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Sample records for recoil decay tagging

  1. In-beam studies of proton emitters using the Recoil-Decay Tagging method

    SciTech Connect

    Seweryniak, D.; Woods, P. J.; Ressler, J.; Davids, C. N.; Heinz, A.; Sonzogni, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.; Caggiano, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Cizewski, J. A.; Davinson, T.; Ding, K. Y.; Fotiades, N.; Garg, U.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T.-L.; Kondev, F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Reiter, P.; Shergur, J.; Wiedenhoever, I.

    2000-01-19

    The last five years have witnessed a rapid increase in the volume of data on proton decaying nuclei. The path was led by decay studies with recoil mass separators equipped with double-sided Si strip detectors. The properties of many proton-decaying states were deduced, which triggered renewed theoretical interest in the process of proton decay. The decay experiments were closely followed by in-beam {gamma}-ray studies which extended one's knowledge of high-spin states of proton emitters. The unparalleled selectivity of the Recoil-Decay Tagging method combined with the high efficiency of large arrays of Ge detectors allowed, despite small cross sections and overwhelming background from strong reaction channels, the observation of excited states in several proton emitters. Recently, in-beam studies of the deformed proton emitters {sup 141}Ho and {sup 131}Eu have been performed with the GAMMASPHERE array of Ge detectors and the Fragment Mass Analyzer at ATLAS. Evidence was found for rotational bands in {sup 141}Ho and {sup 131}Eu. The deformations and the single-particle configurations proposed for the proton emitting states from the earlier proton-decay studies were confronted with the assignments deduced based on the in-beam data. It should be noted that the cross section for populating {sup 131}Eu is only about 50 nb, and it represents the weakest channel ever studied in an in-beam experiment.

  2. Recoil Decay Tagging Study Of Transitional Proton Emitters 145,146,147Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A.P.; Woods, P.J.; Davinson, T.; Liu, Z.; Davids, C.N.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M.P.; Hammond, N.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Mukherjee, G.; Sinha, S.; Blank, B.; Freeman, S.J.; Hoteling, N.; Shergur, J.; Walters, W.B.; Scholey, C.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Woehr, A.

    2005-04-05

    Gamma rays from the transitional proton emitting nuclei 145,146,147Tm have been observed using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The ground state band of 147Tm was confirmed and extended and the unfavoured signature sequence was observed. A ground state rotational band with properties of a decoupled h11/2 band was observed in 145Tm. In addition coincidences between the proton fine structure line and the 2+{yields}0+ {gamma}-ray transition in 144Er were detected at the focal plane of the FMA. This is the first time that coincidences between proton radioactive decays and {gamma} rays have been seen. The particle decay of 146Tm has been measured with improved statistics and a rotational band similar to 147Tm has been observed.

  3. Musett: A segmented Si array for Recoil-Decay-Tagging studies at VAMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Ch.; Jeanneau, F.; Sulignano, B.; Druillole, F.; Ljungvall, J.; Paul, B.; Virique, E.; Baron, P.; Bervas, H.; Clément, E.; Delagnes, E.; Dijon, A.; Dossat, E.; Drouart, A.; Farget, F.; Flouzat, Ch.; De France, G.; Görgen, A.; Houarner, Ch.; Jacquot, B.; Korten, W.; Lebertre, G.; Lecornu, B.; Legeard, L.; Lermitage, A.; Lhenoret, S.; Marry, C.; Maugeais, C.; Menager, L.; Meunier, O.; Navin, A.; Nizery, F.; Obertelli, A.; Rauly, E.; Raine, B.; Rejmund, M.; Ropert, J.; Saillant, F.; Savajols, H.; Schmitt, Ch.; Tripon, M.; Wanlin, E.; Wittwer, G.

    2014-05-01

    A new segmented silicon-array called MUSETT has been built for the study of heavy elements using the Recoil-Decay-Tagging technique. MUSETT is located at the focal plane of the VAMOS spectrometer at GANIL and is used in conjunction with a γ-ray array at the target position. This paper describes the device, which consists of four 10×10 cm2 Si detectors and its associated front-end electronics based on highly integrated ASICs electronics. The triggerless readout electronics, the data acquisition and the analysis tools developed for its characterization are presented. This device was commissioned at GANIL with the EXOGAM γ-ray spectrometer using the fusion-evaporation reaction 197Au(22Ne,5n)214Ac. Additionally, the performance of the VAMOS Wien filter used during the in-beam commissioning is also reported.

  4. Identification of γ Transitions in ^176-179Hg Using the Recoil Decay Tagging Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, M. P.; Ackermann, D.; Blumenthal, D.; Davids, C.; Fischer, S. M.; Hackman, G.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Nisius, D.; Seweryniak, D.; Woods, P. J.; Amro, H.; Brown, T.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Reviol, W.; Schwartz, J.; Simpson, J.

    1996-05-01

    In light Hg isotopes (100<= N <= 108), shape co-existence has been established close to the ground state where rotational bands built on collective oblate and prolate shapes are observed. While this shape co-existence feature is predicted to be sustained in lighter Hg nuclei, such measurements become increasingly difficult due to the fact that the cross-sections for making these nuclei become very small (<1mb) and fission dominates (σ_fiss > 100 mb). In order to study this shape-coexistence phenomenon all the way to the proton-drip line, we have identified for the first time γ-ray transitions in ^176-179Hg using the Ayeball Ge array coupled to the Fragment Mass Analyzer. In order to assign γ transitions to a particular nuclide, the recoil decay tagging method was utilized, a technique which correlates γ-rays emitted from excited residues with the charged particle radioactivity of their decay. This work is supported by the DOE under contract W-31-109-ENG-38.

  5. Spectroscopy of {sup 144}Ho using recoil-isomer tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, P. J. R; Cullen, D. M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Puurunen, A.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sorri, J.; Saren, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Xu, F. R.

    2010-02-15

    Excited states in the proton-unbound odd-odd nucleus {sup 144}Ho have been populated using the {sup 92}Mo({sup 54}Fe,pn){sup 144}Ho reaction and studied using the recoil-isomer-tagging technique. The alignment properties and signature splitting of the rotational band above the I{sup p}i=(8{sup +}){sup 144m}Ho isomer have been analyzed and the isomer confirmed to have a pih{sub 11/2} x nuh{sub 11/2} two-quasiparticle configuration. The configuration-constrained blocking method has been used to calculate the shapes of the ground and isomeric states, which are both predicted to have triaxial nuclear shapes with |gamma|approx =24 deg.

  6. α -decay chains of recoiled superheavy nuclei: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyti, Sawhney, Gudveen; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-05-01

    A systematic theoretical study of α -decay half-lives in the superheavy mass region of the periodic table of elements is carried out by extending the quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory based on the preformed cluster model (PCM) to include temperature (T ) dependence in its built-in preformation and penetration probabilities of decay fragments. Earlier, the α -decay chains of the isotopes of Z =115 were investigated by using the standard PCM for spontaneous decays, with"hot-optimum" orientation effects included, which required a constant scaling factor of 104 to approach the available experimental data. In the present approach of the PCM (T ≠0 ), the temperature effects are included via the recoil energy of the residual superheavy nucleus (SHN) left after x -neutron emission from the superheavy compound nucleus. The important result is that the α -decay half-lives calculated by the PCM (T ≠0 ) match the experimental data nearly exactly, without using any scaling factor of the type used in the PCM. Note that the PCM (T ≠0 ) is an equivalent of the dynamical cluster-decay model for heavy-ion collisions at angular momentum ℓ =0 . The only parameter of model is the neck-length parameter Δ R , which for the calculated half-lives of α -decay chains of various isotopes of Z =113 to 118 nuclei formed in "hot-fusion" reactions is found to be nearly constant, i.e., Δ R ≈0.95 ±0.05 fm for all the α -decay chains studied. The use of recoiled residue nucleus as a secondary heavy-ion beam for nuclear reactions has also been suggested in the past.

  7. Recoil ion charge state distribution following the beta(sup +) decay of {sup 21}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, Nicholas D.; Freedman, Stuart J.; Fujikawa, Brian K.; Vetter, Paul A.

    2003-01-03

    The charge state distribution following the positron decay of 21Na has been measured, with a larger than expected fraction of the daughter 21Ne in positive charge states. No dependence on either the positron or recoil nucleus energy is observed. The data is compared to a simple model based on the sudden approximation. Calculations suggest a small but important contribution from recoil ionization has important consequences for precision beta decay correlation experiments detecting recoil ions.

  8. Prompt and delayed spectroscopy of {sup 142}Tb using recoil-isomer tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, P. J. R.; Cullen, D. M.; Kishada, A. M.; Rigby, S. V.; Varley, B. J.; Scholey, C.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Maentyniemi, K.; Nieminen, P.; Nyman, M.; Pakarinen, J.

    2009-02-15

    Recoil-isomer tagging has been used to characterize the states built upon an I{sup {pi}}=8{sup +} isomer in {sup 142}Tb. High-spin states of the neutron-deficient nucleus {sup 142}Tb were populated using an {sup 54}Fe beam, accelerated onto a {sup 92}Mo target of thickness {approx}500 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} at energies of 245, 252, and 265 MeV using the K130 cyclotron at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. Use of the JUROGAM target-position Ge-detector array coupled with the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer at the RITU gas-filled recoil separator has significantly increased the efficiency of the isomer-tagging technique. The rotational band built upon the I{sup {pi}}=8{sup +} isomeric state was established with isomer-tagged {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data and angular distributions were measured for some of the more intensely populated states. Two previously unobserved bands that bypass the isomer were also established. The new data have been interpreted within the framework of the cranked-shell model. The data show good agreement with the calculated triaxial nuclear shape with {gamma}=-30 deg. for the {sup 142m2}Tb isomeric state. The B(M1)/B(E2) branching ratios, nuclear alignment, signature splitting, and reduced transition probability, B(E1), of the isomeric state have been systematically compared with those of the neighboring nuclei. These comparisons give further evidence for the {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}h{sub 11/2} configuration of the isomer.

  9. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc; Trcera, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  10. First detection and energy measurement of recoil ions following beta decay in a Penning trap with the WITCH experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M.; Coeck, S.; Kozlov, V. Yu.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Delahaye, P.; Friedag, P.; Glück, F.; Herbane, M.; Herlert, A.; Kraev, I. S.; Mader, J.; Tandecki, M.; Van Gorp, S.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wenander, F.; Severijns, N.

    2011-03-01

    The WITCH experiment (Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles) will search for exotic interactions by investigating the β - ν angular correlation via the measurement of the recoil energy spectrum after β -decay. As a first step the recoil ions from the β-_{} -decay of 124In stored in a Penning trap have been detected. The evidence for the detection of recoil ions is shown and the properties of the ion cloud that forms the radioactive source for the experiment in the Penning trap are presented.

  11. Measurement of the (211)Pb half-life using recoil atoms from (219)Rn decay.

    PubMed

    Aitken-Smith, P M; Collins, S M

    2016-04-01

    The radioactive half-life of (211)Pb was measured, by α-particle counting of samples of radiochemically pure (211)Pb in equilibrium with its α-emitting progeny, (211)Bi and (211)Po. The samples were prepared by the collection of (215)Po recoil atoms from the decay of the (219)Rn decay progeny produced from a (223)Ra sample onto stainless steel discs. The radioactive decay of the (211)Pb was measured utilising a 2π proportional counter operating on the α plateau. A half-life of 36.164 (13)min was determined, which is in agreement with currently available literature. A full uncertainty budget is presented. A recommended half-life of T1/2((211)Pb)=36.161 (17)min has been evaluated from the current literature values. PMID:26773817

  12. Recoil effects due to electron shake-off following the beta decay of 6 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Gordon W. F.; Schulhoff, Eva

    2016-05-01

    There are currently several experiments in progress to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model by high precision studies of angular correlations in the β decay of the helium isotope 6He to form 6Li +e- +νe. After the β decay process, the atomic electrons of 6 Li+ adjust to the sudden change of nuclear charge from 2 to 3. We calculate the probabilities for electron shake-up and shake-off, including recoil effects, by the use of a Stieltjes imaging representation of the final states. A variety of sum rules provides tight consistency checks on the accuracy of the results. Results obtained previously indicate that there is a 7 σ disagreement between theory and experiment for the additional nuclear recoil induced by the emission of atomic shake-off electrons. This disagreement will be further studied, and the results extended to the 1 s 2 p3 P and metastable 1 s 2 s3 S states as initial states of 6 He before β-decay. Research supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  13. Tensor interaction constraints from {beta}-decay recoil spin asymmetry of trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcairn, J. R. A.; Roberge, D.; Gorelov, A.; Ashery, D.; Aviv, O.; Behr, J. A.; Bricault, P. G.; Dombsky, M.; Holt, J. D.; Jackson, K. P.; Lee, B.; Pearson, M. R.; Gaudin, A.; Dej, B.; Hoehr, C.; Gwinner, G.; Melconian, D.

    2009-01-15

    We have measured the angular distribution of recoiling daughter nuclei emitted from the Gamow-Teller {beta} decay of spin-polarized {sup 80}Rb. The asymmetry of this distribution vanishes to lowest order in the standard model (SM) in pure Gamow-Teller decays, producing an observable very sensitive to new interactions. We measure the non-SM contribution to the asymmetry to be A{sub T}=0.015{+-}0.029 (stat) {+-}0.019 (syst), consistent with the SM prediction. We constrain higher-order SM corrections using the measured momentum dependence of the asymmetry, and their remaining uncertainty dominates the systematic error. Future progress in determining the weak magnetism term theoretically or experimentally would reduce the final errors. We describe the resulting constraints on fundamental four-Fermi tensor interactions.

  14. Observation of a resonance in B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decays at low recoil.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; 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Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-13

    A broad peaking structure is observed in the dimuon spectrum of B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decays in the kinematic region where the kaon has a low recoil against the dimuon system. The structure is consistent with interference between the B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decay and a resonance and has a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations. The mean and width of the resonance are measured to be 4191(-8)(+9)  MeV/c2 and 65(-16)(+22)  MeV/c2, respectively, where the uncertainties include statistical and systematic contributions. These measurements are compatible with the properties of the ψ(4160) meson. First observations of both the decay B+ → ψ(4160)K+ and the subsequent decay ψ(4160) → μ+ μ- are reported. The resonant decay and the interference contribution make up 20% of the yield for dimuon masses above 3770  MeV/c2. This contribution is larger than theoretical estimates. PMID:24074076

  15. 8He cluster structure studied by recoil proton tagged knockout reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y.; Cao, Z.; Xiao, J.; Jiang, D.; Zheng, T.; Hua, H.; Ge, Y.; Li, X.; Lou, J.; Li, Q.; Lv, L.; Qiao, R.; You, H.; Chen, R.; Sakurai, H.; Otsu, H.; Li, Z.; Nishimura, M.; Sakaguchi, S.; Baba, H.; Togano, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Li, C.; Wang, S.; Wang, H.; Li, K.; Nakayama, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Deguchi, S.; Sato, Y.; Tshoo, K.

    2013-04-01

    Knockout reaction experiment for 8He at 82.3 MeV/u on Hydrogen target was carried out at the RIPS beam line in RIKEN. Recoil protons were detected in coincidence with the forward moving core fragments and neutrons. The quasi-free knockout mechanism is identified through the polar angle correlation and checked by various kinematics conditions. The absolute differential cross sections for 6He core cluster are obtained and compared with the simple Glauber model calculations. The extracted spectroscopic factor is close to unity and a shrinking of the cluster size is evidenced.

  16. Hadronic effects and observables in B →π ℓ+ℓ- decay at large recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambrock, Christian; Khodjamirian, Alexander; Rusov, Aleksey

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the amplitude of the rare flavor-changing neutral-current decay B →π ℓ+ℓ- at large recoil of the pion. The nonlocal contributions in which the weak effective operators are combined with the electromagnetic lepton-pair emission are systematically taken into account. These amplitudes are calculated at off-shell values of the lepton-pair mass squared, q2<0 , employing the operator-product expansion, QCD factorization and light-cone sum rules. The results are fitted to hadronic dispersion relations in q2, including the intermediate vector meson contributions. The dispersion relations are then used in the physical region q2>0 . Our main result is the process-dependent addition Δ C9(B π )(q2) to the Wilson coefficient C9 obtained at 4 mℓ2decay B →π ν ν ¯.

  17. Use of the ECL-CAMAC trigger processor system for recoil missing mass triggers at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Bracker, S.; Hartner, G.; Appel, J.; Nash, T.

    1981-05-01

    A trigger processor in operation since May 1980 at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab will be described. The processor, based on the Fermilab ECL-CAMAC system, allows fast selection of high mass diffractive events from the total hadronic cross section. Data from a recoil detector, consisting of 3 wire chambers and 4 layers of scintillator concentric about a 1.5 m liquid hydrogen target, is digitized and presented to the processor within 3 sec. From the chamber data are found the vertices and angles of all recoiling tracks.

  18. Spectroscopy of 9B via high-resolution ejectile-tagged recoil break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheldon, C.; Kokalova, Tz.; Freer, M.; Walshe, J.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Faestermann, Th.; Lutter, R.; Malcolm, J. D.; Marín-Lámbarri, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    An experiment has been carried out using the 9Be(3He ,t )B9* reaction at a beam energy of 33 MeV. A large acceptance silicon-strip array was used to detect the B9* break-up in coincidence with the triton ejectiles in the high-resolution Munich-Q3D spectrograph. The excitation energy regime <3 MeV has been explored and the spectrum resulting from proton decaying states, isolated and characterized. Additional resonance strength is observed at 1.86 MeV ±70 keV(stat) ±35 keV(syst), in agreement with two other recent measurements at higher energies and different angles. The consequences for the "missing" ½+ first excited state are discussed. Additionally, the branching ratios for the 2.36 MeV 5/2 - state have been measured as Γα 0/Γ =0.98 ±0.12 and Γp 0/Γ =0.016 ±0.008 , in close agreement with earlier work.

  19. A measurement of A FBb in lifetime tagged heavy flavour Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Mattison, T.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Nencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Schael, S.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Jacquet, M.; Kimtr19, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Simion, S.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Martin, E. B.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1994-08-01

    A new measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in Z→ b overlineb decays is presented. Hadrons from b decays are tagged using their long lifetimes. The b quark charge and direction are reconstructed with a hemisphere charge algorithm. The asymmetry and reconstructed b hemisphere charge are measured in the 69 pb -1 of data collected by ALEPH during 1991, 1992 and 1993. They are used to extract sin 2θ Weff, which is determined to be 0.2315 ± 0.0016 (stat.) ± 0.0009 (syst.), corresponding to an AFBb of 0.0992 ± 0.0084 (stat.) ± 0.0046 (syst.).

  20. Direct Measurement of Ab in Z0 Decays Using Charged Kaon Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kenji; Abe, Koya; Abe, T.; Adam, I.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Arodzero, A.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T. L.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Bauer, J. M.; Bellodi, G.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolen, B.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Byrne, R. M.; Calcaterra, A.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chou, A.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Convery, M. R.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; Crawford, G.; Damerell, C. J.; Danielson, M. N.; Daoudi, M.; de Groot, N.; dell'Orso, R.; Dervan, P. J.; de Sangro, R.; Dima, M.; D'Oliveira, A.; Dong, D. N.; Doser, M.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Eschenburg, V.; Etzion, E.; Fahey, S.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fero, M. J.; Flood, K.; Frey, R.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Goodman, E. R.; Hart, E. L.; Harton, J. L.; Hasan, A.; Hasuko, K.; Hedges, S. J.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Huynh, X.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, M.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J. A.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kim, Y. D.; King, R.; King, M. E.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Leith, D. W.; Lia, V.; Lin, C.-J. S.; Liu, X.; Liu, M. X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mahjouri, M.; Mancinelli, G.; Manley, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Menegatti, G.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Moore, T. B.; Morii, M.; Muller, D.; Murzin, V.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Oishi, N.; Onoprienko, D.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, H.; Park, C. H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schumm, B. A.; Schwiening, J.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Smy, M. B.; Snyder, J. A.; Staengle, H.; Stahl, A.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, R.; Steiner, H.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Thom, J.; Torrence, E.; Toumbas, N. K.; Usher, T.; Vannini, C.; Va'Vra, J.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Wagner, D. L.; Waite, A. P.; Walston, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, C.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, B.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittlin, J. L.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wright, T. R.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yashima, J.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zhou, J.

    1999-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry Ab in the Z0 to bb¯ coupling using a new technique to distinguish the b and b¯ quarks using charged kaons from B decays. The Z0 bosons are produced in e+e- collisions at the SLC with longitudinally polarized electrons. bb¯ events are selected using a secondary vertex mass tag and Ab is determined from the left-right forward-backward asymmetry. From the 1994-1995 data sample, selected from 100 000 hadronic Z0 decays, we obtain Ab = 0.855+/-0.088stat+/-0.102syst.

  1. Electron emission and recoil effects following the beta decay of He6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulhoff, Eva E.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2015-11-01

    Probabilities for atomic electron excitation (shake-up) and ionization (shake-off) are studied following the beta-decay process →Li+6He6+e-+ν¯e , and in particular, recoil-induced contributions to the shake-off probability are calculated within the nonrelativistic sudden approximation. A pseudostate expansion method together with Stieltjes imaging is used to represent the complete two-electron spectrum of final Li+6 ,Li26+, and Li36+ states. Results for the recoil correction show a 7 σ disagreement with the experiment of Carlson et al. [Phys. Rev. 129, 2220 (1963), 10.1103/PhysRev.129.2220]. A variety of sum rules, including a newly derived Thomas-Reich-Kuhn oscillator strength sum rule for dipole recoil terms, provides tight constraints on the accuracy of the results. Calculations are performed for the helium 1 s 2 s 3S metastable state, as well as for the 1 s21S ground state. Our results would reduce the recoil-induced correction to the measured electroneutrino coupling constant ae μ from the apparent 0.6% used in the experiments to 0.09%.

  2. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A.B.; Nygren, D.

    2015-03-24

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase offers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at themore » 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.« less

  3. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A.B.; Nygren, D.

    2015-03-24

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase offers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at the 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  4. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Nygren, D.

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase o_ers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at the 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  5. CP Violation in Flavor Tagged $B_s \\to J/\\psi \\phi$ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Makhoul, Khaldoun

    2009-06-01

    In this dissertation, we present the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of Bs → J/ΨΦ decays performed with the use of initial-state flavor tagging. CP violation is observed in this mode through the interference of decay without net mixing and decay with net mixing, that is, Bs → J/ΨΦ and Bs → $\\bar{B}$s → J/ΨΦ . The time-dependent angular analysis is used to extract the decay widths of the heavy and light Bs eigenstates and the difference between these decay widths ΔΓs {triple_bond} ΓsLsH. Initial-state flavor tagging is used to determine the matter-antimatter content of the Bs mesons at production time. We combine flavor tagging with the angular analysis, which statistically determines the contributions of the CP-even and CP-odd components at decay time, to measure the CP-violating phase βs. The phase βs is expressed in terms of elements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix as βs {triple_bond} arg (-VtsV*tb/VcsV*cb), and is predicted by the Standard Model to be close to zero, βsSM = 0.02. In the measurement of ΔΓs, we use a dataset corresponding to 1.7 fb-1 of luminosity, collected at the CDF experiment from proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. In the measurement of βs, we use a dataset corresponding to 1.3 fb-1 of collected luminosity. We measure ΔΓs = (0.071-0.059+0.064 ± 0.007) ps-1 using the time-dependent angular analysis. Combining the angular analysis with flavor-tagging, we find that assuming the Standard Model predictions of βs and ΔΓs, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 33%. We obtain a suite of associated

  6. Developments for a measurement of the beta -- nu correlation and determination of the recoil charge-state distribution in 6He beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ran

    The beta-nu of a pure Gamow-Teller beta decay such as the 6He decay is sensitive to tensor-type weak currents predicted by theories beyond the Standard Model. An experiment is developed at University of Washington aiming at measuring the coefficient a_{beta-nu} of 6He decays to the 0.1% level and looking for its deviation from the Standard-Model prediction -1/3 using laser-trapped 6He atoms. The beta particle is detected by a scintillator and a multi-wire proportional chamber, and the recoil ion is detected by a microchannel plate with delay-line anodes for position readouts. a_{beta-nu} is extracted by fitting the measured time-of-flight spectrum of the recoil ions to templates generated by Monte Carlo simulations. This dissertation describes the developments of this experiment for the intermediate goal of a 1% level a_{beta-nu} measurement, such as the detector design, Monte Carlo simulation software, and data analysis frame work. Particularly, detector calibrations are described in detail. The analysis of a 2% level proof-of-principle run in October 2015 is presented as well. Shake-off probabilities for decays of trapped 6He atoms matter for the high-precision a_{beta-nu} measurement. The charge state distribution of recoil ions is obtained by analyzing their time-of-flight distribution using the same experimental setups for the a_{beta-nu} measurement. An analysis approach that is independent of the beta-nu correlation is developed. The measured upper limit of the double shake-off probability is 2x10. {-4} at 90% confidence level. This result is 100 times lower than the most recent calculation by Schulhoff and Drake. This disagreement is significant for the a_{beta-nu} measurement and needs to be addressed by improved atomic theory calculations.

