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Sample records for recoil mass separator

  1. Nuclear astrophysics studies by recoil mass separators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gialanella, L.; Brand, K.; Campajola, L.; D'Onofrio, A.; Greife, U.; Morone, M. C.; Oliviero, G.; Ordine, A.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, M.; Romoli, M.; Schmidt, S.; Schulte, W. H.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H. P.; Zahnow, D.

    1997-11-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system, used as a recoil separator in conjunction with a windowless gas target, can yield the high suppression factor needed to dispersively analyze radiative capture residues, with the aim of measuring cross sections in the sub-microbarn range. An experiment is underway utilizing a radioactive 7Be beam for the measurement of the cross section of the astrophysically important reaction 7Be(p, γ)8B at a center of mass energy ECM = 1 MeV. Preliminary results of this experiment are presented. The extension of the method to another reaction playing a key role in stellar evolution, i.e. 12C(α, γ)16O, requires an improvement of the angle- and momentum-acceptance of the recoil separator, the use of a jet gas target and of a specially designed low-threshold detector. The solutions proposed by a joint Italian-German project are discussed.

  2. Design of the recoil mass separator St. George

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couder, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Görres, J.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Lamm, L. O.; Stech, E.; Wiescher, M.; Hinnefeld, J.

    2008-03-01

    A recoil mass separator has been designed for the purpose of studying low energy (α,γ) reactions in inverse kinematics for beam masses up to about A=40. Their reaction rates are of importance for our understanding of energy production and nucleosynthesis during stellar and explosive helium burning. The reactions take place in a windowless He gas target at the beginning of the separator which consists of three sections. The first section selects the most abundant charge state. The Wien filter in the second section efficiently separates the intense beam from the few reaction products. In the last section the reaction products are focused into a detector system consisting of time pickup and energy detectors. In order to accept the complete kinematic cone of recoil particles for energies as low as reasonably possible we specified a large circular angular acceptance of ±40 mrad. This requires a careful minimization of higher-order aberrations. The present system has been designed to allow for a future upgrade to extend the experimental program to the analysis of (p,γ) reactions.

  3. Sub-barrier reactions measured using a recoil mass separator

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Few data exist in the sub-barrier region for reaction channels other than fusion. In particular, our experimental knowledge of quasi-elastic transfer reactions is sparse, despite the belief that this particular channel may be dominant in determining some features of the sub-barrier fusion enhancement. Transfer reactions are governed primarily by the closet approach of the colliding nuclei which, at low energies, results in a strong backward peaking of the angular distribution in the center-of-mass frame. For situations where the projectile has a significant fraction of the target mass, as is so in most cases of interest, the backscattered projectile-like fragment has such low energy that the usual techniques of measurement and identification become invalid. Here, we report on a solution to this problem which allows a systematic study of many aspects of transfer reactions in the energy regime of interest. We exploit the fact that associated with the low-energy backscattered projectile-like fragment is a complementary target-like fragment which recoils to forward angles with a large fraction of the incident beam energy. These target-like fragments were detected and identified using the Daresbury Recoil Mass Separator thus allowing the measurement of quasi-elastic transfer over hitherto inaccessible energy range from the vicinity of the barrier to several tens of MeV below. The experiments described here used VYNi beams of energies ranging from 180 to 260 MeV provided by the Daresbury Laboratory Nuclear Structure Facility tandem accelerator. Data on sub-barrier transfer for targets of /sup 116,118,120,122,124/Sn and /sup 144,148,150,152,154/Sm were obtained. 16 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. COSY Simulations to Guide Commissioning of the St. George Recoil Mass Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Jaclyn; Moran, Michael; Seymour, Christopher; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Couder, Manoel

    2015-10-01

    The goal of St. George (STrong Gradient Electromagnetic Online Recoil separator for capture Gamma ray Experiments) is to measure (α, γ) cross sections relevant to stellar helium burning. Recoil separators such as St. George are able to more closely approach the low astrophysical energies of interest because they collect reaction recoils rather than γ-rays, and thus are not limited by room background. In order to obtain an accurate cross section measurement, a recoil separator must be able to collect all recoils over their full range of expected energy and angular spread. The energy acceptance of St. George is currently being measured, and the angular acceptance will be measured soon. Here we present the results of COSY ion optics simulations and magnetic field analyses which were performed to help guide the commissioning measurements and diagnostic upgrades required to complete those measurements. National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

  5. Recoil Separators for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, J. C.

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen and helium capture reactions are important in many astrophysical environments. Measurements in inverse kinematics using recoil separators have demonstrated a particularly sensitive technique for studying low-yield capture reactions.(M. S. Smith, C. E. Rolfs, and C. A. Barnes, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res. A306) (1991) 233. This approach allows a low background rate to be achieved with a high detection efficiency (about 50%) for the particles of interest using a device with only modest acceptance. Recoil separators using a variety of ion-optic configurations have been installed at numerous accelerator facilities in the past decade and have been used to measure, for example, alpha capture reactions using stable beams(D. Rogalla et al.), Eur. Phys. J. 6 (1999) 471. and proton capture reactions using radioactive ion beams.(S. Bishop et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (2003) 162501. Measurements in inverse kinematics are the only viable means for studying reactions on short-lived nuclei that are crucial for understanding stellar explosions, and a recoil separator optimized for the measurement of capture reactions with radioactive ion beams figures prominently into the design of the low energy experimental area at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). The operational requirements for such a device will be outlined, and recoil separator designs and characteristics will be presented.

  6. A recoil separator for nuclear astrophysics SECAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, G. P. A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chipps, K. A.; Couder, M.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Montes, F.; Rehm, K. E.; Schatz, H.; Smith, M. S.; Wiescher, M.; Wrede, C.; Zeller, A.

    2016-06-01

    A recoil separator SECAR has been designed to study radiative capture reactions relevant for the astrophysical rp-process in inverse kinematics for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We describe the design, layout, and ion optics of the recoil separator and present the status of the project.

  7. Moving towards first science with the St. George recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Zachary; Berg, G. P. A.; Gilardy, G.; Moran, M.; Schmitt, J.; Seymour, C.; Stech, E.; Couder, M.

    2015-10-01

    The St. George recoil mass separator has recently been coupled to the 5MV St. Ana accelerator at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Lab. St. George is a unique tool designed to measure radiative alpha-capture reactions for nuclei up to A = 40 in inverse kinematics in order to directly obtain cross sections required for astrophysical models of stellar and explosive helium burning. Commissioning of St. George is presently taking place with primary beams of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen. In this presentation, results will be shown for the measured energy acceptance of St. George, which compare favorably to COSY results when employing the calculated optimal ion-optical settings. Additionally, future plans will be discussed, such as assessing the angular acceptance of St. George and the re-integration of HiPPO at the separator target position to provide a dense, windowless helium gas-jet target. The material presented in this work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. 1419765.

  8. Improvements of the DRAGON recoil separator at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Buchmann, L.; Caggiano, J.; Chen, A. A.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davis, C. A.; Greife, U.; Hussein, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Ottewell, D.; Ouellet, C. O.; Parikh, A.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Zylberberg, J.

