, and μ4 subunits of the corresponding AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, and AP-4 complexes. Previous x-ray crystallographic analyses identified distinct binding sites for YXXØ signals on μ2 and μ4, which were located on opposite faces of the proteins. To elucidate the mode of recognition of YXXØ signals by other members of the μ family, we solved the crystal structure at 1.85 Å resolution of the C-terminal domain of the μ3 subunit of AP-3 (isoform A) in complex with a peptide encoding a YXXØ signal (SDYQRL) from the trans-Golgi network protein TGN38. The μ3A C-terminal domain consists of an immunoglobulin-like β-sandwich organized into two subdomains, A and B. The YXXØ signal binds in an extended conformation to a site on μ3A subdomain A, at a location similar to the YXXØ-binding site on μ2 but not μ4. The binding sites on μ3A and μ2 exhibit similarities and differences that account for the ability of both proteins to bind distinct sets of YXXØ signals. Biochemical analyses confirm the identification of the μ3A site and show that this protein binds YXXØ signals with 14-19 μm affinity. The surface electrostatic potential of μ3A is less basic than that of μ2, in part explaining the association of AP-3 with intracellular membranes having less acidic phosphoinositides. PMID:23404500

  5. Structural Basis for the Recognition of Tyrosine-based Sorting Signals by the μ3A Subunit of the AP-3 Adaptor Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Lin, Yimo; Kloer, Daniel P.; Magadán, Javier G.; Hurley, James H.; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine-based signals fitting the YXXØ motif mediate sorting of transmembrane proteins to endosomes, lysosomes, the basolateral plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells, and the somatodendritic domain of neurons through interactions with the homologous μ1, μ2, μ3, and μ4 subunits of the corresponding AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, and AP-4 complexes. Previous x-ray crystallographic analyses identified distinct binding sites for YXXØ signals on μ2 and μ4, which were located on opposite faces of the proteins. To elucidate the mode of recognition of YXXØ signals by other members of the μ family, we solved the crystal structure at 1.85 Å resolution of the C-terminal domain of the μ3 subunit of AP-3 (isoform A) in complex with a peptide encoding a YXXØ signal (SDYQRL) from the trans-Golgi network protein TGN38. The μ3A C-terminal domain consists of an immunoglobulin-like β-sandwich organized into two subdomains, A and B. The YXXØ signal binds in an extended conformation to a site on μ3A subdomain A, at a location similar to the YXXØ-binding site on μ2 but not μ4. The binding sites on μ3A and μ2 exhibit similarities and differences that account for the ability of both proteins to bind distinct sets of YXXØ signals. Biochemical analyses confirm the identification of the μ3A site and show that this protein binds YXXØ signals with 14–19 μm affinity. The surface electrostatic potential of μ3A is less basic than that of μ2, in part explaining the association of AP-3 with intracellular membranes having less acidic phosphoinositides. PMID:23404500

  6. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  7. The TCP1γ subunit of Leishmania donovani forms a biologically active homo-oligomeric complex.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar; Mitra, Kalyan; Kuldeep, Jitendra; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Goyal, Neena

    2015-12-01

    Chaperonins are a class of molecular chaperons that encapsulate nascent or stress-denatured proteins and assist their intracellular assembly and folding in an ATP-dependent manner. The ubiquitous eukaryotic chaperonin, TCP1 ring complex is a hetero-oligomeric complex comprising two rings, each formed of eight subunits that may have distinct substrate recognition and ATP hydrolysis properties. In Leishmania, only the TCP1γ subunit has been cloned and characterized. It exhibited differential expression at various growth stages of promastigotes. In the present study, we expressed the TCP1γ subunit in Escherichia coli to investigate whether it forms chaperonin-like complexes and plays a role in protein folding. LdTCP1γ formed high-molecular-weight complexes within E. coli cells as well as in Leishmania cell lysates. The recombinant protein is arranged into two back-to-back rings of seven subunits each, as predicted by homology modelling and observed by negative staining electron microscopy. This morphology is consistent with that of the oligomeric double-ring group I chaperonins found in mitochondria. The LdTCP1γ homo-oligomeric complex hydrolysed ATP, and was active as assayed by luciferase refolding. Thus, the homo-oligomer performs chaperonin reactions without partner subunit(s). Further, co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that LdTCP1γ interacts with actin and tubulin proteins, suggesting that the complex may have a role in maintaining the structural dynamics of the cytoskeleton of parasites. PMID:26395202

  8. Multiple functions of the origin recognition complex.

    PubMed

    Chesnokov, Igor N

    2007-01-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC), a heteromeric six-subunit protein, is a central component for eukaryotic DNA replication. The ORC binds to DNA at replication origin sites in an ATP-dependent manner and serves as a scaffold for the assembly of other key initiation factors. Sequence rules for ORC-DNA binding appear to vary widely. In budding yeast the ORC recognizes specific ori elements, however, in higher eukaryotes origin site selection does not appear to depend on the specific DNA sequence. In metazoans, during cell cycle progression, one or more of the ORC subunits can be modified in such a way that ORC activity is inhibited until mitosis is complete and a nuclear membrane is assembled. In addition to its well-documented role in the initiation of DNA replication, the ORC is also involved in other cell functions. Some of these activities directly link cell cycle progression with DNA replication, while other functions seem distinct from replication. The function of ORCs in the establishment of transcriptionally repressed regions is described for many species and may be a conserved feature common for both unicellular eukaryotes and metazoans. ORC subunits were found at centrosomes, at the cell membranes, at the cytokinesis furrows of dividing cells, as well as at the kinetochore. The exact mechanism of these localizations remains to be determined, however, latest results support the idea that ORC proteins participate in multiple aspects of the chromosome inheritance cycle. In this review, we discuss the participation of ORC proteins in various cell functions, in addition to the canonical role of ORC in initiating DNA replication. PMID:17241905

  9. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  10. Dual Functions, Clamp Opening and Primer-Template Recognition, Define a Key Clamp Loader Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Maria Magdalena; Jin, Mi; Ceapa, Razvan; Finkelstein, Jeff; O'Donnell, Michael; Chait, Brian T.; Hingorani, Manju M.

    2010-01-01

    Clamp loader proteins catalyze assembly of circular sliding clamps on DNA to enable processive DNA replication. During the reaction, the clamp loader binds primer-template DNA and positions it in the center of a clamp to form a topological link between the two. Clamp loaders are multi-protein complexes, such as the five protein Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and human clamp loaders, and the two protein Pyrococcus furiosus and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum clamp loaders, and thus far the site(s) responsible for binding and selecting primer-template DNA as the target for clamp assembly remain unknown. To address this issue, we analyzed the interaction between the E. coli γ complex clamp loader and DNA using UV-induced protein–DNA cross-linking and mass spectrometry. The results show that the δ subunit in the γ complex makes close contact with the primer-template junction. Tryptophan 279 in the δ C-terminal domain lies near the 3′-OH primer end and may play a key role in primer-template recognition. Previous studies have shown that δ also binds and opens the β clamp (hydrophobic residues in the N-terminal domain of δ contact β. The clamp-binding and DNA-binding sites on δ appear positioned for facile entry of primer-template into the center of the clamp and exit of the template strand from the complex. A similar analysis of the S. cerevisiae RFC complex suggests that the dual functionality observed for δ in the γ complex may be true also for clamp loaders from other organisms. PMID:15364574

  11. Structural basis for the subunit assembly of the anaphase-promoting complex.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Anne; Stengel, Florian; Zhang, Ziguo; Enchev, Radoslav I; Kong, Eric H; Morris, Edward P; Robinson, Carol V; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Barford, David

    2011-02-10

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is an unusually large E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for regulating defined cell cycle transitions. Information on how its 13 constituent proteins are assembled, and how they interact with co-activators, substrates and regulatory proteins is limited. Here, we describe a recombinant expression system that allows the reconstitution of holo APC/C and its sub-complexes that, when combined with electron microscopy, mass spectrometry and docking of crystallographic and homology-derived coordinates, provides a precise definition of the organization and structure of all essential APC/C subunits, resulting in a pseudo-atomic model for 70% of the APC/C. A lattice-like appearance of the APC/C is generated by multiple repeat motifs of most APC/C subunits. Three conserved tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) subunits (Cdc16, Cdc23 and Cdc27) share related superhelical homo-dimeric architectures that assemble to generate a quasi-symmetrical structure. Our structure explains how this TPR sub-complex, together with additional scaffolding subunits (Apc1, Apc4 and Apc5), coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate recognition module (Apc2, Apc11 and Apc10 (also known as Doc1)), and TPR-phosphorylation sites, relative to co-activator, regulatory proteins and substrates. PMID:21307936

  12. Functional diversity of complex I subunits in Candida albicans mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; She, Xiaodong; Calderone, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Our interest in the mitochondria of Candida albicans has progressed to the identification of several proteins that are critical to complex I (CI) activity. We speculated that there should be major functional differences at the protein level between mammalian and fungal mitochondria CI. In our pursuit of this idea, we were helped by published data of CI subunit proteins from a broad diversity of species that included two subunit proteins that are not found in mammals. These subunit proteins have been designated as Nuo1p and Nuo2p (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductases). Since functional assignments of both C. albicans proteins were unknown, other than having a putative NADH-oxidoreductase activity, we constructed knock-out strains that could be compared to parental cells. The relevance of our research relates to the critical roles of both proteins in cell biology and pathogenesis and their absence in mammals. These features suggest they may be exploited in antifungal drug discovery. Initially, we characterized Goa1p that apparently regulates CI activity but is not a CI subunit protein. We have used the goa1∆ for comparisons to Nuo1p and Nuo2p. We have demonstrated the critical role of these proteins in maintaining CI activities, virulence, and prolonging life span. More recently, transcriptional profiling of the three mutants and an ndh51∆ (protein is a highly conserved CI subunit) has revealed that there are overlapping yet also different functional assignments that suggest subunit specificity. The differences and similarities of each are described below along with our hypotheses to explain these data. Our conclusion and perspective is that the C. albicans CI subunit proteins are highly conserved except for two that define non-mammalian functions. PMID:26373419

  13. The Role of TcdB and TccC Subunits in Secretion of the Photorhabdus Tcd Toxin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guowei; Waterfield, Nicholas R.

    2013-01-01

    The Toxin Complex (TC) is a large multi-subunit toxin encoded by a range of bacterial pathogens. The best-characterized examples are from the insect pathogens Photorhabdus, Xenorhabdus and Yersinia. They consist of three large protein subunits, designated A, B and C that assemble in a 5∶1∶1 stoichiometry. Oral toxicity to a range of insects means that some have the potential to be developed as pest control technology. The three subunit proteins do not encode any recognisable export sequences and as such little progress has been made in understanding their secretion. We have developed heterologous TC production and secretion models in E. coli and used them to ascribe functions to different domains of the crucial B+C sub-complex. We have determined that the B and C subunits use a secretion mechanism that is either encoded by the proteins themselves or employ an as yet undefined system common to laboratory strains of E. coli. We demonstrate that both the N-terminal domains of the B and C subunits are required for secretion of the whole complex. We propose a model whereby the N-terminus of the C-subunit toxin exports the B+C sub-complex across the inner membrane while that of the B-subunit allows passage across the outer membrane. We also demonstrate that even in the absence of the B-subunit, that the C-subunit can also facilitate secretion of the larger A-subunit. The recognition of this novel export system is likely to be of importance to future protein secretion studies. Finally, the identification of homologues of B and C subunits in diverse bacterial pathogens, including Burkholderia and Pseudomonas, suggests that these toxins are likely to be important in a range of different hosts, including man. PMID:24098116

  14. CMF70 is a subunit of the dynein regulatory complex.

    PubMed

    Kabututu, Zakayi P; Thayer, Michelle; Melehani, Jason H; Hill, Kent L

    2010-10-15

    Flagellar motility drives propulsion of several important pathogens and is essential for human development and physiology. Motility of the eukaryotic flagellum requires coordinate regulation of thousands of dynein motors arrayed along the axoneme, but the proteins underlying dynein regulation are largely unknown. The dynein regulatory complex, DRC, is recognized as a focal point of axonemal dynein regulation, but only a single DRC subunit, trypanin/PF2, is currently known. The component of motile flagella 70 protein, CMF70, is broadly and uniquely conserved among organisms with motile flagella, suggesting a role in axonemal motility. Here we demonstrate that CMF70 is part of the DRC from Trypanosoma brucei. CMF70 is located along the flagellum, co-sediments with trypanin in sucrose gradients and co-immunoprecipitates with trypanin. RNAi knockdown of CMF70 causes motility defects in a wild-type background and suppresses flagellar paralysis in cells with central pair defects, thus meeting the functional definition of a DRC subunit. Trypanin and CMF70 are mutually conserved in at least five of six extant eukaryotic clades, indicating that the DRC was probably present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. We have identified only the second known subunit of this ubiquitous dynein regulatory system, highlighting the utility of combined genomic and functional analyses for identifying novel subunits of axonemal sub-complexes. PMID:20876659

  15. Conformation of 4.5S RNA in the signal recognition particle and on the 30S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    GU, SHAN-QING; JÖCKEL, JOHANNES; BEINKER, PHILIPP; WARNECKE, JENS; SEMENKOV, YURI P.; RODNINA, MARINA V.; WINTERMEYER, WOLFGANG

    2005-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) from Escherichia coli consists of 4.5S RNA and protein Ffh. It is essential for targeting ribosomes that are translating integral membrane proteins to the translocation pore in the plasma membrane. Independently of Ffh, 4.5S RNA also interacts with elongation factor G (EF-G) and the 30S ribosomal subunit. Here we use a cross-linking approach to probe the conformation of 4.5S RNA in SRP and in the complex with the 30S ribosomal subunit and to map the binding site. The UV-activatable cross-linker p-azidophenacyl bromide (AzP) was attached to positions 1, 21, and 54 of wild-type or modified 4.5S RNA. In SRP, cross-links to Ffh were formed from AzP in all three positions in 4.5S RNA, indicating a strongly bent conformation in which the 5′ end (position 1) and the tetraloop region (including position 54) of the molecule are close to one another and to Ffh. In ribosomal complexes of 4.5S RNA, AzP in both positions 1 and 54 formed cross-links to the 30S ribosomal subunit, independently of the presence of Ffh. The major cross-linking target on the ribosome was protein S7; minor cross-links were formed to S2, S18, and S21. There were no cross-links from 4.5S RNA to the 50S subunit, where the primary binding site of SRP is located close to the peptide exit. The functional role of 4.5S RNA binding to the 30S subunit is unclear, as the RNA had no effect on translation or tRNA translocation on the ribosome. PMID:16043501

  16. Opportunity recognition in complex environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, L.

    1996-12-31

    An agent operating in an unpredictable world must be able to take advantage of opportunities but cannot afford to perform a detailed analysis of the effects of every nuance of the current situation on its goals if it is to respond in a timely manner. This paper describes a filtering mechanism that enables the effective recognition of opportunities. The mechanism is based on a characterization of the world in terms of reference features, features that are both cheap and functional and that appear to be prevalent in everyday life. Its use enables the plan execution system PARETO to recognize types of opportunities that other systems cannot. Reference features can also play a role in the detection of threats, and may be involved in the development of expertise.

  17. RNA degradation paths in a 12-subunit nuclear exosome complex.

    PubMed

    Makino, Debora Lika; Schuch, Benjamin; Stegmann, Elisabeth; Baumgärtner, Marc; Basquin, Claire; Conti, Elena

    2015-08-01

    The eukaryotic exosome is a conserved RNA-degrading complex that functions in RNA surveillance, turnover and processing. How the same machinery can either completely degrade or precisely trim RNA substrates has long remained unexplained. Here we report the crystal structures of a yeast nuclear exosome containing the 9-subunit core, the 3'-5' RNases Rrp44 and Rrp6, and the obligate Rrp6-binding partner Rrp47 in complex with different RNAs. The combined structural and biochemical data of this 12-subunit complex reveal how a single-stranded RNA can reach the Rrp44 or Rrp6 active sites directly or can bind Rrp6 and be threaded via the central channel towards the distal RNase Rrp44. When a bulky RNA is stalled at the entrance of the channel, Rrp6-Rrp47 swings open. The results suggest how the same molecular machine can coordinate processive degradation and partial trimming in an RNA-dependent manner by a concerted swinging mechanism of the two RNase subunits. PMID:26222026

  18. Crystal Structure of the Eukaryotic Origin Recognition Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bleichert, Franziska; Botchan, Michael R.; Berger, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of cellular DNA replication is tightly controlled to sustain genomic integrity. In eukaryotes, the heterohexameric origin recognition complex (ORC) is essential for coordinating replication onset. The 3.5 Å resolution crystal structure of Drosophila ORC reveals that the 270 kDa initiator core complex comprises a two-layered notched ring in which a collar of winged-helix domains from the Orc1-5 subunits sits atop a layer of AAA+ ATPase folds. Although canonical inter-AAA+ domain interactions exist between four of the six ORC subunits, unanticipated features are also evident, including highly interdigitated domain-swapping interactions between the winged-helix folds and AAA+ modules of neighboring protomers, and a quasi-spiral arrangement of DNA binding elements that circumnavigate a ~20 Å wide channel in the center of the complex. Comparative analyses indicate that ORC encircles DNA, using its winged-helix domain face to engage the MCM2-7 complex during replicative helicase loading; however, an observed >90° out-of-plane rotation for the Orc1 AAA+ domain disrupts interactions with catalytic amino acids in Orc4, narrowing and sealing off entry into the central channel. Prima facie, our data indicate that Drosophila ORC can switch between active and autoinhibited conformations, suggesting a novel means for cell cycle and/or developmental control of ORC functions. PMID:25762138

  19. Substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by a single-subunit protein-only RNase P.

    PubMed

    Brillante, Nadia; Gößringer, Markus; Lindenhofer, Dominik; Toth, Ursula; Rossmanith, Walter; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-03-18

    RNase P is the enzyme that removes 5' extensions from tRNA precursors. With its diversity of enzyme forms-either protein- or RNA-based, ranging from single polypeptides to multi-subunit ribonucleoproteins-the RNase P enzyme family represents a unique model system to compare the evolution of enzymatic mechanisms. Here we present a comprehensive study of substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by the nuclear single-subunit proteinaceous RNase P PRORP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared to bacterial RNase P, the best-characterized RNA-based enzyme form, PRORP3 requires a larger part of intact tRNA structure, but little to no determinants at the cleavage site or interactions with the 5' or 3' extensions of the tRNA. The cleavage site depends on the combined dimensions of acceptor stem and T domain, but also requires the leader to be single-stranded. Overall, the single-subunit PRORP appears mechanistically more similar to the complex nuclear ribonucleoprotein enzymes than to the simpler bacterial RNase P. Mechanistic similarity or dissimilarity among different forms of RNase P thus apparently do not necessarily reflect molecular composition or evolutionary relationship. PMID:26896801

  20. Substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by a single-subunit protein-only RNase P

    PubMed Central

    Brillante, Nadia; Gößringer, Markus; Lindenhofer, Dominik; Toth, Ursula; Rossmanith, Walter; Hartmann, Roland K.

    2016-01-01

    RNase P is the enzyme that removes 5′ extensions from tRNA precursors. With its diversity of enzyme forms—either protein- or RNA-based, ranging from single polypeptides to multi-subunit ribonucleoproteins—the RNase P enzyme family represents a unique model system to compare the evolution of enzymatic mechanisms. Here we present a comprehensive study of substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by the nuclear single-subunit proteinaceous RNase P PRORP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared to bacterial RNase P, the best-characterized RNA-based enzyme form, PRORP3 requires a larger part of intact tRNA structure, but little to no determinants at the cleavage site or interactions with the 5′ or 3′ extensions of the tRNA. The cleavage site depends on the combined dimensions of acceptor stem and T domain, but also requires the leader to be single-stranded. Overall, the single-subunit PRORP appears mechanistically more similar to the complex nuclear ribonucleoprotein enzymes than to the simpler bacterial RNase P. Mechanistic similarity or dissimilarity among different forms of RNase P thus apparently do not necessarily reflect molecular composition or evolutionary relationship. PMID:26896801

  1. The architecture of the DNA replication origin recognition complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Speck, Christian; Wendel, Patricia; Tang, Chunyan; Stillman, Bruce; Li, Huilin

    2008-07-29

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) is conserved in all eukaryotes. The six proteins of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORC that form a stable complex bind to origins of DNA replication and recruit prereplicative complex (pre-RC) proteins, one of which is Cdc6. To further understand the function of ORC we recently determined by single-particle reconstruction of electron micrographs a low-resolution, 3D structure of S. cerevisiae ORC and the ORC-Cdc6 complex. In this article, the spatial arrangement of the ORC subunits within the ORC structure is described. In one approach, a maltose binding protein (MBP) was systematically fused to the N or the C termini of the five largest ORC subunits, one subunit at a time, generating 10 MBP-fused ORCs, and the MBP density was localized in the averaged, 2D EM images of the MBP-fused ORC particles. Determining the Orc1-5 structure and comparing it with the native ORC structure localized the Orc6 subunit near Orc2 and Orc3. Finally, subunit-subunit interactions were determined by immunoprecipitation of ORC subunits synthesized in vitro. Based on the derived ORC architecture and existing structures of archaeal Orc1-DNA structures, we propose a model for ORC and suggest how ORC interacts with origin DNA and Cdc6. The studies provide a basis for understanding the overall structure of the pre-RC. PMID:18647841

  2. Immunological characterization of exocyst complex subunits in cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Hsu, Shu C

    2003-06-01

    We have generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three proteins sec6, sec15, and exo84. These proteins have been shown to be components of the exocyst complex, a macromolecule required for many biological processes such as kidney epithelial formation and neuronal development. These antibodies can detect the three proteins by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunoprecipitation. Using these antibodies, we found that the three proteins have similar subcellular localization which changes upon cell differentiation. These three proteins also co-immunoprecipitate with each other. These results suggest that at least three exocyst subunits associate with each other in vivo and redistribute in response to cell differentiation. In the future, these antibodies should be useful in the cell biological and functional analysis of the exocyst complex under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:12954101

  3. Unique subunit packing in mycobacterial nanoRNase leads to alternate substrate recognitions in DHH phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Srivastav, Rajpal; Kumar, Dilip; Grover, Amit; Singh, Ajit; Manjasetty, Babu A.; Sharma, Rakesh; Taneja, Bhupesh

    2014-01-01

    DHH superfamily includes RecJ, nanoRNases (NrnA), cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases and pyrophosphatases. In this study, we have carried out in vitro and in vivo investigations on the bifunctional NrnA-homolog from Mycobacterium smegmatis, MSMEG_2630. The crystal structure of MSMEG_2630 was determined to 2.2-Å resolution and reveals a dimer consisting of two identical subunits with each subunit folding into an N-terminal DHH domain and a C-terminal DHHA1 domain. The overall structure and fold of the individual domains is similar to other members of DHH superfamily. However, MSMEG_2630 exhibits a distinct quaternary structure in contrast to other DHH phosphodiesterases. This novel mode of subunit packing and variations in the linker region that enlarge the domain interface are responsible for alternate recognitions of substrates in the bifunctional nanoRNases. MSMEG_2630 exhibits bifunctional 3′-5′ exonuclease [on both deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) substrates] as well as CysQ-like phosphatase activity (on pAp) in vitro with a preference for nanoRNA substrates over single-stranded DNA of equivalent lengths. A transposon disruption of MSMEG_2630 in M. smegmatis causes growth impairment in the presence of various DNA-damaging agents. Further phylogenetic analysis and genome organization reveals clustering of bacterial nanoRNases into two distinct subfamilies with possible role in transcriptional and translational events during stress. PMID:24878921

  4. Multipoint molecular recognition within a calix[6]arene funnel complex

    PubMed Central

    Coquière, David; de la Lande, Aurélien; Martí, Sergio; Parisel, Olivier; Prangé, Thierry; Reinaud, Olivia

    2009-01-01

    A multipoint recognition system based on a calix[6]arene is described. The calixarene core is decorated on alternating aromatic subunits by 3 imidazole arms at the small rim and 3 aniline groups at the large rim. This substitution pattern projects the aniline nitrogens toward each other when Zn(II) binds at the Tris-imidazole site or when a proton binds at an aniline. The XRD structure of the monoprotonated complex having an acetonitrile molecule bound to Zn(II) in the cavity revealed a constrained geometry at the metal center reminiscent of an entatic state. Computer modeling suggests that the aniline groups behave as a tritopic monobasic site in which only 1 aniline unit is protonated and interacts with the other 2 through strong hydrogen bonding. The metal complex selectively binds a monoprotonated diamine vs. a monoamine through multipoint recognition: coordination to the metal ion at the small rim, hydrogen bonding to the calix-oxygen core, CH/π interaction within the cavity's aromatic walls, and H-bonding to the anilines at the large rim. PMID:19237564

  5. Structure of subcomplex Iβ of mammalian respiratory complex I leads to new supernumerary subunit assignments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiapeng; King, Martin S; Yu, Minmin; Klipcan, Liron; Leslie, Andrew G W; Hirst, Judy

    2015-09-29

    Mitochondrial complex I (proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is an essential respiratory enzyme. Mammalian complex I contains 45 subunits: 14 conserved "core" subunits and 31 "supernumerary" subunits. The structure of Bos taurus complex I, determined to 5-Å resolution by electron cryomicroscopy, described the structure of the mammalian core enzyme and allowed the assignment of 14 supernumerary subunits. Here, we describe the 6.8-Å resolution X-ray crystallography structure of subcomplex Iβ, a large portion of the membrane domain of B. taurus complex I that contains two core subunits and a cohort of supernumerary subunits. By comparing the structures and composition of subcomplex Iβ and complex I, supported by comparisons with Yarrowia lipolytica complex I, we propose assignments for eight further supernumerary subunits in the structure. Our new assignments include two CHCH-domain containing subunits that contain disulfide bridges between CX9C motifs; they are processed by the Mia40 oxidative-folding pathway in the intermembrane space and probably stabilize the membrane domain. We also assign subunit B22, an LYR protein, to the matrix face of the membrane domain. We reveal that subunit B22 anchors an acyl carrier protein (ACP) to the complex, replicating the LYR protein-ACP structural module that was identified previously in the hydrophilic domain. Thus, we significantly extend knowledge of how the mammalian supernumerary subunits are arranged around the core enzyme, and provide insights into their roles in biogenesis and regulation. PMID:26371297

  6. Structural basis of H2A.Z recognition by SRCAP chromatin-remodeling subunit YL1.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoping; Shan, Shan; Pan, Lu; Zhao, Jicheng; Ranjan, Anand; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Huang, Yingzi; Feng, Hanqiao; Wei, Debbie; Huang, Li; Liu, Xuehui; Zhong, Qiang; Lou, Jizhong; Li, Guohong; Wu, Carl; Zhou, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Histone variant H2A.Z, a universal mark of dynamic nucleosomes flanking gene promoters and enhancers, is incorporated into chromatin by SRCAP (SWR1), an ATP-dependent, multicomponent chromatin-remodeling complex. The YL1 (Swc2) subunit of SRCAP (SWR1) plays an essential role in H2A.Z recognition, but how it achieves this has been unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the H2A.Z-binding domain of Drosophila melanogaster YL1 (dYL1-Z) in complex with an H2A.Z-H2B dimer at 1.9-Å resolution. The dYL1-Z domain adopts a new whip-like structure that wraps over H2A.Z-H2B, and preferential recognition is largely conferred by three residues in loop 2, the hyperacidic patch and the extended αC helix of H2A.Z. Importantly, this domain is essential for deposition of budding yeast H2A.Z in vivo and SRCAP (SWR1)-catalyzed histone H2A.Z replacement in vitro. Our studies distinguish YL1-Z from known H2A.Z chaperones and suggest a hierarchical mechanism based on increasing binding affinity facilitating H2A.Z transfer from SRCAP (SWR1) to the nucleosome. PMID:26974124

  7. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic origin recognition complex.

    PubMed

    Bleichert, Franziska; Botchan, Michael R; Berger, James M

    2015-03-19

    Initiation of cellular DNA replication is tightly controlled to sustain genomic integrity. In eukaryotes, the heterohexameric origin recognition complex (ORC) is essential for coordinating replication onset. Here we describe the crystal structure of Drosophila ORC at 3.5 Å resolution, showing that the 270 kilodalton initiator core complex comprises a two-layered notched ring in which a collar of winged-helix domains from the Orc1-5 subunits sits atop a layer of AAA+ (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) folds. Although canonical inter-AAA+ domain interactions exist between four of the six ORC subunits, unanticipated features are also evident. These include highly interdigitated domain-swapping interactions between the winged-helix folds and AAA+ modules of neighbouring protomers, and a quasi-spiral arrangement of DNA binding elements that circumnavigate an approximately 20 Å wide channel in the centre of the complex. Comparative analyses indicate that ORC encircles DNA, using its winged-helix domain face to engage the mini-chromosome maintenance 2-7 (MCM2-7) complex during replicative helicase loading; however, an observed out-of-plane rotation of more than 90° for the Orc1 AAA+ domain disrupts interactions with catalytic amino acids in Orc4, narrowing and sealing off entry into the central channel. Prima facie, our data indicate that Drosophila ORC can switch between active and autoinhibited conformations, suggesting a novel means for cell cycle and/or developmental control of ORC functions. PMID:25762138

  8. Retrovirus Restriction by TRIM5 Proteins Requires Recognition of Only a Small Fraction of Viral Capsid Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiong; Friedman, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The host restriction factors TRIM5α and TRIMCyp potently inhibit retrovirus infection by binding to the incoming retrovirus capsid. TRIM5 proteins are dimeric, and their association with the viral capsid appears to be enhanced by avidity effects owing to formation of higher-order oligomeric complexes. We examined the stoichiometric requirement for TRIM5 functional recognition by quantifying the efficiencies of restriction of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MLV) particles containing various proportions of restriction-sensitive and -insensitive CA subunits. Both TRIMCyp and TRIM5α inhibited infection of retrovirus particles containing as little as 25% of the restriction-sensitive CA protein. Accordingly, we also observed efficient binding of TRIMCyp in vitro to capsid assemblies containing as little as one-fourth wild-type CA protein. Paradoxically, the ability of HIV-1 particles to abrogate TRIMCyp restriction in trans was more strongly dependent on the fraction of wild-type CA than was restriction of infection. Collectively, our results indicate that TRIM5 restriction factors bind to retroviral capsids in a highly cooperative manner and suggest that TRIM5 can engage a capsid lattice containing a minimum of three or fewer recognizable subunits per hexamer. Our study supports a model in which localized binding of TRIM5 to the viral capsid nucleates rapid polymerization of a TRIM5 lattice on the capsid surface. PMID:23785198

  9. Functional architecture of the retromer cargo-recognition complex

    PubMed Central

    Hierro, Aitor; Rojas, Adriana L.; Rojas, Raul; Murthy, Namita; Effantin, Grégory; Kajava, Andrey V.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Hurley, James H.

    2008-01-01

    The retromer complex 1, 2 is required for the sorting of acid hydrolases to lysosomes 3-7, transcytosis of the polymeric Ig receptor 8, Wnt gradient formation 9, 10, iron transporter recycling 11, and processing of the amyloid precursor protein 12. Human retromer consists of two smaller complexes, the cargo recognition Vps26:Vps29:Vps35 heterotrimer, and a membrane-targeting heterodimer or homodimer of SNX1 and/or SNX2 13. The crystal structure of a Vps29:Vps35 subcomplex shows how the metallophosphoesterase-fold subunit Vps29 14, 15 acts as a scaffold for the C-terminal half of Vps35. Vps35 forms a horseshoe-shaped right-handed α-helical solenoid whose concave face completely covers the metal-binding site of Vps29 and whose convex face exposes a series of hydrophobic interhelical grooves. Electron microscopy shows that the intact Vps26:Vps29:Vps35 complex is a stick-shaped, somewhat flexible, structure, ∼ 21 nm long. A hybrid structural model derived from crystal structures, electron microscopy, interaction studies, and bioinformatics shows that the α-solenoid fold extends the full length of Vps35, and that Vps26 is bound at the opposite end from Vps29. This extended structure presents multiple binding sites for the SNX complex and receptor cargo, and appears capable of flexing to conform to curved vesicular membranes. PMID:17891154

  10. Structure of a Cytoplasmic 11-Subunit RNA Exosome Complex.

    PubMed

    Kowalinski, Eva; Kögel, Alexander; Ebert, Judith; Reichelt, Peter; Stegmann, Elisabeth; Habermann, Bianca; Conti, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The RNA exosome complex associates with nuclear and cytoplasmic cofactors to mediate the decay, surveillance, or processing of a wide variety of transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the conserved core of the exosome (Exo10) functions together with the conserved Ski complex. The interaction of S. cerevisiae Exo10 and Ski is not direct but requires a bridging cofactor, Ski7. Here, we report the 2.65 Å resolution structure of S. cerevisiae Exo10 bound to the interacting domain of Ski7. Extensive hydrophobic interactions rationalize the high affinity and stability of this complex, pointing to Ski7 as a constitutive component of the cytosolic exosome. Despite the absence of sequence homology, cytoplasmic Ski7 and nuclear Rrp6 bind Exo10 using similar surfaces and recognition motifs. Knowledge of the interacting residues in the yeast complexes allowed us to identify a splice variant of human HBS1-Like as a Ski7-like exosome-binding protein, revealing the evolutionary conservation of this cytoplasmic cofactor. PMID:27345150

  11. Structure of Csm2 elucidates the relationship between small subunits of CRISPR-Cas effector complexes.

    PubMed

    Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-05-01

    Type I and type III CRISPR-Cas effector complexes share similar architecture and have homologous key subunits. However, the relationship between the so-called small subunits of these complexes remains a contentious issue. Here, it is shown that the recently solved structure of Thermotoga maritima Csm2 represents a dimer with the extensive structure swapping between monomers. Unswapping the structure generates a compact globular monomer which shares similar structure and surface properties with Cmr5, the small subunit of a related Cmr complex. Detailed analysis of available structures of small subunits reveals that they all have a common fold suggesting their common origin. PMID:27091242

  12. Structural Basis for Promoter ;#8722;10 Element Recognition by the Bacterial RNA Polymerase [sigma] Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Feklistov, Andrey; Darst, Seth A.

    2011-12-15

    The key step in bacterial promoter opening is recognition of the -10 promoter element (T-{sub 12}A-{sub 11}T-{sub 10}A-{sub 9}A-{sub 8}T{sub -7} consensus sequence) by the RNA polymerase {alpha} subunit. We determined crystal structures of {alpha} domain 2 bound to single-stranded DNA bearing -10 element sequences. Extensive interactions occur between the protein and the DNA backbone of every -10 element nucleotide. Base-specific interactions occur primarily with A{sub -11} and T{sub -7}, which are flipped out of the single-stranded DNA base stack and buried deep in protein pockets. The structures, along with biochemical data, support a model where the recognition of the -10 element sequence drives initial promoter opening as the bases of the nontemplate strand are extruded from the DNA double-helix and captured by {alpha}. These results provide a detailed structural basis for the critical roles of A{sub -11} and T{sub -7} in promoter melting and reveal important insights into the initiation of transcription bubble formation.

  13. Structural basis for promoter –10 element recognition by the bacterial RNA polymerase σ subunit

    PubMed Central

    Feklistov, Andrey; Darst, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The key step in bacterial promoter opening is recognition of the -10 promoter element (T-12A-11T-10A-9A-8T-7 consensus sequence) by the RNA polymerase σ subunit. We determined crystal structures of σ domain 2 bound to single-stranded DNA bearing -10 element sequences. Extensive interactions occur between the protein and the DNA backbone of every -10 element nucleotide. Base-specific interactions occur primarily with A-11, and T-7, which are flipped out of the single-stranded DNA base-stack and buried deep in protein pockets. The structures, along with biochemical data, support a model where the recognition of the -10 element sequence drives initial promoter opening as the bases of the non-template strand are extruded from the DNA double-helix and captured by σ. These results provide a detailed structural basis for the critical roles of A-11 and T-7 in promoter melting, and reveal important insights into the initiation of transcription bubble formation. PMID:22136875

  14. A role for interaction of the RNA polymerase flap domain with the sigma subunit in promoter recognition.

    PubMed

    Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Dove, Simon L; Rogulja, Dragana; Nickels, Bryce E; Hochschild, Ann; Heyduk, Tomasz; Severinov, Konstantin

    2002-02-01

    In bacteria, promoter recognition depends on the RNA polymerase sigma subunit, which combines with the catalytically proficient RNA polymerase core to form the holoenzyme. The major class of bacterial promoters is defined by two conserved elements (the -10 and -35 elements, which are 10 and 35 nucleotides upstream of the initiation point, respectively) that are contacted by sigma in the holoenzyme. We show that recognition of promoters of this class depends on the "flexible flap" domain of the RNA polymerase beta subunit. The flap interacts with conserved region 4 of sigma and triggers a conformational change that moves region 4 into the correct position for interaction with the -35 element. Because the flexible flap is evolutionarily conserved, this domain may facilitate promoter recognition by specificity factors in eukaryotes as well. PMID:11823642

  15. LEGO-NMR spectroscopy: a method to visualize individual subunits in large heteromeric complexes.

    PubMed

    Mund, Markus; Overbeck, Jan H; Ullmann, Janina; Sprangers, Remco

    2013-10-18

    Seeing the big picture: Asymmetric macromolecular complexes that are NMR active in only a subset of their subunits can be prepared, thus decreasing NMR spectral complexity. For the hetero heptameric LSm1-7 and LSm2-8 rings NMR spectra of the individual subunits of the complete complex are obtained, showing a conserved RNA binding site. This LEGO-NMR technique makes large asymmetric complexes accessible to detailed NMR spectroscopic studies. PMID:23946163

  16. Aspects of Subunit Interactions in the Chloroplast ATP Synthase (I. Isolation of a Chloroplast Coupling Factor 1-Subunit III Complex from Spinach Thylakoids).

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, C. M.; McCarty, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    A chloroplast ATP synthase complex (CF1 [chloroplast-coupling factor 1]-CF0 [membrane-spanning portion of chloroplast ATP synthase]) depleted of all CF0 subunits except subunit III (also known as the proteolipid subunit) was purified to study the interaction between CF1 and subunit III. Subunit III has a putative role in proton translocation across the thylakoid membrane during photophosphorylation; therefore, an accurate model of subunit inter-actions involving subunit III will be valuable for elucidating the mechanism and regulation of energy coupling. Purification of the complex from a crude CF1-CF0 preparation from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) thylakoids was accomplished by detergent treatment during anion-exchange chromatography. Subunit III in the complex was positively identified by amino acid analysis and N-terminal sequencing. The association of subunit III with CF1 was verified by linear sucrose gradient centrifugation, immunoprecipitation, and incorporation of the complex into asolectin liposomes. After incorporation into liposomes, CF1 was removed from the CF1-III complex by ethylenediaminetetracetate treatment. The subunit III-proteoliposomes were competent to rebind purified CF1. These results indicate that subunit III directly interacts with CF1 in spinach thylakoids. PMID:12231815

  17. Studies of the properties of human origin recognition complex and its Walker A motif mutants.

    PubMed

    Giordano-Coltart, Jennifer; Ying, Carol Y; Gautier, Jean; Hurwitz, Jerard

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic six-subunit origin recognition complex (ORC) governs the initiation site of DNA replication and formation of the prereplication complex. In this report we describe the isolation of the wild-type Homo sapiens (Hs)ORC and variants containing a Walker A motif mutation in the Orc1, Orc4, or Orc5 subunit using the baculovirus-expression system. Coexpression of all six HsORC subunits yielded a stable complex containing HsOrc subunits 1-5 (HsORC1-5) with virtually no Orc6 protein (Orc6p). We examined the ATPase, DNA-binding, and replication activities of these complexes. Similar to other eukaryotic ORCs, wild-type HsORC1-5 possesses ATPase activity that is stimulated only 2-fold by single-stranded DNA. HsORC1-5 with a mutated Walker A motif in Orc1p contains no ATPase activity, whereas a similar mutation of either the Orc4 or Orc5 subunit did not affect this activity. The DNA-binding activity of HsORC1-5, using lamin B2 DNA as substrate, is stimulated by ATP 3- to 5-fold. Mutations in the Walker A motif of Orc1p, Orc4p, or Orc5p reduced the binding efficiency of HsORC1-5 modestly (2- to 5-fold). Xenopus laevis ORC-depleted extracts supplemented with HsORC1-5 supported prereplication complex formation and X. laevis sperm DNA replication, whereas the complex with a mutation in the Walker A motif of the Orc1, Orc4, or Orc5 subunit did not. These studies indicate that the ATP-binding motifs of Orc1, Orc4, and Orc5 are all essential for the replication activity associated with HsORC. PMID:15618391

  18. Molecular Basis of mRNA Cap Recognition by Influenza B Polymerase PB2 Subunit.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lili; Wartchow, Charles; Shia, Steven; Uehara, Kyoko; Steffek, Micah; Warne, Robert; Sutton, James; Muiru, Gladys T; Leonard, Vincent H J; Bussiere, Dirksen E; Ma, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus polymerase catalyzes the transcription of viral mRNAs by a process known as "cap-snatching," where the 5'-cap of cellular pre-mRNA is recognized by the PB2 subunit and cleaved 10-13 nucleotides downstream of the cap by the endonuclease PA subunit. Although this mechanism is common to both influenza A (FluA) and influenza B (FluB) viruses, FluB PB2 recognizes a wider range of cap structures including m(7)GpppGm-, m(7)GpppG-, and GpppG-RNA, whereas FluA PB2 utilizes methylated G-capped RNA specifically. Biophysical studies with isolated PB2 cap-binding domain (PB2(cap)) confirm that FluB PB2 has expanded mRNA cap recognition capability, although the affinities toward m(7)GTP are significantly reduced when compared with FluA PB2. The x-ray co-structures of the FluB PB2(cap) with bound cap analogs m(7)GTP and GTP reveal an inverted GTP binding mode that is distinct from the cognate m(7)GTP binding mode shared between FluA and FluB PB2. These results delineate the commonalities and differences in the cap-binding site between FluA and FluB PB2 and will aid structure-guided drug design efforts to identify dual inhibitors of both FluA and FluB PB2. PMID:26559973

  19. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Anna; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. PMID:27329756

  20. Preprotein recognition by the Toc complex

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Thomas; Jelic, Marko; Vojta, Aleksandar; Radunz, Alfons; Soll, Jürgen; Schleiff, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    The Toc core complex consists of the pore-forming Toc75 and the GTPases Toc159 and Toc34. We confirm that the receptor form of Toc159 is integrated into the membrane. The association of Toc34 to Toc75/Toc159 is GTP dependent and enhanced by preprotein interaction. The N-terminal half of the pSSU transit peptide interacts with high affinity with Toc159, whereas the C-terminal part stimulates its GTP hydrolysis. The phosphorylated C-terminal peptide of pSSU interacts strongly with Toc34 and therefore inhibits binding and translocation of pSSU into Toc proteoliposomes. In contrast, Toc159 recognises only the dephosphorylated forms. The N-terminal part of the pSSU presequence does not influence binding to the Toc complex, but is able to block import into proteoliposomes through its interaction with Toc159. We developed a model of differential presequence recognition by Toc34 and Toc159. PMID:14765117

  1. The origin recognition complex in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    ORC (origin recognition complex) serves as the initiator for the assembly of the pre-RC (pre-replication complex) and the subsequent DNA replication. Together with many of its non-replication functions, ORC is a pivotal regulator of various cellular processes. Notably, a number of reports connect ORC to numerous human diseases, including MGS (Meier–Gorlin syndrome), EBV (Epstein–Barr virus)-infected diseases, American trypanosomiasis and African trypanosomiasis. However, much of the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In those genetic diseases, mutations in ORC alter its function and lead to the dysregulated phenotypes; whereas in some pathogen-induced symptoms, host ORC and archaeal-like ORC are exploited by these organisms to maintain their own genomes. In this review, I provide detailed examples of ORC-related human diseases, and summarize the current findings on how ORC is involved and/or dysregulated. I further discuss how these discoveries can be generalized as model systems, which can then be applied to elucidating other related diseases and revealing potential targets for developing effective therapies. PMID:23662735

  2. PATTERN RECOGNITION STUDIES OF COMPLEX CHROMATOGRAPHIC DATA SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromatographic fingerprinting of complex biological samples is an active research area with a large and growing literature. Multivariate statistical and pattern recognition techniques can be effective methods for the analysis of such complex data. However, the classification of ...

  3. Visualization of Subunit Interactions and Ternary Complexes of Protein Phosphatase 2A in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Shu-Ting; Chiang, Shang-Ju; Lai, Tai-Yu; Cheng, Yu-Ling; Chung, Cheng-En; Kuo, Spencer C. H.; Reece, Kelie M.; Chen, Yung-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Chiang, Chi-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase that controls many diverse cellular functions. The predominant form of PP2A is a heterotrimeric holoenzyme consisting of a scaffolding A subunit, a variable regulatory B subunit, and a catalytic C subunit. The C subunit also associates with other interacting partners, such as α4, to form non-canonical PP2A complexes. We report visualization of PP2A complexes in mammalian cells. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis of PP2A subunit interactions demonstrates that the B subunit plays a key role in directing the subcellular localization of PP2A, and confirms that the A subunit functions as a scaffold in recruiting the B and C subunits to form a heterotrimeric holoenzyme. BiFC analysis also reveals that α4 promotes formation of the AC core dimer. Furthermore, we demonstrate visualization of specific ABC holoenzymes in cells by combining BiFC and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BiFC-FRET). Our studies not only provide direct imaging data to support previous biochemical observations on PP2A complexes, but also offer a promising approach for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of individual PP2A complexes in cells. PMID:25536081

  4. The Adaptor Protein-1 μ1B Subunit Expands the Repertoire of Basolateral Sorting Signal Recognition in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; Mattera, Rafael; Ren, Xuefeng; Chen, Yu; Retamal, Claudio; González, Alfonso; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An outstanding question in protein sorting is why polarized epithelial cells express two isoforms of the μ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin adaptor complex: the ubiquitous μ1A and the epithelial-specific μ1B. Previous studies led to the notion that μ1A and μ1B mediate basolateral sorting predominantly from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes, respectively. Using improved analytical tools, however, we find that μ1A and μ1B largely colocalize with each other. They also colocalize to similar extents with TGN and recycling endosome markers, as well as with basolateral cargoes transiting biosynthetic and endocytic-recycling routes. Instead, the two isoforms differ in their signal-recognition specificity. In particular, μ1B preferentially binds a subset of signals from cargoes that are sorted basolaterally in a μ1B-dependent manner. We conclude that expression of distinct μ1 isoforms in epithelial cells expands the repertoire of signals recognized by AP-1 for sorting of a broader range of cargoes to the basolateral surface. PMID:24229647

  5. A novel 3′ splice site recognition by the two zinc fingers in the U2AF small subunit

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hisashi; Park, Sam-Yong; Oda, Takashi; Akiyoshi, Taeko; Sato, Mamoru; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tsuda, Kengo; Kuwasako, Kanako; Unzai, Satoru; Muto, Yutaka; Urano, Takeshi; Obayashi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The pre-mRNA splicing reaction of eukaryotic cells has to be carried out extremely accurately, as failure to recognize the splice sites correctly causes serious disease. The small subunit of the U2AF heterodimer is essential for the determination of 3′ splice sites in pre-mRNA splicing, and several single-residue mutations of the U2AF small subunit cause severe disorders such as myelodysplastic syndromes. However, the mechanism of RNA recognition is poorly understood. Here we solved the crystal structure of the U2AF small subunit (U2AF23) from fission yeast, consisting of an RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain flanked by two conserved CCCH-type zinc fingers (ZFs). The two ZFs are positioned side by side on the β sheet of the RRM domain. Further mutational analysis revealed that the ZFs bind cooperatively to the target RNA sequence, but the RRM domain acts simply as a scaffold to organize the ZFs and does not itself contact the RNA directly. This completely novel and unexpected mode of RNA-binding mechanism by the U2AF small subunit sheds light on splicing errors caused by mutations of this highly conserved protein. PMID:26215567

  6. Exposing the subunit diversity within protein complexes: a mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Shelly; Tieri, Alessandra; Ridner, Gabriela; Stark, Ann-Kathrin; Schmaler, Tilo; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Sharon, Michal

    2013-03-01

    Identifying the list of subunits that make up protein complexes constitutes an important step towards understanding their biological functions. However, such knowledge alone does not reveal the full complexity of protein assemblies, as each subunit can take on multiple forms. Proteins can be post-translationally modified or cleaved, multiple products of alternative splicing can exist, and a single subunit may be encoded by more than one gene. Thus, for a complete description of a protein complex, it is necessary to expose the diversity of its subunits. Adding this layer of information is an important step towards understanding the mechanisms that regulate the activity of protein assemblies. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based approach that exposes the array of protein variants that comprise protein complexes. Our method relies on denaturing the protein complex, and separating its constituent subunits on a monolithic column prepared in-house. Following the subunit elution from the column, the flow is split into two fractions, using a Triversa NanoMate robot. One fraction is directed straight into an on-line ESI-QToF mass spectrometer for intact protein mass measurements, while the rest of the flow is fractionated into a 96-well plate for subsequent proteomic analysis. The heterogeneity of subunit composition is then exposed by correlating the subunit sequence identity with the accurate mass. Below, we describe in detail the methodological setting of this approach, its application on the endogenous human COP9 signalosome complex, and the significance of the method for structural mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes. PMID:23296018

  7. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Ilca, Serban L; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M; Stuart, David I; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  8. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ilca, Serban L.; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M.; Stuart, David I.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  9. Subunit Organisation of In Vitro Reconstituted HOPS and CORVET Multisubunit Membrane Tethering Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhong; Johnston, Wayne; Kovtun, Oleksiy; Mureev, Sergey; Bröcker, Cornelia; Ungermann, Christian; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical and structural analysis of macromolecular protein assemblies remains challenging due to technical difficulties in recombinant expression, engineering and reconstitution of multisubunit complexes. Here we use a recently developed cell-free protein expression system based on the protozoan Leishmania tarentolae to produce in vitro all six subunits of the 600 kDa HOPS and CORVET membrane tethering complexes. We demonstrate that both subcomplexes and the entire HOPS complex can be reconstituted in vitro resulting in a comprehensive subunit interaction map. To our knowledge this is the largest eukaryotic protein complex in vitro reconstituted to date. Using the truncation and interaction analysis, we demonstrate that the complex is assembled through short hydrophobic sequences located in the C-terminus of the individual Vps subunits. Based on this data we propose a model of the HOPS and CORVET complex assembly that reconciles the available biochemical and structural data. PMID:24312556

  10. Conformational flexibility and subunit arrangement of the modular yeast Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase complex.

    PubMed

    Setiaputra, Dheva; Ross, James D; Lu, Shan; Cheng, Derrick T; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yip, Calvin K

    2015-04-17

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex is a highly conserved, 19-subunit histone acetyltransferase complex that activates transcription through acetylation and deubiquitination of nucleosomal histones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because SAGA has been shown to display conformational variability, we applied gradient fixation to stabilize purified SAGA and systematically analyzed this flexibility using single-particle EM. Our two- and three-dimensional studies show that SAGA adopts three major conformations, and mutations of specific subunits affect the distribution among these. We also located the four functional modules of SAGA using electron microscopy-based labeling and transcriptional activator binding analyses and show that the acetyltransferase module is localized in the most mobile region of the complex. We further comprehensively mapped the subunit interconnectivity of SAGA using cross-linking mass spectrometry, revealing that the Spt and Taf subunits form the structural core of the complex. These results provide the necessary restraints for us to generate a model of the spatial arrangement of all SAGA subunits. According to this model, the chromatin-binding domains of SAGA are all clustered in one face of the complex that is highly flexible. Our results relate information of overall SAGA structure with detailed subunit level interactions, improving our understanding of its architecture and flexibility. PMID:25713136

  11. Conformational Flexibility and Subunit Arrangement of the Modular Yeast Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Setiaputra, Dheva; Ross, James D.; Lu, Shan; Cheng, Derrick T.; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yip, Calvin K.

    2015-01-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex is a highly conserved, 19-subunit histone acetyltransferase complex that activates transcription through acetylation and deubiquitination of nucleosomal histones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because SAGA has been shown to display conformational variability, we applied gradient fixation to stabilize purified SAGA and systematically analyzed this flexibility using single-particle EM. Our two- and three-dimensional studies show that SAGA adopts three major conformations, and mutations of specific subunits affect the distribution among these. We also located the four functional modules of SAGA using electron microscopy-based labeling and transcriptional activator binding analyses and show that the acetyltransferase module is localized in the most mobile region of the complex. We further comprehensively mapped the subunit interconnectivity of SAGA using cross-linking mass spectrometry, revealing that the Spt and Taf subunits form the structural core of the complex. These results provide the necessary restraints for us to generate a model of the spatial arrangement of all SAGA subunits. According to this model, the chromatin-binding domains of SAGA are all clustered in one face of the complex that is highly flexible. Our results relate information of overall SAGA structure with detailed subunit level interactions, improving our understanding of its architecture and flexibility. PMID:25713136

  12. Structure of a C-terminal fragment of its Vps53 subunit suggests similarity of Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex to a family of tethering complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Vasan, Neil; Hutagalung, Alex; Novick, Peter; Reinisch, Karin M.

    2010-08-13

    The Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex is a membrane-tethering complex that functions in traffic from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. Here we present the structure of a C-terminal fragment of the Vps53 subunit, important for binding endosome-derived vesicles, at a resolution of 2.9 {angstrom}. We show that the C terminus consists of two {alpha}-helical bundles arranged in tandem, and we identify a highly conserved surface patch, which may play a role in vesicle recognition. Mutations of the surface result in defects in membrane traffic. The fold of the Vps53 C terminus is strongly reminiscent of proteins that belong to three other tethering complexes - Dsl1, conserved oligomeric Golgi, and the exocyst - thought to share a common evolutionary origin. Thus, the structure of the Vps53 C terminus suggests that GARP belongs to this family of complexes.

  13. Profiling the expression pattern of GPI transamidase complex subunits in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Jatin K; Dasgupta, Santanu; Jadallah, Sana; Chae, Young K; Ratovitski, Edward A; Toubaji, Antoun; Netto, George J; Eagle, Toby; Nissan, Aviram; Sidransky, David; Trink, Barry

    2008-08-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol transamidase complex (GPIT) consists of five subunits: PIG-U, PIG-T, GPAA1, PIG-S and GPI8, and is important in attaching GPI anchors to target proteins. On the basis of our previous reports incriminating PIG-U as an oncogene in bladder cancer and PIG-T and GPAA1 as oncogenes in breast cancer, we evaluated the expression pattern of the GPIT subunits in 19 different human cancers at both mRNA and protein levels. In general, our results demonstrate a more frequent expression of GPIT subunits in cancers than in normal. Among the 19 anatomic sites compared; breast, ovary and uterus showed consistent evidence of overexpression of specific GPIT subunits. There was also overexpression of PIG-U and GPI8 in lymphoma. In addition, non-small cell lung carcinoma showed significant overexpression of the GPIT subunits as compared to small cell lung carcinoma and normal lung tissue. Also, deregulation of specific GPIT subunits was seen in various other cancers. Forced overexpression of two GPIT subunits; PIG-S and GPI8 alone or in combination induced increased proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells. Collectively, our study defines a trend involving the deregulated expression and the functional contribution of the GPIT subunits in various cancers with potential implications in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:18487995

  14. Identification of precise electrostatic recognition sites between cytochrome c6 and the photosystem I subunit PsaF using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Frederik; Drepper, Friedel; Haehnel, Wolfgang; Hippler, Michael

    2006-11-17

    The reduction of the photo-oxidized special chlorophyll pair P700 of photosystem I (PSI) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of eukaryotic organisms is facilitated by the soluble copper-containing protein plastocyanin (pc). In the absence of copper, pc is functionally replaced by the heme-containing protein cytochrome c6 (cyt c6) in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Binding and electron transfer between both donors and PSI follows a two-step mechanism that depends on electrostatic and hydrophobic recognition between the partners. Although the electrostatic and hydrophobic recognition sites on pc and PSI are well known, the precise electrostatic recognition site on cyt c6 is unknown. To specify the interaction sites on a molecular level, we cross-linked cyt c6 and PSI using a zero-length cross-linker and obtained a cross-linked complex competent in fast and efficient electron transfer. As shown previously, cyt c6 cross-links specifically with the PsaF subunit of PSI. Mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides from the cross-linked product revealed specific interaction sites between residues Lys27 of PsaF and Glu69 of cyt c6 and between Lys23 of PsaF and Glu69/Glu70 of cyt c6. Using these new data, we present a molecular model of the intermolecular electron transfer complex between eukaryotic cyt c6 and PSI. PMID:16984911

  15. Molecular recognition and self-assembly special feature: Multipoint molecular recognition within a calix[6]arene funnel complex.

    PubMed

    Coquière, David; de la Lande, Aurélien; Martí, Sergio; Parisel, Olivier; Prangé, Thierry; Reinaud, Olivia

    2009-06-30

    A multipoint recognition system based on a calix[6]arene is described. The calixarene core is decorated on alternating aromatic subunits by 3 imidazole arms at the small rim and 3 aniline groups at the large rim. This substitution pattern projects the aniline nitrogens toward each other when Zn(II) binds at the Tris-imidazole site or when a proton binds at an aniline. The XRD structure of the monoprotonated complex having an acetonitrile molecule bound to Zn(II) in the cavity revealed a constrained geometry at the metal center reminiscent of an entatic state. Computer modeling suggests that the aniline groups behave as a tritopic monobasic site in which only 1 aniline unit is protonated and interacts with the other 2 through strong hydrogen bonding. The metal complex selectively binds a monoprotonated diamine vs. a monoamine through multipoint recognition: coordination to the metal ion at the small rim, hydrogen bonding to the calix-oxygen core, CH/pi interaction within the cavity's aromatic walls, and H-bonding to the anilines at the large rim. PMID:19237564

  16. Analysis of origin recognition complex in saccharomyces cerevisiae by use of Degron mutants.

    PubMed

    Makise, Masaki; Matsui, Nanako; Yamairi, Fumiko; Takahashi, Naoko; Takehara, Masaya; Asano, Teita; Mizushima, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC), a six-protein complex (Orc1p-Orc6p), may deeply involve in initiation of chromosomal DNA replication. However, since most temperature-sensitive orc mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show the accumulation of cells with nearly 2C DNA content, the exact stage at which ORC acts is not fully understood. In this study, we constructed a heat-inducible degron mutant for each ORC subunit. As well as each targeted subunit, other subunits of ORC were also rapidly degraded under non-permissive conditions. In the orc5 degron mutant, incubation under the non-permissive conditions caused accumulation of cells with nearly 2C DNA content, and phosphorylation of Rad53p. When Orc5p (ORC) is depleted, this inhibits G1/S transition and formation of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC). For pre-RC to form, and G1/S transition to proceed, Orc5p (ORC) must be present in late G1, rather than early G1, or G2/M. Block and release experiments revealed that Orc5p (ORC) is not necessary for S and G2/M phase progression. We therefore propose that ORC is necessary for the G1/S transition and pre-RC formation, and accumulation of cells with nearly 2C DNA content seen in various orc mutants is due to inefficient pre-RC formation, and/or induction of checkpoint systems. PMID:18211918

  17. Subunit Interactions within the Carbon-Phosphorus Lyase Complex from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhongjie; Ranganathan, Soumya; Zinnel, Nathanael F.; Russell, William K.; Russell, David H.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphonates are a large class of organophosphorus compounds with a characteristic carbon-phosphorus bond. The genes responsible for phosphonate utilization in gram-negative bacteria are arranged in an operon of 14 genes. The carbon-phosphorus lyase complex, encoded by the genes phnGHIJKLM, catalyzes the cleavage of the stable carbon-phosphorus bond of organophosphonates to the corresponding hydrocarbon and inorganic phosphate. Recently, complexes of this enzyme containing five subunits (PhnG-H-I-J-K), four subunits (PhnG-H-I-J), and two subunits (PhnG-I) were purified after expression in Escherichia coli. Here we demonstrated using mass spectrometry, ultracentrifugation, and chemical crosslinking experiments that these complexes are formed from a PhnG2I2 core that is further elaborated by the addition of two copies each of PhnH and PhnJ to generate PhnG2H2I2J2. This complex adds an additional subunit of PhnK to form PhnG2H2I2J2K. Chemical crosslinking of the 5-component complex demonstrated that PhnJ physically interacts with both PhnG and PhnI. We were unable to demonstrate the interaction of PhnH or PhnK with any other subunits by chemical crosslinking. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange was utilized to probe for alterations in the dynamic properties of individual subunits within the various complexes. Significant regions of PhnG become less accessible to hydrogen/deuterium exchange from solvent within the PhnG2I2 complex compared with PhnG alone. Specific regions of PhnI exhibited significant differences in the H/D exchange rates in PhnG2I2 and PhnG2H2I2J2K. PMID:25954983

  18. The Purification of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast ClpP complex: additional subunits and structural features

    PubMed Central

    Derrien, Benoît; Majeran, Wojciech; Effantin, Grégory; Ebenezer, Joseph; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Vallon, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The ClpP peptidase is a major constituent of the proteolytic machinery of bacteria and organelles. The chloroplast ClpP complex is unusual, in that it associates a large number of subunits, one of which (ClpP1) is encoded in the chloroplast, the others in the nucleus. The complexity of these large hetero-oligomeric complexes has been a major difficulty in their overproduction and biochemical characterization. In this paper, we describe the purification of native chloroplast ClpP complex from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using a strain that carries the Strep-tag II at the C-terminus of the ClpP1 subunit. Similar to land plants, the algal complex comprises active and inactive subunits (3 ClpP and 5 ClpR, respectively). Evidence is presented that a sub-complex can be produced by dissociation, comprising ClpP1 and ClpR1, 2, 3 and 4, similar to the ClpR-ring described in land plants. Our Chlamydomonas ClpP preparation also contains two ClpT subunits, ClpT3 and ClpT4, which like the land plant ClpT1 and ClpT2 show 2 Clp-N domains. ClpTs are believed to function in substrate binding and/or assembly of the two heptameric rings. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ClpT subunits have appeared independently in Chlorophycean algae, in land plants and in dispersed cyanobacterial genomes. Negative staining electron microscopy shows that the Chlamydomonas complex retains the barrel-like shape of homo-oligomeric ClpPs, with 4 additional peripheral masses that we speculate represent either the additional IS1 domain of ClpP1 (a feature unique to algae) or ClpTs or extensions of ClpR subunits PMID:22772861

  19. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cargo-Binding Sites on the μ4-Subunit of Adaptor Protein Complex 4

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Breyan H.; Lin, Yimo; Corales, Esteban A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Mardones, Gonzalo A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes facilitate protein trafficking by playing key roles in the selection of cargo molecules to be sorted in post-Golgi compartments. Four AP complexes (AP-1 to AP-4) contain a medium-sized subunit (μ1-μ4) that recognizes YXXØ-sequences (Ø is a bulky hydrophobic residue), which are sorting signals in transmembrane proteins. A conserved, canonical region in μ subunits mediates recognition of YXXØ-signals by means of a critical aspartic acid. Recently we found that a non-canonical YXXØ-signal on the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds to a distinct region of the μ4 subunit of the AP-4 complex. In this study we aimed to determine the functionality of both binding sites of μ4 on the recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP. We found that substitutions in either binding site abrogated the interaction with the APP-tail in yeast-two hybrid experiments. Further characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry showed instead loss of binding to the APP signal with only the substitution R283D at the non-canonical site, in contrast to a decrease in binding affinity with the substitution D190A at the canonical site. We solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the D190A mutant bound to this non-canonical YXXØ-signal. This structure showed no significant difference compared to that of wild-type μ4. Both differential scanning fluorimetry and limited proteolysis analyses demonstrated that the D190A substitution rendered μ4 less stable, suggesting an explanation for its lower binding affinity to the APP signal. Finally, in contrast to overexpression of the D190A mutant, and acting in a dominant-negative manner, overexpression of μ4 with either a F255A or a R283D substitution at the non-canonical site halted APP transport at the Golgi apparatus. Together, our analyses support that the functional recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP is limited to the non

  20. Structural and functional characterization of cargo-binding sites on the μ4-subunit of adaptor protein complex 4.

    PubMed

    Ross, Breyan H; Lin, Yimo; Corales, Esteban A; Burgos, Patricia V; Mardones, Gonzalo A

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes facilitate protein trafficking by playing key roles in the selection of cargo molecules to be sorted in post-Golgi compartments. Four AP complexes (AP-1 to AP-4) contain a medium-sized subunit (μ1-μ4) that recognizes YXXØ-sequences (Ø is a bulky hydrophobic residue), which are sorting signals in transmembrane proteins. A conserved, canonical region in μ subunits mediates recognition of YXXØ-signals by means of a critical aspartic acid. Recently we found that a non-canonical YXXØ-signal on the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds to a distinct region of the μ4 subunit of the AP-4 complex. In this study we aimed to determine the functionality of both binding sites of μ4 on the recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP. We found that substitutions in either binding site abrogated the interaction with the APP-tail in yeast-two hybrid experiments. Further characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry showed instead loss of binding to the APP signal with only the substitution R283D at the non-canonical site, in contrast to a decrease in binding affinity with the substitution D190A at the canonical site. We solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the D190A mutant bound to this non-canonical YXXØ-signal. This structure showed no significant difference compared to that of wild-type μ4. Both differential scanning fluorimetry and limited proteolysis analyses demonstrated that the D190A substitution rendered μ4 less stable, suggesting an explanation for its lower binding affinity to the APP signal. Finally, in contrast to overexpression of the D190A mutant, and acting in a dominant-negative manner, overexpression of μ4 with either a F255A or a R283D substitution at the non-canonical site halted APP transport at the Golgi apparatus. Together, our analyses support that the functional recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP is limited to the non

  1. Disulfide Engineering to Map Subunit Interactions in the Proteasome and Other Macromolecular Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hochstrasser, Mark; Funakoshi, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Summary In studies of protein complexes for which high-resolution structural data are unavailable, it is often still possible to determine both nearest-neighbor relationships between subunits and atomic-resolution details of these interactions. The eukaryotic 26S proteasome, a ~2.5 MDa protein complex with at least 33 different subunits, is a prime example. Important information about quaternary organization and assembly of proteasomes has been gained using a combination of sequence alignments with related proteins of known tertiary structure, molecular modeling, and disulfide engineering to allow oxidative crosslinking between predicted polypeptide neighbors. Here we provide detailed protocols for engineered cysteine crosslinking of yeast proteasome subunits in whole cell extracts, in active 26S proteasome complexes first isolated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and in subcomplexes that function as potential assembly intermediates. PMID:22350897

  2. eIF3 Peripheral Subunits Rearrangement after mRNA Binding and Start-Codon Recognition.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Angelita; Brito Querido, Jailson; Myasnikov, Alexander G; Mancera-Martinez, Eder; Renaud, Adeline; Kuhn, Lauriane; Hashem, Yaser

    2016-07-21

    mRNA translation initiation in eukaryotes requires the cooperation of a dozen eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) forming several complexes, which leads to mRNA attachment to the small ribosomal 40S subunit, mRNA scanning for start codon, and accommodation of initiator tRNA at the 40S P site. eIF3, composed of 13 subunits, 8 core (a, c, e, f, h, l, k, and m) and 5 peripheral (b, d, g, i, and j), plays a central role during this process. Here we report a cryo-electron microscopy structure of a mammalian 48S initiation complex at 5.8 Å resolution. It shows the relocation of subunits eIF3i and eIF3g to the 40S intersubunit face on the GTPase binding site, at a late stage in initiation. On the basis of a previous study, we demonstrate the relocation of eIF3b to the 40S intersubunit face, binding below the eIF2-Met-tRNAi(Met) ternary complex upon mRNA attachment. Our analysis reveals the deep rearrangement of eIF3 and unravels the molecular mechanism underlying eIF3 function in mRNA scanning and timing of ribosomal subunit joining. PMID:27373335

  3. The exosome subunit Rrp44 plays a direct role in RNA substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Claudia; Anderson, James T; Tollervey, David

    2007-07-20

    The exosome plays key roles in RNA maturation and surveillance, but it is unclear how target RNAs are identified. We report the functional characterization of the yeast exosome component Rrp44, a member of the RNase II family. Recombinant Rrp44 and the purified TRAMP polyadenylation complex each specifically recognized tRNA(i)(Met) lacking a single m(1)A(58) modification, even in the presence of a large excess of total tRNA. This tRNA is otherwise mature and functional in translation in vivo but is presumably subtly misfolded. Complete degradation of the hypomodified tRNA required both Rrp44 and the poly(A) polymerase activity of TRAMP. The intact exosome lacking only the catalytic activity of Rrp44 failed to degrade tRNA(i)(Met), showing this to be a specific Rrp44 substrate. Recognition of hypomodified tRNA(i)(Met) by Rrp44 is genetically separable from its catalytic activity on other substrates, with the mutations mapping to distinct regions of the protein. PMID:17643380

  4. APC16 is a conserved subunit of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome

    PubMed Central

    Kops, Geert J. P. L.; van der Voet, Monique; Manak, Michael S.; van Osch, Maria H. J.; Naini, Said M.; Brear, Andrea; McLeod, Ian X.; Hentschel, Dirk M.; Yates, John R.; van den Heuvel, Sander; Shah, Jagesh V.

    2010-01-01

    Error-free chromosome segregation depends on timely activation of the multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase APC/C. Activation of the APC/C initiates chromosome segregation and mitotic exit by targeting critical cell-cycle regulators for destruction. The APC/C is the principle target of the mitotic checkpoint, which prevents segregation while chromosomes are unattached to spindle microtubules. We now report the identification and characterization of APC16, a conserved subunit of the APC/C. APC16 was found in association with tandem-affinity-purified mitotic checkpoint complex protein complexes. APC16 is a bona fide subunit of human APC/C: it is present in APC/C complexes throughout the cell cycle, the phenotype of APC16-depleted cells copies depletion of other APC/C subunits, and APC16 is important for APC/C activity towards mitotic substrates. APC16 sequence homologues can be identified in metazoans, but not fungi, by four conserved primary sequence stretches. We provide evidence that the C. elegans gene K10D2.4 and the D. rerio gene zgc:110659 are functional equivalents of human APC16. Our findings show that APC/C is composed of previously undescribed subunits, and raise the question of why metazoan APC/C is molecularly different from unicellular APC/C. PMID:20392738

  5. Complexity reduction with recognition rate maintained for online handwritten Japanese text recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinfeng; Zhu, Bilan; Nakagawa, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents complexity reduction of an on-line handwritten Japanese text recognition system by selecting an optimal off-line recognizer in combination with an on-line recognizer, geometric context evaluation and linguistic context evaluation. The result is that a surprisingly small off-line recognizer, which alone is weak, produces nearly the best recognition rate in combination with other evaluation factors in remarkably small space and time complexity. Generally speaking, lower dimensions with less principle components produce a smaller set of prototypes, which reduce memory-cost and time-cost. It degrades the recognition rate, however, so that we need to compromise them. In an evaluation function with the above-mentioned multiple factors combined, the configuration of only 50 dimensions with as little as 5 principle components for the off-line recognizer keeps almost the best accuracy 97.87% (the best accuracy 97.92%) for text recognition while it suppresses the total memory-cost from 99.4 MB down to 32 MB and the average time-cost of character recognition for text recognition from 0.1621 ms to 0.1191 ms compared with the traditional offline recognizer with 160 dimensions and 50 principle components.