  7. Measurement of |Vcb| and the Form-Factor Slope for BBar -> Dlnu Decays on the Recoil of Fully Reconstructed B Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2008-08-21

    We present a measurement of the CKM matrix element |V{sub cb}| and the form-factor slope {rho}{sup 2} for {bar B} {yields} D{ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays based on 417 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The semileptonic decays are selected in B{bar B} events in which the hadronic decay of the second B meson is fully reconstructed. From the measured differential decay rate of the signal decay we determine G(1)|V{sub cb}| = (43.0 {+-} 1.9 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -3}, {rho}{sup 2} = 1.20 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, where G(1) is the hadronic form factor at the point of zero recoil. Using a lattice calculation for G(1) we extract |V{sub cb}| = (39.8 {+-} 1.8 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -3}, where the stated errors refer to the statistical, systematic, and form factor uncertainties. We also present a measurement of the exclusive branching fractions, {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = (2.31 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.07)% and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = (2.23 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.08)%.

  8. Measurement of the branching fraction of B+→τ+ντ decays with the semileptonic tagging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenbitter, B.; Heck, M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Kuhr, T.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, V.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Golob, B.; Grygier, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Heider, M.; Heller, A.; Horiguchi, T.; Huschle, M.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sakai, Y.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schram, M.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Ziegler, M.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fraction of B+→τ+ντ decays using a data sample of 772 ×106B B ¯ pairs, collected at the ϒ (4 S ) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We reconstruct the accompanying B meson in a semileptonic decay and detect the recoiling B candidate in the decay channel B+→τ+ντ. We obtain a branching fraction of B (B+→τ+ντ)=[1.25 ±0.28 (stat.)±0.27 (syst.)]×10-4 . This result is in good agreement with previous measurements and the expectation from the calculation based on the Standard Model.

  9. Resonant structure and flavour tagging in the Bπ+/- system using fully reconstructed B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Etienne, F.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-04-01

    Starting from a sample of four million hadronic Z decays collected with the ALEPH detector at LEP, 404 charged and neutral B mesons are fully reconstructed and used to look for resonant structure in the Bπ system. An excess of events is observed above the expected background in the Bπ mass spectrum at a mass ~5.7 GeV/c2, consistent with the production and decay to B(*)π of the B** states predicted by Heavy Quark Symmetry (HQS). In the framework of HQS, it is found that the mass of the B2* state is (5739+ 8-11(stat)+6-4(syst)) MeV/c2 and the relative production rate of the B** system is BR(b-->B**-->B(*)π)/BR(b-- >Bu,d)=(31+/-9(stat)+6-5(syst))%. In the same sample of B mesons, significant Bπ+/- charge-flavour correlations are observed, which may prove important for tagging the initial B state in future CP violation studies.

  10. Search for B to K nu nubar Decays with a Semileptonic Tag

    SciTech Connect

    Vuosalo, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Flavor-changing neutral-current transitions such as b → sν$\\bar{v}$ are absent at tree level in the Standard Model and can only occur via loop diagrams. Several new physics models may enhance the rate of these transitions. This document presents searches for the exclusive decays B+ u → K+ν$\\bar{v}$ and B0 d → K0S ν$\\bar{v}$, which have a predicted theoretical branching fraction of (3.8+1.2 -0.6) × 10-6. The presence of two neutrinos in the final state makes recognition of the signal challenging, so the full reconstruction of one B meson in the semileptonic decay channel B → D(*)lν is used to facilitate the search for the signal in the recoiling B. This analysis uses approximately 420 fb-1 or 460 million B$\\bar{B}$ pairs collected over runs 1-6 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. This analysis finds 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions of 1.3×10-5 for B+ u → K+ν$\\bar{v}$, 5.6×10-5 for B0 d → K0ν$\\bar{v}$, and the first upper limits on the partial branching fractions for B+ u → K+ν$\\bar{v}$ of 3.1 × 10-5 for K+ CMS momentum < 1.5 GeV/c and of 0.89 × 10-5 for K+ CMS momentum > 1.5 GeV/c. These results improve upon the previous best upper limits, which came from the Belle experiment, of 1.4 × 10-5 for B+ u → K+ν$\\bar{v}$ and 16 × 10-5 for B0 d → K0ν$\\bar{v}$. They also rule out a new physics model of scalar dark matter for scalar particle masses below 1.7 GeV/c2.

  11. A Search for the Rare Leptonic B- to tau- anti-neutrino Recoiling against B+ to Decays to anti-D*0 l+ Lepton-neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Mousumi; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-10-17

    This thesis describes a search for the decay B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} in 231.8 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed exclusive semi-leptonic B decay (B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}*{sup 0} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} signal is performed in the following {tau} decay modes: {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}. They find no evidence of signal, and they set a preliminary upper limit on the branching fraction of {beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -4} at the 90% confidence level (CL). This result is then combined with a statistically independent BABAR search for B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} to give a combined preliminary limit of {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) < 2.6 x 10{sup -4} at 90% CL.

  12. Desorption due to Recoil Induced by Neutrino Emission and Auger Relaxation of CHLORINE-37 Following the Electron Capture Decay of ARGON-37.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin

    1995-01-01

    A novel experiment was developed in this work to study the desorption and the Auger relaxation processes of ^{37}Cl following the ^{37}Ar electron capture decay. For the first time, the desorption of ^{37}Cl ions due to recoil induced by neutrino emission in this decay process was observed. The kinetic energy distribution of the desorbing ^{37}Cl ions was accurately measured by using coincidence techniques. The resulting ^{37}Cl ion energy ranges from 5 eV to 13 eV with a maximum at around 9 eV and an FWHM about 3 eV. The charge state distribution of the desorbing ^{37}Cl ions was also measured. The resulting charge state distribution is: 53% of the total ions have charge +e, 21% have charge +2e and 26% have charge +ne, where n >= 3. The desorbing probability of ^ {37}Cl ions was measured by two independent experiments which gave the result of 9.4+/-1.2 %. The energy distribution, the charge state distribution and the desorbing probability of ^{37}Cl ions are all quite different as compared with the expected values for an isolated Cl atom. These differences are explained in the desorption model involving charge exchange and Coulomb repulsion between ^{37}Cl ions and their surrounding atoms. The electron capture decay also creates a highly unusual initial state in the ^{37 }Cl atom which allows direct observation of some novel relaxation processes which are amenable to many body theory, but essentially impossible to probe experimentally with conventional techniques. For the first time, direct evidence of the double Auger decay of a K-hole and the large shift in energy (22 eV) of an LMM Auger line was reported. The double Auger decay probability and energy distribution of the two double Auger electrons were measured by using coincidence techniques. The resulting double Auger decay probability ranges from 12+/-0.3 % to 15+/-0.4% of the total Auger decay. The preferred energy distribution of the double Auger emission is for one of the electrons to take most of the

  13. Energy-charge correlation in the π+π-π0 decay of K L and of tagged neutral kaons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Pisanti, O.; Sannino, F.

    1995-03-01

    We relate the asymmetries in the charged pions energy in the decay into π+π-π0 of K L and of the tagged neutral kaons. The former asymmetry is a given combination ofRe (\\varepsilon ), Im (\\varepsilon ), and üɛ'ü. Moreover, the non-violating CP asymmetry allows a test for theχ PT predictions within the Zel'dovich approach for the final state interaction.

  14. B Flavor Tagging Calibration and Search for B(s) Oscillations in Semileptonic Decays with the CDF Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Giurgiu, Gavril A

    2005-09-01

    In this thesis we present a search for oscillations of B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons using semileptonic B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decays. Data were collected with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDFII) from events produced in collisions of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons accelerated in the Tevatron ring. The total proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy is 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is the unique source in the world for B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons, to be joined by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN after 2007. We establish a lower limit on the B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s} > 7.7 ps{sup -1} at 95% Confidence Level. We also present a multivariate tagging algorithm that identifies semileptonic B {yields} {mu}X decays of the other B mesons in the event. Using this muon tagging algorithm as well as opposite side electron and jet charge tagging algorithms, we infer the B{sub s}{sup 0} flavor at production. The tagging algorithms are calibrated using high statistics samples of B{sup 0} and B{sup +} semileptonic B{sup 0/+} {yields} D{ell}{nu} decays. The oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub d} in semileptonic B{sup 0} {yields} D{ell}{nu} decays is measured to be {Delta}m{sub d} = (0.501 {+-} 0.029(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.)) ps{sup -1}.

  15. Reassessing the discovery potential of the B →K*ℓ+ℓ- decays in the large-recoil region: SM challenges and BSM opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, S.; Martin Camalich, J.

    2016-01-01

    We critically examine the potential to disentangle the Standard Model (SM) and new physics (NP) in B →K*μ+μ- and B →K*e+e- decays, focusing on (i) the LHCb anomaly, (ii) the search for right-handed currents, and (iii) lepton-universality violation. Restricting ourselves to the large-recoil region, we advocate a parametrization of the hadronic matrix elements that separates model-independent information about nonperturbative QCD from the results of model calculations. We clarify how to estimate corrections to the heavy-quark limit that would generate a right-handed (virtual) photon in the b →s γ contribution to the decay. We then apply this approach to the discussion of various sets of observables of increasing theoretical cleanness. First, we show that angular observables in the optimized Pi(') basis are, in general, still not robust against the long-distance QCD effects, both numerically and by examining analytically the dependence on corrections to the (model-independent) heavy-quark limit. As a result, while a fit to data favors a NP contribution to the semileptonic operators of the type δ C9≃-1.5 , this comes at a relatively small statistical significance of ≲2 σ once such power corrections are properly accounted for. Second, two of these observables, P1 and P3C P, are particularly clean at very low q2 and sensitive probes of right-handed quark currents. We discuss their potential to set stringent bounds on the Wilson coefficient C7', especially using data of the electronic mode, and we update the bounds with current angular data in the muonic channel. Finally, in light of the recent hint of lepton-universality violation in B+→K+ℓℓ , we introduce and investigate new lepton-universality observables involving angular observables of the muonic and electronic modes and their zero crossings and show that, if the effect is of the size suggested by experiment, these can clearly distinguish between different NP explanations in terms of underlying

  16. First superheavy element experiments at the GSI recoil separator TASCA: The production and decay of element 114 in the {sup 244}Pu({sup 48}Ca,3-4n) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, J. M.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Schaedel, M.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Bruechle, W.; Essel, H. G.; Hartmann, W.; Hessberger, F. P.; Huebner, A.; Jaeger, E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Steiner, J.

    2011-05-15

    Experiments with the new recoil separator, Transactinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA), at the GSI were performed by using beams of {sup 48}Ca to irradiate targets of {sup 206-208}Pb, which led to the production of {sup 252-254}No isotopes. These studies allowed for evaluation of the performance of TASCA when coupled to a new detector and electronics system. By following these studies, the isotopes of element 114 ({sup 288-291}114) were produced in irradiations of {sup 244}Pu targets with {sup 48}Ca beams at compound nucleus excitation energies around 41.7 and 37.5 MeV, demonstrating TASCA's ability to perform experiments with picobarn-level cross sections. A total of 15 decay chains were observed and were assigned to the decay of {sup 288-291}114. A new {alpha}-decay branch in {sup 281}Ds was observed, leading to the new nucleus {sup 277}Hs.

  17. Determination of the Michel parameters ρ, ξ, and δ in τ-lepton decays with τ-->ρν tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus Collaboration; Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reßing, D.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Frankl, C.; Graf, J.; Schmidtler, M.; Schramm, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Rohde, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Bračko, M.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Medin, G.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Barsuk, S.; Belyaev, I.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Eiges, V.; Gershtein, L.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Igonkina, O.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1998-07-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II, we have measured the Michel parameters ρ, ξ, and ξδ for τ+/--->l+/-νν¯ decays in τ-pair events produced at center of mass energies in the region of the Υ resonances. Using τ-/+-->ρ-/+ν as spin analyzing tags, we find ρe=0.68+/-0.04+/-0.08, ξe=1.12+/-0.20+/-0.09, ξδe=0.57+/-0.14+/-0.07, ρμ=0.69+/-0.06+/-0.08, ξμ=1.25+/-0.27+/-0.14 and ξδμ=0.72+/-0.18+/-0.10. In addition, we report the combined ARGUS results on ρ, ξ, and ξδ using this work und previous measurements.

  18. Search for the B to K nu nu-bar Decay Using Semi-Leptonic Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-06-02

    We present an update of the search for the flavor-changing neutral current B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} decay using 351 X 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory. Due to the presence of two neutrinos in the final state, we require the reconstruction of the companion B in the event through the decay channel B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}X. We find 38 candidates in the data with an expected background of 31{-+} 12. This allows us to set an upper limit on the branching fraction for B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} of 4.5 X 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level.

  19. Evidence for B+ --> tau+ nu_tau Decays using Hadronic B Tags

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} using 467.8 x 10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. We select a sample of events with on completely reconstructed B{sup -} in an hadronic decay mode (B{sup -} --> D{sup (*)0}X{sup -} and B{sup -} --> J/{psi} X{sup -}). We examine the rest of the event to search for a B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We identify the {tau}{sup +} lepton in the following modes: {tau}{sup +} --> e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {pi}{sup +}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup +} --> {rho}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We find an excess of events with respect to expected background, which excludes the null signal hypothesis at the level of 3.3 {sigma} and can be converted to a branching fraction central value of B(B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}})= (1.80{sup + 0.57}{sub - 0.54}(stat.) {+-} 0.26 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4}.

  20. Measurement of B0(s) mixing parameters from the flavor-tagged decay B0(s) ---> J/psi phi

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-02-01

    From an analysis of the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} they obtain the width difference between the B{sub s}{sup 0} light and heavy mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} {triple_bond} {Lambda}{sub L} - {Lambda}{sub H} = 0.19 {+-} 0.07(stat){sub -0.01}{sup +0.02}(syst) ps{sup -1}, and the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s} = -0.57{sub -0.30}{sup +0.24}(stat){sub -0.02}{sup +0.07}(syst). The allowed 90% C.L. intervals of {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} and {phi}{sub s} are 0.06 < {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} < 0.30 ps{sup -1} and -1.20 < {phi}{sub s} < 0.06, respectively. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  1. Measurement of |V(cb)| and the form-factor slope in B --> Dl- nu(l) decays in events tagged by a fully reconstructed B meson.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Sanchez, P del Amo; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V(cb)| and the form-factor slope rho2 in B --> Dl- nu(l) decays based on 460x10(6) BB events recorded at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. B --> Dl- nu(l) decays are selected in events in which a hadronic decay of the second B meson is fully reconstructed. We measure B(B- --> D0 l- nu(l))/B(B- --> Xl- nu(l)) = (0.255+/-0.009+/-0.009) and B(B0 --> D+ l- nu(l))/B(B0 --> Xl- nu(l)) = (0.230+/-0.011+/-0.011), along with the differential decay distribution in B --> Dl- nu(l) decays. We then determine G(1)|V(cb)| = (42.3+/-1.9+/-1.4)x10(-3) and rho2 = 1.20+/-0.09+/-0.04, where G(1) is the hadronic form factor at the point of zero recoil. PMID:20366358

  2. Measurement of |Vcb| and the Form-Factor Slope in Bbar -> Dlnu Decays in Events Tagged by a Fully Reconstructed B Meson

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-30

    We present a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V{sub cb}| and the form-factor slope {rho}{sup 2} in {bar B} {yields} D{ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays based on 460 million B{bar B} events recorded at the {Gamma}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. {bar B} {yields} D{ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays are selected in events in which a hadronic decay of the second B meson is fully reconstructed. We measure the differential decay rate and determine G(1)|V{sub cb}| = (43.0 {+-} 1.9 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -3} and {rho}{sup 2} = 1.20 {+-}0.09 {+-} 0.04, where G(1) is the hadronic form factor at the point of zero recoil. We also determine the exclusive branching fractions and find {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = (2.31 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.09)% and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = (2.23 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.11)%.

  3. Branching Fraction for B+ -> pi0 l+ nu, Measured in Upsilon (4S) -> BBbar Events Tagged by B- -> D0 l- nubar (X) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U.

    2005-06-29

    We report a preliminary branching fraction of (1.80 {+-} 0.37{sub stat.} {+-} 0.23{sub syst.}) x 10{sup -4} for the charmless exclusive semileptonic B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decay, where {ell} can be either a muon or an electron. This result is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 81 fb{sup -1} collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses B{bar B} events that are tagged by a B meson reconstructed in the semileptonic B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}(X) decays, where X can be either a {gamma} or a {pi}{sup 0} from a D* decay.

  4. Primary retention following nuclear recoil in β-decay: Proposed synthesis of a metastable rare gas oxide ((38)ArO4) from ((38)ClO4(-)) and the evolution of chemical bonding over the nuclear transmutation reaction path.

    PubMed

    Timm, Matthew J; Matta, Chérif F

    2014-12-01

    Argon tetroxide (ArO4) is the last member of the N=50 e(-) isoelectronic and isosteric series of ions: SiO4(4-), PO4(3-), SO4(2-), and ClO4(-). A high level computational study demonstrated that while ArO4 is kinetically stable it has a considerable positive enthalpy of formation (of ~298kcal/mol) (Lindh et al., 1999. J. Phys. Chem. A 103, pp. 8295-8302) confirming earlier predictions by Pyykkö (1990. Phys. Scr. 33, pp. 52-53). ArO4 can be expected to be difficult to synthesize by traditional chemistry due to its metastability and has not yet been synthesized at the time of writing. A computational investigation of the changes in the chemical bonding of chlorate (ClO4(-)) when the central chlorine atom undergoes a nuclear transmutation from the unstable artificial chlorine isotope (38)Cl to the stable rare argon isotope (38)Ar through β-decay, hence potentially leading to the formation of ArO4, is reported. A mathematical model is presented that allows for the prediction of yields following the recoil of a nucleus upon ejecting a β-electron. It is demonstrated that below a critical angle between the ejected β-electron and that of the accompanying antineutrino their respective linear momentums can cancel to such an extent as imparting a recoil to the daughter atom insufficient for breaking the Ar-O bond. As a result, a primary retention yield of ~1% of ArO4 is predicted following the nuclear disintegration. The study is conducted at the quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitations [QCISD/6-311+G(3df)] level of theory followed by an analysis of the electron density by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Crossed potential energy surfaces (PES) were used to construct a PES from the metastable ArO4 ground singlet state to the Ar-O bond dissociation product ArO3+O((3)P) from which the predicted barrier to dissociation is ca. 22kcal/mol and the exothermic reaction energy is ca. 28kcal/mol [(U)MP2/6-311+G(d)]. PMID:25222874

  5. The HERMES recoil detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Belostotski, S.; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J.; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capitani, G. P.; Carassiti, V.; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Guler, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Hartig, M.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Jo, H. S.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Kisselev, A.; Krause, B.; Krauss, B.; Lagamba, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, S.; Lu, X.-G.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nowak, W.-D.; Naryshkin, Y.; Osborne, A.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrov, A.; Pickert, N.; Prahl, V.; Protopopescu, D.; Reinecke, M.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rubacek, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shearer, C.; Shutov, V.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vilardi, I.; Vikhrov, V.; Vogel, C.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.

    2013-05-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with a field strength of 1T. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  6. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.

    2006-07-11

    The HERMES Collaboration is installing a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the spectrometer for measurements of hard exclusive electron/positron scattering reactions, in particular deeply virtual Compton scattering. These measurements will provide access to generalised parton distributions and hence to the localisation of quarks inside hadrons and to their orbital angular momentum. The HERMES Recoil Detector consists of three active components: a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fibre tracker and a photon detector consisting of three layers of tungsten/scintillator. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. The Recoil Detector was extensively tested with cosmic muons over the summer of 2005 and is being installed in the winter of 2005/6 for data taking until summer 2007.

  7. Elastic recoil detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, W. M. A.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.

    1993-07-01

    In elastic recoil detection (ERD) one determines the yield and energy of particles ejected out of the surface region of samples under MeV ion bombardment. By application of this surface and thin film analysis technique one can obtain quantitative information concerning the depth distribution of light elements in a sample to be analysed. The quantitativity and the depth resolving power are based on knowledge of the recoil cross section and the stopping power of high-energy ions in matter. This paper reviews the fundamentals of this technique and the various experimental methods for recoil identification. Furthermore, important features for material analysis, such as detection limits, depth resolution and elemental range are discussed. Some emphasis is put on the conversion of the spectral contribution of the elements to atomic concentrations in the films for several representative cases. Throughout the review numerous examples are given to illustrate the features of ERD and to demonstrate empirically the accuracy of the quantification method.

  8. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  9. Study of B̄→Xulν̄ decays in BB̄ events tagged by a fully reconstructed B-meson decay and determination of |Vub|

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; et al

    2012-08-07

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ and the determination of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vub|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467×10⁶ Υ(4S)→BB¯¯¯ decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions ΔB in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |Vub| based on different QCDmore » predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*l>1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain ΔB=(1.80±0.13stat±0.15sys±0.02theo)×10⁻³ from a fit to the two-dimensional MX-q² distribution. Here, MX refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q² is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |Vub|=(4.33±0.24exp±0.15theo)×10⁻³ as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for B¯¯¯0 and B⁻ decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ decays.« less

  10. Study of Bbar to Xu l nubar Decays in BBbar Events Tagged by a Fully Reconstructed B-meson Decay and Determination of |V_{ub}|

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-07-13

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays {bar B} {yields} X{sub u}{ell}{bar {nu}}, and the determination of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions {Delta}{Beta} in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |V{sub ub}| based on four different QCD predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*{sub {ell}} > 1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain {Delta}{Beta} = (1.80 {+-} 0.13{sub stat.} {+-} 0.15{sub sys.} {+-} 0.02{sub theo.}) x 10{sup -3} from a maximum likelihood fit to the two-dimensional M{sub X} - q{sup 2} distribution. Here, M{sub X} refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q{sup 2} is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |V{sub ub}| = (4.31 {+-} 0.25{sub exp.} {+-} 0.16{sub theo.}) x 10{sup -3} as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for {bar B}{sup 0} and B{sup -} decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in {bar B} {yields} X{sub u}{ell}{bar {nu}} decays.

  11. Developing the Recoil Distance Doppler-Shift technique towards a versatile tool for lifetime measurements of excited nuclear states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, A.; Möller, O.; Petkov, P.

    2012-07-01

    In this article, the Recoil Distance Doppler-Shift (RDDS) method which is extensively used in nuclear structure physics to determine level lifetimes and absolute transition probabilities is reviewed. Especially, it is aimed to present new developments and variants of the technique which have evolved mainly in the past 25 years. After a short and comprehensive description of the basic elements of the plunger technique, the new variants are presented. This comprises the RDDS technique using γγ-coincidences, RDDS measurements in combination with particle detectors for selecting specific reaction channels, RDDS after Coulomb excitation, RDDS after fission and RDDS using a gas target. In addition, the concept of a differential plunger is discussed with respect to its specific features and typical experimental setups. Examples of differential plunger measurements with recoil tagging, recoil decay tagging and after deep inelastic reactions, Coulomb excitation in inverse reaction kinematics as well as after reactions with fast radioactive beams at energies of 50-100 MeV/u are given. The second focus of the review is dedicated to today’s plunger devices and related hardware. The concepts of specific plunger devices which accommodate the specific demands of the aforementioned RDDS applications including specific feedback systems for controlling target-stopper/degrader separations in-beam are presented. Also discussed are target and stopper/degrader foil related issues like foil preparation, mounting and stretching as well as specific features of the foil behavior in-beam (temperature, blistering, wrinkling and carbon build-up). The third focus is devoted to the data analysis. The concept of the Differential Decay Curve Method (DDCM) is presented as an alternative approach for the analysis of RDDS data measured as singles or as γγ-coincidences. For the latter, different gating possibilities are discussed, e.g. gating from above and gating from below the level of

  12. First flavor-tagged determination of bounds on mixing-induced CP violation in Bs0 --> J/psiphi decays.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Labarga, L; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M

    2008-04-25

    This Letter describes the first determination of bounds on the CP-violation parameter 2beta(s) using B(s)(0) decays in which the flavor of the bottom meson at production is identified. The result is based on approximately 2000 B(s)(0)-->J/psiphi decays reconstructed in a 1.35 fb(-1) data sample collected with the CDF II detector using pp collisions produced at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report confidence regions in the two-dimensional space of 2beta(s) and the decay-width difference DeltaGamma. Assuming the standard model predictions of 2beta(s) and DeltaGamma, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 15%, corresponding to 1.5 Gaussian standard deviations. PMID:18518184

  13. Search for B+→ℓ+νℓγ decays with hadronic tagging using the full Belle data sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Heck, M.; Kuhr, T.; Zupanc, A.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Grygier, J.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; He, X. H.; Heider, M.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W.-S.; Huschle, M.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Libby, J.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Belle Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We search for the decay B+→ℓ+νℓγ with ℓ+=e+orμ+ using the full Belle data set of 772 ×106B B ¯ pairs, collected at the Υ (4 S ) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We reconstruct one B meson in a hadronic decay mode and search for the B+→ℓ+νℓγ decay in the remainder of the event. We observe no significant signal within the phase space of Eγsig>1 GeV and obtain upper limits of B (B +→e+ν eγ )<6.1 ×10-6 , B (B+→μ+νμγ )<3.4 ×10-6 , and B (B+→ℓ+νℓγ )<3.5 ×10-6 at 90% credibility level.