    2008-10-01

    The DRAGON (Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions) is used to measure radiative proton and alpha capture reaction rates involving both stable and radioactive, heavy-ion reactants at the TRIUMF-ISAC high intensity radioactive beam facility. Completed in 2001 it has been used for several challenging studies for nuclear astrophysics, e.g. 12C(α, γ)16O, 21Na(p, γ)22Mg, 26gAl(p, γ)27Si and 40Ca(α, γ)44Ti. Since initial operation, a number of improvements have been incorporated which are described here. These include a beam centering monitor based on a CCD camera, a mechanical iris to skim of beam halo, a solid state stripper acting as a charge state booster for beams with A ≳ 30, beta and gamma detectors to monitor beam intensity and to determine beam contamination in experiments with radioactive beam and the ionization chamber for both recoil identification and isobar separation.

  9. Automation of experiments at Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to solving the problems of automation of basic processes in long-term experiments in heavy ion beams of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) facility are considered. Approaches in the field of spectrometry, both of rare α decays of superheavy nuclei and those for constructing monitoring systems to provide accident-free experiment running with highly radioactive targets and recording basic parameters of experiment, are described. The specific features of Double Side Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are considered, special attention is paid to the role of boundary effects of neighboring p-n transitions in the "active correlations" method. An example of an off-beam experiment attempting to observe Zeno effect is briefly considered. Basic examples for nuclear reactions of complete fusion at 48Ca ion beams of U-400 cyclotron (LNR, JINR) are given. A scenario of development of the "active correlations" method for the case of very high intensity beams of heavy ions at promising accelerators of LNR, JINR, is presented.

  10. Monitoring of physics performance of ILC Software based on Higgs Recoil Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, E.; Voutsinas, G.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a part of ILC software development, that allow us to make automated testing of ILC results. The testing code consists of automated everyday Higgs recoil mass analysis and compares Higgs recoil mass with one of the previous day result. This code uses the result of generation, Mokka simulation and Marlin reconstruction of ILC events.

  11. Monte Carlo Simulation of the DRAGON Recoil Mass Spectrometer End Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloce, Laurelle; Fallis, J.; Ruiz, C.; Reeve, S.

    2010-11-01

    DRAGON (Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions), located at TRIUMF in Vancouver, BC, is designed to study radiative capture reactions relevant in astrophysical nucleosynthesis processes. These types of reactions help us understand the production of heavy elements in the Universe. An accelerated beam of a given isotope is sent through a gas target where the reactions take place. Magnetic and electrostatic dipoles separate the recoils from the original beam particles, selecting particles according to charge and mass. The products of the nuclear reactions are then detected at the end of DRAGON by heavy ion detectors, which constitute two micro channel plate (MCP) detectors for time of flight measurements, used in conjunction with a Double Sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSSD) or an ionization chamber (IC). The DSSSD gives information on number of counts, total energy deposited, and position while the IC measures the number of counts and the energy deposited as the particle travels through the chamber. In order to determine which set up is ideal for a given reaction and energy range, we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation of these end detectors. The program simulates both recoil and beam particles, and takes into account effects such as straggling and pulse height defect. Reaction kinematics in the gas target are also considered. Comparisons to recent experimental data will be discussed.

  12. Mass Separation by Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Being able to manipulate mass flow is critically important in a variety of physical processes in chemical and biomolecular science. For example, separation and catalytic systems, which requires precise control of mass diffusion, are crucial in the manufacturing of chemicals, crystal growth of semiconductors, waste recovery of biological solutes or chemicals, and production of artificial kidneys. Coordinate transformations and metamaterials are powerful methods to achieve precise manipulation of molecular diffusion. Here, we introduce a novel approach to obtain mass separation based on metamaterials that can sort chemical and biomolecular species by cloaking one compound while concentrating the other. A design strategy to realize such metamaterial using homogeneous isotropic materials is proposed. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen is manipulated using a metamaterial that cloaks nitrogen and concentrates oxygen. This work lays the foundation for molecular mass separation in biophysical and chemical systems through metamaterial devices. PMID:26912419

  13. Mass Separation by Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Being able to manipulate mass flow is critically important in a variety of physical processes in chemical and biomolecular science. For example, separation and catalytic systems, which requires precise control of mass diffusion, are crucial in the manufacturing of chemicals, crystal growth of semiconductors, waste recovery of biological solutes or chemicals, and production of artificial kidneys. Coordinate transformations and metamaterials are powerful methods to achieve precise manipulation of molecular diffusion. Here, we introduce a novel approach to obtain mass separation based on metamaterials that can sort chemical and biomolecular species by cloaking one compound while concentrating the other. A design strategy to realize such metamaterial using homogeneous isotropic materials is proposed. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen is manipulated using a metamaterial that cloaks nitrogen and concentrates oxygen. This work lays the foundation for molecular mass separation in biophysical and chemical systems through metamaterial devices.

  14. Mass Separation by Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Being able to manipulate mass flow is critically important in a variety of physical processes in chemical and biomolecular science. For example, separation and catalytic systems, which requires precise control of mass diffusion, are crucial in the manufacturing of chemicals, crystal growth of semiconductors, waste recovery of biological solutes or chemicals, and production of artificial kidneys. Coordinate transformations and metamaterials are powerful methods to achieve precise manipulation of molecular diffusion. Here, we introduce a novel approach to obtain mass separation based on metamaterials that can sort chemical and biomolecular species by cloaking one compound while concentrating the other. A design strategy to realize such metamaterial using homogeneous isotropic materials is proposed. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen is manipulated using a metamaterial that cloaks nitrogen and concentrates oxygen. This work lays the foundation for molecular mass separation in biophysical and chemical systems through metamaterial devices. PMID:26912419

  15. Clean recoil implantation of the 100Pd/Rh TDPAC probe using a solenoidal separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiona, A. A.; Kemp, W. J.; Williams, E.; Timmers, H.

    2012-10-01

    The synthesis and recoil implantation of the 100Pd/Rh probe for time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy using the solenoidal reaction product separator SOLITAIRE has been demonstrated for the first time. The separator suppresses the co-implantation of the intense flux of elastically scattered projectile ions that can affect results obtained with the hyperfine interactions technique. Using three different fusion evaporation reactions, the solenoid field was optimised at 4.5 T to achieve a concentrated, circular focus of evaporation residue ions with a lateral FWHM of 20 mm. Employing the reaction 92Zr(12C,4n)100Pd several samples have been recoil-implanted with the 100Pd/Rh probe. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of a silver sample and a TDPAC measurement on zinc confirm that the new preparation technique is effective. The ratio function measured with TDPAC of an undoped germanium sample may indicate that palladium-defect pairs are absent when implanting with SOLITAIRE. However, a direct comparison with TDPAC results for germanium samples prepared with conventional recoil implantation, which does not suppress the flux of elastics, does not support this assertion.