  6. The evolution of new lipoprotein subunits of the bacterial outer membrane BAM complex

    PubMed Central

    Anwari, Khatira; Webb, Chaille T; Poggio, Sebastian; Perry, Andrew J; Belousoff, Matthew; Celik, Nermin; Ramm, Georg; Lovering, Andrew; Sockett, R Elizabeth; Smit, John; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Lithgow, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) complex is an essential feature of all bacteria with an outer membrane. The core subunit of the BAM complex is BamA and, in Escherichia coli, four lipoprotein subunits: BamB, BamC, BamD and BamE, also function in the BAM complex. Hidden Markov model analysis was used to comprehensively assess the distribution of subunits of the BAM lipoproteins across all subclasses of proteobacteria. A patchwork distribution was detected which is readily reconciled with the evolution of the α-, β-, γ-, δ- and ε-proteobacteria. Our findings lead to a proposal that the ancestral BAM complex was composed of two subunits: BamA and BamD, and that BamB, BamC and BamE evolved later in a distinct sequence of events. Furthermore, in some lineages novel lipoproteins have evolved instead of the lipoproteins found in E. coli. As an example of this concept, we show that no known species of α-proteobacteria has a homologue of BamC. However, purification of the BAM complex from the model α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus identified a novel subunit we refer to as BamF, which has a conserved sequence motif related to sequences found in BamC. BamF and BamD can be eluted from the BAM complex under similar conditions, mirroring the BamC:D module seen in the BAM complex of γ-proteobacteria such as E. coli. PMID:22524202

  7. COG Complex Complexities: Detailed Characterization of a Complete Set of HEK293T Cells Lacking Individual COG Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bailey Blackburn, Jessica; Pokrovskaya, Irina; Fisher, Peter; Ungar, Daniel; Lupashin, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    The Conserved Oligomeric Golgi complex is an evolutionarily conserved multisubunit tethering complex (MTC) that is crucial for intracellular membrane trafficking and Golgi homeostasis. The COG complex interacts with core vesicle docking and fusion machinery at the Golgi; however, its exact mechanism of action is still an enigma. Previous studies of COG complex were limited to the use of CDGII (Congenital disorders of glycosylation type II)-COG patient fibroblasts, siRNA mediated knockdowns, or protein relocalization approaches. In this study we have used the CRISPR approach to generate HEK293T knock-out (KO) cell lines missing individual COG subunits. These cell lines were characterized for glycosylation and trafficking defects, cell proliferation rates, stability of COG subunits, localization of Golgi markers, changes in Golgi structure, and N-glycan profiling. We found that all KO cell lines were uniformly deficient in cis/medial-Golgi glycosylation and each had nearly abolished binding of Cholera toxin. In addition, all cell lines showed defects in Golgi morphology, retrograde trafficking and sorting, sialylation and fucosylation, but severities varied according to the affected subunit. Lobe A and Cog6 subunit KOs displayed a more severely distorted Golgi structure, while Cog2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 knock outs had the most hypo glycosylated form of Lamp2. These results led us to conclude that every subunit is essential for COG complex function in Golgi trafficking, though to varying extents. We believe that this study and further analyses of these cells will help further elucidate the roles of individual COG subunits and bring a greater understanding to the class of MTCs as a whole. PMID:27066481

  8. Recognition of chimeric small-subunit ribosomal DNAs composed of genes from uncultivated microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopczynski, E. D.; Bateson, M. M.; Ward, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    When PCR was used to recover small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes from a hot spring cyanobacterial mat community, chimeric SSU rRNA sequences which exhibited little or no secondary structural abnormality were recovered. They were revealed as chimeras of SSU rRNA genes of uncultivated species through separate phylogenetic analysis of short sequence domains.

  9. Capsoplexes: encapsulating complexes via guest recognition.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Philipp J; Pöthig, Alexander

    2016-07-12

    A new dinuclear Ni-NHC complex is able to selectively recognise and self-assemble with guests via tennis-ball like encapsulation, exemplarily demonstrated employing halides. Addition of chloride or bromide leads to the formation of capsules with small cavities which are stabilised through non-classical hydrogen bonds and Coulomb interactions between the anion and the metal centres. PMID:26923883

  10. Formation of novel TRPC channels by complex subunit interactions in embryonic brain.

    PubMed

    Strübing, Carsten; Krapivinsky, Grigory; Krapivinsky, Luba; Clapham, David E

    2003-10-01

    Mammalian short TRP channels (TRPCs) are putative receptor- and store-operated cation channels that play a fundamental role in the regulation of cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Assembly of the seven TRPC homologs (TRPC1-7) into homo- and heteromers can create a large variety of different channels. However, the compositions as well as the functional properties of native TRPC complexes are largely undefined. We performed a systematic biochemical study of TRPC interactions in mammalian brain and identified previously unrecognized channel heteromers composed of TRPC1, TRPC4, or TRPC5 and the diacylglycerol-activated TRPC3 or TRPC6 subunits. The novel TRPC heteromers were found exclusively in embryonic brain. In heterologous systems, we demonstrated that assembly of these novel heteromers required the combination of TRPC1 plus TRPC4 or TRPC5 subunits along with diacylglycerol-sensitive subunits in the channel complexes. Functional interaction of the TRPC subunits was verified using a dominant negative TRPC5 mutant (TRPC5DN). Co-expression of TRPC5DN suppressed currents through TRPC5- and TRPC4-containing complexes; TRPC3-associated currents were unaffected by TRPC5DN unless TRPC1 was also co-expressed. This complex assembly mechanism increases the diversity of TRPC channels in mammalian brain and may generate novel heteromers that have specific roles in the developing brain. PMID:12857742

  11. Dissecting the Roles of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Subunits in the Control of Skin Development.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Katherine L; Perdigoto, Carolina N; Valdes, Victor J; Santoriello, Francis J; Cohen, Idan; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is an essential regulator of cell physiology. Although there have been numerous studies on PRC2 function in somatic tissue development and stem cell control, these have focused on the loss of a single PRC2 subunit. Recent studies, however, have shown that PRC2 subunits may function independently of the PRC2 complex. To investigate the function of PRC2 in the control of skin development, we generated and analyzed three conditional knockout mouse lines, in which the essential PRC2 subunits embryonic ectoderm development (EED), suppressor of zeste 12 homolog (Suz12), and enhancer of zeste homologs 1 and 2 (Ezh1/2) are conditionally ablated in the embryonic epidermal progenitors that give rise to the epidermis, hair follicles, and Merkel cells. Our studies showed that the observed loss-of-function phenotypes are shared between the three knockouts, indicating that in the skin epithelium, EED, Suz12, and Ezh1/2 function largely as subunits of the PRC2 complex. Interestingly, the absence of PRC2 results in dramatically different phenotypes across the different skin lineages: premature acquisition of a functional epidermal barrier, formation of ectopic Merkel cells, and defective postnatal development of hair follicles. The strikingly different roles of PRC2 in the formation of three lineages exemplify the complex outcomes that the lack of PRC2 can have in a somatic stem cell system. PMID:26994968

  12. Research on recognition methods of aphid objects in complex backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Ji-Hong

    2009-07-01

    In order to improve the recognition accuracy among the kinds of aphids in the complex backgrounds, the recognition method among kinds of aphids based on Dual-Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DT-CWT) and Support Vector Machine (Libsvm) is proposed. Firstly the image is pretreated; secondly the aphid images' texture feature of three crops are extracted by DT-CWT in order to get the training parameters of training model; finally the training model could recognize aphids among the three kinds of crops. By contrasting to Gabor wavelet transform and the traditional extracting texture's methods based on Gray-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM), the experiment result shows that the method has a certain practicality and feasibility and provides basic for aphids' recognition between the identification among same kind aphid.

  13. The subunit structure of the arom multienzyme complex of Neurospora crassa. A possible pentafunctional polypeptide chain.

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, J; Coggins, J R

    1977-01-01

    A new procedure for the purification of the arom multienzyme complex from Neurospora crassa is presented. Important factors are the inactivation of proteinases by phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride and the use of cellulose phosphate as an affinity adsorbent. A homogeneous enzyme, with a specific shikimate dehydrogenase activity of 70 units/mg of protein, is obtained in 25% yield. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate, combined with cross-linking studies using dimethyl suberimidate, suggest that the complex is composed of two subunits of molecular weight 165000. Glycerol-density-gradient centrifugation indicates a molecular weight for the intact complex of about 270000. Evidence for the effects of proteolysis, both during the preparation and on storage of the purified complex, is presented, and previous reports in the literature of the occurrence of multiple subunits are discussed in this light. Images PLATE 1 PMID:139889

  14. Arenavirus Stable Signal Peptide Is the Keystone Subunit for Glycoprotein Complex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bederka, Lydia H.; Bonhomme, Cyrille J.; Ling, Emily L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rodent arenavirus glycoprotein complex encodes a stable signal peptide (SSP) that is an essential structural component of mature virions. The SSP, GP1, and GP2 subunits of the trimeric glycoprotein complex noncovalently interact to stud the surface of virions and initiate arenavirus infectivity. Nascent glycoprotein production undergoes two proteolytic cleavage events: first within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cleave SSP from the remaining precursor GP1/2 (glycoprotein complex [GPC]) glycoprotein and second within the Golgi stacks by the cellular SKI-1/S1P for GP1/2 processing to yield GP1 and GP2 subunits. Cleaved SSP is not degraded but retained as an essential glycoprotein subunit. Here, we defined functions of the 58-amino-acid lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) SSP in regard to glycoprotein complex processing and maturation. Using molecular biology techniques, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, we detected SSP at the plasma membrane of transfected cells. Further, we identified a sorting signal (FLLL) near the carboxyl terminus of SSP that is required for glycoprotein maturation and trafficking. In the absence of SSP, the glycoprotein accumulated within the ER and was unable to undergo processing by SKI-1/S1P. Mutation of this highly conserved FLLL motif showed impaired glycoprotein processing and secretory pathway trafficking, as well as defective surface expression and pH-dependent membrane fusion. Immunoprecipitation of SSP confirmed an interaction between the signal peptide and the GP2 subunit; however, mutations within this FLLL motif disrupted the association of the GP1 subunit with the remaining glycoprotein complex. PMID:25352624

  15. Structural Characterization of Tip20p and Dsl1p, Subunits of the Dsl1p Vesicle Tethering Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A.; Ren, Y; Jeffrey, P; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit tethering complexes are essential for intracellular trafficking and have been proposed to mediate the initial interaction between vesicles and the membranes with which they fuse. Here we report initial structural characterization of the Dsl1p complex, whose three subunits are essential for trafficking from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystal structures reveal that two of the three subunits, Tip20p and Dsl1p, resemble known subunits of the exocyst complex, establishing a structural connection among several multisubunit tethering complexes and implying that many of their subunits are derived from a common progenitor. We show, moreover, that Tip20p and Dsl1p interact directly via N-terminal alpha-helices. Finally, we establish that different Dsl1p complex subunits bind independently to different ER SNARE proteins. Our results map out two alternative protein-interaction networks capable of tethering COPI-coated vesicles, via the Dsl1p complex, to ER membranes.

  16. Skills Recognition and Validation--Complexity and Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaco, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to identify and examine the reasons for the complexity and tensions underlying the skills recognition, accreditation and certification scheme (SRAC) that has been in place in Portugal since 2001. Empirical data were collected through semi-directive interviews with staff in three Centros Novas Oportunidades [CNOs] [New…

  17. Subunit dynamics and nucleotide-dependent asymmetry of an AAA(+) transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Joly, Nicolas; Lawton, Edward; Robinson, Carol V; Buck, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are transcription activators that belong to the AAA(+) protein family. They form higher-order self-assemblies to regulate transcription initiation at stress response and pathogenic promoters. The precise mechanism by which these ATPases utilize ATP binding and hydrolysis energy to remodel their substrates remains unclear. Here we employed mass spectrometry of intact complexes to investigate subunit dynamics and nucleotide occupancy of the AAA(+) domain of one well-studied bEBP in complex with its substrate, the σ(54) subunit of RNA polymerase. Our results demonstrate that the free AAA(+) domain undergoes significant changes in oligomeric states and nucleotide occupancy upon σ(54) binding. Such changes likely correlate with one transition state of ATP and are associated with an open spiral ring formation that is vital for asymmetric subunit function and interface communication. We confirmed that the asymmetric subunit functionality persists for open promoter complex formation using single-chain forms of bEBP lacking the full complement of intact ATP hydrolysis sites. Outcomes reconcile low- and high-resolution structures and yield a partial sequential ATP hydrolysis model for bEBPs. PMID:24055699

  18. DNA binding and recognition by binuclear transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changlin; Yan, Rui; Xu, Yan; Yu, Siwang; Liao, Zhanru; Li, Dongfeng; Xu, Hui-Bie F.

    2001-09-01

    The development of small molecules that can bind and recognize DNA with sequence- or stereo-specificity under physiological conditions has been attracting a great interest in chemistry and biochemistry. Here, spectroscopic characterization and gel electrophoresis methods have been utilized to investigate the DNA binding and recognition by a variety of binuclear transition metal complexes. The result indicate that the structures and charges of binuclear transition metal complexes, compositions of coordination spheres, central metal ions and their coordination unsaturation, and separations between two central metal atoms can exert significant effects on the DNA binding and recognition. If there are not intercalative ligands into DNA base pairs or kinetically substitutable ligands by DNA phosphate groups within coordination sphere, the coordination saturation and compact binuclear transition metal complexes weaker bind to DNA than the coordination unsaturation and extended ones to DNA. Since the different transtiometal ions exhibit different affinities to DNA phosphate oxygen atoms, the binding interactions between their binuclear complexes and DNA are controlled by the affinity. He binuclear complexes with one or more negative charges lead to a consequence that they can not efficient associate with DNA, because DNA phosphodiester backbone is negatively charged. Whenthe separations between two central transition metal atoms is more than the distance between two DNA base pairs, the binuclear complexes could bind and recognize the DNA sequence with two or more base pairs. The protonated and positively charged ligands can strengthen the DNA binding and recognition by these binuclear metal complexes. Based on such DNA binding and recognition principles, the binuclear zinc complex designed in the study preferentially bind and recognize the following DNA sequence on pBR322 DNA with binding constant K.

  19. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  20. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dawe, G Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C; Bowie, Derek

    2016-03-16

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  1. The methionine-rich domain of the 54 kDa subunit of signal recognition particle is sufficient for the interaction with signal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lütcke, H; High, S; Römisch, K; Ashford, A J; Dobberstein, B

    1992-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) binds to signal sequences when they emerge from a translating ribosome and targets the complex of ribosome, nascent chain and SRP to the membrane of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) allowing the co-translational translocation of the nascent chain. By photo-crosslinking it has been shown that the signal sequence of preprolactin (PPL) only interacts with the methionine-rich (M) domain of the 54 kDa protein subunit (SRP54) of SRP. Here we show that (i) a signal-anchor sequence is likewise crosslinked only to the methionine-rich domain of SRP54, (ii) free SRP54 can interact with signal sequences independently of the other components of SRP, (iii) its M domain suffices to perform this function, and (iv) an essentially intact M domain is required for signal sequence recognition. Alkylation of the N+G domain in intact SRP54 with N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), but not after cleavage with V8 protease, prevents the binding of a signal sequence to the M domain. This suggests a proximity between the N+G and M domains of SRP54 and raises the possibility that the role of the N+G domain may be to regulate the binding and/or the release of signal sequences. Images PMID:1314169

  2. Differential regulation by AMP and ADP of AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Fiona A.; Jensen, Thomas E.; Hardie, D. Grahame

    2015-01-01

    The γ subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different γ isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged versions of the γ1, γ2 or γ3 isoform. When assayed at a physiological ATP concentration (5 mM), γ1- and γ2-containing complexes were allosterically activated almost 10-fold by AMP, with EC50 values one to two orders of magnitude lower than the ATP concentration. By contrast, γ3 complexes were barely activated by AMP under these conditions, although we did observe some activation at lower ATP concentrations. Despite this, all three complexes were activated, due to increased Thr172 phosphorylation, when cells were incubated with mitochondrial inhibitors that increase cellular AMP. With γ1 complexes, activation and Thr172 phosphorylation induced by the upstream kinase LKB1 [liver kinase B1; but not calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKKβ)] in cell-free assays was markedly promoted by AMP and, to a smaller extent and less potently, by ADP. However, effects of AMP or ADP on activation and phosphorylation of the γ2 and γ3 complexes were small or insignificant. Binding of AMP or ADP protected all three γ subunit complexes against inactivation by Thr172 dephosphorylation; with γ2 complexes, ADP had similar potency to AMP, but with γ1 and γ3 complexes, ADP was less potent than AMP. Thus, AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms respond differently to changes in AMP, ADP or ATP. These differences may tune the responses of the isoforms to fit their differing physiological roles. PMID:26542978

  3. Deep Fusion of Multiple Semantic Cues for Complex Event Recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xishan; Zhang, Hanwang; Zhang, Yongdong; Yang, Yang; Wang, Meng; Luan, Huanbo; Li, Jintao; Chua, Tat-Seng

    2016-03-01

    We present a deep learning strategy to fuse multiple semantic cues for complex event recognition. In particular, we tackle the recognition task by answering how to jointly analyze human actions (who is doing what), objects (what), and scenes (where). First, each type of semantic features (e.g., human action trajectories) is fed into a corresponding multi-layer feature abstraction pathway, followed by a fusion layer connecting all the different pathways. Second, the correlations of how the semantic cues interacting with each other are learned in an unsupervised cross-modality autoencoder fashion. Finally, by fine-tuning a large-margin objective deployed on this deep architecture, we are able to answer the question on how the semantic cues of who, what, and where compose a complex event. As compared with the traditional feature fusion methods (e.g., various early or late strategies), our method jointly learns the essential higher level features that are most effective for fusion and recognition. We perform extensive experiments on two real-world complex event video benchmarks, MED'11 and CCV, and demonstrate that our method outperforms the best published results by 21% and 11%, respectively, on an event recognition task. PMID:26780785

  4. Random assembly of SUR subunits in K(ATP) channel complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wayland W L; Tong, Ailing; Flagg, Thomas P; Nichols, Colin G

    2008-01-01

    Sulfonylurea receptors (SURs) associate with Kir6.x subunits to form tetradimeric K(ATP) channel complexes. SUR1 and SUR2 confer differential channel sensitivities to nucleotides and pharmacological agents, and are expressed in specific, but overlapping, tissues. This raises the question of whether these different SUR subtypes can assemble in the same channel complex and generate channels with hybrid properties. To test this, we engineered dimeric constructs of wild type or N160D mutant Kir6.2 fused to SUR1 or SUR2A. Dimeric fusions formed functional, ATP-sensitive, channels. Coexpression of weakly rectifying SUR1-Kir6.2 (WTF-1) with strongly rectifying SUR1-Kir6.2[N160D] (NDF-1) in COSm6 cells results in mixed subunit complexes that exhibit unique rectification properties. Coexpression of NDF-1 and SUR2A-Kir6.2 (WTF-2) results in similar complex rectification, reflecting the presence of SUR1- and SUR2A-containing dimers in the same channel. The data demonstrate clearly that SUR1 and SUR2A subunits associate randomly, and suggest that heteromeric channels will occur in native tissues. PMID:18690055

  5. The Exocyst Subunit Sec6 Interacts with Assembled Exocytic SNARE Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dubuke, Michelle L; Maniatis, Stephanie; Shaffer, Scott A; Munson, Mary

    2015-11-20

    In eukaryotic cells, membrane-bound vesicles carry cargo between intracellular compartments, to and from the cell surface, and into the extracellular environment. Many conserved families of proteins are required for properly localized vesicle fusion, including the multisubunit tethering complexes and the SNARE complexes. These protein complexes work together to promote proper vesicle fusion in intracellular trafficking pathways. However, the mechanism by which the exocyst, the exocytosis-specific multisubunit tethering complex, interacts with the exocytic SNAREs to mediate vesicle targeting and fusion is currently unknown. We have demonstrated previously that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae exocyst subunit Sec6 directly bound the plasma membrane SNARE protein Sec9 in vitro and that Sec6 inhibited the assembly of the binary Sso1-Sec9 SNARE complex. Therefore, we hypothesized that the interaction between Sec6 and Sec9 prevented the assembly of premature SNARE complexes at sites of exocytosis. To map the determinants of this interaction, we used cross-linking and mass spectrometry analyses to identify residues required for binding. Mutation of residues identified by this approach resulted in a growth defect when introduced into yeast. Contrary to our previous hypothesis, we discovered that Sec6 does not change the rate of SNARE assembly but, rather, binds both the binary Sec9-Sso1 and ternary Sec9-Sso1-Snc2 SNARE complexes. Together, these results suggest a new model in which Sec6 promotes SNARE complex assembly, similar to the role proposed for other tether subunit-SNARE interactions. PMID:26446795

  6. Chick myotendinous antigen. II. A novel extracellular glycoprotein complex consisting of large disulfide-linked subunits.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, M; Fambrough, D M

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the biochemical characterization of a novel extracellular matrix component, " myotendinous antigen," which appears early in chick limb morphogenesis at sites connecting developing muscle fibers, tendons, and bone ( Chiquet , M., and D. Fambrough , 1984; J. Cell Biol., 98:1926-1936). This extracellular matrix antigen is a major component of the secretory proteins released into the medium by fibroblast and muscle cultures; the soluble form is characterized here. This form of myotendinous antigen is a large glycoprotein complex consisting of several disulfide linked subunits (Mr approximately 150,000-240,000). The differently sized antigen subunits are related, since they yielded very similar proteolytic cleavage patterns. M1 antibody can bind to the denatured subunits. The antigen subunits, as well as a Mr approximately 80,000 pepsin-resistant antigenic domain derived from them, are resistant to bacterial collagenase. Despite possessing subunits similar in size to fibronectin, myotendinous antigen appears to be both structurally and antigenically unrelated to fibronectin or to other known extracellular matrix components. About seven times more M1 antigen per cell nucleus was released into the medium in fibroblast as compared to muscle cultures. In muscle conditioned medium, myotendinous antigen is noncovalently complexed to very high molecular weight material that could be heavily labeled by [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulfate. This material is sensitive to chondroitinase ABC and hence appears to contain sulfated glycosaminoglycans. We speculate that myotendinous antigen might interact with proteoglycans on the surface of muscle fibers, thereby acting as a link to tendons. PMID:6202699

  7. PAF Complex Plays Novel Subunit-Specific Roles in Alternative Cleavage and Polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Hou, Liming; Shen, Steven; Tian, Bin; Dynlacht, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    The PAF complex (Paf1C) has been shown to regulate chromatin modifications, gene transcription, and RNA polymerase II (PolII) elongation. Here, we provide the first genome-wide profiles for the distribution of the entire complex in mammalian cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing. We show that Paf1C is recruited not only to promoters and gene bodies, but also to regions downstream of cleavage/polyadenylation (pA) sites at 3’ ends, a profile that sharply contrasted with the yeast complex. Remarkably, we identified novel, subunit-specific links between Paf1C and regulation of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) and upstream antisense transcription using RNAi coupled with deep sequencing of the 3’ ends of transcripts. Moreover, we found that depletion of Paf1C subunits resulted in the accumulation of PolII over gene bodies, which coincided with APA. Depletion of specific Paf1C subunits led to global loss of histone H2B ubiquitylation, although there was little impact of Paf1C depletion on other histone modifications, including tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysines 4 and 36 (H3K4me3 and H3K36me3), previously associated with this complex. Our results provide surprising differences with yeast, while unifying observations that link Paf1C with PolII elongation and RNA processing, and indicate that Paf1C subunits could play roles in controlling transcript length through suppression of PolII accumulation at transcription start site (TSS)-proximal pA sites and regulating pA site choice in 3’UTRs. PMID:26765774

  8. RILP interacts with HOPS complex via VPS41 subunit to regulate endocytic trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaosi; Yang, Ting; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Yun, Ye; Sun, Lixiang; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Akazawa, Chihiro; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2014-01-01

    The HOPS complex serves as a tethering complex with GEF activity for Ypt7p in yeast to regulate late endosomal membrane maturation. While the role of HOPS complex is well established in yeast cells, its functional and mechanistic aspects in mammalian cells are less well defined. In this study, we report that RILP, a downstream effector of Rab7, interacts with HOPS complex and recruits HOPS subunits to the late endosomal compartment. Structurally, the amino-terminal portion of RILP interacts with HOPS complex. Unexpectedly, this interaction is independent of Rab7. VPS41 subunit of HOPS complex was defined to be the major partner for interacting with RILP. The carboxyl-terminal region of VPS41 was mapped to be responsible for the interaction. Functionally, either depletion of VPS41 by shRNA or overexpression of VPS41 C-terminal half retarded EGF-induced degradation of EGFR. These results suggest that interaction of RILP with HOPS complex via VPS41 plays a role in endocytic trafficking of EGFR. PMID:25445562

  9. Subunits of the Drosophila CCR4-NOT complex and their roles in mRNA deadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Temme, Claudia; Zhang, Lianbing; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Ihling, Christian; Chartier, Aymeric; Sinz, Andrea; Simonelig, Martine; Wahle, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    The CCR4-NOT complex is the main enzyme catalyzing the deadenylation of mRNA. We have investigated the composition of this complex in Drosophila melanogaster by immunoprecipitation with a monoclonal antibody directed against NOT1. The CCR4, CAF1 (=POP2), NOT1, NOT2, NOT3, and CAF40 subunits were associated in a stable complex, but NOT4 was not. Factors known to be involved in mRNA regulation were prominent among the other proteins coprecipitated with the CCR4-NOT complex, as analyzed by mass spectrometry. The complex was localized mostly in the cytoplasm but did not appear to be a major component of P bodies. Of the known CCR4 paralogs, Nocturnin was found associated with the subunits of the CCR4-NOT complex, whereas Angel and 3635 were not. RNAi experiments in Schneider cells showed that CAF1, NOT1, NOT2, and NOT3 are required for bulk poly(A) shortening and hsp70 mRNA deadenylation, but knock-down of CCR4, CAF40, and NOT4 did not affect these processes. Overexpression of catalytically dead CAF1 had a dominant-negative effect on mRNA decay. In contrast, overexpression of inactive CCR4 had no effect. We conclude that CAF1 is the major catalytically important subunit of the CCR4-NOT complex in Drosophila Schneider cells. Nocturnin may also be involved in mRNA deadenylation, whereas there is no evidence for a similar role of Angel and 3635. PMID:20504953

  10. The 73 kD Subunit of the Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (CPSF) Complex Affects Reproductive Development in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) is an important multi-subunit component of the mRNA 3’-end processing apparatus in eukaryotes. We have identified the Arabidopsis CPSF complex that involves five protein subunits named AtCPSF160, AtCPSF100, AtCPSF73-I, AtCPSF73-II and AtCPSF30....

  11. Architecture of the Complex Formed by Large and Small Terminase Subunits from Bacteriophage P22.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Reginald; Lokareddy, Ravi Kumar; Roy, Ankoor; Yang, Yang; Lander, Gabriel C; Heck, Albert J R; Johnson, John E; Cingolani, Gino

    2015-10-01

    Packaging of viral genomes inside empty procapsids is driven by a powerful ATP-hydrolyzing motor, formed in many double-stranded DNA viruses by a complex of a small terminase (S-terminase) subunit and a large terminase (L-terminase) subunit, transiently docked at the portal vertex during genome packaging. Despite recent progress in elucidating the structure of individual terminase subunits and their domains, little is known about the architecture of an assembled terminase complex. Here, we describe a bacterial co-expression system that yields milligram quantities of the S-terminase:L-terminase complex of the Salmonella phage P22. In vivo assembled terminase complex was affinity-purified and stabilized by addition of non-hydrolyzable ATP, which binds specifically to the ATPase domain of L-terminase. Mapping studies revealed that the N-terminus of L-terminase ATPase domain (residues 1-58) contains a minimal S-terminase binding domain sufficient for stoichiometric association with residues 140-162 of S-terminase, the L-terminase binding domain. Hydrodynamic analysis by analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity and native mass spectrometry revealed that the purified terminase complex consists predominantly of one copy of the nonameric S-terminase bound to two equivalents of L-terminase (1S-terminase:2L-terminase). Direct visualization of this molecular assembly in negative-stained micrographs yielded a three-dimensional asymmetric reconstruction that resembles a "nutcracker" with two L-terminase protomers projecting from the C-termini of an S-terminase ring. This is the first direct visualization of a purified viral terminase complex analyzed in the absence of DNA and procapsid. PMID:26301600

  12. Conservation of the TRAPPII-specific subunits of a Ypt/Rab exchanger complex

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Randal; Chen, Shu Hui; Yoo, Eunice; Segev, Nava

    2007-01-01

    Background Ypt/Rab GTPases and their GEF activators regulate intra-cellular trafficking in all eukaryotic cells. In S. cerivisiae, the modular TRAPP complex acts as a GEF for the Golgi gatekeepers: Ypt1 and the functional pair Ypt31/32. While TRAPPI, which acts in early Golgi, is conserved from fungi to animals, not much is known about TRAPPII, which acts in late Golgi and consists of TRAPPI plus three additional subunits. Results Here, we show a phylogenetic analysis of the three TRAPPII-specific subunits. One copy of each of the two essential subunits, Trs120 and Trs130, is present in almost every fully sequenced eukaryotic genome. Moreover, the primary, as well as the predicted secondary, structure of the Trs120- and Trs130-related sequences are conserved from fungi to animals. The mammalian orthologs of Trs120 and Trs130, NIBP and TMEM1, respectively, are candidates for human disorders. Currently, NIBP is implicated in signaling, and TMEM1 is suggested to have trans-membrane domains (TMDs) and to function as a membrane channel. However, we show here that the yeast Trs130 does not function as a trans-membrane protein, and the human TMEM1 does not contain putative TMDs. The non-essential subunit, Trs65, is conserved only among many fungi and some unicellular eukaryotes. Multiple alignment analysis of each TRAPPII-specific subunit revealed conserved domains that include highly conserved amino acids. Conclusion We suggest that the function of both NIBP and TMEM1 in the regulation of intra-cellular trafficking is conserved from yeast to man. The conserved domains and amino acids discovered here can be used for functional analysis that should help to resolve the differences in the assigned functions of these proteins in fungi and animals. PMID:17274825

  13. Loss of Complex I activity in the Escherichia coli enzyme results from truncating the C-terminus of subunit K, but not from cross-linking it to subunits N or L.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaotong; Canales, Alejandra; Bedair, Mai; Vik, Steven B

    2016-06-01

    Complex I is a multi-subunit enzyme of the respiratory chain with seven core subunits in its membrane arm (A, H, J, K, L, M, and N). In the enzyme from Escherichia coli the C-terminal ten amino acids of subunit K lie along the lateral helix of subunit L, and contribute to a junction of subunits K, L and N on the cytoplasmic surface. Using double cysteine mutagenesis, the cross-linking of subunit K (R99C) to either subunit L (K581C) or subunit N (T292C) was attempted. A partial yield of cross-linked product had no effect on the activity of the enzyme, or on proton translocation, suggesting that the C-terminus of subunit K has no dynamic role in function. To further elucidate the role of subunit K genetic deletions were constructed at the C-terminus. Upon the serial deletion of the last 4 residues of the C-terminus of subunit K, various results were obtained. Deletion of one amino acid had little effect on the activity of Complex I, but deletions of 2 or more amino acids led to total loss of enzyme activity and diminished levels of subunits L, M, and N in preparations of membrane vesicles. Together these results suggest that while the C-terminus of subunit K has no dynamic role in energy transduction by Complex I, it is vital for the correct assembly of the enzyme. PMID:26931547

  14. Multiple modes of regulation of the human Ino80 SNF2 ATPase by subunits of the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    SNF2 family ATPases are ATP-dependent motors that often function in multisubunit complexes to regulate chromatin structure. Although the central role of SNF2 ATPases in chromatin biology is well established, mechanisms by which their catalytic activities are regulated by additional subunits of chromatin-remodeling complexes are less well understood. Here we present evidence that the human Inositol auxotrophy 80 (Ino80) SNF2 ATPase is subject to regulation at multiple levels in the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex. The zinc finger histidine triad domain-containing protein Ies2 (Ino Eighty Subunit 2) functions as a potent activator of the intrinsic catalytic activity of the Ino80 ATPase, whereas the YL-1 family Ies6 (Ino Eighty Subunit 6) and actin-related Arp5 proteins function together to promote binding of the Ino80 ATPase to nucleosomes. These findings support the idea that both substrate recognition and the intrinsic catalytic activities of SNF2 ATPases have evolved as important sites for their regulation. PMID:24297934

  15. Characterization of a novel origin recognition complex-like complex: implications for DNA recognition, cell cycle control, and locus-specific gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad; York, Randall D; Hommel, Jonathan; Kapler, Geoffrey M

    2003-07-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) plays a central role in eukaryotic DNA replication. Here we describe a unique ORC-like complex in Tetrahymena thermophila, TIF4, which bound in an ATP-dependent manner to sequences required for cell cycle-controlled replication and gene amplification (ribosomal DNA [rDNA] type I elements). TIF4's mode of DNA recognition was distinct from that of other characterized ORCs, as it bound exclusively to single-stranded DNA. In contrast to yeast ORCs, TIF4 DNA binding activity was cell cycle regulated and peaked during S phase, coincident with the redistribution of the Orc2-related subunit, p69, from the cytoplasm to the macronucleus. Origin-binding activity and nuclear p69 immunoreactivity were further regulated during development, where they distinguished replicating from nonreplicating nuclei. Both activities were lost from germ line micronuclei following the programmed arrest of micronuclear replication. Replicating macronuclei stained with Orc2 antibodies throughout development in wild-type cells but failed to do so in the amplification-defective rmm11 mutant. Collectively, these findings indicate that the regulation of TIF4 is intimately tied to the cell cycle and developmentally programmed replication cycles. They further implicate TIF4 in rDNA gene amplification. As type I elements interact with other sequence-specific single-strand breaks (in vitro and in vivo), the dynamic interplay of Orc-like (TIF4) and non-ORC-like proteins with this replication determinant may provide a novel mechanism for regulation. PMID:12832485

  16. Diverged composition and regulation of the Trypanosoma brucei origin recognition complex that mediates DNA replication initiation

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Catarina A.; Tiengwe, Calvin; Lemgruber, Leandro; Damasceno, Jeziel D.; Scott, Alan; Paape, Daniel; Marcello, Lucio; McCulloch, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Initiation of DNA replication depends upon recognition of genomic sites, termed origins, by AAA+ ATPases. In prokaryotes a single factor binds each origin, whereas in eukaryotes this role is played by a six-protein origin recognition complex (ORC). Why eukaryotes evolved a multisubunit initiator, and the roles of each component, remains unclear. In Trypanosoma brucei, an ancient unicellular eukaryote, only one ORC-related initiator, TbORC1/CDC6, has been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that three TbORC1/CDC6-interacting factors also act in T. brucei nuclear DNA replication and demonstrate that TbORC1/CDC6 interacts in a high molecular complex in which a diverged Orc4 homologue and one replicative helicase subunit can also be found. Analysing the subcellular localization of four TbORC1/CDC6-interacting factors during the cell cycle reveals that one factor, TbORC1B, is not a static constituent of ORC but displays S-phase restricted nuclear localization and expression, suggesting it positively regulates replication. This work shows that ORC architecture and regulation are diverged features of DNA replication initiation in T. brucei, providing new insight into this key stage of eukaryotic genome copying. PMID:26951375

  17. Diverged composition and regulation of the Trypanosoma brucei origin recognition complex that mediates DNA replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Catarina A; Tiengwe, Calvin; Lemgruber, Leandro; Damasceno, Jeziel D; Scott, Alan; Paape, Daniel; Marcello, Lucio; McCulloch, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Initiation of DNA replication depends upon recognition of genomic sites, termed origins, by AAA+ ATPases. In prokaryotes a single factor binds each origin, whereas in eukaryotes this role is played by a six-protein origin recognition complex (ORC). Why eukaryotes evolved a multisubunit initiator, and the roles of each component, remains unclear. In Trypanosoma brucei, an ancient unicellular eukaryote, only one ORC-related initiator, TbORC1/CDC6, has been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that three TbORC1/CDC6-interacting factors also act in T. brucei nuclear DNA replication and demonstrate that TbORC1/CDC6 interacts in a high molecular complex in which a diverged Orc4 homologue and one replicative helicase subunit can also be found. Analysing the subcellular localization of four TbORC1/CDC6-interacting factors during the cell cycle reveals that one factor, TbORC1B, is not a static constituent of ORC but displays S-phase restricted nuclear localization and expression, suggesting it positively regulates replication. This work shows that ORC architecture and regulation are diverged features of DNA replication initiation in T. brucei, providing new insight into this key stage of eukaryotic genome copying. PMID:26951375

  18. Structure of the Cmr2 Subunit of the CRISPR-Cas RNA Silencing Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Ramia, Nancy F.; Shao, Yaming; Hale, Caryn R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong

    2012-08-10

    Cmr2 is the largest and an essential subunit of a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex (the Cmr complex) that cleaves foreign RNA to protect prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. Cmr2 is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the effector complex because of its N-terminal HD nuclease domain. Here, however, we report that the HD domain of Cmr2 is not required for cleavage by the complex in vitro. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2 (lacking the HD domain) reveals two adenylyl cyclase-like and two {alpha}-helical domains. The adenylyl cyclase-like domains are arranged as in homodimeric adenylyl cyclases and bind ADP and divalent metals. However, mutagenesis studies show that the metal- and ADP-coordinating residues of Cmr2 are also not critical for cleavage by the complex. Our findings suggest that another component provides the catalytic function and that the essential role by Cmr2 does not require the identified ADP- or metal-binding or HD domains in vitro.

  19. Subunit Interactions and Organization of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Intraflagellar Transport Complex A Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Behal, Robert H.; Miller, Mark S.; Qin, Hongmin; Lucker, Ben F.; Jones, Alexis; Cole, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles can be biochemically resolved into two smaller assemblies, complexes A and B, that contain up to six and 15 protein subunits, respectively. We provide here the proteomic and immunological analyses that verify the identity of all six Chlamydomonas A proteins. Using sucrose density gradient centrifugation and antibody pulldowns, we show that all six A subunits are associated in a 16 S complex in both the cell bodies and flagella. A significant fraction of the cell body IFT43, however, exhibits a much slower sedimentation of ∼2 S and is not associated with the IFT A complex. To identify interactions between the six A proteins, we combined exhaustive yeast-based two-hybrid analysis, heterologous recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli, and analysis of the newly identified complex A mutants, ift121 and ift122. We show that IFT121 and IFT43 interact directly and provide evidence for additional interactions between IFT121 and IFT139, IFT121 and IFT122, IFT140 and IFT122, and IFT140 and IFT144. The mutant analysis further allows us to propose that a subset of complex A proteins, IFT144/140/122, can form a stable 12 S subcomplex that we refer to as the IFT A core. Based on these results, we propose a model for the spatial arrangement of the six IFT A components. PMID:22170070

  20. Phase effects in masking by harmonic complexes: Speech recognition

    PubMed Central

    Deroche, Mickael L. D.; Culling, John F.; Chatterjee, Monita

    2013-01-01

    Harmonic complexes that generate highly modulated temporal envelopes on the basilar membrane (BM) mask a tone less effectively than complexes that generate relatively flat temporal envelopes, because the non-linear active gain of the BM selectively amplifies a low-level tone in the dips of a modulated masker envelope. The present study examines a similar effect in speech recognition. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured for a voice masked by harmonic complexes with partials in sine phase (SP) or in random phase (RP). The masker’s fundamental frequency (F0) was 50, 100 or 200 Hz. SRTs were considerably lower for SP than for RP maskers at 50-Hz F0, but the two converged at 100-Hz F0, while at 200-Hz F0, SRTs were a little higher for SP than RP maskers. The results were similar whether the target voice was male or female and whether the masker’s spectral profile was flat or speech-shaped. Although listening in the masker dips has been shown to play a large role for artificial stimuli such as Schroeder-phase complexes at high levels, it contributes weakly to speech recognition in the presence of harmonic maskers with different crest factors at more moderate sound levels (65 dB SPL). PMID:24076425

  1. Pattern recognition tool based on complex network-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, Dalcimar; Backes, André Ricardo; Martinez Bruno, Odemir

    2013-02-01

    This work proposed a generalization of the method proposed by the authors: 'A complex network-based approach for boundary shape analysis'. Instead of modelling a contour into a graph and use complex networks rules to characterize it, here, we generalize the technique. This way, the work proposes a mathematical tool for characterization signals, curves and set of points. To evaluate the pattern description power of the proposal, an experiment of plat identification based on leaf veins image are conducted. Leaf vein is a taxon characteristic used to plant identification proposes, and one of its characteristics is that these structures are complex, and difficult to be represented as a signal or curves and this way to be analyzed in a classical pattern recognition approach. Here, we model the veins as a set of points and model as graphs. As features, we use the degree and joint degree measurements in a dynamic evolution. The results demonstrates that the technique has a good power of discrimination and can be used for plant identification, as well as other complex pattern recognition tasks.

  2. Sgf73, a subunit of SAGA complex, is required for the assembly of RITS complex in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaolong; Zhou, Huan; Zhang, Guiping; Wang, Wenchao; Mao, Langyong; Zhou, Xing; Yu, Yao; Lu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widespread gene-silencing mechanism and is required for heterochromatin assembly in a variety of organisms. The RNA-induced transcriptional silencing complex (RITS), composed of Ago1, Tas3 and Chp1, is a key component of RNAi machinery in fission yeast that connects short interference RNA (siRNA) and heterochromatin formation. However, the process by which RITS is assembled is not well understood. Here, we identified Sgf73, a subunit of the SAGA co-transcriptional complex, is required for pericentromeric heterochromatin silencing and the generation of siRNA. This novel role of Sgf73 is independent of enzymatic activities or structural integrity of SAGA. Instead, Sgf73 is physically associated with Ago1 and Chp1. The interactions among the subunits of the RITS, including those between Tas3 and Chp1, between Chp1 and Ago1, between Ago1 and Tas3, were all impaired by the deletion of sgf73+. Consistently, the recruitment of Ago1 and Chp1 to the pericentromeric region was abolished in sgf73Δ cells. Our study unveils a moonlighting function of a SAGA subunit. It suggests Sgf73 is a novel factor that promotes assembly of RITS and RNAi-mediated heterochromatin formation. PMID:26443059

  3. A link between the cytoplasmic engulfment protein Elmo1 and the Mediator complex subunit Med31.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, Joshua P; Lu, Mingjian; Das, Soumita; Park, Daeho; Ernst, Peter B; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2013-01-21

    The cytoplasmic Elmo1:Dock180 complex acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the small GTPase Rac and functions downstream of the phagocytic receptor BAI1 during apoptotic cell clearance, and in the entry of Salmonella and Shigella into cells. We discovered an unexpected binding between Elmo1 and the Mediator complex subunit Med31. The Mediator complex is a regulatory hub for nearly all gene transcription via RNA polymerase II, bridging the general transcription machinery with gene-specific regulatory proteins. Med31 is the smallest and the most evolutionarily conserved Mediator subunit, and knockout of Med31 results in embryonic lethality in mice; however, Med31 function in specific biological contexts is poorly understood. We observed that in primary macrophages, during Salmonella infection, Elmo1 and Med31 specifically affected expression of the cytokine genes Il10 and Il33 among the >25 genes monitored. Although endogenous Med31 is predominantly nuclear localized, Elmo1 increased the cytoplasmic localization of Med31. We identify ubiquitination as a novel posttranslational modification of Med31, with the cytoplasmic monoubiquitinated form of Med31 being enhanced by Elmo1. These data identify Elmo1 as a novel regulator of Med31, revealing a previously unrecognized link between cytoplasmic signaling proteins and the Mediator complex. PMID:23273896

  4. Structural Changes Enable Start Codon Recognition by the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanweer; Llácer, Jose L.; Fernández, Israel S.; Munoz, Antonio; Martin-Marcos, Pilar; Savva, Christos G.; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary During eukaryotic translation initiation, initiator tRNA does not insert fully into the P decoding site on the 40S ribosomal subunit. This conformation (POUT) is compatible with scanning mRNA for the AUG start codon. Base pairing with AUG is thought to promote isomerization to a more stable conformation (PIN) that arrests scanning and promotes dissociation of eIF1 from the 40S subunit. Here, we present a cryoEM reconstruction of a yeast preinitiation complex at 4.0 Å resolution with initiator tRNA in the PIN state, prior to eIF1 release. The structure reveals stabilization of the codon-anticodon duplex by the N-terminal tail of eIF1A, changes in the structure of eIF1 likely instrumental in its subsequent release, and changes in the conformation of eIF2. The mRNA traverses the entire mRNA cleft and makes connections to the regulatory domain of eIF2α, eIF1A, and ribosomal elements that allow recognition of context nucleotides surrounding the AUG codon. PMID:25417110

  5. The Sec6/8 complex in mammalian cells: characterization of mammalian Sec3, subunit interactions, and expression of subunits in polarized cells.

    PubMed

    Matern, H T; Yeaman, C; Nelson, W J; Scheller, R H

    2001-08-14

    The yeast exocyst complex (also called Sec6/8 complex in higher eukaryotes) is a multiprotein complex essential for targeting exocytic vesicles to specific docking sites on the plasma membrane. It is composed of eight proteins (Sec3, -5, -6, -8, -10, and -15, and Exo70 and -84), with molecular weights ranging from 70 to 144 kDa. Mammalian orthologues for seven of these proteins have been described and here we report the cloning and initial characterization of the remaining subunit, Sec3. Human Sec3 (hSec3) shares 17% sequence identity with yeast Sec3p, interacts in the two-hybrid system with other subunits of the complex (Sec5 and Sec8), and is expressed in almost all tissues tested. In yeast, Sec3p has been proposed to be a spatial landmark for polarized secretion (1), and its localization depends on its interaction with Rho1p (2). We demonstrate here that hSec3 lacks the potential Rho1-binding site and GFP-fusions of hSec3 are cytosolic. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusions of nearly every subunit of the mammalian Sec6/8 complex were expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, but they failed to assemble into a complex with endogenous proteins and localized in the cytosol. Of the subunits tested, only GFP-Exo70 localized to lateral membrane sites of cell-cell contact when expressed in MDCK cells. Cells overexpressing GFP-Exo70 fail to form a tight monolayer, suggesting the Exo70 targeting interaction is critical for normal development of polarized epithelial cells. PMID:11493706

  6. Circular permutation as a tool to reduce surface entropy triggers crystallization of the signal recognition particle receptor beta subunit.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas U; Walczak, Rudolf; Blobel, Günter

    2004-10-01

    The production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a difficult obstacle on the road to high-resolution structural characterization of proteins. This is primarily a result of the empirical nature of the process. Although crystallization is not predictable, factors inhibiting it are well established. First, crystal formation is always entropically unfavorable. Reducing the entropic cost of crystallizing a given protein is thus desirable. It is common practice to map boundaries and remove unstructured regions surrounding the folded protein domain. However, a problem arises when flexible regions are not at the boundaries but within a domain. Such regions cannot be deleted without adding new restraints to the domain. We encountered this problem during an attempt to crystallize the beta subunit of the eukaryotic signal recognition particle (SRbeta), bearing a long and flexible internal loop. Native SRbeta did not crystallize. However, after circularly permuting the protein by connecting the spatially close N and C termini with a short heptapeptide linker GGGSGGG and removing 26 highly flexible loop residues within the domain, we obtained diffraction-quality crystals. This protein-engineering method is simple and should be applicable to other proteins, especially because N and C termini of protein domains are often close in space. The success of this method profits from prior knowledge of the domain fold, which is becoming increasingly common in today's postgenomic era. PMID:15340174

  7. A novel approach to analyze membrane proteins by laser mass spectrometry: from protein subunits to the integral complex.

    PubMed

    Morgner, Nina; Kleinschroth, Thomas; Barth, Hans-Dieter; Ludwig, Bernd; Brutschy, Bernhard

    2007-08-01

    A novel laser-based mass spectrometry method termed LILBID (laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption) is applied to analyze large integral membrane protein complexes and their subunits. In this method the ions are IR-laser desorbed from aqueous microdroplets containing the hydrophobic protein complexes solubilized by detergent. The method is highly sensitive, very efficient in sample handling, relatively tolerant to various buffers, and detects the ions in narrow, mainly low-charge state distributions. The crucial experimental parameter determining whether the integral complex or its subunits are observed is the laser intensity: At very low intensity level corresponding to an ultrasoft desorption, the intact complexes, together with few detergent molecules, are transferred into vacuum. Under these conditions the oligomerization state of the complex (i.e., its quaternary structure) may be analyzed. At higher laser intensity, complexes are thermolyzed into subunits, with any residual detergent being stripped off to yield the true mass of the polypeptides. The model complexes studied are derived from the respiratory chain of the soil bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans and include complexes III (cytochrome bc(1) complex) and IV (cytochrome c oxidase). These are well characterized multi-subunit membrane proteins, with the individual hydrophobic subunits being composed of up to 12 transmembrane helices. PMID:17544294

  8. Signal recognition particle receptor is a complex that contains two distinct polypeptide chains

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, S.; Lauffer, L.; Rath, V.L.; Walter, P.

    1986-10-01

    Signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor are known to be essential components of the cellular machinery that targets nascent secretory proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Here the authors report that the SRP receptor contains, in addition to the previously identified and sequenced 69-kD polypeptide (..cap alpha..-subunit, SR..cap alpha..), a 30-kD ..beta..-subunit SR..beta..). When SRP receptor was purified by SRP-Sepharose affinity chromatography, they observed the co-purification of two other ER membrane proteins. Both proteins are approx.30 kD in size and are immunologically distinct from each other, as well as from SR..cap alpha.. and SRP proteins. One of the 30-kD proteins (SR..beta..) forms a tight complex with SR..cap alpha.. in detergent solution that is stable to high salt and can be immunoprecipitated with antibodies to either SR..cap alpha.. or SR..beta... Both subunits are present in the ER membrane in equimolar amounts and co-fractionate in constant stoichiometry when rough and smooth liver microsomes are separated on sucrose gradients. They therefore conclude that SR..beta.. is an integral component of SRP receptor. The presence of SR..beta.. was previously masked by proteolytic breakdown products of SR..cap alpha.. observed by others and by the presence of another 30-kD ER membrane protein (mp30) which co-purifies with SR..cap alpha... Mp30 binds to SRP-Sepharose directly and is present in the ER membrane in several-fold molar excess of SR..cap alpha.. and SR..beta... The affinity of mp30 for SRP suggests that it may serve a yet unknown function in protein translocation.

  9. Rapid Purification and Characterization of Mutant Origin Recognition Complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Purification of the origin recognition complex (ORC) from wild-type budding yeast cells more than two decades ago opened up doors to analyze the initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication biochemically. Although revised methods to purify ORC from overproducing cells were reported later, purification of mutant proteins using these systems still depends on time-consuming processes including genetic manipulation to construct and amplify mutant baculoviruses or yeast strains as well as several canonical protein fractionations. Here, we present a streamlined method to construct mutant overproducers, followed by purification of mutant ORCs. Use of mammalian cells co-transfected with conveniently mutagenized plasmids bearing a His tag excludes many of the construction and fractionation steps. Transfection is highly efficient. All the six subunits of ORC are overexpressed at a considerable level and isolated as a functional heterohexameric complex. Furthermore, use of mammalian cells prevents contamination of wild-type ORC from yeast cells. The method is applicable to wild-type and at least three mutant ORCs, and the resultant purified complexes show expected biochemical activities. The rapid acquisition of mutant ORCs using this system will boost systematic biochemical dissection of ORC and can be even applied to the purification of protein complexes other than ORC. PMID:27148210

  10. Rapid Purification and Characterization of Mutant Origin Recognition Complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Purification of the origin recognition complex (ORC) from wild-type budding yeast cells more than two decades ago opened up doors to analyze the initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication biochemically. Although revised methods to purify ORC from overproducing cells were reported later, purification of mutant proteins using these systems still depends on time-consuming processes including genetic manipulation to construct and amplify mutant baculoviruses or yeast strains as well as several canonical protein fractionations. Here, we present a streamlined method to construct mutant overproducers, followed by purification of mutant ORCs. Use of mammalian cells co-transfected with conveniently mutagenized plasmids bearing a His tag excludes many of the construction and fractionation steps. Transfection is highly efficient. All the six subunits of ORC are overexpressed at a considerable level and isolated as a functional heterohexameric complex. Furthermore, use of mammalian cells prevents contamination of wild-type ORC from yeast cells. The method is applicable to wild-type and at least three mutant ORCs, and the resultant purified complexes show expected biochemical activities. The rapid acquisition of mutant ORCs using this system will boost systematic biochemical dissection of ORC and can be even applied to the purification of protein complexes other than ORC. PMID:27148210

  11. Losses, Expansions, and Novel Subunit Discovery of Adaptor Protein Complexes in Haptophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laura J Y; Klute, Mary J; Herman, Emily K; Read, Betsy; Dacks, Joel B

    2015-11-01

    The phylum Haptophyta (Diaphoratickes) contains marine algae that perform biomineralization, extruding large, distinctive calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths) that completely cover the cell. Coccolith production is an important part of global carbon cycling; however, the membrane trafficking pathway by which they are secreted has not yet been elucidated. In most eukaryotes, post-Golgi membrane trafficking involves five heterotetrameric adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which impart cargo selection specificity. To better understand coccolith secretion, we performed comparative genomic, phylogenetic, and transcriptomic analyses of the AP complexes in Emiliania huxleyi strains 92A, Van556, EH2, and CCMP1516, and related haptophytes Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Isochrysis galbana; the latter has lost the ability to biomineralize. We show that haptophytes have a modified membrane trafficking system (MTS), as we found both AP subunit losses and duplications. Additionally, we identified a single conserved subunit of the AP-related TSET complex, whose expression suggests a functional role in membrane trafficking. Finally, we detected novel alpha adaptin ear and gamma adaptin ear proteins, the first of their kind to be described outside of opisthokonts. These novel ear proteins and the sculpting of the MTS may support the capacity for biomineralization in haptophytes, enhancing their ability to perform this highly specialized form of secretion. PMID:26519625

  12. Crystal structure of an RNA-bound 11-subunit eukaryotic exosome complex.

    PubMed

    Makino, Debora Lika; Baumgärtner, Marc; Conti, Elena

    2013-03-01

    The exosome is the major 3'-5' RNA-degradation complex in eukaryotes. The ubiquitous core of the yeast exosome (Exo-10) is formed by nine catalytically inert subunits (Exo-9) and a single active RNase, Rrp44. In the nucleus, the Exo-10 core recruits another nuclease, Rrp6. Here we crystallized an approximately 440-kilodalton complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Exo-10 bound to a carboxy-terminal region of Rrp6 and to an RNA duplex with a 3'-overhang of 31 ribonucleotides. The 2.8 Å resolution structure shows how RNA is funnelled into the Exo-9 channel in a single-stranded conformation by an unwinding pore. Rrp44 adopts a closed conformation and captures the RNA 3'-end that exits from the side of Exo-9. Exo-9 subunits bind RNA with sequence-unspecific interactions reminiscent of archaeal exosomes. The substrate binding and channelling mechanisms of 3'-5' RNA degradation complexes are conserved in all kingdoms of life. PMID:23376952

  13. Assembly of nuclear DNA-encoded subunits into mitochondrial complex IV, and their preferential integration into supercomplex forms in patient mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Michael; Smith, Stacey M; Thorburn, David R; Ryan, Michael T; McKenzie, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    Complex IV is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In humans, biogenesis of complex IV involves the coordinated assembly of 13 subunits encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The early stages of complex IV assembly involving mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits CO1 and CO2 have been well studied. However, the latter stages, during which many of the nuclear DNA-encoded subunits are incorporated, are less well understood. Using in vitro import and assembly assays, we found that subunits Cox6a, Cox6b and Cox7a assembled into pre-existing complex IV, while Cox4-1 and Cox6c subunits assembled into subcomplexes that may represent rate-limiting intermediates. We also found that Cox6a and Cox7a are incorporated into a novel intermediate complex of approximately 250 kDa, and that transition of subunits from this complex to the mature holoenzyme had stalled in the mitochondria of patients with isolated complex IV deficiency. A number of complex IV subunits were also found to integrate into supercomplexes containing combinations of complex I, dimeric complex III and complex IV. Subunit assembly into these supercomplexes was also observed in mitochondria of patients in whom monomeric complex IV was selectively reduced. We conclude that newly imported nuclear DNA-encoded subunits can integrate into the complex IV holoenzyme and supercomplex forms by associating with pre-existing subunits and intermediate assembly complexes. PMID:19843159

  14. Eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin contains t-complex polypeptide 1 and seven related subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Rommelaere, H; Van Troys, M; Gao, Y; Melki, R; Cowan, N J; Vandekerckhove, J; Ampe, C

    1993-01-01

    We have characterized the cytosolic chaperonin from both rabbit reticulocyte lysate and bovine testis. The heteromeric complex contains eight subunits. Partial amino acid sequence data reveal that one of these is t-complex polypeptide 1 (TCP-1), while the other seven are TCP-1-related polypeptides, implicating the existence of a multigene family of TCP-1 homologues. We provide evidence that TCP-1 ring complex from bovine testis can facilitate the folding of both actin and tubulin, although, as in the case of chaperonin from reticulocyte lysate, two cofactors are required for the generation of properly folded tubulin. An additional molecule of TCP-1 may associate with the chaperonin depending on the purification procedure used. We propose that a highly conserved region in these polypeptides and in other chaperonins of the cpn60 chaperone family participates in ATP binding. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7903455

  15. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M W; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-02-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the patient's mitochondria. However, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of complex I polypeptides demonstrated that the majority of the 25 polypeptides comprising complex I were present in the affected mitochondria. A more detailed analysis using subunit selective antisera against the main polypeptides of the iron-protein fragments of complex I revealed a selective absence of the 75- and 13-kD polypeptides. These findings suggest that the underlying basis for this patient's disease was a congenital deficiency of at least two polypeptides comprising the iron-protein fragment of complex I, which resulted in the inability to correctly assemble a functional enzyme complex. PMID:3100577

  16. Cryo-EM structure of a tetrameric cyanobacterial photosystem I complex reveals novel subunit interactions.

    PubMed

    Semchonok, Dmitry A; Li, Meng; Bruce, Barry D; Oostergetel, Gert T; Boekema, Egbert J

    2016-09-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) of the thermophilic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp. TS-821 (TS-821) forms tetramers Li et al. (2014). Two-dimensional maps obtained by single particle electron microscopy (EM) clearly show that the tetramer lacks four-fold symmetry and is actually composed of a dimer of dimers with C2 symmetry. The resolution of these negative stain 2D maps did not permit the placement of most of the small PSI subunits, except for PsaL. Therefore cryo-EM was used for 3D reconstruction of the PSI tetramer complex. A 3D model at ~11.5Å resolution was obtained and a 2D map within the membrane plane of ~6.1Å. This data was used to build a model that was compared with the high-resolution structure of the PSI of Thermosynechococcus elongatus (T. elongatus) at 2.5Å. This comparison reveals key differences in which subunits are involved in the two different interfaces, interface type 1 within a dimer and interface type 2 between dimers. The type 1 interface in TS-821 is similar to the monomer interface in the trimeric PSI from T. elongatus, with interactions between subunits PsaA, -B, -I, -L and M. In type 2 the interaction is only between PsaA, -B and -L. Unlike the trimeric PSI, the central cavity of the complex is not filled with the PsaL-derived helical bundle, but instead seems filled with lipids. The physiological or evolutionary advantage of the tetramer is unknown. However, the presence of both dimers and tetramers in the thylakoid membrane suggest a dynamic equilibrium that shifts towards the tetramers in high light. PMID:27392600

  17. NDUFAF7 Methylates Arginine 85 in the NDUFS2 Subunit of Human Complex I*

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Virginie F.; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in mammalian mitochondria is an L-shaped assembly of 44 subunits. One arm is embedded in the inner membrane with the other protruding ∼100 Å into the matrix of the organelle. The extrinsic arm contains binding sites for NADH and the primary electron acceptor FMN, and it provides a scaffold for seven iron-sulfur clusters that form an electron pathway linking FMN to the terminal electron acceptor, ubiquinone, which is bound in the region of the junction between the arms. The membrane arm contains four antiporter-like domains, probably energetically coupled to the quinone site and involved in pumping protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space contributing to the proton motive force. Complex I is put together from preassembled subcomplexes. Their compositions have been characterized partially, and at least 12 extrinsic assembly factor proteins are required for the assembly of the complex. One such factor, NDUFAF7, is predicted to belong to the family of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases characterized by the presence in their structures of a seven-β-strand protein fold. In the present study, the presence of NDUFAF7 in the mitochondrial matrix has been confirmed, and it has been demonstrated that it is a protein methylase that symmetrically dimethylates the ω-NG,NG′ atoms of residue Arg-85 in the NDUFS2 subunit of complex I. This methylation step occurs early in the assembly of complex I and probably stabilizes a 400-kDa subcomplex that forms the initial nucleus of the peripheral arm and its juncture with the membrane arm. PMID:24089531

  18. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1–Utp21, Utp12–Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data. PMID:27330138

  19. In Vivo Identification of Photosystem II Light Harvesting Complexes Interacting with PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT S.

    PubMed

    Gerotto, Caterina; Franchin, Cinzia; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2015-08-01

    Light is the primary energy source for photosynthetic organisms, but in excess, it can generate reactive oxygen species and lead to cell damage. Plants evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate light use efficiency depending on illumination intensity to thrive in a highly dynamic natural environment. One of the main mechanisms for protection from intense illumination is the dissipation of excess excitation energy as heat, a process called nonphotochemical quenching. In plants, nonphotochemical quenching induction depends on the generation of a pH gradient across thylakoid membranes and on the presence of a protein called PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT S (PSBS). Here, we generated Physcomitrella patens lines expressing histidine-tagged PSBS that were exploited to purify the native protein by affinity chromatography. The mild conditions used in the purification allowed copurifying PSBS with its interactors, which were identified by mass spectrometry analysis to be mainly photosystem II antenna proteins, such as LIGHT-HARVESTING COMPLEX B (LHCB). PSBS interaction with other proteins appears to be promiscuous and not exclusive, although the major proteins copurified with PSBS were components of the LHCII trimers (LHCB3 and LHCBM). These results provide evidence of a physical interaction between specific photosystem II light-harvesting complexes and PSBS in the thylakoids, suggesting that these subunits are major players in heat dissipation of excess energy. PMID:26069151

  20. A formalism for scattering of complex composite structures. I. Applications to branched structures of asymmetric sub-units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2012-03-01

    We present a formalism for the scattering of an arbitrary linear or acyclic branched structure build by joining mutually non-interacting arbitrary functional sub-units. The formalism consists of three equations expressing the structural scattering in terms of three equations expressing the sub-unit scattering. The structural scattering expressions allow composite structures to be used as sub-units within the formalism itself. This allows the scattering expressions for complex hierarchical structures to be derived with great ease. The formalism is generic in the sense that the scattering due to structural connectivity is completely decoupled from internal structure of the sub-units. This allows sub-units to be replaced by more complex structures. We illustrate the physical interpretation of the formalism diagrammatically. By applying a self-consistency requirement, we derive the pair distributions of an ideal flexible polymer sub-unit. We illustrate the formalism by deriving generic scattering expressions for branched structures such as stars, pom-poms, bottle-brushes, and dendrimers build out of asymmetric two-functional sub-units.

  1. A formalism for scattering of complex composite structures. I. Applications to branched structures of asymmetric sub-units.

    PubMed

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2012-03-14

    We present a formalism for the scattering of an arbitrary linear or acyclic branched structure build by joining mutually non-interacting arbitrary functional sub-units. The formalism consists of three equations expressing the structural scattering in terms of three equations expressing the sub-unit scattering. The structural scattering expressions allow composite structures to be used as sub-units within the formalism itself. This allows the scattering expressions for complex hierarchical structures to be derived with great ease. The formalism is generic in the sense that the scattering due to structural connectivity is completely decoupled from internal structure of the sub-units. This allows sub-units to be replaced by more complex structures. We illustrate the physical interpretation of the formalism diagrammatically. By applying a self-consistency requirement, we derive the pair distributions of an ideal flexible polymer sub-unit. We illustrate the formalism by deriving generic scattering expressions for branched structures such as stars, pom-poms, bottle-brushes, and dendrimers build out of asymmetric two-functional sub-units. PMID:22423826

  2. Assembly of NADH: ubiquinone reductase (complex I) in Neurospora mitochondria. Independent pathways of nuclear-encoded and mitochondrially encoded subunits.