  14. Recoil-α-fission and recoil-α-α-fission events observed in the reaction 48Ca + 243Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, U.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L.-L.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Fahlander, C.; Gates, J. M.; Golubev, P.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gross, C. J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kratz, J. V.; Rykaczewski, K.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Schädel, M.; Yakushev, A.; Åberg, S.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Brand, H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Cox, D.; Derkx, X.; Dobaczewski, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Even, J.; Gerl, J.; Jäger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Mistry, A.; Mokry, C.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nitsche, H.; Omtvedt, J. P.; Papadakis, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Runke, J.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Shi, Yue; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Torres, T.; Traut, T.; Trautmann, N.; Türler, A.; Ward, A.; Ward, D. E.; Wiehl, N.

    2016-09-01

    Products of the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am were studied with the TASISpec set-up at the gas-filled separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany. Amongst the detected thirty correlated α-decay chains associated with the production of element Z = 115, two recoil-α-fission and five recoil- α- α-fission events were observed. The latter five chains are similar to four such events reported from experiments performed at the Dubna gas-filled separator, and three such events reported from an experiment at the Berkeley gas-filled separator. The four chains observed at the Dubna gas-filled separator were assigned to start from the 2n-evaporation channel 289115 due to the fact that these recoil- α- α-fission events were observed only at low excitation energies. Contrary to this interpretation, we suggest that some of these recoil- α- α-fission decay chains, as well as some of the recoil- α- α-fission and recoil-α-fission decay chains reported from Berkeley and in this article, start from the 3n-evaporation channel 288115.

  15. Search for a light Higgs resonance in radiative decays of the Y(1S) with a charm tag

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.

    2015-04-10

    In this study, a search is presented for the decay Υ(1S)→γA0, A0 → cc¯, where A0 is a candidate for the CP-odd Higgs boson of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. The search is based on data collected with the BABAR detector at the Υ(2S) resonance. A sample of Υ(1S) mesons is selected via the decay Υ(2S) → π+π Υ(1S). The A0 → cc¯ decay is identified through the reconstruction of hadronic D0, D+, and D*(2010)+ meson decays. No significant signal is observed. The measured 90% confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S) → γA0)×B(A0 → cc¯) range from 7.4×10–5 to 2.4×10–3 for A0 masses from 4.00 to 8.95 GeV/c2 and 9.10 to 9.25 GeV/c2, where the region between 8.95 and 9.10 GeV/c2 is excluded because of background from Υ(2S) → γχbJ(1P), χbJ(1P) → γΥ(1S) decays.

  16. Interpreting Recoil for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed, Tarek A.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of recoil is usually explained to students in the context of Newton's third law. Typically, when a projectile is fired, the recoil of the launch mechanism is interpreted as a reaction to the ejection of the smaller projectile. The same phenomenon is also interpreted in the context of the conservation of linear momentum, which is…

  17. Measurement of CP Violation in B Anti-B Mixing on the Recoil of Partially Reconstructed Anti-B0 to D* L- Anti-Nu/L Using Kaon Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Gaz, Alessandro

    2011-11-16

    After its formulation in 1960's the Standard Model of Fundamental Interactions has gone through an impressive series of successes, begun with the discovery of neutral weak currents [1] and the experimental observations of the massive carriers of weak interactions, the W± and Z0 bosons [2], [3]. High precision measurements performed at LEP and SLAC test the validity of the theory to an unprecedented level of accuracy and do not show any significant deviations with respect to the Standard Model predictions. One of the attractive features of the Standard Model is the description of the phenomena which violate the matter-antimatter symmetry (CP), and this violation uniquely depends (in the quark sector) on a weak phase in the matrix describing the couplings among different quark flavors. CP-violation was discovered in 1964 as a tiny effect in the mixing of the K0 - $\\bar{K}$0 system [12] but, after a few decades of study of the physics of K mesons, no strong confirmation of the Standard Model can be obtained on the mechanism which generates CP-violation. On the other hand the physics of B mesons is suitable for a pretty large number of measurements which can confirm or disprove this aspect of the theory. The main goal of the BABAR and Belle experiments physics program is to test the description of CP-violation and flavor physics mainly from the decays of Bu and Bd mesons. Soon after the beginning of data-taking in 1999, CP-violation was discovered in the interference between mixing and decay in the golden channel B0 → J/Ψ}K0 [17] [18], while in 2004 a large direct charge asymmetry was observed in the B0 → K+π- channel [16]. There is a third kind of CP-violation which can be exhibited by the Bd - $\\bar{B}$d system, the so called CP-violation in mixing. The Standard Model predicts this asymmetry to be small, possibly out

  18. Measurement of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs using charm-tagged events in e+e- collisions at square root s=10.58 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M

    2007-04-01

    Using 230.2 fb-1 of e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at and near the peak of the Upsilon(4S) resonance, 489+/-55 events containing the pure leptonic decay Ds+-->micro;+numicro have been isolated in charm-tagged events. The ratio of partial widths Gamma(D+-->micro+numicro)/Gamma(Ds+-->phipi+) is measured to be 0.143+/-0.018+/-0.006 allowing a determination of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs=(283+/-17+/-7+/-14) MeV. The errors are statistical, systematic, and from the Ds+-->phipi+ branching ratio, respectively. PMID:17501265

  19. Further insight into gravitational recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Lousto, Carlos O.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2008-02-15

    We test the accuracy of our recently proposed empirical formula to model the recoil velocity imparted to the merger remnant of spinning, unequal-mass black-hole binaries. We study three families of black-hole binary configurations, all with mass ratio q=3/8 (to nearly maximize the unequal-mass contribution to the kick) and spins aligned (or counter-aligned) with the orbital angular momentum, two with spin configurations chosen to minimize the spin-induced tangential and radial accelerations of the trajectories, respectively, and a third family where the trajectories are significantly altered by spin-orbit coupling. We find good agreement between the measured and predicted recoil velocities for the first two families, and reasonable agreement for the third. We also reexamine our original generic binary configuration that led to the discovery of extremely large spin-driven recoil velocities and inspired our empirical formula, and find rough agreement between the predicted and measured recoil speeds.

  20. Rupture and recoil of bent-core liquid crystal filaments.

    PubMed

    Salili, S M; Ostapenko, T; Kress, O; Bailey, C; Weissflog, W; Harth, K; Eremin, A; Stannarius, R; Jákli, A

    2016-05-25

    The recoil process of free-standing liquid crystal filaments is investigated experimentally and theoretically. We focus on two aspects, the contraction speed of the filament and a spontaneously formed undulation instability. At the moment of rupture, the filaments buckle similarly to the classical Euler buckling of elastic rods. The tip velocity decays with decreasing filament length. The wavelength of buckling affinely decreases with the retracting filament tip. The energy gain related to the decrease of the total length and surface area of the filaments is mainly dissipated by layer rearrangements during thickening of the fibre. A flow back into the meniscus is relevant only in the final stage of the recoil process. We introduce a model for the quantitative description of the filament retraction speed. The dynamics of this recoil behaviour may find relevance as a model for biology-related filaments. PMID:27140824

  1. Accounting for Recoil Effects in Geochronometers: A New Model Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, V. E.; Huber, C.

    2012-12-01

    A number of geologically important chronometers are affected by, or owe their utility to, the "recoil effect". This effect describes the physical displacement of a nuclide due to energetic nuclear processes such as radioactive alpha decay (as in the case of various parent-daughter pairs in the uranium-series decay chains, and Sm-Nd), as well as neutron irradiation (in the case of the methodology for the 40Ar/39Ar dating method). The broad range of affected geochronometers means that the recoil effect can impact a wide range of dating method applications in the geosciences, including but not limited to: Earth surface processes, paleoclimate, volcanic processes, and cosmochemistry and planetary evolution. In particular, the recoil effect can have a notable impact on the use of fine grains (silt- and clay-sized particles) for geochronometric dating purposes. This is because recoil-induced loss of a nuclide from the surfaces of a grain can create an isotopically-depleted outer rind, and for small grains, this depleted rind can be volumetrically significant. When this recoil loss is measurable and occurs in a known time-dependent fashion, it can usefully serve as the basis for chronometers (such as the U-series comminution age method); in other cases recoil loss from fine particles creates an unwanted deviation from expected isotope values (such as for the Ar-Ar method). To improve both the accuracy and precision of ages inferred from geochronometric systems that involve the recoil of a key nuclide from small domains, it is necessary to quantify the magnitude of the recoil loss of that particular nuclide. It is also necessary to quantitatively describe the effect of geological processes that can alter the outer surface of grains, and hence the isotopically-depleted rind. Here we present a new mathematical and numerical model that includes two main features that enable enhanced accuracy and precision of ages determined from geochronometers. Since the surface area of the

  2. Developement of a same-side kaon tagging algorithm of B^0_s decays for measuring delta m_s at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Menzemer, Stephanie; /Heidelberg U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors developed a Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm to determine the production flavor of B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. Until the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing frequency is clearly observed the performance of the Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm can not be measured on data but has to be determined on Monte Carlo simulation. Data and Monte Carlo agreement has been evaluated for both the B{sub s}{sup 0} and the high statistics B{sup +} and B{sup 0} modes. Extensive systematic studies were performed to quantify potential discrepancies between data and Monte Carlo. The final optimized tagging algorithm exploits the particle identification capability of the CDF II detector. it achieves a tagging performance of {epsilon}D{sup 2} = 4.0{sub -1.2}{sup +0.9} on the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} sample. The Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm presented here has been applied to the ongoing B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing analysis, and has provided a factor of 3-4 increase in the effective statistical size of the sample. This improvement results in the first direct measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing frequency.

  3. Measurement of the CP-violating phase phi sJ/psi phi using the flavor-tagged decay Bs(0) -> J/psi phi in 8 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}, from the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.163{sub -0.064}{sup +0.065} ps{sup -1} and {phi}{sub s}{sup J}/{psi}{phi} = -0.55{sub -0.36}{sup +0.38}. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  4. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ΦsJ/ψΦ using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0→J/ ψΦ in 8 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ΦsJ/ψΦ, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ΔΓs, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s→J/ψΦ. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb⁻¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ΔΓs=0.163+0.065₋0.064 ps⁻¹ and ΦsJ/ψΦ=₋0.55+0.38₋0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  5. Recoil Separators for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, J. C.

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen and helium capture reactions are important in many astrophysical environments. Measurements in inverse kinematics using recoil separators have demonstrated a particularly sensitive technique for studying low-yield capture reactions.(M. S. Smith, C. E. Rolfs, and C. A. Barnes, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res. A306) (1991) 233. This approach allows a low background rate to be achieved with a high detection efficiency (about 50%) for the particles of interest using a device with only modest acceptance. Recoil separators using a variety of ion-optic configurations have been installed at numerous accelerator facilities in the past decade and have been used to measure, for example, alpha capture reactions using stable beams(D. Rogalla et al.), Eur. Phys. J. 6 (1999) 471. and proton capture reactions using radioactive ion beams.(S. Bishop et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (2003) 162501. Measurements in inverse kinematics are the only viable means for studying reactions on short-lived nuclei that are crucial for understanding stellar explosions, and a recoil separator optimized for the measurement of capture reactions with radioactive ion beams figures prominently into the design of the low energy experimental area at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). The operational requirements for such a device will be outlined, and recoil separator designs and characteristics will be presented.

  6. Ear tag

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: An inherited tendency to have this facial feature A genetic syndrome that includes having these pits or tags A sinus tract problem (an abnormal connection between the skin and tissue underneath) When to Contact a Medical Professional Your provider will usually find the skin tag ...

  7. Study of Inclusive $B^-$ and $\\bar{B}^0$ Decays toFlavor-Tagged $D$, $D_s$ and $\\Lambda_c$

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-06-15

    We report on a study of inclusive B{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} meson decays to D{sup 0}X, {bar D}{sup 0}X, D{sup +}X, D{sup -}X, D{sub s}{sup +}X, D{sub s}{sup -}X, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}X, {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -}X, based on a sample of 231 million B{bar B} events recorded with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Events are selected by completely reconstructing one B and searching for a reconstructed charm particle in the rest of the event. From the measured branching fractions of these decays, we infer the number of charm and anti-charm particles per {bar B} decay, separately for charged and neutral parents. We derive the total charm yield per B{sup -} decay, n{sub c}{sup -} = 1.202 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.040{sub -0.029}{sup +0.035}, and per {bar B}{sup 0} decay, n = 1.193 {+-} 0.030 {+-} 0.034{sub -0.035}{sup +0.044} where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third reflects the charm branching-fraction uncertainties. We also present the charm momentum distributions measured in the {bar B} rest frame.

  8. Measurement of the Branching Fractions of Bmacr →D**ℓ-ν¯ℓ Decays in Events Tagged by a Fully Reconstructed B Meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Lo Secco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2008-12-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fractions of Bmacr →D**ℓ-ν¯ℓ decays based on 417fb-1 of data collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- storage rings. Events are selected by fully reconstructing one of the B mesons in a hadronic decay mode. A fit to the invariant mass differences m(D(*)π)-m(D(*)) is performed to extract the signal yields of the different D** states. We observe the Bmacr →D**ℓ-ν¯ℓ decay modes corresponding to the four D** states predicted by heavy quark symmetry with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties.

  9. Measurement of the branching fractions of B-->D**(l) nu(l) decays in events tagged by a fully reconstructed B meson.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; Mckenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, E; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Lo Secco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; 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Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2008-12-31

    We report a measurement of the branching fractions of B-->D**(l) nu(l), decays based on 417 fb(-1) of data collected at the Y(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- storage rings. Events are selected by full reconstructing one of the B mesons in a hadronic decay mode. A fit to the invariant mass differences m(D(*) pi)- m(D(*)) is performed to extract the signal yields of the different D** states. We observe the B-->D**l(-1)nu(l) decay modes corresponding to the four D states predicted by heavy quark symmetry with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. PMID:19113769

  10. Measurement of the Branching Fractions of Bbar -> D** l^- nubar_l Decays in Events Tagged by a Fully Reconstructed B Meson

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-11-05

    We report a measurement of the branching fractions of {bar B} {yields} D** {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays based on 417 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. Events are selected by fully reconstructing one of the B mesons in a hadronic decay mode. A fit to the invariant mass differences m(D{sup (*)})-m(D{sup (*)}) is performed to extract the signal yields of the different D** states. We observe the {bar B} {yields} D**{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decay modes corresponding to the four D** states predicted by Heavy Quark Symmetry with a significance greater than six standard deviations including systematic uncertainties.

  11. First Flavor-Tagged Determination of Bounds on Mixing-Induced CP Violation in B0(s) ---> J/psi phi Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    This Letter describes the first determination of bounds on the CP-violation parameter 2{beta}{sub s} using B{sub s}{sup 0} decays in which the flavor of the bottom meson at production is identified. The result is based on approximately 2,000 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays reconstructed in a 1.35 fb{sup -1} data sample collected with the CDFII detector using p{bar p} collisions produced at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report confidence regions in the two-dimensional space of 2{beta}{sub s} and the decay-width difference {Delta}{Lambda}. Assuming the standard model predictions of 2{beta}{sub s} and {Delta}{Lambda}, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 15%, corresponding to 1.5 Gaussian standard deviations.

  12. First Flavor-Tagged Determination of Bounds on Mixing-Induced CP Violation in B^0_s --> j/psi phi Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, CDF; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    This Letter describes the first determination 1 of bounds on the CP-violation parameter 2{beta}{sub s} using B{sub s}{sup 0} decays in which the flavor of the bottom meson at production is identified. The result is based on approximately 2, 000 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays reconstructed in a 1.35 fb{sup -1} data sample collected with the CDFII detector using p{bar p} collisions produced at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report confidence regions in the two-dimensional space of 2{beta}{sub s} and the decay-width difference {Delta}{Lambda}. Assuming the standard model predictions of 2{beta}{sub s} and {Delta}{Lambda}, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 15%, corresponding to 1.5 Gaussian standard deviations.

  13. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Kim, T. J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Velde, C. Vander; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Diblen, S. Salva; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Marono, M. Vidal; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins, M. Correa; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Pol, M. E.; Aldá, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Manganote, E. J. Tonelli; Pereira, A. Vilela; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Sierra, L. F. Chaparro; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. 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Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; De Oliveira, A. Carvalho Antunes; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Alvarez, J. D. Ruiz; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Donckt, M. Vander; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Ahmad, W. Haj; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Pardos, C. Diez; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, F.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Cipriano, P. M. Ribeiro; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Spannagel, S.; Trevino, A. D. R. Vargas; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Blobel, V.; Vignali, M. Centis; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Gosselink, M.; Haller, J.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Pardo, P. Lobelle; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Gouskos, L.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. 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N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Outschoorn, V. I. Martinez; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Xin, Y.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Ceballos, G. Gomez; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Berry, E.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Woods, N.

    2014-08-01

    A search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q*decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton GRS decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' → WZ and GRS → WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* → qW, q* → qZ, W' → WZ, GRS → WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a "bulk" graviton Gbulk that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s} $$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-08-29

    Our search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. We found that the search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95%more » on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q*decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton GRS decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' → WZ and GRS → WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* → qW, q* → qZ, W' → WZ, GRS → WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a “bulk” graviton Gbulk that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.« less

  15. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-08-29

    Our search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. We found that the search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q*decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton GRS decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' → WZ and GRS → WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* → qW, q* → qZ, W' → WZ, GRS → WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a “bulk” graviton Gbulk that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

  16. Measurement of the branching ratio of B ¯ →D(*)τ-ν¯ τ relative to B ¯→D(*)ℓ-ν¯ℓ decays with hadronic tagging at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huschle, M.; Kuhr, T.; Heck, M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, V.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Grygier, J.; Hamer, P.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Heider, M.; Heller, A.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsu, C.-L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Keck, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fraction ratios R (D(*)) of B ¯→D(*)τ-ν¯τ relative to B ¯→D(*)ℓ-ν¯ℓ (where ℓ=e or μ ) using the full Belle data sample of 772 ×106B B ¯ pairs collected at the ϒ (4 S ) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The measured values are R (D )=0.375 ±0.064 (stat)±0.026 (syst) and R (D*)=0.293 ±0.038 (stat)±0.015 (syst) . The analysis uses hadronic reconstruction of the tag-side B meson and purely leptonic τ decays. The results are consistent with earlier measurements and do not show a significant deviation from the standard model prediction.

  17. Searches for the decays B0→l±τ∓ and B+→l+ν (l=e, μ) using hadronic tag reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Saleem, M.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Zhang, L.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Chen, E.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Gabareen, A. M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Klose, V.; Kobel, M. J.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Lombardo, V.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Santoro, V.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Klemetti, M.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Biesiada, J.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Neal, H.

    2008-05-01

    We present searches for the leptonic decays B+→ℓ+ν and the lepton flavor violating decays B0→ℓ±τ∓, where ℓ=e, μ, with data collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. This search demonstrates a novel technique in which we fully reconstruct the accompanying Bmacr in Υ(4S)→B Bmacr events, and look for a monoenergetic lepton from the signal B decay. The signal yield is extracted from a fit to the signal lepton candidate momentum distribution in the signal B rest frame. Using a data sample of approximately 378×106 B Bmacr pairs (342fb-1), we find no evidence of signal in any of the decay modes. Branching fraction upper limits of B(B+→e+ν)<5.2×10-6, B(B+→μ+ν)<5.6×10-6, B(B0→e+τ-)<2.8×10-5 and B(B0→μ+τ-)<2.2×10-5, are obtained at 90% confidence level.

  18. Searches for the Decays B0 to l+- tau-+ and B+ to l+ nu(L=e,mu) using Hadronic Tag Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R.N.; /more authors..

    2008-01-30

    We present searches for the leptonic decays B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu} and the lepton flavor violating decays B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}, where {ell} = e, {mu}, with data collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. This search demonstrates a novel technique in which we fully reconstruct the accompanying {bar B} in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events, and look for a monoenergetic lepton from the signal B decay. The signal yield is extracted from a fit to the signal lepton candidate momentum distribution in the signal B rest frame. Using a data sample of approximately 378 million B{bar B} pairs (342 fb{sup -1}), we find no evidence of signal in any of the decay modes. Branching fraction upper limits of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}) < 5.2 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}) < 5.6 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) < 2.2 x 10{sup -5}, are obtained at 90% confidence level.

  19. Beauty baryon decays: a theoretical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    I overview the theoretical status and recent progress on the calculations of beauty baryon decays focusing on the QCD aspects of the exclusive semi-leptonic Λb → plμ decay at large recoil and theoretical challenges of radiative and electro-weak penguin decays Λb → Λγ,Λl+l-.

  20. The WITCH experiment: Acquiring the first recoil ion spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. Yu.; Beck, M.; Coeck, S.; Delahaye, P.; Friedag, P.; Herbane, M.; Herlert, A.; Kraev, I. S.; Tandecki, M.; Van Gorp, S.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wenander, F.; Zákoucký, D.; Severijns, N.

    2008-10-01

    The standard model of the electroweak interaction describes β-decay in the well-known V-A form. Nevertheless, the most general Hamiltonian of a β-decay includes also other possible interaction types, e.g. scalar (S) and tensor (T) contributions, which are not fully ruled out yet experimentally. The WITCH experiment aims to study a possible admixture of these exotic interaction types in nuclear β-decay by a precise measurement of the shape of the recoil ion energy spectrum. The experimental set-up couples a double Penning trap system and a retardation spectrometer. The set-up is installed in ISOLDE/CERN and was recently shown to be fully operational. The current status of the experiment is presented together with the data acquired during the 2006 campaign, showing the first recoil ion energy spectrum obtained. The data taking procedure and corresponding data acquisition system are described in more detail. Several further technical improvements are briefly reviewed.

  1. Study of B̄→Xulν̄ decays in BB̄ events tagged by a fully reconstructed B-meson decay and determination of |Vub|

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Tackmann, K.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lindsay, C.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-07

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ and the determination of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vub|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467×10⁶ Υ(4S)→BB¯¯¯ decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions ΔB in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |Vub| based on different QCD predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*l>1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain ΔB=(1.80±0.13stat±0.15sys±0.02theo)×10⁻³ from a fit to the two-dimensional MX-q² distribution. Here, MX refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q² is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |Vub|=(4.33±0.24exp±0.15theo)×10⁻³ as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for B¯¯¯0 and B⁻ decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ decays.

  2. Angular Momentum Ejection and Recoil*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohia, O.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    The spontaneous rotation phenomenon observed in axisymmetric magnetically confined plasmas has been explained by the ``accretion theory'' [1] that considers the plasma angular momentum as gained from its interaction with the magnetic field and the surrounding material wall. The ejection of angular momentum to the wall, and the consequent recoil are attributed to modes excited at the edge while the transport of the (recoil) angular momentum from the edge toward the center is attributed to a different kind of mode. The toroidal phase velocity of the edge mode, to which the sign of the ejected angular momentum is related, is considered to change its direction in the transition from the H-regime to the L-regime. For the latter case, edge modes with phase velocity in the direction of vdi are driven by the temperature gradient of a cold ion population at the edge and damped on the ``hot'' ion population. The ``balanced'' double interaction [2] of the mode with the two populations, corresponding to a condition of marginal stability, leads to ejection of hot ions and loss of angular momentum in the direction of vdi while the cold population acquires angular momentum in the opposite direction. In the H-regime resistive ballooning modes with phase velocities in the direction of vde are viewed as the best candidates for the excited edge modes. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. DOE. [1] B. Coppi, Nucl. Fusion 42, 1 (2002) [2] B. Coppi and F. Pegoraro, Nucl. Fusion 17, 969 (1977)

  3. A Measurement of the Pseudoscalar DecayConstant fDs using Charm-Tagged Events in e+e- Collisions at the Y(4S)

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, Jorg; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-10-10

    The decay constant f{sub D{sub s}} of the pseudoscalar strange charm meson D{sub s}{sup +} is an important benchmark test of the theoretical methods that quantitatively describe the nonperturbative low-energy regime of QCD, the theory of the strong interaction. A confirmation of the validity of these predictive methods, foremost lattice QCD, in the sector of heavy-light meson decay constants increases trust in the calculation of f{sub B}, which is an important number for the measurement of the CKM matrix element V{sub td} in B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0}-mixing events. From October 1999 through July 2004, the BABAR experiment, located at the PEP-II storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, collected 230.2 fb{sup -1} of data in e{sup +}e{sup -} collision at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. In this thesis, these data are searched for e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events by identifying sets of charged and neutral pions and charged kaons, consistent with the decay of a charm meson, D{sup 0}, D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +}, or D*{sup +}. A sample of 510,000 charmed mesons with a momentum consistent with e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events is identified.