  16. Mass and energy dispersive recoil spectrometry of MOCVD grown Al xGa 1- xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. R.; Johnston, P. N.; Bubb, I. F.; Stannard, W. B.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Hult, M.; Whitlow, H. J.; Zaring, C.; Östling, M.; Andersson, M.

    1994-12-01

    Mass and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry (RS) has been employed to study stoichiometric variations in Al xGa 1- xAs layers. Quantitative determination of x is an important problem in the production of device materials which is not easily solved with standard techniques. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) has been used extensively in semiconductor research but overlap of signals in the backscattered ion spectrum is an important limitation in the analysis of materials such as Al xGa 1- xAs which contain elements of low and similar masses. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis has good elemental resolution for this class of materials but provides little depth resolution. RS enables the determination of separate energy spectra for individual or small groups of isotopes. This allows it to be used in many situations where RBS is inappropriate. It employs a heavy ion beam to cause constituent nuclei to recoil from the target, and a Time of Flight and Energy (ToF- E) detector to detect these recoiling nuclei. Appropriate mass selection of the ToF- E data allows the determination of depth distributions for each element.

  17. Studies of (p, γ) reactions with the Daresbury Recoil Separator at ORNL'S HRIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R.; Abbotoy, E.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Champagne, A. E.; Chen, A. A.; Greife, U.; Hill, D. W.; James, A. N.; Kozub, R. L.; Lewis, T. A.; Livesay, R.; Ma, Z.; Mahan, S. L.; McConnell, J. W.; Milner, W. T.; Moazen, B. H.; Parker, P. D.; Pierce, D. E.; Roettger, M. E.; Sahin, L.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M. S.; Strieder, F.; Swartz, K. B.; Thomas, J. S.; Visser, D. W.

    2005-02-01

    The fusion of protons with radioactive nuclei is important in stellar explosions such as novae and X-ray bursts and for the production of neutrinos in the sun. The Daresbury Recoil Separator and a windowless gas target system have been installed at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) for measurements of proton capture reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams. The performance of the system has been characterized with a number of experiments using stable ion beams. We report on results from these commissioning measurements and plans for measurements of the 1H(17F,18Ne) and 1H(7Be,8B) reactions.

  18. Research and Development of a New Gas-Filled Recoil Separator GARIS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Daiya; Morimoto, Kouji; Haba, Hiromitsu; Wakabayashi, Yasuo; Kudou, Yuki; Hung, Minghui; Goto, Shin-ichi; Murakami, Masashi; Goto, Naoya; Koyama, Takumi; Tamura, Nobuyuki; Tsuto, Shouhei; Sumita, Takayuki; Tanaka, Kengo; Takeyama, Mirei; Yamaki, Sayaka; Morita, Kosuke

    The results of the recent on-line test experiment using a gas-filled recoil ion separator GARIS-II, whose main purpose is to perform the so-called hot fusion reactions to produce superheavy elements, are presented. Reaction products via 169Tm(40Ar,4n)205Fr and 208Pb(40Ar,3n)245Fm were collected by the focal plane detection system of GARIS-II with high efficiency of 47% for 205Fr and 63% for 245Fm under low background condition.

  19. Mass calibration of the energy axis in ToF-E elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meersschaut, J.; Laricchiuta, G.; Sajavaara, T.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-03-01

    We report on procedures that we have developed to mass-calibrate the energy axis of ToF-E histograms in elastic recoil detection analysis. The obtained calibration parameters allow one to transform the ToF-E histogram into a calibrated ToF-M histogram.

  20. Experimental Concept for a Precision Measurement of Nuclear Recoil Ionization Yields for Low Mass WIMP Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saab, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the response of dark matter detectors at the lowest recoil energies is important for correctly interpreting data from current experiments or predicting the sensitivity of future experiments to low mass weakly interacting massive particles. In particular, the ionization yield is essential for determining the correct recoil energy of candidate nuclear recoil events; however, few measurements in cryogenic crystals exist below 1 keV. Using the voltage-assisted calorimetric ionization detection technique with a mono-energetic neutron source, we show that it is possible to determine the ionization yield in cryogenic crystals down to an energy to 100 eV. This measurement will also determine the statistics of ionization production at these low energies.

  1. Low energy nuclear recoils study in noble liquids for low-mass WIMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming

    2014-03-01

    Detector response to low-energy nuclear recoils is critical to the detection of low-mass dark matter particles-WIMPs (Weakly interacting massive particles). Although the detector response to the processes of low-energy nuclear recoils is subtle and direct experimental calibration is rather difficult, many studies have been performed for noble liquids, NEST is a good example. However, the response of low-energy nuclear recoils, as a critical issue, needs more experimental data, in particular, with presence of electric field. We present a new design using time of flight to calibrate the large-volume xenon detector, such as LUX-Zeplin (LZ) and Xenon1T, energy scale for low-energy nuclear recoils. The calculation and physics models will be discussed based on the available data to predict the performance of the calibration device and set up criteria for the design of the device. A small test bench is built to verify the concepts at The University of South Dakota. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota.

  2. Studies Of (lowercasep,γ) Reactions With The Daresbury Recoil Separator At ORNL'S HRIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R.; Champagne, A. E.; Visser, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Bardayan, D. W.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M. S.; Kozub, R. L.; Moazen, B. H.; Parker, P. D.; Greife, U.; Livesay, R.; Ma, Z.; Jones, K. L.; Thomas, J. S.; Johnson, M. S.

    2004-10-01

    The fusion of protons with radioactive nuclei is important in stellar explosions such as novae and X-ray bursts as well as in solar neutrino production. The Daresbury Recoil Separator and a windowless gas target system have been installed at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) for measurements of proton capture reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams. The performance of the system has been characterized with a number of experiments with stable ion beams. The windowless gas target thickness has been determined to 3% using a novel technique and the DRS transmission has been studied with ^1H(^12C,γ)^13N. Results from this work will be presented. We will also report on plans for ^1H(^7Be,γ)^8B and ^1H(^17F,γ)^18Ne measurements at the HRIBF.

  3. Simulation of Velocity Filters in the Daresbury Recoil Separator at the HRIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. P.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.; Smith, M. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Liu, Y.; Matos, M.

    2008-10-01

    The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) at Oak Ridge National Lab's (ORNL) Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is used for the study of nuclear reactions of astrophysical importance. For example, the DRS enables direct measurements of proton capture reactions on radioactive ions which occur in stellar explosions such as novae and X-ray bursts. The DRS uses velocity filters (Wien filters) that are tuned to transmit the reaction products with a specific velocity while deflecting the unreacted primary beam particles away from the optical axis, where they are stopped on adjustable slits. Data from earlier calculations of the electromagnetic fields inside and around the filters has been implemented into a FORTRAN program to provide accurate calculations and graphic representations of particle trajectories through the Wien filters. This information can be used to predetermine optimum positions of the slits for future experiments. The program will be used as an experimental setup tool for the DRS.