    PubMed

    Tuschen, G; Sackmann, U; Nehls, U; Haiker, H; Buse, G; Weiss, H

    1990-06-20

    NADH:ubiquinone reductase, the respiratory chain complex I of mitochondria, consists of some 25 nuclear-encoded and seven mitochondrially encoded subunits, and contains as redox groups one FMN, probably one internal ubiquinone and at least four iron-sulphur clusters. We are studying the assembly of the enzyme in Neurospora crassa. The flux of radioactivity in cells that were pulse-labelled with [35S]methionine was followed through immunoprecipitable assembly intermediates into the holoenzyme. Labelled polypeptides were observed to accumulate transiently in a Mr 350,000 intermediate complex. This complex contains all mitochondrially encoded subunits of the enzyme as well as subunits encoded in the nucleus that have no homologous counterparts in a small, merely nuclear-encoded form of the NADH:ubiquinone reductase made by Neurospora crassa cells poisoned with chloramphenicol. With regard to their subunit compositions, the assembly intermediate and small NADH:ubiquinone reductase complement each other almost perfectly to give the subunit composition of the large complex I. These results suggest that two pathways exist in the assembly of complex I that independently lead to the preassembly of two major parts, which subsequently join to form the complex. One preassembled part is related to the small form of NADH:ubiquinone reductase and contributes most of the nuclear-encoded subunits, FMN, three iron-sulphur clusters and the site for the internal ubiquinone. The other part is the assembly intermediate and contributes all mitochondrially encoded subunits, one iron-sulphur cluster and the catalytic site for the substrate ubiquinone. We discuss the results with regard to the evolution of the electron pathway through complex I. PMID:2141652

  3. RBM7 subunit of the NEXT complex binds U-rich sequences and targets 3′-end extended forms of snRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hrossova, Dominika; Sikorsky, Tomas; Potesil, David; Bartosovic, Marek; Pasulka, Josef; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Stefl, Richard; Vanacova, Stepanka

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Exosome Targeting (NEXT) complex is a key cofactor of the mammalian nuclear exosome in the removal of Promoter Upstream Transcripts (PROMPTs) and potentially aberrant forms of other noncoding RNAs, such as snRNAs. NEXT is composed of three subunits SKIV2L2, ZCCHC8 and RBM7. We have recently identified the NEXT complex in our screen for oligo(U) RNA-binding factors. Here, we demonstrate that NEXT displays preference for U-rich pyrimidine sequences and this RNA binding is mediated by the RNA recognition motif (RRM) of the RBM7 subunit. We solved the structure of RBM7 RRM and identified two phenylalanine residues that are critical for interaction with RNA. Furthermore, we showed that these residues are required for the NEXT interaction with snRNAs in vivo. Finally, we show that depletion of components of the NEXT complex alone or together with exosome nucleases resulted in the accumulation of mature as well as extended forms of snRNAs. Thus, our data suggest a new scenario in which the NEXT complex is involved in the surveillance of snRNAs and/or biogenesis of snRNPs. PMID:25852104

  4. Protein degradation corrects for imbalanced subunit stoichiometry in OST complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Susanne; Wahlander, Asa; Selevsek, Nathalie; Otto, Claudia; Ngwa, Elsy Mankah; Poljak, Kristina; Frey, Alexander D.; Aebi, Markus; Gauss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation is essential for cellular homeostasis. We developed a sensitive approach to examining protein degradation rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by coupling a SILAC approach to selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Combined with genetic tools, this analysis made it possible to study the assembly of the oligosaccharyl transferase complex. The ER-associated degradation machinery compensated for disturbed homeostasis of complex components by degradation of subunits in excess. On a larger scale, protein degradation in the ER was found to be a minor factor in the regulation of protein homeostasis in exponentially growing cells, but ERAD became relevant when the gene dosage was affected, as demonstrated in heterozygous diploid cells. Hence the alleviation of fitness defects due to abnormal gene copy numbers might be an important function of protein degradation. PMID:25995378

  5. Functional Redundancy of Paralogs of an Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome Subunit in Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Kathryn K.; Nesmith, Jessica E.; Ross, Benjamin D.; Golden, Andy

    2010-01-01

    The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) mediates the metaphase-to-anaphase transition by instructing the ubiquitination and turnover of key proteins at this stage of the cell cycle. We have recovered a gain-of-function allele in an APC5 subunit of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome. This finding led us to investigate further the role of APC5 in Caenorhabditis elegans, which contains two APC5 paralogs. We have shown that these two paralogs, such-1 and gfi-3, are coexpressed in the germline but have nonoverlapping expression patterns in other tissues. Depletion of such-1 or gfi-3 alone does not have a notable effect on the meiotic divisions; however, codepletion of these two factors results in meiotic arrest. In sum, the two C. elegans APC5 paralogs have a redundant function during the meiotic divisions. PMID:20944012

  6. The influence of beta subunit structure on the stability of Na+/K(+)-ATPase complexes and interaction with K+.

    PubMed

    Eakle, K A; Kabalin, M A; Wang, S G; Farley, R A

    1994-03-01

    Heterologous expression of the beta subunit of H+/K(+)-ATPase (HK beta) with alpha subunits of Na+/K(+)-ATPase (NK alpha) in yeast leads to the formation of ouabain binding complexes, indicating assembly of the two subunits into active ion pumps (Eakle, K. A., Kim, K. S., Kabalin, M. A., and Farley, R. A. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 89, 2834-2838). Complexes of NK alpha and HK beta are less sensitive to inhibition of ouabain binding by K+, suggesting that HK beta lowers the affinity of K+ binding sites. This effect is particularly pronounced when HK beta is combined with the alpha 3 isoform of NK alpha. In this case, titration with K+ yields a biphasic curve, suggesting that there are two nonequivalent sites for K+ binding. Attempts at purifying complexes formed with either alpha 1 + HK beta or alpha 3 + HK beta using SDS extraction of microsomal membranes resulted in the loss of ouabain binding. Controls show that alpha 1 + beta 1 and alpha 3 + beta 1 complexes still retain ouabain binding after SDS extraction under the same conditions. This suggests that the HK beta subunit forms a less stable complex with NK alpha subunits. We have created chimeric beta subunits comprised of the amino-terminal cytoplasmic and transmembrane regions of HK beta combined with the carboxyl-terminal extracellular region of Na+/K(+)-ATPase beta 1 (HN beta 1) and the complementary chimera with amino-terminal cytoplasmic and transmembrane regions of beta 1 combined with the carboxyl-terminal extracellular region of HK beta (NH beta 1). When NH beta 1 is combined with either alpha 1 or alpha 3, the complexes show profiles of K+ inhibition of ouabain binding that are very similar to HK beta combined with either alpha 1 or alpha 3. The data suggest that the extracellular region of HK beta is primarily responsible for the effect on apparent K+ affinity. When the HN beta 1 subunit is expressed with the alpha 3 subunit, less than 5% of the amount of ouabain binding complexes are

  7. Fibrinogen Substrate Recognition by Staphylocoagulase·(Pro)thrombin Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Panizzi, Peter; Friedrich, Rainer; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Richter, Klaus; Bock, Paul E.; Bode, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Thrombin generation and fibrinogen (Fbg) clotting are the ultimate proteolytic reactions in the blood coagulation pathway. Staphylocoagulase (SC), a protein secreted by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, activates prothrombin (ProT) without proteolysis. The SC·(pro)thrombin complex recognizes Fbg as a specific substrate, converting it directly into fibrin. The crystal structure of a fully active SC fragment containing residues 1–325 (SC-(1–325)) bound to human prethrombin 2 showed previously that SC inserts its Ile1-Val2 N terminus into the Ile16 pocket of prethrombin 2, inducing a functional active site in the cognate zymogen conformationally. Exosite I of α-thrombin, the Fbg recognition site, and proexosite I on ProT are blocked by domain 2 of SC-(1–325). In the present studies, active site-labeled fluorescent ProT analogs were used to quantitate Fbg binding to the SC-(1–325)·ProT complex. Fbg binding and cleavage are mediated by expression of a new Fbg-binding exosite on the SC-(1–325)·ProT complex, resulting in formation of an (SC-(1–325)·ProT)2·Fbg pentameric complex with a dissociation constant of 8–34 nM. In both crystal structures, the SC-(1–325)·(pre)thrombin complexes form dimers, with both pro-teinases/zymogens facing each other over a large U-shaped cleft, through which the Fbg substrate could thread. On this basis, a molecular model of the pentameric (SC-(1–325)·thrombin)2·Fbg encounter complex was generated, which explains the coagulant properties and efficient Fbg conversion. The results provide new insight into the mechanism that mediates high affinity Fbg binding and cleavage as a substrate of SC·(pro)thrombin complexes, a process that is central to the molecular pathology of S. aureus endocarditis. PMID:16230339

  8. Conformation of the signal recognition particle in ribosomal targeting complexes

    PubMed Central

    Buskiewicz, Iwona A.; Jöckel, Johannes; Rodnina, Marina V.; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial signal recognition particle (SRP) binds to ribosomes synthesizing inner membrane proteins and, by interaction with the SRP receptor, FtsY, targets them to the translocon at the membrane. Here we probe the conformation of SRP and SRP protein, Ffh, at different stages of targeting by measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorophores placed at various positions within SRP. Distances derived from FRET indicate that SRP binding to nontranslating ribosomes triggers a global conformational change of SRP that facilitates binding of the SRP receptor, FtsY. Binding of SRP to a signal-anchor sequence exposed on a ribosome-nascent chain complex (RNC) causes a further change of the SRP conformation, involving the flexible part of the Ffh(M) domain, which increases the affinity for FtsY of ribosome-bound SRP up to the affinity exhibited by the isolated NG domain of Ffh. This indicates that in the RNC–SRP complex the Ffh(NG) domain is fully exposed for binding FtsY to form the targeting complex. Binding of FtsY to the RNC–SRP complex results in a limited conformational change of SRP, which may initiate subsequent targeting steps. PMID:19029307

  9. Complex control of GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA expression: variation, covariation, and genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Megan K; Wang, Xusheng; Adler, Adrienne L; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    GABA type-A receptors are essential for fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are critical in brain function. Surprisingly, expression of receptor subunits is highly variable among individuals, but the cause and impact of this fluctuation remains unknown. We have studied sources of variation for all 19 receptor subunits using massive expression data sets collected across multiple brain regions and platforms in mice and humans. Expression of Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabrb2, Gabrb3, and Gabrg2 is highly variable and heritable among the large cohort of BXD strains derived from crosses of fully sequenced parents--C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. Genetic control of these subunits is complex and highly dependent on tissue and mRNA region. Remarkably, this high variation is generally not linked to phenotypic differences. The single exception is Gabrb3, a locus that is linked to anxiety. We identified upstream genetic loci that influence subunit expression, including three unlinked regions of chromosome 5 that modulate the expression of nine subunits in hippocampus, and that are also associated with multiple phenotypes. Candidate genes within these loci include, Naaa, Nos1, and Zkscan1. We confirmed a high level of coexpression for subunits comprising the major channel--Gabra1, Gabrb2, and Gabrg2--and identified conserved members of this expression network in mice and humans. Gucy1a3, Gucy1b3, and Lis1 are novel and conserved associates of multiple subunits that are involved in inhibitory signaling. Finally, proximal and distal regions of the 3' UTRs of single subunits have remarkably independent expression patterns in both species. However, corresponding regions of different subunits often show congruent genetic control and coexpression (proximal-to-proximal or distal-to-distal), even in the absence of sequence homology. Our findings identify novel sources of variation that modulate subunit expression and highlight the extraordinary capacity of biological networks to buffer 4-100 fold

  10. Structure and Biochemical Properties of Fission Yeast Arp2/3 Complex Lacking the Arp2 Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, B.; Pollard, T

    2008-01-01

    Arp2/3 (actin-related protein 2/3) complex is a seven-subunit complex that nucleates branched actin filaments in response to cellular signals. Nucleation-promoting factors such as WASp/Scar family proteins activate the complex by facilitating the activating conformational change and recruiting the first actin monomer for the daughter branch. Here we address the role of the Arp2 subunit in the function of Arp2/3 complex by isolating a version of the complex lacking Arp2 (Arp2? Arp2/3 complex) from fission yeast. An x-ray crystal structure of the ?Arp2 Arp2/3 complex showed that the rest of the complex is unperturbed by the loss of Arp2. However, the Arp2? Arp2/3 complex was inactive in actin nucleation assays, indicating that Arp2 is essential to form a branch. A fluorescence anisotropy assay showed that Arp2 does not contribute to the affinity of the complex for Wsp1-VCA, a Schizosaccharomyces pombe nucleation-promoting factor protein. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments showed that the loss of Arp2 does not prevent VCA from recruiting an actin monomer to the complex. Truncation of the N terminus of ARPC5, the smallest subunit in the complex, increased the yield of Arp2? Arp2/3 complex during purification but did not compromise nucleation activity of the full Arp2/3 complex.

  11. Molecular characterization and mutational analysis of the human B17 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Smeitink, J; Loeffen, J; Smeets, R; Triepels, R; Ruitenbeek, W; Trijbels, F; van den Heuvel, L

    1998-08-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex 1) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of about 36 nuclear-encoded subunits. We review the current knowledge of the 15 human complex I subunits cloned so far, and report the 598-bp cDNA sequence, the chromosomal localization and the tissue expression of an additional subunit, the B17 subunit. The cDNA open reading frame of B17 comprises 387 bp and encodes a protein of 128 amino acids (calculated Mr 15.5 kDa). There is 82.7% and 78.1% homology, respectively, at the cDNA and amino acid level with the bovine counterpart. The gene of the B17 subunit has been mapped to chromosome 2. Multiple-tissue dot-blots showed ubiquitous expression of the mRNA with relatively higher expression in tissues known for their high energy demand. Of these, kidney showed the highest expression. Mutational analysis of the subunit revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in 20 patients with isolated enzymatic complex I deficiency in cultured skin fibroblasts. PMID:9760212

  12. Subunit organization in the Dam1 kinetochore complex and its ring around microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Ramey, Vincent H.; Wong, Amanda; Fang, Jie; Howes, Stuart; Barnes, Georjana; Nogales, Eva

    2011-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells must segregate their chromosomes equally between two daughter cells at each division. This process needs to be robust, as errors in the form of loss or gain of genetic material have catastrophic effects on viability. Chromosomes are captured, aligned, and segregated to daughter cells via interaction with spindle microtubules mediated by the kinetochore. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae one microtubule attaches to each kinetochore, requiring extreme processivity from this single connection. The yeast Dam1 complex, an essential component of the outer kinetochore, forms rings around microtubules and in vitro recapitulates much of the functionality of a kinetochore–microtubule attachment. To understand the mechanism of the Dam1 complex at the kinetochore, we must know how it binds to microtubules, how it assembles into rings, and how assembly is regulated. We used electron microscopy to map several subunits within the structure of the Dam1 complex and identify the organization of Dam1 complexes within the ring. Of importance, new data strongly support a more passive role for the microtubule in Dam1 ring formation. Integrating this information with previously published data, we generated a structural model for the Dam1 complex assembly that advances our understanding of its function and will direct future experiments. PMID:21965284

  13. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    PubMed

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation. PMID:26644464

  14. Structure determination of an 11-subunit exosome in complex with RNA by molecular replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, Debora Lika Conti, Elena

    2013-11-01

    The crystallographic steps towards the structure determination of a complete eukaryotic exosome complex bound to RNA are presented. Phasing of this 11-protein subunit complex was carried out via molecular replacement. The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex involved in the 3′ degradation of a variety of RNA transcripts. In the nucleus, the exosome participates in the maturation of structured RNAs, in the surveillance of pre-mRNAs and in the decay of a variety of noncoding transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the exosome degrades mRNAs in constitutive and regulated turnover pathways. Several structures of subcomplexes of eukaryotic exosomes or related prokaryotic exosome-like complexes are known, but how the complete assembly is organized to fulfil processive RNA degradation has been unclear. An atomic snapshot of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 420 kDa exosome complex bound to an RNA substrate in the pre-cleavage state of a hydrolytic reaction has been determined. Here, the crystallographic steps towards the structural elucidation, which was carried out by molecular replacement, are presented.

  15. Characterization of non-canonical Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 subunits during early mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eid, André; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena

    2016-06-01

    An intense period of chromatin remodeling takes place after fertilization in mammals, which is thought necessary for epigenetic reprogramming to start a new developmental program. While much attention has been given to the role of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) and to canonical PRC1 complexes during this process, little is known as to whether there is any contribution of non-canonical PRC1 in shaping the chromatin landscape after fertilization. Here, we first describe in detail the temporal dynamics and abundance of H2A ubiquitylation (H2AK119ub), a histone modification catalyzed by PRC1, during pre-implantation mouse development. In addition, we have analyzed the presence of the 2 characteristic subunits of non-canonical PRC1 complexes, RYBP and its homolog YAF-2. Our results indicate that H2AK119ub is inherited from the sperm, rapidly removed from the paternal chromatin after fertilization, but detected again prior to the first mitosis, suggesting that PRC1 activity occurs as early as the zygotic stage. RYBP and YAF-2, together with the non-canonical subunit L3MBTL2, are all present during pre-implantation development but show different temporal dynamics. While RYBP is absent in the zygote, it is strongly induced from the 4-cell stage onwards. YAF-2 is inherited maternally and localizes to the pericentromeric regions in the zygote, is strongly induced between the 2- and 4-cell stages but then remains weak to undetectable subsequently. All together, our data suggest that non-canonical PRC1 is active during pre-implantation development and should be regarded as an additional component during epigenetic reprogramming and in the establishment of cellular plasticity of the early embryo. PMID:27081692

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of multi-subunit tethering complexes demonstrates an ancient pan-eukaryotic complement and sculpting in Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Christen M; Klute, Mary J; Dacks, Joel B

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexa are obligate intracellular parasites that cause tremendous disease burden world-wide. They utilize a set of specialized secretory organelles in their invasive process that require delivery of components for their biogenesis and function, yet the precise mechanisms underpinning such processes remain unclear. One set of potentially important components is the multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs), factors increasingly implicated in all aspects of vesicle-target interactions. Prompted by the results of previous studies indicating a loss of membrane trafficking factors in Apicomplexa, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of MTC conservation. Building on knowledge of the ancient presence of most MTC proteins, we demonstrate the near complete retention of MTCs in the newly available genomes for Guillardiatheta and Bigelowiellanatans. The latter is a key taxonomic sampling point as a basal sister taxa to the group including Apicomplexa. We also demonstrate an ancient origin of the CORVET complex subunits Vps8 and Vps3, as well as the TRAPPII subunit Tca17. Having established that the lineage leading to Apicomplexa did at one point possess the complete eukaryotic complement of MTC components, we undertook a deeper taxonomic investigation in twelve apicomplexan genomes. We observed excellent conservation of the VpsC core of the HOPS and CORVET complexes, as well as the core TRAPP subunits, but sparse conservation of TRAPPII, COG, Dsl1, and HOPS/CORVET-specific subunits. However, those subunits that we did identify appear to be expressed with similar patterns to the fully conserved MTC proteins, suggesting that they may function as minimal complexes or with analogous partners. Strikingly, we failed to identify any subunits of the exocyst complex in all twelve apicomplexan genomes, as well as the dinoflagellate Perkinsus marinus. Overall, we demonstrate reduction of MTCs in Apicomplexa and their ancestors, consistent with modification during, and possibly pre

  17. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Multi-Subunit Tethering Complexes Demonstrates an Ancient Pan-Eukaryotic Complement and Sculpting in Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Christen M.; Klute, Mary J.; Dacks, Joel B.

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexa are obligate intracellular parasites that cause tremendous disease burden world-wide. They utilize a set of specialized secretory organelles in their invasive process that require delivery of components for their biogenesis and function, yet the precise mechanisms underpinning such processes remain unclear. One set of potentially important components is the multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs), factors increasingly implicated in all aspects of vesicle-target interactions. Prompted by the results of previous studies indicating a loss of membrane trafficking factors in Apicomplexa, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of MTC conservation. Building on knowledge of the ancient presence of most MTC proteins, we demonstrate the near complete retention of MTCs in the newly available genomes for Guillardiatheta and Bigelowiellanatans. The latter is a key taxonomic sampling point as a basal sister taxa to the group including Apicomplexa. We also demonstrate an ancient origin of the CORVET complex subunits Vps8 and Vps3, as well as the TRAPPII subunit Tca17. Having established that the lineage leading to Apicomplexa did at one point possess the complete eukaryotic complement of MTC components, we undertook a deeper taxonomic investigation in twelve apicomplexan genomes. We observed excellent conservation of the VpsC core of the HOPS and CORVET complexes, as well as the core TRAPP subunits, but sparse conservation of TRAPPII, COG, Dsl1, and HOPS/CORVET-specific subunits. However, those subunits that we did identify appear to be expressed with similar patterns to the fully conserved MTC proteins, suggesting that they may function as minimal complexes or with analogous partners. Strikingly, we failed to identify any subunits of the exocyst complex in all twelve apicomplexan genomes, as well as the dinoflagellate Perkinsus marinus. Overall, we demonstrate reduction of MTCs in Apicomplexa and their ancestors, consistent with modification during, and possibly pre

  18. The KCNE2 K⁺ channel regulatory subunit: Ubiquitous influence, complex pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2015-09-15

    The KCNE single-span transmembrane subunits are encoded by five-member gene families in the human and mouse genomes. Primarily recognized for co-assembling with and functionally regulating the voltage-gated potassium channels, the broad influence of KCNE subunits in mammalian physiology belies their small size. KCNE2 has been widely studied since we first discovered one of its roles in the heart and its association with inherited and acquired human Long QT syndrome. Since then, physiological analyses together with human and mouse genetics studies have uncovered a startling array of functions for KCNE2, in the heart, stomach, thyroid and choroid plexus. The other side of this coin is the variety of interconnected disease manifestations caused by KCNE2 disruption, involving both excitable cells such as cardiomyocytes, and non-excitable, polarized epithelia. Kcne2 deletion in mice has been particularly instrumental in illustrating the potential ramifications within a monogenic arrhythmia syndrome, with removal of one piece revealing the unexpected complexity of the puzzle. Here, we review current knowledge of the function and pathobiology of KCNE2. PMID:26123744

  19. Exon junction complex subunits are required to splice Drosophila MAP kinase, a large heterochromatic gene

    PubMed Central

    Roignant, Jean-Yves; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The exon junction complex (EJC) is assembled on spliced mRNAs upstream of exon-exon junctions, and can regulate their subsequent translation, localization, or degradation. We isolated mutations in Drosophila mago nashi (mago), which encodes a core EJC subunit, based on their unexpectedly specific effects on photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of Mago prevents Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, due to a large reduction in MAPK mRNA levels. MAPK expression also requires the EJC subunits Y14 and eIF4AIII, and EJC-associated splicing factors. Mago depletion does not affect the transcription or stability of MAPK mRNA, but alters its splicing pattern. MAPK expression from an exogenous promoter requires Mago only when the template includes introns. MAPK is the primary functional target of mago in eye development; in cultured cells, Mago knockdown disproportionately affects other large genes located in heterochromatin. These data support a nuclear role for EJC components in splicing a specific subset of introns. PMID:20946982

  20. Hough-based recognition of complex 3-D road scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresti, Gian L.; Regazzoni, Carlo S.

    1992-02-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of the object recognition in a complex 3-D scene by detecting the 2-D object projection on the image-plane for an autonomous vehicle driving; in particular, the problems of road detection and obstacle avoidance in natural road scenes are investigated. A new implementation of the Hough Transform (HT), called Labeled Hough Transform (LHT), to extract and group symbolic features is here presented; the novelty of this method, in respect to the traditional approach, consists in the capability of splitting a maximum in the parameter space into noncontiguous segments, while performing voting. Results are presented on a road image containing obstacles which show the efficiency, good quality, and time performances of the algorithm.

  1. Molecular counting by photobleaching in protein complexes with many subunits: best practices and application to the cellulose synthesis complex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yalei; Deffenbaugh, Nathan C.; Anderson, Charles T.; Hancock, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The constituents of large, multisubunit protein complexes dictate their functions in cells, but determining their precise molecular makeup in vivo is challenging. One example of such a complex is the cellulose synthesis complex (CSC), which in plants synthesizes cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on Earth. In growing plant cells, CSCs exist in the plasma membrane as six-lobed rosettes that contain at least three different cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms, but the number and stoichiometry of CESAs in each CSC are unknown. To begin to address this question, we performed quantitative photobleaching of GFP-tagged AtCESA3-containing particles in living Arabidopsis thaliana cells using variable-angle epifluorescence microscopy and developed a set of information-based step detection procedures to estimate the number of GFP molecules in each particle. The step detection algorithms account for changes in signal variance due to changing numbers of fluorophores, and the subsequent analysis avoids common problems associated with fitting multiple Gaussian functions to binned histogram data. The analysis indicates that at least 10 GFP-AtCESA3 molecules can exist in each particle. These procedures can be applied to photobleaching data for any protein complex with large numbers of fluorescently tagged subunits, providing a new analytical tool with which to probe complex composition and stoichiometry. PMID:25232006

  2. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.

  3. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, themore » target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.« less

  4. Protein Kinase A Catalytic Subunit Primed for Action: Time-Lapse Crystallography of Michaelis Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana; Parks, Jerry M; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Heller, William T

    2015-12-01

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg(2+) binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg(2+) binding to the M2 site. Concurrently, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. Lastly, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer. PMID:26585512

  5. A putative novel nuclear-encoded subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex in trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Dmitri A; Zíková, Alena; Kyselová, Iveta; Lukes, Julius

    2002-01-01

    A relatively large nuclear-encoded polypeptide, designated trCOIV, is found in the cytochrome c oxidase (CO) complex of trypanosomatids. In order to determine if this polypeptide represents a bona fide subunit of the complex, we have characterized the cDNA and the gene for this polypeptide in Leishmania tarentolae. Its nuclear gene has no sequence similarity to mammalian COIV. The trCOIV preprotein has a long mitochondrial targeting sequence of 31 residues. The mature polypeptide cofractionates with kinetoplast-mitochondria and its preferential mitochondrial localization was confirmed by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Based on the hydropathy plot analysis, the protein lacks pronounced transmembrane domains and likely occupies a peripheral position within the CO complex. The corresponding genes are also present in the sequenced portions of the Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major genomes, and the same polypeptide is found in cytochrome oxidase isolated from procyclic T. brucei and promastigote Leishmania mexicana amazonensis. However, the trCOIV gene, the mRNA and the polypeptide could not be detected in a respiration-deficient trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. PMID:12467979

  6. The Use of Small-Angle Scattering for the Characterization of Multi Subunit Complexes.

    PubMed

    Round, Adam

    2016-01-01

    As the continuing trend in structural biology is to probe ever more complex systems, new methodologies are being developed plus existing techniques are being expanded and adapted, to keep up with the demands of the research community. To investigate multi subunit complexes (protein-DNA, protein-RNA or protein-protein complexes) no one technique holds a monopoly, as each technique yields independent information inaccessible to the other methods, but can be used together in a complementary way. Additionally as large conformational changes are not unlikely, investigation of the dynamics of these systems under physiological conditions is needed to fully understand their function. Investigations under physiological conditions in solution are becoming more standardized and with more dedicated, automated beamlines available these experiments are easy to access by the general research community. As such the need for explanations of how to plan and undertake these experiments is needed. In this chapter we will cover the requirements of these experiments as well and how to plan undertake and analyze the results of such experiments. PMID:27165335

  7. Complex I Subunit Gene Therapy With NDUFA6 Ameliorates Neurodegeneration in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Talla, Venu; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari; Porciatti, Vittorio; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L.; Hauswirth, William W.; Guy, John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To address the permanent disability induced by mitochondrial dysfunction in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Methods. Mice sensitized for EAE were rescued by intravitreal injection of adeno-associated viral vector serotype 2 with the complex I subunit gene scAAV-NDUFA6Flag. Controls were injected with a mitochondrially targeted red fluorescent protein (scAAV-COX8-cherry). Another group received scAAV-COX8-cherry, but was not sensitized for EAE. Serial pattern electroretinograms (PERGs) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) evaluated visual function and structure of the retina at 1, 3, and 6 months post injection (MPI). Treated mice were killed 6 MPI for histopathology. Immunodetection of cleaved caspase 3 gauged apoptosis. Complex I activity was assessed spectrophotometrically. Expression of NDUFA6Flag in the retina and optic nerve were evaluated between 1 week to 1 month post injection by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Results. Reverse transcription-PCR and immunoblotting confirmed NDUFA6Flag overexpression with immunoprecipitation and blue native PAGE showing integration into murine complex I. Overexpression of NDUFA6Flag in the visual system of EAE mice rescued retinal complex I activity completely, axonal loss by 73%, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss by 88%, RGC apoptosis by 66%, and restored the 33% loss of complex I activity in EAE to normal levels; thereby, preventing loss of vision indicated by the 43% reduction in the PERG amplitudes of EAE mice. Conclusions. NDUFA6 gene therapy provided long-term suppression of neurodegeneration in the EAE animal model suggesting that it may also ameliorate the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with permanent disability in optic neuritis and MS patients. PMID:25613946

  8. Molecular constituents of maxi KCa channels in human coronary smooth muscle: predominant alpha + beta subunit complexes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Meera, P; Song, M; Knaus, H G; Toro, L

    1997-08-01

    1. Human large-conductance voltage- and calcium-sensitive K+ (maxi KCa) channels are composed of at least two subunits: the pore-forming subunit, alpha, and a modulatory subunit, beta. Expression of the beta subunit induces dramatic changes in alpha subunit function. It increases the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity and it allows dehydrosoyasaponin I (DHS-I) to upregulate the channel. 2. The functional coupling of maxi KCa channel alpha and beta subunits in freshly dissociated human coronary smooth muscle cells was assessed. To distinguish maxi KCa currents modulated by the beta subunit, we examined (a) their apparent Ca2+ sensitivity, as judged from the voltage necessary to half-activate the channel (V1/2), and (b) their activation by DHS-I. 3. In patches with unitary currents, the majority of channels were half-activated near -85 mV at 18 microM Ca2+, a value similar to that obtained when the human KCa channel alpha (HSLO) and beta (HKV,Ca beta) subunits are co-expressed. A small number of channels half-activated around 0 mV, suggesting the activity of the alpha subunit alone. 4. The properties of macroscopic currents were consistent with the view that most pore-forming alpha subunits were coupled to beta subunits, since the majority of currents had values for V1/2 near to -90 mV, and currents were potentiated by DHS-I. 5. We conclude that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells, most maxi KCa channels are composed of alpha and beta subunits. The higher Ca2+ sensitivity of maxi KCa channels, resulting from their coupling to beta subunits, suggests an important role of this channel in regulating coronary tone. Their massive activation by micromolar Ca2+ concentrations may lead to a large hyperpolarization causing profound changes in coronary blood flow and cardiac function. PMID:9279807

  9. Molecular constituents of maxi KCa channels in human coronary smooth muscle: predominant alpha + beta subunit complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Meera, P; Song, M; Knaus, H G; Toro, L

    1997-01-01

    1. Human large-conductance voltage- and calcium-sensitive K+ (maxi KCa) channels are composed of at least two subunits: the pore-forming subunit, alpha, and a modulatory subunit, beta. Expression of the beta subunit induces dramatic changes in alpha subunit function. It increases the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity and it allows dehydrosoyasaponin I (DHS-I) to upregulate the channel. 2. The functional coupling of maxi KCa channel alpha and beta subunits in freshly dissociated human coronary smooth muscle cells was assessed. To distinguish maxi KCa currents modulated by the beta subunit, we examined (a) their apparent Ca2+ sensitivity, as judged from the voltage necessary to half-activate the channel (V1/2), and (b) their activation by DHS-I. 3. In patches with unitary currents, the majority of channels were half-activated near -85 mV at 18 microM Ca2+, a value similar to that obtained when the human KCa channel alpha (HSLO) and beta (HKV,Ca beta) subunits are co-expressed. A small number of channels half-activated around 0 mV, suggesting the activity of the alpha subunit alone. 4. The properties of macroscopic currents were consistent with the view that most pore-forming alpha subunits were coupled to beta subunits, since the majority of currents had values for V1/2 near to -90 mV, and currents were potentiated by DHS-I. 5. We conclude that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells, most maxi KCa channels are composed of alpha and beta subunits. The higher Ca2+ sensitivity of maxi KCa channels, resulting from their coupling to beta subunits, suggests an important role of this channel in regulating coronary tone. Their massive activation by micromolar Ca2+ concentrations may lead to a large hyperpolarization causing profound changes in coronary blood flow and cardiac function. Images Figure 1 PMID:9279807

  10. Subcomplexes of Ancestral Respiratory Complex I Subunits Rapidly Turn Over in Vivo as Productive Assembly Intermediates in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J.; Carrie, Chris; Gawryluk, Ryan M. R.; Solheim, Cory; Gray, Michael W.; Whelan, James; Millar, A. Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Subcomplexes of mitochondrial respiratory complex I (CI; EC 1.6.5.3) are shown to turn over in vivo, and we propose a role in an ancestral assembly pathway. By progressively labeling Arabidopsis cell cultures with 15N and isolating mitochondria, we have identified CI subcomplexes through differences in 15N incorporation into their protein subunits. The 200-kDa subcomplex, containing the ancestral γ-carbonic anhydrase (γ-CA), γ-carbonic anhydrase-like, and 20.9-kDa subunits, had a significantly higher turnover rate than intact CI or CI+CIII2. In vitro import of precursors for these CI subunits demonstrated rapid generation of subcomplexes and revealed that their specific abundance varied when different ancestral subunits were imported. Time course studies of precursor import showed the further assembly of these subcomplexes into CI and CI+CIII2, indicating that the subcomplexes are productive intermediates of assembly. The strong transient incorporation of new subunits into the 200-kDa subcomplex in a γ-CA mutant is consistent with this subcomplex being a key initiator of CI assembly in plants. This evidence alongside the pattern of coincident occurrence of genes encoding these particular proteins broadly in eukaryotes, except for opisthokonts, provides a framework for the evolutionary conservation of these accessory subunits and evidence of their function in ancestral CI assembly. PMID:23271729

  11. FliT Selectively Enhances Proteolysis of FlhC Subunit in FlhD4C2 Complex by an ATP-dependent Protease, ClpXP*

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yoshiharu; Takaya, Akiko; Mouslim, Chakib; Hughes, Kelly T.; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that the ClpXP ATP-dependent protease specifically recognizes and degrades the flagellar master transcriptional activator complex, FlhD4C2, to negatively control flagellar biogenesis. The flagellum-related protein, FliT, is also a negative regulator of flagellar regulon by inhibiting the binding of FlhD4C2 to the promoter DNA. We have found a novel pathway of FliT inhibition of FlhD4C2 activity connected to ClpXP proteolysis. An in vitro degradation assay using purified proteins shows that FliT selectively increases ClpXP proteolysis of the FlhC subunit in the FlhD4C2 complex. FliT behaves specifically to ClpXP-dependent proteolysis of FlhC. An in vitro interaction assay detects the ternary complex of FliT-FlhD4C2-ClpX. FliT promotes the affinity of ClpX against FlhD4C2 complex, whereas FliT does not directly interact with ClpX. Thus, FliT interacts with the FlhC in FlhD4C2 complex and increases the presentation of the FlhC recognition region to ClpX. The DNA-bound form of FlhD4C2 complex is resistant to ClpXP proteolysis. We suggest that the role of FliT in negatively controlling the flagellar gene expression involves increasing free molecules of FlhD4C2 sensitive to ClpXP proteolysis by inhibiting the binding to the promoter DNA as well as enhancing the selective proteolysis of FlhC subunit by ClpXP. PMID:25278020

  12. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  13. A new family of Fe2Ln complexes built from mononuclear anionic Schiff base subunits.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ivan; Machata, Marek; Herchel, Radovan; Boča, Roman; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2012-12-28

    A series of the trinuclear [{Fe(3MeO-L)(2)}(2){μ(6)-Ln(η(2)-NO(3))(H(2)O)}]·nH(2)O, (Ln = Gd (2a), Tb (2b), Dy (2c), Ho (2d), Er (2e), Y (2f), H(2)-3MeO-L = 2-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenylsalicylaldimine) complexes were prepared and thoroughly characterized. The crystal structure of 2bwas determined and it revealed that the heterotrinuclear complex consists of two anionic [Fe(3MeO-L)(2)](-) subunits coordinated to the [Tb(H(2)O)(η(2)-NO(3))](2+) bridging moiety through the phenolato and methoxy oxygen atoms. The angular distortion within the coordination polyhedron of the [Fe(3MeO-L)(2)](-) subunits grows significantly upon coordination to the Ln atom of the bridging moiety, which consequently induces an increase in the parameter of the axial magnetic anisotropy. This conclusion is obvious from the comparison and analysis of the structural (XRD) and magnetic data of the yttrium trimer 2fand the precursor complex (Pr(3)NH)[Fe(3MeO-L)(2)] (1, Pr(3)NH = the tripropylammonium cation), where D(Fe)(1) = +0.80 cm(-1) and D(Fe)(2f) = +1.64 cm(-1). Furthermore, a weak antiferromagnetic interaction between the Fe(III) centres was found in 2f(J(FeFe) = -0.26 cm(-1)). The magnetic parameters of 2f were used in the fitting of the magnetic properties of 2a as constraints. The ferromagnetic nature of the Fe-Gd interaction in 2a was confirmed, with J(GdFe) = +1.40 cm(-1), D(Gd) = -0.26 cm(-1). Moreover, in the case of the Tb (2b) and Dy (2c) compounds, a slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperature (below 1.9 K) was observed upon the dehydration of the parent compounds. PMID:23104402

  14. Phosphorylation of the Scc2 cohesin deposition complex subunit regulates chromosome condensation through cohesin integrity

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Julie; Hoffman, Matthew; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk C.; Megee, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The cohesion of replicated sister chromatids promotes chromosome biorientation, gene regulation, DNA repair, and chromosome condensation. Cohesion is mediated by cohesin, which is deposited on chromosomes by a separate conserved loading complex composed of Scc2 and Scc4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although it is known to be required, the role of Scc2/Scc4 in cohesin deposition remains enigmatic. Scc2 is a phosphoprotein, although the functions of phosphorylation in deposition are unknown. We identified 11 phosphorylated residues in Scc2 by mass spectrometry. Mutants of SCC2 with substitutions that mimic constitutive phosphorylation retain normal Scc2–Scc4 interactions and chromatin association but exhibit decreased viability, sensitivity to genotoxic agents, and decreased stability of the Mcd1 cohesin subunit in mitotic cells. Cohesin association on chromosome arms, but not pericentromeric regions, is reduced in the phosphomimetic mutants but remains above a key threshold, as cohesion is only modestly perturbed. However, these scc2 phosphomimetic mutants exhibit dramatic chromosome condensation defects that are likely responsible for their high inviability. From these data, we conclude that normal Scc2 function requires modulation of its phosphorylation state and suggest that scc2 phosphomimetic mutants cause an increased incidence of abortive cohesin deposition events that result in compromised cohesin complex integrity and Mcd1 turnover. PMID:26354421

  15. Endosidin2 targets conserved exocyst complex subunit EXO70 to inhibit exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Brown, Michelle Q; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Wu, Bin; Young, Michael C; Synek, Lukáš; Borchardt, Dan; Harrison, Reed; Pan, Songqin; Luo, Nan; Huang, Yu-Ming M; Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Ung, Nolan; Li, Ruixi; Isley, Jonathan; Morikis, Dimitrios; Song, Jikui; Guo, Wei; Hooley, Richard J; Chang, Chia-En A; Yang, Zhenbiao; Zarsky, Viktor; Muday, Gloria K; Hicks, Glenn R; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2016-01-01

    The exocyst complex regulates the last steps of exocytosis, which is essential to organisms across kingdoms. In humans, its dysfunction is correlated with several significant diseases, such as diabetes and cancer progression. Investigation of the dynamic regulation of the evolutionarily conserved exocyst-related processes using mutants in genetically tractable organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana is limited by the lethality or the severity of phenotypes. We discovered that the small molecule Endosidin2 (ES2) binds to the EXO70 (exocyst component of 70 kDa) subunit of the exocyst complex, resulting in inhibition of exocytosis and endosomal recycling in both plant and human cells and enhancement of plant vacuolar trafficking. An EXO70 protein with a C-terminal truncation results in dominant ES2 resistance, uncovering possible distinct regulatory roles for the N terminus of the protein. This study not only provides a valuable tool in studying exocytosis regulation but also offers a potentially new target for drugs aimed at addressing human disease. PMID:26607451

  16. Endosidin2 targets conserved exocyst complex subunit EXO70 to inhibit exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunhua; Brown, Michelle Q.; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Wu, Bin; Young, Michael C.; Synek, Lukáš; Borchardt, Dan; Harrison, Reed; Pan, Songqin; Luo, Nan; Huang, Yu-ming M.; Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Ung, Nolan; Li, Ruixi; Isley, Jonathan; Morikis, Dimitrios; Song, Jikui; Guo, Wei; Hooley, Richard J.; Chang, Chia-en A.; Yang, Zhenbiao; Zarsky, Viktor; Muday, Gloria K.; Hicks, Glenn R.; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2016-01-01

    The exocyst complex regulates the last steps of exocytosis, which is essential to organisms across kingdoms. In humans, its dysfunction is correlated with several significant diseases, such as diabetes and cancer progression. Investigation of the dynamic regulation of the evolutionarily conserved exocyst-related processes using mutants in genetically tractable organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana is limited by the lethality or the severity of phenotypes. We discovered that the small molecule Endosidin2 (ES2) binds to the EXO70 (exocyst component of 70 kDa) subunit of the exocyst complex, resulting in inhibition of exocytosis and endosomal recycling in both plant and human cells and enhancement of plant vacuolar trafficking. An EXO70 protein with a C-terminal truncation results in dominant ES2 resistance, uncovering possible distinct regulatory roles for the N terminus of the protein. This study not only provides a valuable tool in studying exocytosis regulation but also offers a potentially new target for drugs aimed at addressing human disease. PMID:26607451

  17. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex subunit SNF5 is essential for hepatocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gresh, Lionel; Bourachot, Brigitte; Reimann, Andreas; Guigas, Bruno; Fiette, Laurence; Garbay, Serge; Muchardt, Christian; Hue, Louis; Pontoglio, Marco; Yaniv, Moshe; Klochendler-Yeivin, Agnès

    2005-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression underlies cell differentiation and organogenesis. Both transcription factors and chromatin modifiers are crucial for this process. To study the role of the ATP-dependent SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex in cell differentiation, we inactivated the gene encoding the core complex subunit SNF5/INI1 in the developing liver. Hepatic SNF5 deletion caused neonatal death due to severe hypoglycemia; mutant animals fail to store glycogen and have impaired energetic metabolism. The formation of a hepatic epithelium is also affected in SNF5-deficient livers. Transcriptome analyses showed that SNF5 inactivation is accompanied by defective transcriptional activation of 70% of the genes that are normally upregulated during liver development. These include genes involved in glycogen synthesis, gluconeogenesis and cell–cell adhesion. A fraction of hepatic developmentally activated genes were normally expressed, suggesting that cell differentiation was not completely blocked. Moreover, SNF5-deleted cells showed increased proliferation and we identified several misexpressed genes that may contribute to cell cycle deregulation in these cells. Our results emphasize the role of chromatin remodeling in the activation of cell-type-specific genetic programs and driving cell differentiation. PMID:16138077

  18. Association between GABAA Receptor Subunit Gene Cluster and Zolpidem-Induced Complex Sleep Behaviors in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Lin, Hung-Hsun; Cheng, Kuang-hung; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate and elucidate the role of GABAA receptor subunits, specifically the 2 genetic markers at the GABAA α1 and GABAA α6 receptors, in zolpidem-induced complex sleep behaviors (CSBs). Design: Genetic association study. Setting: Kaohsiung Medical University-affiliated hospitals, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Patients: 30 zolpidem-induced CSB subjects and 37 controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The χ2 test demonstrated an association between the A15G variant at the GABAA α1 receptor subunit gene and zolpidem-induced CSBs (P = 0.007). The adjusted odds ratio of the GABAA α1 receptor subunit genotype for the risk of zolpidem-induced CSBs was approximately 10 (OR = 9.99, 95% CI = 1.82, 74.87; P = 0.013). Conclusions: The finding reveals that the A15G variant at the GABAA α1 receptor subunit gene confers a high risk of zolpidem-induced CSBs and may be considered in clinical services. Citation: Tsai JH; Yang P; Lin HH; Cheng Kh; Yang YH; Wu MT; Chen CC. Association between GABAA receptor subunit gene cluster and zolpidem-induced complex sleep behaviors in Han Chinese. SLEEP 2013;36(2):197–202. PMID:23372267

  19. Helicobacter pylori RNA polymerase α-subunit C-terminal domain shows features unique to ɛ-proteobacteria and binds NikR/DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Borin, Brendan N; Tang, Wei; Krezel, Andrzej M

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase is a large, multi-subunit enzyme responsible for transcription of genomic information. The C-terminal domain of the α subunit of RNA polymerase (αCTD) functions as a DNA and protein recognition element localizing the polymerase on certain promoter sequences and is essential in all bacteria. Although αCTD is part of RNA polymerase, it is thought to have once been a separate transcription factor, and its primary role is the recruitment of RNA polymerase to various promoters. Despite the conservation of the subunits of RNA polymerase among bacteria, the mechanisms of regulation of transcription vary significantly. We have determined the tertiary structure of Helicobacter pylori αCTD. It is larger than other structurally determined αCTDs due to an extra, highly amphipathic helix near the C-terminal end. Residues within this helix are highly conserved among ɛ-proteobacteria. The surface of the domain that binds A/T rich DNA sequences is conserved and showed binding to DNA similar to αCTDs of other bacteria. Using several NikR dependent promoter sequences, we observed cooperative binding of H. pylori αCTD to NikR:DNA complexes. We also produced αCTD lacking the 19 C-terminal residues, which showed greatly decreased stability, but maintained the core domain structure and binding affinity to NikR:DNA at low temperatures. The modeling of H. pylori αCTD into the context of transcriptional complexes suggests that the additional amphipathic helix mediates interactions with transcriptional regulators. PMID:24442709

  20. Physical Interactions and Functional Coordination between the Core Subunits of Set1/Mll Complexes and the Reprogramming Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenhua; Augustin, Jonathan; Hu, Jing; Jiang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to the pluripotent state by overexpression of defined factors, and this process is profoundly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms including dynamic histone modifications. Changes in H3K4 methylation have been shown to be the predominant activating response in the early stage of cellular reprogramming. Mechanisms underlying such epigenetic priming, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the expression of the reprogramming factors (Yamanaka factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc), especially Myc, directly promotes the expression of certain core subunits of the Set1/Mll family of H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. A dynamic recruitment of the Set1/Mll complexes largely, though not sufficiently in its own, explains the dynamics of the H3K4 methylation during cellular reprogramming. We then demonstrate that the core subunits of the Set1/Mll complexes physically interact with mainly Sox2 and Myc among the Yamanaka factors. We further show that Sox2 directly binds the Ash2l subunit in the Set1/Mll complexes and this binding is mediated by the HMG domain of Sox2. Functionally, we show that the Set1/Mll complex core subunits are required for efficient cellular reprogramming. We also show that Dpy30, one of the core subunits in the complexes, is required for the efficient target binding of the reprogramming factors. Interestingly, such requirement is not necessarily dependent on locus-specific H3K4 methylation. Our work provides a better understanding of how the reprogramming factors physically interact and functionally coordinate with a key group of epigenetic modulators to mediate transitions of the chromatin state involved in cellular reprogramming. PMID:26691508

  1. Physical Interactions and Functional Coordination between the Core Subunits of Set1/Mll Complexes and the Reprogramming Factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenhua; Augustin, Jonathan; Hu, Jing; Jiang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to the pluripotent state by overexpression of defined factors, and this process is profoundly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms including dynamic histone modifications. Changes in H3K4 methylation have been shown to be the predominant activating response in the early stage of cellular reprogramming. Mechanisms underlying such epigenetic priming, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the expression of the reprogramming factors (Yamanaka factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc), especially Myc, directly promotes the expression of certain core subunits of the Set1/Mll family of H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. A dynamic recruitment of the Set1/Mll complexes largely, though not sufficiently in its own, explains the dynamics of the H3K4 methylation during cellular reprogramming. We then demonstrate that the core subunits of the Set1/Mll complexes physically interact with mainly Sox2 and Myc among the Yamanaka factors. We further show that Sox2 directly binds the Ash2l subunit in the Set1/Mll complexes and this binding is mediated by the HMG domain of Sox2. Functionally, we show that the Set1/Mll complex core subunits are required for efficient cellular reprogramming. We also show that Dpy30, one of the core subunits in the complexes, is required for the efficient target binding of the reprogramming factors. Interestingly, such requirement is not necessarily dependent on locus-specific H3K4 methylation. Our work provides a better understanding of how the reprogramming factors physically interact and functionally coordinate with a key group of epigenetic modulators to mediate transitions of the chromatin state involved in cellular reprogramming. PMID:26691508

  2. Study of robot landmark recognition with complex background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Yang, Jia

    2007-12-01

    It's of great importance for assisting robot in path planning, position navigating and task performing by perceiving and recognising environment characteristic. To solve the problem of monocular-vision-oriented landmark recognition for mobile intelligent robot marching with complex background, a kind of nested region growing algorithm which fused with transcendental color information and based on current maximum convergence center is proposed, allowing invariance localization to changes in position, scale, rotation, jitters and weather conditions. Firstly, a novel experiment threshold based on RGB vision model is used for the first image segmentation, which allowing some objects and partial scenes with similar color to landmarks also are detected with landmarks together. Secondly, with current maximum convergence center on segmented image as each growing seed point, the above region growing algorithm accordingly starts to establish several Regions of Interest (ROI) orderly. According to shape characteristics, a quick and effectual contour analysis based on primitive element is applied in deciding whether current ROI could be reserved or deleted after each region growing, then each ROI is judged initially and positioned. When the position information as feedback is conveyed to the gray image, the whole landmarks are extracted accurately with the second segmentation on the local image that exclusive to landmark area. Finally, landmarks are recognised by Hopfield neural network. Results issued from experiments on a great number of images with both campus and urban district as background show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  3. N-acetylation and phosphorylation of Sec complex subunits in the ER membrane

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Covalent modifications of proteins provide a mechanism to control protein function. Here, we have investigated modifications of the heptameric Sec complex which is responsible for post-translational protein import into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It consists of the Sec61 complex (Sec61p, Sbh1p, Sss1p) which on its own mediates cotranslational protein import into the ER and the Sec63 complex (Sec63p, Sec62p, Sec71p, Sec72p). Little is known about the biogenesis and regulation of individual Sec complex subunits. Results We show that Sbh1p when it is part of the Sec61 complex is phosphorylated on T5 which is flanked by proline residues. The phosphorylation site is conserved in mammalian Sec61ß, but only partially in birds, and not in other vertebrates or unicellular eukaryotes, suggesting convergent evolution. Mutation of T5 to A did not affect the ability of mutant Sbh1p to complement the growth defect in a Δsbh1Δsbh2 strain, and did not result in a hypophosphorylated protein which shows that alternate sites can be used by the T5 kinase. A survey of yeast phosphoproteome data shows that Sbh1p can be phosphorylated on multiple sites which are organized in two patches, one at the N-terminus of its cytosolic domain, the other proximal to the transmembrane domain. Surprisingly, although N-acetylation has been shown to interfere with ER targeting, we found that both Sbh1p and Sec62p are cotranslationally N-acetylated by NatA, and N-acetyl-proteome data indicate that Sec61p is modified by the same enzyme. Mutation of the N-acetylation site, however, did not affect Sec62p function in posttranslational protein import into the ER. Disabling NatA resulted in growth retardation, but not in co- or posttranslational translocation defects or instability of Sec62p or Sbh1p. Conclusions We conclude that N-acetylation of transmembrane and tail-anchored proteins does not interfere with their ER-targeting, and that Sbh1p phosphorylation on T5, which is not present in

  4. Transcription initiation complexes and upstream activation with RNA polymerase II lacking the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Buratowski, S; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II assembles with other factors on the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter to generate pairs of transcription initiation complexes resolvable by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. The pairing of the complexes is caused by the presence or absence of the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit. This domain is not required for transcription stimulation by the major late transcription factor in vitro. Images PMID:2398901

  5. The F0F1-ATP Synthase Complex Contains Novel Subunits and Is Essential for Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Zíková, Alena; Schnaufer, Achim; Dalley, Rachel A.; Panigrahi, Aswini K.; Stuart, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial F0F1 ATP synthase is an essential multi-subunit protein complex in the vast majority of eukaryotes but little is known about its composition and role in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. We purified the F0F1 ATP synthase by a combination of affinity purification, immunoprecipitation and blue-native gel electrophoresis and characterized its composition and function. We identified 22 proteins of which five are related to F1 subunits, three to F0 subunits, and 14 which have no obvious homology to proteins outside the kinetoplastids. RNAi silencing of expression of the F1 α subunit or either of the two novel proteins showed that they are each essential for the viability of procyclic (insect stage) cells and are important for the structural integrity of the F0F1-ATP synthase complex. We also observed a dramatic decrease in ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation after silencing expression of each of these proteins while substrate phosphorylation was not severely affected. Our procyclic T. brucei cells were sensitive to the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin even in the presence of glucose contrary to earlier reports. Hence, the two novel proteins appear essential for the structural organization of the functional complex and regulation of mitochondrial energy generation in these organisms is more complicated than previously thought. PMID:19436713

  6. The origin of the supernumerary subunits and assembly factors of complex I: A treasure trove of pathway evolution.

    PubMed

    Elurbe, Dei M; Huynen, Martijn A

    2016-07-01

    We review and document the evolutionary origin of all complex I assembly factors and nine supernumerary subunits from protein families. Based on experimental data and the conservation of critical residues we identify a spectrum of protein function conservation between the complex I representatives and their non-complex I homologs. This spectrum ranges from proteins that have retained their molecular function but in which the substrate specificity may have changed or have become more specific, like NDUFAF5, to proteins that have lost their original molecular function and critical catalytic residues like NDUFAF6. In between are proteins that have retained their molecular function, which however appears unrelated to complex I, like ACAD9, or proteins in which amino acids of the active site are conserved but for which no enzymatic activity has been reported, like NDUFA10. We interpret complex I evolution against the background of molecular evolution theory. Complex I supernumerary subunits and assembly factors appear to have been recruited from proteins that are mitochondrial and/or that are expressed when complex I is active. Within the evolution of complex I and its assembly there are many cases of neofunctionalization after gene duplication, like ACAD9 and TMEM126B, one case of subfunctionalization: ACPM1 and ACPM2 in Yarrowia lipolytica, and one case in which a complex I protein itself appears to have been the source of a new protein from another complex: NDUFS6 gave rise to cytochrome c oxidase subunit COX4/COX5b. Complex I and its assembly can therewith be regarded as a treasure trove for pathway evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:27048931

  7. The Arabidopsis Elongator Complex Subunit2 Epigenetically Regulates Plant Immune Responses[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongsheng; An, Chuanfu; Zhang, Xudong; Yao, Jiqiang; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Yu, Fahong; Amador, David Moraga; Mou, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Elongator complex subunit2 (ELP2) genetically interacts with NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (NPR1), a key transcription coactivator of plant immunity, and regulates the induction kinetics of defense genes. However, the mechanistic relationship between ELP2 and NPR1 and how ELP2 regulates the kinetics of defense gene induction are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ELP2 is an epigenetic regulator required for pathogen-induced rapid transcriptome reprogramming. We show that ELP2 functions in a transcriptional feed-forward loop regulating both NPR1 and its target genes. An elp2 mutation increases the total methylcytosine number, reduces the average methylation levels of methylcytosines, and alters (increases or decreases) methylation levels of specific methylcytosines. Interestingly, infection of plants with the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000/avrRpt2 induces biphasic changes in DNA methylation levels of NPR1 and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4), which encodes another key regulator of plant immunity. These dynamic changes are blocked by the elp2 mutation, which is correlated with delayed induction of NPR1 and PAD4. The elp2 mutation also reduces basal histone acetylation levels in the coding regions of several defense genes. Together, our data demonstrate a new role for Elongator in somatic DNA demethylation/methylation and suggest a function for Elongator-mediated chromatin regulation in pathogen-induced transcriptome reprogramming. PMID:23435660

  8. Complex long-distance effects of mutations that confer linezolid resistance in the large ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Fulle, Simone; Saini, Jagmohan S.; Homeyer, Nadine; Gohlke, Holger

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens will make current antibiotics ineffective. For linezolid, a member of the novel oxazolidinone class of antibiotics, 10 nucleotide mutations in the ribosome have been described conferring resistance. Hypotheses for how these mutations affect antibiotics binding have been derived based on comparative crystallographic studies. However, a detailed description at the atomistic level of how remote mutations exert long-distance effects has remained elusive. Here, we show that the G2032A-C2499A double mutation, located > 10 Å away from the antibiotic, confers linezolid resistance by a complex set of effects that percolate to the binding site. By molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we identify U2504 and C2452 as spearheads among binding site nucleotides that exert the most immediate effect on linezolid binding. Structural reorganizations within the ribosomal subunit due to the mutations are likely associated with mutually compensating changes in the effective energy. Furthermore, we suggest two main routes of information transfer from the mutation sites to U2504 and C2452. Between these, we observe cross-talk, which suggests that synergistic effects observed for the two mutations arise in an indirect manner. These results should be relevant for the development of oxazolidinone derivatives that are active against linezolid-resistant strains. PMID:26202966

  9. Downregulation of BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex subunit 3 sensitizes glioma cells to temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Chai, Kit Man; Wang, Chih-Yen; Liaw, Hung-Jiun; Fang, Kuan-Min; Yang, Chung-Shi; Tzeng, Shun-Fen

    2014-11-15

    We previously found that BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex subunit 3 (BRCC3) was highly expressed in tumorigenic rat glioma cells. However, the functional role of BRCC3 in human glioma cells remains to be characterized. This study indicated that the upregulation of BRCC3 expression was induced in two human malignant glioblastoma U251 and A172 cell lines following exposure to the alkylating agent, temozolomide (TMZ). Homologous recombination (HR)-dependent DNA repair-associated genes (i.e. BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and FANCD2) were also increased in U251 and A172 cells after treatment with TMZ. BRCC3 gene knockdown through lentivirus-mediated gene knockdown approach not only significantly reduced the clonogenic and migratory abilities of U251 and A172 cells, but also enhanced their sensitization to TMZ. The increase in phosphorylated H2AX foci (γH2AX) formation, an indicator of DNA damage, persisted in TMZ-treated glioma cells with stable knockdown BRCC3 expression, suggesting that BRCC3 gene deficiency is associated with DNA repair impairment. In summary, we demonstrate that by inducing DNA repair, BRCC3 renders glioma cells resistant to TMZ. The findings point to BRCC3 as a potential target for treatment of alkylating drug-resistant glioma. PMID:25337721

  10. Genetic variation of the mitochondrial Complex I subunit NDUFV2 and Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Kenya; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Cobb, Stephanie A.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Ross, Owen A.; Hentati, Emna; Hentati, Faycal; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    NADH dehydrogenase ubiquinone flavoprotein 2 (NDUFV2), encoding a subunit of mitochondrial complex I, is a candidate gene for several neuronal diseases; schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Parkinson disease (PD). We screened the entire coding region of NDUFV2 in 33 familial PD patients of North African Arab-Berber ethnicity in which all known genetic forms of PD had been excluded. We detected one novel substitution p.K209R (c.626A>G) in one PD. Segregation analysis within the family is inconclusive due to small sample size, but consistent with autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Subsequent screening of this mutation in ethnically-matched sporadic PD patients (n=238) and controls (n=371) identified p.K209R in one additional patient. The clinical features of the mutation carriers revealed a mild form of parkinsonism with a prognosis similar to idiopathic PD. Our findings suggest further studies addressing the role of NDUFV2 variation in PD may be warranted. PMID:20971673

  11. Ligand-induced formation of a transient tryptophan synthase complex with αββ subunit stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Alexander; Richter, Klaus; Busch, Florian; Reimann, Julia; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Sterner, Reinhard

    2010-12-28

    The prototypical tryptophan synthases form a stable heterotetrameric αββα complex in which the constituting TrpA and TrpB1 subunits activate each other in a bidirectional manner. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus does not contain a TrpB1 protein but instead two members of the phylogenetically distinct family of TrpB2 proteins, which are encoded within (sTrpB2i) and outside (sTrpB2a) the tryptophan operon. It has previously been shown that sTrpB2a does not functionally or structurally interact with sTrpA, whereas sTrpB2i substantially activates sTrpA in a unidirectional manner. However, in the absence of catalysis, no physical complex between sTrpB2i and sTrpA could be detected. In order to elucidate the structural requirements for complex formation, we have analyzed the interaction between sTrpA (α-monomer) and sTrpB2i (ββ-dimer) by means of spectroscopy, analytical gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation, as well as isothermal titration calorimetry. In the presence of the TrpA ligand glycerol 3-phosphate (GP) and the TrpB substrate l-serine, sTrpA and sTrpB2i formed a physical complex with a thermodynamic dissociation constant of about 1 μM, indicating that the affinity between the α- and ββ-subunits is weaker by at least 1 order of magnitude than the affinity between the corresponding subunits of prototypical tryptophan synthases. The observed stoichiometry of the complex was 1 subunit of sTrpA per 2 subunits of sTrpB2i, which corresponds to a αββ quaternary structure and testifies to a strong negative cooperativity for the binding of the α-monomers to the ββ-dimer. The analysis of the interaction between sTrpB2i and sTrpA in the presence of several substrate, transition state, and product analogues suggests that the αββ complex remains stable during the whole catalytic cycle and disintegrates into α- and ββ-subunits upon the release of the reaction product tryptophan. The formation of a transient tryptophan

  12. Isolation of photosystem II-enriched membranes and the oxygen-evolving complex subunit proteins from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Leng, Jing; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2011-01-01

    We describe methods to isolate highly active oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes and core complexes from higher plants, and to purify subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The membrane samples used as the material for various in vitro studies of PSII are prepared by solubilizing thylakoid membranes with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100, and the core complexes are prepared by further solubilization of the PSII membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-DDM). The OEC subunit proteins are dissociated from the PSII-enriched membranes by alkaline or salt treatment, and are then purified by ion-exchange chromatography using an automated high performance liquid chromatography system. PMID:20960116

  13. Structure/Function Implications in a Dynamic Complex of the Intrinsically Disordered Sic1 with the Cdc4 Subunit of an SCF Ubiquitin Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Mittag, Tanja; Marsh, Joseph; Grishaev, Alexander; Orlicky, Stephen; Lin, Hong; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2010-11-22

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can form highly dynamic complexes with partner proteins. One such dynamic complex involves the intrinsically disordered Sic1 with its partner Cdc4 in regulation of yeast cell cycle progression. Phosphorylation of six N-terminal Sic1 sites leads to equilibrium engagement of each phosphorylation site with the primary binding pocket in Cdc4, the substrate recognition subunit of a ubiquitin ligase. ENSEMBLE calculations using experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and small-angle X-ray scattering data reveal significant transient structure in both phosphorylation states of the isolated ensembles (Sic1 and pSic1) that modulates their electrostatic potential, suggesting a structural basis for the proposed strong contribution of electrostatics to binding. A structural model of the dynamic pSic1-Cdc4 complex demonstrates the spatial arrangements in the ubiquitin ligase complex. These results provide a physical picture of a protein that is predominantly disordered in both its free and bound states, enabling aspects of its structure/function relationship to be elucidated.

  14. The mammalian homologue of yeast Afg1 ATPase (lactation elevated 1) mediates degradation of nuclear-encoded complex IV subunits.

    PubMed

    Cesnekova, Jana; Rodinova, Marie; Hansikova, Hana; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri; Stiburek, Lukas

    2016-03-15

    Mitochondrial protein homeostasis is crucial for cellular function and integrity and is therefore maintained by several classes of proteins possessing chaperone and/or proteolytic activities. In the present study, we focused on characterization of LACE1 (lactation elevated 1) function in mitochondrial protein homeostasis. LACE1 is the human homologue of yeast mitochondrial Afg1 (ATPase family gene 1) ATPase, a member of the SEC18-NSF, PAS1, CDC48-VCP, TBP family. Yeast Afg1 was shown to mediate degradation of mitochondrially encoded complex IV subunits, and, on the basis of its similarity to CDC48 (p97/VCP), it was suggested to facilitate extraction of polytopic membrane proteins. We show that LACE1, which is a mitochondrial integral membrane protein, exists as part of three complexes of approximately 140, 400 and 500 kDa and is essential for maintenance of fused mitochondrial reticulum and lamellar cristae morphology. We demonstrate that LACE1 mediates degradation of nuclear-encoded complex IV subunits COX4 (cytochrome c oxidase 4), COX5A and COX6A, and is required for normal activity of complexes III and IV of the respiratory chain. Using affinity purification of LACE1-FLAG expressed in a LACE1-knockdown background, we show that the protein interacts physically with COX4 and COX5A subunits of complex IV and with mitochondrial inner-membrane protease YME1L. Finally, we demonstrate by ectopic expression of both K142A Walker A and E214Q Walker B mutants, that an intact ATPase domain is essential for LACE1-mediated degradation of nuclear-encoded complex IV subunits. Thus the present study establishes LACE1 as a novel factor with a crucial role in mitochondrial protein homeostasis. PMID:26759378

  15. Mass Spectrometry Profiles Superoxide-Induced Intra-molecular Disulfide in the FMN-binding Subunit of Mitochondrial Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwen; Xu, Hua; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Green-Church, Kari B.; Freitas, Michael A.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2008-01-01

    Protein thiols with regulatory functions play a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of the redox state in mitochondria. One major host of regulatory cysteines in mitochondria is complex I, with the thiols primarily located on its 51 kDa FMN-binding subunit. In response to oxidative stress, these thiols are expected to form intra-molecular disulfide bridges as one of their oxidative post-translational modifications. Here, to test this hypothesis and gain insights into the molecular pattern of disulfide in complex I, the isolated bovine complex I was prepared. Superoxide (O2•−) is generated by complex I under the conditions of enzyme turnover. O2•−-induced intra-molecular disulfide formation at the 51 kDa subunit was determined by tandem mass spectrometry and database searching, with the latter accomplished by adaptation of the in-house developed database search engine, MassMatrix [Xu H., et. al J. Proteome Res. (2008) 7, 138–44]. LC/MS/MS analysis of tryptic/chymotryptic digests of the 51 kDa subunit from alkylated complex I revealed that four specific cysteines (C125, C142, C187, and C206) of the 51 kDa subunit were involved in the formation of mixed intra-molecular disulfide linkages. In all, three cysteine pairs were observed: C125/C142, C187/C206, and C142/C206. The formation of disulfide bond was subsequently inhibited by superoxide dismutase, indicating the involvement of O2•−. These results elucidated by mass spectrometry indicates that the residues of C125, C142, C187, and C206 are the specific regulatory cysteines of complex I, and they participate in the oxidative modification with disulfide formation under the physiological or pathophysiological conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:18789718

  16. Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex contains a C-terminal Ras-like domain that promotes association of Paf1 complex with chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Amrich C. G.; Heroux A.; Davis, C. P.; Rogal, W. P.; Shirra, M. K.; Gardner, R. G.; Arndt, K. M.; VanDemark, A. P.

    2012-03-30

    The conserved Paf1 complex localizes to the coding regions of genes and facilitates multiple processes during transcription elongation, including the regulation of histone modifications. However, the mechanisms that govern Paf1 complex recruitment to active genes are undefined. Here we describe a previously unrecognized domain within the Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex, the Cdc73 C-domain, and demonstrate its importance for Paf1 complex occupancy on transcribed chromatin. Deletion of the C-domain causes phenotypes associated with elongation defects without an apparent loss of complex integrity. Simultaneous mutation of the C-domain and another subunit of the Paf1 complex, Rtf1, causes enhanced mutant phenotypes and loss of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation. The crystal structure of the C-domain reveals unexpected similarity to the Ras family of small GTPases. Instead of a deep nucleotide-binding pocket, the C-domain contains a large but comparatively flat surface of highly conserved residues, devoid of ligand. Deletion of the C-domain results in reduced chromatin association for multiple Paf1 complex subunits. We conclude that the Cdc73 C-domain probably constitutes a protein interaction surface that functions with Rtf1 in coupling the Paf1 complex to the RNA polymerase II elongation machinery.

  17. Distinct function of 2 chromatin remodeling complexes that share a common subunit, Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Fujiki, Ryoji; Tanabe, Masahiko; Takezawa, Shinichiro; Takada, Ichiro; Yamaoka, Ikuko; Yonezawa, Masayoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Hisato; Yoshinaga, Shin; Masuda, Takeyoshi; Fukuda, Toru; Yamamoto, Yoko; Ebihara, Kanae; Li, Dean Y; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Takeuchi, Jun K; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-06-01

    A number of nuclear complexes modify chromatin structure and operate as functional units. However, the in vivo role of each component within the complexes is not known. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes form several types of protein complexes, which reorganize chromatin structure cooperatively with histone modifiers. Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) was biochemically identified as a major subunit, along with 2 distinct complexes: WINAC, a SWI/SNF-type complex, and WICH, an ISWI-type complex. Here, WSTF(-/-) mice were generated to investigate its function in chromatin remodeling in vivo. Loss of WSTF expression resulted in neonatal lethality, and all WSTF(-/-) neonates and approximately 10% of WSTF(+/-) neonates suffered cardiovascular abnormalities resembling those found in autosomal-dominant Williams syndrome patients. Developmental analysis of WSTF(-/-) embryos revealed that Gja5 gene regulation is aberrant from E9.5, conceivably because of inappropriate chromatin reorganization around the promoter regions where essential cardiac transcription factors are recruited. In vitro analysis in WSTF(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells also showed impaired transactivation functions of cardiac transcription activators on the Gja5 promoter, but the effects were reversed by overexpression of WINAC components. Likewise in WSTF(-/-) MEF cells, recruitment of Snf2h, an ISWI ATPase, to PCNA and cell survival after DNA damage were both defective, but were ameliorated by overexpression of WICH components. Thus, the present study provides evidence that WSTF is shared and is a functionally indispensable subunit of the WICH complex for DNA repair and the WINAC complex for transcriptional control. PMID:19470456

  18. Complex regulation of γ-secretase: from obligatory to modulatory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gertsik, Natalya; Chiu, Danica; Li, Yue-Ming

    2014-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a four subunit, 19-pass transmembrane enzyme that cleaves amyloid precursor protein (APP), catalyzing the formation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides that form amyloid plaques, which contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. γ-Secretase also cleaves Notch, among many other type I transmembrane substrates. Despite its seemingly promiscuous enzymatic capacity, γ-secretase activity is tightly regulated. This regulation is a function of many cellular entities, including but not limited to the essential γ-secretase subunits, nonessential (modulatory) subunits, and γ-secretase substrates. Regulation is also accomplished by an array of cellular events, such as presenilin (active subunit of γ-secretase) endoproteolysis and hypoxia. In this review we discuss how γ-secretase is regulated with the hope that an advanced understanding of these mechanisms will aid in the development of effective therapeutics for γ-secretase-associated diseases like AD and Notch-addicted cancer. PMID:25610395

  19. Identification of Essential Subunits in the Plastid-Encoded RNA Polymerase Complex Reveals Building Blocks for Proper Plastid Development1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Sebastian; Schröter, Yvonne; Pfalz, Jeannette; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The major RNA polymerase activity in mature chloroplasts is a multisubunit, Escherichia coli-like protein complex called PEP (for plastid-encoded RNA polymerase). Its subunit structure has been extensively investigated by biochemical means. Beside the “prokaryotic” subunits encoded by the plastome-located RNA polymerase genes, a number of additional nucleus-encoded subunits of eukaryotic origin have been identified in the PEP complex. These subunits appear to provide additional functions and regulation modes necessary to adapt transcription to the varying functional situations in chloroplasts. However, despite the enormous progress in genomic data and mass spectrometry techniques, it is still under debate which of these subunits belong to the core complex of PEP and which ones represent rather transient or peripheral components. Here, we present a catalog of true PEP subunits that is based on comparative analyses from biochemical purifications, protein mass spectrometry, and phenotypic analyses. We regard reproducibly identified protein subunits of the basic PEP complex as essential when the corresponding knockout mutants reveal an albino or pale-green phenotype. Our study provides a clearly defined subunit catalog of the basic PEP complex, generating the basis for a better understanding of chloroplast transcription regulation. In addition, the data support a model that links PEP complex assembly and chloroplast buildup during early seedling development in vascular plants. PMID:21949211

  20. Assembly of Newly Imported Oxygen-Evolving Complex Subunits in Isolated Chloroplasts: Sites of Assembly and Mechanism of Binding.

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, A.; Ettinger, W. F.; Yamamoto, Y.; Theg, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the assembly of the nuclear-encoded subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) after their import into isolated intact chloroplasts. We showed that all three subunits examined (OE33, OE23, and OE17) partition between the thylakoid lumen and a site on the inner surface of the thylakoid membrane after import in a homologous system (e.g., pea or spinach subunits into pea or spinach chloroplasts, respectively). Although some interspecies protein import experiments resulted in OEC subunit binding, maize OE17 did not bind thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts isolated from peas. Newly imported OE33 and OE23 were washed from the membranes at the same concentrations of urea and NaCl as the native, indigenous proteins; this observation suggests that the former subunits are bound productively within the OEC. Inhibition of neither chloroplast protein synthesis nor light- or ATP-dependent energization of the thylakoid membrane significantly affected these assembly reactions, and we present evidence suggesting that incoming subunits actively displace those already bound to the thylakoid membrane. Transport of OE33 took place primarily in the stromal-exposed membranes and proceeded through a protease-sensitive, mature intermediate. Initial binding of OE33 to the thylakoid membrane occurred primarily in the stromal-exposed membranes, from where it migrated with measurable kinetics to the granal region. In contrast, OE23 assembly occurred in the granal membrane regions. This information is incorporated into a model of the stepwise assembly of oxygen-evolving photosystem II. PMID:12237359

  1. Antibody Recognition of Shiga Toxins (Stxs): Computational Identification of the Epitopes of Stx2 Subunit A to the Antibodies 11E10 and S2C4

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yongjun; Legge, Fiona S.; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Treutlein, Herbert R.; Zeng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We have recently developed a new method to predict the epitopes of the antigens that are recognized by a specific antibody. In this work, we applied the method to identify the epitopes of the Shiga toxin (Stx2 subunit A) that were bound by two specific antibodies 11E10 and S2C4. The predicted epitopes of Stx2 binding to the antibody 11E10 resembles the recognition surface constructed by the regions of Stx2 identified experimentally. For the S2C4, our results indicate that the antibody recognizes the Stx2 at two different regions on the protein surface. The first region (residues 246-254: ARSVRAVNE) is similar to the recognition region of the 11E10, while the second region is formed by two epitopes. The second region is particularly significant because it includes the amino acid sequence region that is diverse between Stx2 and other Stx (residues 176-188: QREFRQALSETAPV). This new recognition region is believed to play an important role in the experimentally observed selectivity of S2C4 to the Stx2. PMID:24516609

  2. A Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutation in a conserved C-terminal helix of Orc6 impedes origin recognition complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Bleichert, Franziska; Balasov, Maxim; Chesnokov, Igor; Nogales, Eva; Botchan, Michael R; Berger, James M

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA replication requires the origin recognition complex (ORC), a six-subunit assembly that promotes replisome formation on chromosomal origins. Despite extant homology between certain subunits, the degree of structural and organizational overlap between budding yeast and metazoan ORC has been unclear. Using 3D electron microscopy, we determined the subunit organization of metazoan ORC, revealing that it adopts a global architecture very similar to the budding yeast complex. Bioinformatic analysis extends this conservation to Orc6, a subunit of somewhat enigmatic function. Unexpectedly, a mutation in the Orc6 C-terminus linked to Meier-Gorlin syndrome, a dwarfism disorder, impedes proper recruitment of Orc6 into ORC; biochemical studies reveal that this region of Orc6 associates with a previously uncharacterized domain of Orc3 and is required for ORC function and MCM2–7 loading in vivo. Together, our results suggest that Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutations in Orc6 impair the formation of ORC hexamers, interfering with appropriate ORC functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00882.001 PMID:24137536

  3. Overexpression of the Arabidopsis anaphase promoting complex subunit CDC27a increases growth rate and organ size.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Cristian Antonio; Eloy, Nubia Barbosa; Lima, Marcelo de Freitas; Rodrigues, Roberta Lopes; Franco, Luciana Ozório; Himanen, Kristiina; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Hemerly, Adriana Silva; Ferreira, Paulo Cavalcanti Gomes

    2009-10-01

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC) controls CDK activity by targeting the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of S-phase and mitosis-promoting cyclins. Here, we report that the ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis CDC27a, an APC subunit, accelerates plant growth and results in plants with increased biomass production. CDC27a overexpression was associated to apical meristem restructuration, protoplasts with higher (3)H-thimidine incorporation and altered cell-cycle marker expression. Total protein extracts immunoprecipitated with a CDC27a antibody showed ubiquitin ligase activity, indicating that the Arabidopsis CDC27a gets incorporated into APC complexes. These results indicate a role of AtCDC27a in regulation of plant growth and raise the possibility that the activity of the APC and the rates of plant cell division could be regulated by the concentration of the CDC27a subunit. PMID:19629716

  4. The stimulating role of subunit F in ATPase activity inside the A1-complex of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1AO ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhirendra; Sielaff, Hendrik; Sundararaman, Lavanya; Bhushan, Shashi; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    A1AO ATP synthases couple ion-transport of the AO sector and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis of the A3B3-headpiece via their stalk subunits D and F. Here, we produced and purified stable A3B3D- and A3B3DF-complexes of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase as confirmed by electron microscopy. Enzymatic studies with these complexes showed that the M. mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase subunit F is an ATPase activating subunit. The maximum ATP hydrolysis rates (Vmax) of A3B3D and A3B3DF were determined by substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis experiments resulting in a Vmax of 7.9 s(-1) and 30.4 s(-1), respectively, while the KM is the same for both. Deletions of the N- or C-termini of subunit F abolished the effect of ATP hydrolysis activation. We generated subunit F mutant proteins with single amino acid substitutions and demonstrated that the subunit F residues S84 and R88 are important in stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Hybrid formation of the A3B3D-complex with subunit F of the related eukaryotic V-ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or subunit ε of the F-ATP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed that subunit F of the archaea and eukaryotic enzymes are important in ATP hydrolysis. PMID:26682760

  5. A novel multi-view object recognition in complex background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yongxin; Yu, Huapeng; Xu, Zhiyong; Fu, Chengyu; Gao, Chunming

    2015-02-01

    Recognizing objects from arbitrary aspects is always a highly challenging problem in computer vision, and most existing algorithms mainly focus on a specific viewpoint research. Hence, in this paper we present a novel recognizing framework based on hierarchical representation, part-based method and learning in order to recognize objects from different viewpoints. The learning evaluates the model's mistakes and feeds it back the detector to avid the same mistakes in the future. The principal idea is to extract intrinsic viewpoint invariant features from the unseen poses of object, and then to take advantage of these shared appearance features to support recognition combining with the improved multiple view model. Compared with other recognition models, the proposed approach can efficiently tackle multi-view problem and promote the recognition versatility of our system. For an quantitative valuation The novel algorithm has been tested on several benchmark datasets such as Caltech 101 and PASCAL VOC 2010. The experimental results validate that our approach can recognize objects more precisely and the performance outperforms others single view recognition methods.