  4. Alpha-recoil damage: Relation to isotopic disequilibrium and leaching of radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, R.L. )

    1988-06-01

    The observation by Raabe et al. (1973) of large differences between the solubilities of isotopically different plutonium dioxides, has led to the recognition of preferential etching of recoil damage as a widespread phenomenon for alpha-active radionuclides. The associated preferential solubility of the products of alpha decay, along with direct recoil ejection, are the two specific microscopic mechanisms that are documented as causes of isotopic disequilibrium in the U and Th decay series. Similarly, leaching plays a significant role in releasing {sup 222}Rn from natural substances, {sup 222}Rn being the alpha-decay product of {sup 226}Ra. The average annealing time in nature of the damage sites can be inferred from the extent of isotopic disequilibrium for different isotopic pairs in the Th and U decay chains.

  5. Measurement of B0-B-0 flavor oscillations in hadronic B0 decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Oddone, P J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; Foster, B; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, Sh; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P-A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; Laplace, S; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Van Bibber, K; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J L; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Nief, J Y; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R G; Gabriel, T A; Brau, J; Frey, R; Grauges, E; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Campagna, E; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J S; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Lamanna, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Aston, D; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Calderini, G; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Haas, T; Himel, T; Hryn'ova, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; Von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Kordich, T M B; Neal, H

    2002-06-01

    Flavor oscillations of neutral B mesons have been studied in e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies near the upsilon(4S) resonance. The data sample used for this purpose consists of events in which one B0 meson is reconstructed in a hadronic decay mode, while the flavor of the recoiling B0 is determined with a tagging algorithm that exploits the correlation between the flavor of the heavy quark and the charges of its decay products. From the time development of the observed mixed and unmixed final states, we determine the B0-B-0 oscillation frequency deltamd to be 0.516+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.010(syst) ps-1. PMID:12059414

  6. A recoil separator for nuclear astrophysics SECAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, G. P. A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chipps, K. A.; Couder, M.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Montes, F.; Rehm, K. E.; Schatz, H.; Smith, M. S.; Wiescher, M.; Wrede, C.; Zeller, A.

    2016-06-01

    A recoil separator SECAR has been designed to study radiative capture reactions relevant for the astrophysical rp-process in inverse kinematics for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We describe the design, layout, and ion optics of the recoil separator and present the status of the project.

  7. Spectroscopy of the neutron-deficient isobars {sup 163}Re and {sup 163}W using tagging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Joss, D. T.; Thomson, J.; Page, R. D.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Grahn, T.; Pakarinen, J.; Paul, E. S.; Scholey, C.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaennen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; Rahkila, P.; Sorri, J.

    2008-11-11

    Selective tagging techniques have been used to establish new band structures in the transitional isobars {sup 163}Re and {sup 163}W. These nuclei were produced in the {sup 106}Cd({sup 60}Ni, xp yn {gamma}) reaction at a bombarding energy of 270 MeV. Prompt {gamma} rays were detected at the target position using the JUROGAM spectrometer while recoiling ions were separated by the RITU separator and implanted into the GREAT spectrometer. At low spin, the yrast band of {sup 163}Re is shown to be a strongly coupled collective band based on a proton h{sub 11/2} configuration. In {sup 163}W, the decay path of the 13/2{sup +} isomeric state to the ground state has been identified and negative parity structures based on the ground state established.

  8. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-03-01

    Searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ˜ 1 and significances often well beyond 5 σ. The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] signature, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb-1. By 300 fb-1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the "stealth" point at {m}_{overline{t}}={m}_t and potentially overlapping with limits from toverline{t} cross section and spin correlation measurements.

  9. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Yonas, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  10. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  11. Evidence for B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}with a semileptonic tagging method

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Inami, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mori, T.; Ohshima, T.; Senyo, K.; Aihara, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Kuzmin, A.; Shwartz, B.; Zhilich, V.; Zyukova, O.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Mohanty, G. B.

    2010-10-01

    We present a measurement of the decay B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}using a data sample containing 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. A sample of B{sup +}B{sup -} pairs are tagged by reconstructing one B{sup +} meson decaying semileptonically. We detect the B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}candidate in the recoil. We obtain a signal with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties, and measure the branching fraction to be B(B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}})=[1.54{sub -0.37}{sup +0.38}(stat){sub -0.31}{sup +0.29}(syst)]x10{sup -4}. This result confirms the evidence for B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}obtained in a previous Belle measurement that used a hadronic B tagging method.

  12. Measurement of the production rate of the charm jet recoiling against the W boson using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.

    2008-05-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate of associated production of the W boson with the charm jet in the proton and anti-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement has direct sensitivity to the strange quark content inside the proton. A direct measurement of the momentum distribution of the strange quark inside the proton is essential for a reliable calculation of new physics signal as well as the background processes at the collider experiments. The identification of events containing a W boson and a charm jet is based on the leptonic decays of the W boson together with a tagging technique for the charm jet identification based on the semileptonic decay of the charm quark into the muon. The charm jet recoiling against the W boson must have a minimum transverse momentum of 20 GeV and an absolute value of pseudorapidity less than 2.5. This measurement utilizes the data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Collider. The measured rate of the charm jet production in association with the W boson in the inclusive jet production with the W boson is 0.074 {+-} 0.023, which is in agreement with the theoretical predictions at the leading order in Quantum Chromodynamics.

  13. Transport of Radioactive Material by Alpha Recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2005-05-19

    The movement of high-specific-activity radioactive particles (i.e., alpha recoil) has been observed and studied since the early 1900s. These studies have been motivated by concerns about containment of radioactivity and the protection of human health. Additionally, studies have investigated the potential advantage of alpha recoil to effect separations of various isotopes. This report provides a review of the observations and results of a number of the studies.

  14. Shark Tagging Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    In this group activity, children learn about the purpose of tagging and how scientists tag a shark. Using a cut-out of a shark, students identify, measure, record data, read coordinates, and tag a shark. Includes introductory information about the purpose of tagging and the procedure, a data sheet showing original tagging data from Tampa Bay, and…

  15. Time dependence in B → V ℓℓ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes-Genon, Sébastien; Virto, Javier

    2015-04-01

    We discuss the theory and phenomenology of B d,s → V (→ M 1 M 2)ℓℓ decays in the presence of neutral-meson mixing. We derive expressions for the time-dependent angular distributions for decays into CP eigenstates, and identify the relevant observables that can be extracted from time-integrated and time-dependent analyses with or without tagging, with a focus on the difference between measurements at B-factories and hadronic machines. We construct two observables of interest, which we call Q {8/-} and Q 9, and which are theoretically clean at large recoil. We compute these two observables in the Standard Model, and show that they have good potential for New Physics searches by considering their sensitivity to benchmark New Physics scenarios consistent with current b → sℓℓ data. These results apply to decays such as B d → K ∗(→ K S π0)ℓℓ, B s → ϕ(→ K S K L )ℓℓ and B s → ϕ(→ K + K -)ℓℓ.

  16. Elution behaviour of alpha-recoil atoms into etchant and ovservation of their tracks on the mica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Komatsu, Shigemi; Kido, Kazuo; Sotobayashi, Takeshi

    1980-12-01

    Muscovite samples, which were irradiated with alpha-recoil atoms emitted from a thinly electrodeposited 232U-source in a vacuum chamber of about 10 -2 Torr, were subjected to a chemical etching treatment with a hydrofluoric acid solution to develop alpha-recoil tracks. The transferred alpha-activities of 224Ra and 212Po, supported by 212Pb, on the mica surface were repeatedly measured after every etching treatment. The results showed that the 224Ra could be rapidly eluted out at earlier etching stages, in contrast to appreciably delayed elution of 212Po. These findings, along with annealing experiments on mica, imply that the recoil range of 224Ra, originated from the parent 228Th by a single decay process, is shorter than the total recoil range of 212Po, which can penetrate partially into inner mica layers through its preceding multiple alpha-decay processes after injection of its precursors into the mica. Scanning electron and phase-contrast microscopic observation of the etched mica surfaces indicated an apparent dependence of the recoil-track etch pit size on the number of succesive alpha-decays.

  17. Search for B+e+νe and B+μ+νμ decays using hadronic tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Yook, Y.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Bansal, V.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Heck, M.; Higuchi, T.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. -S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, I.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Lange, J. S.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakamura, I.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Park, C. -S.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. -S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a search for the rare leptonic decays B+ → e+ν and B+ → μ+ν, using the full *(4S) data sample of 772 × 106 B ¯B pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. One of the B mesons from the *(4S) → B ¯B decay is fully reconstructed in a hadronic mode while the recoiling side is analyzed for the signal decay. We find no evidence of a signal in any of the decay modes. Upper limits of the corresponding branching fractions are determined as B(B+ → e+ν) < 3.4 × 10-6 and B(B+ →μ+ν) < 2.7 × 10-6 at 90% confidence level.

  18. A Measurement of the Recoil Polarization of Electroproduced {Lambda}(1116)

    SciTech Connect

    Simeon McAleer

    2002-01-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory was used to study the reaction e + p {yields} e{prime} + K{sup +} + {Lambda}(1116) for events where {Lambda}(1116) subsequently decayed via the channel {Lambda}(1116) {yields} p + {pi}{sup -}. Data were taken at incident electron beam energies of 2.5, 4.0, and 4.2 GeV during the 1999 E1C run period. They hyperon production spectra span the Q{sup 2} range from 0.5 to 2.8 GeV{sup 2} and nearly the entire range in the center of mass angles. The proton angular distribution in the {Lambda}(1116) rest frame is used to deduce the recoil polarization of the hyperon, and the W and cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} dependence of the recoil polarization will be presented. The data show sizeable negative polarizations for the {Lambda}(1116) as a function of both cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} and W.

  19. Elastic recoil changes in early emphysema.

    PubMed Central

    Silvers, G W; Petty, T L; Stanford, R E

    1980-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine if emphysema and static lung recoil were related in a group of 65 excised human lungs. We studied 23 normal lungs, 24 lungs with an emphysema score of 5 or less, and 18 lungs with an emphysema score greater than 5. A comparison of the percentage of predicted elastic recoil revealed that both emphysema groups were significantly different from normal lungs. In addition, the total lung capacities were significantly different between the three groups. In the group with an emphysema score greater than 5 we found a linear negative correlation between the extent of emphysema and percent of predicted elastic recoil at 90% total lung capacity (r = -0.696, p < 0.01). We found a negative correlation between the percentage of predicted elastic recoil and the lung volume (r = -0.612, p < 0.01). We conclude that a significant loss of elastic recoil and a significant increase in total lung capacity occurs in the early stages of emphysema. PMID:7434309

  20. Flavor Tagging at CDF using Run II Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paus, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    An overview on soft lepton tagging at CDF is presented. Determine the b flavor at production is required for B mixing and CP asymmetry measurements. At Tevatron, we produce bbarb pairs and so the flavor of the B is strongly correlated with the flavor of the B decay on the opposite side. One can then tag the B, using a semileptonic decay of the b quark into a lepton (b(barb) → ℓ^-(ℓ^+)barν(ν)X) on the opposite side where ℓ stands for electrons or muons. We study the performance of the soft lepton tagging using a sample of semileptonic b arrow ℓ ν X decays .

  1. Low energy electron/recoil discrimination for directional Dark Matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, J.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D. E-mail: mayet@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2012-07-01

    Directional detection is a promising Dark Matter search strategy. Even though it could accommodate to a sizeable background contamination, electron/recoil discrimination remains a key and challenging issue as for direction-insensitive detectors. The measurement of the 3D track may be used to discriminate electrons from nuclear recoils. While a high rejection power is expected above 20 keV ionization, a dedicated data analysis is needed at low energy. After identifying discriminant observables, a multivariate analysis, namely a Boosted Decision Tree, is proposed, enabling an efficient event tagging for Dark Matter search. We show that it allows us to optimize rejection while keeping a rather high efficiency which is compulsory for rare event search.With respect to a sequential analysis, the rejection is about ∼ 20 times higher with a multivariate analysis, for the same Dark Matter exclusion limit.

  2. Measurement of the Decay B→ ωℓν with the BaBar Detector and Determination of |Vub|

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We measure the branching fraction of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decay B→ ωℓν, where ℓ is either an electron or a muon, with the charged B meson recoiling against a tag B meson decaying in the charmed semileptonic modes B → Dℓν or B → D*ℓν. The measurement is based on a dataset of 426.1 fb-1 of e+e- collisions at a CM energy of 10.58 GeV recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We also calculate the relevant B → ω hadronic form factors to determine the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub|.

  3. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  4. Jet Charge Tagging at CDF using Run II Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paus, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    We present a study of the jet charge tagging in Run II CDF. The jet charge tagging method is applied to determine the b/barb-quark flavor of B hadrons at the time of production in a sample of b arrow ℓ ν X decays collected in 2002-2003.

  5. Determination of the extraction efficiency for 233U source α-recoil ions from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v. d. Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2015-03-01

    Following the α decay of 233U, 229Th recoil ions are shown to be extracted in a significant amount from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell. The produced recoil ions and subsequent daughter nuclei are mass purified with the help of a customized quadrupole mass spectrometer. The combined extraction and mass purification efficiency for 229Th3+ is determined via MCP-based measurements and via the direct detection of the 229Th α decay. A large value of (10±2)% for the combined extraction and mass purification efficiency of 229Th3+ is obtained at a mass resolution of about 1u/e. In addition to 229Th, also other α-recoil ions of the 233, 232U decay chains are addressed.

  6. Soft Lepton Flavor Tagging at CDF using Run 2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, Tania

    2003-04-01

    An overview of soft lepton tagging at CDF is presented. Flavour tagging is needed to determine the flavour of a B(B_0/B_S) meson at production. Making such a decision is called flavour tagging the B meson. This is required to make precision measurements of B mixing and CP violation. Soft Lepton tagging is an opposite side tagging which exploits the sign of the lepton in the decays, b arrow X l^- compared to barb arrow X l^+, where l is an electron or muon, to tag the B. The effectiveness of the tagging is characterised by the effective tagging efficiency, ɛ D^2, where ɛ is the tagging efficiency and the dilution D is a measure of the wrong sign tags. In Run 2, CDF expects to improve the effective tagging efficiency, due to an extended lepton coverage with the muon extension systems and the plug calorimeter. Details on the soft lepton tagging studies and results using the latest data sample at CDF are presented.

  7. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Shuman, D.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Dias, T. H. V. T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gil, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jinete, M. A.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Moiseenko, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Natal da Luz, H.; Navarro, G.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Palma, R.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Tomás, A.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R. C.; White, J.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  8. Recoil Based Fuel Breeding Fuel Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Popa-Simil, Liviu

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear transmutation reactions are based on the absorption of a smaller particle as neutron, proton, deuteron, alpha, etc. The resulting compound nucleus gets out of its initial lattice mainly by taking the recoil, also with help from its sudden change in chemical properties. The recoil implantation is used in correlation with thin and ultra thin materials mainly for producing radiopharmaceuticals and ultra-thin layer radioactive tracers. In nuclear reactors, the use of nano-particulate pellets could facilitate the recoil implantation for breeding, transmutation and partitioning purposes. Using enriched {sup 238}U or {sup 232}Th leads to {sup 239}Pu and {sup 233}U production while using other actinides as {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am etc. leads to actinide burning. When such a lattice is immersed into a radiation resistant fluid (water, methanol, etc.), the recoiled product is transferred into the flowing fluid and removed from the hot area using a concentrator/purifier, preventing the occurrence of secondary transmutation reactions. The simulation of nuclear collision and energy transfer shows that the impacted nucleus recoils in the interstitial space creating a defect or lives small lattices. The defect diffuses, and if no recombination occurs it stops at the lattices boundaries. The nano-grains are coated in thin layer to get a hydrophilic shell to be washed by the collection liquid the particle is immersed in. The efficiency of collection depends on particle magnitude and nuclear reaction channel parameters. For {sup 239}Pu the direct recoil extraction rate is about 70% for {sup 238}UO{sub 2} grains of 5 nm diameters and is brought up to 95% by diffusion due to {sup 239}Neptunium incompatibility with Uranium dioxide lattice. Particles of 5 nm are hard to produce so a structure using particles of 100 nm have been tested. The particles were obtained by plasma sputtering in oxygen atmosphere. A novel effect as nano-cluster radiation damage robustness and cluster

  9. Notes on SAW Tag Interrogation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of interrogating a single SAW RFID tag with a known ID and known range in the presence of multiple interfering tags under the following assumptions: (1) The RF propagation environment is well approximated as a simple delay channel with geometric power-decay constant alpha >/= 2. (2) The interfering tag IDs are unknown but well approximated as independent, identically distributed random samples from a probability distribution of tag ID waveforms with known second-order properties, and the tag of interest is drawn independently from the same distribution. (3) The ranges of the interfering tags are unknown but well approximated as independent, identically distributed realizations of a random variable rho with a known probability distribution f(sub rho) , and the tag ranges are independent of the tag ID waveforms. In particular, we model the tag waveforms as random impulse responses from a wide-sense-stationary, uncorrelated-scattering (WSSUS) fading channel with known bandwidth and scattering function. A brief discussion of the properties of such channels and the notation used to describe them in this document is given in the Appendix. Under these assumptions, we derive the expression for the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for an arbitrary combination of transmitted interrogation signal and linear receiver filter. Based on this expression, we derive the optimal interrogator configuration (i.e., transmitted signal/receiver filter combination) in the two extreme noise/interference regimes, i.e., noise-limited and interference-limited, under the additional assumption that the coherence bandwidth of the tags is much smaller than the total tag bandwidth. Finally, we evaluate the performance of both optimal interrogators over a broad range of operating scenarios using both numerical simulation based on the assumed model and Monte Carlo simulation based on a small sample of measured tag waveforms. The performance evaluation results not only

  10. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePlus

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  11. Cavity cooling below the recoil limit.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Matthias; Klinner, Julian; Keßler, Hans; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Conventional laser cooling relies on repeated electronic excitations by near-resonant light, which constrains its area of application to a selected number of atomic species prepared at moderate particle densities. Optical cavities with sufficiently large Purcell factors allow for laser cooling schemes, avoiding these limitations. Here, we report on an atom-cavity system, combining a Purcell factor above 40 with a cavity bandwidth below the recoil frequency associated with the kinetic energy transfer in a single photon scattering event. This lets us access a yet-unexplored regime of atom-cavity interactions, in which the atomic motion can be manipulated by targeted dissipation with sub-recoil resolution. We demonstrate cavity-induced heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequent cooling at particle densities and temperatures incompatible with conventional laser cooling. PMID:22767925

  12. Extracting Tag Hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the “flat” organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search

  13. Extracting tag hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the "flat" organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search. Moreover

  14. SIMULATIONS OF RECOILING MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN THE VIA LACTEA HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, J.; Madau, P.; Diemand, J.; Kuhlen, M.; Zemp, M.

    2009-09-10

    The coalescence of a massive black hole (MBH) binary leads to the gravitational-wave recoil of the system and its ejection from the galaxy core. We have carried out N-body simulations of the motion of a M{sub BH} = 3.7 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} MBH remnant in the 'Via Lactea I' simulation, a Milky Way-sized dark matter halo. The black hole receives a recoil velocity of V{sub kick} = 80, 120, 200, 300, and 400 km s{sup -1} at redshift 1.5, and its orbit is followed for over 1 Gyr within a 'live' host halo, subject only to gravity and dynamical friction against the dark matter background. We show that, owing to asphericities in the dark matter potential, the orbit of the MBH is highly nonradial, resulting in a significantly increased decay timescale compared to a spherical halo. The simulations are used to construct a semi-analytic model of the motion of the MBH in a time-varying triaxial Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo plus a spherical stellar bulge, where the dynamical friction force is calculated directly from the velocity dispersion tensor. Such a model should offer a realistic picture of the dynamics of kicked MBHs in situations where gas drag, friction by disk stars, and the flattening of the central cusp by the returning black hole are all negligible effects. We find that MBHs ejected with initial recoil velocities V{sub kick} {approx}> 500 km s{sup -1} do not return to the host center within a Hubble time. In a Milky Way-sized galaxy, a recoiling hole carrying a gaseous disk of initial mass {approx}M{sub BH} may shine as a quasar for a substantial fraction of its 'wandering' phase. The long decay timescales of kicked MBHs predicted by this study may thus be favorable to the detection of off-nuclear quasar activity.

  15. Barium Tagging for nEXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudenberg, Daniel; Brunner, Thomas; Varentsov, Victor; Devoe, Ralph; Dilling, Jens; Gratta, Giorgio; nEXO Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    nEXO is a next-generation experiment designed to search for 0 νββ -decay of Xe-136 in a liquid xenon time projection chamber. Positive observation of this decay would determine the neutrino to be a Majorana particle In order to greatly reduce background contributions to this search, the collaboration is developing several ``barium tagging'' techniques to recover and identify the decay daughter, Ba-136. ``Tagging'' may be available for a 2nd phase of nEXO and will push the sensitivity beyond the inverted neutrino-mass hierarchy. Tagging methods in testing for this phase include Ba-ion capture on a probe with identification by resonance ionization laser spectroscopy, and Ba capture in solid xenon on a cold probe with identification by fluorescence. In addition, Ba tagging for a gas-phase detector, appropriate for a later stage, is being tested. Here efficient ion extraction from heavy carrier gases is key. Detailed gas-dynamic and ion transport calculations have been performed to optimize for ion extraction. An apparatus to extract Ba ions from up to 10 bar xenon gas into vacuum using an RF-only funnel has been constructed and demonstrates extraction of ions from noble gases. We will present this system's status along with results of this R&D program.

  16. Same Side Pion Tagging Study at CDF using Run II Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paus, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    We present a study of the same side tagging in Run II CDF. The same side pion tagging method is applied to determine the b/barb-quark flavor of B mesons at the time of production in a sample of B_u,d arrow ℓ D^(*) X decays collected in 2002-2003. Three decay signatures are reconstructed. The analysis is a prerequisite to apply same-side kaon tagging to the lepton+D_s^(*) sample in the future.

  17. Decay properties of double heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-08-05

    We study the semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  18. PrimEx Experiments and the Prospects of Rare Meson Decays at GlueX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Liping

    2013-04-01

    There are two major challenges in contemporary physics: QCD confinement and new physics beyond the Standard Model. A study of not-so-rare and rare decays of light neutral pseudoscalar mesons 0^, η and η' provides a sensitive probe to investigate both fundamental issues. A comprehensive PrimEx experimental program at Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) is aimed at gathering high precision measurements on the two-photon decay widths and transition form factors at low Q^2 on ^0, η and η' via the Primakoff effect. Completed experiments on the ^0 radiative decay width at Jlab 6 GeV, and planned measurements of η and η' at Jlab 12 GeV will provide a rich laboratory to test chiral anomaly and to study the origin and dynamics of symmetry breaking in QCD confinement. On the other hand, measurements of branching ratios or upper limits for various rare and forbidden η decays are about five orders of magnitude more sensitive to high order QCD contributions or new interactions, because the lowest orders are filtered out by conserved symmetries. This circumstance presents a great opportunity to test high order chiral perturbation predictions, and to search for new sources of symmetry violations (such as C and CP) and new physics beyond the Standard Model. An experimental program to study η rare decays with the GlueX apparatus has been developed at Jlab. Simulations show that the experimental approach, which combines a state of the art PbWO4 calorimeter, a 12 GeV tagged photon beam, and recoil particle measurement, will reduce the background by almost two orders of magnitude compared to other competitors in the world. The updated result from the PrimEx experiments and the prospects of rare meson decays at GlueX will be presented.

  19. Thermal recoil force, telemetry, and the Pioneer anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Viktor T.; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2009-02-15

    Precision navigation of spacecraft requires accurate knowledge of small forces, including the recoil force due to anisotropies of thermal radiation emitted by spacecraft systems. We develop a formalism to derive the thermal recoil force from the basic principles of radiative heat exchange and energy-momentum conservation. The thermal power emitted by the spacecraft can be computed from engineering data obtained from flight telemetry, which yields a practical approach to incorporate the thermal recoil force into precision spacecraft navigation. Alternatively, orbit determination can be used to estimate the contribution of the thermal recoil force. We apply this approach to the Pioneer anomaly using a simulated Pioneer 10 Doppler data set.

  20. Recombination in liquid xenon for low-energy recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Detector response to low-energy recoils in sub-keV region is critical to detection of low-mass dark matter particles-WIMPS (Weakly interacting massive particles). The role of electron-ion recombination is important to the interpretation of the relation between ionization yield and scintillation yield, which are in general anti-correlated. Recent experimental results show that ionization yield increases down to keV range. This phenomenon contradicts general understanding for low energy recoils in the keV range in which direct excitation dominates. The explanation is that recombination becomes much less efficient when the track length is smaller than the thermalization distance of electrons. However, recombination rate is also proportional to ionization density, which is very high for keV recoils. To understand how recombination rate behaves for keV recoils, we calculated both initial recombination rate and volume recombination rate for keV recoils in liquid xenon. In this paper, we show the results of the calculated recombination rate as a function of recoil energy for both electronic recoils and nuclear recoils. Detector response to low-energy recoils in sub-keV region is critical to detection of low-mass dark matter particles-WIMPS (Weakly interacting massive particles). The role of electron-ion recombination is important to the interpretation of the relation between ionization yield and scintillation yield, which are in general anti-correlated. Recent experimental results show that ionization yield increases down to keV range. This phenomenon contradicts general understanding for low energy recoils in the keV range in which direct excitation dominates. The explanation is that recombination becomes much less efficient when the track length is smaller than the thermalization distance of electrons. However, recombination rate is also proportional to ionization density, which is very high for keV recoils. To understand how recombination rate behaves for keV recoils

  1. Automation of experiments at Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to solving the problems of automation of basic processes in long-term experiments in heavy ion beams of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) facility are considered. Approaches in the field of spectrometry, both of rare α decays of superheavy nuclei and those for constructing monitoring systems to provide accident-free experiment running with highly radioactive targets and recording basic parameters of experiment, are described. The specific features of Double Side Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are considered, special attention is paid to the role of boundary effects of neighboring p-n transitions in the "active correlations" method. An example of an off-beam experiment attempting to observe Zeno effect is briefly considered. Basic examples for nuclear reactions of complete fusion at 48Ca ion beams of U-400 cyclotron (LNR, JINR) are given. A scenario of development of the "active correlations" method for the case of very high intensity beams of heavy ions at promising accelerators of LNR, JINR, is presented.