  4. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    SciTech Connect

    Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (MW) and decay width (ΓW) in 1 fb-1 of W → ev collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass MT, pT(e), and ET distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the MT distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the pT and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be MW = 80.4035 ± 0.024(stat) ± 0.039(syst) from the MT, MW = 80.4165 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 ± 0.023(stat) ± 0.043(syst) from the ET distributions. ΓW is measured to be ΓW = 2.025 ± 0.038(stat) ± 0.061(syst) GeV.

  5. Binary black hole merger gravitational waves and recoil in the large mass ratio limit

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararajan, Pranesh A.; Hughes, Scott A.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2010-05-15

    Spectacular breakthroughs in numerical relativity now make it possible to compute spacetime dynamics in almost complete generality, allowing us to model the coalescence and merger of binary black holes with essentially no approximations. The primary limitation of these calculations is now computational. In particular, it is difficult to model systems with large mass ratio and large spins, since one must accurately resolve the multiple length scales that play a role in such systems. Perturbation theory can play an important role in extending the reach of computational modeling for binary systems. In this paper, we present first results of a code that allows us to model the gravitational waves generated by the inspiral, merger, and ringdown of a binary system in which one member of the binary is much more massive than the other. This allows us to accurately calibrate binary dynamics in the large mass ratio regime. We focus in this analysis on the recoil imparted to the merged remnant by these waves. We closely examine the ''antikick,'' an antiphase cancellation of the recoil arising from the plunge and ringdown waves, described in detail by Schnittman et al. We find that, for orbits aligned with the black hole spin, the antikick grows as a function of spin. The total recoil is smallest for prograde coalescence into a rapidly rotating black hole, and largest for retrograde coalescence. Amusingly, this completely reverses the predicted trend for kick versus spin from analyses that only include inspiral information.

  6. Direct Measurements of (p,gamma) Cross Sections at Astrophysical Energies using Radioactive Beams and the Daresbury Recoil Separator

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, Daniel W; Chipps, K.; Fitzgerald, R. P.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Champagne, A. E.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, Robert; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-01-01

    There are a number of astrophysical environments in which the path of nucleosynthesis leads through proton-rich nuclei. These nuclei have traditionally not been available as beams, and thus proton-capture reactions on these nuclei could only be studied indirectly. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), some of the first direct measurements of (p,gamma) cross sections on radioactive beams have been made. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been used to separate the recoils of interest from the unreacted primary beam and identify them in an isobutane-filled ionization counter. First data from 17F(p,gamma)18Ne and 7B(p,gamma)8B measurements are presented.

  7. Direct measurements of (p, γ) cross-sections at astrophysical energies using radioactive beams and the Daresbury Recoil Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Fitzgerald, R. P.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chae, K. Y.; Champagne, A. E.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, C.; Moazen, B. H.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Shriner, J. F.; Smith, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    There are a number of astrophysical environments in which the path of nucleosynthesis proceeds through proton-rich nuclei. These nuclei have traditionally not been available as beams, and thus proton-capture reactions on these nuclei could only be studied indirectly. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), some of the first direct measurements of ( p, γ) cross-sections on radioactive beams have been made. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been used to separate the recoils of interest from the unreacted primary beam and identify them in an isobutane-filled ionization counter. First data from 17F ( p, γ 18Ne and 7Be ( p, γ 8B measurements are presented.

  8. Direct measurments of (p,gamma) cross sections at astrophysical energies using radioactive beams and the Daresbury Recoil Separator

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, Daniel W; Chipps, K.; Fitzgerald, R. P.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Champagne, A. E.; Greife, Uwe; Hatarik, Robert; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-01-01

    There are a number of astrophysical environments in which the path of nucleosynthesis proceeds through proton-rich nuclei. Radioactive nuclei have traditionally not been available as beams, and thus proton-capture reactions on these nuclei could only be studied indirectly. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), some of the first direct measurements of (p,g ) cross sections on radioactive beams have been made. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been used to separate the recoils of interest from the unreacted primary beam and identify them in an isobutane-filled ionization counter. Data from 17F(p,g )18Ne and 7Be(p,g )8B measurements are presented.

  9. A Monte Carlo C-code for calculating transmission efficiency of recoil separators and viewing residue trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, S.

    2008-10-01

    We present a semimicroscopic Monte Carlo code for calculating absolute transmission efficiency of recoil separators for heavy ion-induced complete fusion reactions. The code generates realistic distributions for energy, charge state and angle of evaporation residues. Residue trajectories are calculated using first order ion optical transfer matrices. Trajectory plots in the dispersive and the non-dispersive planes are generated. Using this code, we have obtained good agreement between calculated and measured transmission efficiencies for the Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer at IUAC. The code can be adapted easily to any other electromagnetic recoil separator. Program summaryProgram title: TERS Catalogue identifier: AEBD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6818 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 216 097 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: The code has been developed and tested on a PC with Intel Pentium IV processor Operating system: Linux RAM: About 8 Mbytes Classification: 17.7 External routines: pgplot graphics subroutine library [1] should be installed in the system for generating residue trajectory plots. Nature of problem: Recoil separators are employed to select and identify nuclei of interest, produced in a nuclear reaction, rejecting unreacted beam and other undesired reaction products. It is important to know what fraction of the selected nuclei, leaving the target, reaches the detection system. This information is crucial for determining absolute cross section of the studied reaction. Solution method:Interaction of projectiles with target nuclei is treated event by event, semimicroscopically. Position and angle (with respect to beam

  10. Optics of mass separator I

    SciTech Connect

    Balestrini, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    The ion optics of an existing mass separator are documented. The elctrostatic and magnetic stages are analyzed theoretically, both separately and in combination, by paying particular attention to the ion trajectories, the linear and angular magnifications, and the dispersion. The possibility of converting the magnet into a tunable unit by means of current-carrying elements in the gap is demonstrated. The feasibility of correction coils constructed from printed circuit board is shown.

  11. Measuring the 16O(α, γ)20Ne Reaction Rate with the Dragon Recoil Separator at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Greife, U.; Buchmann, L.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Reeve, S.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Erikson, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Vockenhuber, C.; Brown, J. R.; Irvine, D.

    2013-03-01

    The DRAGON recoil separator facility at TRIUMF measures radiative α and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance in inverse kinematics. This is done employing radioactive and stable ion beams produced and accelerated using the ISAC (Isotope Separator and ACcelerator) facility in conjunction with the DRAGON windowless gas target. Over the last few years, the DRAGON collaboration has embarked on a programme to measure a variety of reactions considered vital to the understanding of various astrophysical scenarios. An overview of DRAGON's separation, beam suppression, and detection capabilities will be given. In addition, examples of recent reaction cross section measurements will be discussed, such as the 16O(α, γ)20Ne reaction, which plays an important part in the He and Ne burning in massive stars.