  6. Spontaneous Object Recognition Memory in Aged Rats: Complexity versus Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamiz, Fernando; Gallo, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Previous work on the effect of aging on spontaneous object recognition (SOR) memory tasks in rats has yielded controversial results. Although the results at long-retention intervals are consistent, conflicting results have been reported at shorter delays. We have assessed the potential relevance of the type of object used in the performance of…

  7. Human origin recognition complex binds preferentially to G-quadruplex-preferable RNA and single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Shoko; Yura, Kei; Teranishi, Honami; Kiyasu, Noriko; Tominaga, Ayumi; Kadoma, Haruka; Nakatsuka, Ayaka; Kunichika, Tomoko; Obuse, Chikashi; Waga, Shou

    2013-10-18

    Origin recognition complex (ORC), consisting of six subunits ORC1-6, is known to bind to replication origins and function in the initiation of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. In contrast to the fact that Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORC recognizes the replication origin in a sequence-specific manner, metazoan ORC has not exhibited strict sequence-specificity for DNA binding. Here we report that human ORC binds preferentially to G-quadruplex (G4)-preferable G-rich RNA or single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). We mapped the G-rich RNA-binding domain in the ORC1 subunit, in a region adjacent to its ATPase domain. This domain itself has an ability to preferentially recognize G4-preferable sequences of ssDNA. Furthermore, we found, by structure modeling, that the G-rich RNA-binding domain is similar to the N-terminal portion of AdoMet_MTase domain of mammalian DNA methyltransferase 1. Therefore, in contrast with the binding to double-stranded DNA, human ORC has an apparent sequence preference with respect to its RNA/ssDNA binding. Interestingly, this specificity coincides with the common signature present in most of the human replication origins. We expect that our findings provide new insights into the regulations of function and chromatin binding of metazoan ORCs. PMID:24003239

  8. Human Origin Recognition Complex Binds Preferentially to G-quadruplex-preferable RNA and Single-stranded DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Hoshina, Shoko; Yura, Kei; Teranishi, Honami; Kiyasu, Noriko; Tominaga, Ayumi; Kadoma, Haruka; Nakatsuka, Ayaka; Kunichika, Tomoko; Obuse, Chikashi; Waga, Shou

    2013-01-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC), consisting of six subunits ORC1–6, is known to bind to replication origins and function in the initiation of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. In contrast to the fact that Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORC recognizes the replication origin in a sequence-specific manner, metazoan ORC has not exhibited strict sequence-specificity for DNA binding. Here we report that human ORC binds preferentially to G-quadruplex (G4)-preferable G-rich RNA or single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). We mapped the G-rich RNA-binding domain in the ORC1 subunit, in a region adjacent to its ATPase domain. This domain itself has an ability to preferentially recognize G4-preferable sequences of ssDNA. Furthermore, we found, by structure modeling, that the G-rich RNA-binding domain is similar to the N-terminal portion of AdoMet_MTase domain of mammalian DNA methyltransferase 1. Therefore, in contrast with the binding to double-stranded DNA, human ORC has an apparent sequence preference with respect to its RNA/ssDNA binding. Interestingly, this specificity coincides with the common signature present in most of the human replication origins. We expect that our findings provide new insights into the regulations of function and chromatin binding of metazoan ORCs. PMID:24003239

  9. Drosophila Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1)/Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) Protein Is Associated with HP1 and ORC and Functions in Heterochromatin-induced Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Shareef, Mohammed Momin; King, Chadwick; Damaj, Mona; Badagu, RamaKrishna; Huang, Da Wei; Kellum, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a conserved component of the highly compact chromatin of higher eukaryotic centromeres and telomeres. Cytogenetic experiments in Drosophila have shown that HP1 localization into this chromatin is perturbed in mutants for the origin recognition complex (ORC) 2 subunit. ORC has a multisubunit DNA-binding activity that binds origins of DNA replication where it is required for origin firing. The DNA-binding activity of ORC is also used in the recruitment of the Sir1 protein to silence nucleation sites flanking silent copies of the mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A fraction of HP1 in the maternally loaded cytoplasm of the early Drosophila embryo is associated with a multiprotein complex containing Drosophila melanogaster ORC subunits. This complex appears to be poised to function in heterochromatin assembly later in embryonic development. Here we report the identification of a novel component of this complex, the HP1/ORC-associated protein. This protein contains similarity to DNA sequence-specific HMG proteins and is shown to bind specific satellite sequences and the telomere-associated sequence in vitro. The protein is shown to have heterochromatic localization in both diploid interphase and mitotic chromosomes and polytene chromosomes. Moreover, the gene encoding HP1/ORC-associated protein was found to display reciprocal dose-dependent variegation modifier phenotypes, similar to those for mutants in HP1 and the ORC 2 subunit. PMID:11408576

  10. Inactivation of genes coding for mitochondrial Nd7 and Nd9 complex I subunits in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Impact of complex I loss on respiration and energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Plancke, Charlotte; Lapaille, Marie; Bailleul, Benjamin; Pirotte, Dorothée; Radoux, Michèle; Leprince, Pierre; Coosemans, Nadine; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    In Chlamydomonas, unlike in flowering plants, genes coding for Nd7 (NAD7/49 kDa) and Nd9 (NAD9/30 kDa) core subunits of mitochondrial respiratory-chain complex I are nucleus-encoded. Both genes possess all the features that facilitate their expression and proper import of the polypeptides in mitochondria. By inactivating their expression by RNA interference or insertional mutagenesis, we show that both subunits are required for complex I assembly and activity. Inactivation of complex I impairs the cell growth rate, reduces the respiratory rate, leads to lower intracellular ROS production and lower expression of ROS scavenging enzymes, and is associated to a diminished capacity to concentrate CO2 without compromising photosynthetic capacity. PMID:24316185

  11. Modulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity alters the subunit assembly in native N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Ferrani-Kile, Karima; Leslie, Steven W

    2005-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is crucial for development and neuroplasticity as well as excitotoxicity. The biochemical basis of the disassembly and reassembly of NMDA receptor has never been reported. Using coimmunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and mass spectrometry, we show that inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases triggers disassembly of NR1, NR2A, and NR2B in cortical NMDA receptor complexes. Furthermore, the disassembly of the NMDA receptor subunits is immediate, dose-dependent, and reversible and seems to occur through mechanisms linked to Src kinases. Together, these results define a novel role for tyrosine phosphatases in the complex mechanism of NMDA receptor regulation. PMID:15837820

  12. Matrix Proteins of Nipah and Hendra Viruses Interact with Beta Subunits of AP-3 Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weina; McCrory, Thomas S.; Khaw, Wei Young; Petzing, Stephanie; Myers, Terrell

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses and other negative-strand RNA viruses encode matrix proteins that coordinate the virus assembly process. The matrix proteins link the viral glycoproteins and the viral ribonucleoproteins at virus assembly sites and often recruit host machinery that facilitates the budding process. Using a co-affinity purification strategy, we have identified the beta subunit of the AP-3 adapter protein complex, AP3B1, as a binding partner for the M proteins of the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Binding function was localized to the serine-rich and acidic Hinge domain of AP3B1, and a 29-amino-acid Hinge-derived polypeptide was sufficient for M protein binding in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Virus-like particle (VLP) production assays were used to assess the relationship between AP3B1 binding and M protein function. We found that for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus, M protein expression in the absence of any other viral proteins led to the efficient production of VLPs in transfected cells, and this VLP production was potently inhibited upon overexpression of short M-binding polypeptides derived from the Hinge region of AP3B1. Both human and bat (Pteropus alecto) AP3B1-derived polypeptides were highly effective at inhibiting the production of VLPs. VLP production was also impaired through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of AP3B1 from cells. These findings suggest that AP-3-directed trafficking processes are important for henipavirus particle production and identify a new host protein-virus protein binding interface that could become a useful target in future efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors to combat paramyxoviral infections. IMPORTANCE Henipaviruses cause deadly infections in humans, with a mortality rate of about 40%. Hendra virus outbreaks in Australia, all involving horses and some involving transmission to humans, have been a continuing problem. Nipah virus caused a large outbreak in Malaysia in 1998

  13. Tim29 is a novel subunit of the human TIM22 translocase and is involved in complex assembly and stability.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yilin; Baker, Michael James; Liem, Michael; Louber, Jade; McKenzie, Matthew; Atukorala, Ishara; Ang, Ching-Seng; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Mathivanan, Suresh; Stojanovski, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The TIM22 complex mediates the import of hydrophobic carrier proteins into the mitochondrial inner membrane. While the TIM22 machinery has been well characterised in yeast, the human complex remains poorly characterised. Here, we identify Tim29 (C19orf52) as a novel, metazoan-specific subunit of the human TIM22 complex. The protein is integrated into the mitochondrial inner membrane with it's C-terminus exposed to the intermembrane space. Tim29 is required for the stability of the TIM22 complex and functions in the assembly of hTim22. Furthermore, Tim29 contacts the Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane, TOM complex, enabling a mechanism for transport of hydrophobic carrier substrates across the aqueous intermembrane space. Identification of Tim29 highlights the significance of analysing mitochondrial import systems across phylogenetic boundaries, which can reveal novel components and mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:27554484

  14. Repressing the Keratinocyte Genome: How the Polycomb Complex Subunits Operate in Concert to Control Skin and Hair Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Mardaryev, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The Polycomb group proteins are transcriptional repressors that are critically important in the control of stem cell activity and maintenance of the identity of differentiated cells. Polycomb proteins interact with each other to form chromatin-associated repressive complexes (Polycomb repressive complexes 1 and 2) leading to chromatin compaction and gene silencing. However, the roles of the distinct components of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 in the control of skin development and keratinocyte differentiation remain obscure. Dauber et al. demonstrate the conditional ablations of three essential Polycomb repressive complex 2 subunits (EED, Suz12, or Ezh1/2) in the epidermal progenitors result in quite similar skin phenotypes including premature acquisition of a functional epidermal barrier, formation of ectopic Merkel cells, and defective postnatal hair follicle development. The reported data demonstrate that in skin epithelia, EED, Suz12, and Ezh1/2 function largely as subunits of the Polycomb repressive complex 2, which is important in the context of data demonstrating their independent activities in other cell types. The report provides an important platform for further analyses of the role of distinct Polycomb components in the control of gene expression programs in the disorders of epidermal differentiation, such as psoriasis and epidermal cancer. PMID:27450498

  15. Nuclear factor 45 (NF45) is a regulatory subunit of complexes with NF90/110 involved in mitotic control.

    PubMed

    Guan, Deyu; Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Parrott, Andrew M; Arrigo, Cindy J; Li, Quan; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Li, Hong; Lee, Chee-Gun; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear factor 90 (NF90) and its C-terminally extended isoform, NF110, have been isolated as DNA- and RNA-binding proteins together with the less-studied protein NF45. These complexes have been implicated in gene regulation, but little is known about their cellular roles and whether they are redundant or functionally distinct. We show that heterodimeric core complexes, NF90-NF45 and NF110-NF45, exist within larger complexes that are more labile and contain multiple NF90/110 isoforms and additional proteins. Depletion of the NF45 subunit by RNA interference is accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the levels of NF90 and NF110. Reciprocally, depletion of NF90 but not of NF110 greatly reduces the level of NF45. Coregulation of NF90 and NF45 is a posttranscriptional phenomenon, resulting from protein destabilization in the absence of partners. Depletion of NF90-NF45 complexes retards cell growth by inhibition of DNA synthesis. Giant multinucleated cells containing nuclei attached by constrictions accumulate when either NF45 or NF90, but not NF110, is depleted. This study identified NF45 as an unstable regulatory subunit of NF90-NF45 complexes and uncovered their critical role in normal cell division. Furthermore, the study revealed that NF90 is functionally distinct from NF110 and is more important for cell growth. PMID:18458058

  16. The subunit structure of the follitropin (FSH) receptor. Photoaffinity labeling of the membrane-bound receptor follitropin complex in situ.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Branca, A A; Reichert, L E

    1985-11-15

    Human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH) was acylated with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB) and radioiodinated (55 microCi/micrograms) for use as a photoaffinity probe to investigate the subunit structure of the FSH receptor in calf testis. After incubation with the photoaffinity probe and photolysis with UV light, the cross-linked hormone-receptor complex was solubilized from the membrane and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Autoradiography of the polyacrylamide gels revealed two major bands, 64 kDa and 84 kDa. These were equivalent in molecular mass to those observed in a previous study (Branca, A. A., Sluss, P. M., Smith, A. A., and Reichert, L. E., Jr. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 9988-9993) in which performed hormone-receptor complexes were solubilized with detergent prior to formation of covalent cross-linkages through the use of homobifunctional cross-linking reagents. Reduction with dithiothreitol resulted in the loss of radioactivity from the 84-kDa band with a concomitant increase in the intensity of the 64-kDa band. Since dithiothreitol increases the dissociation of intact radioiodinated azidobenzoyl-FSH into subunits, it is suggested that the conversion of the 84-kDa band to the 64-kDa band by dithiothreitol is due to the loss of non-cross-linked hFSH subunit from the 84-kDa band and that the two bands observed after photoaffinity labeling arise from covalent bond formation between hFSH and a receptor subunit having a relative molecular weight (Mr) of 48,000. In addition to the predominant photolabeling of the receptor to yield the 64-kDa and 84-kDa bands, several other, less intense bands (54 kDa, 76 kDa, 97 kDa, and 116 kDa) were also consistently observed on autoradiographs. The appearance of all bands, however, was inhibited by the inclusion of unlabeled hFSH in the initial binding incubation mixtures. The results of this study indicate

  17. Structure, Subunit Topology, and Actin-binding Activity of the Arp2/3 Complex from Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, R. Dyche; Stafford, Walter F.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    The Arp2/3 complex, first isolated from Acanthamoeba castellani by affinity chromatography on profilin, consists of seven polypeptides; two actinrelated proteins, Arp2 and Arp3; and five apparently novel proteins, p40, p35, p19, p18, and p14 (Machesky et al., 1994). The complex is homogeneous by hydrodynamic criteria with a Stokes' radius of 5.3 nm by gel filtration, sedimentation coefficient of 8.7 S, and molecular mass of 197 kD by analytical ultracentrifugation. The stoichiometry of the subunits is 1:1:1:1:1:1:1, indicating the purified complex contains one copy each of seven polypeptides. In electron micrographs, the complex has a bilobed or horseshoe shape with outer dimensions of ∼13 × 10 nm, and mathematical models of such a shape and size are consistent with the measured hydrodynamic properties. Chemical cross-linking with a battery of cross-linkers of different spacer arm lengths and chemical reactivities identify the following nearest neighbors within the complex: Arp2 and p40; Arp2 and p35; Arp3 and p35; Arp3 and either p18 or p19; and p19 and p14. By fluorescent antibody staining with anti-p40 and -p35, the complex is concentrated in the cortex of the ameba, especially in linear structures, possibly actin filament bundles, that lie perpendicular to the leading edge. Purified Arp2/3 complex binds actin filaments with a Kd of 2.3 μM and a stoichiometry of approximately one complex molecule per actin monomer. In electron micrographs of negatively stained samples, Arp2/3 complex decorates the sides of actin filaments. EDC/NHS cross-links actin to Arp3, p35, and a low molecular weight subunit, p19, p18, or p14. We propose structural and topological models for the Arp2/3 complex and suggest that affinity for actin filaments accounts for the localization of complex subunits to actinrich regions of Acanthamoeba. PMID:9015304

  18. Distinct function of 2 chromatin remodeling complexes that share a common subunit, Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF)

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Fujiki, Ryoji; Tanabe, Masahiko; Takezawa, Shinichiro; Takada, Ichiro; Yamaoka, Ikuko; Yonezawa, Masayoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Hisato; Yoshinaga, Shin; Masuda, Takeyoshi; Fukuda, Toru; Yamamoto, Yoko; Ebihara, Kanae; Li, Dean Y.; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Takeuchi, Jun K.; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-01-01

    A number of nuclear complexes modify chromatin structure and operate as functional units. However, the in vivo role of each component within the complexes is not known. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes form several types of protein complexes, which reorganize chromatin structure cooperatively with histone modifiers. Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) was biochemically identified as a major subunit, along with 2 distinct complexes: WINAC, a SWI/SNF-type complex, and WICH, an ISWI-type complex. Here, WSTF−/− mice were generated to investigate its function in chromatin remodeling in vivo. Loss of WSTF expression resulted in neonatal lethality, and all WSTF−/− neonates and ≈10% of WSTF+/− neonates suffered cardiovascular abnormalities resembling those found in autosomal-dominant Williams syndrome patients. Developmental analysis of WSTF−/− embryos revealed that Gja5 gene regulation is aberrant from E9.5, conceivably because of inappropriate chromatin reorganization around the promoter regions where essential cardiac transcription factors are recruited. In vitro analysis in WSTF−/− mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells also showed impaired transactivation functions of cardiac transcription activators on the Gja5 promoter, but the effects were reversed by overexpression of WINAC components. Likewise in WSTF−/− MEF cells, recruitment of Snf2h, an ISWI ATPase, to PCNA and cell survival after DNA damage were both defective, but were ameliorated by overexpression of WICH components. Thus, the present study provides evidence that WSTF is shared and is a functionally indispensable subunit of the WICH complex for DNA repair and the WINAC complex for transcriptional control. PMID:19470456

  19. Emotion recognition deficits among persons with schizophrenia: Beyond stimulus complexity level and presentation modality.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Daniel; Hasson-Ohayon, Ilanit; Laukka, Petri; Vishne, Tali; Dembinsky, Yael; Kravets, Shlomo

    2016-06-30

    Studies have shown that persons with schizophrenia have lower accuracy in emotion recognition compared to persons without schizophrenia. However, the impact of the complexity level of the stimuli or the modality of presentation has not been extensively addressed. Forty three persons with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 43 healthy controls, matched for age and gender, were administered tests assessing emotion recognition from stimuli with low and high levels of complexity presented via visual, auditory and semantic channels. For both groups, recognition rates were higher for high-complexity stimuli compared to low-complexity stimuli. Additionally, both groups obtained higher recognition rates for visual and semantic stimuli than for auditory stimuli, but persons with schizophrenia obtained lower accuracy than persons in the control group for all presentation modalities. Persons diagnosed with schizophrenia did not present a level of complexity specific deficit or modality-specific deficit compared to healthy controls. Results suggest that emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia are beyond level of complexity of stimuli and modality, and present a global difficulty in cognitive functioning. PMID:27085665

  20. Crystal Structure in the Vivo-Assembled Bacillus subtilis Spx/RNA Polymerase alpha Subunit C-Terminal Domain Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, V.; Westblade, L; Campbell, E; Darst, S

    2009-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis Spx protein is a global transcription factor that interacts with the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase {alpha} subunit ({alpha}CTD) and regulates transcription of genes involved in thiol-oxidative stress, sporulation, competence, and organosulfur metabolism. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Spx/{alpha}CTD complex from an entirely new crystal form than previously reported [Newberry, K.J., Nakano, S., Zuber, P., Brennan, R.G., 2005. Crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis anti-alpha, global transcriptional regulator, Spx, in complex with the alpha C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102, 15839-15844]. Comparison of the previously reported sulfate-bound complex and our sulfate-free complex reveals subtle conformational changes that may be important for the role of Spx in regulating organosulfur metabolism.

  1. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar; Kumari, Neeti; Goyal, Neena

    2012-12-01

    T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1γ), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1γ of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1γ), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1γ revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1γ. However, leishmanial TCP1γ represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1γ exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1γ as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1γ was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1γ with actin suggests that, this gene may have a role in maintaining the structural dynamics of cytoskeleton of parasite. PMID:23137535

  2. Inhibition of Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Processing by Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin Requires an Enzymatically Active A Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Matousek, Milita P.; Nedrud, John G.; Cieplak, Witold; Harding, Clifford V.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and cholera toxin (CT) were found to inhibit intracellular antigen processing. Processing was not inhibited by mutant LT with attenuated ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, CT B or LT B subunit, which enhanced presentation of preexisting cell surface peptide-class II major histocompatibility complex complexes. Inhibition of antigen processing correlated with A subunit ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PMID:9632629

  3. Dual functions of a small regulatory subunit in the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Phillips, Charles B; Ranaghan, Matthew; Tsai, Chen-Wei; Wu, Yujiao; Williams, Carole; Miller, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, a process crucial for bioenergetics and Ca2+ signaling, is catalyzed by the mitochondrial calcium uniporter. The uniporter is a multi-subunit Ca2+-activated Ca2+ channel, with the Ca2+ pore formed by the MCU protein and Ca2+-dependent activation mediated by MICU subunits. Recently, a mitochondrial inner membrane protein EMRE was identified as a uniporter subunit absolutely required for Ca2+ permeation. However, the molecular mechanism and regulatory purpose of EMRE remain largely unexplored. Here, we determine the transmembrane orientation of EMRE, and show that its known MCU-activating function is mediated by the interaction of transmembrane helices from both proteins. We also reveal a second function of EMRE: to maintain tight MICU regulation of the MCU pore, a role that requires EMRE to bind MICU1 using its conserved C-terminal polyaspartate tail. This dual functionality of EMRE ensures that all transport-competent uniporters are tightly regulated, responding appropriately to a dynamic intracellular Ca2+ landscape. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15545.001 PMID:27099988

  4. Photocross-linking of nascent chains to the STT3 subunit of the oligosaccharyltransferase complex

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, IngMarie; Kelleher, Daniel J.; Miao, Yiwei; Shao, Yuanlong; Kreibich, Gert; Gilmore, Reid; von Heijne, Gunnar; Johnson, Arthur E.

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, polypeptides are N glycosylated after passing through the membrane of the ER into the ER lumen. This modification is effected cotranslationally by the multimeric oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) enzyme. Here, we report the first cross-linking of an OST subunit to a nascent chain that is undergoing translocation through, or integration into, the ER membrane. A photoreactive probe was incorporated into a nascent chain using a modified Lys-tRNA and was positioned in a cryptic glycosylation site (-Q-K-T- instead of -N-K-T-) in the nascent chain. When translocation intermediates with nascent chains of increasing length were irradiated, nascent chain photocross-linking to translocon components, Sec61α and TRAM, was replaced by efficient photocross-linking solely to a protein identified by immunoprecipitation as the STT3 subunit of the OST. No cross-linking was observed in the absence of a cryptic sequence or in the presence of a competitive peptide substrate of the OST. As no significant nascent chain photocross-linking to other OST subunits was detected in these fully assembled translocation and integration intermediates, our results strongly indicate that the nascent chain portion of the OST active site is located in STT3. PMID:12756234

  5. Mitotic Functions for SNAP45, a Subunit of the Small Nuclear RNA-activating Protein Complex SNAPc*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Hernandez, Nouria

    2008-01-01

    The small nuclear RNA-activating protein complex SNAPc is required for transcription of small nuclear RNA genes and binds to a proximal sequence element in their promoters. SNAPc contains five types of subunits stably associated with each other. Here we show that one of these polypeptides, SNAP45, also known as PTF δ, localizes to centrosomes during parts of mitosis, as well as to the spindle midzone during anaphase and the mid-body during telophase. Consistent with localization to these mitotic structures, both down- and up-regulation of SNAP45 lead to a G2/M arrest with cells displaying abnormal mitotic structures. In contrast, down-regulation of SNAP190, another SNAPc subunit, leads to an accumulation of cells with a G0/G1 DNA content. These results are consistent with the proposal that SNAP45 plays two roles in the cell, one as a subunit of the transcription factor SNAPc and another as a factor required for proper mitotic progression. PMID:18356157

  6. Recognition of preproteins by the isolated TOM complex of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Stan, T; Ahting, U; Dembowski, M; Künkele, K P; Nussberger, S; Neupert, W; Rapaport, D

    2000-09-15

    A multisubunit complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane, the TOM complex, mediates targeting and membrane translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins. We have isolated the TOM holo complex, containing the preprotein receptor components Tom70 and Tom20, and the TOM core complex, which lacks these receptors. The interaction of recombinant mitochondrial preproteins with both types of soluble TOM complex was analyzed. Preproteins bound efficiently in a specific manner to the isolated complexes in the absence of chaperones and lipids in a bilayer structure. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range was determined. The affinity was lower when the preprotein was stabilized in its folded conformation. Following the initial binding, the presequence was transferred into the translocation pore in a step that required unfolding of the mature part of the preprotein. This translocation step was also mediated by protease-treated TOM holo complex, which contains almost exclusively Tom40. Thus, the TOM core complex, consisting of Tom40, Tom22, Tom6 and Tom7, is a molecular machine that can recognize and partially translocate mitochondrial precursor proteins. PMID:10990453

  7. Analysis of the NuRD subunits reveals a histone deacetylase core complex and a connection with DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Ng, Huck-Hui; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Bird, Adrian; Reinberg, Danny

    1999-01-01

    ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling and core histone acetylation and deacetylation represent mechanisms to alter nucleosome structure. NuRD is a multisubunit complex containing nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase activities. The histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2 and the histone binding proteins RbAp48 and RbAp46 form a core complex shared between NuRD and Sin3-histone deacetylase complexes. The histone deacetylase activity of the core complex is severely compromised. A novel polypeptide highly related to the metastasis-associated protein 1, MTA2, and the methyl-CpG-binding domain-containing protein, MBD3, were found to be subunits of the NuRD complex. MTA2 modulates the enzymatic activity of the histone deacetylase core complex. MBD3 mediates the association of MTA2 with the core histone deacetylase complex. MBD3 does not directly bind methylated DNA but is highly related to MBD2, a polypeptide that binds to methylated DNA and has been reported to possess demethylase activity. MBD2 interacts with the NuRD complex and directs the complex to methylated DNA. NuRD may provide a means of gene silencing by DNA methylation. PMID:10444591

  8. Luminescent complexes of terbium ion for molecular recognition of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Selivanova, Natalia; Vasilieva, Kristina; Galyametdinov, Yury

    2014-05-01

    The complexation behavior and luminescent properties of terbium (Tb(3+) ) complexes containing bi-dental ligands were studied: nitrogen - 1,10-phenanthroline, and oxygen - trifluoroacetylacetone as well as acetylacetone ligands with ibuprofen (Ibu; a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug). Aqueous and aqueous alcohol microheterogeneous solutions were used as media. The effects of solubilization by various micellar solutions, pH and ligand type on luminescent properties of Tb(3+) complexes were investigated. Sensitized luminescence of mixed ligand complex Tb(1,10-phenanthroline)-Ibu and dynamic quenching effect in complex Tb(trifluoroacetylacetone)3 -Ibu allow Ibu determination with the limit of detection 5.3 × 10(-8)  mol/L and 1.26 × 10(-6)  mol/L, respectively. PMID:23713065

  9. Functional characterization of the trans-membrane domain interactions of the Sec61 protein translocation complex beta-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xueqiang; Jäntti, Jussi

    2009-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic cells co- and post-translational protein translocation is mediated by the trimeric Sec61 complex. Currently, the role of the Sec61 complex β-subunit in protein translocation is poorly understood. We have shown previously that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae the trans-membrane domain alone is sufficient for the function of the β-subunit Sbh1p in co-translational protein translocation. In addition, Sbh1p co-purifies not only with the protein translocation channel subunits Sec61p and Sss1p, but also with the reticulon family protein Rtn1p. Results We used random mutagenesis to generate novel Sbh1p mutants in order to functionally map the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. These mutants were analyzed for their interactions with Sec61p and how they support co-translational protein translocation. The distribution of mutations identifies one side of the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain α-helix that is involved in interactions with Sec61p and that is important for Sbh1p function in protein translocation. At the same time, these mutations do not affect Sbh1p interaction with Rtn1p. Furthermore we show that Sbh1p is found in protein complexes containing not only Rtn1p, but also the two other reticulon-like proteins Rtn2p and Yop1p. Conclusion Our results identify functionally important amino acids in the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. In addition, our results provide additional support for the involvement of Sec61β in processes unlinked to protein translocation. PMID:19857245

  10. Inducible Repression of Nuclear-Encoded Subunits of the Cytochrome b6f Complex in Tobacco Reveals an Extraordinarily Long Lifetime of the Complex1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hojka, Marta; Thiele, Wolfram; Tóth, Szilvia Z.; Lein, Wolfgang; Bock, Ralph; Schöttler, Mark Aurel

    2014-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cytochrome b6f complex in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seems to be restricted to young leaves, suggesting a high lifetime of the complex. To directly determine its lifetime, we employed an ethanol-inducible RNA interference (RNAi) approach targeted against the essential nuclear-encoded Rieske protein (PetC) and the small M subunit (PetM), whose function in higher plants is unknown. Young expanding leaves of both PetM and PetC RNAi transformants bleached rapidly and developed necroses, while mature leaves, whose photosynthetic apparatus was fully assembled before RNAi induction, stayed green. In line with these phenotypes, cytochrome b6f complex accumulation and linear electron transport capacity were strongly repressed in young leaves of both RNAi transformants, showing that the M subunit is as essential for cytochrome b6f complex accumulation as the Rieske protein. In mature leaves, all photosynthetic parameters were indistinguishable from the wild type even after 14 d of induction. As RNAi repression of PetM and PetC was highly efficient in both young and mature leaves, these data indicate a lifetime of the cytochrome b6f complex of at least 1 week. The switch-off of cytochrome b6f complex biogenesis in mature leaves may represent part of the first dedicated step of the leaf senescence program. PMID:24963068

  11. Externalization and recognition by macrophages of large subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 in apoptotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Yuji; Shiratsuchi, Akiko; Manaka, Junko; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Takio, Koji; Zhang Jianting; Suganuma, Tatsuo; Nakanishi, Yoshinobu . E-mail: nakanaka@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-09-10

    We previously isolated a monoclonal antibody named PH2 that inhibits phosphatidylserine-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages [C. Fujii, A. Shiratsuchi, J. Manaka, S. Yonehara, Y. Nakanishi. Cell Death Differ. 8 (2001) 1113-1122]. We report here the identification of the cognate antigen. A protein bound by PH2 in Western blotting was identified as the 170-kDa subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3 p170/eIF3a). When eIF3a was expressed in a culture cell line as a protein fused to green fluorescence protein, the fusion protein was detected at the cell surface only after the induction of apoptosis. The same phenomenon was seen when the localization of endogenous eIF3a was determined using anti-eIF3a antibody, and eIF3a seemed to be partially degraded during apoptosis. Furthermore, bacterially expressed N-terminal half of eIF3a fused to glutathione S-transferase bound to the surface of macrophages and inhibited phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages when it was added to phagocytosis reactions. These results collectively suggest that eIF3a translocates to the cell surface upon apoptosis, probably after partial degradation, and bridges apoptotic cells and macrophages to enhance phagocytosis.

  12. Characterization of the RnfB and RnfG Subunits of the Rnf Complex from the Archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans

    PubMed Central

    Suharti, Suharti; Wang, Mingyu; de Vries, Simon; Ferry, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Rnf complexes are redox-driven ion pumps identified in diverse species from the domains Bacteria and Archaea, biochemical characterizations of which are reported for two species from the domain Bacteria. Here, we present characterizations of the redox-active subunits RnfG and RnfB from the Rnf complex of Methanosarcina acetivorans, an acetate-utilizing methane-producing species from the domain Archaea. The purified RnfG subunit produced in Escherichia coli fluoresced in SDS-PAGE gels under UV illumination and showed a UV-visible spectrum typical of flavoproteins. The Thr166Gly variant of RnfG was colorless and failed to fluoresce under UV illumination confirming a role for Thr166 in binding FMN. Redox titration of holo-RnfG revealed a midpoint potential of −129 mV for FMN with n = 2. The overproduced RnfG was primarily localized to the membrane of E. coli and the sequence contained a transmembrane helix. A topological analysis combining reporter protein fusion and computer predictions indicated that the C-terminal domain containing FMN is located on the outer aspect of the cytoplasmic membrane. The purified RnfB subunit produced in E. coli showed a UV-visible spectrum typical of iron-sulfur proteins. The EPR spectra of reduced RnfB featured a broad spectral shape with g values (2.06, 1.94, 1.90, 1.88) characteristic of magnetically coupled 3Fe-4S and 4Fe-4S clusters in close agreement with the iron and acid-labile sulfur content. The ferredoxin specific to the aceticlastic pathway served as an electron donor to RnfB suggesting this subunit is the entry point of electrons to the Rnf complex. The results advance an understanding of the organization and biochemical properties of the Rnf complex and lay a foundation for further understanding the overall mechanism in the pathway of methane formation from acetate. PMID:24836163

  13. The Cohesin Subunit Rad21 Is Required for Synaptonemal Complex Maintenance, but Not Sister Chromatid Cohesion, during Drosophila Female Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Christian F.; Heidmann, Stefan K.

    2014-01-01

    Replicated sister chromatids are held in close association from the time of their synthesis until their separation during the next mitosis. This association is mediated by the ring-shaped cohesin complex that appears to embrace the sister chromatids. Upon proteolytic cleavage of the α-kleisin cohesin subunit at the metaphase-to-anaphase transition by separase, sister chromatids are separated and segregated onto the daughter nuclei. The more complex segregation of chromosomes during meiosis is thought to depend on the replacement of the mitotic α-kleisin cohesin subunit Rad21/Scc1/Mcd1 by the meiotic paralog Rec8. In Drosophila, however, no clear Rec8 homolog has been identified so far. Therefore, we have analyzed the role of the mitotic Drosophila α-kleisin Rad21 during female meiosis. Inactivation of an engineered Rad21 variant by premature, ectopic cleavage during oogenesis results not only in loss of cohesin from meiotic chromatin, but also in precocious disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC). We demonstrate that the lateral SC component C(2)M can interact directly with Rad21, potentially explaining why Rad21 is required for SC maintenance. Intriguingly, the experimentally induced premature Rad21 elimination, as well as the expression of a Rad21 variant with destroyed separase consensus cleavage sites, do not interfere with chromosome segregation during meiosis, while successful mitotic divisions are completely prevented. Thus, chromatid cohesion during female meiosis does not depend on Rad21-containing cohesin. PMID:25101996

  14. YY1 and Sp1 activate transcription of the human NDUFS8 gene encoding the mitochondrial complex I TYKY subunit.

    PubMed

    Lescuyer, Pierre; Martinez, Pascal; Lunardi, Joël

    2002-03-19

    Complex I is the most complicated of the multimeric enzymes that constitute the mitochondrial respiratory chain. It is encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. We have previously characterized the human NDUFS8 gene that encodes the TYKY subunit. This essential subunit is thought to participate in the electron transfer and proton pumping activities of complex I. Here, we have analyzed the transcriptional regulation of the NDUFS8 gene. Using primer extension assays, we have identified two transcription start sites. The basal promoter was mapped to a 247 bp sequence upstream from the main transcription start site by reporter gene analysis in HeLa cells and in differentiated or non-differentiated C2C12 cells. Three Sp1 sites and one YY1 site were identified in this minimal promoter. Through gel shift analysis, all sites were shown to bind to their cognate transcription factors. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the YY1 site and two upstream adjacent Sp1 sites drive most of the promoter activity. This work represents the first promoter analysis for a complex I gene. Together with previous studies, our results indicate that YY1 and Sp1 control the expression of genes encoding proteins that are involved in almost all steps of the oxidative phosphorylation metabolism. PMID:11955626

  15. Mutations in exocyst complex subunit SEC6 gene impaired polar auxin transport and PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis primary root.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yihong; Liu, Yulong; Bao, Yiqun

    2016-09-01

    Polar auxin transport, which is critical for land plant pattern formation and directional growth, is largely depended on asymmetric distribution of PIN proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Endocytosis and recycling processes play important roles in regulating PIN protein distribution and abundance at the PM. Two subunits (SEC8, EXO70A1) of exocyst, an octameric vesicle-tethering complex, have been reported to be involved in PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis. However, the function of exocyst complex in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport remains incompletely understood. In this study, we utilized two SEC6 down-regulation mutants (PRsec6-1 and PRsec6-2) to investigate the role of exocyst subunit SEC6 in the primary root development, polar auxin transport and PIN proteins recycling. We found that in PRsec6 mutants: 1. Primary root growth was retarded, and lateral root initiation were compromised. 2. Primary roots were sensitive to exogenous auxin 1-napthalene acetic acid (NAA) but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2.4-D). 3. Recycling of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins from the Brefeldin A (BFA) compartment to the PM was delayed. 4. Vesicles accumulated in the primary root tip cells, especially accumulated in the cytosol closed to the PM. These results further demonstrated that the exocyst complex plays an important role in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis primary root. PMID:27457987

  16. Decomposition, lookup, and recombination: MEG evidence for the full decomposition model of complex visual word recognition.

    PubMed

    Fruchter, Joseph; Marantz, Alec

    2015-04-01

    There is much evidence that visual recognition of morphologically complex words (e.g., teacher) proceeds via a decompositional route, first involving recognition of their component morphemes (teach + -er). According to the Full Decomposition model, after the visual decomposition stage, followed by morpheme lookup, there is a final "recombination" stage, in which the decomposed morphemes are combined and the well-formedness of the complex form is evaluated. Here, we use MEG to provide evidence for the temporally-differentiated stages of this model. First, we demonstrate an early effect of derivational family entropy, corresponding to the stem lookup stage; this is followed by a surface frequency effect, corresponding to the later recombination stage. We also demonstrate a late effect of a novel statistical measure, semantic coherence, which quantifies the gradient semantic well-formedness of complex words. Our findings illustrate the usefulness of corpus measures in investigating the component processes within visual word recognition. PMID:25797098

  17. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    PubMed

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging. PMID:25244469

  18. Theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiang; Liu, Yongjun

    2013-11-12

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) is a member of a family of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase (OADH) multienzyme complexes involved in several central points of oxidative metabolism, and the E1 subunit is the most important component in the entire PDHc catalytic system, which catalyzes the reversible transfer of an acetyl group from a pyruvate to the lipoyl group of E2 subunit lipoly domain. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of the E1 subunit has been systematically studied using density functional theory (DFT). Four possible pathways with different general acid/base catalysts in decarboxylation and reductive acylation processes were explored. Our calculation results indicate that the 4'-amino pyrimidine of ThDP and residue His128 are the most likely proton donors in the decarboxylation and reductive acylation processes, respectively. During the reaction, each C-C and C-S bond formation or cleavage process, except for the liberation of CO2, is always accompanied by a proton transfer between the substrates and proton donors. The liberation of CO2 is calculated to be the rate-limiting step for the overall reaction, with an energy barrier of 13.57 kcal/mol. The decarboxylation process is endothermic by 5.32 kcal/mol, whereas the reductive acylation process is exothermic with a value of 5.74 kcal/mol. The assignment of protonation states of the surrounding residues can greatly influence the reaction. Residues His128 and His271 play roles in positioning the first substrate pyruvate and second substrate lipoyl group, respectively. PMID:24171427

  19. On the recognition of complex structures: Computer software using artificial intelligence applied to pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakimovsky, Y.

    1974-01-01

    An approach to simultaneous interpretation of objects in complex structures so as to maximize a combined utility function is presented. Results of the application of a computer software system to assign meaning to regions in a segmented image based on the principles described in this paper and on a special interactive sequential classification learning system, which is referenced, are demonstrated.

  20. Structural and biochemical characterization of human PR70 in isolation and in complex with the scaffolding subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Dovega, Rebecca; Tsutakawa, Susan; Quistgaard, Esben M; Anandapadamanaban, Madhanagopal; Löw, Christian; Nordlund, Pär

    2014-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. PP2A assembles into diverse trimeric holoenzymes, which consist of a scaffolding (A) subunit, a catalytic (C) subunit and various regulatory (B) subunits. Here we report a 2.0 Å crystal structure of the free B''/PR70 subunit and a SAXS model of an A/PR70 complex. The crystal structure of B''/PR70 reveals a two domain elongated structure with two Ca2+ binding EF-hands. Furthermore, we have characterized the interaction of both binding partner and their calcium dependency using biophysical techniques. Ca2+ biophysical studies with Circular Dichroism showed that the two EF-hands display different affinities to Ca2+. In the absence of the catalytic C-subunit, the scaffolding A-subunit remains highly mobile and flexible even in the presence of the B''/PR70 subunit as judged by SAXS. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry studies and SAXS data support that PR70 and the A-subunit have high affinity to each other. This study provides additional knowledge about the structural basis for the function of B'' containing holoenzymes. PMID:25007185

  1. Subunit organization of a synechocystis hetero-oligomeric thylakoid FtsH complex involved in photosystem II repair.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Marko; Yu, Jianfeng; Krynicka, Vendula; Barker, Myles; Tichy, Martin; Komenda, Josef; Nixon, Peter J; Nield, Jon

    2012-09-01

    FtsH metalloproteases are key components of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which operates to maintain photosynthetic activity in the light. Despite their physiological importance, the structure and subunit composition of thylakoid FtsH complexes remain uncertain. Mutagenesis has previously revealed that the four FtsH homologs encoded by the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 are functionally different: FtsH1 and FtsH3 are required for cell viability, whereas FtsH2 and FtsH4 are dispensable. To gain insights into FtsH2, which is involved in selective D1 protein degradation during PSII repair, we used a strain of Synechocystis 6803 expressing a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged derivative (FtsH2-GST) to isolate FtsH2-containing complexes. Biochemical analysis revealed that FtsH2-GST forms a hetero-oligomeric complex with FtsH3. FtsH2 also interacts with FtsH3 in the wild-type strain, and a mutant depleted in FtsH3, like ftsH2(-) mutants, displays impaired D1 degradation. FtsH3 also forms a separate heterocomplex with FtsH1, thus explaining why FtsH3 is more important than FtsH2 for cell viability. We investigated the structure of the isolated FtsH2-GST/FtsH3 complex using transmission electron microscopy and single-particle analysis. The three-dimensional structural model obtained at a resolution of 26 Å revealed that the complex is hexameric and consists of alternating FtsH2/FtsH3 subunits. PMID:22991268

  2. A Developmental Study of Recognition and Recall of Complex Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczcz, M. A.

    Three experiments using the same overall design were conducted to address problems associated with repeated measurement designs employed to assess retention of information in complex pictures and to assess the developmental course of schemata-guided retention efforts. Forty-eight subjects, ages 6, 10, and 20 years, were shown scenes whose forms…

  3. Understanding Complexity: Pattern Recognitions, Emergent Phenomena and Causal Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raia, F.

    2010-12-01

    In teaching and learning complex systems we face a fundamental issue: Simultaneity of causal interactions -where effects are at the same time causes of systems’ behavior. Complex systems’ behavior and evolution are controlled by negative and positive feedback processes, continually changing boundary conditions and complex interaction between systems levels (emergence). These processes cannot be described and understood in a mechanistic framework where causality is conceived of being mostly of cause-effect nature or a linear chain of causes and effects. Mechanist causality by definition is characterized by the assumption that an earlier phenomenon A has a causal effect on the development of a phenomenon B. Since this concept also assumes unidirectional time, B cannot have an effect on A. Since students study science mostly in the lingering mechanistic framework, they have problems understanding complex systems. Specifically, our research on students understanding of complexity indicates that our students seem to have great difficulties in explaining mechanisms underlying natural processes within the current paradigm. Students tend to utilize simple linear model of causality and establish a one-to-one correspondence between cause and effect describing phenomena such as emergence and self-organization as being mechanistically caused. Contrary to experts, when presented with data distribution -spatial and/or temporal-, students first consider or search for a unique cause without describing the distribution or a recognized pattern. Our research suggests that students do not consider a pattern observed as an emergent phenomenon and therefore a causal determinant influencing and controlling the evolution of the system. Changes in reasoning have been observed when students 1) are iteratively asked to recognize and describe patterns in data distribution and 2) subsequently learn to identify these patterns as emergent phenomena and as fundamental causal controls over

  4. In Vivo Identification of Photosystem II Light Harvesting Complexes Interacting with PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT S1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gerotto, Caterina; Franchin, Cinzia; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Light is the primary energy source for photosynthetic organisms, but in excess, it can generate reactive oxygen species and lead to cell damage. Plants evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate light use efficiency depending on illumination intensity to thrive in a highly dynamic natural environment. One of the main mechanisms for protection from intense illumination is the dissipation of excess excitation energy as heat, a process called nonphotochemical quenching. In plants, nonphotochemical quenching induction depends on the generation of a pH gradient across thylakoid membranes and on the presence of a protein called PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT S (PSBS). Here, we generated Physcomitrella patens lines expressing histidine-tagged PSBS that were exploited to purify the native protein by affinity chromatography. The mild conditions used in the purification allowed copurifying PSBS with its interactors, which were identified by mass spectrometry analysis to be mainly photosystem II antenna proteins, such as LIGHT-HARVESTING COMPLEX B (LHCB). PSBS interaction with other proteins appears to be promiscuous and not exclusive, although the major proteins copurified with PSBS were components of the LHCII trimers (LHCB3 and LHCBM). These results provide evidence of a physical interaction between specific photosystem II light-harvesting complexes and PSBS in the thylakoids, suggesting that these subunits are major players in heat dissipation of excess energy. PMID:26069151

  5. Interactions of Brf1 peptides with the tetratricopeptide repeat-containing subunit of TFIIIC inhibit and promote preinitiation complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yanling; Moir, Robyn D; Willis, Ian M

    2006-08-01

    The binding of Brf1 to the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing transcription factor IIIC (TFIIIC) subunit (Tfc4) represents a rate-limiting step in the ordered assembly of the RNA polymerase III initiation factor TFIIIB. Tfc4 contains multiple binding sites for Brf1 within its amino terminus and adjacent TPR arrays, but the access of Brf1 to these sites is limited by autoinhibition. Moreover, the Brf1 binding sites in Tfc4 overlap with sites important for the subsequent recruitment of another TFIIIB subunit, Bdp1, implying that repositioning of Brf1 is required after its initial interaction with Tfc4. As a starting point for dissecting the steps in TFIIIC-directed assembly of TFIIIB, we conducted yeast two-hybrid screens of Brf1 peptide libraries against different TPR-containing Tfc4 fragments. Short, biochemically active peptides were identified in three distinct regions of Brf1. Two peptides defined conserved but distal regions of Brf1 that participate in stable binding of Brf1 to TFIIIC-DNA. Remarkably, a third peptide that binds specifically to TPR6-9 of Tfc4 was found to promote the formation of both TFIIIC-DNA and Brf1-TFIIIC-DNA complexes and to reduce the mobility of these complexes in native gels. The data are consistent with this peptide causing a conformational change in TFIIIC that overcomes Tfc4 autoinhibition of Brf1 binding and suggest a structural model for the Brf1-Tfc4 interaction. PMID:16880507

  6. Interactions of Brf1 Peptides with the Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Subunit of TFIIIC Inhibit and Promote Preinitiation Complex Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yanling; Moir, Robyn D.; Willis, Ian M.

    2006-01-01

    The binding of Brf1 to the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing transcription factor IIIC (TFIIIC) subunit (Tfc4) represents a rate-limiting step in the ordered assembly of the RNA polymerase III initiation factor TFIIIB. Tfc4 contains multiple binding sites for Brf1 within its amino terminus and adjacent TPR arrays, but the access of Brf1 to these sites is limited by autoinhibition. Moreover, the Brf1 binding sites in Tfc4 overlap with sites important for the subsequent recruitment of another TFIIIB subunit, Bdp1, implying that repositioning of Brf1 is required after its initial interaction with Tfc4. As a starting point for dissecting the steps in TFIIIC-directed assembly of TFIIIB, we conducted yeast two-hybrid screens of Brf1 peptide libraries against different TPR-containing Tfc4 fragments. Short, biochemically active peptides were identified in three distinct regions of Brf1. Two peptides defined conserved but distal regions of Brf1 that participate in stable binding of Brf1 to TFIIIC-DNA. Remarkably, a third peptide that binds specifically to TPR6-9 of Tfc4 was found to promote the formation of both TFIIIC-DNA and Brf1-TFIIIC-DNA complexes and to reduce the mobility of these complexes in native gels. The data are consistent with this peptide causing a conformational change in TFIIIC that overcomes Tfc4 autoinhibition of Brf1 binding and suggest a structural model for the Brf1-Tfc4 interaction. PMID:16880507

  7. Tetranuclear lanthanide (III) complexes containing dimeric subunits: single-molecule magnet behavior for the Dy4 analogue.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli; Das, Sourav; Dey, Atanu; Hossain, Sakiat; Sutter, Jean-Pascal

    2013-10-21

    The reaction of the lanthanide(III) salts [Dy(III), Tb(III), and Gd (III)] with a hetero donor chelating ligand N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-6-(hydroxymethyl) picolinohydrazide (LH3) and pivalic acid (PivH) in the presence of tetra-n-butylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) afforded the tetranuclear Ln(III) coordination compounds, [Ln4(LH)2(LH2)2(μ2-η(1)η(1)Piv)2(η(1)Piv)4]·2CHCl3 [Ln = Dy(1), Tb(2), and Gd(3)]. The molecular structure of these complexes reveals that the tetranuclear derivatives are composed of two dinuclear subunits which are interconnected through the coordination action of the picolinoyl hydrazine ligand. Within each subunit two different types of Ln(III) ions are present. One of these is eight-coordinate in a distorted triangular dodecahedral geometry while the other is nine-coordinate in a distorted spherical capped square antiprism geometry. Alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements of complex 1 reveal a frequency- and temperature-dependent two step out-of-phase signals under 1kOe DC field which is characteristic of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. Analysis of the magnetic data afforded the anisotropic barriers and relaxation times: Δ/kB = 62.6 K, τ0 = 8.7 × 10(-7) s; Δ/kB = 26.3 K, τ0 = 1.26 × 10(-6) s for the slow and fast relaxations respectively. PMID:24111517

  8. Insulator protein Su(Hw) recruits SAGA and Brahma complexes and constitutes part of Origin Recognition Complex-binding sites in the Drosophila genome

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyeva, Nadezhda E.; Mazina, Marina U.; Golovnin, Anton K.; Kopytova, Daria V.; Gurskiy, Dmitriy Y.; Nabirochkina, Elena N.; Georgieva, Sofia G.; Georgiev, Pavel G.; Krasnov, Aleksey N.

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing data on the properties of replication origins, molecular mechanisms underlying origin recognition complex (ORC) positioning in the genome are still poorly understood. The Su(Hw) protein accounts for the activity of best-studied Drosophila insulators. Here, we show that Su(Hw) recruits the histone acetyltransferase complex SAGA and chromatin remodeler Brahma to Su(Hw)-dependent insulators, which gives rise to regions with low nucleosome density and creates conditions for ORC binding. Depletion in Su(Hw) leads to a dramatic drop in the levels of SAGA, Brahma and ORC subunits and a significant increase in nucleosome density on Su(Hw)-dependent insulators, whereas artificial Su(Hw) recruitment itself is sufficient for subsequent SAGA, Brahma and ORC binding. In contrast to the majority of replication origins that associate with promoters of active genes, Su(Hw)-binding sites constitute a small proportion (6%) of ORC-binding sites that are localized preferentially in transcriptionally inactive chromatin regions termed BLACK and BLUE chromatin. We suggest that the key determinants of ORC positioning in the genome are DNA-binding proteins that constitute different DNA regulatory elements, including insulators, promoters and enhancers. Su(Hw) is the first example of such a protein. PMID:23609538

  9. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti; Goyal, Neena

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  10. A role for Mediator complex subunit MED13L in Rb/E2F-induced growth arrest

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Steven P.; Nevins, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    The Rb/E2F pathway is deregulated in virtually all human tumors. It is clear that, in addition to Rb itself, essential co-factors required for transcriptional repression and silencing of E2F target genes are mutated or lost in cancer. To identify novel co-factors required for Rb/E2F-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation, we performed a genome-wide shRNA screen. In addition to several known Rb co-factors, the screen identified components of the Mediator complex, a large multiprotein coactivator required for RNA polymerase II transcription. We show that the Mediator complex subunit MED13L is required for Rb/E2F control of cell growth, the complete repression of cell cycle target genes, and cell cycle inhibition. PMID:22249253

  11. Nonsense mutations in the COX1 subunit impair the stability of respiratory chain complexes rather than their assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Tatsuta, Takashi; Buckermann, Angela; Bust, Maria; Kollberg, Gittan; Rötig, Agnes; Hellmich, Martin; Nijtmans, Leo; Wiesner, Rudolf J

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory chain (RC) complexes are organized into supercomplexes forming ‘respirasomes'. The mechanism underlying the interdependence of individual complexes is still unclear. Here, we show in human patient cells that the presence of a truncated COX1 subunit leads to destabilization of complex IV (CIV) and other RC complexes. Surprisingly, the truncated COX1 protein is integrated into subcomplexes, the holocomplex and even into supercomplexes, which however are all unstable. Depletion of the m-AAA protease AFG3L2 increases stability of the truncated COX1 and other mitochondrially encoded proteins, whereas overexpression of wild-type AFG3L2 decreases their stability. Both full-length and truncated COX1 proteins physically interact with AFG3L2. Expression of a dominant negative AFG3L2 variant also promotes stabilization of CIV proteins as well as the assembled complex and rescues the severe phenotype in heteroplasmic cells. Our data indicate that the mechanism underlying pathogenesis in these patients is the rapid clearance of unstable respiratory complexes by quality control pathways, rather than their impaired assembly. PMID:22252130

  12. The MTA1 subunit of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex can recruit two copies of RBBP4/7.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Jason W; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Torrado, Mario; Silva, Ana P G; Landsberg, Michael J; Brillault, Lou; AlQarni, Saad; Zeng, Yi Cheng; Parker, Benjamin L; Low, Jason K K; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-08-01

    The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex remodels the genome in the context of both gene transcription and DNA damage repair. It is essential for normal development and is distributed across multiple tissues in organisms ranging from mammals to nematode worms. In common with other chromatin-remodeling complexes, however, its molecular mechanism of action is not well understood and only limited structural information is available to show how the complex is assembled. As a step towards understanding the structure of the NuRD complex, we have characterized the interaction between two subunits: the metastasis associated protein MTA1 and the histone-binding protein RBBP4. We show that MTA1 can bind to two molecules of RBBP4 and present negative stain electron microscopy and chemical crosslinking data that allow us to build a low-resolution model of an MTA1-(RBBP4)2 subcomplex. These data build on our understanding of NuRD complex structure and move us closer towards an understanding of the biochemical basis for the activity of this complex. PMID:27144666

  13. Mutations in the protein kinase A R1α regulatory subunit cause familial cardiac myxomas and Carney complex

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Mairead; Vaughan, Carl J.; He, Jie; Hatcher, Cathy J.; Winter, Jordan M.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Montgomery, Kate; Kucherlapati, Raju; Morton, Cynthia C.; Basson, Craig T.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are benign mesenchymal tumors that can present as components of the human autosomal dominant disorder Carney complex. Syndromic cardiac myxomas are associated with spotty pigmentation of the skin and endocrinopathy. Our linkage analysis mapped a Carney complex gene defect to chromosome 17q24. We now demonstrate that the PRKAR1α gene encoding the R1α regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) maps to this chromosome 17q24 locus. Furthermore, we show that PRKAR1α frameshift mutations in three unrelated families result in haploinsufficiency of R1α and cause Carney complex. We did not detect any truncated R1α protein encoded by mutant PRKAR1α. Although cardiac tumorigenesis may require a second somatic mutation, DNA and protein analyses of an atrial myxoma resected from a Carney complex patient with a PRKAR1α deletion revealed that the myxoma cells retain both the wild-type and the mutant PRKAR1α alleles and that wild-type R1α protein is stably expressed. However, in this atrial myxoma, we did observe a reversal of the ratio of R1α to R2β regulatory subunit protein, which may contribute to tumorigenesis. Further investigation will elucidate the cell-specific effects of PRKAR1α haploinsufficiency on PKA activity and the role of PKA in cardiac growth and differentiation. This article may have been published online in advance of the print edition. The date of publication is available from the JCI website, http://www.jci.org. J. Clin. Invest. 106:R31–R38 (2000). PMID:10974026

  14. Monopolin Subunit Csm1 Associates with MIND Complex to Establish Monopolar Attachment of Sister Kinetochores at Meiosis I

    PubMed Central

    Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Newnham, Louise; Hoffmann, Eva; Millar, Jonathan B. A.; Arumugam, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Sexually reproducing organisms halve their cellular ploidy during gametogenesis by undergoing a specialized form of cell division known as meiosis. During meiosis, a single round of DNA replication is followed by two rounds of nuclear divisions (referred to as meiosis I and II). While sister kinetochores bind to microtubules emanating from opposite spindle poles during mitosis, they bind to microtubules originating from the same spindle pole during meiosis I. This phenomenon is referred to as mono-orientation and is essential for setting up the reductional mode of chromosome segregation during meiosis I. In budding yeast, mono-orientation depends on a four component protein complex referred to as monopolin which consists of two nucleolar proteins Csm1 and Lrs4, meiosis-specific protein Mam1 of unknown function and casein kinase Hrr25. Monopolin complex binds to kinetochores during meiosis I and prevents bipolar attachments. Although monopolin associates with kinetochores during meiosis I, its binding site(s) on the kinetochore is not known and its mechanism of action has not been established. By carrying out an imaging-based screen we have found that the MIND complex, a component of the central kinetochore, is required for monopolin association with kinetochores during meiosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that interaction of monopolin subunit Csm1 with the N-terminal domain of MIND complex subunit Dsn1, is essential for both the association of monopolin with kinetochores and for monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores during meiosis I. As such this provides the first functional evidence for a monopolin-binding site at the kinetochore. PMID:23861669

  15. The developmental and pathogenic roles of BAF57, a special subunit of the BAF chromatin-remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Lomelí, Hilda; Castillo-Robles, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian SWI/SNF or BAF chromatin-remodeling complexes are polymorphic assemblies of homologous subunit families that remodel nucleosomes. BAF57 is a subunit of the BAF complexes; it is encoded only in higher eukaryotes and is present in all mammalian assemblies. Its main structural feature is a high-mobility group domain, the DNA-binding properties of which suggest that BAF57 may play topological roles as the BAF complex enters or exits the nucleosome. BAF57 displays specific interactions with a number of proteins outside the BAF complex. Through these interactions, it can accomplish specific functions. In the embryo, BAF57 is responsible for the silencing of the CD4 gene during T-cell differentiation, and during the repression of neuronal genes in non-neuronal cells, BAF57 interacts with the transcriptional corepressor, Co-REST, and facilitates repression. Extensive work has demonstrated a specific role of BAF57 in regulating the interactions between BAF and nuclear hormone receptors. Despite its involvement in oncogenic pathways, new generation sequencing studies do not support a prominent role for BAF57 in the initiation of cancer. On the other hand, evidence has emerged to support a role for BAF57 as a metastasis factor, a prognosis marker and a therapeutic target. In humans, BAF57 is associated with disease, as mutations in this gene predispose to important congenital disorders, including menigioma disease or the Coffin-Siris syndrome. In this article, we present an exhaustive analysis of the BAF57 molecular and biochemical properties, cellular functions, loss-of-function phenotypes in living organisms and pathological manifestations in cases of human mutations. PMID:27149204

  16. Thymoproteasome subunit-β5T generates peptide-MHC complexes specialized for positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yan; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical thymic epithelial cells (cTECs) express a unique thymoproteasome subunit-β5T that plays an essential role in the development of CD8 T cells. In contrast, the immunoproteasome subunit-β5i is expressed in other thymic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The thymoproteasome may generate peptides that are specialized for positive selection, or it may simply serve to generate peptides that are distinct from other APCs that cause negative selection, thereby promoting an overall larger number of surviving clones to mature and function in the immune system. To distinguish these models, we genetically engineered mice to express distinct peptide repertoires in cTECs vs. other APCs without expressing β5T, by generating β5t5i knockin mice, in which β5i replaced β5T in cTECs. When such animals were crossed to β5i−/− mice, β5i was exclusively expressed in cTECs, whereas β5 was expressed in other cells. However, this mouse did not support normal positive selection, suggesting that β5T generates peptides that are intrinsically better for positive selection (i.e., β5i could not replace β5T) and not merely because these peptides are distinct from peptides presented by other APCs. Finally, using an Nur77GFP reporter, we show that the T cells generated in the absence of β5T have higher reactivity to self, generating predominantly CD44hi memory phenotype peripheral CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our results suggest that the thymoproteasome supports positive selection by generating peptides that are optimized for the selection of weakly self-reactive, naïve T-cell clones. PMID:23569244

  17. Binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes for amyloid fibrils recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanczyc, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Metal-organic compounds represent a unique class of biomarkers with promising photophysical properties useful for imaging. Here interactions of insulin fibrils with two binuclear complexes [μ-(11,11‧-bidppz)(phen)4Ru2]4+ (1) and [μ-C4(cpdppz)(phen)4Ru2]4+ (2) are studied by linear dichroism (LD) and fluorescence. These ruthenium(II) compounds could provide a new generation of amyloid binding chromophores with long lived lifetimes, good luminescence quantum yields for the bound molecules and photo-stability useful in multiphoton luminescence imaging.

  18. The Role of Derivative Suffix Productivity in the Visual Word Recognition of Complex Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lázaro, Miguel; Sainz, Javier; Illera, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present two lexical decision experiments that examine the role of base frequency and of derivative suffix productivity in visual recognition of Spanish words. In the first experiment we find that complex words with productive derivative suffixes result in lower response times than those with unproductive derivative suffixes.…

  19. Predictive recognition of native proteins by cucurbit[7]uril in a complex mixture.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Bockus, Andrew T; Vinciguerra, Brittany; Isaacs, Lyle; Urbach, Adam R

    2016-06-30

    The recognition of human growth hormone (hGH) by the synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril (Q7) was predicted on the basis of its N-terminal phenylalanine. An aqueous-compatible resin with covalently immobilized Q7 groups was prepared and shown to recognize native insulin and hGH in simple and complex mixtures. PMID:27311878

  20. The Effects of Semantic Transparency and Base Frequency on the Recognition of English Complex Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Joe; Taft, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    A visual lexical decision task was used to examine the interaction between base frequency (i.e., the cumulative frequencies of morphologically related forms) and semantic transparency for a list of derived words. Linear mixed effects models revealed that high base frequency facilitates the recognition of the complex word (i.e., a "base…

  1. Tim29 is a novel subunit of the human TIM22 translocase and is involved in complex assembly and stability

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yilin; Baker, Michael James; Liem, Michael; Louber, Jade; McKenzie, Matthew; Atukorala, Ishara; Ang, Ching-Seng; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Mathivanan, Suresh; Stojanovski, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The TIM22 complex mediates the import of hydrophobic carrier proteins into the mitochondrial inner membrane. While the TIM22 machinery has been well characterised in yeast, the human complex remains poorly characterised. Here, we identify Tim29 (C19orf52) as a novel, metazoan-specific subunit of the human TIM22 complex. The protein is integrated into the mitochondrial inner membrane with it’s C-terminus exposed to the intermembrane space. Tim29 is required for the stability of the TIM22 complex and functions in the assembly of hTim22. Furthermore, Tim29 contacts the Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane, TOM complex, enabling a mechanism for transport of hydrophobic carrier substrates across the aqueous intermembrane space. Identification of Tim29 highlights the significance of analysing mitochondrial import systems across phylogenetic boundaries, which can reveal novel components and mechanisms in higher organisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17463.001 PMID:27554484

  2. Role of post-translational modifications at the β-subunit ectodomain in complex association with a promiscuous plant P4-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sara R; Marek, Magdalena; Axelsen, Kristian B; Theorin, Lisa; Pomorski, Thomas G; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-06-01

    P-type ATPases of subfamily IV (P4-ATPases) constitute a major group of phospholipid flippases that form heteromeric complexes with members of the Cdc50 (cell division control 50) protein family. Some P4-ATPases interact specifically with only one β-subunit isoform, whereas others are promiscuous and can interact with several isoforms. In the present study, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to assess the role of post-translational modifications at the plant ALIS5 β-subunit ectodomain in the functionality of the promiscuous plant P4-ATPase ALA2. We identified two N-glycosylated residues, Asn(181) and Asn(231) Whereas mutation of Asn(231) seems to have a small effect on P4-ATPase complex formation, mutation of evolutionarily conserved Asn(181) disrupts interaction between the two subunits. Of the four cysteine residues located in the ALIS5 ectodomain, mutation of Cys(86) and Cys(107) compromises complex association, but the mutant β-subunits still promote complex trafficking and activity to some extent. In contrast, disruption of a conserved disulfide bond between Cys(158) and Cys(172) has no effect on the P4-ATPase complex. Our results demonstrate that post-translational modifications in the β-subunit have different functional roles in different organisms, which may be related to the promiscuity of the P4-ATPase. PMID:27048590

  3. Role of post-translational modifications at the β-subunit ectodomain in complex association with a promiscuous plant P4-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sara R.; Marek, Magdalena; Axelsen, Kristian B.; Theorin, Lisa; Pomorski, Thomas G.; López-Marqués, Rosa L.

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases of subfamily IV (P4-ATPases) constitute a major group of phospholipid flippases that form heteromeric complexes with members of the Cdc50 (cell division control 50) protein family. Some P4-ATPases interact specifically with only one β-subunit isoform, whereas others are promiscuous and can interact with several isoforms. In the present study, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to assess the role of post-translational modifications at the plant ALIS5 β-subunit ectodomain in the functionality of the promiscuous plant P4-ATPase ALA2. We identified two N-glycosylated residues, Asn181 and Asn231. Whereas mutation of Asn231 seems to have a small effect on P4-ATPase complex formation, mutation of evolutionarily conserved Asn181 disrupts interaction between the two subunits. Of the four cysteine residues located in the ALIS5 ectodomain, mutation of Cys86 and Cys107 compromises complex association, but the mutant β-subunits still promote complex trafficking and activity to some extent. In contrast, disruption of a conserved disulfide bond between Cys158 and Cys172 has no effect on the P4-ATPase complex. Our results demonstrate that post-translational modifications in the β-subunit have different functional roles in different organisms, which may be related to the promiscuity of the P4-ATPase. PMID:27048590

  4. Molecular recognition using corona phase complexes made of synthetic polymers adsorbed on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P.; Barone, Paul W.; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W.; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Hilmer, Andrew J.; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C.; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A.; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Şen, Fatih; Şen, Selda; Croy, Robert G.; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Heller, Daniel A.; Essigmann, John M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding molecular recognition is of fundamental importance in applications such as therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensor design. The most common recognition motifs involve biological macromolecules such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to biorecognition consists of a unique three-dimensional structure formed by a folded and constrained bioheteropolymer that creates a binding pocket, or an interface, able to recognize a specific molecule. Here, we show that synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymer-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and oestradiol. In each case, the recognition was predicted using a two-dimensional thermodynamic model of surface interactions in which the dissociation constants can be tuned by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatiotemporal sensors based on modulation of the carbon nanotube photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages.