  2. Neutron star recoils from anisotropic supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, H.-T.; Mueller, E.

    1994-10-01

    Refering to recent hydrodynamical computations (Herant et al. 1992; Janka & Mueller 1993a) it is argued that neutron star kicks up to a few hundred km/s might be caused by a turbulent overturn of the matter between proto-neutron star and supernova shock during the early phase of the supernova explosion. These recoil speeds ("kick velocities") may be of the right size to explain the measured proper motions of most pulsars and do not require the presence of magnetic fields in the star. It is also possible that anisotropic neutrino emission associated with convective processes in the surface layers of the nascent neutron star (Burrows & Fryxell 1992; Janka & Mueller 1993b; Mueller 1993) provides an acceleration mechanism (Woosley 1987), although our estimates indicate that the maximum attainable velocities are around 200km/s. Yet, it turns out to be very unlikely that the considered stochastic asymmetries of supernova explosions are able to produce large enough recoils to account for pulsar velocities in excess of about 500km/s, which can be found in the samples of Harrison et al. (1993) and Taylor et al. (1993). It is concluded that other acceleration mechanisms have to be devised to explain the fast motion of PSR 2224+65 (transverse speed >=800km/s Cordes et al. 1993) and the high-velocities deduced from associations between supernova remnants and nearby young pulsars (e.g., Frail & Kulkarni 1991; Stewart et al. 1993; Caraveo 1993).

  3. Nuclear astrophysics studies by recoil mass separators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gialanella, L.; Brand, K.; Campajola, L.; D'Onofrio, A.; Greife, U.; Morone, M. C.; Oliviero, G.; Ordine, A.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, M.; Romoli, M.; Schmidt, S.; Schulte, W. H.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H. P.; Zahnow, D.

    1997-11-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system, used as a recoil separator in conjunction with a windowless gas target, can yield the high suppression factor needed to dispersively analyze radiative capture residues, with the aim of measuring cross sections in the sub-microbarn range. An experiment is underway utilizing a radioactive 7Be beam for the measurement of the cross section of the astrophysically important reaction 7Be(p, γ)8B at a center of mass energy ECM = 1 MeV. Preliminary results of this experiment are presented. The extension of the method to another reaction playing a key role in stellar evolution, i.e. 12C(α, γ)16O, requires an improvement of the angle- and momentum-acceptance of the recoil separator, the use of a jet gas target and of a specially designed low-threshold detector. The solutions proposed by a joint Italian-German project are discussed.

  4. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    SciTech Connect

    Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (MW) and decay width (ΓW) in 1 fb-1 of W → ev collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass MT, pT(e), and ET distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the MT distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the pT and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be MW = 80.4035 ± 0.024(stat) ± 0.039(syst) from the MT, MW = 80.4165 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 ± 0.023(stat) ± 0.043(syst) from the ET distributions. ΓW is measured to be ΓW = 2.025 ± 0.038(stat) ± 0.061(syst) GeV.

  5. Friction induced skin tags.

    PubMed

    Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

    2008-01-01

    Skin tags are common benign neoplasm located predominantly in intertriginous skin. Generally of cosmetic concern, they can be easily treated with cryotherapy, electrodessication or snip-excision. Despite their high incidence data about their etiopathogenesis are scarce in the medical literature. We describe a patient who developed multiple skin tags arranged in a linear fashion suggesting an etiopathogenic role for friction. PMID:18627719

  6. Leptonic Decays of the Charged B Meson

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, Luke A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a search for the decay B+ → ℓ+ν ( = τ, μ, or e) in (458.9±5.1)×106 Υ(4S) decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed exclusive semi-leptonic B decay (B- → D0-$\\bar{v}$X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B+ →ℓ +ν signal is performed. The τ is identified in the following channels: τ+ → e+νe$\\bar{v}$τ , τ+ → μ+νμ$\\bar{v}$τ , τ+ → π+$\\bar{v}$τ , and τ+ → π+π0$\\bar{v}$τ . The analysis strategy and the statistical procedure is set up for branching fraction extraction or upper limit determination. We determine from the dataset a preliminary measurement of B(B+ → τ+ντ) = (1.8 ± 0.8 ± 0.1) × 10-4, which excludes zero at 2.4σ, and fB = 255 ± 58 MeV. Combination with the hadronically tagged measurement yields B(B+ → τ+ντ) = (1.8 ± 0.6) × 10-4. We also set preliminary limits on the branching fractions at B(B+ → e+νe) < 7.7 × 10-6 (90% C.L.), B(B+ → μ+νμ) < 11 × 10-6 (90% C.L.), and B(B+ → τ+ντ ) < 3.2 × 10-4(90% C.L.).

  7. Weak decay of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Moby Dick spectrometer (at BNL) in coincidence with a range spectrometer and a TOF neutron detector will be used to study the weak decay modes of /sup 12/C. The Moby Dick spectrometer will be used to reconstruct and tag events in which specific hypernuclear states are formed in the reaction K/sup -/ + /sup 12/C ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/ + /sup 12/C. Subsequent emission of decay products (pions, protons and neutrons) in coincidence with the fast forward pion will be detected in a time and range spectrometer, and a neutron detector.

  8. Spiral MR myocardial tagging.

    PubMed

    Ryf, Salome; Kissinger, Kraig V; Spiegel, Marcus A; Börnert, Peter; Manning, Warren J; Boesiger, Peter; Stuber, Matthias

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, complementary spatial modulation of magnetization (CSPAMM) myocardial tagging was extended with an interleaved spiral imaging sequence. The use of a spiral sequence enables the acquisition of grid-tagged images with a tagline distance as low as 4 mm in a single breath-hold. Alternatively, a high temporal resolution of 77 frames per second was obtained with 8-mm grid spacing. Ten healthy adult subjects were studied. With this new approach, high-quality images can be obtained and the tags persist throughout the entire cardiac cycle. PMID:14755646

  9. Flavor Tagging at Tevatron incl. calibration and control

    SciTech Connect

    Moulik, T.; /Kansas U.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the flavor tagging techniques developed at the CDF and D0 experiments. Flavor tagging involves identification of the B meson flavor at production, whether its constituent is a quark or an anti-quark. It is crucial for measuring the oscillation frequency of neutral B mesons, both in the B{sup 0} and B{sub S} system. The two experiments have developed their unique approaches to flavor tagging, using neural networks, and likelihood methods to disentangle tracks from b decays from other tracks. This report discusses these techniques and the measurement of B{sup 0} mixing, as a means to calibrate the taggers.

  10. TAG Advertisement Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    LaRc SI Material Overall photograph showing the material specimens, the graphite composite, the gold composite and the molded gears on a black background. These photos were used for the TAG CO-OP Public Relations and promotions

  11. A gun recoil system employing a magnetorheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. C.; Wang, J.

    2012-10-01

    This research aims to design and control a full scale gun recoil buffering system which works under real firing impact loading conditions. A conventional gun recoil absorber is replaced with a controllable magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper. Through dynamic analysis of the gun recoil system, a theoretical model for optimal design and control of the MR fluid damper for impact loadings is derived. The optimal displacement, velocity and optimal design rules are obtained. By applying the optimal design theory to protect against impact loadings, an MR fluid damper for a full scale gun recoil system is designed and manufactured. An experimental study is carried out on a firing test rig which consists of a 30 mm caliber, multi-action automatic gun with an MR damper mounted to the fixed base through a sliding guide. Experimental buffering results under passive control and optimal control are obtained. By comparison, optimal control is better than passive control, because it produces smaller variation in the recoil force while achieving less displacement of the recoil body. The optimal control strategy presented in this paper is open-loop with no feedback system needed. This means that the control process is sensor-free. This is a great benefit for a buffering system under impact loading, especially for a gun recoil system which usually works in a harsh environment.

  12. Rare Down Quark Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Kwong-Kwai Humphrey

    1992-01-01

    The rare decays bto sX are sensitive to strong interaction corrections. The effects can be estimated by a renormalization group technique which requires the evaluation of QCD mixing among effective operators. In the dimensional reduction and the naive dimensional regularization methods, there are discrepancies in evaluating the QCD mixing of the four-quark operators with the bto sgamma and bto s+gluon dipole operators. In this thesis, the problem is investigated by considering the contributions of the epsilon -scalar field and the epsilon -dimensional operators that distinguish between the two methods. The discrepancies are shown to come from the epsilon-dimensional four-quark operators in dimensional reduction and not from the epsilon -scalar field. In the decay bto sl^+l^ -, the intermediate of cc pairs in the charm-penguin diagram can form the resonance states J/psi and psi^'. In the published literature, there is a sign discrepancy in the Breit-Wigner amplitude for the resonance effects. Here, the sign difference is settled by considering the unitarity limit of the amplitude in the Argand diagram. The effects of the resonances are quite substantial on the invariant mass spectrum for this decay. However, they are shown to be negligible on the dilepton energy spectrum below 0.95 GeV. The energy spectrum is, thus, more useful than the invariant mass spectrum for measurements of the top -quark mass. The decays Bto K^*X are well modeled by the quark-level decays bto sX. In the quark model, the hadronization is done using a nonrelativistic wave function. In the decay B to K^*gamma, the large K ^* recoil creates an uncertainty in calculating the branching ratio using the quark model. The problem is explored by considering other meson processes where data exist. The data on the pi form factor and the omegapi^0 transition form factor suggest the necessity to retain relativistic spinor and meson normalizations in the quark -model; however, the data do not resolve the

  13. Difference between a Photon's Momentum and an Atom's Recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Gibble, Kurt

    2006-08-18

    When an atom absorbs a photon from a laser beam that is not an infinite plane wave, the atom's recoil is less than ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})k in the propagation direction. We show that the recoils in the transverse directions produce a lensing of the atomic wave functions, which leads to a frequency shift that is not discrete but varies linearly with the field amplitude and strongly depends on the atomic state detection. The same lensing effect is also important for microwave atomic clocks. The frequency shifts are of the order of the naive recoil shift for the transverse wave vector of the photons.

  14. Facets: Ersatz, Resource and Tag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frické, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Faceted classification appears to be of utmost importance. Ersatz facets, resource faceting and tag faceting: The distinctions are drawn between facets and ersatz facets, and between faceted resources and faceted tags. Single tag resource faceting and multiple tag information object faceting: The basic features are explored of single…

  15. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ΦsJ/ψΦ using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0→J/ ψΦ in 8 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strom, D.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Zelitch, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ΦsJ/ψΦ, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ΔΓs, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s→J/ψΦ. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb⁻¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ΔΓs=0.163+0.065₋0.064 ps⁻¹ and ΦsJ/ψΦ=₋0.55+0.38₋0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  16. First high-statistics and high-resolution recoil-ion data from the WITCH retardation spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, P.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Porobić, T.; Wursten, E.; Ban, G.; Beck, M.; Couratin, C.; Fabian, X.; Fléchard, X.; Friedag, P.; Glück, F.; Herlert, A.; Knecht, A.; Kozlov, V. Y.; Liénard, E.; Soti, G.; Tandecki, M.; Traykov, E.; Van Gorp, S.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Zákoucký, D.; Severijns, N.

    2016-07-01

    The first high-statistics and high-resolution data set for the integrated recoil-ion energy spectrum following the β^+ decay of 35Ar has been collected with the WITCH retardation spectrometer located at CERN-ISOLDE. Over 25 million recoil-ion events were recorded on a large-area multichannel plate (MCP) detector with a time-stamp precision of 2ns and position resolution of 0.1mm due to the newly upgraded data acquisition based on the LPC Caen FASTER protocol. The number of recoil ions was measured for more than 15 different settings of the retardation potential, complemented by dedicated background and half-life measurements. Previously unidentified systematic effects, including an energy-dependent efficiency of the main MCP and a radiation-induced time-dependent background, have been identified and incorporated into the analysis. However, further understanding and treatment of the radiation-induced background requires additional dedicated measurements and remains the current limiting factor in extracting a beta-neutrino angular correlation coefficient for 35Ar decay using the WITCH spectrometer.

  17. Exerpts from the history of alpha recoils.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Christer

    2011-05-01

    Any confined air volume holding radon ((222)Rn) gas bears a memory of past radon concentrations due to (210)Pb (T(1/2) = 22 y) and its progenies entrapped in all solid objects in the volume. The efforts of quantifying past radon exposures by means of the left-behind long-lived radon progenies started in 1987 with this author's unsuccessful trials of removing (214)Po from radon exposed glass objects. In this contribution the history and different techniques of assessing radon exposure to man in retrospect will be overviewed. The main focus will be on the implantation of alpha recoils into glass surfaces, but also potential traps in radon dwellings will be discussed. It is concluded that for a successful retrospective application, three crucial imperatives must be met, i.e. firstly, the object must persistently store a certain fraction of the created (210)Pb atoms, secondly, be resistant over decades towards disturbances from the outside and thirdly, all (210)Pb atoms analysed must originate from airborne radon only. For large-scale radon epidemiological studies, non-destructive and inexpensive measurement techniques are essential. Large-scale studies cannot be based on objects rarely found in dwellings or not available for measurements. PMID:21306801

  18. Scintillation Efficiency of Liquid Xenon for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongjirad, Taritree; Ni, Kaixuan; Manzur, Angel; Kastens, Louis; McKinsey, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    In early 2006, the XENON and ZEPLIN collaborations announced highly stringent upper limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section. However, the dominant systematic uncertainty in these limits is due to the uncertainty in the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency (NRSE) for liquid xenon. The NRSE is defined as the amount of scintillation produced by nuclear recoils, divided by the amount of scintillation produced by electron recoils, per unit energy. Though the NRSE has been measured by several groups, its value at the low energies most important for the liquid xenon WIMP searches has a large uncertainty. Furthermore, the NRSE may vary with the strength of the electric field in the liquid xenon. In an attempt to reduce these uncertainties, we have measured the NRSE down to 5 keV nuclear recoil energy for various electric fields.

  19. RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN SPIN-FLIP RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Wang Dong; Chen Xian

    2012-02-20

    Numerical relativity simulations predict that coalescence of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries leads not only to a spin flip but also to a recoiling of the merger remnant SMBHs. In the literature, X-shaped radio sources are popularly suggested to be candidates for SMBH mergers with spin flip of jet-ejecting SMBHs. Here we investigate the spectral and spatial observational signatures of the recoiling SMBHs in radio sources undergoing black hole spin flip. Our results show that SMBHs in most spin-flip radio sources have mass ratio q {approx}> 0.3 with a minimum possible value q{sub min} {approx_equal} 0.05. For major mergers, the remnant SMBHs can get a kick velocity as high as 2100 km s{sup -1} in the direction within an angle {approx}< 40 Degree-Sign relative to the spin axes of remnant SMBHs, implying that recoiling quasars are biased to be with high Doppler-shifted broad emission lines while recoiling radio galaxies are biased to large apparent spatial off-center displacements. We also calculate the distribution functions of line-of-sight velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacements for spin-flip radio sources with different apparent jet reorientation angles. Our results show that the larger the apparent jet reorientation angle is, the larger the Doppler-shifting recoiling velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacement will be. We investigate the effects of recoiling velocity on the dust torus in spin-flip radio sources and suggest that recoiling of SMBHs would lead to 'dust-poor' active galactic nuclei. Finally, we collect a sample of 19 X-shaped radio objects and for each object give the probability of detecting the predicted signatures of recoiling SMBH.

  20. Recoil splitting of x-ray-induced optical fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, S.; Aagren, H.; Gel'mukhanov, F.; Sun, Y.-P.; Levin, S.

    2010-03-15

    We show that the anisotropy of the recoil velocity distribution of x-ray-ionized atoms or molecules leads to observable splittings in subsequent optical fluorescence or absorption when the polarization vector of the x rays is parallel to the momentum of the fluorescent photons. The order of the magnitude of the recoil-induced splitting is about 10 {mu}eV, which can be observed using Fourier or laser-absorption spectroscopic techniques.

  1. A Reliable Tag Anti-Collision Algorithm for Mobile Tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaodong; Rong, Mengtian; Liu, Tao

    As RFID technology is being more widely adopted, it is fairly common to read mobile tags using RFID systems, such as packages on conveyer belt and unit loads on pallet jack or forklift truck. In RFID systems, multiple tags use a shared medium for communicating with a reader. It is quite possible that tags will exit the reading area without being read, which results in tag leaking. In this letter, a reliable tag anti-collision algorithm for mobile tags is proposed. It reliably estimates the expectation of the number of tags arriving during a time slot when new tags continually enter the reader's reading area and no tag leaves without being read. In addition, it gives priority to tags that arrived early among read cycles and applies the expectation of the number of tags arriving during a time slot to the determination of the number of slots in the initial inventory round of the next read cycle. Simulation results show that the reliability of the proposed algorithm is close to that of DFSA algorithm when the expectation of the number of tags entering the reading area during a time slot is a given, and is better than that of DFSA algorithm when the number of time slots in the initial inventory round of next read cycle is set to 1 assuming that the number of tags arriving during a time slot follows Poisson distribution.

  2. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K. S.; Mas, J. F.; McConnell, J. W.; Yu, C.-H.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R. C.; Woods, P. J.; Ginter, T. N.; Gross, C. J.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S. H.; Weintraub, W.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; MacDonald, B. D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E. F.

    1998-12-21

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu.

  3. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K.S.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Yu, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S.H.; Weintraub, W.; Rykaczewski, K.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R.C.; Woods, P.J.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; MacDonald, B.D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.F.; Ressler, J.J.; Walters, W.B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-01

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Same Side Pion Tagging Study in Lepton+D^(*) Sample at CDF using Run 2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitin, Alexandre

    2003-04-01

    The same side pion tagging method is applied to determine the b/barb-quark flavor of B mesons at the time of production in a sample of B_u,d arrow ℓ D^(*) X decays collected in 2002-2003 using the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Three decay signatures are reconstructed. The analysis is a prerequisite to apply same-side kaon tagging to the lepton+D_s^(*) sample in the future.

  5. Tag Completion for Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Jin, Rong; Jain, Anil K

    2013-03-01

    Many social image search engines are based on keyword/tag matching. This is because tag-based image retrieval (TBIR) is not only efficient but also effective. The performance of TBIR is highly dependent on the availability and quality of manual tags. Recent studies have shown that manual tags are often unreliable and inconsistent. In addition, since many users tend to choose general and ambiguous tags in order to minimize their efforts in choosing appropriate words, tags that are specific to the visual content of images tend to be missing or noisy, leading to a limited performance of TBIR. To address this challenge, we study the problem of tag completion, where the goal is to automatically fill in the missing tags as well as correct noisy tags for given images. We represent the image-tag relation by a tag matrix, and search for the optimal tag matrix consistent with both the observed tags and the visual similarity. We propose a new algorithm for solving this optimization problem. Extensive empirical studies show that the proposed algorithm is significantly more effective than the state-of-the-art algorithms. Our studies also verify that the proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and scales well to large databases. PMID:22641703

  6. Project 8 Tags

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos-Burrows, Michele

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes 8 Tags, a project that she used with her eighth-grade studio art students to encourage them to come up with original and creative solutions to an assignment. She also wanted to incorporate their knowledge of the elements of art and principles of design. In this project, students were challenged to create an…

  7. Ontologies and tag-statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2012-05-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of collaborative tagging systems, the research on tagged networks, hypergraphs, ontologies, folksonomies and other related concepts is becoming an important interdisciplinary area with great potential and relevance for practical applications. In most collaborative tagging systems the tagging by the users is completely ‘flat’, while in some cases they are allowed to define a shallow hierarchy for their own tags. However, usually no overall hierarchical organization of the tags is given, and one of the interesting challenges of this area is to provide an algorithm generating the ontology of the tags from the available data. In contrast, there are also other types of tagged networks available for research, where the tags are already organized into a directed acyclic graph (DAG), encapsulating the ‘is a sub-category of’ type of hierarchy between each other. In this paper, we study how this DAG affects the statistical distribution of tags on the nodes marked by the tags in various real networks. The motivation for this research was the fact that understanding the tagging based on a known hierarchy can help in revealing the hidden hierarchy of tags in collaborative tagging systems. We analyse the relation between the tag-frequency and the position of the tag in the DAG in two large sub-networks of the English Wikipedia and a protein-protein interaction network. We also study the tag co-occurrence statistics by introducing a two-dimensional (2D) tag-distance distribution preserving both the difference in the levels and the absolute distance in the DAG for the co-occurring pairs of tags. Our most interesting finding is that the local relevance of tags in the DAG (i.e. their rank or significance as characterized by, e.g., the length of the branches starting from them) is much more important than their global distance from the root. Furthermore, we also introduce a simple tagging model based on random walks on the DAG, capable of

  8. Semileptonic meson decays in the quark model: An update

    SciTech Connect

    D. Scora; N. Isgur

    1995-03-01

    The authors present the predictions of ISGW2, an update of the ISGW quark model for semileptonic meson decays. The updated model incorporates a number of features which should make it more reliable, including the constraints imposed by Heavy Quark Symmetry, hyperfine distortions of wave-functions, and form factors with more realistic high recoil behaviors.

  9. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-01

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP “smoking gun.” If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of ˜2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  10. Stimulated Rayleigh resonances and recoil-induced effects

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, J.Y.; Grynberg, G.

    1996-12-31

    The organization of this paper is as follows. We present in Section II the basic ideas about stimulated Rayleigh scattering by considering more particularly the situation where it arises from a relaxation process going on in the material system, and we describe a few experimental observations made in atomic and molecular physics. We then consider the case of nonstationary two-level atoms, and we derive the shape and characteristics of the recoil-induced resonances (Section III). In particular, we show that these resonances can be interpreted either as originating from a stimulated Rayleigh effect or as a stimulated Raman phenomena between atomic energy-momentum states having different momenta. Finally, to make a clear distinction between the physical phenomena that pertain directly to recoil-induced processes (i.e., that actually permit the measurement of the photon recoil) and those for which the introduction of the recoil constitutes a mere physical convenience, we review in Section IV some indisputable manifestations of the photon recoil in atomic and molecular physics. 92 refs., 22 figs.

  11. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-15

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP 'smoking gun'. If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of {approx}2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  12. Calculation of recoil implantation profiles using known range statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C. D.; Avila, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed to calculate the depth distribution of recoil atoms that result from ion implantation onto a substrate covered with a thin surface layer. The calculation includes first order recoils considering projected range straggles, and lateral straggles of recoils but neglecting lateral straggles of projectiles. Projectile range distributions at intermediate energies in the surface layer are deduced from look-up tables of known range statistics. A great saving of computing time and human effort is thus attained in comparison with existing procedures. The method is used to calculate recoil profiles of oxygen from implantation of arsenic through SiO2 and of nitrogen from implantation of phosphorus through Si3N4 films on silicon. The calculated recoil profiles are in good agreement with results obtained by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation and they also compare very well with available experimental results in the literature. The deviation between calculated and experimental results is discussed in relation to lateral straggles. From this discussion, a range of surface layer thickness for which the method applies is recommended.

  13. Nuclear Recoil Calibration of DarkSide-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edkins, Erin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    DarkSide-50 dark matter experiment is a liquid argon time projection chamber (TPC) surrounded by a liquid scintillator active neutron veto, designed for the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The success of such an experiment is dependent upon a detailed understanding of both the expected signal and backgrounds, achieved using radioactive calibration sources of known energies. Nuclear recoils provide a measurement of both the expected signal and the most dangerous background, as nuclear recoils from neutrons cannot be distinguished from a dark matter signal on an event-by-event basis in the TPC. In this talk, I will present the DS-50 calibration system, and analysis of the results of the calibration of DarkSide-50 to nuclear recoils using radioactive neutron sources. See also the DS-50 presentations by X. Xiang and G. Koh.

  14. Recoil release of fission products from nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, C.

    1985-10-01

    An analytical approximation is developed for calculating recoil release from nuclear fuel into gas filled interspaces. This expression is evaluated for a number of interspace geometries and shown to be generally accurate to within about 10% by comparison with numerical calculations. The results are applied to situations of physical interest and it is demonstrated that recoil can be important when modelling fission product release from low temperature CAGR pin failures. Furthermore, recoil can contribute significantly in experiments on low temperature fission product release, particularly where oxidation enhancement of this release is measured by exposing the fuel to CO 2. The calculations presented here are one way of allowing for this, other methods are suggested.

  15. Fission product release from nuclear fuel by recoil and knockout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.