  12. Vacuum arc plasma mass separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paperny, V. L.; Krasov, V. I.; Lebedev, N. V.; Astrakchantsev, N. V.; Chernikch, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    The propagation of a metal plasma flow in a transport system with a curvilinear magnetic field was studied experimentally. The flow was generated by a pulsed vacuum arc discharge with a composite (W+Fe) cathode. The ion energy measurements at the transport system output showed that all ion components were accelerated up to equal energies per charge unit, about 150 eV and 320 eV in the outer and inner areas of the curved plasma flow, respectively. The spatial separation of the atoms of the cathode material was measured at the system output by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The ions of the lighter element (Fe) were concentrated in the inner part of the cathodic plasma flow deflected by the magnetic field while the distribution of the heavy element (W) was substantially shifted toward the outer area of the flow. The maximum mass separation efficiency reached 45, the effective value being 7.7. Such a system is promising for use in plasma technology for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, namely for the separation of the heavy radioactive fission product from nuclear waste.

  13. Spectroscopy of transfermium nuclei using the GABRIELA set up at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA recoil separator

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Piot, J.; Curien, D.; Gall, B.; Yeremin, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Isaev, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Katrasev, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Sokol, E. A.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Wiborg-Hagen, T.; Nyhus, H. T

    2010-06-01

    An IN2P3-JINR collaboration has launched a project called GABRIELA at the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) within the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna (Russia). The goal of the project is to perform gamma-ray and internal conversion electron spectroscopy of heavy nuclei produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and transported to the focal plane of the recoil separator VASSILISSA. During five experimental campaigns of GABRIELA, the detection system has gained in sensitivity and new spectroscopic information has been obtained for {sup 249}Fm, {sup 251}Fm, {sup 253}No and {sup 255}Lr. In this contribution new results for {sup 253}No will be discussed.

  14. MASS SEPARATION OF HIGH ENERGY PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, L.

    1962-09-25

    An apparatus and method are described for separating charged, high energy particles of equal momentum forming a beam where the particles differ slightly in masses. Magnetic lenses are utilized to focus the beam and maintain that condition while electrostatic fields located between magnetic lenses are utilized to cause transverse separation of the particles into two beams separated by a sufficient amount to permit an aperture to block one beam. (AEC)

  15. Use of the ECL-CAMAC trigger processor system for recoil missing mass triggers at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Bracker, S.; Hartner, G.; Appel, J.; Nash, T.

    1981-05-01

    A trigger processor in operation since May 1980 at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab will be described. The processor, based on the Fermilab ECL-CAMAC system, allows fast selection of high mass diffractive events from the total hadronic cross section. Data from a recoil detector, consisting of 3 wire chambers and 4 layers of scintillator concentric about a 1.5 m liquid hydrogen target, is digitized and presented to the processor within 3 sec. From the chamber data are found the vertices and angles of all recoiling tracks.

  16. Alpha spectrometry applications with mass separated samples.

    PubMed

    Dion, M P; Eiden, Gregory C; Farmer, Orville T; Liezers, Martin; Robinson, John W

    2016-01-01

    (241)Am has been deposited using a novel technique that employs a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This work presents results of high-resolution alpha spectrometry on the (241)Am samples using a small area passivated implanted planar silicon detector. We have also investigated the mass-based separation capability by developing a (238)Pu sample, present as a minor constituent in a (244)Pu standard, and performed subsequent radiometric counting. With this new sample development method, the (241)Am samples achieved the intrinsic energy resolution of the detector used for these measurements. There was no detectable trace of any other isotopes contained in the (238)Pu implant demonstrating the mass-based separation (or enhancement) attainable with this technique. PMID:26583262

  17. Further insight into gravitational recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Lousto, Carlos O.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2008-02-15

    We test the accuracy of our recently proposed empirical formula to model the recoil velocity imparted to the merger remnant of spinning, unequal-mass black-hole binaries. We study three families of black-hole binary configurations, all with mass ratio q=3/8 (to nearly maximize the unequal-mass contribution to the kick) and spins aligned (or counter-aligned) with the orbital angular momentum, two with spin configurations chosen to minimize the spin-induced tangential and radial accelerations of the trajectories, respectively, and a third family where the trajectories are significantly altered by spin-orbit coupling. We find good agreement between the measured and predicted recoil velocities for the first two families, and reasonable agreement for the third. We also reexamine our original generic binary configuration that led to the discovery of extremely large spin-driven recoil velocities and inspired our empirical formula, and find rough agreement between the predicted and measured recoil speeds.

  18. CHARGE BOTTLE FOR A MASS SEPARATOR

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, P.H.

    1959-07-01

    Improved mass separator charge bottles are described for containing a dense charge of a chemical compound of copper, nickel, lead or other useful substance which is to be vaporized, and to the method of utilizing such improvcd charge bottles so that the chemical compound is vaporized from the under surface of the charge and thus permits the non-volatile portion thereof to fall to the bottom of the charge bottle where it does not form an obstacle to further evaporation. The charge bottle comprises a vertically disposed cylindrical portion, an inner re-entrant cylindrical portion extending axially and downwardly into the same from the upper end thereof, and evaporative source material in the form of a chemical compound compacted within the upper annular pontion of the charge bottle formed by the re-entrant cylindrical portion, whereby vapor from the chemical compound will pass outwardly from the charge bottle through an apertured closure.

  19. Advances and problems in plasma-optical mass-separation

    SciTech Connect

    Bardakov, V. M.; Ivanov, S. D.; Strokin, N. A.

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a short review of plasma-optical mass-separation and defines the fields for its possible application. During theoretical studies, numerical simulations, and experiments, the effect of the azimuthator finite size and of the vacuum conditions on the mass separator characteristics was revealed, as well as the quality of different-mass ion separation. The problems, solving which may lead to a successful end of the mass-separation plasma-optical technique implementation, were specified.

  20. A novel double-focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer for absolute recoil ion cross sections measurements.

    PubMed

    Sigaud, L; de Jesus, V L B; Ferreira, Natalia; Montenegro, E C

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the inclusion of an Einzel-like lens inside the time-of-flight drift tube of a standard mass spectrometer coupled to a gas cell-to study ionization of atoms and molecules by electron impact-is described. Both this lens and a conical collimator are responsible for further focalization of the ions and charged molecular fragments inside the spectrometer, allowing a much better resolution at the time-of-flight spectra, leading to a separation of a single mass-to-charge unit up to 100 a.m.u. The procedure to obtain the overall absolute efficiency of the spectrometer and micro-channel plate detector is also discussed. PMID:27587105

  1. Low-Mass WIMP Sensitivity and Statistical Discrimination of Electron and Nuclear Recoils by Varying Luke-Neganov Phonon Gain in Semiconductor Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, M.; Bauer, D. A.; Cabrera, B.; Hall, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Basu Thakur, R.; Yellin, S.