  5. Intact functional fourteen-subunit respiratory membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase complex of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    McTernan, Patrick M; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Wu, Chang-Hao; Vaccaro, Brian J; Lancaster, W Andrew; Yang, Qingyuan; Fu, Dax; Hura, Greg L; Tainer, John A; Adams, Michael W W

    2014-07-11

    The archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally at 100 °C by converting carbohydrates to acetate, CO2, and H2, obtaining energy from a respiratory membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH). This conserves energy by coupling H2 production to oxidation of reduced ferredoxin with generation of a sodium ion gradient. MBH is encoded by a 14-gene operon with both hydrogenase and Na(+)/H(+) antiporter modules. Herein a His-tagged MBH was expressed in P. furiosus and the detergent-solubilized complex purified under anaerobic conditions by affinity chromatography. Purified MBH contains all 14 subunits by electrophoretic analysis (13 subunits were also identified by mass spectrometry) and had a measured iron:nickel ratio of 15:1, resembling the predicted value of 13:1. The as-purified enzyme exhibited a rhombic EPR signal characteristic of the ready nickel-boron state. The purified and membrane-bound forms of MBH both preferentially evolved H2 with the physiological donor (reduced ferredoxin) as well as with standard dyes. The O2 sensitivities of the two forms were similar (half-lives of ∼ 15 h in air), but the purified enzyme was more thermolabile (half-lives at 90 °C of 1 and 25 h, respectively). Structural analysis of purified MBH by small angle x-ray scattering indicated a Z-shaped structure with a mass of 310 kDa, resembling the predicted value (298 kDa). The angle x-ray scattering analyses reinforce and extend the conserved sequence relationships of group 4 enzymes and complex I (NADH quinone oxidoreductase). This is the first report on the properties of a solubilized form of an intact respiratory MBH complex that is proposed to evolve H2 and pump Na(+) ions. PMID:24860091

  6. Ectopic expression of plasma membrane targeted subunits of the Ndc80-complex as a tool to study kinetochore biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Tim H; Rehnberg, Jonathan; Ahonen, Leena J; Kallio, Marko J

    2009-06-01

    Genomic stability depends on the normal function of the kinetochore, a multi-protein assemblage, which consists of over 80 molecules including both constitutive and transiently binding components. Information regarding the spatial-temporal assembly of kinetochore subcomplexes is often limited by technical difficulties in their isolation. To study kinetochore subcomplex formation, we targeted separately Hec1 and Spc24, two subunits of the Ndc80 kinetochore compilation, to the plasma membrane by fusing them with the amino-terminal palmitoylation and myristoylation (pm) sequence of the receptor tyrosine kinase Fyn. We found that in early mitotic cells, pm-GFP-Hec1 and pm-GFP-Spc24 fusion proteins localised to the plasma membrane and were able to recruit all subunits of the Ndc80 complex (Ndc80/Hec1, Nuf2, Spc24 and Spc25) to these foci. In interphase cells, only Hec1-Nuf2 and Spc24-Spc25 heterodimers accumulated to the plasma membrane foci. The results propose that the assembly of Ndc80 tetramer can take place outside of the kinetochore but requires co-factors that are only present in mitotic cells. These findings provide the first experimental evidence on the successful employment of the plasma membrane targeting technique in the study of kinetochore biochemistry. PMID:19393581

  7. The Eukaryotic Mismatch Recognition Complexes Track with the Replisome during DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Haye, Joanna E.; Gammie, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    During replication, mismatch repair proteins recognize and repair mispaired bases that escape the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase. In this work, we tested the model that the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex tracks with the advancing replisome. Using yeast, we examined the dynamics during replication of the leading strand polymerase Polε using Pol2 and the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex using Msh2, the invariant protein involved in mismatch recognition. Specifically, we synchronized cells and processed samples using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with custom DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-chip). The Polε signal was not detectable in G1, but was observed at active origins and replicating DNA throughout S-phase. The Polε signal provided the resolution to track origin firing timing and efficiencies as well as replisome progression rates. By detecting Polε and Msh2 dynamics within the same strain, we established that the mismatch recognition complex binds origins and spreads to adjacent regions with the replisome. In mismatch repair defective PCNA mutants, we observed that Msh2 binds to regions of replicating DNA, but the distribution and dynamics are altered, suggesting that PCNA is not the sole determinant for the mismatch recognition complex association with replicating regions, but may influence the dynamics of movement. Using biochemical and genomic methods, we provide evidence that both MutS complexes are in the vicinity of the replisome to efficiently repair the entire spectrum of mutations during replication. Our data supports the model that the proximity of MutSα/β to the replisome for the efficient repair of the newly synthesized strand before chromatin reassembles. PMID:26684201

  8. Developmental Regulation of the Tetrahymena thermophila Origin Recognition Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Po-Hsuen; Meng, Xiangzhou; Kapler, Geoffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    The Tetrahymena thermophila DNA replication machinery faces unique demands due to the compartmentalization of two functionally distinct nuclei within a single cytoplasm, and complex developmental program. Here we present evidence for programmed changes in ORC and MCM abundance that are not consistent with conventional models for DNA replication. As a starting point, we show that ORC dosage is critical during the vegetative cell cycle and development. A moderate reduction in Orc1p induces genome instability in the diploid micronucleus, aberrant division of the polyploid macronucleus, and failure to generate a robust intra-S phase checkpoint response. In contrast to yeast ORC2 mutants, replication initiation is unaffected; instead, replication forks elongation is perturbed, as Mcm6p levels decline in parallel with Orc1p. Experimentally induced down-regulation of ORC and MCMs also impairs endoreplication and gene amplification, consistent with essential roles during development. Unexpectedly Orc1p and Mcm6p levels fluctuate dramatically in developing wild type conjugants, increasing for early cycles of conventional micronuclear DNA replication and macronuclear anlagen replication (endoreplication phase I, rDNA gene amplification). This increase does not reflect the DNA replication load, as much less DNA is synthesized during this developmental window compared to vegetative S phase. Furthermore, although Orc1p levels transiently increase prior to endoreplication phase II, Orc1p and Mcm6p levels decline when the replication load increases and unconventional DNA replication intermediates are produced. We propose that replication initiation is re-programmed to meet different requirements or challenges during the successive stages of Tetrahymena development. PMID:25569357

  9. Binding energies of nucleobase complexes: Relevance to homology recognition of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Sergio Cruz; Prentiss, Mara; Fyta, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The binding energies of complexes of DNA nucleobase pairs are evaluated using quantum mechanical calculations at the level of dispersion corrected density functional theory. We begin with Watson-Crick base pairs of singlets, duplets, and triplets and calculate their binding energies. At a second step, mismatches are incorporated into the Watson-Crick complexes in order to evaluate the variation in the binding energy with respect to the canonical Watson-Crick pairs. A linear variation of this binding energy with the degree of mismatching is observed. The binding energies for the duplets and triplets containing mismatches are further compared to the energies of the respective singlets in order to assess the degree of collectivity in these complexes. This study also suggests that mismatches do not considerably affect the energetics of canonical base pairs. Our work is highly relevant to the recognition process in DNA promoted through the RecA protein and suggests a clear distinction between recognition in singlets, and recognition in duplets or triplets. Our work assesses the importance of collectivity in the homology recognition of DNA.

  10. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  11. HIC1 interacts with a specific subunit of SWI/SNF complexes, ARID1A/BAF250A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Leprince, Dominique

    2009-08-07

    HIC1, a tumor suppressor gene epigenetically silenced in many human cancers encodes a transcriptional repressor involved in regulatory loops modulating p53-dependent and E2F1-dependent cell survival and stress responses. HIC1 is also implicated in growth control since it recruits BRG1, one of the two alternative ATPases (BRM or BRG1) of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes to repress transcription of E2F1 in quiescent fibroblasts. Here, through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identify ARID1A/BAF250A, as a new HIC1 partner. ARID1A/BAF250A is one of the two mutually exclusive ARID1-containing subunits of SWI/SNF complexes which define subsets of complexes endowed with anti-proliferative properties. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in WI38 fibroblasts and in BRG1-/- SW13 cells showed that endogenous HIC1 and ARID1A proteins interact in a BRG1-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HIC1 does not interact with BRM. Finally, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-reChIP) experiments demonstrated that HIC1 represses E2F1 through the recruitment of anti-proliferative SWI/SNF complexes containing ARID1A.

  12. Structural basis for the wobbler mouse neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutation in the Vps54 subunit of the GARP complex

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Victoria, F. Javier; Abascal-Palacios, Guillermo; Tascón, Igor; Kajava, Andrey; Magadán, Javier G.; Pioro, Erik P.; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Hierro, Aitor

    2010-01-01

    The multisubunit Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex is required for tethering and fusion of endosome-derived transport vesicles to the trans-Golgi network. Mutation of leucine-967 to glutamine in the Vps54 subunit of GARP is responsible for spinal muscular atrophy in the wobbler mouse, an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The crystal structure at 1.7 Å resolution of the mouse Vps54 C-terminal fragment harboring leucine-967, in conjunction with comparative sequence analysis, reveals that Vps54 has a continuous α-helical bundle organization similar to that of other multisubunit tethering complexes. The structure shows that leucine-967 is buried within the α-helical bundle through predominantly hydrophobic interactions that are critical for domain stability and folding in vitro. Mutation of this residue to glutamine does not prevent integration of Vps54 into the GARP complex but greatly reduces the half-life and levels of the protein in vivo. Severely reduced levels of mutant Vps54 and, consequently, of the whole GARP complex underlie the phenotype of the wobbler mouse. PMID:20615984

  13. Reduced levels of mitochondrial complex I subunit NDUFB8 and linked complex I + III oxidoreductase activity in the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Francis, Beverly M; Yang, Jimao; Song, Byung Jun; Gupta, Saurabh; Maj, Mary; Bazinet, Richard P; Robinson, Brian; Mount, Howard T J

    2014-01-01

    Bioenergetic failure is a feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We examined mitochondrial function in the amyloid-β protein precursor transgenic 'TgCRND8' mouse model of AD. Activities of NADH: cytochrome c reductase (complex I + III) and cytochrome oxidase (complex IV) of the electron transport chain, as well as those of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (α-KGDH) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were assessed in brains of 45 week-old mice. Complex I + III activity was reduced by almost 50%, whereas complex IV, α-KGDH, and PDH activities were unaffected. Reduced activity coincided with decreased expression of NDUFB8, a nuclear-DNA encoded subunit integral to the assembly of complex I. The composition and availability of cardiolipin, a major phospholipid in inner mitochondrial membranes, was not altered. To determine whether mitochondrial output is affected by the selective reduction in complex I + III activity, we examined tissue levels of high-energy phosphates. ATP was maintained whereas creatine increased in the cortex and hippocampus. These results suggest disruption of complex I function and the likely role of creatine in sustaining ATP at late stages of dysfunction in TgCRND8 mice. PMID:24217272

  14. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART I: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS ON RESPIRATORY COMPLEX SUBUNITS OR ASSEMBLY FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Torraco, Alessandra; Peralta, Susana; Iommarini, Luisa; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are the most common inborn errors of metabolism affecting the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Because the poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms, a cure for these disorders is still unavailable and all the treatments currently in use are supportive more than curative. Therefore, in the past decade a great variety of mouse models have been developed to assess the in vivo function of several mitochondrial proteins involved in human diseases. Due to the genetic and physiological similarity to humans, mice represent reliable models to study the pathogenic mechanisms of mitochondrial disorders and are precious to test new therapeutic approaches. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to defects in subunits of the OXPHOS complexes or in assembly factors. We discuss how these models recapitulate many human conditions and how they have contributed to the understanding of mitochondrial function in health and disease. PMID:25660179

  15. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  16. Med1 Subunit of the Mediator Complex in Nuclear Receptor-Regulated Energy Metabolism, Liver Regeneration, and Hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  17. Cardiomyocyte-Specific Ablation of Med1 Subunit of the Mediator Complex Causes Lethal Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuzhi; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Schipma, Matthew J.; Liu, Jing; Shete, Varsha; Liu, Ning; Sato, Tatsuya; Thorp, Edward B.; Barger, Philip M.; Zhu, Yi-Jun; Viswakarma, Navin; Kanwar, Yashpal S.; Ardehali, Hossein; Thimmapaya, Bayar; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator, an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex consisting of about 30 subunits, is a key component of the polymerase II mediated gene transcription. Germline deletion of the Mediator subunit 1 (Med1) of the Mediator in mice results in mid-gestational embryonic lethality with developmental impairment of multiple organs including heart. Here we show that cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Med1 in mice (csMed1-/-) during late gestational and early postnatal development by intercrossing Med1fl/fl mice to α-MyHC-Cre transgenic mice results in lethality within 10 days after weaning due to dilated cardiomyopathy-related ventricular dilation and heart failure. The csMed1-/- mouse heart manifests mitochondrial damage, increased apoptosis and interstitial fibrosis. Global gene expression analysis revealed that loss of Med1 in heart down-regulates more than 200 genes including Acadm, Cacna1s, Atp2a2, Ryr2, Pde1c, Pln, PGC1α, and PGC1β that are critical for calcium signaling, cardiac muscle contraction, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor regulated energy metabolism. Many genes essential for oxidative phosphorylation and proper mitochondrial function such as genes coding for the succinate dehydrogenase subunits of the mitochondrial complex II are also down-regulated in csMed1-/- heart contributing to myocardial injury. Data also showed up-regulation of about 180 genes including Tgfb2, Ace, Atf3, Ctgf, Angpt14, Col9a2, Wisp2, Nppa, Nppb, and Actn1 that are linked to cardiac muscle contraction, cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis and myocardial injury. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cardiac specific deletion of Med1 in adult mice using tamoxifen-inducible Cre approach (TmcsMed1-/-), results in rapid development of cardiomyopathy and death within 4 weeks. We found that the key findings of the csMed1-/- studies described above are highly reproducible in TmcsMed1-/- mouse heart

  18. Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E2 and E3BP Core Subunits: New Models and Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hezaveh, Samira; Zeng, An-Ping; Jandt, Uwe

    2016-05-19

    Targeted manipulation and exploitation of beneficial properties of multienzyme complexes, especially for the design of novel and efficiently structured enzymatic reaction cascades, require a solid model understanding of mechanistic principles governing the structure and functionality of the complexes. This type of system-level and quantitative knowledge has been very scarce thus far. We utilize the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (hPDC) as a versatile template to conduct corresponding studies. Here we present new homology models of the core subunits of the hPDC, namely E2 and E3BP, as the first time effort to elucidate the assembly of hPDC core based on molecular dynamic simulation. New models of E2 and E3BP were generated and validated at atomistic level for different properties of the proteins. The results of the wild type dimer simulations showed a strong hydrophobic interaction between the C-terminal and the hydrophobic pocket which is the main driving force in the intertrimer binding and the core self-assembly. On the contrary, the C-terminal truncated versions exhibited a drastic loss of hydrophobic interaction leading to a dimeric separation. This study represents a significant step toward a model-based understanding of structure and function of large multienzyme systems like PDC for developing highly efficient biocatalyst or bioreaction cascades. PMID:27104227

  19. Assignment of the gene for the core protein II (UQCRC2) subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex to human chromosome 16p12

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.M.V. Kingston General Hospital ); Ozawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi ); Rozen, R. Montreal Children's Hospital )

    1993-11-01

    The mammalian cytochrome be[sub 1] complex (complex III) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain catalyzes electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome c. The complex consists of 10-11 subunits: Core proteins I and II, cytochromes b and c[sub 1], the Rieske iron-sulfur protein, the ubiquinone-binding protein, the hinge protein, and 3-4 subunits of low molecular weight. Cytochrome b is encoded by the mitochondrial genome; the other subunits are encoded by nuclear genes. Both the human cytochrome c[sub 1] and the human ubiquinone-binding protein subunits have been assigned to chromosome 8 by somatic cell hybrid mapping. In this study, the authors used in situ hybridization to map core protein II. In situ hybridization to BrdU-synchronized peripheral blood lymphocytes was performed using the method of Harper and Saunders. Chromosomes were stained with a modified fluorescence, 0.25% Wright's stain procedure. The positions of silver grains directly over or touching well-banded metaphase chromosomes were mapped to an ISCN idiogram. The analysis of the distribution of 200 silver grams following in situ hybridization revealed a significant clustering of grains in the p12 region of chromosome 16. The assignment of the core II subunit to human chromosome 16p12 confirms that it is encoded by the nuclear, rather than the mitochondrial, genome. The identification of a single strong hybridization signal is indicative of one locus with no pseudogenes. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Structural change of E. coli separated and complexed 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits due to Mg 2+ ions: SANS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briganti, G.; Pedone, F.; Giansanti, A.; Giordano, R.

    1995-02-01

    Small-angle neutron-scattering experiments have been performed on E. Coli 70S ribosomes and on 50S and 30S separated subunits in the presence and absence of magnesium ions. In the 70S complex in presence of magnesium, the scattering intensity at Q = 0 ( I(0)) is roughly two times higher than without magnesium, in apparent agreement with the general view of an association-dissociation of the subunits induced by magnesium. But a similar increment is observed in both separated subunits too. The probability distribution functions of the intra-particle distance p( r), obtained by Fourier transforming, the experimental data, indicate that, even at low temperature (5°C) and concentration (0.1 wt%), the 70S and the separated subunits form aggregates. In all samples, the absence of Mg 2+ ions shifts and shrinks p( r) in the single-particle region, below 200 Å, and affects the shape of the curve in the aggregate region. Our results suggest that the presence of Mg 2+ ions does not strongly affect the degree of complexation of the subunits: the 70S complex retains its individuality even in the absence of magnesium, but undergoes structural rearrangements similar to those in 30S and 50S.

  1. Crystal structure of subunit VPS25 of the endosomal trafficking complex ESCRT-II

    PubMed Central

    Wernimont, Amy K; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2004-01-01

    Background Down-regulation of plasma membrane receptors via the endocytic pathway involves their monoubiquitylation, transport to endosomal membranes and eventual sorting into multi vesicular bodies (MVB) destined for lysosomal degradation. Successive assemblies of Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT-I, -II and III) largely mediate sorting of plasma membrane receptors at endosomal membranes, the formation of multivesicular bodies and their release into the endosomal lumen. In addition, the human ESCRT-II has been shown to form a complex with RNA polymerase II elongation factor ELL in order to exert transcriptional control activity. Results Here we report the crystal structure of Vps25 at 3.1 Å resolution. Vps25 crystallizes in a dimeric form and each monomer is composed of two winged helix domains arranged in tandem. Structural comparisons detect no conformational changes between unliganded Vps25 and Vps25 within the ESCRT-II complex composed of two Vps25 copies and one copy each of Vps22 and Vps36 [1,2]. Conclusions Our structural analyses present a framework for studying Vps25 interactions with ESCRT-I and ESCRT-III partners. Winged helix domain containing proteins have been implicated in nucleic acid binding and it remains to be determined whether Vps25 has a similar activity which might play a role in the proposed transcriptional control exerted by Vps25 and/or the whole ESCRT-II complex. PMID:15579210

  2. Subunit Q Is Required to Stabilize the Large Complex of NADPH Dehydrogenase in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiaohong; Rong, Weiqiong; Gao, Fudan; Ogawa, Teruo; Ma, Weimin

    2015-06-01

    Two major complexes of NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) have been identified in cyanobacteria. A large complex (NDH-1L) contains NdhD1, NdhF1, and NdhP, which are absent in a medium size complex (NDH-1M). They play important roles in respiration, NDH-1-dependent cyclic electron transport around photosystem I, and CO2 uptake. Two mutants sensitive to high light for growth and impaired in cyclic electron transport around photosystem I were isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 transformed with a transposon-bearing library. Both mutants had a tag in an open reading frame encoding a product highly homologous to NdhQ, a single-transmembrane small subunit of the NDH-1L complex, identified in Thermosynechococcus elongatus by proteomics strategy. Deletion of ndhQ disassembled about one-half of the NDH-1L to NDH-1M and consequently impaired respiration, but not CO2 uptake. During prolonged incubation of the thylakoid membrane with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside at room temperature, the rest of the NDH-1L in ΔndhQ was disassembled completely to NDH-1M and was much faster than in the wild type. In the ndhP-deletion mutant (ΔndhP) background, absence of NdhQ almost completely disassembled the NDH-1L to NDH-1M, similar to the results observed in the ΔndhD1/ΔndhD2 mutant. We therefore conclude that both NdhQ and NdhP are essential to stabilize the NDH-1L complex. PMID:25873552

  3. Structural Mechanism Underlying the Specific Recognition between the Arabidopsis State-Transition Phosphatase TAP38/PPH1 and Phosphorylated Light-Harvesting Complex Protein Lhcb1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xuepeng; Guo, Jiangtao; Li, Mei; Liu, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    During state transitions, plants regulate energy distribution between photosystems I and II through reversible phosphorylation and lateral migration of the major light-harvesting complex LHCII. Dephosphorylation of LHCII and the transition from state 2 to state 1 requires a thylakoid membrane-associated phosphatase named TAP38 or PPH1. TAP38/PPH1 specifically targets LHCII but not the core subunits of photosystem II, whereas the underlying molecular mechanism of their mutual recognition is currently unclear. Here, we present the structures of Arabidopsis thaliana TAP38/PPH1 in the substrate-free and substrate-bound states. The protein contains a type 2C serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PP2C) core domain, a Mn2+ (or Mg2+) binuclear center and two additional motifs contributing to substrate recognition. A 15-mer phosphorylated N-terminal peptide of Lhcb1 binds to TAP38/PPH1 on two surface clefts enclosed by the additional motifs. The first segment of the phosphopeptide is clamped by a pair of tooth-like arginine residues at Cleft 1 site. The binding adopts the lock-and-key mechanism with slight rearrangement of the substrate binding residues on TAP38/PPH1. Meanwhile, a more evident substrate-induced fitting occurs on Cleft 2 harboring the extended part of the phosphopeptide. The results unravel the bases for the specific recognition between TAP38/PPH1 and phosphorylated Lhcb1, a crucial step in state transitions. PMID:25888588

  4. Plant cap-binding complexes eukaryotic initiation factors eIF4F and eIFISO4F: molecular specificity of subunit binding.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Laura K; Allen, M Leah; Nitka, Kelley R; Campbell, Lara; Murphy, Patricia A; Browning, Karen S

    2011-12-01

    The initiation of translation in eukaryotes requires a suite of eIFs that include the cap-binding complex, eIF4F. eIF4F is comprised of the subunits eIF4G and eIF4E and often the helicase, eIF4A. The eIF4G subunit serves as an assembly point for other initiation factors, whereas eIF4E binds to the 7-methyl guanosine cap of mRNA. Plants have an isozyme form of eIF4F (eIFiso4F) with comparable subunits, eIFiso4E and eIFiso4G. Plant eIF4A is very loosely associated with the plant cap-binding complexes. The specificity of interaction of the individual subunits of the two complexes was previously unknown. To address this issue, mixed complexes (eIF4E-eIFiso4G or eIFiso4E-eIF4G) were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli for biochemical analysis. The activity of the mixed complexes in in vitro translation assays correlated with the large subunit of the respective correct complex. These results suggest that the eIF4G or eIFiso4G subunits influence translational efficiency more than the cap-binding subunits. The translation assays also showed varying responses of the mRNA templates to eIF4F or eIFiso4F, suggesting that some level of mRNA discrimination is possible. The dissociation constants for the correct complexes have K(D) values in the subnanomolar range, whereas the mixed complexes were found to have K(D) values in the ∼10 nm range. Displacement assays showed that the correct binding partner readily displaces the incorrect binding partner in a manner consistent with the difference in K(D) values. These results show molecular specificity for the formation of plant eIF4F and eIFiso4F complexes and suggest a role in mRNA discrimination during initiation of translation. PMID:21965660

  5. Differential role of PKA catalytic subunits in mediating phenotypes caused by knockout of the Carney complex gene Prkar1a.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhirong; Pringle, Daphne R; Jones, Georgette N; Kelly, Kimberly M; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2011-10-01

    The Carney complex is an inherited tumor predisposition caused by activation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase [protein kinase A (PKA)] resulting from mutation of the PKA-regulatory subunit gene PRKAR1A. Myxomas and tumors in cAMP-responsive tissues are cardinal features of this syndrome, which is unsurprising given the important role played by PKA in modulating cell growth and function. Previous studies demonstrated that cardiac-specific knockout of Prkar1a causes embryonic heart failure and myxomatous degeneration in the heart, whereas limited Schwann cell-specific knockout of the gene causes schwannoma formation. In this study, we sought to determine the role of PKA activation in this phenotype by using genetic means to reduce PKA enzymatic activity. To accomplish this goal, we introduced null alleles of the PKA catalytic subunits Prkaca (Ca) or Prkacb (Cb) into the Prkar1a-cardiac knockout (R1a-CKO) or limited Schwann cell knockout (R1a-TEC3KO) line. Heterozygosity for Prkaca rescued the embryonic lethality of the R1a-CKO, although mice had a shorter than normal lifespan and died from cardiac failure with atrial thrombosis. In contrast, heterozygosity for Prkacb only enabled the mice to survive 1 extra day during embryogenesis. Biochemical analysis indicated that reduction of Ca markedly reduced PKA activity in embryonic hearts, whereas reduction of Cb had minimal effects. In R1a-TEC3KO mice, tumorigenesis was completely suppressed by a heterozygosity for Prkaca, and by more than 80% by heterozygosity for Prkacb. These data suggest that both developmental and tumor phenotypes caused by Prkar1a mutation result from excess PKA activity due to PKA-Ca. PMID:21852354

  6. Mutations in Two Genes Encoding Different Subunits of a Receptor Signaling Complex Result in an Identical Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Paloneva, Juha; Manninen, Tuula; Christman, Grant; Hovanes, Karine; Mandelin, Jami; Adolfsson, Rolf; Bianchin, Marino; Bird, Thomas; Miranda, Roxana; Salmaggi, Andrea; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Konttinen, Yrjö; Peltonen, Leena

    2002-01-01

    Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL), also known as “Nasu-Hakola disease,” is a globally distributed recessively inherited disease leading to death during the 5th decade of life and is characterized by early-onset progressive dementia and bone cysts. Elsewhere, we have identified PLOSL mutations in TYROBP (DAP12), which codes for a membrane receptor component in natural-killer and myeloid cells, and also have identified genetic heterogeneity in PLOSL, with some patients carrying no mutations in TYROBP. Here we complete the molecular pathology of PLOSL by identifying TREM2 as the second PLOSL gene. TREM2 forms a receptor signaling complex with TYROBP and triggers activation of the immune responses in macrophages and dendritic cells. Patients with PLOSL have no defects in cell-mediated immunity, suggesting a remarkable capacity of the human immune system to compensate for the inactive TYROBP-mediated activation pathway. Our data imply that the TYROBP-mediated signaling pathway plays a significant role in human brain and bone tissue and provide an interesting example of how mutations in two different subunits of a multisubunit receptor complex result in an identical human disease phenotype. PMID:12080485

  7. p150Glued, the largest subunit of the dynactin complex, is nonessential in Neurospora but required for nuclear distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, J H; Minke, P F; Bruno, K S; Plamann, M

    1996-01-01

    Dynactin is a multisubunit complex that is required for cytoplasmic dynein, a minus-end-directed, microtubule-associated motor, to efficiently transport vesicles along microtubules in vitro. p150Glued, the largest subunit of dynactin, has been identified in vertebrates and Drosophila and recently has been shown to interact with cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chains in vitro. The mechanism by which dynactin facilitates cytoplasmic dynein-dependent vesicle transport is unknown. We have devised a genetic screen for cytoplasmic dynein/dynactin mutants in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. In this paper, we report that one of these mutants, ro-3, defines a gene encoding an apparent homologue of p150Glued, and we provide genetic evidence that cytoplasmic dynein and dynactin interact in vivo. The major structural features of vertebrate and Drosophila p150Glued, a microtubule-binding site at the N-terminus and two large alpha-helical coiled-coil regions contained within the distal two-thirds of the polypeptide, are conserved in Ro3. Drosophila p150Glued is essential for viability; however, ro-3 null mutants are viable, indicating that dynactin is not an essential complex in N. crassa. We show that N. crassa cytoplasmic dynein and dynactin mutants have abnormal nuclear distribution but retain the ability to organize cytoplasmic microtubules and actin in anucleate hyphae. Images PMID:8744947

  8. Actin related protein complex subunit 1b controls sperm release, barrier integrity and cell division during adult rat spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anita; Dumasia, Kushaan; Deshpande, Sharvari; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, N H

    2016-08-01

    Actin remodeling is a vital process for signaling, movement and survival in all cells. In the testes, extensive actin reorganization occurs at spermatid-Sertoli cell junctions during sperm release (spermiation) and at inter Sertoli cell junctions during restructuring of the blood testis barrier (BTB). During spermiation, tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), rich in branched actin networks, ensure recycling of spermatid-Sertoli cell junctional molecules. Similar recycling occurs during BTB restructuring around the same time as spermiation occurs. Actin related protein 2/3 complex is an essential actin nucleation and branching protein. One of its subunits, Arpc1b, was earlier found to be down-regulated in an estrogen-induced rat model of spermiation failure. Also, Arpc1b was found to be estrogen responsive through estrogen receptor beta in seminiferous tubule culture. Here, knockdown of Arpc1b by siRNA in adult rat testis led to defects in spermiation caused by failure in TBC formation. Knockdown also compromised BTB integrity and caused polarity defects of mature spermatids. Apart from these effects pertaining to Sertoli cells, Arpc1b reduction perturbed ability of germ cells to enter G2/M phase thus hindering cell division. In summary, Arpc1b, an estrogen responsive gene, is a regulator of spermiation, mature spermatid polarity, BTB integrity and cell division during adult spermatogenesis. PMID:27113856

  9. Structure of a herpesvirus nuclear egress complex subunit reveals an interaction groove that is essential for viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Kendra E.; Sharma, Mayuri; Mansueto, My Sam; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.; Wagner, Gerhard; Coen, Donald M.; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses require a nuclear egress complex (NEC) for efficient transit of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The NEC orchestrates multiple steps during herpesvirus nuclear egress, including disruption of nuclear lamina and particle budding through the inner nuclear membrane. In the important human pathogen human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this complex consists of nuclear membrane protein UL50, and nucleoplasmic protein UL53, which is recruited to the nuclear membrane through its interaction with UL50. Here, we present an NMR-determined solution-state structure of the murine CMV homolog of UL50 (M50; residues 1–168) with a strikingly intricate protein fold that is matched by no other known protein folds in its entirety. Using NMR methods, we mapped the interaction of M50 with a highly conserved UL53-derived peptide, corresponding to a segment that is required for heterodimerization. The UL53 peptide binding site mapped onto an M50 surface groove, which harbors a large cavity. Point mutations of UL50 residues corresponding to surface residues in the characterized M50 heterodimerization interface substantially decreased UL50–UL53 binding in vitro, eliminated UL50–UL53 colocalization, prevented disruption of nuclear lamina, and halted productive virus replication in HCMV-infected cells. Our results provide detailed structural information on a key protein–protein interaction involved in nuclear egress and suggest that NEC subunit interactions can be an attractive drug target. PMID:26150520

  10. Spindle and kinetochore associated complex subunit 1 regulates the proliferation of oral adenosquamous carcinoma CAL-27 cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma is very poor due to local recurrence and metastasis. This study explores the molecular events involved in oral carcinoma with the goal of developing novel therapeutic strategies. The mitotic spindle is a complex mechanical apparatus required for the accurate segregation of sister chromosomes during mitosis. Spindle and kinetochore associated complex subunit 1 (SKA1) is a microtubule-binding subcomplex of the outer kinetochore that is essential for proper chromosome segregation. In recent years, much attention has been focused on determining how SKA proteins interact with each other, as well as their biological role in cancer cells. However, the precise role of SKA1 in oral carcinoma remains unknown. Methods In order to investigate the role of SKA1 in oral cancer, we employed lentivirus-mediated shRNA to silence SKA1 expression in the CAL-27 human oral adenosquamous carcinoma cell line. Results Depletion of SKA1 in CAL-27 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation, as determined by MTT and colony formation assays. These results strongly demonstrate that reduced SKA1 protein levels may cause inhibition of tumor formation. The shRNA-mediated depletion of SKA1 also led to G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Conclusion This is the first report to show that SKA1 plays an important role in the progression of oral adenosqamous carcinoma. Thus, silencing of SKA1 by RNAi might be a potential therapy for this disease. PMID:23962337

  11. LHX3 Interacts with Inhibitor of Histone Acetyltransferase Complex Subunits LANP and TAF-1β to Modulate Pituitary Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Witzmann, Frank A.; Rhodes, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    LIM-homeodomain 3 (LHX3) is a transcription factor required for mammalian pituitary gland and nervous system development. Human patients and animal models with LHX3 gene mutations present with severe pediatric syndromes that feature hormone deficiencies and symptoms associated with nervous system dysfunction. The carboxyl terminus of the LHX3 protein is required for pituitary gene regulation, but the mechanism by which this domain operates is unknown. In order to better understand LHX3-dependent pituitary hormone gene transcription, we used biochemical and mass spectrometry approaches to identify and characterize proteins that interact with the LHX3 carboxyl terminus. This approach identified the LANP/pp32 and TAF-1β/SET proteins, which are components of the inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase (INHAT) multi-subunit complex that serves as a multifunctional repressor to inhibit histone acetylation and modulate chromatin structure. The protein domains of LANP and TAF-1β that interact with LHX3 were mapped using biochemical techniques. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that LANP and TAF-1β are associated with LHX3 target genes in pituitary cells, and experimental alterations of LANP and TAF-1β levels affected LHX3-mediated pituitary gene regulation. Together, these data suggest that transcriptional regulation of pituitary genes by LHX3 involves regulated interactions with the INHAT complex. PMID:23861948

  12. Multiple Rieske genes in prokaryotes: exchangeable Rieske subunits in the cytochrome bc-complex of Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    PubMed

    Ouchane, Soufian; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Bianco, Pierre; Vermeglio, André; Astier, Chantal

    2005-07-01

    Bacterial cytochrome bc1-complex encoded by the petABC operon consists of three subunits, the Rieske iron-sulphur protein, the b-type cytochrome, and the c1-type cytochrome. Disruption of the petA gene of Rubrivivax gelatinosus is not lethal under photosynthetic growth conditions. However, deletion of both petA and petB results in a photosynthesis-deficient strain, suggesting the presence of a second gene encoding a Rieske protein and rescuing a functional cytochrome bc1-complex in the PETA1 mutant. The corresponding petA2 gene was identified and the PETA2 mutant could also grow under photosynthetic conditions. The double mutant PETA12, however, was unable to grow photosynthetically. The presence of a photo-induced cyclic electron transfer was tested by monitoring the kinetics of cytochrome photo-oxidation on intact cells; the data confirm the capacity of petA2 to replace petA1 in the bc1-complex to support photosynthesis. Soluble forms of both PetA1 and PetA2 Rieske proteins were purified from Escherichia coli and found to contain correctly inserted [2Fe-2S] clusters. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and midpoint potential measurements showed typical [2Fe-2S] signals and E(m) values of +275 mV for both Rieske proteins. The high amino acid sequence similarity and the obtained midpoint potential values argue for a functional role of these proteins in the cytochrome bc1-complex. The presence of duplicated Rieske genes is not restricted to R. gelatinosus. Phylogenetic trees of Rieske genes from Rubrivivax and other proteobacteria as well as from cyanobacteria were reconstructed. On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses, differing evolutionary origins of duplicated Rieske genes in proteo- and cyanobacteria are proposed. PMID:15948965

  13. Drosophila homologs of transcriptional mediator complex subunits are required for adult cell and segment identity specification

    PubMed Central

    Boube, Muriel; Faucher, Christian; Joulia, Laurent; Cribbs, David L.; Bourbon, Henri-Marc

    2000-01-01

    The origins of specificity in gene expression are a central concern in understanding developmental control. Mediator protein complexes regulate transcriptional initiation, acting as modular adaptors linking specific transcription factors to core RNA polymerase II. Here, we identified the Drosophila homologs of 23 human mediator genes and mutations of two, dTRAP240 and of dTRAP80 (the putative fly homolog of yeast SRB4). Clonal analysis indicates a general role for dTRAP80 necessary for cell viability. The dTRAP240 gene is also essential, but cells lacking its function are viable and proliferate normally. Clones reveal localized developmental activities including a sex comb cell identity function. This contrasts with the ubiquitous nuclear accumulation of dTRAP240 protein in imaginal discs. Synergistic genetic interactions support shared developmental cell and segment identity functions of dTRAP240 and dTRAP80, potentially within a common complex. Further, they identify the homeotic Sex combs reduced product, required for the same cell/tissue identities, as a functional partner of these mediator proteins. PMID:11090137

  14. Functional co-operation between the subunits in heterodimeric platelet-derived growth factor receptor complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Emaduddin, M; Ekman, S; Rönnstrand, L; Heldin, C H

    1999-01-01

    To determine the importance of the phosphorylation capacity of receptor kinase as well as the ability to serve as docking sites for SH2-domain-containing signal transduction molecules, we established pig aortic endothelial cell lines stably expressing kinase-active platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) alpha-receptors together with kinase-inactive beta-receptors, and vice versa. After stimulation with PDGF-AB, heterodimeric receptor complexes were formed in which the kinase-inactive receptor was phosphorylated by the kinase-active receptor, although less efficiently than in heterodimers of wild-type receptors. The kinase-active receptor was only minimally phosphorylated. Thus the phosphorylation within the receptor dimer occurred in trans between the components. Analyses of the abilities of heterodimeric receptor complexes of one kinase-active and one kinase-inactive receptor to mediate mitogenicity, chemotaxis and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase revealed less efficient effects than those of heterodimers of wild-type receptors. Importantly, however, the fact that signalling capacities were retained illustrates a functional co-operation between the two receptor molecules in the dimer, where one receptor provides a functional kinase and the other acts as a substrate and provides docking sites for downstream signalling molecules. PMID:10417313

  15. The influence of beta subunit structure on the interaction of Na+/K(+)-ATPase complexes with Na+. A chimeric beta subunit reduces the Na+ dependence of phosphoenzyme formation from ATP.

    PubMed

    Eakle, K A; Lyu, R M; Farley, R A

    1995-06-01

    High-affinity ouabain binding to Na+/K(+)-ATPase (sodium- and potassium-transport adenosine triphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.37)) requires phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of the enzyme either by ATP or by inorganic phosphate. For the native enzyme (alpha/beta 1), the ATP-dependent reaction proceeds about 4-fold more slowly in the absence of Na+ than when saturating concentrations of Na+ are present. Hybrid pumps were formed from either the alpha 1 or the alpha 3 subunit isoforms of Na+/K(+)-ATPase and a chimeric beta subunit containing the transmembrane segment of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase beta 1 isoform and the external domain of the gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase beta subunit (alpha/NH beta 1 complexes). In the absence of Na+, these complexes show a rate of ATP-dependent ouabain binding from approximately 75-100% of the rate seen in the presence of Na+ depending on buffer conditions. Nonhydrolyzable nucleotides or treatment of ATP with apyrase abolishes ouabain binding, demonstrating that ouabain binding to alpha/NH beta 1 complexes requires phosphorylation of the protein. Buffer ions inhibit ouabain binding by alpha/NH beta 1 in the absence of Na+ rather than promote ouabain binding, indicating that they are not substituting for sodium ions in the phosphorylation reaction. The pH dependence of ATP-dependent ouabain binding in the presence or absence of Na+ is similar, suggesting that protons are probably not substituting for Na+. Hybrid alpha/NH beta 1 pumps also show slightly higher apparent affinities (2-3-fold) for ATP, Na+, and ouabain; however, these are not sufficient to account for the increase in ouabain binding in the absence of Na+. In contrast to phosphoenzyme formation and ouabain binding by alpha/NH beta 1 complexes in the absence of Na+, ATPase activity, measured as release of phosphate from ATP, requires Na+. These data suggest that the transition from E1P to E2P during the catalytic cycle does not occur when the sodium binding sites are not occupied. Thus, the

  16. Individual odor recognition in procellariiform chicks: potential role for the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Terence W; Nevitt, Gabrielle A

    2009-07-01

    Since the groundbreaking work of Wenzel, Bang, and Grubb in the 1960s, enormous progress has been made toward elucidating the sense of smell in procellariiform seabirds. Although it is now well established that adult procellariiforms use olfaction in many behaviors, such as for foraging, nest relocation, and mate recognition, the olfactory abilities of petrel chicks are less well understood. Recent studies have shown that petrel chicks can recognize prey-related odors and odors associated with their nest before leaving their burrow for the first time. The recognition of burrow odors by petrel chicks is unlikely to be used for homing, and we have suggested that chicks may be learning personal odors associated with the nest's occupants for use later in life in the context of kin recognition or mate choice. The source of personal odors in petrels is unknown. However, in other vertebrates, the major histocompatibility complex influences body odors, which in turn influence mating preferences. It is not currently known whether this highly polymorphic gene region influences body odors and individual recognition in the procellariiforms, but this could be a fruitful area of future research. PMID:19686174

  17. MAT1 ('menage à trois') a new RING finger protein subunit stabilizing cyclin H-cdk7 complexes in starfish and Xenopus CAK.

    PubMed Central

    Devault, A; Martinez, A M; Fesquet, D; Labbé, J C; Morin, N; Tassan, J P; Nigg, E A; Cavadore, J C; Dorée, M

    1995-01-01

    The kinase responsible for Thr161-Thr160 phosphorylation and activation of cdc2/cdk2 (CAK:cdk-activating kinase) has been shown previously to comprise at least two subunits, cdk7 and cyclin H. An additional protein co-purified with CAK in starfish oocytes, but its sequencing did not reveal any similarity with any known protein. In the present work, a cDNA encoding this protein is cloned and sequenced in both starfish and Xenopus oocytes. It is shown to encode a new member of the RING finger family of proteins with a characteristic C3HC4 motif located in the N-terminal domain. We demonstrate that the RING finger protein (MAT1: 'menage à trois') is a new subunit of CAK in both vertebrate and invertebrates. However, CAK may also exist in oocytes as heterodimeric complexes between cyclin H and cdk7 only. Stable heterotrimeric CAK complexes were generated in reticulocyte lysates programmed with mRNAs encoding Xenopus cdk7, cyclin H and MAT1. In contrast, no heterodimeric cyclin H-cdk7 complex could be immunoprecipitated from reticulocyte lysates programmed with cdk7 and cyclin H mRNAs only. Stabilization of CAK complexes by MAT1 does not involve phosphorylation of Thr176, as the Thr176-->Ala mutant of Xenopus cdk7 could engage as efficiently as wild-type cdk7 in ternary complexes. Even though starfish MAT1 is almost identical to Xenopus MAT1 in the RING finger domain, the starfish subunit could not replace the Xenopus subunit and stabilize cyclin H-cdk7 in reticulocyte lysate, suggesting that the MAT1 subunit does not (or not only) interact with cyclin H-cdk7 through the RING finger domain. Images PMID:7588631

  18. Cloning and characterization of Sdga gene encoding alpha-subunit of heterotrimeric guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding protein complex in Scoparia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Shite, Masato; Yamamura, Yoshimi; Hayashi, Toshimitsu; Kurosaki, Fumiya

    2008-11-01

    A homology-based cloning strategy yielded Sdga, a cDNA clone presumably encoding alpha-subunit of heterotrimeric guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding protein complex, from leaf tissues of Scoparia dulcis. Phylogenetic tree analysis of G-protein alpha-subunits from various biological sources suggested that, unlike in animal cells, classification of Galpha-proteins into specific subfamilies could not be applicable to the proteins from higher plants. Restriction digests of genomic DNA of S. dulcis showed a single hybridized signal in Southern blot analysis, suggesting that Sdga is a sole gene encoding Galpha-subunit in this plant. The expression level of Sdga appeared to be maintained at almost constant level after exposure of the leaves to methyl jasmonate as analyzed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results suggest that Sdga plays roles in methyl jasmonate-induced responses of S. dulcis without a notable change in the transcriptional level. PMID:18981590

  19. Bacterial origin recognition complexes direct assembly of higher-order DnaA oligomeric structures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Diana T; Grimwade, Julia E; Betteridge, Thu; Rozgaja, Tania; Torgue, Julien J-C; Leonard, Alan C

    2009-11-01

    Eukaryotic initiator proteins form origin recognition complexes (ORCs) that bind to replication origins during most of the cell cycle and direct assembly of prereplication complexes (pre-RCs) before the onset of S phase. In the eubacterium Escherichia coli, there is a temporally similar nucleoprotein complex comprising the initiator protein DnaA bound to three high-affinity recognition sites in the unique origin of replication, oriC. At the time of initiation, this high-affinity DnaA-oriC complex (the bacterial ORC) accumulates additional DnaA that interacts with lower-affinity sites in oriC, forming a pre-RC. In this paper, we investigate the functional role of the bacterial ORC and examine whether it mediates low-affinity DnaA-oriC interactions during pre-RC assembly. We report that E. coli ORC is essential for DnaA occupation of low-affinity sites. The assistance given by ORC is directed primarily to proximal weak sites and requires oligomerization-proficient DnaA. We propose that in bacteria, DnaA oligomers of limited length and stability emerge from single high-affinity sites and extend toward weak sites to facilitate their loading as a key stage of prokaryotic pre-RC assembly. PMID:19833870

  20. Mutation in archain 1, a subunit of COPI coatomer complex, causes diluted coat color and Purkinje cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinjie; Kedlaya, Rajendra; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Ikeda, Sakae; Justice, Monica J; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi; Ikeda, Akihiro

    2010-05-01

    Intracellular trafficking is critical for delivering molecules and organelles to their proper destinations to carry out normal cellular functions. Disruption of intracellular trafficking has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, a number of genes involved in vesicle/organelle trafficking are also essential for pigmentation, and loss of those genes is often associated with mouse coat-color dilution and human hypopigmentary disorders. Hence, we postulated that screening for mouse mutants with both neurological defects and coat-color dilution will help identify additional factors associated with intracellular trafficking in neuronal cells. In this study, we characterized a mouse mutant with a unique N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, named nur17. nur17 mutant mice exhibit both coat-color dilution and ataxia due to Purkinje cell degeneration in the cerebellum. By positional cloning, we identified that the nur17 mouse carries a T-to-C missense mutation in archain 1 (Arcn1) gene which encodes the delta subunit of the coat protein I (COPI) complex required for intracellular trafficking. Consistent with this function, we found that intracellular trafficking is disrupted in nur17 melanocytes. Moreover, the nur17 mutation leads to common characteristics of neurodegenerative disorders such as abnormal protein accumulation, ER stress, and neurofibrillary tangles. Our study documents for the first time the physiological consequences of the impairment of the ARCN1 function in the whole animal and demonstrates a direct association between ARCN1 and neurodegeneration. PMID:20502676

  1. mTOR complex 2 regulates proper turnover of insulin receptor substrate-1 via the ubiquitin ligase subunit Fbw8

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Jin; DeStefano, Michael A.; Oh, Won Jun; Wu, Chang-chih; Vega-Cotto, Nicole M.; Finlan, Monica; Liu, Dou; Su, Bing; Jacinto, Estela

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals from nutrients and insulin via two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. Disruption of mTORC2 impairs the insulin-induced activation of Akt, an mTORC2 substrate. Here we found that mTORC2 can also regulate insulin signaling at the level of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Despite phosphorylation at the mTORC1-mediated serine sites, which supposedly triggers IRS-1 downregulation, inactive IRS-1 accumulated in mTORC2-disrupted cells. Defective IRS-1 degradation was due to attenuated expression and phosphorylation of the ubiquitin ligase substrate-targeting subunit, Fbw8. mTORC2 stabilizes Fbw8 by phosphorylation at Ser86, allowing the insulin-induced translocation of Fbw8 to the cytosol where it mediates IRS-1 degradation. Thus, mTORC2 negatively feeds back to IRS-1 via control of Fbw8 stability and localization. Our findings reveal that in addition to persistent mTORC1 signaling, heightened mTORC2 signals can promote insulin resistance due to mTORC2-mediated degradation of IRS-1. PMID:23142081

  2. DLAT subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is upregulated in gastric cancer-implications in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Wen Quan Jonathan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A; Chong, Shirly; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2015-01-01

    An iTRAQ-based tandem mass spectrometry approach was employed to relatively quantify proteins in the membrane proteome of eleven gastric cancer cell lines relative to a denominator non-cancer gastric epithelial cell line HFE145. Of the 882 proteins detected, 57 proteins were found to be upregulated with > 1.3-fold change in at least 6 of the 11 cell lines. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that these proteins are significantly associated with cancer, cell growth and proliferation, death, survival and cell movement. The catalogue of membrane proteins presented that are potential regulators/effectors of gastric cancer progression has implications in cancer therapy. DLAT, a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was selected as a candidate protein for further studies as its function in gastric cancer has yet to be established. SiRNA studies supported a role of DLAT in gastric cancer cell proliferation and carbohydrate metabolism, reprogramming of which is a hallmark of cancer. Our study contributes to recent interest and discussion in cancer energetics and related phenomena such as the Warburg and Reverse Warburg effects. Future mechanistic studies should lead to the elucidation of the mode of action of DLAT in human gastric cancer and establish DLAT as a viable drug target. PMID:26279757

  3. The nascent-polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit regulates the polygalacturonases expression negatively and influences the pathogenicity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuli; Guo, Min; Xu, Dafeng; Chen, Fangxin; Zhang, Huajian; Pan, Yuemin; Li, Maomao; Gao, Zhimou

    2015-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a necrotrophic plant-pathogenic fungus that infects more than 400 species of plants. In this study the nascent polypeptide-associated complex α subunit gene of S. sclerotiorum (SsNACα; accession No. XP_001593856.1) was cloned and characterized. The relative transcript expression of SsNACα at different morphological stages of asexual development of S. sclerotiorum were analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). RNAi-mediated gene silencing was successful for SsNACα, and the mutated strains exhibited less than 15% of the relative expression of SsNACα were obtained and used for studying the biological functions of the gene. A delay in sclerotial maturation for S. sclerotiorum was observed in the SsNACα mutants. The significant elevations for both the activities of pectin-degrading enzymes and the expression of polygalacturonase genes also were associated with the mutated strains, indicating that SsNACα could negatively influence polygalacturonases expression and modulate the pathogenicity of S. sclerotiorum. PMID:26297780

  4. G3BP-Caprin1-USP10 complexes mediate stress granule condensation and associate with 40S subunits.

    PubMed

    Kedersha, Nancy; Panas, Marc D; Achorn, Christopher A; Lyons, Shawn; Tisdale, Sarah; Hickman, Tyler; Thomas, Marshall; Lieberman, Judy; McInerney, Gerald M; Ivanov, Pavel; Anderson, Paul

    2016-03-28

    Mammalian stress granules (SGs) contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes that are assembled into discrete granules by specific RNA-binding proteins such as G3BP. We now show that cells lacking both G3BP1 and G3BP2 cannot form SGs in response to eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation or eIF4A inhibition, but are still SG-competent when challenged with severe heat or osmotic stress. Rescue experiments using G3BP1 mutants show that phosphomimetic G3BP1-S149E fails to rescue SG formation, whereas G3BP1-F33W, a mutant unable to bind G3BP partner proteins Caprin1 or USP10, rescues SG formation. Caprin1/USP10 binding to G3BP is mutually exclusive: Caprin binding promotes, but USP10 binding inhibits, SG formation. G3BP interacts with 40S ribosomal subunits through its RGG motif, which is also required for G3BP-mediated SG formation. We propose that G3BP mediates the condensation of SGs by shifting between two different states that are controlled by the phosphorylation of S149 and by binding to Caprin1 or USP10. PMID:27022092

  5. Two putative subunits of a peptide pump encoded in the human major histocompatability complex class 2 region

    SciTech Connect

    Bahram, S.; Arnold, D.; Bresnahan, M.; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T. )

    1991-11-15

    The class 2 region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may encode several genes controlling the processing of endogenous antigen and the presentation of peptide epitopes by MHC class 1 molecules to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. A previously described peptide supply factor (PSF1) is a member of the multidrug-resistance family of transporters and may pump cytosolic peptides into the membrane-bound compartment where class 1 molecules assemble. A second transporter gene, PSF2, was identified 10 kilobases (kb) from PSF1, near the class 2 DOB gene. The complete sequences of PSF1 and PSF2 were determined from cDNA clones. The translation products are closely related in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Both contain a highly conserved ATP-binding fold and share 25% homology in a hydrophobic domain with a tentative number of eight membrane-spanning segments. Based on the principle dimeric organization of these two domains in other transporters, PSF1 and PSF2 may function as complementary subunits, independently as homodimers, or both. Taken together with previous genetic evidence, the coregulation of PSF1 and PSF2 by {gamma} interferon and the to-some-degree coordinate transcription of these genes suggest a common role in peptide-loading of class 1 molecules, although a distinct function of PSF2 cannot be ruled out.

  6. The β-Subunit of the SnRK1 Complex Is Phosphorylated by the Plant Cell Death Suppressor Adi31[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Julian; Gregory, Oliver G.; Su, Dongyin; Deeter, Taunya A.; Chen, Sixue; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Xu, Shouling; Martin, Gregory B.; Devarenne, Timothy P.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase AvrPto-dependent Pto-interacting protein3 (Adi3) is a known suppressor of cell death, and loss of its function has been correlated with cell death induction during the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) resistance response to its pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. However, Adi3 downstream interactors that may play a role in cell death regulation have not been identified. We used a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify the plant SnRK1 (for Sucrose non-Fermenting-1-Related Protein Kinase1) protein as an Adi3-interacting protein. SnRK1 functions as a regulator of carbon metabolism and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. SnRK1 exists in a heterotrimeric complex with a catalytic α-subunit (SnRK1), a substrate-interacting β-subunit, and a regulatory γ-subunit. Here, we show that Adi3 interacts with, but does not phosphorylate, the SnRK1 α-subunit. The ability of Adi3 to phosphorylate the four identified tomato β-subunits was also examined, and it was found that only the Galactose Metabolism83 (Gal83) β-subunit was phosphorylated by Adi3. This phosphorylation site on Gal83 was identified as serine-26 using a mutational approach and mass spectrometry. In vivo expression of Gal83 indicates that it contains multiple phosphorylation sites, one of which is serine-26. An active SnRK1 complex containing Gal83 as the β-subunit and sucrose nonfermenting4 as the γ-subunit was constructed to examine functional aspects of the Adi3 interaction with SnRK1 and Gal83. These assays revealed that Adi3 is capable of suppressing the kinase activity of the SnRK1 complex through Gal83 phosphorylation plus the interaction with SnRK1 and suggested that this function may be related to the cell death suppression activity of Adi3. PMID:22573803

  7. Characterization of heterosubunit complexes formed by the R1 and R2 subunits of herpes simplex virus 1 and equine herpes virus 4 ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y; Conner, J

    2000-01-01

    We report on the separate PCR cloning and subsequent expression and purification of the large (R1) and small (R2) subunits from equine herpes virus type 4 (EHV-4) ribonucleotide reductase. The EHV-4 R1 and R2 subunits reconstituted an active enzyme and their abilities to complement the R1 and R2 subunits from the closely related herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ribonucleotide reductase, with the use of subunit interaction and enzyme activity assays, were analysed. Both EHV-4 R1/HSV-1 R2 and HSV-1 R1/EHV-4 R2 were able to assemble heterosubunit complexes but, surprisingly, neither of these complexes was fully active in enzyme activity assays; the EHV-4 R1/HSV-1 R2 and HSV-1 R1/EHV-4 R2 enzymes had 50% and 5% of their respective wild-type activities. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to alter two non-conserved residues located within the highly conserved and functionally important C-termini of the EHV-4 and HSV-1 R1 proteins. Mutation of Pro-737 to Lys and Lys-1084 to Pro in EHV-4 and HSV-1 R1 respectively had no effects on subunit assembly. Mutation of Pro-737 to Lys in EHV-4 R1 decreased enzyme activity by 50%; replacement of Lys-1084 by Pro in HSV-1 R1 had no effect on enzyme activity. Both alterations failed to restore full enzyme activities to the heterosubunit enzymes. Therefore probably neither of these amino acids has a direct role in catalysis. However, mutation of the highly conserved Tyr-1111 to Phe in HSV-1 R1 inactivated enzyme activity without affecting subunit interaction. PMID:10727407

  8. REF4 and RFR1, Subunits of the Transcriptional Coregulatory Complex Mediator, Are Required for Phenylpropanoid Homeostasis in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Soltau, Whitney L.; Blatchley, Michael R.; Powers, Brendan L.; Hurlock, Anna K.; Seals, Leslie A.; Weng, Jing-Ke; Stout, Jake; Chapple, Clint

    2012-01-01

    The plant phenylpropanoid pathway produces an array of metabolites that impact human health and the utility of feed and fiber crops. We previously characterized several Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with dominant mutations in REDUCED EPIDERMAL FLUORESCENCE 4 (REF4) that cause dwarfing and decreased accumulation of phenylpropanoids. In contrast, ref4 null plants are of normal stature and have no apparent defect in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Here we show that disruption of both REF4 and its paralog, REF4-RELATED 1 (RFR1), results in enhanced expression of multiple phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes, as well as increased accumulation of numerous downstream products. We also show that the dominant ref4-3 mutant protein interferes with the ability of the PAP1/MYB75 transcription factor to induce the expression of PAL1 and drive anthocyanin accumulation. Consistent with our experimental results, both REF4 and RFR1 have been shown to physically associate with the conserved transcriptional coregulatory complex, Mediator, which transduces information from cis-acting DNA elements to RNA polymerase II at the core promoter. Taken together, our data provide critical genetic support for a functional role of REF4 and RFR1 in the Mediator complex, and for Mediator in the maintenance of phenylpropanoid homeostasis. Finally, we show that wild-type RFR1 substantially mitigates the phenotype of the dominant ref4-3 mutant, suggesting that REF4 and RFR1 may compete with one another for common binding partners or for occupancy in Mediator. Determining the functions of diverse Mediator subunits is essential to understand eukaryotic gene regulation, and to facilitate rational manipulation of plant metabolic pathways to better suit human needs. PMID:22167189

  9. The BAF60 subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex directly controls the formation of a gene loop at FLOWERING LOCUS C in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jégu, Teddy; Latrasse, David; Delarue, Marianne; Hirt, Heribert; Domenichini, Séverine; Ariel, Federico; Crespi, Martin; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2014-02-01

    SWI/SNF complexes mediate ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling to regulate gene expression. Many components of these complexes are evolutionarily conserved, and several subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana SWI/SNF complexes are involved in the control of flowering, a process that depends on the floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). BAF60 is a SWI/SNF subunit, and in this work, we show that BAF60, via a direct targeting of the floral repressor FLC, induces a change at the high-order chromatin level and represses the photoperiod flowering pathway in Arabidopsis. BAF60 accumulates in the nucleus and controls the formation of the FLC gene loop by modulation of histone density, composition, and posttranslational modification. Physiological analysis of BAF60 RNA interference mutant lines allowed us to propose that this chromatin-remodeling protein creates a repressive chromatin configuration at the FLC locus. PMID:24510722

  10. Subunit composition of CP43-less photosystem II complexes of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: implications for the assembly and repair of photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, M.; Yu, J.; Reisinger, V.; Beckova, M.; Eichacker, L. A.; Schlodder, E.; Komenda, J.; Nixon, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) mutants are useful experimental tools to trap potential intermediates involved in the assembly of the oxygen-evolving PSII complex. Here, we focus on the subunit composition of the RC47 assembly complex that accumulates in a psbC null mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 unable to make the CP43 apopolypeptide. By using native gel electrophoresis, we showed that RC47 is heterogeneous and mainly found as a monomer of 220 kDa. RC47 complexes co-purify with small Cab-like proteins (ScpC and/or ScpD) and with Psb28 and its homologue Psb28-2. Analysis of isolated His-tagged RC47 indicated the presence of D1, D2, the CP47 apopolypeptide, plus nine of the 13 low-molecular-mass (LMM) subunits found in the PSII holoenzyme, including PsbL, PsbM and PsbT, which lie at the interface between the two momomers in the dimeric holoenzyme. Not detected were the LMM subunits (PsbK, PsbZ, Psb30 and PsbJ) located in the vicinity of CP43 in the holoenzyme. The photochemical activity of isolated RC47-His complexes, including the rate of reduction of P680+, was similar to that of PSII complexes lacking the Mn4CaO5 cluster. The implications of our results for the assembly and repair of PSII in vivo are discussed. PMID:23148271

  11. Macrophage recognition of immune complexes: development and application of novel cell surface labeling procedures.

    PubMed

    Petty, H R; Dereski, W

    1985-07-16

    A fluorescein- and lactoperoxidase-conjugated ferritin-anti-ferritin immune complex has been prepared for cell surface labeling experiments on immune recognition and effector function. Lactoperoxidase (LPO) has been covalently coupled to affinity-purified anti-ferritin antibodies with p-benzoquinone by a modified version of the method of Ternynck and Avrameas [Ternynck, T., & Avrameas, S. (1976) Ann. Immunol. (Paris) 127C, 197]. The conjugate is a heterodimer of Mr230 000 with linkages to either or both of the heavy and light chains of the antibody, as judged by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in the absence and presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. The conjugate retains antibody-binding activity as measured by a quantitative precipitin assay. When incorporated into immune complexes, the modified antibody also retains Fc receptor recognition ability as determined by erythrocyte-antibody rosette inhibition assays. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the antigen, ferritin, was monodisperse with complete apoprotein sheaths surrounding the core. Ferritin-anti-ferritin-LPO complexes were formed in 4-fold antigen excess. Complexes were verified by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Immune complexes were masked with "cold" iodine by use of the endogenous LPO activity. The complexes bound to cells at 4 degrees C as shown by electron microscopy and fluorescence video/intensification microscopy. The LPO delivered to the cell surface in this fashion can be utilized to iodinate the surface with 125I. Under saturation conditions, the labeling with local LPO delivery followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography is identical with labeling with free LPO. Labeling has also been conducted under conditions of substrate deficit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4052386

  12. The B subunit of the DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae executes an essential function at the initial stage of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Foiani, M; Marini, F; Gamba, D; Lucchini, G; Plevani, P

    1994-01-01

    The four-subunit DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex is unique in its ability to synthesize DNA chains de novo, and some in vitro data suggest its involvement in initiation and elongation of chromosomal DNA replication, although direct in vivo evidence for a role in the initiation reaction is still lacking. The function of the B subunit of the complex is unknown, but the Saccharomyces cerevisiae POL12 gene, which encodes this protein, is essential for cell viability. We have produced different pol12 alleles by in vitro mutagenesis of the cloned gene. The in vivo analysis of our 18 pol12 alleles indicates that the conserved carboxy-terminal two-thirds of the protein contains regions that are essential for cell viability, while the more divergent NH2-terminal portion is partially dispensable. The characterization of the temperature-sensitive pol12-T9 mutant allele demonstrates that the B subunit is required for in vivo DNA synthesis and correct progression through S phase. Moreover, reciprocal shift experiments indicate that the POL12 gene product plays an essential role at the early stage of chromosomal DNA replication, before the hydroxyurea-sensitive step. A model for the role of the B subunit in initiation of DNA replication at an origin is presented. Images PMID:8289832

  13. The VPS-20 Subunit of the Endosomal Sorting Complex ESCRT-III Exhibits an Open Conformation in the Absence of Upstream Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amber L.; Hanna, Michael; Quinney, Kyle; Wang, Lei; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Audhya, Anjon

    2015-01-01

    Members of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery function in membrane remodeling processes during multivesicular endosome biogenesis, cytokinesis, retroviral budding, and plasma membrane repair. During lumenal vesicle formation at endosomes, the ESCRT-II complex and the ESCRT-III subunit VPS-20 play a specific role in regulating assembly of ESCRT-III filaments, which promote vesicle scission. Previous work suggests that Vps20 isoforms, like other ESCRT-III subunits, exhibits an autoinhibited, closed conformation in solution, and its activation depends on an association with ESCRT-II specifically at membranes. However, we show here that C. elegans ESCRT-II and VPS-20 interact directly in solution, both in cytosolic cell extracts and using recombinant proteins in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrate that purified VPS-20 exhibits an open, extended conformation, irrespective of ESCRT-II binding, in contrast with the closed, autoinhibited architecture of another ESCRT-III subunit, VPS-24. Our data argue that individual ESCRT-III subunits adopt distinct conformations, which are tailored for their specific functions during ESCRT-mediated membrane reorganization events. PMID:25588614

  14. DISTORTED3/SCAR2 is a putative arabidopsis WAVE complex subunit that activates the Arp2/3 complex and is required for epidermal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basu, Dipanwita; Le, Jie; El-Essal, Salah El-Din; Huang, Shanjin; Zhang, Chunhua; Mallery, Eileen L; Koliantz, Gregore; Staiger, Christopher J; Szymanski, Daniel B

    2005-02-01

    In a plant cell, a subset of actin filaments function as a scaffold that positions the endomembrane system and acts as a substrate on which organelle motility occurs. Other actin filament arrays appear to be more dynamic and reorganize in response to growth signals and external cues. The distorted group of trichome morphology mutants provides powerful genetic tools to study the control of actin filament nucleation in the context of morphogenesis. In this article, we report that DISTORTED3 (DIS3) encodes a plant-specific SCAR/WAVE homolog. Null alleles of DIS3, like those of other Arabidopsis thaliana WAVE and Actin-Related Protein (ARP) 2/3 subunit genes, cause trichome distortion, defects in cell-cell adhesion, and reduced hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings. DIS3 efficiently activates the actin filament nucleation and branching activity of vertebrate Arp2/3 and functions within a WAVE-ARP2/3 pathway in vivo. DIS3 may assemble into a WAVE complex via a physical interaction with a highly diverged Arabidopsis Abi-1-like bridging protein. These results demonstrate the utility of the Arabidopsis trichome system to understand how the WAVE and ARP2/3 complexes translate signaling inputs into a coordinated morphogenetic response. PMID:15659634

  15. Speech recognition against harmonic and inharmonic complexes: Spectral dips and periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Deroche, Mickael L. D.; Culling, John F.; Chatterjee, Monita; Limb, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Speech recognition in a complex masker usually benefits from masker harmonicity, but there are several factors at work. The present study focused on two of them, glimpsing spectrally in between masker partials and periodicity within individual frequency channels. Using both a theoretical and an experimental approach, it is demonstrated that when inharmonic complexes are generated by jittering partials from their harmonic positions, there are better opportunities for spectral glimpsing in inharmonic than in harmonic maskers, and this difference is enhanced as fundamental frequency (F0) increases. As a result, measurements of masking level difference between the two maskers can be reduced, particularly at higher F0s. Using inharmonic maskers that offer similar glimpsing opportunity to harmonic maskers, it was found that the masking level difference between the two maskers varied little with F0, was influenced by periodicity of the first four partials, and could occur in low-, mid-, or high-frequency regions. Overall, the present results suggested that both spectral glimpsing and periodicity contribute to speech recognition under masking by harmonic complexes, and these effects seem independent from one another. PMID:24815268

  16. ND3, ND1 and 39 kDa subunits are more exposed in the de-active form of bovine mitochondrial complex I

    PubMed Central

    Babot, Marion; Labarbuta, Paola; Birch, Amanda; Kee, Sara; Fuszard, Matthew; Botting, Catherine H.; Wittig, Ilka; Heide, Heinrich; Galkin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    An intriguing feature of mitochondrial complex I from several species is the so-called A/D transition, whereby the idle enzyme spontaneously converts from the active (A) form to the de-active (D) form. The A/D transition plays an important role in tissue response to the lack of oxygen and hypoxic deactivation of the enzyme is one of the key regulatory events that occur in mitochondria during ischaemia. We demonstrate for the first time that the A/D conformational change of complex I does not affect the macromolecular organisation of supercomplexes in vitro as revealed by two types of native electrophoresis. Cysteine 39 of the mitochondrially-encoded ND3 subunit is known to become exposed upon de-activation. Here we show that even if complex I is a constituent of the I + III2 + IV (S1) supercomplex, cysteine 39 is accessible for chemical modification in only the D-form. Using lysine-specific fluorescent labelling and a DIGE-like approach we further identified two new subunits involved in structural rearrangements during the A/D transition: ND1 (MT-ND1) and 39 kDa (NDUFA9). These results clearly show that structural rearrangements during de-activation of complex I include several subunits located at the junction between hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains, in the region of the quinone binding site. De-activation of mitochondrial complex I results in concerted structural rearrangement of membrane subunits which leads to the disruption of the sealed quinone chamber required for catalytic turnover. PMID:24560811

  17. Complete sequence, subunit structure, and complexes with pancreatic alpha-amylase of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, K; Hayashi, K; Arakawa, T; Philo, J S; Wen, J; Hara, S; Yamaguchi, H

    1996-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I), which is composed of two kinds of glycopolypeptide subunits, alpha and beta, was established by conventional methods. The polypeptide molecular weight of PHA-I determined by the light-scattering technique, considered together with the sequence molecular weights revealed for the subunits, indicated that PHA-I has the subunit stoichiometry of (alpha beta)2 complex. Inhibition test of PHA-I with increasing amounts of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA) suggested that an inactive 2:1 complex is formed between PPA and PHA-I. In fact, two complexes differing from each other in the molar ratio of PPA to PHA-I were separated by gel filtration, and molecular weight estimation by the light-scattering technique confirmed that they are complexes of PHA-I with one or two PPA molecules. The binding of PPA to PHA-I appeared to follow simple binomial statistics, suggesting that two binding sites on PHA-I are independent and of high affinity for PPA. PMID:8864861

  18. Arabidopsis BRICK1/HSPC300 is an essential WAVE-complex subunit that selectively stabilizes the Arp2/3 activator SCAR2.