    1987-03-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the fission product release from nuclear fuel arising from the surface-fission release mechanisms of recoil and knockout. Release expressions are evaluated and compared to the short-lived activity measurements from in-reactor experiments with intact operating fuel. Recoil is shown to be an important process for releasing fission products from free UO 2 surfaces into the fuel-to-sheath gap. The model is also applied to tramp uranium in a power reactor primary heat transport circuit where it is demonstrated that recoil is the dominant release mechanism for small particles of fuel which are deposited on in-core surfaces. A methodology is established whereby release from surface contamination can be distinguished from that of fuel pin failure.

  16. Social Tagging Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Leandro Balby; Nanopoulos, Alexandros; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars; Jäschke, Robert; Hotho, Andreas; Stumme, Gerd; Symeonidis, Panagiotis

    The new generation of Web applications known as (STS) is successfully established and poised for continued growth. STS are open and inherently social; features that have been proven to encourage participation. But while STS bring new opportunities, they revive old problems, such as information overload. Recommender Systems are well known applications for increasing the level of relevant content over the "noise" that continuously grows as more and more content becomes available online. In STS however, we face new challenges. Users are interested in finding not only content, but also tags and even other users. Moreover, while traditional recommender systems usually operate over 2-way data arrays, STS data is represented as a third-order tensor or a hypergraph with hyperedges denoting (user, resource, tag) triples. In this chapter, we survey the most recent and state-of-the-art work about a whole new generation of recommender systems built to serve STS.We describe (a) novel facets of recommenders for STS, such as user, resource, and tag recommenders, (b) new approaches and algorithms for dealing with the ternary nature of STS data, and (c) recommender systems deployed in real world STS. Moreover, a concise comparison between existing works is presented, through which we identify and point out new research directions.

  17. Ionic recoil energies in the Coulomb explosion of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuber, S.; Döppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    The photoionization of metal clusters in intense femtosecond laser fields has been studied. In contrast to an experiment on atoms, the interaction in this case leads to a very efficient and high charging of the particle where tens of electrons per atom are ejected from the cluster. The recoil energy distribution of the atomic fragment ions was measured which in the case of lead clusters exceeds 180 keV. Enhanced charging efficiency which we observed earlier for specific pulse conditions is not reflected in the recoil energy spectra. Both the average and the maximum energies decrease with increasing laser pulse width. This is in good agreement with molecular dynamics calculations.

  18. Status and Prospects of the HERMES Recoil Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mussgiller, Andreas

    2009-08-04

    Hard exclusive processes provide access to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), which extend our description of the nucleon structure beyond the standard parton distributions. The Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process provides the theoretically cleanest access to the GPDs. For the final two years of data taking, a recoil detector was installed at HERMES for the purpose of improving the ability to measure hard-exclusive processes. In addition the recoil detector allows one to measure the individual background contributions which can be used to refine previously published results on DVCS. The progress of the ongoing data analysis is presented.

  19. Advances in Tagging Methods for Lifetimes of Isomeric- and Proton-Unbound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.

    2008-11-11

    This paper summarises the programme of Recoil-isomer tagging that has been performed over the last ten years at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. The nuclei studied lie in the mass 130-140 region of the Segre chart very close to the proton drip line. The evolution of the isomer character is seen to change from K-isomers, at N = 74, to shape-isomers in the gamma soft N = 77 nuclei to seniority-isomers around N = 82. The influence of the proton drip line on the N = 74 isomers and possible critical-point symmetries in the N = 77 nuclei are discussed and the latest results presented. Developments of the isomer-tagging technique, using large beam currents with a dual Multi-Wire Proportional Counter setup, and an Isomer-tagged Differential-Plunger setup are discussed along with a future programme of work at Jyvaeskylae.

  20. A study of neutron structure with (un)polarized deuterons and forward spectator tagging at EIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kijun

    2015-10-01

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable measurements of neutron structure through deep-inelastic electron-deuteron scattering with coincidence tagging of the forward-moving spectator proton. This technique allows to identify the active neutron and control its quantum state in the deuteron through measurement of the recoil proton momentum. An intensive study has established the feasibility of spectator tagging, including measurements of neutron spin structure with a polarized deuteron beam. A Monte Carlo simulation with the GEANT4 modular framework is developed with the physical processes, the MEIC accelerator/detector design and used to optimize the analysis strategy. A technique is implemented for obtaining the free neutron structure function by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum to the on-shell point. Such measurements provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, an d precision studies of QCD evolution. The EMC effect in light nuclei can be elucidated by studying the recoil momentum dependence of the nuclear modification away from the on-shell point. In this talk, I describe the proposed experimental set up, analysis procedure, and present results of the neutron structure functions.

  1. Polarized Electron - Polarized Deuteron Deep-Inelastic Scattering in Electron-Ion Collider with Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsian, Misak; Cosyn, Wim; Weiss, Christian

    2015-10-01

    For the past several years there have been an intensive research and development for the possible electron-ion collider that will be able to probe deep inelastic processes at unprecedentedly high energies in eA channel. One of the important advantages of the collider kinematics in DIS processes is the possibility for an unambiguous separation of hadrons emerging from DIS and hadrons fragmenting from the target nucleus. This creates a unique possibility for tagging the interacting nucleon with the recoil slow fragments in the DIS process. The situation is most clean for the deuteron target in which case the recoil particle is a nucleon. In addition, the possibility of having polarized deuteron beams will create unprecedented opportunities in probing polarization degrees of freedom for parton distributions in the interacting bound nucleon. In this work we develop a theoretical framework for the polarized electron-polarized deuteron deep inelastic scattering in which the recoil nucleon is detected in the target fragmentation region. Two main contributions for which theoretical models are developed are the plane-wave impulse approximation, in which no reinteractions are taking place between the final state products of DIS and the recoil nucleon.

  2. Measurement of Rb Using a Vertex Mass Tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T. L.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolen, B.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chou, A.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; Crawford, G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Groot, N.; de Sangro, R.; dell'Orso, R.; Dervan, P. J.; Dima, M.; Dong, D. N.; Du, P. Y.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Fahey, S.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hart, E. L.; Harton, J. L.; Hasan, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasuko, K.; Hedges, S. J.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J. A.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y. D.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Lia, V.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Moore, T. B.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Oishi, N.; Onoprienko, D.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, C. H.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schumm, B. A.; Schwiening, J.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Smy, M. B.; Snyder, J. A.; Staengle, H.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Trandafir, A. I.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'Vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yashima, J.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zhou, J.

    1998-01-01

    We report a new measurement of Rb = γZ0-->bb¯/γZ0-->hadrons using a double tag technique, where the b hemisphere selection is based on the reconstructed mass of the B hadron decay vertex. The measurement was performed using a sample of 130×103 hadronic Z0 events, collected with the SLD detector at SLC. The method utilizes the 3D vertexing abilities of the CCD pixel vertex detector and the small stable SLC beams to obtain a high b-tagging efficiency and purity. We obtain Rb = 0.2142+/-0.0034\\(stat\\)+/-0.0015\\(syst\\)+/-0.0002\\(Rc\\).

  3. Social Tagging of Mission Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Powell, Mark W.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Mittman, David S.; Abramyan, Lucy; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Fox, Jason M.; Pyrzak, Guy; Vaughn, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Mars missions will generate a large amount of data in various forms, such as daily plans, images, and scientific information. Often, there is a semantic linkage between images that cannot be captured automatically. Software is needed that will provide a method for creating arbitrary tags for this mission data so that items with a similar tag can be related to each other. The tags should be visible and searchable for all users. A new routine was written to offer a new and more flexible search option over previous applications. This software allows users of the MSLICE program to apply any number of arbitrary tags to a piece of mission data through a MSLICE search interface. The application of tags creates relationships between data that did not previously exist. These tags can be easily removed and changed, and contain enough flexibility to be specifically configured for any mission. This gives users the ability to quickly recall or draw attention to particular pieces of mission data, for example: Give a semantic and meaningful description to mission data; for example, tag all images with a rock in them with the tag "rock." Rapidly recall specific and useful pieces of data; for example, tag a plan as"driving template." Call specific data to a user s attention; for example, tag a plan as "for:User." This software is part of the MSLICE release, which was written in Java. It will run on any current Windows, Macintosh, or Linux system.

  4. Towards an "Intelligent" Tagging Tool for Blogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Juraj; Motschnig, Renate; Homola, Martin

    Tagging allows people to effectively organize web resources such as images, bookmarks or blog articles. Things are found easier by browsing tag clouds relying on the tags that have been assigned before. The success is by large determined by the quality and relevance of tags assigned to content - and so it is dependent on people who do the tagging. We investigate mental processes that underlie tagging. In order to improve quality of tagging, we provide guidelines for users of tagging systems and in addition we suggest features that an "intelligent" tagging tool should bear in order to facilitate the tagging process.

  5. Direct Measurement of Photon Recoil from a Levitated Nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vijay; Gieseler, Jan; Moritz, Clemens; Dellago, Christoph; Quidant, Romain; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-06-01

    The momentum transfer between a photon and an object defines a fundamental limit for the precision with which the object can be measured. If the object oscillates at a frequency Ω0 , this measurement backaction adds quanta ℏΩ0 to the oscillator's energy at a rate Γrecoil, a process called photon recoil heating, and sets bounds to coherence times in cavity optomechanical systems. Here, we use an optically levitated nanoparticle in ultrahigh vacuum to directly measure Γrecoil. By means of a phase-sensitive feedback scheme, we cool the harmonic motion of the nanoparticle from ambient to microkelvin temperatures and measure its reheating rate under the influence of the radiation field. The recoil heating rate is measured for different particle sizes and for different excitation powers, without the need for cavity optics or cryogenic environments. The measurements are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions and provide valuable guidance for the realization of quantum ground-state cooling protocols and the measurement of ultrasmall forces.

  6. Direct Measurement of Photon Recoil from a Levitated Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vijay; Gieseler, Jan; Moritz, Clemens; Dellago, Christoph; Quidant, Romain; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-06-17

    The momentum transfer between a photon and an object defines a fundamental limit for the precision with which the object can be measured. If the object oscillates at a frequency Ω_{0}, this measurement backaction adds quanta ℏΩ_{0} to the oscillator's energy at a rate Γ_{recoil}, a process called photon recoil heating, and sets bounds to coherence times in cavity optomechanical systems. Here, we use an optically levitated nanoparticle in ultrahigh vacuum to directly measure Γ_{recoil}. By means of a phase-sensitive feedback scheme, we cool the harmonic motion of the nanoparticle from ambient to microkelvin temperatures and measure its reheating rate under the influence of the radiation field. The recoil heating rate is measured for different particle sizes and for different excitation powers, without the need for cavity optics or cryogenic environments. The measurements are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions and provide valuable guidance for the realization of quantum ground-state cooling protocols and the measurement of ultrasmall forces. PMID:27367388

  7. μx boosted-bottom-jet tagging and Z' boson searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Keith; Sullivan, Zack

    2016-01-01

    We present a new technique for tagging heavy-flavor jets with pT>500 GeV called "μx tagging." Current track-based methods of b -jet tagging lose efficiency and experience a large rise in fake rate in the boosted regime. Using muons from B hadron decay, we combine angular information and jet substructure to tag b jets, c jets, light jets, and "light-heavy" jets (those containing B hadrons from gluon splitting). We find tagging efficiencies of ɛb=14 %, ɛc=6.5 %, ɛlight-light=0.14 % , and ɛlight-heavy=0.5 %, respectively, that are nearly independent of transverse momentum at high energy. We demonstrate the usefulness of this new scheme by examining the discovery potential for multi-TeV leptophobic Z' bosons in the boosted-b -tagged dijet channel at the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Measurement of upper limits for {upsilon}{yields}{gamma}+R decays

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J. L.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.

    2007-12-01

    We report on a study of exclusive radiative decays {upsilon}(nS){yields}{gamma}+R (n=1, 2, 3), with R a narrow resonant hadronic state decaying into four or more charged particles (plus possible neutrals). Using data collected from the CLEO III detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we present upper limits of order 10{sup -4} for such bottomonium two-body decays as a function of the mass M{sub R} recoiling opposite the photon.

  9. Isotopic disequilibrium of uranium: alpha-recoil damage and preferential solution effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, R.L.

    1980-02-29

    Preferential loss of uranium-234 relative to uranium-238 from rocks into solutions has long been attributed to recoiling alpha-emitting nuclei. Direct evidence has been obtained for two mechanisms, first, recoil ejection from grains, and now release by natural etching of alpha-recoil tracks. The observations have implications for radon emanation and for the storage of alpha-emitting radioactive waste.

  10. Polarized light ions and spectator nucleon tagging at EIC

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, Vadim; Higinbotham, Dougas W.; Hyde, Charles; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel A.; Park, Kijun; Sargsian, Misak M.; Strikman, Mark; Weiss, Christian

    2014-10-01

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x ll 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < p(R) < several 100MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We review the prospects for neutron structure measurements with spectator tagging at EIC, the status of R&D efforts, and the accelerator and detector requirements.

  11. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  12. Buddy Tag CONOPS and Requirements.

    SciTech Connect

    Brotz, Jay Kristoffer; Deland, Sharon M.

    2015-12-01

    This document defines the concept of operations (CONOPS) and the requirements for the Buddy Tag, which is conceived and designed in collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Princeton University under the Department of State Key VerificationAssets Fund. The CONOPS describe how the tags are used to support verification of treaty limitations and is only defined to the extent necessary to support a tag design. The requirements define the necessary functions and desired non-functional features of the Buddy Tag at a high level

  13. Characterization of the Oxidation State of 229 Th Recoils Implanted in MgF2 for the Search of the Low-lying 229 Th Isomeric State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Beau; Meyer, Edmund; Schacht, Mike; Collins, Lee; Wilkerson, Marianne; Zhao, Xinxin

    2016-05-01

    The low-lying (7.8 eV) isomeric state in 229 Th has the potential to become a nuclear frequency standard. 229 Th recoils from 233 U decays have been collected in MgF2 for use in the direct search of the transition. Of interest is the oxidation state of the implanted 229 Th atoms as this can have an influence on the decay mechanisms and photon emission rate. Too determine the oxidation state of the implanted 229 Th recoils we have employed laser induced florescence (LIF), and plan-wave pseudopotential DFT calculations to search for emission from thorium ions in oxidation states less than + 4. Our search focused on detecting emission from Th3+ ions. The DFT calculations predicted the Th3+ state to be the most likely to be present in the crystal after Th4+. We also calculated the band structure for the Th3+ doped MgF2 crystal. For LIF spectra a number of excitation wavelengths were employed, emission spectra in the visible to near-IR were recorded along with time-resolved emission spectra. We have found no evidence for Th3+ in the MgF2 plates. We also analyzed the detection limit of our apprentice and found that the minimum number of Th3+ atoms that we could detect is quite small compared to the number of implanted 229 Th recoils. The number of implanted 229 Th recoils was derived from a γ-ray spectrum by monitoring emission from the daughters of 228 Th. These were present in the MgF2 plates due to a 232 U impurity, which decays to 228 Th, in the source. LA-UR-16-20442.

  14. Radiative decay of [ital D][sub 2][sup *](2460) and [ital D][sub 1](2420)

    SciTech Connect

    Fayyazuddin; Mobarek, O.H. )

    1994-08-01

    The [ital E]1 transition decay widths for the decays [ital D][sub 2][sup *][r arrow][ital D][sup *]+[gamma], [ital D][sub 1][r arrow][ital D]+[gamma], and [ital D][sub 1][r arrow][ital D][sup *]+[gamma] are calculated in the nonrelativistic quark model with recoil and relativistic corrections.

  15. Molecular modeling of the effects of 40Ar recoil in illite particles on their K-Ar isotope dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, Marek; Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Środoń, Jan

    2015-06-01

    The radioactive decay of 40K to 40Ar is the basis of isotope age determination of micaceous clay minerals formed during diagenesis. The difference in K-Ar ages between fine and coarse grained illite particles has been interpreted using detrital-authigenic components system, its crystallization history or post-crystallization diffusion. Yet another mechanism should also be considered: natural 40Ar recoil. Whether this recoil mechanism can result in a significant enough loss of 40Ar to provide observable decrease of K-Ar age of the finest illite crystallites at diagenetic temperatures - is the primary objective of this study which is based on molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. All the simulations were performed for the same kinetic energy (initial velocity) of the 40Ar atom, but for varying recoil angles that cover the entire range of their possible values. The results show that 40Ar recoil can lead to various deformations of the illite structure, often accompanied by the displacement of OH groups or breaking of the Si-O bonds. Depending on the recoil angle, there are four possible final positions of the 40Ar atom with respect to the 2:1 layer at the end of the simulation: it can remain in the interlayer space or end up in the closest tetrahedral, octahedral or the opposite tetrahedral sheet. No simulation angles were found for which the 40Ar atom after recoil passes completely through the 2:1 layer. The energy barrier for 40Ar passing through the hexagonal cavity from the tetrahedral sheet into the interlayer was calculated to be 17 kcal/mol. This reaction is strongly exothermic, therefore there is almost no possibility for 40Ar to remain in the tetrahedral sheet of the 2:1 layer over geological time periods. It will either leave the crystal, if close enough to the edge, or return to the interlayer space. On the other hand, if 40Ar ends up in the octahedral sheet after recoil, a substantially higher energy barrier of 55 kcal/mol prevents it from leaving

  16. QCD in heavy quark production and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wiss, J.

    1997-06-01

    The author discusses how QCD is used to understand the physics of heavy quark production and decay dynamics. His discussion of production dynamics primarily concentrates on charm photoproduction data which are compared to perturbative QCD calculations which incorporate fragmentation effects. He begins his discussion of heavy quark decay by reviewing data on charm and beauty lifetimes. Present data on fully leptonic and semileptonic charm decay are then reviewed. Measurements of the hadronic weak current form factors are compared to the nonperturbative QCD-based predictions of Lattice Gauge Theories. He next discusses polarization phenomena present in charmed baryon decay. Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicts that the daughter baryon will recoil from the charmed parent with nearly 100% left-handed polarization, which is in excellent agreement with present data. He concludes by discussing nonleptonic charm decay which is traditionally analyzed in a factorization framework applicable to two-body and quasi-two-body nonleptonic decays. This discussion emphasizes the important role of final state interactions in influencing both the observed decay width of various two-body final states as well as modifying the interference between interfering resonance channels which contribute to specific multibody decays. 50 refs., 77 figs.

  17. Charged-particle multiplicities in B-meson decay

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Csorna, S.E.; Fridman, A.; Hicks, R.G.; Panvini, R.S.; Andrews, D.; Avery, P.; Berkelman, K.; Cabenda, R.; Cassel, D.G.; DeWire, J.W.; Ehrlich, R.; Ferguson, T.; Gilchriese, M.G.D.; Gittelman, B.; Hartill, D.L.; Herrup, D.; Herzlinger, M.; Holzner, S.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.L.; Mistry, N.B.; Morrow, F.; Nordberg, E.; Perchonok, R.; Plunkett, R.; Silverman, A.; Stein, P.C.; Stone, S.; Weber, D.; Wilcke, R.; Sadoff, A.J.; Bebek, C.; Haggerty, J.; Hempstead, M.; Izen, J.M.; Loomis, W.A.; MacKay, W.W.; Pipkin, F.M.; Rohlf, J.; Tanenbaum, W.; Wilson, R.; Chadwick, K.; Chauveau, J.; Ganci, P.; Gentile, T.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.L.; Poling, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rucinski, G.; Thorndike, E.H.; Green, J.; Sannes, F.; Skubic, P.; Snyder, A.; Stone, R.; Brody, A.; Chen, A.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Lipari, P.; Kooy, H.; Moneti, G.C.; Pistilli, P.

    1982-08-09

    The charged multiplicity has been measured at the UPSILON(4S) and a value of 5.75 +- 0.1 +- 0.2 has been obtained for the mean charged multiplicity in B-meson decay. Combining this result with the measurement of prompt letpons from B decay, the values 4.1 +- 0.35 +- 0.2 and 6.3 +- 0.2 +- 0.2 are found for the semileptonic and nonleptonic charged multiplicities, respectively. If b..-->..c dominance is assumed for the weak decay of the B meson, then the semileptonic multiplicity is consistent with the recoil mass determined from the lepton momentum spectrum.

  18. A Search for Invisible Decays of the Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-17

    We search for invisible decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B Factory. We select events containing the decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable {Upsilon}(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} invisible) < 3.0 x 10{sup ?4} at the 90% confidence level.

  19. Search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-12-18

    We search for invisible decays of the Upsilon(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B factory. We select events containing the decay Upsilon(3S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable Upsilon(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction B(Upsilon(1S) --> invisible) < 3.0 x 10(-4) at the 90% confidence level. PMID:20366249

  20. Search for Invisible Decays of the Υ(1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    We search for invisible decays of the Υ(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4×106 Υ(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B factory. We select events containing the decay Υ(3S)→π+π-Υ(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable Υ(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction B(Υ(1S)→invisible)<3.0×10-4 at the 90% confidence level.

  1. An Overview of Social Tagging and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manish; Li, Rui; Yin, Zhijun; Han, Jiawei

    Social tagging on online portals has become a trend now. It has emerged as one of the best ways of associating metadata with web objects. With the increase in the kinds of web objects becoming available, collaborative tagging of such objects is also developing along new dimensions. This popularity has led to a vast literature on social tagging. In this survey paper, we would like to summarize different techniques employed to study various aspects of tagging. Broadly, we would discuss about properties of tag streams, tagging models, tag semantics, generating recommendations using tags, visualizations of tags, applications of tags, integration of different tagging systems and problems associated with tagging usage. We would discuss topics like why people tag, what influences the choice of tags, how to model the tagging process, kinds of tags, different power laws observed in tagging domain, how tags are created and how to choose the right tags for recommendation. Metadata generated in the form of tags can be efficiently used to improve web search, for web object classification, for generating ontologies, for enhanced browsing etc. We would discuss these applications and conclude with thoughts on future work in the area.

  2. A recoil resilient lumen support, design, fabrication and mechanical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Arash; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Takahata, Kenichi; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek

    2013-06-01

    Stents are artificial implants that provide scaffolding to a cavity inside the body. This paper presents a new luminal device for reducing the mechanical failure of stents due to recoil, which is one of the most important issues in stenting. This device, which we call a recoil-resilient ring (RRR), is utilized standalone or potentially integrated with existing stents to address the problem of recoil. The proposed structure aims to minimize the need for high-pressure overexpansion that can induce intra-luminal trauma and excess growth of vascular tissue causing later restenosis. The RRR is an overlapped open ring with asymmetrical sawtooth structures that are intermeshed. These teeth can slide on top of each other, while the ring is radially expanded, but interlock step-by-step so as to keep the final expanded state against compressional forces that normally cause recoil. The RRRs thus deliver balloon expandability and, when integrated with a stent, bring both radial rigidity and longitudinal flexibility to the stent. The design of the RRR is investigated through finite element analysis (FEA), and then the devices are fabricated using micro-electro-discharge machining of 200-µm-thick Nitinol sheet. The standalone RRR is balloon expandable in vitro by 5-7 Atm in pressure, which is well within the recommended in vivo pressure ranges for stenting procedures. FEA compression tests indicate 13× less reduction of the cross-sectional area of the RRR compared with a typical stainless steel stent. These results also show perfect elastic recovery of the RRR after removal of the pressure compared to the remaining plastic deformations of the stainless steel stent. On the other hand, experimental loading tests show that the fabricated RRRs have 2.8× radial stiffness compared to a two-column section of a commercial stent while exhibiting comparable elastic recovery. Furthermore, testing of in vitro expansion in a mock artery tube shows around 2.9% recoil, approximately 5-11

  3. Investigating light NMSSM pseudoscalar states with boosted ditau tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Eric; Fuks, Benjamin; Guo, Jun; Li, Jinmian; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-05-01

    We study a class of realizations of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model that is motivated by dark matter and Higgs data, and in which the lightest pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass is smaller than twice the bottom quark mass and greater than twice the tau lepton mass. In such scenarios, the lightest pseudoscalar Higgs boson can be copiously produced at the LHC from the decay of heavier superpartners and will dominantly further decay into a pair of tau leptons that is generally boosted. We make use of a boosted object tagging technique designed to tag such a ditau jet, and estimate the sensitivity of the LHC to the considered supersymmetric scenarios with 20 to 50 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  4. A Study of Intrinsic Statistical Variation for Nuclear Recoils in Germanium Detector for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenzhao; Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The intrinsic statistical variation in nuclear recoils is a critical part that cannot be ignored when calculating energy resolution of germanium detector in detecting WIMPs. Have a good theoretical understanding about the intrinsic statistical variation in nuclear recoils and develop a model for calculating this variation based on experimental data is of great importance in determining the width of nuclear recoil band, which is used to identify nuclear recoils events. Hence, we designed an experiment to study the intrinsic statistical variation in nuclear recoils with various gamma sources and AmBe neutron source. In addition, we developed a theoretical model to calculate the intrinsic statistical variation in nuclear recoils based on data from AmBe neutron source. In this work, we will present our data and theoretical calculation for nuclear recoils. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF PHY-0758120, DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  5. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging.