    2012-06-01

    Amplifying the phonon signal in a semiconductor dark matter detector can be accomplished by operating at high voltage bias and converting the electrostatic potential energy into Luke-Neganov phonons. This amplification method has been validated at up to | E|=40 V/cm without producing leakage in CDMS II Ge detectors, allowing sensitivity to a benchmark WIMP with mass M χ =8 GeV/c2 and σ=1.8×10-42 cm2 (with significant sensitivity for M χ >2 GeV/c2) assuming flat electronic recoil backgrounds near threshold. Furthermore, for the first time we show that differences in Luke-Neganov gain for nuclear and electronic recoils can be used to discriminate statistically between low-energy background and a hypothetical WIMP signal by operating at two distinct voltage biases. Specifically, 99% of events have p-value <10-8 for a simulated 20 kg-day experiment with a benchmark WIMP signal with M χ =8 GeV/c2 and σ=3.3×10-41 cm2.

  2. [Sublimatographic separation of fission products by beta-diketone complexes--FP chelate complexes produced directly by recoil effects (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, S

    1980-03-01

    The sublimatographic separation of volatile beta-diketonate complexes of fission products produced directly by the recoil atoms of fission products under exposure of a mixture of M (beta-diketone)n and U3O8 on neutron, was carried out. When Fe(dpm)3 and Fe(pta)3 were used as the catcher chelates, both samples, the sublimated radioactive chelates located at the one zone, and the positions agreed with the deposited position of inactive each catcher chelate. The unclides presented in the zone were almost 97Zr-97Nb, 105Ru and 99Mo-99mTc. When Y(dpm)3 was used as the catcher chelates, the sublimated radioactive chelates located at the one zone, and the zone agreed with the deposited position of inactive catcher chelates, the presented nuclides in the zone were mainly 97Zr-97Nb, 95Zr-95Nb, 105Ru, 103Ru, 143Ce, 141Ce, 93Y, 92Y and 147Nd. In the case of Y(pta)3, the sublimated radioactive chelates located at the two zones. The zone at higher temperature side agreed with the deposited position of inactive catcher chelates, and the nuclides presented in this zone were the same as in the case of Y(dpm)3. On the other hand, it was observed that mainly carrier free states of 97Zr-97Nb were deposited at the zone of lower temperature side. When Ni(acac)2 was used as the catcher chelates, the sublimated radioactive chelates located at the same pattern as Y(pta)3, but the amount of deposited zones of activity was quite low. As a U3O8 target was diluted with Fe(dpm)3 catcher chelates, the yield of deposited 97Zr and 95Zr nuclides was enhanced, to about 50%. PMID:7455176

  3. The electromagnetic mass analyser EMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davids, B.

    2014-01-01

    EMMA is a recoil mass spectrometer for ISAC-II at TRIUMF that will be used to separate the recoils of nuclear reactions from the beam and to disperse them according to their mass-to-charge ratios. EMMA has been designed for both efficiency and selectivity, possessing large acceptances in angle, mass, and energy without sacrificing the necessary beam suppression and mass resolving power.

  4. Plasma mass filtering for separation of actinides from lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-06-01

    Separating lanthanides from actinides is a key process in reprocessing nuclear spent fuel. Plasma mass filters, which operate on dissociated elements, offer conceptual advantages for such a task as compared with conventional chemical methods. The capabilities of a specific plasma mass filter concept, called the magnetic centrifugal mass filter, are analyzed within this particular context. Numerical simulations indicate separation of americium ions from a mixture of lanthanides ions for plasma densities of the order of 1012 cm-3, and ion temperatures of about 10 eV. In light of collision considerations, separating small fractions of heavy elements from a larger volume of lighter ones is shown to enhance the separation capabilities.

  5. Transport of Radioactive Material by Alpha Recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2005-05-19

    The movement of high-specific-activity radioactive particles (i.e., alpha recoil) has been observed and studied since the early 1900s. These studies have been motivated by concerns about containment of radioactivity and the protection of human health. Additionally, studies have investigated the potential advantage of alpha recoil to effect separations of various isotopes. This report provides a review of the observations and results of a number of the studies.

  6. Compact ExB mass separator for heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Hashino, T.; Hirata, F.; Kasuya, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nishiura, M.

    2008-02-15

    A compact ExB mass separator that deflects beam by 30 deg. has been designed and built to prove its principle of operation. The main part of the separator is contained in a shielding box of 11 cm long, 9 cm wide, and 1.5 cm high. An electromagnet of 7 cm pole diameter produced variable magnetic field in the mass separation region instead of a couple of permanent magnets which is to be used in the final design. The experimental result agreed well with the theoretical prediction, and larger mass ions is bent with less magnetic field with the aid of the deflection electric field. The reduction in resolving power for mass separation due to the deflection electric field has been investigated experimentally.

  7. Recoiling from a Kick in the Head-On Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Dae-Il; Kelly, Bernard J.; Boggs, William D.; Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Van Meter, James

    2007-01-01

    Recoil "kicks" induced by gravitational radiation are expected in the inspiral and merger of black holes. Recently the numerical relativity community has begun to measure the significant kicks found when both unequal masses and spins are considered. Because understanding the cause and magnitude of each component of this kick may be complicated in inspiral simulations, we consider these effects in the context of a simple test problem. We study recoils from collisions of binaries with initially head-on trajectories, starting with the simplest case of equal masses with no spin; adding spin and varying the mass ratio, both separately and jointly. We find spin-induced recoils to be significant even in head-on configurations. Additionally, it appears that the scaling of transverse kicks with spins is consistent with post-Newtonian (PN) theory, even though the kick is generated in the nonlinear merger interaction, where PN theory should not apply. This suggests that a simple heuristic description might be effective in the estimation of spin-kicks.

  8. Separation of steroid isomers by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahonen, Linda; Fasciotti, Maíra; Gennäs, Gustav Boije Af; Kotiaho, Tapio; Daroda, Romeu J; Eberlin, Marcos; Kostiainen, Risto

    2013-10-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry performed in a compact traveling wave cell (TWIM-MS) is shown to provide a reliable, fast and repeatable method to separate derivatized steroid isomers. Three steroid isomer pairs were analyzed in their native form and as their p-toluenesulfonyl isocyanate derivatives. The native steroids were separated from each other, but no separation could be attained for the isomers. The derivatized steroid isomers were, however, properly separated by TWIM-MS with peak-to-peak resolutions close to or as high as baseline resolution (Rp-p=0.77-1.08). PMID:23992881

  9. Anatomy of the Binary Black Hole Recoil: A Multipolar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Buonanno, Alessandra; vanMeter, James R.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the recoil velocity computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including 1 = 4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (= 98%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (2 95%). We describe how the relative amplitude, and more importantly, the relative phase, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ring-down phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced, to a high level of accuracy, by an effective Newtonian formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing in the Newtonian formula the radial separation with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes. Analytic formulae, obtained by expressing the multipole moments in terms of the fundamental QNMs of a Kerr BH, are able to explain the onset and amount of '.anti-kick" for each of the simulations. Lastly, we apply this multipolar analysis to understand the remarkable difference between the amplitudes of planar and non-planar kicks for equal-mass spinning black holes.

  10. Mass transfer apparatus and method for separation of gases

    DOEpatents

    Blount, Gerald C.