    PubMed

    Le, Jie; Mallery, Eileen L; Zhang, Chunhua; Brankle, Steven; Szymanski, Daniel B

    2006-05-01

    The actin cytoskeleton dynamically reorganizes the cytoplasm during cell morphogenesis. The actin-related protein (Arp)2/3 complex is a potent nucleator of actin filaments that controls a variety of endomembrane functions including the endocytic internalization of plasma membrane , vacuole biogenesis , plasma-membrane protrusion in crawling cells , and membrane trafficking from the Golgi . Therefore, Arp2/3 is an important signaling target during morphogenesis. The evolutionarily conserved Rac-WAVE-Arp2/3 pathway links actin filament nucleation to cell morphogenesis . WAVE translates Rac-GTP signals into Arp2/3 activation by regulating the stability and/or localization of the activator subunit Scar/WAVE . The WAVE complex includes Sra1/PIR121/CYFIP1, Nap1/NAP125, Abi-1/Abi-2, Brick1(Brk1)/HSPC300, and Scar/WAVE : Defining the in vivo function of each subunit is an important step toward understanding this complicated signaling pathway. Brk1/HSPC300 has been the most recalcitrant WAVE-complex protein and has no known function. In this paper, we report that Arabidopsis brick1 (brk1) is a member of the "distorted group" of trichome morphology mutants, a group that defines a WAVE-ARP2/3 morphogenesis pathway . In this paper we provide the first strong genetic and biochemical evidence that BRK1 is a critical WAVE-complex subunit that selectively stabilizes the Arp2/3 activator SCAR2. PMID:16584883

  19. Role of the N-terminal signal peptide in the membrane insertion of Aquifex aeolicus F1F0 ATP synthase c-subunit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunli; Marcia, Marco; Langer, Julian D; Peng, Guohong; Michel, Hartmut

    2013-07-01

    Rotary ATPases are membrane protein complexes that couple ATP hydrolysis to ion translocation across the membrane. Overall, they are evolutionarily well conserved, but the N-terminal segments of their rotary subunits (c-subunits) possess different lengths and levels of hydrophobicity across species. By analyzing the N-terminal variability, we distinguish four phylogenetic groups of c-subunits (groups 1-4). We characterize a member of group 2, the c-subunit from Aquifex aeolicus F1F0 ATP synthase, both in native cells and in a heterologous expression system. We demonstrate that its N-terminal segment forms a signal peptide with signal recognition particle (SRP) recognition features and is obligatorily required for membrane insertion. Based on our study and on previous characterizations of c-subunits from other organisms, we propose that c-subunits follow different membrane insertion pathways. PMID:23663226

  20. MED15, encoding a subunit of the mediator complex, is overexpressed at high frequency in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Menon, Roopika; Braun, Martin; Offermann, Anne; Queisser, Angela; Boehm, Diana; Vogel, Wenzel; Rüenauver, Kerstin; Ruiz, Christian; Zellweger, Tobias; Svensson, Maria; Andren, Ove; Kristiansen, Glen; Wernert, Nicolas; Bubendorf, Lukas; Kirfel, Jutta; Biskup, Saskia; Perner, Sven

    2014-07-01

    The mediator complex is an evolutionary conserved key regulator of transcription of protein-coding genes and an integrative hub for diverse signaling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether the mediator subunit MED15 is implicated in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). MED15 expression and copy number/rearrangement status were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), respectively on 718 prostate cancer (PCa) specimens and sequenced by Sanger on a subset. Furthermore, SMAD3 phosphorylation, androgen receptor (AR) and proliferation markers were evaluated by IHC. In PCa cells, siRNA/shRNA knockdown of MED15 was followed by proliferation assays with/without dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and treatments with recombinant TGF-β3. Our results show that MED15 is overexpressed in 76% of distant metastatic CRPC (CRPC(MET) ) and 70% of local-recurrent CRPC (CRPC(LOC) ), in contrast to low frequencies in androgen-sensitive PCa, and no expression in benign prostatic tissue. Furthermore, MED15 overexpression correlates with worse clinical outcome thus defining a highly lethal phenotype. Moreover, TGF-β signaling activation associates with MED15 overexpression in PCa tissues, and leads to increased expression of MED15 in PCa cells. MED15 knockdown effects phosphorylation and shuttling of p-SMAD3 to the nucleus as well as TGF-β-enhanced proliferation. In PCa tissues, MED15 overexpression associates with AR overexpression/amplification and correlates with high proliferative activity. MED15 knockdown decreases both androgen-dependent and -independent proliferation in PCa cells. Taken together, these findings implicate MED15 in CRPC, and as MED15 is evolutionary conserved, it is likely to emerge as a lethal phenotype in other therapeutic-resistant diseases, and not restricted to our disease model. PMID:24374838

  1. Regulation of the mammalian elongation cycle by subunit rolling: a eukaryotic-specific ribosome rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Budkevich, Tatyana V; Giesebrecht, Jan; Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Ramrath, David J F; Mielke, Thorsten; Ismer, Jochen; Hildebrand, Peter W; Tung, Chang-Shung; Nierhaus, Knud H; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Spahn, Christian M T

    2014-07-01

    The extent to which bacterial ribosomes and the significantly larger eukaryotic ribosomes share the same mechanisms of ribosomal elongation is unknown. Here, we present subnanometer resolution cryoelectron microscopy maps of the mammalian 80S ribosome in the posttranslocational state and in complex with the eukaryotic eEF1A⋅Val-tRNA⋅GMPPNP ternary complex, revealing significant differences in the elongation mechanism between bacteria and mammals. Surprisingly, and in contrast to bacterial ribosomes, a rotation of the small subunit around its long axis and orthogonal to the well-known intersubunit rotation distinguishes the posttranslocational state from the classical pretranslocational state ribosome. We term this motion "subunit rolling." Correspondingly, a mammalian decoding complex visualized in substates before and after codon recognition reveals structural distinctions from the bacterial system. These findings suggest how codon recognition leads to GTPase activation in the mammalian system and demonstrate that in mammalia subunit rolling occurs during tRNA selection. PMID:24995983

  2. Recognition of Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens on Cultured Human Biliary Epithelial Cells by Alloreactive Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saidman, Susan L.; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Zeevi, Adriana; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Demetris, A. Jake

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system to study the interactions between biliary epithelium and lymphocytes using cultured human biliary epithelial cells. No class II antigens were detected by immunoperoxidase staining of the normal biliary epithelial cells, but alloactivated lymphocyte culture supernatants were able to induce class II expression. The activity of the supernatants was blocked with an anti-γ-interferon monoclonal antibody. In addition, recombinant human γ-interferon alone induced the expression of class II antigens and increased the intensity of class I staining of cultured biliary epithelial cells. Biliary epithelial cell–induced proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex molecules carry functional lymphocyte-activating determinants. The recognition of major histocompatibility complex determinants was confirmed by monoclonal antibody–blocking studies and by stimulation of an alloreactive T-cell clone. However, the biliary epithelial cells were much less potent stimulators than arterial endothelial cells tested in the same assay system. PMID:1704868

  3. Glucocorticoids regulate mRNA levels for subunits of the 19 S regulatory complex of the 26 S proteasome in fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Combaret, Lydie; Taillandier, Daniel; Dardevet, Dominique; Béchet, Daniel; Rallière, Cécile; Claustre, Agnès; Grizard, Jean; Attaix, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Circulating levels of glucocorticoids are increased in many traumatic and muscle-wasting conditions that include insulin-dependent diabetes, acidosis, infection, and starvation. On the basis of indirect findings, it appeared that these catabolic hormones are required to stimulate Ub (ubiquitin)-proteasome-dependent proteolysis in skeletal muscles in such conditions. The present studies were performed to provide conclusive evidence for an activation of Ub-proteasome-dependent proteolysis after glucocorticoid treatment. In atrophying fast-twitch muscles from rats treated with dexamethasone for 6 days, compared with pair-fed controls, we found (i) increased MG132-inhibitable proteasome-dependent proteolysis, (ii) an enhanced rate of substrate ubiquitination, (iii) increased chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity of the proteasome, and (iv) a co-ordinate increase in the mRNA expression of several ATPase (S4, S6, S7 and S8) and non-ATPase (S1, S5a and S14) subunits of the 19 S regulatory complex, which regulates the peptidase and the proteolytic activities of the 26 S proteasome. These studies provide conclusive evidence that glucocorticoids activate Ub-proteasome-dependent proteolysis and the first in vivo evidence for a hormonal regulation of the expression of subunits of the 19 S complex. The results suggest that adaptations in gene expression of regulatory subunits of the 19 S complex by glucocorticoids are crucial in the regulation of the 26 S muscle proteasome. PMID:14636157

  4. Specialized Roles of the Conserved Subunit OST3/6 of the Oligosaccharyltransferase Complex in Innate Immunity and Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Farid, Akhlaq; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Veit, Christiane; Schoberer, Jennifer; Zipfel, Cyril; Strasser, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation of proteins is an essential cotranslational and posttranslational protein modification in plants. The central step in this process is the transfer of a preassembled oligosaccharide to nascent proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum by the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) complex. Despite the importance of the catalyzed reaction, the composition and the function of individual OST subunits are still ill defined in plants. Here, we report the function of the highly conserved OST subunit OST3/6. We have identified a mutant in the OST3/6 gene that causes overall underglycosylation of proteins and affects the biogenesis of the receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR involved in innate immunity and the endo-β-1,4-glucanase KORRIGAN1 required for cellulose biosynthesis. Notably, the ost3/6 mutation does not affect mutant variants of the receptor kinase BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1. OST3/6 deficiency results in activation of the unfolded protein response and causes hypersensitivity to salt/osmotic stress and to the glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin. Consistent with its role in protein glycosylation, OST3/6 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and interacts with other subunits of the OST complex. Together, our findings reveal the importance of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) OST3/6 for the efficient glycosylation of specific glycoproteins involved in different physiological processes and shed light on the composition and function of the plant OST complex. PMID:23493405

  5. The Cambridge Mindreading (CAM) Face-Voice Battery: Testing Complex Emotion Recognition in Adults with and without Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golan, Ofer; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Hill, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    Adults with Asperger Syndrome (AS) can recognise simple emotions and pass basic theory of mind tasks, but have difficulties recognising more complex emotions and mental states. This study describes a new battery of tasks, testing recognition of 20 complex emotions and mental states from faces and voices. The battery was given to males and females…

  6. beta-1,3-Glucan recognition by an insect pathogen recognition domain causes self-association of protein: carbohydrate complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In response to invading microorganisms, insect beta-1,3-glucan recognition protein (beta-GRP), a soluble receptor in the hemolymph, binds to the surfaces of bacteria and fungi and activates serine protease cascades associated with the prophenoloxidase (proPO) and Toll pathways; it also agglutinates ...

  7. Orc1 Binding to Mitotic Chromosomes Precedes Spatial Patterning during G1 Phase and Assembly of the Origin Recognition Complex in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kara, Nihan; Hossain, Manzar; Prasanth, Supriya G; Stillman, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    Replication of eukaryotic chromosomes occurs once every cell division cycle in normal cells and is a tightly controlled process that ensures complete genome duplication. The origin recognition complex (ORC) plays a key role during the initiation of DNA replication. In human cells, the level of Orc1, the largest subunit of ORC, is regulated during the cell division cycle, and thus ORC is a dynamic complex. Upon S phase entry, Orc1 is ubiquitinated and targeted for destruction, with subsequent dissociation of ORC from chromosomes. Time lapse and live cell images of human cells expressing fluorescently tagged Orc1 show that Orc1 re-localizes to condensing chromatin during early mitosis and then displays different nuclear localization patterns at different times during G1 phase, remaining associated with late replicating regions of the genome in late G1 phase. The initial binding of Orc1 to mitotic chromosomes requires C-terminal amino acid sequences that are similar to mitotic chromosome-binding sequences in the transcriptional pioneer protein FOXA1. Depletion of Orc1 causes concomitant loss of the mini-chromosome maintenance (Mcm2-7) helicase proteins on chromatin. The data suggest that Orc1 acts as a nucleating center for ORC assembly and then pre-replication complex assembly by binding to mitotic chromosomes, followed by gradual removal from chromatin during the G1 phase. PMID:25784553

  8. The tryptophan synthase alpha 2 beta 2 complex: a comparison of the reactivity of amino groups in the alpha and beta 2 subunits and in the complex by differential labeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, E.W.; Fairwell, T.

    1984-05-01

    The interaction of the alpha and beta 2 subunits of tryptophan synthase of Escherichia coli to form an alpha 2 beta 2 complex has been probed by differential labeling studies. In the first step the separate alpha or beta 2 subunit or the alpha 2 beta 2 complex was labeled by reductive methylation with trace amounts of (/sup 3/H)HCHO in the presence of NaCNBH/sub 3/. In the second step the /sup 3/H-labeled preparation was fully labeled under denaturing conditions with (/sup 14/C)HCHO and NaCNBH/sub 3/. Peptides containing labeled monomethyl or dimethyl amino groups were isolated after thermolytic digestion or after cyanogen bromide treatment. The /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio of each peptide is a measure of the relative reactivity of the amino group or groups in each peptide. The most reactive amino group in the alpha subunit, lysine-109, is strongly shielded from modification in the alpha 2 beta 2 complex. The most reactive amino group in the beta 2 subunit, the amino-terminal threonine, is not shielded from modification in the alpha 2 beta 2 complex.

  9. Functional Characterization of the Small Regulatory Subunit PetP from the Cytochrome b6f Complex in Thermosynechococcus elongatus[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Rexroth, Sascha; Rexroth, Dorothea; Veit, Sebastian; Plohnke, Nicole; Cormann, Kai U.; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Rögner, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterial cytochrome b6f complex is central for the coordination of photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport and also for the balance between linear and cyclic electron transport. The development of a purification strategy for a highly active dimeric b6f complex from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 enabled characterization of the structural and functional role of the small subunit PetP in this complex. Moreover, the efficient transformability of this strain allowed the generation of a ΔpetP mutant. Analysis on the whole-cell level by growth curves, photosystem II light saturation curves, and P700+ reduction kinetics indicate a strong decrease in the linear electron transport in the mutant strain versus the wild type, while the cyclic electron transport via photosystem I and cytochrome b6f is largely unaffected. This reduction in linear electron transport is accompanied by a strongly decreased stability and activity of the isolated ΔpetP complex in comparison with the dimeric wild-type complex, which binds two PetP subunits. The distinct behavior of linear and cyclic electron transport may suggest the presence of two distinguishable pools of cytochrome b6f complexes with different functions that might be correlated with supercomplex formation. PMID:25139006

  10. Functional Characterization of the Subunits N, H, J, and O of the NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Complexes in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 68031[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes play crucial roles in variety of bioenergetic reactions such as respiration, CO2 uptake, and cyclic electron transport around PSI. Recently, substantial progress has been made in identifying the composition of subunits of NDH-1 complexes. However, the localization and the physiological roles of several subunits in cyanobacteria are not fully understood. Here, by constructing fully segregated ndhN, ndhO, ndhH, and ndhJ null mutants in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, we found that deletion of ndhN, ndhH, or ndhJ but not ndhO severely impaired the accumulation of the hydrophilic subunits of the NDH-1 in the thylakoid membrane, resulting in disassembly of NDH-1MS, NDH-1MS′, as well as NDH-1L, finally causing the severe growth suppression phenotype. In contrast, deletion of NdhO affected the growth at pH 6.5 in air. In the cytoplasm, either NdhH or NdhJ deleted mutant, but neither NdhN nor NdhO deleted mutant, failed to accumulate the NDH-1 assembly intermediate consisting of NdhH, NdhJ, NdhK, and NdhM. Based on these results, we suggest that NdhN, NdhH, and NdhJ are essential for the stability and the activities of NDH-1 complexes, while NdhO for NDH-1 functions under the condition of inorganic carbon limitation in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. We discuss the roles of these subunits and propose a new NDH-1 model. PMID:27208236

  11. Functional Characterization of the Subunits N, H, J, and O of the NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Complexes in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    He, Zhihui; Mi, Hualing

    2016-06-01

    The cyanobacterial NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes play crucial roles in variety of bioenergetic reactions such as respiration, CO2 uptake, and cyclic electron transport around PSI. Recently, substantial progress has been made in identifying the composition of subunits of NDH-1 complexes. However, the localization and the physiological roles of several subunits in cyanobacteria are not fully understood. Here, by constructing fully segregated ndhN, ndhO, ndhH, and ndhJ null mutants in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, we found that deletion of ndhN, ndhH, or ndhJ but not ndhO severely impaired the accumulation of the hydrophilic subunits of the NDH-1 in the thylakoid membrane, resulting in disassembly of NDH-1MS, NDH-1MS', as well as NDH-1L, finally causing the severe growth suppression phenotype. In contrast, deletion of NdhO affected the growth at pH 6.5 in air. In the cytoplasm, either NdhH or NdhJ deleted mutant, but neither NdhN nor NdhO deleted mutant, failed to accumulate the NDH-1 assembly intermediate consisting of NdhH, NdhJ, NdhK, and NdhM. Based on these results, we suggest that NdhN, NdhH, and NdhJ are essential for the stability and the activities of NDH-1 complexes, while NdhO for NDH-1 functions under the condition of inorganic carbon limitation in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. We discuss the roles of these subunits and propose a new NDH-1 model. PMID:27208236

  12. Inactivation of Genes Encoding Subunits of the Peripheral and Membrane Arms of Neurospora Mitochondrial Complex I and Effects on Enzyme Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, M.; Sousa, R.; Videira, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized the nuclear genes encoding the 12.3-kD subunit of the membrane arm and the 29.9-kD subunit of the peripheral arm of complex I from Neurospora crassa. The former gene was known to be located in linkage group I and the latter is now assigned to linkage group IV of the fungal genome. The genes were separately transformed into different N. crassa strains and transformants with duplicated DNA sequences were isolated. Selected transformants were then mated with other strains to generate repeat-induced point mutations in both copies of the genes present in the nucleus of the parental transformant. From the progeny of the crosses, we were then able to recover two individual mutants lacking the 12.3- and 29.9-kD proteins in their mitochondria, mutants nuo12.3 and nuo29.9, respectively. Several other subunits of complex I are present in the mutant organelles, although with altered stoichiometries as compared with those in the wild-type strain. Based on the analysis of Triton-solubilized mitochondrial complexes in sucrose gradients, neither mutant is able to fully assemble complex I. Our results indicate that mutant nuo12.3 separately assembles the peripheral arm and most of the membrane arm of the enzyme. Mutant nuo29.9 seems to accumulate the membrane arm of complex I and being devoid of the peripheral part. This implicates the 29.9-kD protein in an early step of complex I assembly. PMID:7768434

  13. Mouse hippocampal GABAB1 but not GABAB2 subunit-containing receptor complex levels are paralleling retrieval in the multiple-T-maze

    PubMed Central

    Falsafi, Soheil K.; Ghafari, Maryam; Miklósi, András G.; Engidawork, Ephrem; Gröger, Marion; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors known to be involved in learning and memory. Although a role for GABAB receptors in cognitive processes is evident, there is no information on hippocampal GABAB receptor complexes in a multiple T maze (MTM) task, a robust paradigm for evaluation of spatial learning. Trained or untrained (yoked control) C57BL/6J male mice (n = 10/group) were subjected to the MTM task and sacrificed 6 h following their performance. Hippocampi were taken, membrane proteins extracted and run on blue native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies against GABAB1, GABAB1a, and GABAB2. Immunoprecipitation with subsequent mass spectrometric identification of co-precipitates was carried out to show if GABAB1 and GABAB2 as well as other interacting proteins co-precipitate. An antibody shift assay (ASA) and a proximity ligation assay (PLA) were also used to see if the two GABAB subunits are present in the receptor complex. Single bands were observed on Western blots, each representing GABAB1, GABAB1a, or GABAB2 at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 100 kDa. Subsequently, densitometric analysis revealed that levels of GABAB1 and GABAB1a but not GABAB2- containing receptor complexes were significantly higher in trained than untrained groups. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric studies confirmed the presence of GABAB1, GABAB2, calcium calmodulin kinases I and II, GluA1 and GluA2 as constituents of the complex. ASA and PLA also showed the presence of the two subunits of GABAB receptor within the complex. It is shown that increased levels of GABAB1 subunit-containing complexes are paralleling performance in a land maze. PMID:26539091

  14. Mutations in the gene encoding C8orf38 block complex I assembly by inhibiting production of the mitochondria-encoded subunit ND1.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Matthew; Tucker, Elena J; Compton, Alison G; Lazarou, Michael; George, Christa; Thorburn, David R; Ryan, Michael T

    2011-12-01

    The assembly of complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a complicated process, requiring the integration of 45 subunits encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial DNAs into a structure of approximately 1 MDa. A number of "assembly factors" that aid complex I biogenesis have recently been described, including C8orf38. This protein was identified as an assembly factor by its evolutionary conservation in organisms containing complex I and by a C8orf38 mutation in a patient presenting with Leigh syndrome and isolated complex I deficiency. In this report, we have undertaken the characterization of C8orf38 and its role in complex I assembly. Analysis of mitochondria from fibroblasts of a patient harboring a C8orf38 mutation showed almost undetectable levels of steady-state complex I and defective biogenesis of the mtDNA-encoded subunit ND1. Complementation with wild-type C8orf38 restored the levels of both ND1 and complex I, confirming the C8orf38 mutation as the cause of the complex I defect in the patient. In the absence of ND1 in patient cells, early- and mid-stage intermediate complexes were still formed; however, assembly of late-stage intermediates was impaired, indicating a convergence point in the assembly process. While C8orf38 appears to behave at a step in complex I biogenesis similar to that of the assembly factor C20orf7, complementation studies showed that both proteins are required for ND1 synthesis/stabilization. We conclude that C8orf38 is a crucial factor required for the translation and/or integration of ND1 into an early-stage assembly intermediate and that mutation of C8orf38 disrupts the initial stages of complex I biogenesis. PMID:22019594

  15. Complement activation by ligand-driven juxtaposition of discrete pattern recognition complexes.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Kjaer, Troels R; Kidmose, Rune T; Jensen, Lisbeth; Hansen, Annette G; Tekin, Mustafa; Jensenius, Jens C; Andersen, Gregers R; Thiel, Steffen

    2014-09-16

    Defining mechanisms governing translation of molecular binding events into immune activation is central to understanding immune function. In the lectin pathway of complement, the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins complexed with the MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-2 cleave C4 and C2 to generate C3 convertase. MASP-1 was recently found to be the exclusive activator of MASP-2 under physiological conditions, yet the predominant oligomeric forms of MBL carry only a single MASP homodimer. This prompted us to investigate whether activation of MASP-2 by MASP-1 occurs through PRM-driven juxtaposition on ligand surfaces. We demonstrate that intercomplex activation occurs between discrete PRM/MASP complexes. PRM ligand binding does not directly escort the transition of MASP from zymogen to active enzyme in the PRM/MASP complex; rather, clustering of PRM/MASP complexes directly causes activation. Our results support a clustering-based mechanism of activation, fundamentally different from the conformational model suggested for the classical pathway of complement. PMID:25197071

  16. T cell receptor reversed polarity recognition of a self-antigen major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Dennis X; Kleijwegt, Fleur S; Wiede, Florian; van der Slik, Arno R; Loh, Khai Lee; Petersen, Jan; Dudek, Nadine L; Duinkerken, Gaby; Laban, Sandra; Joosten, Antoinette; Vivian, Julian P; Chen, Zhenjun; Uldrich, Adam P; Godfrey, Dale I; McCluskey, James; Price, David A; Radford, Kristen J; Purcell, Anthony W; Nikolic, Tatjana; Reid, Hugh H; Tiganis, Tony; Roep, Bart O; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2015-11-01

    Central to adaptive immunity is the interaction between the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. Presumably reflecting TCR-MHC bias and T cell signaling constraints, the TCR universally adopts a canonical polarity atop the MHC. We report the structures of two TCRs, derived from human induced T regulatory (iT(reg)) cells, complexed to an MHC class II molecule presenting a proinsulin-derived peptide. The ternary complexes revealed a 180° polarity reversal compared to all other TCR-peptide-MHC complex structures. Namely, the iT(reg) TCR α-chain and β-chain are overlaid with the α-chain and β-chain of MHC class II, respectively. Nevertheless, this TCR interaction elicited a peptide-reactive, MHC-restricted T cell signal. Thus TCRs are not 'hardwired' to interact with MHC molecules in a stereotypic manner to elicit a T cell signal, a finding that fundamentally challenges our understanding of TCR recognition. PMID:26437244

  17. Complement activation by ligand-driven juxtaposition of discrete pattern recognition complexes

    PubMed Central

    Degn, Søren E.; Kjaer, Troels R.; Kidmose, Rune T.; Jensen, Lisbeth; Hansen, Annette G.; Tekin, Mustafa; Jensenius, Jens C.; Andersen, Gregers R.; Thiel, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Defining mechanisms governing translation of molecular binding events into immune activation is central to understanding immune function. In the lectin pathway of complement, the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins complexed with the MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-2 cleave C4 and C2 to generate C3 convertase. MASP-1 was recently found to be the exclusive activator of MASP-2 under physiological conditions, yet the predominant oligomeric forms of MBL carry only a single MASP homodimer. This prompted us to investigate whether activation of MASP-2 by MASP-1 occurs through PRM-driven juxtaposition on ligand surfaces. We demonstrate that intercomplex activation occurs between discrete PRM/MASP complexes. PRM ligand binding does not directly escort the transition of MASP from zymogen to active enzyme in the PRM/MASP complex; rather, clustering of PRM/MASP complexes directly causes activation. Our results support a clustering-based mechanism of activation, fundamentally different from the conformational model suggested for the classical pathway of complement. PMID:25197071

  18. A Novel Non-SET Domain Multi-subunit Methyltransferase Required for Sequential Nucleosomal Histone H3 Methylation by the Mixed Lineage Leukemia Protein-1 (MLL1) Core Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anamika; Vought, Valarie E.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Cosgrove, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression within the context of eukaryotic chromatin is regulated by enzymes that catalyze histone lysine methylation. Histone lysine methyltransferases that have been identified to date possess the evolutionarily conserved SET or Dot1-like domains. We previously reported the identification of a new multi-subunit histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase lacking homology to the SET or Dot1 family of histone lysine methyltransferases. This enzymatic activity requires a complex that includes WRAD (WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30), a complex that is part of the MLL1 (mixed lineage leukemia protein-1) core complex but that also exists independently of MLL1 in the cell. Here, we report that the minimal complex required for WRAD enzymatic activity includes WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L and that DPY-30, although not required for enzymatic activity, increases the histone substrate specificity of the WRAD complex. We also show that WRAD requires zinc for catalytic activity, displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and is inhibited by S-adenosyl-homocysteine. In addition, we demonstrate that WRAD preferentially methylates lysine 4 of histone H3 within the context of the H3/H4 tetramer but does not methylate nucleosomal histone H3 on its own. In contrast, we find that MLL1 and WRAD are required for nucleosomal histone H3 methylation, and we provide evidence suggesting that each plays distinct structural and catalytic roles in the recognition and methylation of a nucleosome substrate. Our results indicate that WRAD is a new H3K4 methyltransferase with functions that include regulating the substrate and product specificities of the MLL1 core complex. PMID:21106533

  19. A novel non-SET domain multi-subunit methyltransferase required for sequential nucleosomal histone H3 methylation by the mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) core complex.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anamika; Vought, Valarie E; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2011-02-01

    Gene expression within the context of eukaryotic chromatin is regulated by enzymes that catalyze histone lysine methylation. Histone lysine methyltransferases that have been identified to date possess the evolutionarily conserved SET or Dot1-like domains. We previously reported the identification of a new multi-subunit histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase lacking homology to the SET or Dot1 family of histone lysine methyltransferases. This enzymatic activity requires a complex that includes WRAD (WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30), a complex that is part of the MLL1 (mixed lineage leukemia protein-1) core complex but that also exists independently of MLL1 in the cell. Here, we report that the minimal complex required for WRAD enzymatic activity includes WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L and that DPY-30, although not required for enzymatic activity, increases the histone substrate specificity of the WRAD complex. We also show that WRAD requires zinc for catalytic activity, displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and is inhibited by S-adenosyl-homocysteine. In addition, we demonstrate that WRAD preferentially methylates lysine 4 of histone H3 within the context of the H3/H4 tetramer but does not methylate nucleosomal histone H3 on its own. In contrast, we find that MLL1 and WRAD are required for nucleosomal histone H3 methylation, and we provide evidence suggesting that each plays distinct structural and catalytic roles in the recognition and methylation of a nucleosome substrate. Our results indicate that WRAD is a new H3K4 methyltransferase with functions that include regulating the substrate and product specificities of the MLL1 core complex. PMID:21106533

  20. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta) is a specific regulator of fibroblast motility and contractility.

    PubMed

    Satish, Latha; Johnson, Sandra; Wang, James H-C; Post, J Christopher; Ehrlich, Garth D; Kathju, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Integumentary wounds in mammalian fetuses heal without scar; this scarless wound healing is intrinsic to fetal tissues and is notable for absence of the contraction seen in postnatal (adult) wounds. The precise molecular signals determining the scarless phenotype remain unclear. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta) is specifically reduced in healing fetal wounds in a rabbit model. In this study, we examine the role of CCT-eta in fibroblast motility and contractility, properties essential to wound healing and scar formation. We demonstrate that CCT-eta (but not CCT-beta) is underexpressed in fetal fibroblasts compared to adult fibroblasts. An in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that adult fibroblasts showed increased cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, whereas fetal fibroblasts were unresponsive. Downregulation of CCT-eta in adult fibroblasts with short inhibitory RNA (siRNA) reduced cellular motility, both basal and growth factor-induced; in contrast, siRNA against CCT-beta had no such effect. Adult fibroblasts were more inherently contractile than fetal fibroblasts by cellular traction force microscopy; this contractility was increased by treatment with EGF and PDGF. CCT-eta siRNA inhibited the PDGF-induction of adult fibroblast contractility, whereas CCT-beta siRNA had no such effect. In each of these instances, the effect of downregulating CCT-eta was to modulate the behavior of adult fibroblasts so as to more closely approximate the characteristics of fetal fibroblasts. We next examined the effect of CCT-eta modulation on alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression, a gene product well known to play a critical role in adult wound healing. Fetal fibroblasts were found to constitutively express less alpha-SMA than adult cells. Reduction of CCT-eta with siRNA had minimal effect on cellular beta-actin but

  1. Bcl11b SWI/SNF-complex subunit modulates intestinal adenoma and regeneration after γ-irradiation through Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Akira; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Otsuka, Kensuke; Tomita, Masanori; Obata, Miki; Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Abe, Manabu; Sato, Toshihiro; Ochiai, Masako; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Gondo, Yoichi; Sakimura, Kenji; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2015-06-01

    SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes constitute a highly related family of multi-subunit complexes to modulate transcription, and SWI/SNF subunit genes are collectively mutated in 20% of all human cancers. Bcl11b is a SWI/SNF subunit and acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in leukemia/lymphomas. Here, we show expression of Bcl11b in intestinal crypt cells and promotion of intestinal tumorigenesis by Bcl11b attenuation in Apc (min/+) mice. Of importance, mutations or allelic loss of BCL11B was detected in one-third of human colon cancers. We also show that attenuated Bcl11b activity in the crypt base columnar (CBC) cells expressing the Lgr5 stem cell marker enhanced regeneration of intestinal epithelial cells after the radiation-induced injury. Interestingly, BCL11B introduction in human cell lines downregulated transcription of β-catenin target genes, whereas Bcl11b attenuation in Lgr5(+) CBCs increased expression of β-catenin targets including c-Myc and cyclin D1. Together, our results argue that Bcl11b impairment promotes tumor development in mouse and human intestine at least in part through deregulation of β-catenin pathway. PMID:25827435

  2. Structure of the nucleotide-binding subunit B of the energy producer A1A0 ATP synthase in complex with adenosine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Grüber, Gerhard

    2008-11-01

    A1A0 ATP synthases are the major energy producers in archaea. Like the related prokaryotic and eukaryotic F1F0 ATP synthases, they are responsible for most of the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. The catalytic events of A1A0 ATP synthases take place inside the A3B3 hexamer of the A1 domain. Recently, the crystallographic structure of the nucleotide-free subunit B of Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1A0 ATP synthase has been determined at 1.5 A resolution. To understand more about the nucleotide-binding mechanism, a protocol has been developed to crystallize the subunit B-ADP complex. The crystallographic structure of this complex has been solved at 2.7 A resolution. The ADP occupies a position between the essential phosphate-binding loop and amino-acid residue Phe149, which are involved in the binding of the antibiotic efrapeptin in the related F1F0 ATP synthases. This trapped ADP location is about 13 A distant from its final binding site and is therefore called the transition ADP-binding position. In the trapped ADP position the structure of subunit B adopts a different conformation, mainly in its C-terminal domain and also in the final nucleotide-binding site of the central alphabeta-domain. This atomic model provides insight into how the substrate enters into the nucleotide-binding protein and thereby into the catalytic A3B3 domain. PMID:19020348

  3. The RPT2 subunit of the 26S proteasome directs complex assembly, histone dynamics, and gametophyte and sporophyte development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hee; Minami, Atsushi; Marshall, Richard S; Book, Adam J; Farmer, Lisa M; Walker, Joseph M; Vierstra, Richard D

    2011-12-01

    The regulatory particle (RP) of the 26S proteasome contains a heterohexameric ring of AAA-ATPases (RPT1-6) that unfolds and inserts substrates into the core protease (CP) for degradation. Through genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana gene pair encoding RPT2, we show that this subunit plays a critical role in 26S proteasome assembly, histone dynamics, and plant development. rpt2a rpt2b double null mutants are blocked in both male and female gamete transmission, demonstrating that the subunit is essential. Whereas rpt2b mutants are phenotypically normal, rpt2a mutants display a range of defects, including impaired leaf, root, trichome, and pollen development, delayed flowering, stem fasciation, hypersensitivity to mitomycin C and amino acid analogs, hyposensitivity to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and decreased 26S complex stability. The rpt2a phenotype can be rescued by both RPT2a and RPT2b, indicative of functional redundancy, but not by RPT2a mutants altered in ATP binding/hydrolysis or missing the C-terminal hydrophobic sequence that docks the RPT ring onto the CP. Many rpt2a phenotypes are shared with mutants lacking the chromatin assembly factor complex CAF1. Like caf1 mutants, plants missing RPT2a or reduced in other RP subunits contain less histones, thus implicating RPT2 specifically, and the 26S proteasome generally, in plant nucleosome assembly. PMID:22158466

  4. Toxicological evaluation of complex mixtures by pattern recognition: correlating chemical fingerprints to mutagenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Eide, Ingvar; Neverdal, Gunhild; Thorvaldsen, Bodil; Grung, Bjørn; Kvalheim, Olav M

    2002-01-01

    We describe the use of pattern recognition and multivariate regression in the assessment of complex mixtures by correlating chemical fingerprints to the mutagenicity of the mixtures. Mixtures were 20 organic extracts of exhaust particles, each containing 102-170 individual compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-PAHs, oxy-PAHs, and saturated hydrocarbons. Mixtures were characterized by full-scan GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). Data were resolved into peaks and spectra for individual compounds by an automated curve resolution procedure. Resolved chromatograms were integrated, resulting in a predictor matrix that was used as input to a principal component analysis to evaluate similarities between mixtures (i.e., classification). Furthermore, partial least-squares projections to latent structures were used to correlate the GC-MS data to mutagenicity, as measured in the Ames Salmonella assay (i.e., calibration). The best model (high r2 and Q2) identifies the variables that co-vary with the observed mutagenicity. These variables may subsequently be identified in more detail. Furthermore, the regression model can be used to predict mutagenicity from GC-MS chromatograms of other organic extracts. We emphasize that both chemical fingerprints as well as detailed data on composition can be used in pattern recognition. PMID:12634129

  5. Toxicological evaluation of complex mixtures by pattern recognition: correlating chemical fingerprints to mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Eide, Ingvar; Neverdal, Gunhild; Thorvaldsen, Bodil; Grung, Bjørn; Kvalheim, Olav M

    2002-12-01

    We describe the use of pattern recognition and multivariate regression in the assessment of complex mixtures by correlating chemical fingerprints to the mutagenicity of the mixtures. Mixtures were 20 organic extracts of exhaust particles, each containing 102-170 individual compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-PAHs, oxy-PAHs, and saturated hydrocarbons. Mixtures were characterized by full-scan GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). Data were resolved into peaks and spectra for individual compounds by an automated curve resolution procedure. Resolved chromatograms were integrated, resulting in a predictor matrix that was used as input to a principal component analysis to evaluate similarities between mixtures (i.e., classification). Furthermore, partial least-squares projections to latent structures were used to correlate the GC-MS data to mutagenicity, as measured in the Ames Salmonella assay (i.e., calibration). The best model (high r2 and Q2) identifies the variables that co-vary with the observed mutagenicity. These variables may subsequently be identified in more detail. Furthermore, the regression model can be used to predict mutagenicity from GC-MS chromatograms of other organic extracts. We emphasize that both chemical fingerprints as well as detailed data on composition can be used in pattern recognition. PMID:12634129

  6. Trinuclear Cage-Like Zn(II) Macrocyclic Complexes: Enantiomeric Recognition and Gas Adsorption Properties.

    PubMed

    Janczak, Jan; Prochowicz, Daniel; Lewiński, Janusz; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Bereta, Tomasz; Lisowski, Jerzy

    2016-01-11

    Three zinc(II) ions in combination with two units of enantiopure [3+3] triphenolic Schiff-base macrocycles 1, 2, 3, or 4 form cage-like chiral complexes. The formation of these complexes is accompanied by the enantioselective self-recognition of chiral macrocyclic units. The X-ray crystal structures of these trinuclear complexes show hollow metal-organic molecules. In some crystal forms, these barrel-shaped complexes are arranged in a window-to-window fashion, which results in the formation of 1D channels and a combination of both intrinsic and extrinsic porosity. The microporous nature of the [Zn3 12 ] complex is reflected in its N2 , Ar, H2 , and CO2 adsorption properties. The N2 and Ar adsorption isotherms show pressure-gating behavior, which is without precedent for any noncovalent porous material. A comparison of the structures of the [Zn3 12 ] and [Zn3 32 ] complexes with that of the free macrocycle H3 1 reveals a striking structural similarity. In H3 1, two macrocyclic units are stitched together by hydrogen bonds to form a cage very similar to that formed by two macrocyclic units stitched together by Zn(II) ions. This structural similarity is manifested also by the gas adsorption properties of the free H3 1 macrocycle. Recrystallization of [Zn3 12 ] in the presence of racemic 2-butanol resulted in the enantioselective binding of (S)-2-butanol inside the cage through the coordination to one of the Zn(II) ions. PMID:26642975

  7. The FgNot3 Subunit of the Ccr4-Not Complex Regulates Vegetative Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Duc-Cuong; Son, Hokyoung; Shin, Ji Young; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-01-01

    The Ccr4-Not complex is evolutionarily conserved and important for multiple cellular functions in eukaryotic cells. In this study, the biological roles of the FgNot3 subunit of this complex were investigated in the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. Deletion of FgNOT3 resulted in retarded vegetative growth, retarded spore germination, swollen hyphae, and hyper-branching. The ΔFgnot3 mutants also showed impaired sexual and asexual sporulation, decreased virulence, and reduced expression of genes related to conidiogenesis. Fgnot3 deletion mutants were sensitive to thermal stress, whereas NOT3 orthologs in other model eukaryotes are known to be required for cell wall integrity. We found that FgNot3 functions as a negative regulator of the production of secondary metabolites, including trichothecenes and zearalenone. Further functional characterization of other components of the Not module of the Ccr4-Not complex demonstrated that the module is conserved. Each subunit primarily functions within the context of a complex and might have distinct roles outside of the complex in F. graminearum. This is the first study to functionally characterize the Not module in filamentous fungi and provides novel insights into signal transduction pathways in fungal development. PMID:26799401

  8. Realtime recognition of complex human daily activities using human motion and location data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chun; Sheng, Weihua

    2012-09-01

    Daily activity recognition is very useful in robot-assisted living systems. In this paper, we proposed a method to recognize complex human daily activities which consist of simultaneous body activities and hand gestures in an indoor environment. A wireless power-aware motion sensor node is developed which consists of a commercial orientation sensor, a wireless communication module, and a power management unit. To recognize complex daily activities, three motion sensor nodes are attached to the right thigh, the waist, and the right hand of a human subject, while an optical motion capture system is used to obtain his/her location information. A three-level dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) is implemented to model the intratemporal and intertemporal constraints among the location, body activity, and hand gesture. The body activity and hand gesture are estimated using a Bayesian filter and a short-time Viterbi algorithm, which reduces the computational complexity and memory usage. We conducted experiments in a mock apartment environment and the obtained results showed the effectiveness and accuracy of our method. PMID:22434793

  9. Structural basis for the recognition of complex-type biantennary oligosaccharides by Pterocarpus angolensis lectin.

    PubMed

    Buts, Lieven; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Imberty, Anne; Amiot, Nicolas; Boons, Geert-Jan; Beeckmans, Sonia; Versées, Wim; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy

    2006-06-01

    The crystal structure of Pterocarpus angolensis lectin is determined in its ligand-free state, in complex with the fucosylated biantennary complex type decasaccharide NA2F, and in complex with a series of smaller oligosaccharide constituents of NA2F. These results together with thermodynamic binding data indicate that the complete oligosaccharide binding site of the lectin consists of five subsites allowing the specific recognition of the pentasaccharide GlcNAc beta(1-2)Man alpha(1-3)[GlcNAc beta(1-2)Man alpha(1-6)]Man. The mannose on the 1-6 arm occupies the monosaccharide binding site while the GlcNAc residue on this arm occupies a subsite that is almost identical to that of concanavalin A (con A). The core mannose and the GlcNAc beta(1-2)Man moiety on the 1-3 arm on the other hand occupy a series of subsites distinct from those of con A. PMID:16704415

  10. Species delimitation and recognition in the Pediomelum megalanthum complex (Fabaceae) via multivariate morphometrics

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Ashley N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pediomelum is a genus endemic to North America comprising about 26 species, including the megalanthum complex, which consists of Pediomelum megalanthum and its varieties retrorsum and megalanthum, Pediomelum mephiticum, and the recently described Pediomelum verdiense and Pediomelum pauperitense. Historically, species of the megalanthum complex have been variably recognized at the species or variety levels, dependent upon the relative importance of morphological characters as diagnostic of species. Ten quantitative morphological characters regarded as diagnostic at the species level were analyzed using multivariate morphometrics across these taxa in order to examine the discriminatory power of these characters to delineate species and to aid in species delimitation. The analyses support the recognition of Pediomelum megalanthum, Pediomelum mephiticum, and Pediomelum verdiense at the species level, Pediomelum retrorsum as a variety under Pediomelum megalanthum, and suggest the sinking of Pediomelum pauperitense into Pediomelum verdiense. The findings of the present study help quantify the power of certain characters at delimiting taxa and provide a basis for taxonomic revision of the Pediomelum megalanthum complex. PMID:25698894

  11. Mitochondrial protein import: recognition of internal import signals of BCS1 by the TOM complex.

    PubMed

    Stan, Tincuta; Brix, Jan; Schneider-Mergener, Jens; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Neupert, Walter; Rapaport, Doron

    2003-04-01

    BCS1, a component of the inner membrane of mitochondria, belongs to the group of proteins with internal, noncleavable import signals. Import and intramitochondrial sorting of BCS1 are encoded in the N-terminal 126 amino acid residues. Three sequence elements were identified in this region, namely, the transmembrane domain (amino acid residues 51 to 68), a presequence type helix (residues 69 to 83), and an import auxiliary region (residues 84 to 126). The transmembrane domain is not required for stable binding to the TOM complex. The Tom receptors (Tom70, Tom22 and Tom20), as determined by peptide scan analysis, interact with the presequence-like helix, yet the highest binding was to the third sequence element. We propose that the initial recognition of BCS1 precursor at the surface of the organelle mainly depends on the auxiliary region and does not require the transmembrane domain. This essential region represents a novel type of signal with targeting and sorting functions. It is recognized by all three known mitochondrial import receptors, demonstrating their capacity to decode various targeting signals. We suggest that the BCS1 precursor crosses the TOM complex as a loop structure and that once the precursor emerges from the TOM complex, all three structural elements are essential for the intramitochondrial sorting to the inner membrane. PMID:12640110

  12. Molecular Basis of Histone Tail Recognition by Human TIP5 PHD Finger and Bromodomain of the Chromatin Remodeling Complex NoRC

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Cynthia; Valentini, Erica; Fedorov, Oleg; Overvoorde, Lois; Ferguson, Fleur M.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Knapp, Stefan; Ciulli, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Binding of the chromatin remodeling complex NoRC to RNA complementary to the rDNA promoter mediates transcriptional repression. TIP5, the largest subunit of NoRC, is involved in recruitment to rDNA by interactions with promoter-bound TTF-I, pRNA, and acetylation of H4K16. TIP5 domains that recognize posttranslational modifications on histones are essential for recruitment of NoRC to chromatin, but how these reader modules recognize site-specific histone tails has remained elusive. Here, we report crystal structures of PHD zinc finger and bromodomains from human TIP5 and BAZ2B in free form and bound to H3 and/or H4 histones. PHD finger functions as an independent structural module in recognizing unmodified H3 histone tails, and the bromodomain prefers H3 and H4 acetylation marks followed by a key basic residue, KacXXR. Further low-resolution analyses of PHD-bromodomain modules provide molecular insights into their trans histone tail recognition, required for nucleosome recruitment and transcriptional repression of the NoRC complex. PMID:25533489

  13. Molecular basis of histone tail recognition by human TIP5 PHD finger and bromodomain of the chromatin remodeling complex NoRC.

    PubMed

    Tallant, Cynthia; Valentini, Erica; Fedorov, Oleg; Overvoorde, Lois; Ferguson, Fleur M; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Svergun, Dmitri I; Knapp, Stefan; Ciulli, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Binding of the chromatin remodeling complex NoRC to RNA complementary to the rDNA promoter mediates transcriptional repression. TIP5, the largest subunit of NoRC, is involved in recruitment to rDNA by interactions with promoter-bound TTF-I, pRNA, and acetylation of H4K16. TIP5 domains that recognize posttranslational modifications on histones are essential for recruitment of NoRC to chromatin, but how these reader modules recognize site-specific histone tails has remained elusive. Here, we report crystal structures of PHD zinc finger and bromodomains from human TIP5 and BAZ2B in free form and bound to H3 and/or H4 histones. PHD finger functions as an independent structural module in recognizing unmodified H3 histone tails, and the bromodomain prefers H3 and H4 acetylation marks followed by a key basic residue, KacXXR. Further low-resolution analyses of PHD-bromodomain modules provide molecular insights into their trans histone tail recognition, required for nucleosome recruitment and transcriptional repression of the NoRC complex. PMID:25533489

  14. Water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator complex recognition process.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Fajar R; Rauch, Christine; Trieb, Michael; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Liedl, Klaus R

    2004-04-15

    Water-mediated contacts are known as an important recognition tool in trp-repressor operator systems. One of these contacts involves two conserved base pairs (G(6).C(-6) and A(5). T(-5)) and three amino acids (Lys 72, Ile 79, and Ala 80). To investigate the nature of these contacts, we analyzed the X-ray structure (PDB code: 1TRO) of the trp-repressor operator complex by means of molecular dynamics simulations. This X-ray structure contains two dimers that exhibit structural differences. From these two different starting structures, two 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations have been performed. Both of our simulations show an increase of water molecules in the major groove at one side of the dimer, while the other side remains unchanged compared to the X-ray structure. Though the maximum residence time of the concerned water molecules decreases with an increase of solvent at the interface, these water molecules continue to play an important role in mediating DNA-protein contacts. This is shown by new stable amino acids-DNA distances and a long water residence time compared to free DNA simulation. To maintain stability of the new contacts, the preferential water binding site on O6(G6) is extended. This extension agrees with mutation experiment data on A5 and G6, which shows different relative affinity due to mutation on these bases [A. Joachimiak, T. E. Haran, P. B. Sigler, EMBO Journal 1994, Vol. 13, No. (2) pp. 367-372]. Due to the rearrangements in the system, the phosphate of the base G6 is able to interconvert to the B(II) substate, which is not observed on the other half side of the complex. The decrease of the number of hydrogen bonds between protein and DNA backbone could be the initial step of the dissociation process of the complex, or in other words an intermediate complex conformation of the association process. Thus, we surmise that these features show the importance of water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator recognition process. PMID

  15. Colorimetric Humidity and Solvent Recognition Based on a Cation-Exchange Clay Mineral Incorporating Nickel(II)-Chelate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Hitoshi; Mochida, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-01

    Solvatochromic nickel(II) complexes with diketonato and diamine ligands were incorporated into a saponite clay by ion exchange, and their colorimetric humidity- and solvent-recognition properties were investigated. These powders exhibit color change from red to blue-green depending on humidity, and the detection range can be controlled by modifying the metal complex. The humidity response takes advantage of the humidity-dependent water content in clay and the coordination of water molecules to the metal complex in equilibrium. The addition of organic solvents to the powders causes a color change to occur, varying from red to blue-green depending on the donor number of the solvent, thereby enabling solvent recognition. In the clay, the affinity of less sterically hindered complexes to water or solvent molecules is decreased compared with that in solution because the cationic complexes interact with the anionic layers in the clay. Incorporating diethylene glycol into the materials produced thermochromic powders. PMID:26542108

  16. Characterization of clinically identified mutations in NDUFV1, the flavin-binding subunit of respiratory complex I, using a yeast model system.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Febin; Atcheson, Erwan; Bridges, Hannah R; Hirst, Judy

    2015-11-15

    Dysfunctions in mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) are both genetically and clinically highly diverse and a major cause of human mitochondrial diseases. The genetic determinants of individual clinical cases are increasingly being described, but how these genetic defects affect complex I on the molecular and cellular level, and have different clinical consequences in different individuals, is little understood. Furthermore, without molecular-level information innocent genetic variants may be misassigned as pathogenic. Here, we have used a yeast model system (Yarrowia lipolytica) to study the molecular consequences of 16 single amino acid substitutions, classified as pathogenic, in the NDUFV1 subunit of complex I. NDUFV1 binds the flavin cofactor that oxidizes NADH and is the site of complex I-mediated reactive oxygen species production. Seven mutations caused loss of complex I expression, suggesting they are detrimental but precluding further study. In two variants complex I was fully assembled but did not contain any flavin, and four mutations led to functionally compromised enzymes. Our study provides a molecular rationale for assignment of all these variants as pathogenic. However, three variants provided complex I that was functionally equivalent to the wild-type enzyme, challenging their assignment as pathogenic. By combining structural, bioinformatic and functional data, a simple scoring system for the initial evaluation of future NDUFV1 variants is proposed. Overall, our results broaden understanding of how mutations in this centrally important core subunit of complex I affect its function and provide a basis for understanding the role of NDUFV1 mutations in mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26345448

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mode of protein recognition by Skp1 and the F-box domain in the SCF complex.

    PubMed

    Chandra Dantu, Sarath; Nathubhai Kachariya, Nitin; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Polyubiquitination of the target protein by a ubiquitin transferring machinery is key to various cellular processes. E3 ligase Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) is one such complex which plays crucial role in substrate recognition and transfer of the ubiquitin molecule. Previous computational studies have focused on S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2), cullin, and RING-finger proteins of this complex, but the roles of the adapter protein Skp1 and F-box domain of Skp2 have not been determined. Using sub-microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of full-length Skp1, unbound Skp2, Skp2-Cks1 (Cks1: Cyclin-dependent kinases regulatory subunit 1), Skp1-Skp2, and Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complexes, we have elucidated the function of Skp1 and the F-box domain of Skp2. We found that the L16 loop of Skp1, which was deleted in previous X-ray crystallography studies, can offer additional stability to the ternary complex via its interactions with the C-terminal tail of Skp2. Moreover, Skp1 helices H6, H7, and H8 display vivid conformational flexibility when not bound to Skp2, suggesting that these helices can recognize and lock the F-box proteins. Furthermore, we observed that the F-box domain could rotate (5°-129°), and that the binding partner determined the degree of conformational flexibility. Finally, Skp1 and Skp2 were found to execute a domain motion in Skp1-Skp2 and Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complexes that could decrease the distance between ubiquitination site of the substrate and the ubiquitin molecule by 3 nm. Thus, we propose that both the F-box domain of Skp2 and Skp1-Skp2 domain motions displaying preferential conformational control can together facilitate polyubiquitination of a wide variety of substrates. PMID:26573739

  18. Subunits of ADA-two-A-containing (ATAC) or Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltrasferase (SAGA) Coactivator Complexes Enhance the Acetyltransferase Activity of GCN5.

    PubMed

    Riss, Anne; Scheer, Elisabeth; Joint, Mathilde; Trowitzsch, Simon; Berger, Imre; Tora, László

    2015-11-27

    Histone acetyl transferases (HATs) play a crucial role in eukaryotes by regulating chromatin architecture and locus specific transcription. GCN5 (KAT2A) is a member of the GNAT (Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase) family of HATs. In metazoans this enzyme is found in two functionally distinct coactivator complexes, SAGA (Spt Ada Gcn5 acetyltransferase) and ATAC (Ada Two A-containing). These two multiprotein complexes comprise complex-specific and shared subunits, which are organized in functional modules. The HAT module of ATAC is composed of GCN5, ADA2a, ADA3, and SGF29, whereas in the SAGA HAT module ADA2b is present instead of ADA2a. To better understand how the activity of human (h) hGCN5 is regulated in the two related, but different, HAT complexes we carried out in vitro HAT assays. We compared the activity of hGCN5 alone with its activity when it was part of purified recombinant hATAC or hSAGA HAT modules or endogenous hATAC or hSAGA complexes using histone tail peptides and full-length histones as substrates. We demonstrated that the subunit environment of the HAT complexes into which GCN5 incorporates determines the enhancement of GCN5 activity. On histone peptides we show that all the tested GCN5-containing complexes acetylate mainly histone H3K14. Our results suggest a stronger influence of ADA2b as compared with ADA2a on the activity of GCN5. However, the lysine acetylation specificity of GCN5 on histone tails or full-length histones was not changed when incorporated in the HAT modules of ATAC or SAGA complexes. Our results thus demonstrate that the catalytic activity of GCN5 is stimulated by subunits of the ADA2a- or ADA2b-containing HAT modules and is further increased by incorporation of the distinct HAT modules in the ATAC or SAGA holo-complexes. PMID:26468280

  19. Bipedicled Preexpanded Forehead Flaps for Simultaneous Reconstruction of Total Nasal and Upper Lip Subunits: A Novel Approach to Complex Facial Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Su, Weijie; Min, Peiru; Sadigh, Parviz; Grassetti, Luca; Lazzeri, Davide; Munnee, Krishna; Pu, Zheming; Zhang, Yixin

    2016-06-01

    Background Reconstruction of the central facial subunits is a complex and challenging task. In cases in which both the nasal and upper lip subunits are involved, a technique that can reconstruct both aesthetic units with tissue of similar color and texture from a single donor site will be ideal. In this article we present our experience with the bipedicled preexpanded forehead flap for simultaneous nasal and upper lip resurfacing. Patients and Methods Between January 2012 and January 2015 we used this technique in the simultaneous reconstruction of total nasal and upper lip subunits in five patients. All cases were for burns scar resurfacing. Results Good aesthetic results were achieved in each of our five cases to date and no complications were encountered. All donor sites closed primarily with aesthetically pleasing well-concealed linear scars. In all cases small modifications such as philtral shaping and further flap thinning were performed under local anesthesia between 6 and 12 months postoperatively Conclusion The preexpanded forehead flap provides an unparalleled color and texture match when it comes to facial resurfacing. When both total nasal and upper lip resurfacings are required, it is possible to achieve this in a single sitting from a single donor site by using a bipedicled preexpanded forehead flap. PMID:27128261

  20. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  1. Structural basis of UV DNA damage recognition by the DDB1-DDB2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Scrima, Andrea; Koníčková, Renata; Czyzewski, Bryan K.; Kawasaki, Yusuke; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Groisman, Regina; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Shigenori; Pavletich, Nikola P.; Thomä, Nicolas H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary UV-light induced pyrimidine photodimers are repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway. Photolesions have biophysical parameters closely resembling undamaged DNA, impeding discovery through damage surveillance proteins. The DDB1-DDB2 complex has the highest known affinity for photodimers in metazoan cells, and serves in the initial detection of UV-lesions in vivo. The structure of the DDB1-DDB2 complex bound to a 6-4 pyrimidine-pyrimidone photodimer (6-4PP) shows that the lesion is held exclusively by the WD40 domain of DDB2. A DDB2 hairpin inserts into the minor groove, extrudes the photodimer into a binding pocket and kinks the duplex by ∼40°. The tightly localized probing of the photolesions, combined with proofreading in the photodimer pocket enables DDB2 to detect lesions refractory to detection by other damage surveillance proteins. The structure provides insights into damage recognition in chromatin, and suggests a mechanism by which the DDB1-associated CUL4 ubiquitin ligase targets proteins surrounding the site of damage. PMID:19109893

  2. Xenopus origin recognition complex (ORC) initiates DNA replication preferentially at sequences targeted by Schizosaccharomyces pombe ORC.

    PubMed

    Kong, Daochun; Coleman, Thomas R; DePamphilis, Melvin L

    2003-07-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) origin recognition complex (ORC) requires ATP to bind specific DNA sequences, whereas fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) ORC binds to specific, asymmetric A:T-rich sites within replication origins, independently of ATP, and frog (Xenopus laevis) ORC seems to bind DNA non-specifically. Here we show that despite these differences, ORCs are functionally conserved. Firstly, SpOrc1, SpOrc4 and SpOrc5, like those from other eukaryotes, bound ATP and exhibited ATPase activity, suggesting that ATP is required for pre-replication complex (pre-RC) assembly rather than origin specificity. Secondly, SpOrc4, which is solely responsible for binding SpORC to DNA, inhibited up to 70% of XlORC-dependent DNA replication in Xenopus egg extract by preventing XlORC from binding to chromatin and assembling pre-RCs. Chromatin-bound SpOrc4 was located at AT-rich sequences. XlORC in egg extract bound preferentially to asymmetric A:T-sequences in either bare DNA or in sperm chromatin, and it recruited XlCdc6 and XlMcm proteins to these sequences. These results reveal that XlORC initiates DNA replication preferentially at the same or similar sites to those targeted in S.pombe. PMID:12840006

  3. Structural Basis for Conserved Regulation and Adaptation of the Signal Recognition Particle Targeting Complex.

    PubMed

    Wild, Klemens; Bange, Gert; Motiejunas, Domantas; Kribelbauer, Judith; Hendricks, Astrid; Segnitz, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-07-17

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ribonucleoprotein complex with a key role in targeting and insertion of membrane proteins. The two SRP GTPases, SRP54 (Ffh in bacteria) and FtsY (SRα in eukaryotes), form the core of the targeting complex (TC) regulating the SRP cycle. The architecture of the TC and its stimulation by RNA has been described for the bacterial SRP system while this information is lacking for other domains of life. Here, we present the crystal structures of the GTPase heterodimers of archaeal (Sulfolobus solfataricus), eukaryotic (Homo sapiens), and chloroplast (Arabidopsis thaliana) SRP systems. The comprehensive structural comparison combined with Brownian dynamics simulations of TC formation allows for the description of the general blueprint and of specific adaptations of the quasi-symmetric heterodimer. Our work defines conserved external nucleotide-binding sites for SRP GTPase activation by RNA. Structural analyses of the GDP-bound, post-hydrolysis states reveal a conserved, magnesium-sensitive switch within the I-box. Overall, we provide a general model for SRP cycle regulation by RNA. PMID:27241309

  4. Analysis of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, of the succinate dehydrogenase complex in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Astolfi, Annalisa; Urbini, Milena; Nannini, Margherita; Paterini, Paola; Indio, Valentina; Saponara, Maristella; Formica, Serena; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Casadio, Rita; Rossi, Giulio; Bertolini, Federica; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria G; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Basso, Umberto; Biasco, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of genes encoding the subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex were described in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST separately in different reports. In this study, we simultaneously sequenced the genome of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD in a larger series of KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST in order to evaluate the frequency of the mutations and explore their biological role. SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD were sequenced on the available samples obtained from 34 KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs. Of these, in 10 cases, both tumor and peripheral blood (PB) were available, in 19 cases only tumor, and in 5 cases only PB. Overall, 9 of the 34 patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST carried mutations in one of the four subunits of the SDH complex (six patients in SDHA, two in SDHB, one in SDHC). WB and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST who harbored SDHA mutations exhibited a significant downregulation of both SDHA and SDHB protein expression, with respect to the other GIST lacking SDH mutations and to KIT/PDGFRA-mutated GIST. Clinically, four out of six patients with SDHA mutations presented with metastatic disease at diagnosis with a very slow, indolent course. Patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST may harbor germline and/or de novo mutations of SDH complex with prevalence for mutations within SDHA, which is associated with a downregulation of SDHA and SDHB protein expression. The presence of germline mutations may suggest that these patients should be followed up for the risk of development of other cancers. PMID:23612575

  5. Analysis of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, of the succinate dehydrogenase complex in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleo, Maria A; Astolfi, Annalisa; Urbini, Milena; Nannini, Margherita; Paterini, Paola; Indio, Valentina; Saponara, Maristella; Formica, Serena; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Casadio, Rita; Rossi, Giulio; Bertolini, Federica; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria G; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Basso, Umberto; Biasco, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of genes encoding the subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex were described in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST separately in different reports. In this study, we simultaneously sequenced the genome of all subunits, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD in a larger series of KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST in order to evaluate the frequency of the mutations and explore their biological role. SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD were sequenced on the available samples obtained from 34 KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs. Of these, in 10 cases, both tumor and peripheral blood (PB) were available, in 19 cases only tumor, and in 5 cases only PB. Overall, 9 of the 34 patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST carried mutations in one of the four subunits of the SDH complex (six patients in SDHA, two in SDHB, one in SDHC). WB and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST who harbored SDHA mutations exhibited a significant downregulation of both SDHA and SDHB protein expression, with respect to the other GIST lacking SDH mutations and to KIT/PDGFRA-mutated GIST. Clinically, four out of six patients with SDHA mutations presented with metastatic disease at diagnosis with a very slow, indolent course. Patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GIST may harbor germline and/or de novo mutations of SDH complex with prevalence for mutations within SDHA, which is associated with a downregulation of SDHA and SDHB protein expression. The presence of germline mutations may suggest that these patients should be followed up for the risk of development of other cancers. PMID:23612575

  6. Complexity of the Ruminococcus flavefaciens cellulosome reflects an expansion in glycan recognition.

    PubMed

    Venditto, Immacolata; Luis, Ana S; Rydahl, Maja; Schückel, Julia; Fernandes, Vânia O; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Bule, Pedro; Goyal, Arun; Pires, Virginia M R; Dourado, Catarina G; Ferreira, Luís M A; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Knox, J Paul; Baslé, Arnaud; Najmudin, Shabir; Gilbert, Harry J; Willats, William G T; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2016-06-28

    The breakdown of plant cell wall (PCW) glycans is an important biological and industrial process. Noncatalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) fulfill a critical targeting function in PCW depolymerization. Defining the portfolio of CBMs, the CBMome, of a PCW degrading system is central to understanding the mechanisms by which microbes depolymerize their target substrates. Ruminococcus flavefaciens, a major PCW degrading bacterium, assembles its catalytic apparatus into a large multienzyme complex, the cellulosome. Significantly, bioinformatic analyses of the R. flavefaciens cellulosome failed to identify a CBM predicted to bind to crystalline cellulose, a key feature of the CBMome of other PCW degrading systems. Here, high throughput screening of 177 protein modules of unknown function was used to determine the complete CBMome of R. flavefaciens The data identified six previously unidentified CBM families that targeted β-glucans, β-mannans, and the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan. The crystal structures of four CBMs, in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis, provide insight into the mechanism of ligand recognition. In the CBMs that recognize β-glucans and β-mannans, differences in the conformation of conserved aromatic residues had a significant impact on the topology of the ligand binding cleft and thus ligand specificity. A cluster of basic residues in CBM77 confers calcium-independent recognition of homogalacturonan, indicating that the carboxylates of galacturonic acid are key specificity determinants. This report shows that the extended repertoire of proteins in the cellulosome of R. flavefaciens contributes to an extended CBMome that supports efficient PCW degradation in the absence of CBMs that specifically target crystalline cellulose. PMID:27298375

  7. Complexity of the Ruminococcus flavefaciens cellulosome reflects an expansion in glycan recognition

    PubMed Central

    Venditto, Immacolata; Luis, Ana S.; Rydahl, Maja; Schückel, Julia; Fernandes, Vânia O.; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Bule, Pedro; Goyal, Arun; Pires, Virginia M. R.; Dourado, Catarina G.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Knox, J. Paul; Baslé, Arnaud; Najmudin, Shabir; Gilbert, Harry J.; Willats, William G. T.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of plant cell wall (PCW) glycans is an important biological and industrial process. Noncatalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) fulfill a critical targeting function in PCW depolymerization. Defining the portfolio of CBMs, the CBMome, of a PCW degrading system is central to understanding the mechanisms by which microbes depolymerize their target substrates. Ruminococcus flavefaciens, a major PCW degrading bacterium, assembles its catalytic apparatus into a large multienzyme complex, the cellulosome. Significantly, bioinformatic analyses of the R. flavefaciens cellulosome failed to identify a CBM predicted to bind to crystalline cellulose, a key feature of the CBMome of other PCW degrading systems. Here, high throughput screening of 177 protein modules of unknown function was used to determine the complete CBMome of R. flavefaciens. The data identified six previously unidentified CBM families that targeted β-glucans, β-mannans, and the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan. The crystal structures of four CBMs, in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis, provide insight into the mechanism of ligand recognition. In the CBMs that recognize β-glucans and β-mannans, differences in the conformation of conserved aromatic residues had a significant impact on the topology of the ligand binding cleft and thus ligand specificity. A cluster of basic residues in CBM77 confers calcium-independent recognition of homogalacturonan, indicating that the carboxylates of galacturonic acid are key specificity determinants. This report shows that the extended repertoire of proteins in the cellulosome of R. flavefaciens contributes to an extended CBMome that supports efficient PCW degradation in the absence of CBMs that specifically target crystalline cellulose. PMID:27298375

  8. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-peptidoglycan complexes increase monocyte/macrophage activation and enhance the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Mauricio C; Todone, Marcos; Ganem, María B; Wang, Qian; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRP) are pattern recognition receptors that can bind or hydrolyse peptidoglycan (PGN). Four human PGRP have been described: PGRP-S, PGRP-L, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. Mammalian PGRP-S has been implicated in intracellular destruction of bacteria by polymorphonuclear cells, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ have been found in keratinocytes and epithelial cells, and PGRP-L is a serum protein that hydrolyses PGN. We have expressed recombinant human PGRP and observed that PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα exist as monomer and disulphide dimer proteins. The PGRP dimers maintain their biological functions. We detected the PGRP-S dimer in human serum and polymorphonuclear cells, from where it is secreted after degranulation; these cells being a possible source of serum PGRP-S. Recombinant PGRP do not act as bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents in the assayed conditions; however, PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα cause slight damage in the bacterial membrane. Monocytes/macrophages increase Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis in the presence of PGRP-S, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. All PGRP bind to monocyte/macrophage membranes and are endocytosed by them. In addition, all PGRP protect cells from PGN-induced apoptosis. PGRP increase THP-1 cell proliferation and enhance activation by PGN. PGRP-S-PGN complexes increase the membrane expression of CD14, CD80 and CD86, and enhance secretion of interleukin-8, interleukin-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α, but reduce interleukin-10, clearly inducing an inflammatory profile. PMID:25752767

  9. Structural characterization of eRF1 mutants indicate a complex mechanism of stop codon recognition.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Shubhadra; Li, Yan; Wong, Leo E; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Eukarya translation termination requires the stop codon recognizing protein eRF1. In contrast to the multiple proteins required for translation termination in Bacteria, eRF1 retains the ability to recognize all three of the stop codons. The details of the mechanism that eRF1 uses to recognize stop codons has remained elusive. This study describes the structural effects of mutations in the eRF1 N-domain that have previously been shown to alter stop codon recognition specificity. Here, we propose a model of eRF1 binding to the pre-translation termination ribosomal complex that is based in part on our solution NMR structures of the wild-type and mutant eRF1 N-domains. Since structural perturbations induced by these mutations were spread throughout the protein structure, residual dipolar coupling (RDC) data were recorded to establish the long-range effects of the specific mutations, E55Q, Y125F, Q(122)FM(Y)F(126). RDCs were recorded on (15)N-labeled eRF1 N-domain weakly aligned in either 5% w/v n-octyl-penta (ethylene glycol)/octanol (C8E5) or the filamentous phage Pf1. These data indicate that the mutations alter the conformation and dynamics of the GTS loop that is distant from the mutation sites. We propose that the GTS loop forms a switch that is key for the multiple codon recognition capability of eRF1. PMID:26725946

  10. Structural characterization of eRF1 mutants indicate a complex mechanism of stop codon recognition

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Shubhadra; Li, Yan; Wong, Leo E; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Eukarya translation termination requires the stop codon recognizing protein eRF1. In contrast to the multiple proteins required for translation termination in Bacteria, eRF1 retains the ability to recognize all three of the stop codons. The details of the mechanism that eRF1 uses to recognize stop codons has remained elusive. This study describes the structural effects of mutations in the eRF1 N-domain that have previously been shown to alter stop codon recognition specificity. Here, we propose a model of eRF1 binding to the pre-translation termination ribosomal complex that is based in part on our solution NMR structures of the wild-type and mutant eRF1 N-domains. Since structural perturbations induced by these mutations were spread throughout the protein structure, residual dipolar coupling (RDC) data were recorded to establish the long-range effects of the specific mutations, E55Q, Y125F, Q122FM(Y)F126. RDCs were recorded on 15N-labeled eRF1 N-domain weakly aligned in either 5% w/v n-octyl-penta (ethylene glycol)/octanol (C8E5) or the filamentous phage Pf1. These data indicate that the mutations alter the conformation and dynamics of the GTS loop that is distant from the mutation sites. We propose that the GTS loop forms a switch that is key for the multiple codon recognition capability of eRF1. PMID:26725946

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the heterodimeric crotoxin complex and the isolated subunits crotapotin and phospholipase A{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, K. F.; Murakami, M. T.; Toyama, M. H.; Marangoni, S.; Forrer, V. P.; Brandão Neto, J. R.; Polikarpov, I.; Arni, R. K.

    2007-04-01

    Crotoxin, a potent neurotoxin from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, exists as a heterodimer formed between a phospholipase A{sub 2} and a catalytically inactive acidic phospholipase A{sub 2} analogue (crotapotin). Large single crystals of the crotoxin complex and of the isolated subunits have been obtained. Crotoxin, a potent neurotoxin from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, exists as a heterodimer formed between a phospholipase A{sub 2} and a catalytically inactive acidic phospholipase A{sub 2} analogue (crotapotin). Large single crystals of the crotoxin complex and of the isolated subunits have been obtained. The crotoxin complex crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.2, b = 68.7, c = 84.2 Å, and diffracted to 1.75 Å resolution. The crystal of the phospholipase A{sub 2} domain belongs to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1}22 (or its enantiomorph P6{sub 5}22), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 38.7, c = 286.7 Å, and diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution. The crotapotin crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution; however, the highly diffuse diffraction pattern did not permit unambiguous assignment of the unit-cell parameters.

  12. Set3 contributes to heterochromatin integrity by promoting transcription of subunits of Clr4-Rik1-Cul4 histone methyltransferase complex in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao; Zhou, Huan; Deng, Xiaolong; Wang, Wenchao; Lu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Heterochromatin formation in fission yeast depends on RNAi machinery and histone-modifying enzymes. One of the key histone-modifying complexes is Clr4-Rik1-Cul4 methyltransferase complex (CLRC), which mediates histone H3K9 methylation, a hallmark for heterochromatin. CLRC is composed of the Clr4 histone methyltransferase, Rik1, Raf1, Raf2 and Pcu4. However, transcriptional regulation of the CLRC subunits is not well understood. In this study, we identified Set3, a core subunit of the Set3/Hos2 histone deacetylase complex (Set3C), as a contributor to the integrity and silencing of heterochromatin at centromeres, telomeres and silent mating-type locus. This novel role of Set3 relies on its PHD finger, but is independent of deacetylase activity or structural integrity of Set3C. Set3 is not located to the centromeric region. Instead, Set3 is targeted to the promoters of clr4+ and rik1+, probably through its PHD finger. Set3 promotes transcription of clr4+ and rik1+. Consistently, the protein levels of Clr4 and Rik1 were reduced in the set3Δ mutant. The heterochromatin silencing defect in the set3Δ mutant could be rescued by overexpressing of clr4+ or rik1+. Our study suggests transcriptional activation of essential heterochromatin factors underlies the tight regulation of heterochromatin integrity. PMID:27538348

  13. The Chlamydomonas Dhc1 gene encodes a dynein heavy chain subunit required for assembly of the I1 inner arm complex.

    PubMed Central

    Myster, S H; Knott, J A; O'Toole, E; Porter, M E

    1997-01-01

    Multiple members of the dynein heavy chain (Dhc) gene family have been recovered in several organisms, but the relationships between these sequences and the Dhc isoforms that they encode are largely unknown. To identify Dhc loci and determine the specific functions of the individual Dhc isoforms, we have screened a collection of motility mutants generated by insertional mutagenesis in Chlamydomonas. In this report, we characterize one strain, pf9-3, in which the insertion event was accompanied by a deletion of approximately 13 kb of genomic DNA within the transcription unit of the Dhc1 gene. Northern blot analysis confirms that pf9-3 is a null mutation. Biochemical and structural studies of isolated axonemes demonstrate that the pf9-3 mutant fails to assemble the I1 inner arm complex, a two-headed dynein isoform composed of two Dhcs (1 alpha and 1 beta) and three intermediate chains. To determine if the Dhc1 gene product corresponds to one of the Dhcs of the I1 complex, antibodies were generated against a Dhc1-specific peptide sequence. Immunoblot analysis reveals that the Dhc1 gene encodes the 1 alpha Dhc subunit. These studies thus, identify the first inner arm Dhc locus to be described in any organism and further demonstrate that the 1 alpha Dhc subunit plays an essential role in the assembly of the I1 inner arm complex. Images PMID:9247642

  14. Set3 contributes to heterochromatin integrity by promoting transcription of subunits of Clr4-Rik1-Cul4 histone methyltransferase complex in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Zhou, Huan; Deng, Xiaolong; Wang, Wenchao; Lu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Heterochromatin formation in fission yeast depends on RNAi machinery and histone-modifying enzymes. One of the key histone-modifying complexes is Clr4-Rik1-Cul4 methyltransferase complex (CLRC), which mediates histone H3K9 methylation, a hallmark for heterochromatin. CLRC is composed of the Clr4 histone methyltransferase, Rik1, Raf1, Raf2 and Pcu4. However, transcriptional regulation of the CLRC subunits is not well understood. In this study, we identified Set3, a core subunit of the Set3/Hos2 histone deacetylase complex (Set3C), as a contributor to the integrity and silencing of heterochromatin at centromeres, telomeres and silent mating-type locus. This novel role of Set3 relies on its PHD finger, but is independent of deacetylase activity or structural integrity of Set3C. Set3 is not located to the centromeric region. Instead, Set3 is targeted to the promoters of clr4(+) and rik1(+), probably through its PHD finger. Set3 promotes transcription of clr4(+) and rik1(+). Consistently, the protein levels of Clr4 and Rik1 were reduced in the set3Δ mutant. The heterochromatin silencing defect in the set3Δ mutant could be rescued by overexpressing of clr4(+) or rik1(+). Our study suggests transcriptional activation of essential heterochromatin factors underlies the tight regulation of heterochromatin integrity. PMID:27538348

  15. A recognition-before-labeling strategy for sensitive detection of lung cancer cells with a quantum dot-aptamer complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunlei; Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Jing; Ji, Haining; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin

    2015-09-01

    A highly specific recognition-before-labeling strategy has been developed for sensitive detection of non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells, by using fluorescent QDs as signal units and DNA aptamers as recognition elements. A QD-aptamer system used for cell imaging and bioanalysis mostly relies on the recognition-after-labeling strategy in which aptamers were firstly labeled with QDs and then the QD-aptamer conjugates as a whole were utilized for specific recognition. Here in our strategy, aptamers were used firstly to recognize target cells, and then fluorescent QDs were sequentially added to bind the aptamers and light the target cells. The proposed recognition-before-labeling strategy didn't require the complex process of QD functionalization, and avoided the possible impact on the aptamer configuration from steric hindrance. Meanwhile, QDs, with strong fluorescence and good photostability, also give this method a high signal-to-background ratio (S/B). The recognition-before-labeling strategy is simple and sensitive, suggesting a new method for in vitro diagnostic assays of cancer cells. PMID:26200911

  16. Disease-Associated Mutations in the HSPD1 Gene Encoding the Large Subunit of the Mitochondrial HSP60/HSP10 Chaperonin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bross, Peter; Fernandez-Guerra, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) forms together with heat shock protein 10 (HSP10) double-barrel chaperonin complexes that are essential for folding to the native state of proteins in the mitochondrial matrix space. Two extremely rare monogenic disorders have been described that are caused by missense mutations in the HSPD1 gene that encodes the HSP60 subunit of the HSP60/HSP10 chaperonin complex. Investigations of the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders have revealed that different degrees of reduced HSP60 function produce distinct neurological phenotypes. While mutations with deleterious or strong dominant negative effects are not compatible with life, HSPD1 gene variations found in the human population impair HSP60 function and depending on the mechanism and degree of HSP60 dys- and mal-function cause different phenotypes. We here summarize the knowledge on the effects of disturbances of the function of the HSP60/HSP10 chaperonin complex by disease-associated mutations.