    PubMed

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-30

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns. PMID:17244704

  6. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging

    PubMed Central

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns. PMID:17244704

  7. Characterization of the CRESST detectors by neutron induced nuclear recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, C.; Ciemniak, C.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Gütlein, A.; Hagn, H.; Isaila, C.; Jochum, J.; Kimmerle, M.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Pfister, S.; Potzel, W.; Rau, W.; Roth, S.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Scholl, S.; Usherov, I.; Westphal, W.

    CRESST is an experiment for the direct detection of dark matter particles via nuclear recoils. The CRESST detectors, based on CaWO4 scintillating crystals, are able to discriminate γ and β background by simultaneously measuring the light and phonon signals produced by particle interactions. The discrimination of the background is possible because of the different light output (Quenching Factor, QF) for nuclear and electron recoils. In this article a measurement is shown, aimed at the determination of the QFs of the different nuclei (O, Ca, W) of the detector crystal at 40-60 mK using an 11 MeV neutron beam produced at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium in Garching (MLL).

  8. Recoiling supermassive black holes: a search in the nearby universe

    SciTech Connect

    Lena, D.; Robinson, A.; Axon, D. J.; Merritt, D.; Marconi, A.; Capetti, A.; Batcheldor, D.

    2014-11-10

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed Hubble Space Telescope archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (≲ 10 pc) displacements between the active galactic nucleus (AGN; the location of the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few gigayears. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kiloparsec-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  9. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.J.

    1994-09-13

    A time-of-flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line is disclosed. The beam line includes an ion source which injects ions into pulse deflection regions and separated by a drift space. A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly. The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions. 23 figs.

  10. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Lamich, George J.

    1994-01-01

    A time of flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line (10). The beam line (10) includes an ion source (12) which injects ions into pulse deflection regions (14) and (16) separated by a drift space (18). A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly (22). The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions (14) and (16).

  11. Spallation recoil and age of presolar grains in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Begemann, F.

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the recoil losses from silicon carbide grain size fractions of spallation neon produced by irradiation with 1.6 GeV protons. During the irradiation the SiC grains were dispersed in paraffin wax in order to avoid re-implantation into neighboring grains. Analysis for spallogenic 21Ne of grain size separates in the size range 0.3 μm to 6 μm and comparison with the 22Na activity of the SiC+paraffin mixture indicates an effective recoil range of 2-3 μm with no apparent effect from acid treatments such as routinely used in the isolation of meteoritic SiC grains. Our results indicate that the majority of presolar SiC grains in primitive meteorites, which are ~μm-sized, will have lost essentially all spallogenic Ne produced by cosmic ray interaction in the interstellar medium. This argues against the validity of previously published presolar ages of Murchison SiC (~10 to ~130 Ma; increasing with grain size; Lewis et al., 1994), where recoil losses had been based on calculated recoil energies. It is argued that the observed variations in meteoritic SiC grain size fractions of 21Ne/22Ne ratios are more likely due to the effects of nucleosynthesis in the He burning shell of the parent AGB stars which imposes new boundary conditions on nuclear parameters and stellar models. It is suggested that spallation-Xe produced on the abundant Ba and REE in presolar SiC, rather than spallogenic Ne, may be a promising approach to the presolar age problem. There is a hint in the currently available Xe data (Lewis et al., 1994) that the large (>1 μm) grains may be younger than the smaller (<1 μm) ones.

  12. Recoil Polarization for Neutral Pion Electroproduction near the Delta Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, James J

    2003-10-01

    We have measured angular distributions for recoil polarization in the p(e,e'p)p0 reaction at Q2»1(GeV/c)2 with 1.16 |lte| W |lte|1.36 GeV across the D resonance. The data are compared with representative models and a truncated Legendre analysis is compared with a more general multipole analysis.

  13. The recoil proton polarization in. pi. p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seftor, C.J.

    1988-09-01

    The polarization of the recoil proton for ..pi../sup +/p and ..pi../sup -/p elastic scattering has been measured for various angles at 547 MeV/c and 625 MeV/c by a collaboration involving The George Washington University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and Abilene Christian University. The experiment was performed at the P/sup 3/ East experimental area of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Beam intensities varied from 0.4 to 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup -/'s/sec and from 3.0 to 10.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup +/'s/sec. The beam spot size at the target was 1 cm in the horizontal direction by 2.5 cm in the vertical direction. A liquid-hydrogen target was used in a flask 5.7 cm in diameter and 10 cm high. The scattered pion and recoil proton were detected in coincidence using the Large Acceptance Spectrometer (LAS) to detect and momentum analyze the pions and the JANUS recoil proton polarimeter to detect and measure the polarization of the protons. Results from this experiment are compared with previous measurements of the polarization, with analyzing power data previously taken by this group, and to partial-wave analysis predictions. 12 refs., 53 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. Recoiling from a Kick in the Head-On Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Dae-Il; Kelly, Bernard J.; Boggs, William D.; Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Van Meter, James

    2007-01-01

    Recoil "kicks" induced by gravitational radiation are expected in the inspiral and merger of black holes. Recently the numerical relativity community has begun to measure the significant kicks found when both unequal masses and spins are considered. Because understanding the cause and magnitude of each component of this kick may be complicated in inspiral simulations, we consider these effects in the context of a simple test problem. We study recoils from collisions of binaries with initially head-on trajectories, starting with the simplest case of equal masses with no spin; adding spin and varying the mass ratio, both separately and jointly. We find spin-induced recoils to be significant even in head-on configurations. Additionally, it appears that the scaling of transverse kicks with spins is consistent with post-Newtonian (PN) theory, even though the kick is generated in the nonlinear merger interaction, where PN theory should not apply. This suggests that a simple heuristic description might be effective in the estimation of spin-kicks.

  15. Absolute cross section for recoil detection of deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besenbacher, F.; Stensgaard, I.; Vase, P.

    1986-04-01

    The D( 4He, D) 4He cross section used for recoil detection of deuterium (D) has been calibrated on an absolute scale against the cross section of the D( 3He, α)p nuclear reaction which is often used for D profiling. For 4He energies ranging from 0.8 to ~1.8 MeV. the D( 4He, D) 4He cross section varies only slightly with incident energy and recoil angle θ (for 0° ⩽ 8 ⩽ 35°) and has a value of ~ 500 mb/sr which is significantly higher than the ~ 65 mb/sr c.m.s. cross section of the D( 3He, α)p nuclear reaction. For 4He energies ranging from ~ 1.9 to ~ 2.3 MeV, the D( 4He,D) 4He cross section exhibits a fairly narrow resonance peak (fwhm ~ 70 keV), with a maximum value (for θ = 0°) of ~ 8.5 b/sr, corresponding to a 4He energy of ~ 2130 keV. The large values of the cross section in connection with the described energy dependence makes the use of forward-recoil detection of D attractive for many purposes, e.g., D Jepth profiling (with an extreme gain in sensitivity), absolute concentration or coverage measurements, and lattice-location experiments by transmission channeling.

  16. Anatomy of the Binary Black Hole Recoil: A Multipolar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Buonanno, Alessandra; vanMeter, James R.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the recoil velocity computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including 1 = 4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (= 98%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (2 95%). We describe how the relative amplitude, and more importantly, the relative phase, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ring-down phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced, to a high level of accuracy, by an effective Newtonian formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing in the Newtonian formula the radial separation with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes. Analytic formulae, obtained by expressing the multipole moments in terms of the fundamental QNMs of a Kerr BH, are able to explain the onset and amount of '.anti-kick" for each of the simulations. Lastly, we apply this multipolar analysis to understand the remarkable difference between the amplitudes of planar and non-planar kicks for equal-mass spinning black holes.

  17. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or abscess. To help prevent cavities Brush your teeth every day with a fluoride toothpaste Clean between ...

  18. Tagged fast neutron beams En > 6 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Favela, F.; Huerta, A.; Santa Rita, P.; Ramos, A. T.; Lucio, O. de; Andrade, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Araujo, V.; Chávez, E.; Acosta, L.; Murillo, G.; Policroniades, R.

    2015-07-23

    Controlled flux of neutrons are produced through the {sup 14}N(d,n){sup 15}O nuclear reaction. Deuteron beams (2-4 MeV) are delivered by the CN-Van de Graaff accelerator and directed with full intensity to our Nitrogen target at SUGAR (SUpersonic GAs jet taRget). Each neutron is electronically tagged by the detection of the associated{sup 15}O. Its energy and direction are known and “beams” of fast monochromatic tagged neutrons (E{sub n}> 6 MeV) are available for basic research and applied work. MONDE is a large area (158 × 63 cm{sup 2}) plastic scintillating slab (5 cm thick), viewed by 16 PMTs from the sides. Fast neutrons (MeV) entering the detector will produce a recoiling proton that induces a light spark at the spot. Signals from the 16 detectors are processed to deduce the position of the spark. Time logic signals from both the {sup 15}O detector and MONDE are combined to deduce a time of flight (TOF) signal. Finally, the position information together with the TOF yields the full momentum vector of each detected neutron.

  19. D-TAG: erasing the tag of gang membership.

    PubMed

    Gurke, B; Armstrong, M L

    1997-04-01

    Gangs are noted for establishing their territory, flaunting gang affiliation, intimidating nonmembers, and documenting their "services performed." These examples are a few reasons for the practice of "tagging," the labeling of an area, person, or object with gang-related graffiti or markings, such as tattoos. This article describes a school nurse's response to gang "tagging" and her efforts to assist former gang members who request removal of their tattoos, to get them removed-in essence to D-TAG themselves from their gang affiliation. D-TAG is a volunteer rehabilitation program utilizing family and community interaction to support gang tattoo removal and direct activities away from gang affiliations toward alternative educational programs and life styles. PMID:9146217

  20. Tagging insulin in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobeck, Michael; Nelson, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the exact subcellular sites of action of insulin in the body has the potential to give basic science investigators a basis from which a cause and cure for this disease can be approached. The goal of this project is to create a test reagent that can be used to visualize these subcellular sites. The unique microgravity environment of the Shuttle will allow the creation of a reagent that has the possibility of elucidating the subcellular sites of action of insulin. Several techniques have been used in an attempt to isolate the sites of action of items such as insulin. One of these is autoradiography in which the test item is obtained from animals fed radioactive materials. What is clearly needed is to visualize individual insulin molecules at their sites of action. The insulin tagging process to be used on G-399 involves the conjugation of insulin molecules with ferritin molecules to create a reagent that will be used back on Earth in an attempt to elucidate the sites of action of insulin.

  1. B → K∗ ℓ + ℓ - decays at large recoil in the Standard Model: a theoretical reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuchini, Marco; Fedele, Marco; Franco, Enrico; Mishima, Satoshi; Paul, Ayan; Silvestrini, Luca; Valli, Mauro

    2016-06-01

    We critically reassess the theoretical uncertainties in the Standard Model calculation of the B → K ∗ ℓ + ℓ - observables, focusing on the low q 2 region. We point out that even optimized observables are affected by sizable uncertainties, since hadronic contributions generated by current-current operators with charm are difficult to estimate, especially for q 2 ˜ 4 m c 2 ≃ 6.8 GeV2. We perform a detailed numerical analysis and present both predictions and results from the fit obtained using most recent data. We find that non-factorizable power corrections of the expected order of magnitude are sufficient to give a good description of current experimental data within the Standard Model. We discuss in detail the q 2 dependence of the corrections and their possible interpretation as shifts of the Standard Model Wilson coefficients.

  2. Flavor tagging TeV jets for physics beyond the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Zack; Pedersen, Keith

    2016-07-01

    We present a new scheme for tagging boosted heavy flavor jets called "µx tagging." At the LHC, the primary method to tag b-jets relies on tracking their charged constituents. However, when highly boosted, track-based b-tags lose efficiency, and the probability to mistag light jets rises dramatically. Using muons from B hadron decay and defining a particular combination "x" of angular information and boost estimation, we find fairly flat efficiencies to tag b-jets, c-jets, light-quark jets, and light-heavy jets (containing B hadrons from gluon splitting) of ɛb = 14%, ɛc = 6:5%, ɛlight-light = 0:1%, and ɛlight-heavy = 0:5%, respectively. We demonstrate the usefulness of this new scheme by showing the reach for discovery of a leptophobic Z' → bb¯ in the dijet channel.

  3. Quantum tagging for tags containing secret classical data

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Adrian

    2011-08-15

    Various authors have considered schemes for quantum tagging, that is, authenticating the classical location of a classical tagging device by sending and receiving quantum signals from suitably located distant sites, in an environment controlled by an adversary whose quantum information processing and transmitting power is potentially unbounded. All of the schemes proposed elsewhere in the literature assume that the adversary is able to inspect the interior of the tagging device. All of these schemes have been shown to be breakable if the adversary has unbounded predistributed entanglement. We consider here the case in which the tagging device contains a finite key string shared with distant sites but kept secret from the adversary, and show this allows the location of the tagging device to be authenticated securely and indefinitely. Our protocol relies on quantum key distribution between the tagging device and at least one distant site, and demonstrates a new practical application of quantum key distribution. It also illustrates that the attainable security in position-based cryptography can depend crucially on apparently subtle details in the security scenario considered.

  4. Cellular tagging as a neural network mechanism for behavioural tagging

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Masanori; Ohkawa, Noriaki; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Yokose, Jun; Suzuki, Akinobu; Matsuo, Mina; Tsujimura, Shuhei; Takahashi, Yukari; Nagase, Masashi; Watabe, Ayako M.; Kato, Fusao; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Behavioural tagging is the transformation of a short-term memory, induced by a weak experience, into a long-term memory (LTM) due to the temporal association with a novel experience. The mechanism by which neuronal ensembles, each carrying a memory engram of one of the experiences, interact to achieve behavioural tagging is unknown. Here we show that retrieval of a LTM formed by behavioural tagging of a weak experience depends on the degree of overlap with the neuronal ensemble corresponding to a novel experience. The numbers of neurons activated by weak training in a novel object recognition (NOR) task and by a novel context exploration (NCE) task, denoted as overlapping neurons, increases in the hippocampal CA1 when behavioural tagging is successfully achieved. Optical silencing of an NCE-related ensemble suppresses NOR–LTM retrieval. Thus, a population of cells recruited by NOR is tagged and then preferentially incorporated into the memory trace for NCE to achieve behavioural tagging. PMID:27477539

  5. Behavioral tagging of extinction learning.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Benetti, Fernando; Izquierdo, Iván

    2013-01-15

    Extinction of contextual fear in rats is enhanced by exposure to a novel environment at 1-2 h before or 1 h after extinction training. This effect is antagonized by administration of protein synthesis inhibitors anisomycin and rapamycin into the hippocampus, but not into the amygdala, immediately after either novelty or extinction training, as well as by the gene expression blocker 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole administered after novelty training, but not after extinction training. Thus, this effect can be attributed to a mechanism similar to synaptic tagging, through which long-term potentiation can be enhanced by other long-term potentiations or by exposure to a novel environment in a protein synthesis-dependent fashion. Extinction learning produces a tag at the appropriate synapses, whereas novelty learning causes the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins that are captured by the tag, strengthening the synapses that generated this tag. PMID:23277583

  6. D meson hadronic decays at CLEO-c

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fan; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The recent CLEO-c results on hadronic decays of D and D{sub s} mesons are presented. First the absolute branching fractions for D and D{sub s} mesons using a double tag technique are discussed, then are the Cabibbo suppressed decays and doubly Cabibbo suppressed decays. Finally, I present the inclusive and rare decay modes and other measurements from CLEO-c. These decays illuminate a wide range of physics. A brief theoretical introduction is given before the corresponding discussion on measurement.

  7. Strep-Tagged Protein Purification.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Barbara; Spriestersbach, Anne; Kubicek, Jan; Schäfer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The Strep-tag system can be used to purify recombinant proteins from any expression system. Here, protocols for lysis and affinity purification of Strep-tagged proteins from E. coli, baculovirus-infected insect cells, and transfected mammalian cells are given. Depending on the amount of Strep-tagged protein in the lysate, a protocol for batch binding and subsequent washing and eluting by gravity flow can be used. Agarose-based matrices with the coupled Strep-Tactin ligand are the resins of choice, with a binding capacity of up to 9 mg ml(-1). For purification of lower amounts of Strep-tagged proteins, the use of Strep-Tactin magnetic beads is suitable. In addition, Strep-tagged protein purification can also be automated using prepacked columns for FPLC or other liquid-handling chromatography instrumentation, but automated purification is not discussed in this protocol. The protocols described here can be regarded as an update of the Strep-Tag Protein Handbook (Qiagen, 2009). PMID:26096503

  8. Measurements of the B_d-barBd mixing frequency using semileptonic decays, hadronic decays and dilepton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yangheng

    2001-04-01

    We present determinations of the B_d-barBd mixing parameter Δ Md from the time evolution of semileptonic decays, hadronic decays and dilepton events contained in a large sample of Υ(4S) decays recorded in the Belle detector at KEKB. For the semileptonic and hadronic decays, the flavor of the other B is determined with tagging techniques that exploit the correlation between the flavor of the heavy quark and its decay products (leptons, kaons, high momentum tracks). The proper-time-difference distributions for the same-flavor and opposite-flavor events are then simultaneously fit to an expression containing Δ M_Bd as a free parameter.

  9. Isotopic disequilibrium of uranium: alpha-recoil damage and preferential solution effects.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, R L

    1980-02-29

    Preferential loss of uranium-234 relative to uranium-238 from rocks into solutions has long been attributed to recoiling alpha-emitting nuclei. Direct evidence has been obtained for two mechanisms, first, recoil ejection from grains, and now release by natural etching of alpha-recoil tracks. The observations have implications for radon emanation and for the storage of alpha-emitting radioactive waste. PMID:17830457

  10. (7)Be-recoil radiolabelling of industrially manufactured silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Holzwarth, Uwe; Bellido, Elena; Dalmiglio, Matteo; Kozempel, Jan; Cotogno, Giulio; Gibson, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelling of industrially manufactured nanoparticles is useful for nanoparticle dosimetry in biodistribution or cellular uptake studies for hazard and risk assessment. Ideally for such purposes, any chemical processing post production should be avoided as it may change the physico-chemical characteristics of the industrially manufactured species. In many cases, proton irradiation of nanoparticles allows radiolabelling by transmutation of a tiny fraction of their constituent atoms into radionuclides. However, not all types of nanoparticles offer nuclear reactions leading to radionuclides with adequate radiotracer properties. We describe here a process whereby in such cases nanoparticles can be labelled with (7)Be, which exhibits a physical half-life of 53.29 days and emits γ-rays of 478 keV energy, and is suitable for most radiotracer studies. (7)Be is produced via the proton-induced nuclear reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be in a fine-grained lithium compound with which the nanoparticles are mixed. The high recoil energy of (7)Be atoms gives them a range that allows the (7)Be-recoils to be transferred from the lithium compound into the nanoparticles by recoil implantation. The nanoparticles can be recovered from the mixture by dissolving the lithium compound and subsequent filtration or centrifugation. The method has been applied to radiolabel industrially manufactured SiO2 nanoparticles. The process can be controlled in such a way that no alterations of the (7)Be-labelled nanoparticles are detectable by dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Moreover, cyclotrons with maximum proton energies of 17-18 MeV that are available in most medical research centres could be used for this purpose. PMID:25285032

  11. A Proton Recoil Telescope Detector for Neutron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bocci, F.; Cinausero, M.; Rizzi, V.; Barbui, M.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Lunardon, M.; Pesente, S.; Fontana, A.; Gemignian, G.; Bonomi, G.; Donzella, A.; Zenoni, A.; Fabris, D.; Morando, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Viesti, G.

    2007-10-26

    A compact and versatile Proton Recoil Telescope (PRT) detector has been realized to measure neutron energy spectra in the range from few to hundred MeV. The PRT is a position sensitive detector made by: an active multilayer segmented plastic scintillator as neutron to proton converter, two silicon strip detectors for proton energy and position measurement and a final thick CsI(T1) scintillator to measure the residual proton energy. The detector has been tested with the {sup 13}C(d,n) reaction at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud using a 40 MeV deuteron beam.

  12. B -> D* l nu at zero recoil: an update

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C.M.; DeTar, C.; El-Khadra, A.X.; Freeland, E.D.; Gamiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U.M.; Hetrick, J.E.

    2010-11-01

    We present an update of our calculation of the form factor for {bar B} {yields} D*{ell}{bar {nu}} at zero recoil, with higher statistics and finer lattices. As before, we use the Fermilab action for b and c quarks, the asqtad staggered action for light valence quarks, and the MILC ensembles for gluons and light quarks (Luescher-Weisz married to 2+1 rooted staggered sea quarks). In this update, we have reduced the total uncertainty on F(1) from 2.6% to 1.7%.

  13. Projectile paths corrected for recoil and air resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, H. R.

    1986-01-01

    The angle of projection of a bullet is not the same as the angle of the bore of the firearm just before firing. This is because recoil alters the direction of the barrel as the bullet moves along the barrel. Neither is the angle of projection of an arrow the same as the direction of the arrow just before it is projected. The difficulty in obtaining the angle of projection limits the value of the standard equation for trajectories relative to a horizontal plane. Furthermore, air resistance makes this equation unrealistic for all but short ranges.

  14. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... locate and reapply the tag to the proper animal. If the lost tag is not located, the dealer or exhibitor shall affix another official tag to the animal in the manner prescribed in § 2.50, and record the tag... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54...

  15. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... locate and reapply the tag to the proper animal. If the lost tag is not located, the dealer or exhibitor shall affix another official tag to the animal in the manner prescribed in § 2.50, and record the tag... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54...

  16. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Sondek, John

    2004-09-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, and for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:18429272

  17. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  18. Semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2009-08-01

    We study the semileptonic decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit, which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  19. Measurement of the B→Xsγ branching fraction and photon energy spectrum using the recoil method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lynch, G.; Orimoto, T. J.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Saleem, M.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Zhang, L.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Chen, E.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Ayad, R.; Gabareen, A. M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Klose, V.; Kobel, M. J.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Lombardo, V.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Watson, J. E.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Santoro, V.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Biesiada, J.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Castelli, G.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Neal, H.

    2008-03-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and photon-energy spectrum for the decay B→Xsγ using data from the BABAR experiment. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 210fb-1, from which approximately 680 000 B Bmacr events are tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of one of the B mesons. In the decay of the second B meson, an isolated high-energy photon is identified. We measure B(B→Xsγ)=(3.66±0.85stat±0.60syst)×10-4 for photon energies Eγ above 1.9 GeV in the B rest frame. From the measured spectrum we calculate the first and second moments for different minimum photon energies, which are used to extract the heavy-quark parameters mb and μπ2. In addition, measurements of the direct CP asymmetry and isospin asymmetry are presented.

  20. A Critical Review of Alpha Radionuclide Therapy—How to Deal with Recoiling Daughters?

    PubMed Central

    de Kruijff, Robin M.; Wolterbeek, Hubert T.; Denkova, Antonia G.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the successes and challenges currently faced in alpha radionuclide therapy. Alpha particles have an advantage in killing tumour cells as compared to beta or gamma radiation due to their short penetration depth and high linear energy transfer (LET). Touching briefly on the clinical successes of radionuclides emitting only one alpha particle, the main focus of this article lies on those alpha-emitting radionuclides with multiple alpha-emitting daughters in their decay chain. While having the advantage of longer half-lives, the recoiled daughters of radionuclides like 224Ra (radium), 223Ra, and 225Ac (actinium) can do significant damage to healthy tissue when not retained at the tumour site. Three different approaches to deal with this problem are discussed: encapsulation in a nano-carrier, fast uptake of the alpha emitting radionuclides in tumour cells, and local administration. Each approach has been shown to have its advantages and disadvantages, but when larger activities need to be used clinically, nano-carriers appear to be the most promising solution for reducing toxic effects, provided there is no accumulation in healthy tissue. PMID:26066613

  1. A Critical Review of Alpha Radionuclide Therapy-How to Deal with Recoiling Daughters?

    PubMed

    de Kruijff, Robin M; Wolterbeek, Hubert T; Denkova, Antonia G

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the successes and challenges currently faced in alpha radionuclide therapy. Alpha particles have an advantage in killing tumour cells as compared to beta or gamma radiation due to their short penetration depth and high linear energy transfer (LET). Touching briefly on the clinical successes of radionuclides emitting only one alpha particle, the main focus of this article lies on those alpha-emitting radionuclides with multiple alpha-emitting daughters in their decay chain. While having the advantage of longer half-lives, the recoiled daughters of radionuclides like 224Ra (radium), 223Ra, and 225Ac (actinium) can do significant damage to healthy tissue when not retained at the tumour site. Three different approaches to deal with this problem are discussed: encapsulation in a nano-carrier, fast uptake of the alpha emitting radionuclides in tumour cells, and local administration. Each approach has been shown to have its advantages and disadvantages, but when larger activities need to be used clinically, nano-carriers appear to be the most promising solution for reducing toxic effects, provided there is no accumulation in healthy tissue. PMID:26066613

  2. Ar-39 recoil and the apparent persistence of the presolar age of an Allende inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessberger, E. K.