    2015-10-13

    A process and apparatus for separating components of a source gas is provided in which more soluble components of the source gas are dissolved in an aqueous solvent at high pressure. The system can utilize hydrostatic pressure to increase solubility of the components of the source gas. The apparatus includes gas recycle throughout multiple mass transfer stages to improve mass transfer of the targeted components from the liquid to gas phase. Separated components can be recovered for use in a value added application or can be processed for long-term storage, for instance in an underwater reservoir.

  11. First superheavy element experiments at the GSI recoil separator TASCA: The production and decay of element 114 in the {sup 244}Pu({sup 48}Ca,3-4n) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, J. M.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Schaedel, M.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Bruechle, W.; Essel, H. G.; Hartmann, W.; Hessberger, F. P.; Huebner, A.; Jaeger, E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Steiner, J.

    2011-05-15

    Experiments with the new recoil separator, Transactinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA), at the GSI were performed by using beams of {sup 48}Ca to irradiate targets of {sup 206-208}Pb, which led to the production of {sup 252-254}No isotopes. These studies allowed for evaluation of the performance of TASCA when coupled to a new detector and electronics system. By following these studies, the isotopes of element 114 ({sup 288-291}114) were produced in irradiations of {sup 244}Pu targets with {sup 48}Ca beams at compound nucleus excitation energies around 41.7 and 37.5 MeV, demonstrating TASCA's ability to perform experiments with picobarn-level cross sections. A total of 15 decay chains were observed and were assigned to the decay of {sup 288-291}114. A new {alpha}-decay branch in {sup 281}Ds was observed, leading to the new nucleus {sup 277}Hs.

  12. The HERMES recoil detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Belostotski, S.; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J.; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capitani, G. P.; Carassiti, V.; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Guler, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Hartig, M.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Jo, H. S.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Kisselev, A.; Krause, B.; Krauss, B.; Lagamba, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, S.; Lu, X.-G.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nowak, W.-D.; Naryshkin, Y.; Osborne, A.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrov, A.; Pickert, N.; Prahl, V.; Protopopescu, D.; Reinecke, M.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rubacek, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shearer, C.; Shutov, V.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vilardi, I.; Vikhrov, V.; Vogel, C.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.

    2013-05-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with a field strength of 1T. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  13. Ion optics system incorporating radio frequency mass separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented. They show that an RF mass discriminator, based on a Bennett mass spectrometer concept, can be used to discriminate between two species of ions with about a 2-to-1 charge-to-mass ratio. Such a device would be useful for separating monatomic and diatomic oxygen ions in a system designed to simulate the environment that spacecraft encounter in low earth orbit. The influence of changing mass discriminator parameters - such as the spacing of its grids, the amplitude and frequency of RF voltage signals applied to it and the current density of ions incident upon it - on its species discrimination capabilities is discussed. Experimental results are also compared to the results of a simple theoretical model to gain insight into the processes occurring in the discriminator. These results are shown to be in good agreement.

  14. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.

    2006-07-11

    The HERMES Collaboration is installing a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the spectrometer for measurements of hard exclusive electron/positron scattering reactions, in particular deeply virtual Compton scattering. These measurements will provide access to generalised parton distributions and hence to the localisation of quarks inside hadrons and to their orbital angular momentum. The HERMES Recoil Detector consists of three active components: a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fibre tracker and a photon detector consisting of three layers of tungsten/scintillator. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. The Recoil Detector was extensively tested with cosmic muons over the summer of 2005 and is being installed in the winter of 2005/6 for data taking until summer 2007.

  15. Elastic recoil detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, W. M. A.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.

    1993-07-01

    In elastic recoil detection (ERD) one determines the yield and energy of particles ejected out of the surface region of samples under MeV ion bombardment. By application of this surface and thin film analysis technique one can obtain quantitative information concerning the depth distribution of light elements in a sample to be analysed. The quantitativity and the depth resolving power are based on knowledge of the recoil cross section and the stopping power of high-energy ions in matter. This paper reviews the fundamentals of this technique and the various experimental methods for recoil identification. Furthermore, important features for material analysis, such as detection limits, depth resolution and elemental range are discussed. Some emphasis is put on the conversion of the spectral contribution of the elements to atomic concentrations in the films for several representative cases. Throughout the review numerous examples are given to illustrate the features of ERD and to demonstrate empirically the accuracy of the quantification method.

  16. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  17. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Jabbari, M.Y.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat (or mass) transfer is underway. This research, sponsored by the Department of Energy (Contract No. FG02-87ER13800), is planned to enhance our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the process. This report summarizes previous accomplishments and briefly describes works done during period May 1, 1989 through April 30, 1990. Future plans and studies under preparation are also mentioned. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Recombination in liquid xenon for low-energy recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Detector response to low-energy recoils in sub-keV region is critical to detection of low-mass dark matter particles-WIMPS (Weakly interacting massive particles). The role of electron-ion recombination is important to the interpretation of the relation between ionization yield and scintillation yield, which are in general anti-correlated. Recent experimental results show that ionization yield increases down to keV range. This phenomenon contradicts general understanding for low energy recoils in the keV range in which direct excitation dominates. The explanation is that recombination becomes much less efficient when the track length is smaller than the thermalization distance of electrons. However, recombination rate is also proportional to ionization density, which is very high for keV recoils. To understand how recombination rate behaves for keV recoils, we calculated both initial recombination rate and volume recombination rate for keV recoils in liquid xenon. In this paper, we show the results of the calculated recombination rate as a function of recoil energy for both electronic recoils and nuclear recoils. Detector response to low-energy recoils in sub-keV region is critical to detection of low-mass dark matter particles-WIMPS (Weakly interacting massive particles). The role of electron-ion recombination is important to the interpretation of the relation between ionization yield and scintillation yield, which are in general anti-correlated. Recent experimental results show that ionization yield increases down to keV range. This phenomenon contradicts general understanding for low energy recoils in the keV range in which direct excitation dominates. The explanation is that recombination becomes much less efficient when the track length is smaller than the thermalization distance of electrons. However, recombination rate is also proportional to ionization density, which is very high for keV recoils. To understand how recombination rate behaves for keV recoils

  19. Is the Binary Mass Ratio Distribution Separation-Dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Kraus, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries of planets orbiting retired A-stars on close orbits and young A-stars on very wide orbits have renewed interest in the properties of nearby intermediate-mass stars. Especially interesting are the young stars because directly-imaged planets orbiting them may be bright enough for characterization (e.g. HR 8799, Beta Pictoris, etc). However, intermediate-mass stars and especially young intermediate mass stars are part of multiple systems more often than not. Close stellar companions may affect the formation and orbital evolution of any planets, and the properties of the companions can help constrain the binary formation mechanism. The mass ratio distribution of a population of binary stars, especially if the distribution for close companions is significantly different from that of wide companions, is helpful to distinguish companions that were born in or affected by the circumstellar disk from those which formed through fragmentation of the molecular core. Previous imaging surveys have found that binary systems with A-type primary stars tend to have cool companions with extreme mass ratios. There are hints at a much flatter mass ratio distribution for close companions, but strong completeness effects complicate the picture. We have conducted a spectroscopic survey of ~400 nearby main sequence A- and B-type stars, aimed at detecting stellar companions as late as M4 for all orbital separations <100 AU. We have searched for companions to the stars by cross-correlating the spectra against model templates for F-M type stars; a significant peak in the cross-correlation function indicates a detection. Our cross-correlation technique can detect low-mass companions with orbits that are too wide to detect with radial velocity monitoring and too small to detect with imaging techniques, making it complementary to work already done. We will present results from our survey and compare the mass ratio distribution we measure to the corresponding distribution for