  17. Revealing Ligand Binding Sites and Quantifying Subunit Variants of Noncovalent Protein Complexes in a Single Native Top-Down FTICR MS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huilin; Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Van Orden, Steve L.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-12-01

    "Native" mass spectrometry (MS) has been proven to be increasingly useful for structural biology studies of macromolecular assemblies. Using horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (hADH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH) as examples, we demonstrate that rich information can be obtained in a single native top-down MS experiment using Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Beyond measuring the molecular weights of the protein complexes, isotopic mass resolution was achieved for yeast ADH tetramer (147 kDa) with an average resolving power of 412,700 at m/z 5466 in absorption mode, and the mass reflects that each subunit binds to two zinc atoms. The N-terminal 89 amino acid residues were sequenced in a top-down electron capture dissociation (ECD) experiment, along with the identifications of the zinc binding site at Cys46 and a point mutation (V58T). With the combination of various activation/dissociation techniques, including ECD, in-source dissociation (ISD), collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), 40% of the yADH sequence was derived directly from the native tetramer complex. For hADH, native top-down ECD-MS shows that both E and S subunits are present in the hADH sample, with a relative ratio of 4:1. Native top-down ISD of the hADH dimer shows that each subunit (E and S chains) binds not only to two zinc atoms, but also the NAD/NADH ligand, with a higher NAD/NADH binding preference for the S chain relative to the E chain. In total, 32% sequence coverage was achieved for both E and S chains.

  18. Revealing Ligand Binding Sites and Quantifying Subunit Variants of Non-Covalent Protein Complexes in a Single Native Top-Down FTICR MS Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huilin; Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Van Orden, Steve L.; Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    “Native” mass spectrometry (MS) has been proven increasingly useful for structural biology studies of macromolecular assemblies. Using horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (hADH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH) as examples, we demonstrate that rich information can be obtained in a single native top-down MS experiment using Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Beyond measuring the molecular weights of the protein complexes, isotopic mass resolution was achieved for yeast ADH tetramer (147 kDa) with an average resolving power of 412,700 at m/z 5466 in absorption mode and the mass reflects that each subunit binds to two zinc atoms. The N-terminal 89 amino acid residues were sequenced in a top-down electron capture dissociation (ECD) experiment, along with the identifications of the zinc binding site at Cys46 and a point mutation (V58T). With the combination of various activation/dissociation techniques, including ECD, in-source dissociation (ISD), collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), 40% of the yADH sequence was derived directly from the native tetramer complex. For hADH, native top-down ECD-MS shows that both E and S subunits are present in the hADH sample, with a relative ratio of 4:1. Native top-down ISD MS hADH dimer shows that each subunit (E and S chain) binds not only to two zinc atoms, but also the NAD+/NADH ligand, with a higher NAD+/NADH binding preference for the S chain relative to the E chain. In total, 32% sequence coverage was achieved for both E and S chains. PMID:24912433

  19. Chlorophyll antenna proteins of photosystem I: topology, synthesis, and regulation of the 20-kDa subunit of Chlamydomonas light-harvesting complex of photosystem I

    SciTech Connect

    Herrin, D.L.; Plumley, F.G.; Ikeuchi, M.; Michaels, A.S.; Schmidt, G.W.

    1987-05-01

    The light-harvesting complex of photosystem I (LHCI) was isolated from wild-type cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; the Chl a/b-protein complex contains four major polypeptides of approximately 27, 26, 24, and 20 kDa (polypeptides 14, 15, 17.2, and 22, respectively, in the nomenclature for Chlamydomonas thylakoid proteins). Antiserum against the 20-kDa subunit of LHCI was prepared and used to determine the membrane topology, subcellular site of synthesis, and cell-cycle regulation of this polypeptide. The results indicate that the 20-kDa subunit as well as the other major LHCI polypeptides are integral membrane proteins. Moreover, protease digestion experiments reveal that the 20-kDa polypeptide is completely protected by the membrane bilayer but the 27- and 26-kDa LHCI polypeptides are exposed at the membrane surface. In vivo synthesis of the 20-kDa polypeptide is sensitive to cycloheximide but not to chloramphenicol; the form of the polypeptide recovered from in vitro translations of polyadenylated RNA is approximately 24 kDa, 4 kDa larger than the mature polypeptide. It is concluded that this LHCI polypeptide is nuclear encoded and synthesized in the cytoplasm as a higher molecular weight precursor. Synthesis of the 20-kDa polypeptide is restricted to the light period in light-dark synchronized cells. Translatable mRNA for this polypeptide accumulates during the light but levels are dramatically reduced during the dark period. Thus, synthesis of the 20-kDa subunit of LHCI appears to be transcriptionally regulated during the cell cycle.

  20. Chlorophyll antenna proteins of photosystem I: topology, synthesis, and regulation of the 20-kDa subunit of Chlamydomonas light-harvesting complex of photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Herrin, D L; Plumley, F G; Ikeuchi, M; Michaels, A S; Schmidt, G W

    1987-05-01

    The light-harvesting complex of photosystem I (LHCI) was isolated from wild-type cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; the Chl a/b-protein complex contains four major polypeptides of approximately 27, 26, 24, and 20 kDa (polypeptides 14, 15, 17.2, and 22, respectively, in the nomenclature for Chlamydomonas thylakoid proteins). Antiserum against the 20-kDa subunit of LHCI was prepared and used to determine the membrane topology, subcellular site of synthesis, and cell-cycle regulation of this polypeptide. The results indicate that the 20-kDa subunit as well as the other major LHCI polypeptides are integral membrane proteins. Moreover, protease digestion experiments reveal that the 20-kDa polypeptide is completely protected by the membrane bilayer but the 27- and 26-kDa LHCI polypeptides are exposed at the membrane surface. In vivo synthesis of the 20-kDa polypeptide is sensitive to cycloheximide but not to chloramphenicol; the form of the polypeptide recovered from in vitro translations of polyadenylated RNA is approximately 24 kDa, 4 kDa larger than the mature polypeptide. It is concluded that this LHCI polypeptide is nuclear encoded and synthesized in the cytoplasm as a higher molecular weight precursor. Synthesis of the 20-kDa polypeptide is restricted to the light period in light-dark synchronized cells. Translatable mRNA for this polypeptide accumulates during the light but levels are dramatically reduced during the dark period. Thus, synthesis of the 20-kDa subunit of LHCI appears to be transcriptionally regulated during the cell cycle. PMID:3555343

  1. Plasma membrane-associated SCAR complex subunits promote cortical F-actin accumulation and normal growth characteristics in Arabidopsis roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ARP2/3 complex, a highly conserved nucleator of F-actin polymerization, and its activator, the SCAR complex, have been shown to play important roles in leaf epidermal cell morphogenesis in Arabidopsis. However, the intracellular site(s) and function(s) of SCAR complex and ARP2/3 complex-depende...

  2. Structural basis of the interaction between RalA and Sec5, a subunit of the sec6/8 complex.

    PubMed

    Fukai, Shuya; Matern, Hugo T; Jagath, Junutula R; Scheller, Richard H; Brunger, Axel T

    2003-07-01

    The sec6/8 complex or exocyst is an octameric protein complex that functions during cell polarization by regulating the site of exocytic vesicle docking to the plasma membrane, in concert with small GTP-binding proteins. The Sec5 subunit of the mammalian sec6/8 complex binds Ral in a GTP-dependent manner. Here we report the crystal structure of the complex between the Ral-binding domain of Sec5 and RalA bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog (GppNHp) at 2.1 A resolution, providing the first structural insights into the mechanism and specificity of sec6/8 regulation. The Sec5 Ral-binding domain folds into an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, which represents a novel fold for an effector of a GTP-binding protein. The interface between the two proteins involves a continuous antiparallel beta-sheet, similar to that found in other effector/G-protein complexes, such as Ras and Rap1A. Specific interactions unique to the RalA.Sec5 complex include Sec5 Thr11 and Arg27, and RalA Glu38, which we show are required for complex formation by isothermal titration calorimetry. Comparison of the structures of GppNHp- and GDP-bound RalA suggests a nucleotide-dependent switch mechanism for Sec5 binding. PMID:12839989

  3. Histidine 407, a phantom residue in the E1 subunit of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, activates reductive acetylation of lipoamide on the E2 subunit. An explanation for conservation of active sites between the E1 subunit and transketolase.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Brunskill, Andrew; Sheibani, Farzad; Wei, Wen; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2002-12-31

    Least squares alignment of the E. coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex E1 subunit and yeast transketolase crystal structures indicates a general structural similarity between the two enzymes and provides a plausible location for a short-loop region in the E1 structure that was unobserved due to disorder. The residue H407, located in this region, is shown to be able to penetrate the active site. Suggested by this comparison, the H407A E1 variant was created, and H407 was shown to participate in the reductive acetylation of both an independently expressed lipoyl domain and the intact 1-lipoyl E2 subunit. While the H407A substitution only modestly affected the reaction through pyruvate decarboxylation (ca. 14% activity compared to parental E1), the overall complex has a much impaired activity, at most 0.15% compared to parental E1. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements show that the binding of the lipoyl domain to the H407A E1 variant is much weaker than that to parental E1. At the same time, mass spectrometric measurements clearly demonstrate much impaired reductive acetylation of the independently expressed lipoyl domain and of the intact 1-lipoyl E2 by the H407A variant compared to the parental E1. A proposal is presented to explain the remarkable conservation of the three-dimensional structure at the active centers of the E. coli E1 subunit and transketolase on the basis of the parallels in the ligation-type reactions carried out and the need to protonate a very weak acid, a dithiolane sulfur atom in the former, and a carbonyl oxygen atom in the latter. PMID:12501174

  4. Mutations in GAS8, a Gene Encoding a Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex Subunit, Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Axonemal Disorganization.

    PubMed

    Jeanson, Ludovic; Thomas, Lucie; Copin, Bruno; Coste, André; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Montantin, Guy; Collot, Nathalie; Tissier, Sylvie; Papon, Jean-François; Clement, Annick; Louis, Bruno; Escudier, Estelle; Amselem, Serge; Legendre, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by chronic respiratory infections of the upper and lower airways, hypofertility, and, in approximately half of the cases, situs inversus. This complex phenotype results from defects in motile cilia and sperm flagella. Among the numerous genes involved in PCD, very few-including CCDC39 and CCDC40-carry mutations that lead to a disorganization of ciliary axonemes with microtubule misalignment. Focusing on this particular phenotype, we identified bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in GAS8, a gene that encodes a subunit of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) orthologous to DRC4 of the flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Unlike the majority of PCD patients, individuals with GAS8 mutations have motile cilia, which, as documented by high-speed videomicroscopy, display a subtle beating pattern defect characterized by slightly reduced bending amplitude. Immunofluorescence studies performed on patients' respiratory cilia revealed that GAS8 is not required for the proper expression of CCDC39 and CCDC40. Rather, mutations in GAS8 affect the subcellular localization of another N-DRC subunit called DRC3. Overall, this study, which identifies GAS8 as a PCD gene, unveils the key importance of the corresponding protein in N-DRC integrity and in the proper alignment of axonemal microtubules in humans. PMID:27120127

  5. Ribosome recycling defects modify the balance between the synthesis and assembly of specific subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in yeast mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Bourand-Plantefol, Alexa; Herbert, Christopher J.; Dujardin, Geneviève; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have their own translation machinery that produces key subunits of the OXPHOS complexes. This machinery relies on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded factors of bacterial origin that are well conserved between humans and yeast. In humans, mutations in these factors can cause diseases; in yeast, mutations abolishing mitochondrial translation destabilize the mitochondrial DNA. We show that when the mitochondrial genome contains no introns, the loss of the yeast factors Mif3 and Rrf1 involved in ribosome recycling neither blocks translation nor destabilizes mitochondrial DNA. Rather, the absence of these factors increases the synthesis of the mitochondrially-encoded subunits Cox1, Cytb and Atp9, while strongly impairing the assembly of OXPHOS complexes IV and V. We further show that in the absence of Rrf1, the COX1 specific translation activator Mss51 accumulates in low molecular weight forms, thought to be the source of the translationally-active form, explaining the increased synthesis of Cox1. We propose that Rrf1 takes part in the coordination between translation and OXPHOS assembly in yeast mitochondria. These interactions between general and specific translation factors might reveal an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial translation machinery to the set of integral membrane proteins that are translated within mitochondria. PMID:27257059

  6. Ribosome recycling defects modify the balance between the synthesis and assembly of specific subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Bourand-Plantefol, Alexa; Herbert, Christopher J; Dujardin, Geneviève; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria have their own translation machinery that produces key subunits of the OXPHOS complexes. This machinery relies on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded factors of bacterial origin that are well conserved between humans and yeast. In humans, mutations in these factors can cause diseases; in yeast, mutations abolishing mitochondrial translation destabilize the mitochondrial DNA. We show that when the mitochondrial genome contains no introns, the loss of the yeast factors Mif3 and Rrf1 involved in ribosome recycling neither blocks translation nor destabilizes mitochondrial DNA. Rather, the absence of these factors increases the synthesis of the mitochondrially-encoded subunits Cox1, Cytb and Atp9, while strongly impairing the assembly of OXPHOS complexes IV and V. We further show that in the absence of Rrf1, the COX1 specific translation activator Mss51 accumulates in low molecular weight forms, thought to be the source of the translationally-active form, explaining the increased synthesis of Cox1. We propose that Rrf1 takes part in the coordination between translation and OXPHOS assembly in yeast mitochondria. These interactions between general and specific translation factors might reveal an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial translation machinery to the set of integral membrane proteins that are translated within mitochondria. PMID:27257059

  7. Chaperone Hsp27, a Novel Subunit of AUF1 Protein Complexes, Functions in AU-Rich Element-Mediated mRNA Decay▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sinsimer, Kristina S.; Gratacós, Frances M.; Knapinska, Anna M.; Lu, Jiebo; Krause, Christopher D.; Wierzbowski, Alexandria V.; Maher, Lauren R.; Scrudato, Shannon; Rivera, Yonaira M.; Gupta, Swati; Turrin, Danielle K.; De La Cruz, Mary Pauline; Pestka, Sidney; Brewer, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Controlled, transient cytokine production by monocytes depends heavily upon rapid mRNA degradation, conferred by 3′ untranslated region-localized AU-rich elements (AREs) that associate with RNA-binding proteins. The ARE-binding protein AUF1 forms a complex with cap-dependent translation initiation factors and heat shock proteins to attract the mRNA degradation machinery. We refer to this protein assembly as the AUF1- and signal transduction-regulated complex, ASTRC. Rapid degradation of ARE-bearing mRNAs (ARE-mRNAs) requires ubiquitination of AUF1 and its destruction by proteasomes. Activation of monocytes by adhesion to capillary endothelium at sites of tissue damage and subsequent proinflammatory cytokine induction are prominent features of inflammation, and ARE-mRNA stabilization plays a critical role in the induction process. Here, we demonstrate activation-induced subunit rearrangements within ASTRC and identify chaperone Hsp27 as a novel subunit that is itself an ARE-binding protein essential for rapid ARE-mRNA degradation. As Hsp27 has well-characterized roles in protein ubiquitination as well as in adhesion-induced cytoskeletal remodeling and cell motility, its association with ASTRC may provide a sensing mechanism to couple proinflammatory cytokine induction with monocyte adhesion and motility. PMID:18573886

  8. The role of the Chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1, subunit 8 (CCT8) in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haibing; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Wei, Yingze; Zong, Guijuan; Yang, Shuyun; Chen, Xudong; Zheng, Guihua; Zhu, Xinghua; Guo, Yan; Li, Chunsun; Chen, Yali; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2016-06-01

    The chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) is known to mediate folding of proteins. CCT, subunit 8 (CCT8), is the θ subunit of CCT complex chaperonin. CCT8 has been reported to be dysregulated in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the role of CCT8 in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Clinically, the expression levels of CCT8 in reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) and B-cell NHL specimens were investigated using immunohistochemical analysis. We found that CCT8 was highly expressed in proliferating germinal center cells compared with the quiescent cells of the follicular mantle zone. Furthermore, CCT8 was highly expressed in progressive lymphomas than in indolent lymphomas. Kaplan-Meier curve showed that high expression of CCT8 was significantly associated with shorter overall survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Moreover, we demonstrated that CCT8 could promote the proliferation of B-cell NHL cells. In addition, we found that CCT8 could accelerate the G1/S transition in B-cell NHL. Finally, we demonstrated that overexpression of CCT8 could reverse cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype. Our study may shed new insights into the important role of CCT8 in cancer development. PMID:27101149

  9. Rho GTPase Recognition by C3 Exoenzyme Based on C3-RhoA Complex Structure.

    PubMed

    Toda, Akiyuki; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Yoshida, Toru; Tsumori, Yayoi; Tsuge, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    C3 exoenzyme is a mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) that catalyzes transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from NAD(+) to Rho GTPases. C3 has long been used to study the diverse regulatory functions of Rho GTPases. How C3 recognizes its substrate and how ADP-ribosylation proceeds are still poorly understood. Crystal structures of C3-RhoA complex reveal that C3 recognizes RhoA via the switch I, switch II, and interswitch regions. In C3-RhoA(GTP) and C3-RhoA(GDP), switch I and II adopt the GDP and GTP conformations, respectively, which explains why C3 can ADP-ribosylate both nucleotide forms. Based on structural information, we successfully changed Cdc42 to an active substrate with combined mutations in the C3-Rho GTPase interface. Moreover, the structure reflects the close relationship among Gln-183 in the QXE motif (C3), a modified Asn-41 residue (RhoA) and NC1 of NAD(H), which suggests that C3 is the prototype ART. These structures show directly for the first time that the ARTT loop is the key to target protein recognition, and they also serve to bridge the gaps among independent studies of Rho GTPases and C3. PMID:26067270

  10. Expression-invariant face recognition using depth and intensity dual-tree complex wavelet transform features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahi, Fazael; Raie, Abolghasem A.; Hajati, Farshid

    2015-03-01

    A new multimodal expression-invariant face recognition method is proposed by extracting features of rigid and semirigid regions of the face which are less affected by facial expressions. Dual-tree complex wavelet transform is applied in one decomposition level to extract the desired feature from range and intensity images by transforming the regions into eight subimages, consisting of six band-pass subimages to represent face details and two low-pass subimages to represent face approximates. The support vector machine has been used to classify both feature fusion and score fusion modes. To test the algorithm, BU-3DFE and FRGC v2.0 datasets have been selected. The BU-3DFE dataset was tested by low intensity versus high intensity and high intensity versus low intensity strategies using all expressions in both training and testing stages in different levels. Findings include the best rank-1 identification rate of 99.8% and verification rate of 100% at a 0.1% false acceptance rate. The FRGC v2.0 was tested by the neutral versus non-neutral strategy, which applies images without expression in training and with expression in the testing stage, thereby achieving the best rank-1 identification rate of 93.5% and verification rate of 97.4% at a 0.1% false acceptance rate.

  11. The role of protein "Stability patches" in molecular recognition: A case study of the human growth hormone-receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Osman, Roman; Mezei, Mihaly; Engel, Stanislav

    2016-04-15

    Dynamic characteristics of protein surfaces are among the factors determining their functional properties, including their potential participation in protein-protein interactions. The presence of clusters of static residues-"stability patches" (SPs)-is a characteristic of protein surfaces involved in intermolecular recognition. The mechanism, by with SPs facilitate molecular recognition, however, remains unclear. Analyzing the surface dynamic properties of the growth hormone and of its high-affinity variant we demonstrated that reshaping of the SPs landscape may be among the factors accountable for the improved affinity of this variant to the receptor. We hypothesized that SPs facilitate molecular recognition by moderating the conformational entropy of the unbound state, diminishing enthalpy-entropy compensation upon binding, and by augmenting the favorable entropy of desolvation. SPs mapping emerges as a valuable tool for investigating the structural basis of the stability of protein complexes and for rationalizing experimental approaches, such as affinity maturation, aimed at improving it. PMID:26691434

  12. Phosphorylation of threonine 156 of the mu2 subunit of the AP2 complex is essential for endocytosis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, O; Andrews, P D; Swedlow, J R; Smythe, E

    2001-06-01

    The clathrin-coated pit is the major port of entry for many receptors and pathogens and is the paradigm for membrane-based sorting events in higher cells [1]. Recently, it has been possible to reconstitute in vitro the events leading to assembly, invagination, and budding off of clathrin-coated vesicles, allowing dissection of the machinery required for sequestration of receptors into these structures [2-6]. The AP2 adaptor complex is a key element of this machinery linking receptors to the coat lattice, and it has previously been reported that AP2 can be phosphorylated both in vitro and in vivo [7-10]. However, the physiological significance of this has never been established. Here, we show that phosphorylation of a single threonine residue (Thr156) of the mu2 subunit of the AP2 complex is essential for efficient endocytosis of transferrin both in an in vitro coated-pit budding assay and in living cells. PMID:11516654

  13. The Mediator Complex MED15 Subunit Mediates Activation of Downstream Lipid-Related Genes by the WRINKLED1 Transcription Factor1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jung

    2016-01-01

    The Mediator complex is known to be a master coordinator of transcription by RNA polymerase II, and this complex is recruited by transcription factors (TFs) to target promoters for gene activation or repression. The plant-specific TF WRINKLED1 (WRI1) activates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. However, no Mediator subunit has yet been identified that mediates WRI1 transcriptional activity. Promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion experiments showed that MEDIATOR15 (MED15) is expressed in the same cells in the embryo as WRI1. We found that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MED15 subunit of the Mediator complex interacts directly with WRI1 in the nucleus. Overexpression of MED15 or WRI1 increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes involved in glycolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis; these genes were down-regulated in wild-type or WRI1-overexpressing plants by silencing of MED15. However, overexpression of MED15 in the wri1 mutant also increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes, suggesting that MED15 also may act with other TFs to activate downstream lipid-related genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association of MED15 with six WRI1 target gene promoters. Additionally, silencing of MED15 resulted in reduced fatty acid content in seedlings and mature seeds, whereas MED15 overexpression increased fatty acid content in both developmental stages. Similar results were found in wri1 mutant and WRI1 overexpression lines. Together, our results indicate that the WRI1/MED15 complex transcriptionally regulates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. PMID:27246098

  14. Role of the Cyclic AMP Response Element Binding Complex and Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Synergistic Activation of the Glycoprotein Hormone α Subunit Gene by Epidermal Growth Factor and Forskolin

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Mark S.; Ban, Makiko; Zhang, Tong; Mulvaney, Jennifer M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of these studies was to elucidate a role for epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in the transcriptional regulation of the glycoprotein hormone α subunit gene, a subunit of chorionic gonadotropin. Studies examined the effects of EGF and the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin on the expression of a transfected α subunit reporter gene in a human choriocarcinoma cell line (JEG3). At maximal doses, administration of EGF resulted in a 50% increase in a subunit reporter activity; forskolin administration induced a fivefold activation; the combined actions of EGF and forskolin resulted in synergistic activation (greater than eightfold) of the α subunit reporter. Mutagenesis studies revealed that the cyclic AMP response elements (CRE) were required and sufficient to mediate EGF-forskolin-induced synergistic activation. The combined actions of EGF and forskolin resulted in potentiated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) enzyme activity compared with EGF alone. Specific blockade of ERK activation was sufficient to block EGF-forskolin-induced synergistic activation of the α subunit reporter. Pretreatment of JEG3 cells with a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor did not influence activation of the α reporter. However, overexpression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein 1 as a dominant interfering molecule abolished the synergistic effects of EGF and forskolin on the α subunit reporter. CRE binding studies suggested that the CRE complex consisted of CRE binding protein and EGF-ERK-dependent recruitment of c-Jun–c-Fos (AP-1) to the CRE. A dominant negative form of c-Fos (A-Fos) that specifically disrupts c-Jun–c-Fos DNA binding inhibited synergistic activation of the α subunit. Thus, synergistic activation of the α subunit gene induced by EGF-forskolin requires the ERK and JNK cascades and the recruitment of AP-1 to the CRE binding complex. PMID:10779323

  15. Pivotal Role for a Tail Subunit of the RNA Polymerase II Mediator Complex CgMed2 in Azole Tolerance and Adherence in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Ferrari, Sélène; Sanglard, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal therapy failure can be associated with increased resistance to the employed antifungal agents. Candida glabrata, the second most common cause of invasive candidiasis, is intrinsically less susceptible to the azole class of antifungals and accounts for 15% of all Candida bloodstream infections. Here, we show that C. glabrata MED2 (CgMED2), which codes for a tail subunit of the RNA polymerase II Mediator complex, is required for resistance to azole antifungal drugs in C. glabrata. An inability to transcriptionally activate genes encoding a zinc finger transcriptional factor, CgPdr1, and multidrug efflux pump, CgCdr1, primarily contributes to the elevated susceptibility of the Cgmed2Δ mutant toward azole antifungals. We also report for the first time that the Cgmed2Δ mutant exhibits sensitivity to caspofungin, a constitutively activated protein kinase C-mediated cell wall integrity pathway, and elevated adherence to epithelial cells. The increased adherence of the Cgmed2Δ mutant was attributed to the elevated expression of the EPA1 and EPA7 genes. Further, our data demonstrate that CgMED2 is required for intracellular proliferation in human macrophages and modulates survival in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Lastly, we show an essential requirement for CgMed2, along with the Mediator middle subunit CgNut1 and the Mediator cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin subunit CgSrb8, for the high-level fluconazole resistance conferred by the hyperactive allele of CgPdr1. Together, our findings underscore a pivotal role for CgMed2 in basal tolerance and acquired resistance to azole antifungals. PMID:25070095

  16. Ternary complex formation of Ino2p-Ino4p transcription factors and Apl2p adaptin beta subunit in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nikawa, Jun-ichi; Yata, Masako; Motomura, Miki; Miyoshi, Nobutaka; Ueda, Tsuyoshi; Hisada, Daisuke

    2006-11-01

    Yeast Ino2p-Ino4p heterodimeric complex is well known as a transcriptional activator for the genes regulated by inositol and choline, such as the INO1 gene. Apl2p is a large subunit of the yeast adaptin complex, an adaptor complex required for the clathrin coat to bind to the membrane. We found that Ino2p, Ino4p, and Apl2p form a ternary complex. This interaction was initially observed in a yeast two-hybrid study and subsequently verified by co-immunoprecipitation. Ino2p and Ino4p bind to Apl2p in the same region of Apl2p, viz., at the middle part and the C-terminal part. Ino2p and Ino4p bind to Apl2p independently, but more strongly when both are present. Furthermore, a disruption of APL2 together with INO2 or INO4 rendered yeast cells sensitive to oxidative stress. INO2-APL2 double disruptants also showed growth inability in non-fermentable carbon sources, such as glycerol. These results indicate a genetic interaction between APL2, INO2 and INO4 and uncovere novel functions of the Ino2p-Ino4p-Apl2p complex in yeast. PMID:17090927

  17. Frequent loss of the expression of multiple subunits of the SWI/SNF complex in large cell carcinoma and pleomorphic carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Taichiro; Matsubara, Daisuke; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Tamura, Tomoko; Endo, Shunsuke; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Niki, Toshiro

    2015-11-01

    The switch/sucrose non-fermenting (SWI/SNF) complex has recently emerged as a novel tumor suppressor in various human cancers. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of multiple SWI/SNF subunits in primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 133 NSCLC, consisting of 25 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 70 adenocarcinomas (AD), 16 large cell carcinomas (LC), and 22 pleomorphic carcinomas (PL), were immunohistochemically examined for the expression of BRG1, BRM, BAF47, ARID1A, and ARID1B. The frequency at which reductions in the expression of BRG1 were observed was significantly higher in the LC-PL group (13/38, 34.2%) than in the SCC-AD group (7/95, 7.4%). Similarly, the frequency at which reductions in the expression of BRM were observed was significantly higher in the LC-PL group (17/38, 44.7%) than in the SCC-AD group (14/95, 14.7%). The loss of the expression of ARID1A, ARID1B, and BAF47 was observed only in a fraction of NSCLC cases. Furthermore, the frequency at which the concurrent loss of multiple subunits of the SWI/SNF complex was observed was significantly higher in the LC-PL group (10/38, 26.3%) than in the SCC-AD group (8/95, 8.4%). Collectively, these results indicate that the loss of the SWI/SNF complex was related to dedifferentiation in NSCLC. PMID:26345631

  18. Recognition of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class Ib Molecule H2-Q10 by the Natural Killer Cell Receptor Ly49C.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Berry, Richard; Sosnin, Natasha; Widjaja, Jacqueline M L; Deuss, Felix A; Balaji, Gautham R; LaGruta, Nicole L; Mirams, Michiko; Trapani, Joseph A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Brooks, Andrew G; Andrews, Daniel M

    2016-09-01

    Murine natural killer (NK) cells are regulated by the interaction of Ly49 receptors with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I). Although the ligands for inhibitory Ly49 were considered to be restricted to classical MHC (MHC-Ia), we have shown that the non-classical MHC molecule (MHC-Ib) H2-M3 was a ligand for the inhibitory Ly49A. Here we establish that another MHC-Ib, H2-Q10, is a bona fide ligand for the inhibitory Ly49C receptor. H2-Q10 bound to Ly49C with a marginally lower affinity (∼5 μm) than that observed between Ly49C and MHC-Ia (H-2K(b)/H-2D(d), both ∼1 μm), and this recognition could be prevented by cis interactions with H-2K in situ To understand the molecular details underpinning Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition, we determined the crystal structures of H2-Q10 and Ly49C bound H2-Q10. Unliganded H2-Q10 adopted a classical MHC-I fold and possessed a peptide-binding groove that exhibited features similar to those found in MHC-Ia, explaining the diverse peptide binding repertoire of H2-Q10. Ly49C bound to H2-Q10 underneath the peptide binding platform to a region that encompassed residues from the α1, α2, and α3 domains, as well as the associated β2-microglobulin subunit. This docking mode was conserved with that previously observed for Ly49C·H-2K(b) Indeed, structure-guided mutation of Ly49C indicated that Ly49C·H2-Q10 and Ly49C·H-2K(b) possess similar energetic footprints focused around residues located within the Ly49C β4-stand and L5 loop, which contact the underside of the peptide-binding platform floor. Our data provide a structural basis for Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition and demonstrate that MHC-Ib represent an extended family of ligands for Ly49 molecules. PMID:27385590

  19. Cochlear implantation with hearing preservation yields significant benefit for speech recognition in complex listening environments

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, René H.; Dorman, Michael F.; Skarzynski, Henryk; Lorens, Artur; Polak, Marek; Driscoll, Colin L. W.; Roland, Peter; Buchman, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the benefit of having preserved acoustic hearing in the implanted ear for speech recognition in complex listening environments. Design The current study included a within subjects, repeated-measures design including 21 English speaking and 17 Polish speaking cochlear implant recipients with preserved acoustic hearing in the implanted ear. The patients were implanted with electrodes that varied in insertion depth from 10 to 31 mm. Mean preoperative low-frequency thresholds (average of 125, 250 and 500 Hz) in the implanted ear were 39.3 and 23.4 dB HL for the English- and Polish-speaking participants, respectively. In one condition, speech perception was assessed in an 8-loudspeaker environment in which the speech signals were presented from one loudspeaker and restaurant noise was presented from all loudspeakers. In another condition, the signals were presented in a simulation of a reverberant environment with a reverberation time of 0.6 sec. The response measures included speech reception thresholds (SRTs) and percent correct sentence understanding for two test conditions: cochlear implant (CI) plus low-frequency hearing in the contralateral ear (bimodal condition) and CI plus low-frequency hearing in both ears (best aided condition). A subset of 6 English-speaking listeners were also assessed on measures of interaural time difference (ITD) thresholds for a 250-Hz signal. Results Small, but significant, improvements in performance (1.7 – 2.1 dB and 6 – 10 percentage points) were found for the best-aided condition vs. the bimodal condition. Postoperative thresholds in the implanted ear were correlated with the degree of EAS benefit for speech recognition in diffuse noise. There was no reliable relationship among measures of audiometric threshold in the implanted ear nor elevation in threshold following surgery and improvement in speech understanding in reverberation. There was a significant correlation between ITD

  20. Complete cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) delta subunit from Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Blitvich, B J; Rayms-Keller, A; Blair, C D; Beaty, B J

    2001-01-01

    The chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) assists in the ATP-dependent folding and assembly of newly translated actin and tubulin in the eukaryotic cytosol. CCT is composed of eight different subunits, each encoded by an independent gene. In this report, we used RT-PCR amplification and 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to determine the complete cDNA sequence of the CCT delta subunit from Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes. The CCT delta cDNA is 1936 nucleotides in length and encodes a putative 533 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 57,179 daltons and pI of 7.15. Hydrophobic residues comprise 39.8% of the amino acid sequence and putative motifs for ATP-binding and ATPase-activity are present. The amino acid sequence displays strong sequence similarity to Drosophila melanogaster (92%), human (85%), puffer fish (84%) and mouse (84%) counterparts. CCT delta mRNA was detected in both biosynthetically active (embryonating) and dormant (diapausing) Ae. triseriatus embryos by RT-PCR analysis. PMID:11762197

  1. Inheritance of low-frequency regulatory SNPs and a rare null mutation in exon-junction complex subunit RBM8A causes TAR

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Cornelis A; Paul, Dirk S; Schulze, Harald; Freson, Kathleen; Stephens, Jonathan C; Smethurst, Peter A; Jolley, Jennifer D; Cvejic, Ana; Kostadima, Myrto; Bertone, Paul; Breuning, Martijn H; Debili, Najet; Deloukas, Panos; Favier, Rémi; Fiedler, Janine; Hobbs, Catherine M; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matthew E; Kiddle, Graham; Krapels, Ingrid; Nurden, Paquita; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Smith, Kenneth; Stemple, Derek L; Strauss, Gabriele; Thys, Chantal; van Geet, Christel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Ouwehand, Willem H; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2012-01-01

    The exon-junction complex (EJC) performs essential RNA processing tasks1-5. Here, we describe the first human disorder, Thrombocytopenia with Absent Radii6 (TAR), caused by deficiency in one of the four EJC subunits. A compound inheritance mechanism of a rare null allele and one of two low-frequency SNPs in the regulatory regions of RBM8A, encoding the Y14 subunit of EJC, causes TAR. We found that this mechanism explained 53 of 55 cases (P<5×10−228) with the rare congenital malformation syndrome. Fifty-one of those 53 carried a previously associated7 submicroscopic deletion of 1q21.1; two carried a truncation or frameshift null mutation in RBM8A. We show that the two regulatory SNPs result in reduction of RBM8A transcription in vitro and that Y14 expression is reduced in platelets from TAR cases. Our data implicate Y14 insufficiency, and presumably EJC defect, as the cause of TAR syndrome. PMID:22366785

  2. Proteomic analysis of human norepinephrine transporter complexes reveals associations with protein phosphatase 2A anchoring subunit and 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Uhna; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Link, Andrew J.; Blakely, Randy D.; E-mail: andy.blakely@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-08-05

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) terminates noradrenergic signals by clearing released NE at synapses. NET regulation by receptors and intracellular signaling pathways is supported by a growing list of associated proteins including syntaxin1A, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit (PP2A-C), PICK1, and Hic-5. In the present study, we sought evidence for additional partnerships by mass spectrometry-based analysis of proteins co-immunoprecipitated with human NET (hNET) stably expressed in a mouse noradrenergic neuroblastoma cell line. Our initial proteomic analyses reveal multiple peptides derived from hNET, peptides arising from the mouse PP2A anchoring subunit (PP2A-Ar) and peptides derived from 14-3-3 proteins. We verified physical association of NET with PP2A-Ar via co-immunoprecipitation studies using mouse vas deferens extracts and with 14-3-3 via a fusion pull-down approach, implicating specifically the hNET NH{sub 2}-terminus for interactions. The transporter complexes described likely support mechanisms regulating transporter activity, localization, and trafficking.

  3. The Rqc2/Tae2 subunit of the ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) complex marks ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Yonashiro, Ryo; Tahara, Erich B; Bengtson, Mario H; Khokhrina, Maria; Lorenz, Holger; Chen, Kai-Chun; Kigoshi-Tansho, Yu; Savas, Jeffrey N; Yates, John R; Kay, Steve A; Craig, Elizabeth A; Mogk, Axel; Bukau, Bernd; Joazeiro, Claudio AP

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome stalling during translation can potentially be harmful, and is surveyed by a conserved quality control pathway that targets the associated mRNA and nascent polypeptide chain (NC). In this pathway, the ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) complex promotes the ubiquitylation and degradation of NCs remaining stalled in the 60S subunit. NC stalling is recognized by the Rqc2/Tae2 RQC subunit, which also stabilizes binding of the E3 ligase, Listerin/Ltn1. Additionally, Rqc2 modifies stalled NCs with a carboxy-terminal, Ala- and Thr-containing extension—the 'CAT tail'. However, the function of CAT tails and fate of CAT tail-modified ('CATylated') NCs has remained unknown. Here we show that CATylation mediates formation of detergent-insoluble NC aggregates. CATylation and aggregation of NCs could be observed either by inactivating Ltn1 or by analyzing NCs with limited ubiquitylation potential, suggesting that inefficient targeting by Ltn1 favors the Rqc2-mediated reaction. These findings uncover a translational stalling-dependent protein aggregation mechanism, and provide evidence that proteins can become specifically marked for aggregation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11794.001 PMID:26943317

  4. Compound inheritance of a low-frequency regulatory SNP and a rare null mutation in exon-junction complex subunit RBM8A causes TAR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Albers, Cornelis A; Paul, Dirk S; Schulze, Harald; Freson, Kathleen; Stephens, Jonathan C; Smethurst, Peter A; Jolley, Jennifer D; Cvejic, Ana; Kostadima, Myrto; Bertone, Paul; Breuning, Martijn H; Debili, Najet; Deloukas, Panos; Favier, Rémi; Fiedler, Janine; Hobbs, Catherine M; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matthew E; Kiddle, Graham; Krapels, Ingrid; Nurden, Paquita; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Smith, Kenneth; Stemple, Derek L; Strauss, Gabriele; Thys, Chantal; van Geet, Chris; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Ouwehand, Willem H; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2012-04-01

    The exon-junction complex (EJC) performs essential RNA processing tasks. Here, we describe the first human disorder, thrombocytopenia with absent radii (TAR), caused by deficiency in one of the four EJC subunits. Compound inheritance of a rare null allele and one of two low-frequency SNPs in the regulatory regions of RBM8A, encoding the Y14 subunit of EJC, causes TAR. We found that this inheritance mechanism explained 53 of 55 cases (P < 5 × 10(-228)) of the rare congenital malformation syndrome. Of the 53 cases with this inheritance pattern, 51 carried a submicroscopic deletion of 1q21.1 that has previously been associated with TAR, and two carried a truncation or frameshift null mutation in RBM8A. We show that the two regulatory SNPs result in diminished RBM8A transcription in vitro and that Y14 expression is reduced in platelets from individuals with TAR. Our data implicate Y14 insufficiency and, presumably, an EJC defect as the cause of TAR syndrome. PMID:22366785

  5. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins, such as APP

  6. Complex stability and dynamic subunit interchange modulates the disparate activities of the yeast moonlighting proteins Hal3 and Vhs3.

    PubMed

    Abrie, J Albert; Molero, Cristina; Ariño, Joaquín; Strauss, Erick

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hal3 and Vhs3 are moonlighting proteins, acting both as inhibitors of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase Ppz1 and as subunits (together with Cab3) of the unique heterotrimeric phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme of Hemiascomycetous yeast. Both these roles are essential: PPCDC catalyses the third step of coenzyme A biosynthesis, while Ppz1 inhibition is required for regulation of monovalent cation homeostasis. However, the mechanisms by which these proteins' disparate activities are regulated are not well understood. The PPCDC domains (PDs) of Hal3, Vhs3 and Cab3 constitute the minimum requirement for these proteins to show both PPCDC activity and, in the case of Hal3 and Vhs3, to bind to Ppz1. Using these PD proteins as a model system to study the possibility of dynamic interchange between these roles, we provide evidence that Hal3 binds Ppz1 as a monomer (1:1 stoichiometry), requiring it to de-oligomerize from its usual homo- and heterotrimeric states (the latter having PPCDC activity). This de-oligomerization is made possible by structural features that set Hal3 apart from Vhs3, increasing its ability to undergo monomer exchange. These findings suggest that oligomer interchange may be a significant factor in the functional regulation of these proteins and their various unrelated (moonlighting) functions. PMID:26514574

  7. Probing the mechanistic role of the long α-helix in subunit L of respiratory Complex I from Escherichia coli by site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Belevich, Galina; Knuuti, Juho; Verkhovsky, Michael I; Wikström, Mårten; Verkhovskaya, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminus of the NuoL subunit of Complex I includes a long amphipathic α-helix positioned parallel to the membrane, which has been considered to function as a piston in the proton pumping machinery. Here, we have introduced three types of mutations into the nuoL gene to test the piston-like function. First, NuoL was truncated at its C- and N-termini, which resulted in low production of a fragile Complex I with negligible activity. Second, we mutated three partially conserved residues of the amphipathic α-helix: Asp and Lys residues and a Pro were substituted for acidic, basic or neutral residues. All these variants exhibited almost a wild-type phenotype. Third, several substitutions and insertions were made to reduce rigidity of the amphipathic α-helix, and/or to change its geometry. Most insertions/substitutions resulted in a normal growth phenotype, albeit often with reduced stability of Complex I. In contrast, insertion of six to seven amino acids at a site of the long α-helix between NuoL and M resulted in substantial loss of proton pumping efficiency. The implications of these results for the proton pumping mechanism of Complex I are discussed. PMID:22060017

  8. Arabidopsis COG Complex Subunits COG3 and COG8 Modulate Golgi Morphology, Vesicle Trafficking Homeostasis and Are Essential for Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingxin; Li, Pengxiang; Gao, Caiji; Ding, Yu; Lan, Zhiyi; Shi, Zhixuan; Rui, Qingchen; Feng, Yihong; Liu, Yulong; Zhao, Yanxue; Wu, Chengyun; Zhang, Qian; Li, Yan; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Spatially and temporally regulated membrane trafficking events incorporate membrane and cell wall materials into the pollen tube apex and are believed to underlie the rapid pollen tube growth. In plants, the molecular mechanisms and physiological functions of intra-Golgi transport and Golgi integrity maintenance remain largely unclear. The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex has been implicated in tethering of retrograde intra-Golgi vesicles in yeast and mammalian cells. Using genetic and cytologic approaches, we demonstrate that T-DNA insertions in Arabidopsis COG complex subunits, COG3 and COG8, cause an absolute, male-specific transmission defect that can be complemented by expression of COG3 and COG8 from the LAT52 pollen promoter, respectively. No obvious abnormalities in the microgametogenesis of the two mutants are observed, but in vitro and in vivo pollen tube growth are defective. COG3 or COG8 proteins fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) label the Golgi apparatus. In pollen of both mutants, Golgi bodies exhibit altered morphology. Moreover, γ-COP and EMP12 proteins lose their tight association with the Golgi. These defects lead to the incorrect deposition of cell wall components and proteins during pollen tube growth. COG3 and COG8 interact directly with each other, and a structural model of the Arabidopsis COG complex is proposed. We believe that the COG complex helps to modulate Golgi morphology and vesicle trafficking homeostasis during pollen tube tip growth. PMID:27448097

  9. Depletion of the "gamma-type carbonic anhydrase-like" subunits of complex I affects central mitochondrial metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Steffanie; Göing, Jennifer; Lorenz, Christin; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    "Gamma-type carbonic anhydrase-like" (CAL) proteins form part of complex I in plants. Together with "gamma carbonic anhydrase" (CA) proteins they form an extra domain which is attached to the membrane arm of complex I on its matrix exposed side. In Arabidopsis two CAL and three CA proteins are present, termed CAL1, CAL2, CA1, CA2 and CA3. It has been proposed that the carbonic anhydrase domain of complex I is involved in a process mediating efficient recycling of mitochondrial CO2 for photosynthetic carbon fixation which is especially important during growth conditions causing increased photorespiration. Depletion of CAL proteins has been shown to significantly affect plant development and photomorphogenesis. To better understand CAL function in plants we here investigated effects of CAL depletion on the mitochondrial compartment. In mutant lines and cell cultures complex I amount was reduced by 90-95% but levels of complexes III and V were unchanged. At the same time, some of the CA transcripts were less abundant. Proteome analysis of CAL depleted cells revealed significant reduction of complex I subunits as well as proteins associated with photorespiration, but increased amounts of proteins participating in amino acid catabolism and stress response reactions. Developmental delay of the mutants was slightly alleviated if plants were cultivated at high CO2. Profiling of selected metabolites revealed defined changes in intermediates of the citric acid cycle and amino acid catabolism. It is concluded that CAL proteins are essential for complex I assembly and that CAL depletion specifically affects central mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26482706

  10. [Complexation between triterpene glycosides of holothurians and cholesterol is the basis of lipid-saponin carriers of subunit protein antigens].

    PubMed

    Mazeĭka, A N; Popov, A M; Kalinin, V I; Avilov, S A; Sil'chenko, A S; Kostetskiĭ, E Ia

    2008-01-01

    The ability of some triterpene glycosides of holothurians: cucumarioside A2-2 from Cucumaria japonica, cucumarioside G1 from Cucumaria fraudatrix, frondoside A from Cucumaria frondosa, and holotoxin A1 from A postichopus japonicus to form lipid-saponin supramolecular complexes was studied. The formation of supramolecular cholesterol-glycosides complexes between cholesterol and these glycosides in water medium was observed by transmission electron microscopy. These complexes were considered as nanoparticles with different structure. Complexes formed by cholesterol with cucumarioside A2-2, holotoxin A1, and frondoside A are tubular nanoparticles. In contrast, complexes between cholesterol and cucumarioside G1 have different structured. The structure of nanoparticles formed in the presence of cucumarioside A2-2, holotoxin A1, and cucumarioside G1 was dependent on the ratio of cholesterol in the lipid-saponin system. On the other hand, frondoside A did not shown this tendency. In lipid-saponin systems with a similar molar ratio cholesterol-glycoside, the ordering of the supramolecular structure decreases in the following order: cucumarioside A2-2, holotoxin A1, frondoside A. A comparative analysis of the morphology of the supramolecular complexes and the peculiarities of the molecular structure of triterpene glycosides studied, demonstrated that the structure of supramolecular complexes formed depends on the branching and length of the glycoside carbohydrate chain. On the other hand, the formation of monomeric cholesterol-glycosides complexes depends on the peculiarities of the structure of aglycone. Thus, the possibility of the formation of a new type of antigen carries on the basis of marine triterpene glycosides was proved. PMID:18954012

  11. The role for the exocyst complex subunits Exo70B2 and Exo70H1 in the plant–pathogen interaction

    PubMed Central

    Pečenková, Tamara; Hála, Michal; Kulich, Ivan; Kocourková, Daniela; Drdová, Edita; Fendrych, Matyáš; Toupalová, Hana; Žárský, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the octameric vesicle-tethering complex exocyst was found in plants and its importance for Arabidopsis morphogenesis was demonstrated. Exo70 exocyst subunits in plants, unlike in yeasts and mammals, are represented by a multigene family, comprising 23 members in Arabidopsis. For Exo70B2 and Exo70H1 paralogues, transcriptional up-regulation was confirmed on treatment with an elicitor peptide, elf18, derived from the bacterial elongation factor. Their ability to participate in the exocyst complex formation was inferred by the interaction of both the Exo70s with several other exocyst subunits using the yeast two-hybrid system. Arabidopsis plants mutated in these two genes were used to analyse their local reaction upon inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. The Pseudomonas sensitivity test revealed enhanced susceptibility for the two exo70B2 and one H1 mutant lines. After Blumeria inoculation, an increase in the proportion of abnormal papilla formation, with an unusual wide halo made of vesicle-like structures, was found in exo70B2 mutants. Intracellular localization of both Exo70 proteins was studied following a GFP fusion assay and Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of the constructs in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermis. GFP-Exo70H1 localizes in the vesicle-like structures, while GFP-Exo70B2 is localized mainly in the cytoplasm. It is concluded that both Exo70B2 and Exo70H1 are involved in the response to pathogens, with Exo70B2 having a more important role in cell wall apposition formation related to plant defence. PMID:21199889

  12. Differential Phosphorylation of a Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase CK2 by Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling and the Cdc-like Kinase Kns1*

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Casalongue, Manuel E.; Lee, Jaehoon; Diamond, Aviva; Shuldiner, Scott; Moir, Robyn D.; Willis, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of ribosome and tRNA synthesis plays a central role in determining protein synthetic capacity and is tightly controlled in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the regulation of ribosome and tRNA synthesis was recently shown to involve the Cdc-like kinase Kns1 and the GSK-3 kinase Mck1. In this study, we explored additional roles for these conserved kinases in processes connected to the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1). We conducted a synthetic chemical-genetic screen in a kns1Δ mck1Δ strain and identified many novel rapamycin-hypersensitive genes. Gene ontology analysis showed enrichment for TORC1-regulated processes (vesicle-mediated transport, autophagy, and regulation of cell size) and identified new connections to protein complexes including the protein kinase CK2. CK2 is considered to be a constitutively active kinase and in budding yeast, the holoenzyme comprises two regulatory subunits, Ckb1 and Ckb2, and two catalytic subunits, Cka1 and Cka2. We show that Ckb1 is differentially phosphorylated in vivo and that Kns1 mediates this phosphorylation when nutrients are limiting and under all tested stress conditions. We determined that the phosphorylation of Ckb1 does not detectably affect the stability of the CK2 holoenzyme but correlates with the reduced occupancy of Ckb1 on tRNA genes after rapamycin treatment. Thus, the differential occupancy of tRNA genes by CK2 is likely to modulate its activation of RNA polymerase III transcription. Our data suggest that TORC1, via its effector kinase Kns1, may regulate the association of CK2 with some of its substrates by phosphorylating Ckb1. PMID:25631054

  13. Differential phosphorylation of a regulatory subunit of protein kinase CK2 by target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling and the Cdc-like kinase Kns1.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Casalongue, Manuel E; Lee, Jaehoon; Diamond, Aviva; Shuldiner, Scott; Moir, Robyn D; Willis, Ian M

    2015-03-13

    Transcriptional regulation of ribosome and tRNA synthesis plays a central role in determining protein synthetic capacity and is tightly controlled in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the regulation of ribosome and tRNA synthesis was recently shown to involve the Cdc-like kinase Kns1 and the GSK-3 kinase Mck1. In this study, we explored additional roles for these conserved kinases in processes connected to the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1). We conducted a synthetic chemical-genetic screen in a kns1Δ mck1Δ strain and identified many novel rapamycin-hypersensitive genes. Gene ontology analysis showed enrichment for TORC1-regulated processes (vesicle-mediated transport, autophagy, and regulation of cell size) and identified new connections to protein complexes including the protein kinase CK2. CK2 is considered to be a constitutively active kinase and in budding yeast, the holoenzyme comprises two regulatory subunits, Ckb1 and Ckb2, and two catalytic subunits, Cka1 and Cka2. We show that Ckb1 is differentially phosphorylated in vivo and that Kns1 mediates this phosphorylation when nutrients are limiting and under all tested stress conditions. We determined that the phosphorylation of Ckb1 does not detectably affect the stability of the CK2 holoenzyme but correlates with the reduced occupancy of Ckb1 on tRNA genes after rapamycin treatment. Thus, the differential occupancy of tRNA genes by CK2 is likely to modulate its activation of RNA polymerase III transcription. Our data suggest that TORC1, via its effector kinase Kns1, may regulate the association of CK2 with some of its substrates by phosphorylating Ckb1. PMID:25631054

  14. Dominant Red Coat Color in Holstein Cattle Is Associated with a Missense Mutation in the Coatomer Protein Complex, Subunit Alpha (COPA) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Dorshorst, Ben; Henegar, Corneliu; Liao, Xiaoping; Sällman Almén, Markus; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Stothard, Paul; Van Doormaal, Brian; Plastow, Graham; Barsh, Gregory S.; Andersson, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Coat color in Holstein dairy cattle is primarily controlled by the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, a central determinant of black (eumelanin) vs. red/brown pheomelanin synthesis across animal species. The major MC1R alleles in Holsteins are Dominant Black (MC1RD) and Recessive Red (MC1Re). A novel form of dominant red coat color was first observed in an animal born in 1980. The mutation underlying this phenotype was named Dominant Red and is epistatic to the constitutively activated MC1RD. Here we show that a missense mutation in the coatomer protein complex, subunit alpha (COPA), a gene with previously no known role in pigmentation synthesis, is completely associated with Dominant Red in Holstein dairy cattle. The mutation results in an arginine to cysteine substitution at an amino acid residue completely conserved across eukaryotes. Despite this high level of conservation we show that both heterozygotes and homozygotes are healthy and viable. Analysis of hair pigment composition shows that the Dominant Red phenotype is similar to the MC1R Recessive Red phenotype, although less effective at reducing eumelanin synthesis. RNA-seq data similarly show that Dominant Red animals achieve predominantly pheomelanin synthesis by downregulating genes normally required for eumelanin synthesis. COPA is a component of the coat protein I seven subunit complex that is involved with retrograde and cis-Golgi intracellular coated vesicle transport of both protein and RNA cargo. This suggests that Dominant Red may be caused by aberrant MC1R protein or mRNA trafficking within the highly compartmentalized melanocyte, mimicking the effect of the Recessive Red loss of function MC1R allele. PMID:26042826

  15. Dominant Red Coat Color in Holstein Cattle Is Associated with a Missense Mutation in the Coatomer Protein Complex, Subunit Alpha (COPA) Gene.

    PubMed

    Dorshorst, Ben; Henegar, Corneliu; Liao, Xiaoping; Sällman Almén, Markus; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Stothard, Paul; Van Doormaal, Brian; Plastow, Graham; Barsh, Gregory S; Andersson, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Coat color in Holstein dairy cattle is primarily controlled by the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, a central determinant of black (eumelanin) vs. red/brown pheomelanin synthesis across animal species. The major MC1R alleles in Holsteins are Dominant Black (MC1RD) and Recessive Red (MC1Re). A novel form of dominant red coat color was first observed in an animal born in 1980. The mutation underlying this phenotype was named Dominant Red and is epistatic to the constitutively activated MC1RD. Here we show that a missense mutation in the coatomer protein complex, subunit alpha (COPA), a gene with previously no known role in pigmentation synthesis, is completely associated with Dominant Red in Holstein dairy cattle. The mutation results in an arginine to cysteine substitution at an amino acid residue completely conserved across eukaryotes. Despite this high level of conservation we show that both heterozygotes and homozygotes are healthy and viable. Analysis of hair pigment composition shows that the Dominant Red phenotype is similar to the MC1R Recessive Red phenotype, although less effective at reducing eumelanin synthesis. RNA-seq data similarly show that Dominant Red animals achieve predominantly pheomelanin synthesis by downregulating genes normally required for eumelanin synthesis. COPA is a component of the coat protein I seven subunit complex that is involved with retrograde and cis-Golgi intracellular coated vesicle transport of both protein and RNA cargo. This suggests that Dominant Red may be caused by aberrant MC1R protein or mRNA trafficking within the highly compartmentalized melanocyte, mimicking the effect of the Recessive Red loss of function MC1R allele. PMID:26042826

  16. Auditory perception vs. recognition: representation of complex communication sounds in the mouse auditory cortical fields.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Diana B; Ehret, Günter

    2004-02-01

    Details of brain areas for acoustical Gestalt perception and the recognition of species-specific vocalizations are not known. Here we show how spectral properties and the recognition of the acoustical Gestalt of wriggling calls of mouse pups based on a temporal property are represented in auditory cortical fields and an association area (dorsal field) of the pups' mothers. We stimulated either with a call model releasing maternal behaviour at a high rate (call recognition) or with two models of low behavioural significance (perception without recognition). Brain activation was quantified using c-Fos immunocytochemistry, counting Fos-positive cells in electrophysiologically mapped auditory cortical fields and the dorsal field. A frequency-specific labelling in two primary auditory fields is related to call perception but not to the discrimination of the biological significance of the call models used. Labelling related to call recognition is present in the second auditory field (AII). A left hemisphere advantage of labelling in the dorsoposterior field seems to reflect an integration of call recognition with maternal responsiveness. The dorsal field is activated only in the left hemisphere. The spatial extent of Fos-positive cells within the auditory cortex and its fields is larger in the left than in the right hemisphere. Our data show that a left hemisphere advantage in processing of a species-specific vocalization up to recognition is present in mice. The differential representation of vocalizations of high vs. low biological significance, as seen only in higher-order and not in primary fields of the auditory cortex, is discussed in the context of perceptual strategies. PMID:15009150

  17. The mate recognition protein gene mediates reproductive isolation and speciation in the Brachionus plicatilis cryptic species complex

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemically mediated prezygotic barriers to reproduction likely play an important role in speciation. In facultatively sexual monogonont rotifers from the Brachionus plicatilis cryptic species complex, mate recognition of females by males is mediated by the Mate Recognition Protein (MRP), a globular glycoprotein on the surface of females, encoded by the mmr-b gene family. In this study, we sequenced mmr-b copies from 27 isolates representing 11 phylotypes of the B. plicatilis species complex, examined the mode of evolution and selection of mmr-b, and determined the relationship between mmr-b genetic distance and mate recognition among isolates. Results Isolates of the B. plicatilis species complex have 1–4 copies of mmr-b, each composed of 2–9 nearly identical tandem repeats. The repeats within a gene copy are generally more similar than are gene copies among phylotypes, suggesting concerted evolution. Compared to housekeeping genes from the same isolates, mmr-b has accumulated only half as many synonymous differences but twice as many non-synonymous differences. Most of the amino acid differences between repeats appear to occur on the outer face of the protein, and these often result in changes in predicted patterns of phosphorylation. However, we found no evidence of positive selection driving these differences. Isolates with the most divergent copies were unable to mate with other isolates and rarely self-crossed. Overall the degree of mate recognition was significantly correlated with the genetic distance of mmr-b. Conclusions Discrimination of compatible mates in the B. plicatilis species complex is determined by proteins encoded by closely related copies of a single gene, mmr-b. While concerted evolution of the tandem repeats in mmr-b may function to maintain identity, it can also lead to the rapid spread of a mutation through all copies in the genome and thus to reproductive isolation. The mmr-b gene is evolving rapidly, and novel alleles may

  18. The "Reading the Mind in Films" Task [Child Version]: Complex Emotion and Mental State Recognition in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golan, Ofer; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Golan, Yael

    2008-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognizing others' emotions. Research has mostly focused on "basic" emotion recognition, devoid of context. This study reports the results of a new task, assessing recognition of "complex" emotions and mental states in social contexts. An ASC group (n = 23) was compared to a general…

  19. Chromatin association of the SMC5/6 complex is dependent on binding of its NSE3 subunit to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zabrady, Katerina; Adamus, Marek; Vondrova, Lucie; Liao, Chunyan; Skoupilova, Hana; Novakova, Marketa; Jurcisinova, Lenka; Alt, Aaron; Oliver, Antony W.; Lehmann, Alan R.; Palecek, Jan J.

    2016-01-01

    SMC5/6 is a highly conserved protein complex related to cohesin and condensin, which are the key components of higher-order chromatin structures. The SMC5/6 complex is essential for proliferation in yeast and is involved in replication fork stability and processing. However, the precise mechanism of action of SMC5/6 is not known. Here we present evidence that the NSE1/NSE3/NSE4 sub-complex of SMC5/6 binds to double-stranded DNA without any preference for DNA-replication/recombination intermediates. Mutations of key basic residues within the NSE1/NSE3/NSE4 DNA-binding surface reduce binding to DNA in vitro. Their introduction into the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome results in cell death or hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the hypomorphic nse3 DNA-binding mutant shows a reduced association of fission yeast SMC5/6 with chromatin. Based on our results, we propose a model for loading of the SMC5/6 complex onto the chromatin. PMID:26446992

  20. Chromatin association of the SMC5/6 complex is dependent on binding of its NSE3 subunit to DNA.

    PubMed

    Zabrady, Katerina; Adamus, Marek; Vondrova, Lucie; Liao, Chunyan; Skoupilova, Hana; Novakova, Marketa; Jurcisinova, Lenka; Alt, Aaron; Oliver, Antony W; Lehmann, Alan R; Palecek, Jan J

    2016-02-18

    SMC5/6 is a highly conserved protein complex related to cohesin and condensin, which are the key components of higher-order chromatin structures. The SMC5/6 complex is essential for proliferation in yeast and is involved in replication fork stability and processing. However, the precise mechanism of action of SMC5/6 is not known. Here we present evidence that the NSE1/NSE3/NSE4 sub-complex of SMC5/6 binds to double-stranded DNA without any preference for DNA-replication/recombination intermediates. Mutations of key basic residues within the NSE1/NSE3/NSE4 DNA-binding surface reduce binding to DNA in vitro. Their introduction into the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome results in cell death or hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the hypomorphic nse3 DNA-binding mutant shows a reduced association of fission yeast SMC5/6 with chromatin. Based on our results, we propose a model for loading of the SMC5/6 complex onto the chromatin. PMID:26446992

  1. Subunit composition and in vivo substrate-binding characteristics of Escherichia coli Tat protein complexes expressed at native levels.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Christopher A; Buchanan, Grant; Sargent, Frank; Palmer, Tracy; Berks, Ben C

    2006-12-01

    The Tat system transports folded proteins across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane and the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. Substrates are targeted to the Tat pathway by signal peptides containing a pair of consecutive arginine residues. The membrane proteins TatA, TatB and TatC are the essential components of this pathway in Escherichia coli. The complexes that these proteins form at native levels of expression have been investigated by the use of affinity tag-coding sequences fused to chromosomal tat genes. Distinct TatA and TatBC complexes were identified using size-exclusion chromatography and shown to have apparent molecular masses of approximately 700 and 500 kDa, respectively. Following in vivo expression, the Tat substrate protein SufI was found to copurify with the TatBC, but not the TatA, complex. This binding required the SufI signal peptide. Substitution of the twin-arginine residues in the SufI signal peptide by either twin lysine or twin alanine residues abolished export. However, both variant SufI proteins still copurified with the TatBC complex. These data show that the twin-arginine residues of the Tat consensus motif are not essential for binding of precursor to the TatBC complex but are required for the successful entry of the precursor into the transport cycle. The effect on substrate binding of single amino acid substitutions in TatC that affect Tat transport were studied using TatC variants Phe94Ala, Glu103Ala, Glu103Arg and Asp211Ala. Only variant Glu103Arg showed reduced copurification of SufI with TatBC. The transport defects associated with the other TatC variants do not, therefore, arise from an inability to bind substrate proteins. PMID:17212781

  2. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunit16 Is a Key Component of Basal Resistance against the Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenggang; Yao, Jin; Du, Xuezhu; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Rollins, Jeffrey A.; Mou, Zhonglin

    2015-01-01

    Although Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a devastating necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen in agriculture, the virulence mechanisms utilized by S. sclerotiorum and the host defense mechanisms against this pathogen have not been fully understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mediator complex subunit MED16 is a key component of basal resistance against S. sclerotiorum. Mutants of MED16 are markedly more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than mutants of 13 other Mediator subunits, and med16 has a much stronger effect on S. sclerotiorum-induced transcriptome changes compared with med8, a mutation not altering susceptibility to S. sclerotiorum. Interestingly, med16 is also more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than coronatine-insensitive1-1 (coi1-1), which is the most susceptible mutant reported so far. Although the jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) defense pathway marker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) cannot be induced in either med16 or coi1-1, basal transcript levels of PDF1.2 in med16 are significantly lower than in coi1-1. Furthermore, ET-induced suppression of JA-activated wound responses is compromised in med16, suggesting a role for MED16 in JA-ET cross talk. Additionally, MED16 is required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to PDF1.2 and OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS ETHYLENE/ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE FACTOR59 (ORA59), two target genes of both JA/ET-mediated and the transcription factor WRKY33-activated defense pathways. Finally, MED16 is physically associated with WRKY33 in yeast and in planta, and WRKY33-activated transcription of PDF1.2 and ORA59 as well as resistance to S. sclerotiorum depends on MED16. Taken together, these results indicate that MED16 regulates resistance to S. sclerotiorum by governing both JA/ET-mediated and WRKY33-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis. PMID:26143252

  3. Fc-based delivery system enhances immunogenicity of a tuberculosis subunit vaccine candidate consisting of the ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex.