    1984-07-01

    This is a report on the isotopic composition of argon found in neutron-irradiated quartz ampoules which contain samples of Allende coarse-grained inclusions or aluminum wrap only, and of argon released from one of these inclusions by stepwise heating. Besides atmospheric argon all ampoules contain, with varying concentrations but in constant proportions, Ar-38 from Cl and Ar-39 from K corresponding to Cl/K of about 1. No Ar-39 which has recoiled out of the samples, and no argon which has diffused out of the samples, has been observed in the ampoule gas. The analysis of the isotope variations of argon released by stepwise heating from a sample of inclusion 18 yields an apparent Ar-40-Ar-39 isochron age of 4.85 AE. A reanalysis of argon from another sample of the same inclusion dated earlier yields the same result. Thus inclusion 18 contains more radiogenic Ar-40 than can be accounted for by K-40 decay during 4.53 AE.

  3. Design of the recoil mass separator St. George

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couder, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Görres, J.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Lamm, L. O.; Stech, E.; Wiescher, M.; Hinnefeld, J.

    2008-03-01

    A recoil mass separator has been designed for the purpose of studying low energy (α,γ) reactions in inverse kinematics for beam masses up to about A=40. Their reaction rates are of importance for our understanding of energy production and nucleosynthesis during stellar and explosive helium burning. The reactions take place in a windowless He gas target at the beginning of the separator which consists of three sections. The first section selects the most abundant charge state. The Wien filter in the second section efficiently separates the intense beam from the few reaction products. In the last section the reaction products are focused into a detector system consisting of time pickup and energy detectors. In order to accept the complete kinematic cone of recoil particles for energies as low as reasonably possible we specified a large circular angular acceptance of ±40 mrad. This requires a careful minimization of higher-order aberrations. The present system has been designed to allow for a future upgrade to extend the experimental program to the analysis of (p,γ) reactions.

  4. Silicon shallow doping by erbium and oxygen recoils implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feklistov, K. V.; Cherkov, A. G.; Popov, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    In order to get shallow high doping of Si with optically active complexes ErOn, Er followed by O recoils implantation was realized by means of subsequent Ar+ 250-290 keV implantation with doses 2×1015-1×1016 cm-2 through 50-nm deposited films of Er and then SiO2, accordingly. High Er concentration up to 5×1020 cm-3 to the depth of 10 nm was obtained after implantation. However, about a half of the Er implanted atoms become part of surface SiO2 during post-implantation annealing at 950 °C for 1 h in the N2 ambient under a SiO2 cap. The mechanism of Er segregation into the cap oxide following the moving amorphous-crystalline interface during recrystallization was rejected by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Instead, the other mechanism of immobile Er atoms and redistribution of recoil-implanted O atoms toward cap oxide was proposed. It explains the observed formation of two Er containing phases: Er-Si-O phase with a high O content adjacent to the cap oxide and deeper O depleted Er-Si phase. The correction of heat treatments is proposed in order to avoid the above-mentioned problems.

  5. Improvements of the DRAGON recoil separator at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Buchmann, L.; Caggiano, J.; Chen, A. A.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davis, C. A.; Greife, U.; Hussein, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Ottewell, D.; Ouellet, C. O.; Parikh, A.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Zylberberg, J.

    2008-10-01

    The DRAGON (Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions) is used to measure radiative proton and alpha capture reaction rates involving both stable and radioactive, heavy-ion reactants at the TRIUMF-ISAC high intensity radioactive beam facility. Completed in 2001 it has been used for several challenging studies for nuclear astrophysics, e.g. 12C(α, γ)16O, 21Na(p, γ)22Mg, 26gAl(p, γ)27Si and 40Ca(α, γ)44Ti. Since initial operation, a number of improvements have been incorporated which are described here. These include a beam centering monitor based on a CCD camera, a mechanical iris to skim of beam halo, a solid state stripper acting as a charge state booster for beams with A ≳ 30, beta and gamma detectors to monitor beam intensity and to determine beam contamination in experiments with radioactive beam and the ionization chamber for both recoil identification and isobar separation.

  6. Development of JENDL Decay and Fission Yield Data Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakura, J.

    2014-04-01

    Decay and fission yield data of fission products have been developed for decay heat calculations to constitute one of the special purpose files of JENDL (Japanese Nuclear Data Library). The decay data in the previous JENDL decay data file have been updated based on the data extracted from ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) and those by Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (TAGS) measurements reported recently. Fission yield data have also been updated in order to maintain consistency between the decay and yield data files. Decay heat calculations were performed using the updated decay and yield data, and the results were compared with measured decay heat data to demonstrate their applicability. The uncertainties of the calculated results were obtained by sensitivity analyses. The resulting JENDL calculations and their uncertainty were compared with those from the ENDF and JEFF evaluated files.

  7. Numerical simulations of spiral galaxy formation and recoiling black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Javiera M.

    This thesis discusses two major topics in regard to the formation and evolution of galaxies and their central massive black holes (MBH). Part 1 explores the detectability of recoiling massive back as kinematically and spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGN). Chapter 3 is devoted to understanding the effect of an aspherical dark matter potential on the trajectories of the MBHs. This is done through collisionless N-body simulations of kicked black holes in the Via Lactea I halo and through a semi-analytical model that accounts for the evolution of the halo's triaxiality as a function of radius over cosmic time. We find that the return time of MBHs that wander through a differentially triaxial halo is significantly extended in comparison with spherical models. This is because their trajectories are become highly non-radial which prevents them from passing near the halo's center, where dynamical friction is most efficient. Chapter 4 puts recoiling MBHs into context. Here we carry out N-body + SPH simulations of recoiling MBHs in high-resolution galaxy mergers with mass ratios 1:1 (Mayer et al. 2007), 1:4, and 1:10 (Callegari et al. 2009). We study not only the trajectories and return times of these black holes, but also their detectability as spatially/kinematically offset AGN. We find that the probability of detection of these MBHs is extremely low. The detection of large kinematic offsets requires that the MBH have relative offset velocities Deltav > 600km s-1 at the time of observation. This is unlikely due to (1) the low probability of large recoils to occur from a general-relativistic viewpoint, and (2) the short time scale during which the MBH can sustain large velocities even if the initial kick is high. The large amounts of gas funneled to the center of the host potential during mergers also prevents MBHs from reaching large apocenter distances, which hampers their detection as spatially offset AGN, especially at high redshift when recoil events are

  8. B → Dℓν form factors at nonzero recoil and |Vcb| from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2015-08-10

    We present the first unquenched lattice-QCD calculation of the hadronic form factors for the exclusive decay B¯→Dℓν¯ at nonzero recoil. We carry out numerical simulations on 14 ensembles of gauge-field configurations generated with 2+1 flavors of asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. The ensembles encompass a wide range of lattice spacings (approximately 0.045 to 0.12 fm) and ratios of light (up and down) to strange sea-quark masses ranging from 0.05 to 0.4. For the b and c valence quarks we use improved Wilson fermions with the Fermilab interpretation, while for the light valence quarks we use asqtad-improved staggered fermions. We extrapolate ourmore » results to the physical point using rooted staggered heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory. We then parametrize the form factors and extend them to the full kinematic range using model-independent functions based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2), including statistical and systematic errors, as coefficients of a series in the variable z and the covariance matrix between these coefficients. We then fit the lattice form-factor data jointly with the experimentally measured differential decay rate from BABAR to determine the CKM matrix element, |Vcb|=(39.6 ± 1.7QCD+exp ± 0.2QED) × 10–3. As a byproduct of the joint fit we obtain the form factors with improved precision at large recoil. In conclusion, we use them to update our calculation of the ratio R(D) in the Standard Model, which yields R(D)=0.299(11).« less

  9. Social image tagging with diverse semantics.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xueming; Hua, Xian-Sheng; Tang, Yuan Yan; Mei, Tao

    2014-12-01

    We have witnessed the popularity of image-sharing websites for sharing personal experiences through photos on the Web. These websites allow users describing the content of their uploaded images with a set of tags. Those user-annotated tags are often noisy and biased. Social image tagging aims at removing noisy tags and suggests new relevant tags. However, most existing tag enrichment approaches predominantly focus on tag relevance and overlook tag diversity problem. How to make the top-ranked tags covering a wide range of semantic is still an opening, yet challenging, issue. In this paper, we propose an approach to retag social images with diverse semantics. Both the relevance of a tag to image as well as its semantic compensations to the already determined tags are fused to determine the final tag list for a given image. Different from existing image tagging approaches, the top-ranked tags are not only highly relevant to the image but also have significant semantic compensations with each other. Experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25415950

  10. Discovery of the alpha decay of 109I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocchi, C.; Grzywacz, R.; Bingham, C. R.; Simpson, D.; Gross, C. J.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Batchelder, J. C.; Liddick, S. N.; Page, R. D.; Korgul, A.; Krolas, W.; Ilyushkin, S.; Winger, J. A.; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.; Li, K.

    2006-10-01

    Alpha emission is a rich source for nuclear-structure information [1]. The alpha-particle energies Eα, corrected for the recoil effect, yield the difference between the ground-state masses of parent and daughter nuclides (Qα). Far from stability the determination of Qα often represents the only way to determine the masses of ground and isomeric states. The evolution of Qα values along an alpha-decay chain are also a probe for shell effects. In the region above ^100Sn an alpha-decay island occurs, its presence is related to the strong Z=50, N=50 double shell-closure. In an experiment performed at the Recoil Mass Separator of the HRIBF at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the first evidence for the alpha-decay branch of the proton-emitter ^109I was obtained. The results and the consequences for nuclear masses in this region will be discussed. [1] E. Roeckl, Alpha decay, in: Nuclear Decay Modes, ed. D.N. Poenaru, IoP Publishing, 1996, p. 237.

  11. Synaptic Tagging During Memory Allocation

    PubMed Central

    Rogerson, Thomas; Cai, Denise; Frank, Adam; Sano, Yoshitake; Shobe, Justin; Aranda, Manuel L.; Silva, Alcino J.

    2014-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the allocation of memory to specific neurons (neuronal allocation) and synapses (synaptic allocation) in a neurocircuit is not random and that instead specific mechanisms, such as increases in neuronal excitability and synaptic tagging and capture, determine the exact sites where memories are stored. We propose an integrated view of these processes, such that neuronal allocation, synaptic tagging and capture, spine clustering and metaplasticity reflect related aspects of memory allocation mechanisms. Importantly, the properties of these mechanisms suggest a set of rules that profoundly affect how memories are stored and recalled. PMID:24496410

  12. WebTag: Web Browsing into Sensor Tags over NFC

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Álvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm. PMID:23012511

  13. WebTag: Web browsing into sensor tags over NFC.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Alvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm. PMID:23012511

  14. A laboratory evaluation of tagging-related mortality and tag loss in juvenile humpback chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Persons, William R.; Young, Kirk; Stone, Dennis M.; Van Haverbeke, Randy; Knight, William R.

    2015-01-01

    We quantified tag retention, survival, and growth in juvenile, captive-reared Humpback Chub Gila cypha marked with three different tag types: (1) Biomark 12.5-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected into the body cavity with a 12-gauge needle; (2) Biomark 8.4-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected with a 16-gauge needle; and (3) Northwest Marine Technology visible implant elastomer (VIE) tags injected under the skin with a 29-gauge needle. Estimates of tag loss, tagging-induced mortality, and growth were evaluated for 60 d with each tag type for four different size-groups of fish: 40–49 mm, 50–59 mm, 60–69 mm, and 70–79 mm TL. Total length was a significant predictor of the probability of PIT tag retention and mortality for both 8-mm and 12-mm PIT tags, and the smallest fish had the highest rates of tag loss (12.5–30.0%) and mortality (7.5–20.0%). Humpback Chub of sizes 40–49 mm TL and tagged with VIE tags had no mortality but did have a 17.5% tag loss. Growth rates of all tagged fish were similar to controls. Our data indicate Humpback Chub can be effectively tagged using either 8-mm or 12-mm PIT tags with little tag loss or mortality at sizes as low as 65 mm TL.

  15. Monitoring of physics performance of ILC Software based on Higgs Recoil Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, E.; Voutsinas, G.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a part of ILC software development, that allow us to make automated testing of ILC results. The testing code consists of automated everyday Higgs recoil mass analysis and compares Higgs recoil mass with one of the previous day result. This code uses the result of generation, Mokka simulation and Marlin reconstruction of ILC events.

  16. Optimal control of gun recoil in direct fire using magnetorheological absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harinder J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-05-01

    Optimal control of a gun recoil absorber is investigated for minimizing recoil loads and maximizing rate of fire. A multi-objective optimization problem was formulated by considering the mechanical model of the recoil absorber employing a spring and a magnetorheological (MR) damper. The damper forces are predicted by evaluating pressure drops using a nonlinear Bingham-plastic model. The optimization methodology provides multiple optimal design configurations with a trade-off between recoil load minimization and increased rate of fire. The configurations with low or high recoil loads imply low or high rate of fire, respectively. The gun recoil absorber performance is also analyzed for perturbations in the firing forces. The adaptive control of the MR damper for varying gun firing forces provides a smooth operation by returning the recoil mass to its battery position (ready to reload and fire) without incurring an end-stop impact. Furthermore, constant load transmissions are observed with respect to the recoil stroke by implementing optimal control during the simulated firing events.

  17. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Scott M.

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS~II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for "background-free'' operation of CDMS~II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space. These results, like any others, are subject to a variety of systematic effects that may alter their final interpretations. A primary focus of this dissertation will be difficulties in precisely calibrating the energy scale for nuclear recoil events like those from WIMPs. Nuclear recoils have suppressed ionization signals relative to electron recoils of the same recoil energy, so the response of the detectors is calibrated differently for each recoil type. The overall normalization and linearity of the energy scale for electron recoils in CDMS~II detectors is clearly established by peaks of known gamma energy in the ionization spectrum of calibration data from a 133Ba source. This electron-equivalent keVee) energy scale enables calibration of the total phonon signal (keVt) by enforcing unity

  18. COSY Simulations to Guide Commissioning of the St. George Recoil Mass Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Jaclyn; Moran, Michael; Seymour, Christopher; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Couder, Manoel

    2015-10-01

    The goal of St. George (STrong Gradient Electromagnetic Online Recoil separator for capture Gamma ray Experiments) is to measure (α, γ) cross sections relevant to stellar helium burning. Recoil separators such as St. George are able to more closely approach the low astrophysical energies of interest because they collect reaction recoils rather than γ-rays, and thus are not limited by room background. In order to obtain an accurate cross section measurement, a recoil separator must be able to collect all recoils over their full range of expected energy and angular spread. The energy acceptance of St. George is currently being measured, and the angular acceptance will be measured soon. Here we present the results of COSY ion optics simulations and magnetic field analyses which were performed to help guide the commissioning measurements and diagnostic upgrades required to complete those measurements. National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

  19. Deconvoluting nonaxial recoil in Coulomb explosion measurements of molecular axis alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lauge; Christiansen, Lars; Shepperson, Benjamin; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    We report a quantitative study of the effect of nonaxial recoil during Coulomb explosion of laser-aligned molecules and introduce a method to remove the blurring caused by nonaxial recoil in the fragment-ion angular distributions. Simulations show that nonaxial recoil affects correlations between the emission directions of fragment ions differently from the effect caused by imperfect molecular alignment. The method, based on analysis of the correlation between the emission directions of the fragment ions from Coulomb explosion, is used to deconvolute the effect of nonaxial recoil from experimental fragment angular distributions. The deconvolution method is then applied to a number of experimental data sets to correct the degree of alignment for nonaxial recoil, to select optimal Coulomb explosion channels for probing molecular alignment, and to estimate the highest degree of alignment that can be observed from selected Coulomb explosion channels.

  20. Electron recombination in low-energy nuclear recoils tracks in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of electron-ion recombination processes in ionization tracks of recoiled atoms in liquid argon (LAr) detectors. The analysis is based on the results of computer simulations which use realistic models of electron transport and reactions. The calculations reproduce the recent experimental results of the ionization yield from 6.7 keV nuclear recoils in LAr. The statistical distribution of the number of electrons that escape recombination is found to deviate from the binomial distribution, and estimates of recombination fluctuations for nuclear recoils tracks are obtained. A study of the recombination kinetics shows that a significant part of electrons undergo very fast static recombination, an effect that may be responsible for the weak drift-field dependence of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in some noble liquids. The obtained results can be useful in the search for hypothetical dark matter particles and in other studies that involve detection of recoiled nuclei.

  1. Decay of a {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}h{sub 11/2} microsecond isomer in {sub 61}{sup 136}Pm{sub 75}

    SciTech Connect

    Rigby, S. V.; Cullen, D. M.; Mason, P. J. R.; Scholes, D. T.; Scholey, C.; Rahkila, P.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kettunen, H.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nieminen, P.; Nyman, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Uusitalo, J.

    2008-09-15

    An experiment has been performed to populate several extremely neutron-deficient nuclei around the mass-140 region of the nuclear chart, using a beam of {sup 54}Fe on a {sup 92}Mo target at an energy of 315 MeV. Analysis of these data using recoil-isomer tagging has established that the yrast {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}h{sub 11/2},J{sup {pi}}=(8{sup +}), bandhead state in {sup 136}Pm is isomeric with a half-life of 1.5(1) {mu}s. This isomeric state decays via a 43-keV, probable-E1 transition to a J{sup {pi}}=(7{sup -}) state. Consideration of the theoretical Nilsson orbitals near the Fermi surface suggests that the J{sup {pi}}=(8{sup +}) state has a {nu}h{sub 11/2}[505](11/2){sup -} x {pi}h{sub 11/2}[532](5/2){sup -} configuration, which decays to the J{sup {pi}}=(7{sup -}) state with a {nu}h{sub 11/2}[505](11/2){sup -} x {pi}d{sub 5/2}[411](3/2){sup +} configuration. Differences in the shape-driving effects for these two configurations is reasoned to be responsible for the long half-life of the J{sup {pi}}=(8{sup +}) isomeric state. The non-observation of other {gamma} rays in prompt or delayed coincidence with the 43-keV transition suggests that this transition may feed another, longer lived isomeric state with a half-life of the order of milliseconds or greater. However, the present experiment was not sensitive to the decay of this new J{sup {pi}}=(7{sup -}) state by internal conversion or even {beta} decay.

  2. Observation of Doppler broadening in β -delayed proton- γ decay

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwartz, S. B.; Wrede, C.; Bennett, M. B.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Bowe, A.; Chen, A. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Cooper, N.; Irvine, D.; et al

    2015-09-14

    Background: The Doppler broadening of gamma-ray peaks is due to nuclear recoil from beta-delayed nucleon emission can be used to measure the energies of the nucleons. This method has never been tested using beta-delayed proton emission or applied to a recoil heavier than A = 10. Purpose: To test and apply this Doppler broadening method using gamma-ray peaks from the P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay sequence. Methods: A fast beam of P-26 was implanted into a planar Ge detector, which was used as a P-26 beta-decay trigger. The SeGA array of high-purity Ge detectors was used to detect gamma rays frommore » the P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay sequence. Results: Radiative Doppler broadening in beta-delayed proton-gamma decay was observed for the first time. Moreover, the Doppler broadening analysis method was verified using the 1613-keV gamma-ray line for which the proton energies were previously known. The 1776-keV gamma ray de-exciting the 2720 keV Al-25 level was observed in P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay for the first time and used to determine that the center-of-mass energy of the proton emission feeding the 2720-keV level is 5.1 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.6 (syst.) MeV, corresponding to a Si-26 excitation energy of 13.3 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.6 (syst.) MeV for the proton-emitting level. Conclusions: Finally, the Doppler broadening method has been demonstrated to provide practical measurements of the energies for beta-delayed nucleon emissions populating excited states of nuclear recoils at least as heavy as A = 25.« less

  3. What Do Tag Games Teach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belka, David

    2006-01-01

    Tag games have been described as "Chasing, fleeing, and dodging" type activities. Most "fleeing" activities involve dramatic play, use of movement concepts (such as quick and light), or movement changes without a partner, while many of the chasing and dodging activities utilize dodging concepts between partners or within small groups and are…

  4. SRNL Tagging and Tracking Video

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-06-15

    SRNL generates a next generation satellite base tracking system. The tagging and tracking system can work in remote wilderness areas, inside buildings, underground and other areas not well served by traditional GPS. It?s a perfect response to customer needs and market demand.

  5. B{yields}D* at zero recoil revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gambino, Paolo; Mannel, Thomas; Uraltsev, Nikolai

    2010-06-01

    We examine the B{yields}D* form factor at zero recoil using a continuum QCD approach rooted in the heavy quark sum rules framework. A refined evaluation of the radiative corrections as well as the most recent estimates of higher-order power terms together with more careful continuum calculation are included. An upper bound on the form factor of F(1) < or approx. 0.93 is derived, based on just the positivity of inelastic contributions. A model-independent estimate of the inelastic contributions shows they are quite significant, lowering the form factor by about 6% or more. This results in an unbiased estimate F(1){approx_equal}0.86 with about 3% uncertainty in the central value.

  6. Dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes and its recoil effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Chen, Qunzhi; Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Kaile; Jiang, Zhe; Sun, Zhili; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-06-15

    A dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes (HEDBS), in which gas flow oriented parallel to the electric field, was proposed. Results showed that with this structure, air can be effectively ignited, forming atmospheric low temperature plasma, and the proposed HEDBS could achieve much higher electron density (5 × 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3}). It was also found that the flow condition, including outlet diameter and flow rate, played a key role in the evolution of electron density. Optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic results showed that the concentration of reactive species had the same variation trend as the electron density. The simulated distribution of discharge gas flow indicated that the HEDBS had a strong recoil effect on discharge gas, and could efficiently promote generating electron density as well as reactive species.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Energetic Uranium Recoil Damage in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2006-10-11

    Defect production and amorphization due to energetic uranium recoils in zircon (ZrSiO4), which is a promising ceramic nuclear waste form, is studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a partial charge model. An algorithm that distinguishes between undamaged crystal, crystalline defects and amorphous regions is used to develop a fundamental understanding of the primary damage state. The amorphous cascade core is separated from the surrounding crystal by a defect-rich region. Small, chemically inhomogeneous amorphous clusters are also produced around the core. The amorphous regions consist of under-coordinated Zr and polymerized Si leading to amorphization and phase separation on a nanometer scale into Zr- and Si-rich regions. This separation could play an important role in the experimentally observed formation of nanoscale ZrO2 in ZrSiO4 irradiated at elevated temperatures.

  8. Proton recoil spectroscopy 400 meters from a fission neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Stanka, M.B.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron kerma and spectrum measurements have been made at the US Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) to 400m in an air-over-ground geometry from a fission neutron source and have been compared to Monte Carlo transport calculations. The neutron spectra measurements were made using a rotating neutron spectrometer. This spectrometer consists of four spherical proton-recoil detectors mounted on a common rotating base. Detector radius, gas composition, and pressure have been varied to allow sensitivity over a neutron range of 50 keV to 4.5 MeV. Neutron kerma was determined by using the Kerr soft-tissue kerma factors. Measured neutron kerma agreed with the calculated neutron kerma to within 5%. Comparisons with other neutron spectrometers such as NE213 and Bonner Spheres are presented and agreement between the different spectrometers is better than 20%.

  9. Recoil Polarization for {delta} Excitation in Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.J.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C.C.; Chant, N.S.; Roos, P.G.; Roche, R.E.; McAleer, S.; Meekins, D.; Chai, Z.; Gayou, O.; Bertozzi, W.; Gilad, S.; Higinbotham, D.W.; Rvachev, M.; Sirca, S.; Suleiman, R.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Jones, M.K.

    2005-09-02

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W=1.23 GeV at Q{sup 2}=1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re (S{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+})=-(6.84{+-}0.15)% and Re (E{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+})=-(2.91{+-}0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M{sub 1+} dominance and l{sub {pi}}{<=}1 truncation.

  10. Recoil polarization for delta excitation in pion electroproduction.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J J; Roché, R E; Chai, Z; Jones, M K; Gayou, O; Sarty, A J; Frullani, S; Aniol, K; Beise, E J; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Boeglin, W U; Botto, T; Brash, E J; Breuer, H; Brown, E; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cavata, C; Chang, C C; Chant, N S; Chen, J-P; Coman, M; Crovelli, D; De Leo, R; Dieterich, S; Escoffier, S; Fissum, K G; Garde, V; Garibaldi, F; Georgakopoulus, S; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glashausser, C; Hansen, J-O; Higinbotham, D W; Hotta, A; Huber, G M; Ibrahim, H; Iodice, M; de Jager, C W; Jiang, X; Klimenko, A; Kozlov, A; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Lagamba, L; Laveissière, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Margaziotis, D J; Marie, F; Markowitz, P; McAleer, S; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Milbrath, B D; Mitchell, J; Nappa, J; Neyret, D; Perdrisat, C F; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Ransome, R D; Roos, P G; Rvachev, M; Saha, A; Sirca, S; Suleiman, R; Strauch, S; Templon, J A; Todor, L; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2005-09-01

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W = 1.23 GeV at Q(2) = 1.0 (GeV/c)(2), obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re (S(1+)/M(1+)) = -(6.84 +/- 0.15)% and Re (E(1+)/M(1+)) = -(2.91 +/- 0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M1+ dominance and ll(pi) < or = 1 truncation. PMID:16196919