    PubMed

    Farsiani, Hadi; Mosavat, Arman; Soleimanpour, Saman; Sadeghian, Hamid; Akbari Eydgahi, Mohammad Reza; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Sankian, Mojtaba; Aryan, Ehsan; Jamehdar, Saeid Amel; Rezaee, Seyed Abdolrahim

    2016-06-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health threat despite chemotherapy and Bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination. Therefore, a safer and more effective vaccine against TB is urgently needed. This study evaluated the immunogenicity of a recombinant fusion protein consisting of early secreted antigenic target protein 6 kDa (ESAT-6), culture filtrate protein 10 kDa (CFP-10) and the Fc-domain of mouse IgG2a as a novel subunit vaccine. The recombinant expression vectors (pPICZαA-ESAT-6:CFP-10:Fcγ2a and pPICZαA-ESAT-6:CFP-10:His) were transferred into Pichia pastoris. After SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting, the immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated in mice. When both recombinant proteins (ESAT-6:CFP-10:Fcγ2a and ESAT-6:CFP-10:His) were used for vaccination, Th1-type cellular responses were induced producing high levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. However, the Fc-tagged recombinant protein induced more effective Th1-type cellular responses with a small increase in IL-4 as compared to the BCG and ESAT-6:CFP-10:His groups. Moreover, mice primed with BCG and then supplemented with ESAT-6:CFP-10:Fcγ2a produced the highest levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 in immunized groups. The findings indicate that when Fcγ2a is fused to the ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex, as a delivery vehicle, there could be an increase in the immunogenicity of this type of subunit vaccine. Therefore, additional investigations are necessary for the development of appropriate Fc-based tuberculosis vaccines. PMID:27138226

  4. Difficulties in recognition of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on the basis of clinical and biochemical features. The role of next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ciara, E.; Rokicki, D.; Halat, P.; Karkucińska-Więckowska, A.; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, D.; Mayr, J.; Trubicka, J.; Szymańska-Dębińska, T.; Pronicki, M.; Pajdowska, M.; Dudzińska, M.; Giżewska, M.; Krajewska-Walasek, M.; Książyk, J.; Sperl, W.; Płoski, R.; Pronicka, E.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) defect is a well-known cause of mitochondrial disorders (MD) with at least six responsible genes (PDHA1, PDHB, DLAT, DLD, PDHX, PDP1). The aim of this work was to assess the diagnostic value of biochemical methods in recognition of PDHc defect in Polish patients with suspicion of MD. In the first step, Western blot of the E1α subunit was performed on 86 archive muscle bioptates with suspicion of MD. In the second step, Sanger PDHA1 sequencing was performed in 21 cases with low E1α expression. In the third step, 7 patients with negative results of PDHA1 sequencing were subjected to whole-exome sequencing (WES). This protocol revealed 4 patients with PDHA1 and one with DLD mutations. Four additional probands were diagnosed outside the protocol (WES or Sanger sequencing). The molecular characterization of PDHc defect was conducted in a total of 9 probands: 5 according to and 4 off the protocol. Additionally, two affected relatives were recognized by a family study. Altogether we identified seven different PDHA1 changes, including two novel variants [c.464T > C (p.Met155Thr) and c.856_859dupACTT (p.Arg288Leufs*10)] and one DLD variant. The lactate response to glucose load in the PDHA1 subset was compared to a subset of non PDHc-related MD. Opposite responses were observed, with an increase of 23% and decrease of 27%, respectively. The results show that determining lactate response to glucose load and muscle E1α expression may contribute to distinguishing PDHc-related and other MD, however, WES is becoming the method of choice for MD diagnostics. PMID:27144126

  5. Difficulties in recognition of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on the basis of clinical and biochemical features. The role of next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ciara, E; Rokicki, D; Halat, P; Karkucińska-Więckowska, A; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, D; Mayr, J; Trubicka, J; Szymańska-Dębińska, T; Pronicki, M; Pajdowska, M; Dudzińska, M; Giżewska, M; Krajewska-Walasek, M; Książyk, J; Sperl, W; Płoski, R; Pronicka, E

    2016-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) defect is a well-known cause of mitochondrial disorders (MD) with at least six responsible genes (PDHA1, PDHB, DLAT, DLD, PDHX, PDP1). The aim of this work was to assess the diagnostic value of biochemical methods in recognition of PDHc defect in Polish patients with suspicion of MD. In the first step, Western blot of the E1α subunit was performed on 86 archive muscle bioptates with suspicion of MD. In the second step, Sanger PDHA1 sequencing was performed in 21 cases with low E1α expression. In the third step, 7 patients with negative results of PDHA1 sequencing were subjected to whole-exome sequencing (WES). This protocol revealed 4 patients with PDHA1 and one with DLD mutations. Four additional probands were diagnosed outside the protocol (WES or Sanger sequencing). The molecular characterization of PDHc defect was conducted in a total of 9 probands: 5 according to and 4 off the protocol. Additionally, two affected relatives were recognized by a family study. Altogether we identified seven different PDHA1 changes, including two novel variants [c.464T > C (p.Met155Thr) and c.856_859dupACTT (p.Arg288Leufs*10)] and one DLD variant. The lactate response to glucose load in the PDHA1 subset was compared to a subset of non PDHc-related MD. Opposite responses were observed, with an increase of 23% and decrease of 27%, respectively. The results show that determining lactate response to glucose load and muscle E1α expression may contribute to distinguishing PDHc-related and other MD, however, WES is becoming the method of choice for MD diagnostics. PMID:27144126

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Complex between the Acidic Transactivation Domain of EBNA2 and the Tfb1/p62 Subunit of TFIIH

    PubMed Central

    Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Morse, Thomas; Arseneault, Genevieve; Archambault, Jacques; Omichinski, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can lead to a number of human diseases including Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphomas. The development of these EBV-linked diseases is associated with the presence of nine viral latent proteins, including the nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2). The EBNA2 protein plays a crucial role in EBV infection through its ability to activate transcription of both host and viral genes. As part of this function, EBNA2 associates with several host transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the Tfb1/p62 (yeast/human) subunit of the general transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) and the histone acetyltransferase CBP(CREB-binding protein)/p300, through interactions with its C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD). In this manuscript, we examine the interaction of the acidic TAD of EBNA2 (residues 431–487) with the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH and CBP/p300 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and transactivation studies in yeast. NMR studies show that the TAD of EBNA2 binds to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Tfb1 (Tfb1PH) and that residues 448–471 (EBNA2448–471) are necessary and sufficient for this interaction. NMR structural characterization of a Tfb1PH-EBNA2448–471 complex demonstrates that the intrinsically disordered TAD of EBNA2 forms a 9-residue α-helix in complex with Tfb1PH. Within this helix, three hydrophobic amino acids (Trp458, Ile461 and Phe462) make a series of important interactions with Tfb1PH and their importance is validated in ITC and transactivation studies using mutants of EBNA2. In addition, NMR studies indicate that the same region of EBNA2 is also required for binding to the KIX domain of CBP/p300. This study provides an atomic level description of interactions involving the TAD of EBNA2 with target host proteins. In addition, comparison of the Tfb1PH-EBNA2448–471 complex with structures of the TAD of p53 and VP16 bound to Tfb1PH highlights the versatility of

  7. Structural and functional characterization of a complex between the acidic transactivation domain of EBNA2 and the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Philippe R; Raiola, Luca; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Morse, Thomas; Arseneault, Genevieve; Archambault, Jacques; Omichinski, James G

    2014-03-01

    Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can lead to a number of human diseases including Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphomas. The development of these EBV-linked diseases is associated with the presence of nine viral latent proteins, including the nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2). The EBNA2 protein plays a crucial role in EBV infection through its ability to activate transcription of both host and viral genes. As part of this function, EBNA2 associates with several host transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the Tfb1/p62 (yeast/human) subunit of the general transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) and the histone acetyltransferase CBP(CREB-binding protein)/p300, through interactions with its C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD). In this manuscript, we examine the interaction of the acidic TAD of EBNA2 (residues 431-487) with the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH and CBP/p300 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and transactivation studies in yeast. NMR studies show that the TAD of EBNA2 binds to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Tfb1 (Tfb1PH) and that residues 448-471 (EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁) are necessary and sufficient for this interaction. NMR structural characterization of a Tfb1PH-EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ complex demonstrates that the intrinsically disordered TAD of EBNA2 forms a 9-residue α-helix in complex with Tfb1PH. Within this helix, three hydrophobic amino acids (Trp458, Ile461 and Phe462) make a series of important interactions with Tfb1PH and their importance is validated in ITC and transactivation studies using mutants of EBNA2. In addition, NMR studies indicate that the same region of EBNA2 is also required for binding to the KIX domain of CBP/p300. This study provides an atomic level description of interactions involving the TAD of EBNA2 with target host proteins. In addition, comparison of the Tfb1PH-EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ complex with structures of the TAD of p53 and VP16 bound to Tfb1

  8. Arabidopsis CROOKED encodes for the smallest subunit of the ARP2/3 complex and controls cell shape by region specific fine F-actin formation.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Jaideep; Mathur, Neeta; Kirik, Victor; Kernebeck, Birgit; Srinivas, Bhylahalli Purushottam; Hülskamp, Martin

    2003-07-01

    The generation of a specific cell shape requires differential growth, whereby specific regions of the cell expand more relative to others. The Arabidopsis crooked mutant exhibits aberrant cell shapes that develop because of mis-directed expansion, especially during a rapid growth phase. GFP-aided visualization of the F-actin cytoskeleton and the behavior of subcellular organelles in different cell-types in crooked and wild-type Arabidopsis revealed that localized expansion is promoted in cellular regions with fine F-actin arrays but is restricted in areas that maintain dense F-actin. This suggested that a spatiotemporal distinction between fine versus dense F-actin in a growing cell could determine the final shape of the cell. CROOKED was molecularly identified as the plant homolog of ARPC5, the smallest sub-unit of the ARP2/3 complex that in other organisms is renowned for its role in creating dendritic arrays of fine F-actin. Rescue of crooked phenotype by the human ortholog provides the first molecular evidence for the presence and functional conservation of the complex in higher plants. Our cell-biological and molecular characterization of CROOKED suggests a general actin-based mechanism for regulating differential growth and generating cell shape diversity. PMID:12783786

  9. Exocyst complex subunit sec8 binds to postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95): a novel interaction regulated by cypin (cytosolic PSD-95 interactor).

    PubMed Central

    Riefler, Gary M; Balasingam, Gaithri; Lucas, Kenyatta G; Wang, Sheng; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2003-01-01

    The PDZ domains of postsynaptic density (PSD) protein-95 play a role in the localization of PSD-95 and binding partners to neuronal synapses. The identification of binding partners to these PDZ domains can help us in understanding how signalling complexes are assembled. We observed that one of the subunits in the sec6/8 or exocyst complex, sec8, contains a C-terminal consensus sequence for PDZ binding. Sec8 binds to PDZ1-2 of PSD-95, and this binding can be competed with a peptide that binds to PDZ1 and PDZ2 in the peptide-binding site. In addition, binding of sec8 is dependent on its C-terminal-binding sequence namely Thr-Thr-Val (TTV). Immunoblotting of rat tissue extracts shows that sec8 and PSD-95 are enriched in the same brain regions, and sec8 and PSD-95 have the same subcellular distribution in pheochromocytoma cells, suggesting that these proteins may interact in vivo. Immunoprecipitation studies of sec8 and PSD-95 in brain provide further evidence of a sec8 and PSD-95 interaction. Furthermore, the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor competes with sec8 for interaction with PSD-95. Taken together, our results suggest that the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor may function to regulate the ability of sec8 to bind to PSD-95. PMID:12675619

  10. Specific Sites in the C Terminus of CTCF Interact with the SA2 Subunit of the Cohesin Complex and Are Required for Cohesin-Dependent Insulation Activity ▿

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Tiaojiang; Wallace, Julie; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein CTCF, which plays an important role in insulation and in large-scale organization of chromatin within the eukaryotic nucleus, depends for both activities on recruitment of the cohesin complex. We show here that the interaction of CTCF with the cohesin complex involves direct contacts between the cohesin subunit SA2 and specific regions of the C-terminal tail of CTCF. All other cohesin components are recruited through their interaction with SA2. Expression in vivo of CTCF mutants lacking the C-terminal domain, or with mutations at sites within it required for SA2 binding, disrupts the normal expression profile of the imprinted genes IGF2-H19 and also results in a loss of insulation activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that specific sites on the C terminus of CTCF are essential for cohesin binding and insulator function. The only direct interaction between CTCF and cohesin involves contact with SA2, which is external to the cohesin ring. This suggests that in recruiting cohesin to CTCF, SA2 could bind first and the ring could assemble subsequently. PMID:21444719

  11. Exocyst complex subunit sec8 binds to postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95): a novel interaction regulated by cypin (cytosolic PSD-95 interactor).

    PubMed

    Riefler, Gary M; Balasingam, Gaithri; Lucas, Kenyatta G; Wang, Sheng; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2003-07-01

    The PDZ domains of postsynaptic density (PSD) protein-95 play a role in the localization of PSD-95 and binding partners to neuronal synapses. The identification of binding partners to these PDZ domains can help us in understanding how signalling complexes are assembled. We observed that one of the subunits in the sec6/8 or exocyst complex, sec8, contains a C-terminal consensus sequence for PDZ binding. Sec8 binds to PDZ1-2 of PSD-95, and this binding can be competed with a peptide that binds to PDZ1 and PDZ2 in the peptide-binding site. In addition, binding of sec8 is dependent on its C-terminal-binding sequence namely Thr-Thr-Val (TTV). Immunoblotting of rat tissue extracts shows that sec8 and PSD-95 are enriched in the same brain regions, and sec8 and PSD-95 have the same subcellular distribution in pheochromocytoma cells, suggesting that these proteins may interact in vivo. Immunoprecipitation studies of sec8 and PSD-95 in brain provide further evidence of a sec8 and PSD-95 interaction. Furthermore, the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor competes with sec8 for interaction with PSD-95. Taken together, our results suggest that the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor may function to regulate the ability of sec8 to bind to PSD-95. PMID:12675619

  12. T−B+NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency caused by complete deficiency of the CD3ζ subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter H.; Cooney, Myriah; Parrott, Roberta E.; Sajaroff, Elisa O.; Win, Chan M.; Keller, Michael D.; Carpenter, Jeffery H.; Carabana, Juan; Krangel, Michael S.; Sarzotti, Marcella; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Wiest, David L.; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2007-01-01

    CD3ζ is a subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex required for its assembly and surface expression that also plays an important role in TCR-mediated signal transduction. We report here a patient with T−B+NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) who was homozygous for a single C insertion following nucleotide 411 in exon 7 of the CD3ζ gene. The few T cells present contained no detectable CD3ζ protein, expressed low levels of cell surface CD3ε, and were nonfunctional. CD4+CD8−CD3εlow, CD4−CD8+CD3εlow, and CD4−CD8−CD3εlow cells were detected in the periphery, and the patient also exhibited an unusual population of CD56−CD16+ NK cells with diminished cytolytic activity. Additional studies demonstrated that retrovirally transduced patient mutant CD3ζ cDNA failed to rescue assembly of nascent complete TCR complexes or surface TCR expression in CD3ζ-deficient MA5.8 murine T-cell hybridoma cells. Nascent transduced mutant CD3ζ protein was also not detected in metabolically labeled MA5.8 cells, suggesting that it was unstable and rapidly degraded. Taken together, these findings provide the first demonstration that complete CD3ζ deficiency in humans can cause SCID by preventing normal TCR assembly and surface expression. PMID:17170122

  13. The acidic transcription activator Gcn4 binds the mediator subunit Gal11/Med15 using a simple protein interface forming a fuzzy complex.

    PubMed

    Brzovic, Peter S; Heikaus, Clemens C; Kisselev, Leonid; Vernon, Robert; Herbig, Eric; Pacheco, Derek; Warfield, Linda; Littlefield, Peter; Baker, David; Klevit, Rachel E; Hahn, Steven

    2011-12-23

    The structural basis for binding of the acidic transcription activator Gcn4 and one activator-binding domain of the Mediator subunit Gal11/Med15 was examined by NMR. Gal11 activator-binding domain 1 has a four-helix fold with a small shallow hydrophobic cleft at its center. In the bound complex, eight residues of Gcn4 adopt a helical conformation, allowing three Gcn4 aromatic/aliphatic residues to insert into the Gal11 cleft. The protein-protein interface is dynamic and surprisingly simple, involving only hydrophobic interactions. This allows Gcn4 to bind Gal11 in multiple conformations and orientations, an example of a "fuzzy" complex, where the Gcn4-Gal11 interface cannot be described by a single conformation. Gcn4 uses a similar mechanism to bind two other unrelated activator-binding domains. Functional studies in yeast show the importance of residues at the protein interface, define the minimal requirements for a functional activator, and suggest a mechanism by which activators bind to multiple unrelated targets. PMID:22195967

  14. TRF2 is recruited to the pre-initiation complex as a testis-specific subunit of TFIIA/ALF to promote haploid cell gene expression.

    PubMed

    Martianov, Igor; Velt, Amandine; Davidson, Guillaume; Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Davidson, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode two genes related to the TATA-box binding protein (TBP), TBP-related factors 2 and 3 (TRF2 and TRF3). Male Trf2(-/-) mice are sterile and characterized by arrested spermatogenesis at the transition from late haploid spermatids to early elongating spermatids. Despite this characterization, the molecular function of murine Trf2 remains poorly characterized and no direct evidence exists to show that it acts as a bona fide chromatin-bound transcription factor. We show here that Trf2 forms a stable complex with TFIIA or the testis expressed paralogue ALF chaperoned in the cytoplasm by heat shock proteins. We demonstrate for the first time that Trf2 is recruited to active haploid cell promoters together with Tbp, Taf7l and RNA polymerase II. RNA-seq analysis identifies a set of genes activated in haploid spermatids during the first wave of spermatogenesis whose expression is down-regulated by Trf2 inactivation. We therefore propose that Trf2 is recruited to the preinitiation complex as a testis-specific subunit of TFIIA/ALF that cooperates with Tbp and Taf7l to promote haploid cell gene expression. PMID:27576952

  15. Functional Characterization of the OFD1 Protein Reveals a Nuclear Localization and Physical Interaction with Subunits of a Chromatin Remodeling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Giovanna; Alfieri, Mariaevelina; Prattichizzo, Clelia; Zullo, Alessandro; Cairo, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    Oral-facial-digital (OFD) type I syndrome is an X-linked dominant disease (MIM311200) characterized by malformations of oral cavity, face, and digits and by cystic kidneys. We previously identified OFD1, the gene responsible for this disorder, which encodes for a centrosomal protein with an unknown function. We now report that OFD1 localizes both to the primary cilium and to the nucleus. Moreover, we demonstrate that the OFD1 protein is able to self-associate and that this interaction is mediated by its coiled-coil rich region. Interestingly, we identify an OFD1-interacting protein RuvBl1, a protein belonging to the AAA+-family of ATPases, which has been recently associated to cystic kidney in zebrafish and to ciliary assembly and function in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We also provide experimental evidence that OFD1, together with RuvBl1, is able to coimmunoprecipitate with subunits of the human TIP60 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) multisubunit complex. On the basis of these results, we hypothesize that OFD1 may be part of a multi-protein complex and could play different biological functions in the centrosome-primary cilium organelles as well as in the nuclear compartment. PMID:17761535

  16. TRF2 is recruited to the pre-initiation complex as a testis-specific subunit of TFIIA/ALF to promote haploid cell gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Martianov, Igor; Velt, Amandine; Davidson, Guillaume; Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Davidson, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode two genes related to the TATA-box binding protein (TBP), TBP-related factors 2 and 3 (TRF2 and TRF3). Male Trf2−/− mice are sterile and characterized by arrested spermatogenesis at the transition from late haploid spermatids to early elongating spermatids. Despite this characterization, the molecular function of murine Trf2 remains poorly characterized and no direct evidence exists to show that it acts as a bona fide chromatin-bound transcription factor. We show here that Trf2 forms a stable complex with TFIIA or the testis expressed paralogue ALF chaperoned in the cytoplasm by heat shock proteins. We demonstrate for the first time that Trf2 is recruited to active haploid cell promoters together with Tbp, Taf7l and RNA polymerase II. RNA-seq analysis identifies a set of genes activated in haploid spermatids during the first wave of spermatogenesis whose expression is down-regulated by Trf2 inactivation. We therefore propose that Trf2 is recruited to the preinitiation complex as a testis-specific subunit of TFIIA/ALF that cooperates with Tbp and Taf7l to promote haploid cell gene expression. PMID:27576952

  17. Specific sites in the C terminus of CTCF interact with the SA2 subunit of the cohesin complex and are required for cohesin-dependent insulation activity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Tiaojiang; Wallace, Julie; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein CTCF, which plays an important role in insulation and in large-scale organization of chromatin within the eukaryotic nucleus, depends for both activities on recruitment of the cohesin complex. We show here that the interaction of CTCF with the cohesin complex involves direct contacts between the cohesin subunit SA2 and specific regions of the C-terminal tail of CTCF. All other cohesin components are recruited through their interaction with SA2. Expression in vivo of CTCF mutants lacking the C-terminal domain, or with mutations at sites within it required for SA2 binding, disrupts the normal expression profile of the imprinted genes IGF2-H19 and also results in a loss of insulation activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that specific sites on the C terminus of CTCF are essential for cohesin binding and insulator function. The only direct interaction between CTCF and cohesin involves contact with SA2, which is external to the cohesin ring. This suggests that in recruiting cohesin to CTCF, SA2 could bind first and the ring could assemble subsequently. PMID:21444719

  18. NMR structure of a complex containing the TFIIF subunit RAP74 and the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao D.; Abbott, Karen L.; Potempa, Krzysztof; Kobor, Michael S.; Archambault, Jacques; Greenblatt, Jack; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G.

    2003-01-01

    FCP1 [transcription factor IIF (TFIIF)-associated carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase] is the only identified phosphatase specific for the phosphorylated CTD of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The phosphatase activity of FCP1 is enhanced in the presence of the large subunit of TFIIF (RAP74 in humans). It has been demonstrated that the CTD of RAP74 (cterRAP74; residues 436–517) directly interacts with the highly acidic CTD of FCP1 (cterFCP; residues 879–961 in human). In this manuscript, we have determined a high-resolution solution structure of a cterRAP74/cterFCP complex by NMR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the cterFCP protein is completely disordered in the unbound state, but forms an α-helix (H1′; E945–M961) in the complex. The cterRAP74/cterFCP binding interface relies extensively on van der Waals contacts between hydrophobic residues from the H2 and H3 helices of cterRAP74 and hydrophobic residues from the H1′ helix of cterFCP. The binding interface also contains two critical electrostatic interactions involving aspartic acid residues from H1′ of cterFCP and lysine residues from both H2 and H3 of cterRAP74. There are also three additional polar interactions involving highly conserved acidic residues from the H1′ helix. The cterRAP74/cterFCP complex is the first high-resolution structure between an acidic residue-rich domain from a holoenzyme-associated regulatory protein and a general transcription factor. The structure defines a clear role for both hydrophobic and acidic residues in protein/protein complexes involving acidic residue-rich domains in transcription regulatory proteins. PMID:12732728

  19. NMR structure of the complex between the Tfb1 subunit of TFIIH and the activation domain of VP16: structural similarities between VP16 and p53.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Chantal; Mas, Caroline; Di Lello, Paola; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2008-08-13

    The Herpes Simplex Virion Protein 16 (VP16) activates transcription through a series of protein/protein interactions involving its highly acidic transactivation domain (TAD). The acidic TAD of VP16 (VP16TAD) has been shown to interact with several partner proteins both in vitro and in vivo, and many of these VP16 partners also bind the acidic TAD of the mammalian tumor suppressor protein p53. For example, the TADs of VP16 and p53 (p53TAD) both interact directly with the p62/Tfb1 (human/yeast) subunit of TFIIH, and this interaction correlates with their ability to activate both the initiation and elongation phase of transcription. In this manuscript, we use NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetery (ITC) and site-directed mutagenesis studies to characterize the interaction between the VP16TAD and Tfb1. We identify a region within the carboxyl-terminal subdomain of the VP16TAD (VP16C) that has sequence similarity with p53TAD2 and binds Tfb1 with nanomolar affinity. We determine an NMR structure of a Tfb1/VP16C complex, which represents the first high-resolution structure of the VP16TAD in complex with a target protein. The structure demonstrates that like p53TAD2, VP16C forms a 9-residue alpha-helix in complex with Tfb1. Comparison of the VP16/Tfb1and p53/Tfb1 structures clearly demonstrates how the viral activator VP16C and p53TAD2 shares numerous aspects of binding to Tfb1. Despite the similarities, important differences are observed between the p53TAD2/Tfb1 and VP16C/Tfb1 complexes, and these differences demonstrate how selected activators such as p53 depend on phosphorylation events to selectively regulate transcription. PMID:18630911

  20. NMR structure of a complex containing the TFIIF subunit RAP74 and the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao D; Abbott, Karen L; Potempa, Krzysztof; Kobor, Michael S; Archambault, Jacques; Greenblatt, Jack; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2003-05-13

    FCP1 [transcription factor IIF (TFIIF)-associated carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase] is the only identified phosphatase specific for the phosphorylated CTD of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The phosphatase activity of FCP1 is enhanced in the presence of the large subunit of TFIIF (RAP74 in humans). It has been demonstrated that the CTD of RAP74 (cterRAP74; residues 436-517) directly interacts with the highly acidic CTD of FCP1 (cterFCP; residues 879-961 in human). In this manuscript, we have determined a high-resolution solution structure of a cterRAP74cterFCP complex by NMR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the cterFCP protein is completely disordered in the unbound state, but forms an alpha-helix (H1'; E945-M961) in the complex. The cterRAP74cterFCP binding interface relies extensively on van der Waals contacts between hydrophobic residues from the H2 and H3 helices of cterRAP74 and hydrophobic residues from the H1' helix of cterFCP. The binding interface also contains two critical electrostatic interactions involving aspartic acid residues from H1' of cterFCP and lysine residues from both H2 and H3 of cterRAP74. There are also three additional polar interactions involving highly conserved acidic residues from the H1' helix. The cterRAP74cterFCP complex is the first high-resolution structure between an acidic residue-rich domain from a holoenzyme-associated regulatory protein and a general transcription factor. The structure defines a clear role for both hydrophobic and acidic residues in proteinprotein complexes involving acidic residue-rich domains in transcription regulatory proteins. PMID:12732728

  1. Biallelic Mutations in Nuclear Pore Complex Subunit NUP107 Cause Early-Childhood-Onset Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Noriko; Tsukaguchi, Hiroyasu; Koshimizu, Eriko; Shono, Akemi; Matsunaga, Satoko; Shiina, Masaaki; Mimura, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Shintaro; Hirose, Tomonori; Okudela, Koji; Nozu, Kandai; Akioka, Yuko; Hattori, Motoshi; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Kitamura, Akiko; Cheong, Hae Il; Kagami, Shoji; Yamashita, Michiaki; Fujita, Atsushi; Miyatake, Satoko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Ohashi, Kenichi; Imamoto, Naoko; Ryo, Akihide; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Iijima, Kazumoto; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a huge protein complex embedded in the nuclear envelope. It has central functions in nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear framework, and gene regulation. Nucleoporin 107 kDa (NUP107) is a component of the NPC central scaffold and is an essential protein in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report on biallelic NUP107 mutations in nine affected individuals who are from five unrelated families and show early-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). These individuals have pathologically focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, a condition that leads to end-stage renal disease with high frequency. NUP107 is ubiquitously expressed, including in glomerular podocytes. Three of four NUP107 mutations detected in the affected individuals hamper NUP107 binding to NUP133 (nucleoporin 133 kDa) and NUP107 incorporation into NPCs in vitro. Zebrafish with nup107 knockdown generated by morpholino oligonucleotides displayed hypoplastic glomerulus structures and abnormal podocyte foot processes, thereby mimicking the pathological changes seen in the kidneys of the SRNS individuals with NUP107 mutations. Considering the unique properties of the podocyte (highly differentiated foot-process architecture and slit membrane and the inability to regenerate), we propose a “podocyte-injury model” as the pathomechanism for SRNS due to biallelic NUP107 mutations. PMID:26411495

  2. T cell receptor recognition of a 'super-bulged' major histocompatibility complex class I-bound peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Tynan, Fleur E; Burrows, Scott R; Buckle, Ashley M; Clements, Craig S; Borg, Natalie A; Miles, John J; Beddoe, Travis; Whisstock, James C; Wilce, Matthew C; Silins, Sharon L; Burrows, Jacqueline M; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Purcell, Anthony W; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-07-20

    Unusually long major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted epitopes are important in immunity, but their 'bulged' conformation represents a potential obstacle to {alpha}{beta} T cell receptor (TCR)-MHC class I docking. To elucidate how such recognition is achieved while still preserving MHC restriction, we have determined here the structure of a TCR in complex with HLA-B*3508 presenting a peptide 13 amino acids in length. This complex was atypical of TCR-peptide-MHC class I interactions, being dominated at the interface by peptide-mediated interactions. The TCR assumed two distinct orientations, swiveling on top of the centrally bulged, rigid peptide such that only limited contacts were made with MHC class I. Although the TCR-peptide recognition resembled an antibody-antigen interaction, the TCR-MHC class I contacts defined a minimal 'generic footprint' of MHC-restriction. Thus our findings simultaneously demonstrate the considerable adaptability of the TCR and the 'shape' of MHC restriction.

  3. Trigger factor binds to ribosome–signal-recognition particle (SRP) complexes and is excluded by binding of the SRP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Buskiewicz, Iwona; Deuerling, Elke; Gu, Shan-Qing; Jöckel, Johannes; Rodnina, Marina V.; Bukau, Bernd; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) and signal recognition particle (SRP) bind to the bacterial ribosome and are both crosslinked to protein L23 at the peptide exit, where they interact with emerging nascent peptide chains. It is unclear whether TF and SRP exclude one another from their ribosomal binding site(s). Here we show that SRP and TF can bind simultaneously to ribosomes or ribosome nascent-chain complexes exposing a SRP-specific signal sequence. Based on changes of the crosslinking pattern and on results obtained by fluorescence measurements using fluorescence-labeled SRP, TF binding induces structural changes in the ribosome–SRP complex. Furthermore, we show that binding of the SRP receptor, FtsY, to ribosome-bound SRP excludes TF from the ribosome. These results suggest that TF and SRP sample nascent chains on the ribosome in a nonexclusive fashion. The decision for ribosome nascent-chain complexes exposing a signal sequence to enter SRP-dependent membrane targeting seems to be determined by the binding of SRP, which is stabilized by signal sequence recognition, and promoted by the exclusion of TF due to the binding of the SRP receptor to ribosome-bound SRP. PMID:15148364

  4. Fingerprints of Learned Object Recognition Seen in the fMRI Activation Patterns of Lateral Occipital Complex.

    PubMed

    Roth, Zvi N; Zohary, Ehud

    2015-09-01

    One feature of visual processing in the ventral stream is that cortical responses gradually depart from the physical aspects of the visual stimulus and become correlated with perceptual experience. Thus, unlike early retinotopic areas, the responses in the object-related lateral occipital complex (LOC) are typically immune to parameter changes (e.g., contrast, location, etc.) when these do not affect recognition. Here, we use a complementary approach to highlight changes in brain activity following a shift in the perceptual state (in the absence of any alteration in the physical image). Specifically, we focus on LOC and early visual cortex (EVC) and compare their functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to degraded object images, before and after fast perceptual learning that renders initially unrecognized objects identifiable. Using 3 complementary analyses, we find that, in LOC, unlike EVC, learned recognition is associated with a change in the multivoxel response pattern to degraded object images, such that the response becomes significantly more correlated with that evoked by the intact version of the same image. This provides further evidence that the coding in LOC reflects the recognition of visual objects. PMID:24692511

  5. Structure of an LDLR-RAP Complex Reveals a General Mode for Ligand Recognition by Lipoprotein Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,C.; Beglova, N.; Blacklow, s.

    2006-01-01

    Proteins of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family are remarkable in their ability to bind an extremely diverse range of protein and lipoprotein ligands, yet the basis for ligand recognition is poorly understood. Here, we report the 1.26 Angstroms X-ray structure of a complex between a two-module region of the ligand binding domain of the LDLR and the third domain of RAP, an escort protein for LDLR family members. The RAP domain forms a three-helix bundle with two docking sites, one for each LDLR module. The mode of recognition at each site is virtually identical: three conserved, calcium-coordinating acidic residues from each LDLR module encircle a lysine side chain protruding from the second helix of RAP. This metal-dependent mode of electrostatic recognition, together with avidity effects resulting from the use of multiple sites, represents a general binding strategy likely to apply in the binding of other basic ligands to LDLR family proteins.

  6. Dynamics and recognition within a protein–DNA complex: a molecular dynamics study of the SKN-1/DNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Etheve, Loïc; Martin, Juliette; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factor SKN-1 bound to its cognate DNA site show that the protein–DNA interface undergoes significant dynamics on the microsecond timescale. A detailed analysis of the simulation shows that movements of two key arginine side chains between the major groove and the backbone of DNA generate distinct conformational sub-states that each recognize only part of the consensus binding sequence of SKN-1, while the experimentally observed binding specificity results from a time-averaged view of the dynamic recognition occurring within this complex. PMID:26721385

  7. Structural basis for recognition and remodeling of the TBP:DNA:NC2 complex by Mot1

    PubMed Central

    Butryn, Agata; Schuller, Jan M; Stoehr, Gabriele; Runge-Wollmann, Petra; Förster, Friedrich; Auble, David T; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Swi2/Snf2 ATPases remodel substrates such as nucleosomes and transcription complexes to control a wide range of DNA-associated processes, but detailed structural information on the ATP-dependent remodeling reactions is largely absent. The single subunit remodeler Mot1 (modifier of transcription 1) dissociates TATA box-binding protein (TBP):DNA complexes, offering a useful system to address the structural mechanisms of Swi2/Snf2 ATPases. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Mot1 in complex with TBP, DNA, and the transcription regulator negative cofactor 2 (NC2). Our data show that Mot1 reduces DNA:NC2 interactions and unbends DNA as compared to the TBP:DNA:NC2 state, suggesting that Mot1 primes TBP:NC2 displacement in an ATP-independent manner. Electron microscopy and cross-linking data suggest that the Swi2/Snf2 domain of Mot1 associates with the upstream DNA and the histone fold of NC2, thereby revealing parallels to some nucleosome remodelers. This study provides a structural framework for how a Swi2/Snf2 ATPase interacts with its substrate DNA:protein complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07432.001 PMID:26258880

  8. Outcomes, moderators, and mediators of empathic-emotion recognition training for complex conduct problems in childhood.

    PubMed

    Dadds, Mark Richard; Cauchi, Avril Jessica; Wimalaweera, Subodha; Hawes, David John; Brennan, John

    2012-10-30

    Impairments in emotion recognition skills are a trans-diagnostic indicator of early mental health problems and may be responsive to intervention. We report on a randomized controlled trial of "Emotion-recognition-training" (ERT) versus treatment-as-usual (TAU) with N=195 mixed diagnostic children (mean age 10.52 years) referred for behavioral/emotional problems measured at pre- and 6 months post-treatment. We tested overall outcomes plus moderation and mediation models, whereby diagnostic profile was tested as a moderator of change. ERT had no impact on the group as a whole. Diagnostic status of the child did not moderate outcomes; however, levels of callous-unemotional (CU) traits moderated outcomes such that children with high CU traits responded less well to TAU, while ERT produced significant improvements in affective empathy and conduct problems in these children. Emotion recognition training has potential as an adjunctive intervention specifically for clinically referred children with high CU traits, regardless of their diagnostic status. PMID:22703720

  9. Subunit Arrangement and Function in NMDA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa,H.; Singh, S.; Mancusso, R.; Gouaux, E.

    2005-01-01

    Excitatory neurotransmission mediated by NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors is fundamental to the physiology of the mammalian central nervous system. These receptors are heteromeric ion channels that for activation require binding of glycine and glutamate to the NR1 and NR2 subunits, respectively. NMDA receptor function is characterized by slow channel opening and deactivation, and the resulting influx of cations initiates signal transduction cascades that are crucial to higher functions including learning and memory. Here we report crystal structures of the ligand-binding core of NR2A with glutamate and that of the NR1-NR2A heterodimer with glutamate and glycine. The NR2A-glutamate complex defines the determinants of glutamate and NMDA recognition, and the NR1-NR2A heterodimer suggests a mechanism for ligand-induced ion channel opening. Analysis of the heterodimer interface, together with biochemical and electrophysiological experiments, confirms that the NR1-NR2A heterodimer is the functional unit in tetrameric NMDA receptors and that tyrosine 535 of NR1, located in the subunit interface, modulates the rate of ion channel deactivation.

  10. Kv4.2 and accessory dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein 10 (DPP10) subunit preferentially form a 4:2 (Kv4.2:DPP10) channel complex.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2015-09-11

    Kv4 is a member of the voltage-gated K(+) channel family and forms a complex with various accessory subunits. Dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like protein (DPP) is one of the auxiliary subunits for the Kv4 channel. Although DPP has been well characterized and is known to increase the current amplitude and accelerate the inactivation and recovery from inactivation of Kv4 current, it remains to be determined how many DPPs bind to one Kv4 channel. To examine whether the expression level of DPP changes the biophysical properties of Kv4, we expressed Kv4.2 and DPP10 in different ratios in Xenopus oocytes and analyzed the currents under two-electrode voltage clamp. The current amplitude and the speed of recovery from inactivation of Kv4.2 changed depending on the co-expression level of DPP10. This raised the possibility that the stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex is variable and affects the biophysical properties of Kv4.2. We next determined the stoichiometry of DPP10 alone by subunit counting using single-molecule imaging. Approximately 70% of the DPP10 formed dimers in the plasma membrane, and the rest existed as monomers in the absence of Kv4.2. We next determined the stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex; Kv4.2-mCherry and mEGFP-DPP10 were co-expressed in different ratios and the stoichiometries of Kv4.2-DPP10 complexes were evaluated by the subunit counting method. The stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex was variable depending on the relative expression level of each subunit, with a preference for 4:2 stoichiometry. This preference may come from the bulky dimeric structure of the extracellular domain of DPP10. PMID:26209633

  11. Subunits of the Plastid ClpPR Protease Complex Have Differential Contributions to Embryogenesis, Plastid Biogenesis, and Plant Development in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Ramirez Rodriguez, Verenice; Zybailov, Boris; Olinares, Paul Dominic B.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2009-01-01

    The plastid ClpPR protease complex in Arabidopsis thaliana consists of five catalytic ClpP and four noncatalytic ClpR subunits. An extensive analysis of the CLPR family and CLPP5 is presented to address this complexity. Null alleles for CLPR2 and CLPR4 showed delayed embryogenesis and albino embryos, with seedling development blocked in the cotyledon stage; this developmental block was overcome under heterotrophic conditions, and seedlings developed into small albino to virescent seedlings. By contrast, null alleles for CLPP5 were embryo lethal. Thus, the ClpPR proteins make different functional contributions. To further test for redundancies and functional differences between the ClpR proteins, we overexpressed full-length cDNAs for ClpR1, R2, R3, R4 in clpr1, clpr2 and clpr4 mutants. This showed that overexpression of ClpR3 can complement for the loss of ClpR1, but not for the loss of ClpR2 or ClpR4, indicating that ClpR3 can functionally substitute ClpR1. By contrast, ClpR1, R2 and R4 could not substitute each other. Double mutants of weak CLPR1 and 2 alleles were seedling lethal, showing that a minimum concentration of different ClpR proteins is essential for Clp function. Microscopy and large-scale comparative leaf proteome analyses of a CLPR4 null allele demonstrate a central role of Clp protease in chloroplast biogenesis and protein homeostasis; substrates are discussed. Lack of transcriptional and translational feedback regulation within the CLPPR gene family indicates that regulation of Clp activity occurs through Clp complex assembly and substrate delivery. PMID:19525416

  12. Mutations in Subunits of the Activating Signal Cointegrator 1 Complex Are Associated with Prenatal Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Congenital Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Ellen; Hirata, Hiromi; Wolf, Nicole I; Morales-Gonzalez, Susanne; Schottmann, Gudrun; Tanaka, Yu; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Orgeur, Mickael; Zerres, Klaus; Vogt, Stefanie; van Riesen, Anne; Gill, Esther; Seifert, Franziska; Zwirner, Angelika; Kirschner, Janbernd; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Hübner, Christoph; Stricker, Sigmar; Meierhofer, David; Stenzel, Werner; Schuelke, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Transcriptional signal cointegrators associate with transcription factors or nuclear receptors and coregulate tissue-specific gene transcription. We report on recessive loss-of-function mutations in two genes (TRIP4 and ASCC1) that encode subunits of the nuclear activating signal cointegrator 1 (ASC-1) complex. We used autozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to search for pathogenic mutations in four families. Affected individuals presented with prenatal-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), multiple congenital contractures (arthrogryposis multiplex congenita), respiratory distress, and congenital bone fractures. We identified homozygous and compound-heterozygous nonsense and frameshift TRIP4 and ASCC1 mutations that led to a truncation or the entire absence of the respective proteins and cosegregated with the disease phenotype. Trip4 and Ascc1 have identical expression patterns in 17.5-day-old mouse embryos with high expression levels in the spinal cord, brain, paraspinal ganglia, thyroid, and submandibular glands. Antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of either trip4 or ascc1 in zebrafish disrupted the highly patterned and coordinated process of α-motoneuron outgrowth and formation of myotomes and neuromuscular junctions and led to a swimming defect in the larvae. Immunoprecipitation of the ASC-1 complex consistently copurified cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), a transcriptional cofactor, which is known to be involved in spinal cord regeneration upon injury in adult zebrafish. ASCC1 mutant fibroblasts downregulated genes associated with neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and pathfinding (SERPINF1, DAB1, SEMA3D, SEMA3A), as well as with bone development (TNFRSF11B, RASSF2, STC1). Our findings indicate that the dysfunction of a transcriptional coactivator complex can result in a clinical syndrome affecting the neuromuscular system. PMID:26924529

  13. Magnesium chelatase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides: initial characterization of the enzyme using purified subunits and evidence for a BchI-BchD complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, L C; Jensen, P E; Hunter, C N

    1999-01-01

    The enzyme magnesium-protoporphyrin IX chelatase (Mg chelatase) catalyses the insertion of Mg into protoporphyrin IX, the first committed step in (bacterio)chlorophyll biosynthesis. In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, this reaction is catalysed by the products of the bchI, bchD and bchH genes. These genes have been expressed in Escherichia coli so that the BchI, BchD and BchH proteins are produced with N-terminal His6 affinity tags, which has led to the production of large amounts of highly purified, highly active Mg chelatase subunits from a single chromatography step. Furthermore, BchD has been purifed free of contamination with the chaperone GroEL, which had proven to be a problem in the past. BchD, present largely as an insoluble protein in E. coli, was purified in 6 M urea and refolded by addition of BchI, MgCl2 and ATP, yielding highly active protein. BchI/BchD mixtures prepared in this way were used in conjunction with BchH to determine the kinetic parameters of R. sphaeroides Mg chelatase for its natural substrates. We have been able to demonstrate for the first time that BchI and BchD form a complex, and that Mg2+ and ATP are required to establish and maintain this complex. Gel filtration data suggest that BchI and BchD form a complex of molecular mass 200 kDa in the presence of Mg2+ and ATP. Our data suggest that, in vivo, BchD is only folded correctly and maintained in its correct conformation in the presence of BchI, Mg2+ and ATP. PMID:9882621

  14. Vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex subunit A28 is a target of neutralizing and protective antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Gretchen E.; Sisler, Jerry R.; Chandran, Dev; Moss, Bernard

    2008-10-25

    The vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex (EFC) is comprised of at least eight transmembrane proteins that are conserved in all poxviruses. However, neither the physical structure of the EFC nor the immunogenicity of the individual components has been determined. We prepared soluble forms of two EFC components, A28 and H2, by replacing the transmembrane domain with a signal peptide and adding a polyhistidine tail. The proteins were expressed by baculoviruses, secreted from insect cells, purified by affinity chromatography and used to raise antibodies in rabbits. The antibodies recognized the viral proteins but only the antibody to recombinant A28 bound intact virions and neutralized infectivity. Analyses with a set of overlapping peptides revealed a neutralizing epitope between residues 73 and 92 of A28. Passive immunization of mice with IgG purified from the anti-A28 serum provided partial protection against a vaccinia virus intranasal challenge, whereas IgG from the anti-H2 serum did not.

  15. SWP73 Subunits of Arabidopsis SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complexes Play Distinct Roles in Leaf and Flower Development

    PubMed Central

    Sacharowski, Sebastian P.; Gratkowska, Dominika M.; Sarnowska, Elzbieta A.; Kondrak, Paulina; Jancewicz, Iga; Porri, Aimone; Bucior, Ernest; Rolicka, Anna T.; Franzen, Rainer; Kowalczyk, Justyna; Pawlikowska, Katarzyna; Huettel, Bruno; Torti, Stefano; Schmelzer, Elmon; Coupland, George; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej; Koncz, Csaba; Sarnowski, Tomasz J.

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana SWP73A and SWP73B are homologs of mammalian BRAHMA-associated factors (BAF60s) that tether SWITCH/SUCROSE NONFERMENTING chromatin remodeling complexes to transcription factors of genes regulating various cell differentiation pathways. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana SWP73s modulate several important developmental pathways. While undergoing normal vegetative development, swp73a mutants display reduced expression of FLOWERING LOCUS C and early flowering in short days. By contrast, swp73b mutants are characterized by retarded growth, severe defects in leaf and flower development, delayed flowering, and male sterility. MNase-Seq, transcript profiling, and ChIP-Seq studies demonstrate that SWP73B binds the promoters of ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 and 2, KANADI1 and 3, and YABBY2, 3, and 5 genes, which regulate leaf development and show coordinately altered transcription in swp73b plants. Lack of SWP73B alters the expression patterns of APETALA1, APETALA3, and the MADS box gene AGL24, whereas other floral organ identity genes show reduced expression correlating with defects in flower development. Consistently, SWP73B binds to the promoter regions of APETALA1 and 3, SEPALLATA3, LEAFY, UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS, TERMINAL FLOWER1, AGAMOUS-LIKE24, and SUPPRESSOR OF CONSTANS OVEREXPRESSION1 genes, and the swp73b mutation alters nucleosome occupancy on most of these loci. In conclusion, SWP73B acts as important modulator of major developmental pathways, while SWP73A functions in flowering time control. PMID:26106148

  16. Engineering Hydrogen Gas Production from Formate in a Hyperthermophile by Heterologous Production of an 18-Subunit Membrane-bound Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Gina L.; Schut, Gerrit J.; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Nixon, William J.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Biohydrogen gas has enormous potential as a source of reductant for the microbial production of biofuels, but its low solubility and poor gas mass transfer rates are limiting factors. These limitations could be circumvented by engineering biofuel production in microorganisms that are also capable of generating H2 from highly soluble chemicals such as formate, which can function as an electron donor. Herein, the model hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 °C by fermenting sugars to produce H2, has been engineered to also efficiently convert formate to H2. Using a bacterial artificial chromosome vector, the 16.9-kb 18-gene cluster encoding the membrane-bound, respiratory formate hydrogen lyase complex of Thermococcus onnurineus was inserted into the P. furiosus chromosome and expressed as a functional unit. This enabled P. furiosus to utilize formate as well as sugars as an H2 source and to do so at both 80° and 95 °C, near the optimum growth temperature of the donor (T. onnurineus) and engineered host (P. furiosus), respectively. This accomplishment also demonstrates the versatility of P. furiosus for metabolic engineering applications. PMID:24318960

  17. Nse1 and Nse4, subunits of the Smc5-Smc6 complex, are involved in Dictyostelium development upon starvation.

    PubMed

    Taniura, Hideo; Tanabe, Naoya; Bando, Yumi; Arai, Natsumi

    2015-08-01

    The Smc5-Smc6 complex contains a heterodimeric core of two SMC proteins and non-Smc elements (Nse1-6), and plays an important role in DNA repair. We investigated the functional roles of Nse4 and Nse1 in Dictyostelium discoideum. Nse4 and Nse3 expressed as Flag-tagged fusion proteins were highly enriched in nuclei, while Nse1 was localized in whole cells. Using yeast two-hybrid assays, only the interaction between Nse3 and Nse1 was detected among the combinations. However, all of the interactions among these three proteins were recognized by co-immunoprecipitation assay using cell lysates prepared from the cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)- or Flag-tagged fusion proteins. GFP-tagged Nse1, which localized in whole cells, was translocated to nuclei when co-expressed with Flag-tagged Nse3 or Nse4. RNAi-mediated Nse1 and Nse4 knockdown cells (Nse1 KD and Nse4 KD cells) were generated and found to be more sensitive to UV-induced cell death than control cells. Upon starvation, Nse1 and Nse4 KD cells had increases in the number of smaller fruiting bodies that formed on non-nutrient agar plates or aggregates that formed under submerged culture. We found a reduction in the mRNA level of pdsA, in vegetative and 8 h-starved Nse4 KD cells, and pdsA knockdown cells displayed effects similar to Nse4 KD cells. Our results suggest that Nse4 and Nse1 are involved in not only the cellular DNA damage response but also cellular development in D. discoideum. PMID:26036668

  18. Phosphorylation of 20S proteasome alpha subunit C8 (alpha7) stabilizes the 26S proteasome and plays a role in the regulation of proteasome complexes by gamma-interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Suchira; Stratford, Fiona L L; Broadfoot, Kerry I; Mason, Grant G F; Rivett, A Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    In animal cells there are several regulatory complexes which interact with 20S proteasomes and give rise to functionally distinct proteasome complexes. gamma-Interferon upregulates three immuno beta catalytic subunits of the 20S proteasome and the PA28 regulator, and decreases the level of 26S proteasomes. It also decreases the level of phosphorylation of two proteasome alpha subunits, C8 (alpha7) and C9 (alpha3). In the present study we have investigated the role of phosphorylation of C8 by protein kinase CK2 in the formation and stability of 26S proteasomes. An epitope-tagged C8 subunit expressed in mammalian cells was efficiently incorporated into both 20S proteasomes and 26S proteasomes. Investigation of mutants of C8 at the two known CK2 phosphorylation sites demonstrated that these are the two phosphorylation sites of C8 in animal cells. Although phosphorylation of C8 was not absolutely essential for the formation of 26S proteasomes, it did have a substantial effect on their stability. Also, when cells were treated with gamma-interferon, there was a marked decrease in phosphorylation of C8, a decrease in the level of 26S proteasomes, and an increase in immunoproteasomes and PA28 complexes. These results suggest that the down-regulation of 26S proteasomes after gamma-interferon treatment results from the destabilization that occurs after dephosphorylation of the C8 subunit. PMID:14583091

  19. Mutant LV(476-7)AA of A-subunit of Enterococcus hirae V1-ATPase: High affinity of A3B3 complex to DF axis and low ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Alam, Jahangir; Yamato, Ichiro; Arai, Satoshi; Saijo, Shinya; Mizutani, Kenji; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Iwata, So; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Murata, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) of Enterococcus hirae is composed of a soluble functional domain V1 (A3B3DF) and an integral membrane domain Vo (ac), where V1 and Vo domains are connected by a central stalk, composed of D-, F-, and d-subunits; and two peripheral stalks (E- and G-subunits). We identified 120 interacting residues of A3B3 heterohexamer with D-subunit in DF heterodimer in the crystal structures of A3B3 and A3B3DF. In our previous study, we reported 10 mutants of E. hirae V1-ATPase, which showed lower binding affinities of DF with A3B3 complex leading to higher initial specific ATPase activities compared to the wild-type. In this study, we identified a mutation of A-subunit (LV(476-7)AA) at its C-terminal domain resulting in the A3B3 complex with higher binding affinities for wild-type or mutant DF heterodimers and lower initial ATPase activities compared to the wild-type A3B3 complex, consistent with our previous proposal of reciprocal relationship between the ATPase activity and the protein-protein binding affinity of DF axis to the A3B3 catalytic domain of E. hirae V-ATPase. These observations suggest that the binding of DF axis at the contact region of A3B3 rotary ring is relevant to its rotation activity. PMID:24404436

  20. PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT R Is Required for Efficient Binding of LIGHT-HARVESTING COMPLEX STRESS-RELATED PROTEIN3 to Photosystem II-Light-Harvesting Supercomplexes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Huidan; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Bergner, Sonja Verena; Scholz, Martin; Minagawa, Jun; Hippler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the LIGHT-HARVESTING COMPLEX STRESS-RELATED PROTEIN3 (LHCSR3) protein is crucial for efficient energy-dependent thermal dissipation of excess absorbed light energy and functionally associates with photosystem II-light-harvesting complex II (PSII-LHCII) supercomplexes. Currently, it is unknown how LHCSR3 binds to the PSII-LHCII supercomplex. In this study, we investigated the role of PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT R (PSBR) an intrinsic membrane-spanning PSII subunit, in the binding of LHCSR3 to PSII-LHCII supercomplexes. Down-regulation of PSBR expression diminished the efficiency of oxygen evolution and the extent of nonphotochemical quenching and had an impact on the stability of the oxygen-evolving complex as well as on PSII-LHCII-LHCSR3 supercomplex formation. Its down-regulation destabilized the PSII-LHCII supercomplex and strongly reduced the binding of LHCSR3 to PSII-LHCII supercomplexes, as revealed by quantitative proteomics. PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT P deletion, on the contrary, destabilized PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT Q binding but did not affect PSBR and LHCSR3 association with PSII-LHCII. In summary, these data provide clear evidence that PSBR is required for the stable binding of LHCSR3 to PSII-LHCII supercomplexes and is essential for efficient energy-dependent quenching and the integrity of the PSII-LHCII-LHCSR3 supercomplex under continuous high light. PMID:25699588

  1. Investigating dynamic and energetic determinants of protein nucleic acid recognition: analysis of the zinc finger zif268-DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein-DNA recognition underlies fundamental biological processes ranging from transcription to replication and modification. Herein, we present a computational study of the sequence modulation of internal dynamic properties and of intraprotein networks of aminoacid interactions that determine the stability and specificity of protein-DNA complexes. Results To this aim, we apply novel theoretical approaches to analyze the dynamics and energetics of biological systems starting from MD trajectories. As model system, we chose different sequences of Zinc Fingers (ZF) of the Zif268 family bound with different sequences of DNA. The complexes differ for their experimental stability properties, but share the same overall 3 D structure and do not undergo structural modifications during the simulations. The results of our analysis suggest that the energy landscape for DNA binding may be populated by dynamically different states, even in the absence of major conformational changes. Energetic couplings between residues change in response to protein and/or DNA sequence variations thus modulating the selectivity of recognition and the relative importance of different regions for binding. Conclusions The results show differences in the organization of the intra-protein energy-networks responsible for the stabilization of the protein conformations recognizing and binding DNA. These, in turn, are reflected into different modulation of the ZF's internal dynamics. The results also show a correlation between energetic and dynamic properties of the different proteins and their specificity/selectivity for DNA sequences. Finally, a dynamic and energetic model for the recognition of DNA by Zinc Fingers is proposed. PMID:21106075

  2. A Conserved Mode of Protein Recognition and Binding in a ParD−ParE Toxin−Antitoxin Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean

    2010-05-06

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This TA system forms an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding subdomain that is conserved between distantly related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite a low level of overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system.

  3. Spectroscopy, NMR and DFT studies on molecular recognition of crown ether bridged chiral heterotrinuclear salen Zn(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Ruan, Wen-Juan; Chen, Jia-Mei; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Zhu, Zhi-Ang

    2005-12-01

    A barium-containing crown ether bridged chiral heterotrinuclear salen Zn(II) complex BaZn 2L(ClO 4) 2, where L is a folded dinuclear chiral ( R, R)-salen ligand, has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, 1H NMR, UV-vis, IR, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and mass spectra. As a folded dinuclear chiral host, its recognition with achiral guests (imidazole derivatives), rigid bidentate guest (1,4-diazobicyclo[2,2,2]octane, DABCO) and chiral guests (amino acid methyl esters) was investigated by means of UV-vis spectrophotometric titration, CD spectra. The association constants of D-amino acid methyl esters are found to be higher than those of their L-enantiomer. The sandwich-type binding of BaZn 2L(ClO 4) 2-DABCO supramolecular assembly was specially studied via 1H NMR titration and 1H ROESY. To understand the recognition on molecular level, density functional theory (DFT) calculations on B3LYP/LanL2DZ were performed on the minimal energy conformations of host, guests, and host-guest complexes. The minimal energy conformations were obtained by molecular mechanics (MM) optimization and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results of single point energy, HOMO energy, and charges transfer were analyzed. The results of theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. A conserved and essential basic region mediates tRNA binding to the Elp1 subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Elongator complex

    PubMed Central

    Di Santo, Rachael; Bandau, Susanne; Stark, Michael J R

    2014-01-01

    Elongator is a conserved, multi-protein complex discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, loss of which confers a range of pleiotropic phenotypes. Elongator in higher eukaryotes is required for normal growth and development and a mutation in the largest subunit of human Elongator (Elp1) causes familial dysautonomia, a severe recessive neuropathy. Elongator promotes addition of mcm5 and ncm5 modifications to uridine in the tRNA anticodon ‘wobble’ position in both yeast and higher eukaryotes. Since these modifications are required for the tRNAs to function efficiently, a translation defect caused by hypomodified tRNAs may therefore underlie the variety of phenotypes associated with Elongator dysfunction. The Elp1 carboxy-terminal domain contains a highly conserved arginine/lysine-rich region that resembles a nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Using alanine substitution mutagenesis, we show that this region is essential for Elongator's function in tRNA wobble uridine modification. However, rather than acting to determine the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of Elongator, we find that the basic region plays a critical role in a novel interaction between tRNA and the Elp1 carboxy-terminal domain. Thus the conserved basic region in Elp1 may be essential for tRNA wobble uridine modification by acting as tRNA binding motif. PMID:24750273

  5. Proteomic analysis reveals that COP9 signalosome complex subunit 7A (CSN7A) is essential for the phase transition of migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xi-Wen; Chen, Bing; Huang, Li-Hua; Feng, Qi-Li; Kang, Le

    2015-01-01

    The migratory locust displays a reversible, density-dependent transition between the two phases of gregaria and solitaria. This phenomenon is a typical kind of behavior plasticity. Here, we report that COP9 signalosome complex subunit 7A (CSN7A) is involved in the regulation of locust phase transition. Firstly, 90 proteins were identified to express differentially between the two phases by quantitative proteomic analysis. Gregaria revealed higher levels in proteins related to structure formation, melanism and energy metabolism, whereas solitaria had more abundant proteins related to digestion, absorption and chemical sensing. Subsequently, ten proteins including CSN7A were found to reveal differential mRNA expression profiles between the two phases. The CSN7A had higher mRNA level in the gregaria as compared with the solitaria, and the mRNA amount in the gregaria decreased remarkably during the 32 h-isolation. However, the mRNA level in the solitaria kept constant during the crowding rearing. Finally and importantly, RNA interference of CSN7A in gregaria resulted in obvious phase transition towards solitaria within 24 h. It suggests that CSN7A plays an essential role in the transition of gregaria towards solitaria in the migratory locust. To our knowledge, it's the first time to report the role of CSN in behavior plasticity of animals. PMID:26212173

  6. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunit16 Positively Regulates Salicylate-Mediated Systemic Acquired Resistance and Jasmonate/Ethylene-Induced Defense Pathways[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a long-lasting plant immunity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Biological induction of SAR requires the signal molecule salicylic acid (SA) and involves profound transcriptional changes that are largely controlled by the transcription coactivator NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (NPR1). However, it is unclear how SAR signals are transduced from the NPR1 signaling node to the general transcription machinery. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana Mediator subunit16 (MED16) is an essential positive regulator of SAR. Mutations in MED16 reduced NPR1 protein levels and completely compromised biological induction of SAR. These mutations also significantly suppressed SA-induced defense responses, altered the transcriptional changes induced by the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000/avrRpt2, and rendered plants susceptible to both Pst DC3000/avrRpt2 and Pst DC3000. In addition, mutations in MED16 blocked the induction of several jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)–responsive genes and compromised resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. The Mediator complex acts as a bridge between specific transcriptional activators and the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery; therefore, our data suggest that MED16 may be a signaling component in the gap between the NPR1 signaling node and the general transcription machinery and may relay signals from both the SA and the JA/ET pathways. PMID:23064320

  7. HISTONE MONOUBIQUITINATION1 Interacts with a Subunit of the Mediator Complex and Regulates Defense against Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Rahul; Luo, Hongli; Foerster, Andrea Maria; AbuQamar, Synan; Du, Hai-Ning; Briggs, Scott D.; Scheid, Ortrun Mittelsten; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2009-01-01

    This work examines the role of the Arabidopsis thaliana RING E3 ligase, HISTONE MONOUBIQUITINATION1 (HUB1) in disease resistance. Loss-of-function alleles of HUB1 show increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola, whereas HUB1 overexpression conferred resistance to B. cinerea. By contrast, responses to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae are unaltered in hub1 plants. hub1 mutants have thinner cell walls but increased callose around an infection site. HUB1 acts independently of jasmonate, but ethylene (ET) responses and salicylate modulate the resistance of hub1 mutants to necrotrophic fungi. The ET response factor ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 is epistatic to HUB1 for A. brassicicola resistance but additive to HUB1 for B. cinerea resistance. HUB1 interacts with MED21, a subunit of the Arabidopsis Mediator, a conserved complex that regulates RNA polymerase II. RNA interference lines with reduced MED21 expression are highly susceptible to A. brassicicola and B. cinerea, whereas T-DNA insertion alleles are embryonic lethal, suggesting an essential role for MED21. However, HUB1-mediated histone H2B modification is independent of histone H3 and DNA methylation. In sum, histone H2B monoubiquitination is an important chromatin modification with regulatory roles in plant defense against necrotrophic fungi most likely through modulation of gene expression. PMID:19286969

  8. The Mediator complex subunit MED25 is targeted by the N-terminal transactivation domain of the PEA3 group members

    PubMed Central

    Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Verreman, Kathye; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; de Launoit, Yvan; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2013-01-01

    PEA3, ERM and ER81 belong to the PEA3 subfamily of Ets transcription factors and play important roles in a number of tissue-specific processes. Transcriptional activation by PEA3 subfamily factors requires their characteristic amino-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD). However, the cellular targets of this domain remain largely unknown. Using ERM as a prototype, we show that the minimal N-terminal TAD activates transcription by contacting the activator interacting domain (ACID)/Prostate tumor overexpressed protein 1 (PTOV) domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. We further show that depletion of MED25 disrupts the association of ERM with the Mediator in vitro. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of MED25 as well as the overexpression of MED25-ACID and MED25-VWA domains efficiently inhibit the transcriptional activity of ERM. Moreover, mutations of amino acid residues that prevent binding of MED25 to ERM strongly reduce transactivation by ERM. Finally we show that siRNA depletion of MED25 diminishes PEA3-driven expression of MMP-1 and Mediator recruitment. In conclusion, this study identifies the PEA3 group members as the first human transcriptional factors that interact with the MED25 ACID/PTOV domain and establishes MED25 as a crucial transducer of their transactivation potential. PMID:23531547

  9. Structure of the Tfb1/p53 complex: Insights into the interaction between the p62/Tfb1 subunit of TFIIH and the activation domain of p53.

    PubMed

    Di Lello, Paola; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Jones, Tamara N; Nguyen, Bao D; Hara, Toshiaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Dikeakos, Jimmy D; Appella, Ettore; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2006-06-23

    The interaction between the amino-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and TFIIH is directly correlated with the ability of p53 to activate both transcription initiation and elongation. We have identified a region within the p53 TAD that specifically interacts with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of the p62 and Tfb1 subunits of human and yeast TFIIH. We have solved the 3D structure of a complex between the p53 TAD and the PH domain of Tfb1 by NMR spectroscopy. Our structure reveals that p53 forms a nine residue amphipathic alpha helix (residues 47-55) upon binding to Tfb1. In addition, we demonstrate that diphosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 and Thr55 leads to a significant enhancement in p53 binding to p62 and Tfb1. These results indicate that a phosphorylation cascade involving Ser46 and Thr55 of p53 could play an important role in the regulation of select p53 target genes. PMID:16793543

  10. Inhibitory function of adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit in the process of nuclear translocation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, Yukiko; Kameoka, Masanori Shoji-Kawata, Sanae; Iwabu, Yukie; Mizuta, Hiroyuki; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Fujino, Masato; Natori, Yukikazu; Yura, Yoshiaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2008-03-30

    The transfection of human cells with siRNA against adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit (AP2{alpha}) was revealed to significantly up-regulate the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This effect was confirmed by cell infection with vesicular stomatitis virus G protein-pseudotyped HIV-1 as well as CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Viral adsorption, viral entry and reverse transcription processes were not affected by cell transfection with siRNA against AP2{alpha}. In contrast, viral nuclear translocation as well as the integration process was significantly up-regulated in cells transfected with siRNA against AP2{alpha}. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that a subpopulation of AP2{alpha} was not only localized in the cytoplasm but was also partly co-localized with lamin B, importin {beta} and Nup153, implying that AP2{alpha} negatively regulates HIV-1 replication in the process of nuclear translocation of viral DNA in the cytoplasm or the perinuclear region. We propose that AP2{alpha} may be a novel target for disrupting HIV-1 replication in the early stage of the viral life cycle.

  11. Human Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase Complex Subunit 1-like 1 (VKORC1L1) Mediates Vitamin K-dependent Intracellular Antioxidant Function*

    PubMed Central

    Westhofen, Philipp; Watzka, Matthias; Marinova, Milka; Hass, Moritz; Kirfel, Gregor; Müller, Jens; Bevans, Carville G.; Müller, Clemens R.; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Human vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1-like 1 (VKORC1L1), expressed in HEK 293T cells and localized exclusively to membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, was found to support both vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR) and vitamin K reductase enzymatic activities. Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for dithiothreitol-driven VKOR activity were: Km (μm) = 4.15 (vitamin K1 epoxide) and 11.24 (vitamin K2 epoxide); Vmax (nmol·mg−1·hr−1) = 2.57 (vitamin K1 epoxide) and 13.46 (vitamin K2 epoxide). Oxidative stress induced by H2O2 applied to cultured cells up-regulated VKORC1L1 expression and VKOR activity. Cell viability under conditions of no induced oxidative stress was increased by the presence of vitamins K1 and K2 but not ubinquinone-10 and was specifically dependent on VKORC1L1 expression. Intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in cells treated with 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone were mitigated in a VKORC1L1 expression-dependent manner. Intracellular oxidative damage to membrane intrinsic proteins was inversely dependent on VKORC1L1 expression and the presence of vitamin K1. Taken together, our results suggest that VKORC1L1 is responsible for driving vitamin K-mediated intracellular antioxidation pathways critical to cell survival. PMID:21367861

  12. A new disease-related mutation for mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome affects the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I

    SciTech Connect

    Lertrit, P.; Noer, A.S.; Kapsa, R.; Marzuki, S. ); Jean-Francois, M.J.B.; Thyagarajan, D.; Byrne, E. ); Dennett, X. ); Lethlean, K. )

    1992-09-01

    The molecular lesions in two patients exhibiting classical clinical manifestations of MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes) syndrome have been investigated. A recently reported disease-related A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243 of the mtDNA, in the DHU loop of tRNA[sup Leu], was detected by restriction-enzyme analysis of the relevant PCR-amplified segment of the mtDNA of one patient but was not observed, by either restriction-enzyme analysis or nucleotide sequencing, in the other. To define the molecular lesion in the patient who does not have the A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243, the total mitochondrial genome of the patient has been sequenced. An A[yields]G base substitution at nt 11084, leading to a Thr-to-Ala amino acid replacement in the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I, is suggested to be a disease-related mutation. 49 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The mediator complex subunit Med10 regulates heart valve formation in zebrafish by controlling Tbx2b-mediated Has2 expression and cardiac jelly formation.

    PubMed

    Just, Steffen; Hirth, Sofia; Berger, Ina M; Fishman, Mark C; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    In search for novel key regulators of cardiac valve formation, we isolated the zebrafish cardiac valve mutant ping pong (png). We find that an insertional promoter mutation within the zebrafish mediator complex subunit 10 (med10) gene is leading to impaired heart valve formation. Expression of the T-box transcription factor 2b (Tbx2b), known to be essential in cardiac valve development, is severely reduced in png mutant hearts. We demonstrate here that transient reconstitution of Tbx2b expression rescues AV canal development in png mutant zebrafish. By contrast, overexpression of Forkhead box N4 (Foxn4), a known upstream regulator of Tbx2b, is not capable to reconstitute tbx2b expression and heart valve formation in Med10-deficient png mutant hearts. Interestingly, hyaluronan synthase 2 (has2), a known downstream target of Tbx2 and producer of hyaluronan (HA) - a major ECM component of the cardiac jelly and critical for proper heart valve development - is completely absent in ping pong mutant hearts. We propose here a rather unique role of Med10 in orchestrating cardiac valve formation by mediating Foxn4 dependent tbx2b transcription, expression of Has2 and subsequently proper development of the cardiac jelly. PMID:27343557

  14. Proteomic analysis reveals that COP9 signalosome complex subunit 7A (CSN7A) is essential for the phase transition of migratory locust

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xi-Wen; Chen, Bing; Huang, Li-Hua; Feng, Qi-Li; Kang, Le

    2015-01-01

    The migratory locust displays a reversible, density-dependent transition between the two phases of gregaria and solitaria. This phenomenon is a typical kind of behavior plasticity. Here, we report that COP9 signalosome complex subunit 7A (CSN7A) is involved in the regulation of locust phase transition. Firstly, 90 proteins were identified to express differentially between the two phases by quantitative proteomic analysis. Gregaria revealed higher levels in proteins related to structure formation, melanism and energy metabolism, whereas solitaria had more abundant proteins related to digestion, absorption and chemical sensing. Subsequently, ten proteins including CSN7A were found to reveal differential mRNA expression profiles between the two phases. The CSN7A had higher mRNA level in the gregaria as compared with the solitaria, and the mRNA amount in the gregaria decreased remarkably during the 32 h-isolation. However, the mRNA level in the solitaria kept constant during the crowding rearing. Finally and importantly, RNA interference of CSN7A in gregaria resulted in obvious phase transition towards solitaria within 24 h. It suggests that CSN7A plays an essential role in the transition of gregaria towards solitaria in the migratory locust. To our knowledge, it’s the first time to report the role of CSN in behavior plasticity of animals. PMID:26212173

  15. The Stoichiometry and Biophysical Properties of the Kv4 Potassium Channel Complex with K+ Channel-interacting Protein (KChIP) Subunits Are Variable, Depending on the Relative Expression Level*

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Kv4 is a voltage-gated K+ channel, which underlies somatodendritic subthreshold A-type current (ISA) and cardiac transient outward K+ (Ito) current. Various ion channel properties of Kv4 are known to be modulated by its auxiliary subunits, such as K+ channel-interacting protein (KChIP) or dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein. KChIP is a cytoplasmic protein and increases the current amplitude, decelerates the inactivation, and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that Kv4 and KChIP form an octameric complex with four Kv4 subunits and four KChIP subunits. However, it remains unknown whether the Kv4·KChIP complex can have a different stoichiometry other than 4:4. In this study, we expressed Kv4.2 and KChIP4 with various ratios in Xenopus oocytes and observed that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 gradually changed with the increase in co-expressed KChIP4. The tandem repeat constructs of Kv4.2 and KChIP4 revealed that the 4:4 (Kv4.2/KChIP4) channel shows faster recovery than the 4:2 channel, suggesting that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 change, depending on the number of bound KChIP4s. Subunit counting by single-molecule imaging revealed that the bound number of KChIP4 in each Kv4.2·KChIP4 complex was dependent on the expression level of KChIP4. Taken together, we conclude that the stoichiometry of Kv4·KChIP complex is variable, and the biophysical properties of Kv4 change depending on the number of bound KChIP subunits. PMID:24811166

  16. The SocioBox: A Novel Paradigm to Assess Complex Social Recognition in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Krueger-Burg, Dilja; Winkler, Daniela; Mitkovski, Mišo; Daher, Fernanda; Ronnenberg, Anja; Schlüter, Oliver M.; Dere, Ekrem; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in social skills are central to mental disease, and developing tools for their assessment in mouse models is essential. Here we present the SocioBox, a new behavioral paradigm to measure social recognition. Using this paradigm, we show that male wildtype mice of different strains can readily identify an unfamiliar mouse among 5 newly acquainted animals. In contrast, female mice exhibit lower locomotor activity during social exploration in the SocioBox compared to males and do not seem to discriminate between acquainted and unfamiliar mice, likely reflecting inherent differences in gender-specific territorial tasks. In addition to a simple quantification of social interaction time of mice grounded on predefined spatial zones (zone-based method), we developed a set of unbiased, data-driven analysis tools based on heat map representations and characterized by greater sensitivity. First proof-of-principle that the SocioBox allows diagnosis of social recognition deficits is provided using male PSD-95 heterozygous knockout mice, a mouse model related to psychiatric pathophysiology. PMID:27563287

  17. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2–30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  18. The SocioBox: A Novel Paradigm to Assess Complex Social Recognition in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Krueger-Burg, Dilja; Winkler, Daniela; Mitkovski, Mišo; Daher, Fernanda; Ronnenberg, Anja; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dere, Ekrem; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in social skills are central to mental disease, and developing tools for their assessment in mouse models is essential. Here we present the SocioBox, a new behavioral paradigm to measure social recognition. Using this paradigm, we show that male wildtype mice of different strains can readily identify an unfamiliar mouse among 5 newly acquainted animals. In contrast, female mice exhibit lower locomotor activity during social exploration in the SocioBox compared to males and do not seem to discriminate between acquainted and unfamiliar mice, likely reflecting inherent differences in gender-specific territorial tasks. In addition to a simple quantification of social interaction time of mice grounded on predefined spatial zones (zone-based method), we developed a set of unbiased, data-driven analysis tools based on heat map representations and characterized by greater sensitivity. First proof-of-principle that the SocioBox allows diagnosis of social recognition deficits is provided using male PSD-95 heterozygous knockout mice, a mouse model related to psychiatric pathophysiology. PMID:27563287

  19. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  20. Conformational changes in E. coli RNA polymerase during promoter recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Brodolin, K L; Studitsky, V M; Mirzabekov, A D

    1993-01-01

    We analysed complexes formed during recognition of the lacUV5 promoter by E. coli RNA polymerase using formaldehyde as a DNA-protein and protein-protein cross-linking reagent. Most of the cross-linked complexes specific for the open complex (RPO) contain the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase cross-linked with promoter DNA in the regions: -50 to -49; -5 to -10; + 5 to +8 and +18 to +21. The protein-protein cross-linking pattern of contacting subunits is the same for the RNA polymerase in solution and in RPO: there are strong sigma-beta' and beta-beta' interactions. In contrast, only beta-beta' cross-links were detected in the closed (RPC) and intermediate (RPI) complexes. In presence of lac repressor before or after formation of the RPO cross-linking pattern is similar with that of RPI (RPC) complex. Images PMID:8284224