  20. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  1. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  2. Transient Ion-Pair Separations for Electrospray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanghui; Lam, Lily; Chi, Bert; Kadjo, Akinde F; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2016-02-16

    We report a novel ion-pair chromatography (IPC) approach for liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS), where the eluent does not contain any ion-pairing reagent (IPR). The IPR is injected on the column, much like the sample, and moves down the column. Significant amounts of a high retention factor IPR is injected, resulting in a transient but reproducible regional coating that progresses along the column. The sample is injected after a brief interval. The sample components interact with the IPR coated region during their passage; the chosen eluent gradient elutes the analytes of interest into the mass spectrometer before the IPR. Following analyte elution, the gradient is steeply raised, the IPR is washed out, and the effluent is sent to waste via a diverter valve until it is fully removed. As the nature of the analyte retention continuously changes along the column and with time, we call this transient ion-pair separation (TIPS). As the IPR never enters the MS, TIPS addresses two major drawbacks of IPC for ESI-MS: it avoids both ion suppression and ion source contamination. The potential of the generic approach for other modes of separation is discussed. An illustrative separation of two small inorganic ions, iodate and nitrate, is demonstrated on a reverse phase column by a transient prior injection of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride as IPR. PMID:26765166

  3. Attomole quantitation of protein separations with accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S; Grant, P G; Buccholz, B A; Dingley, K; Turteltaub, K W

    2000-12-15

    Quantification of specific proteins depends on separation by chromatography or electrophoresis followed by chemical detection schemes such as staining and fluorophore adhesion. Chemical exchange of short-lived isotopes, particularly sulfur, is also prevalent despite the inconveniences of counting radioactivity. Physical methods based on isotopic and elemental analyses offer highly sensitive protein quantitation that has linear response over wide dynamic ranges and is independent of protein conformation. Accelerator mass spectrometry quantifies long-lived isotopes such as 14C to sub-attomole sensitivity. We quantified protein interactions with small molecules such as toxins, vitamins, and natural biochemicals at precisions of 1-5% . Micro-proton-induced-xray-emission quantifies elemental abundances in separated metalloprotein samples to nanogram amounts and is capable of quantifying phosphorylated loci in gels. Accelerator-based quantitation is a possible tool for quantifying the genome translation into proteome.

  4. Chemical separations by bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David A; Adleman, James R; Goodwin, David G; Psaltis, Demetri

    2008-04-01

    We show that when a small amount of heat is added close to a liquid-vapor interface of a captive gas bubble in a microchannel, interphase mass-transfer through the bubble can occur in a controlled manner with only a slight change in the temperature of the fluid. We demonstrate that this method, which we refer to as bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer (BAIM), can be applied to interphase chemical separations, e.g., simple distillation, without the need for high temperatures, vacuum, or active cooling. Although any source of localized heating could be used, we illustrate BAIM with an all-optical technique that makes use of the plasmon resonance in an array of nanoscale metal structures that are incorporated into the channel to produce localized heating of the fluid when illuminated by a stationary low-power laser. PMID:18321130

  5. Radioactive beam experiments using the Fragment Mass Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.

    1994-04-01

    The Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) is a recoil mass spectrometer that has many potential applications in experiments with radioactive beams. The FMA can be used for spectroscopic studies of nuclei produced in reactions with radioactive beams. The FMA is also an ideal tool for studying radiative capture reactions of astrophysical interest, using inverse kinematics. The FMA has both mass and energy dispersion, which can be used to efficiently separate the reaction recoils from the primary beam. When used with radioactive beams, the FMA allows the recoils from radiative capture reactions to be detected in a low-background environment.

  6. Unbalance magnetron plasma source for ion mass-separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paperny, V. L.; Krasov, V. I.; Astrakchantsev, N. V.; Lebedev, N. V.

    2014-11-01

    The report presents the results of the preliminary studies characteristics of an unbalanced magnetron plasma source supplied with the transport system based on a curved magnetic field. The aim of these studies was to recognize if the system is suitable, in principle, for mass-separation of a multi-component plasma flow. The magnetron source has 50 mm diameter cathode manufactured of an alloy composed of Cu (64%), Pb (22.5%) and admixtures, about of 14% (Al, Zn, C). By means of an immersion time-of-flight spectrometer, a spatial distribution of ions of the cathode material was measured through the system output cross-section. Distribution of atom of these elements was measured here by the X-ray fluorescence spectrometry as well. Both methods showed that the ions of the lighter element (Cu) were concentrated in the inner part of the plasma flow deflected by the magnetic field while the distribution of the heavy element (Pb) was shifted toward the outer area of the flow. The similar effect was observed for each couple of the elements. Such a system is promising for use in plasma technology of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, namely for separation heavy radioactive fission product from nuclear waste.

  7. Recoil-α-fission and recoil-α-α-fission events observed in the reaction 48Ca + 243Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, U.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L.-L.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Fahlander, C.; Gates, J. M.; Golubev, P.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gross, C. J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kratz, J. V.; Rykaczewski, K.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Schädel, M.; Yakushev, A.; Åberg, S.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Brand, H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Cox, D.; Derkx, X.; Dobaczewski, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Even, J.; Gerl, J.; Jäger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Mistry, A.; Mokry, C.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nitsche, H.; Omtvedt, J. P.; Papadakis, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Runke, J.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Shi, Yue; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Torres, T.; Traut, T.; Trautmann, N.; Türler, A.; Ward, A.; Ward, D. E.; Wiehl, N.

    2016-09-01

    Products of the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am were studied with the TASISpec set-up at the gas-filled separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany. Amongst the detected thirty correlated α-decay chains associated with the production of element Z = 115, two recoil-α-fission and five recoil- α- α-fission events were observed. The latter five chains are similar to four such events reported from experiments performed at the Dubna gas-filled separator, and three such events reported from an experiment at the Berkeley gas-filled separator. The four chains observed at the Dubna gas-filled separator were assigned to start from the 2n-evaporation channel 289115 due to the fact that these recoil- α- α-fission events were observed only at low excitation energies. Contrary to this interpretation, we suggest that some of these recoil- α- α-fission decay chains, as well as some of the recoil- α- α-fission and recoil-α-fission decay chains reported from Berkeley and in this article, start from the 3n-evaporation channel 288115.

  8. Interpreting Recoil for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed, Tarek A.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of recoil is usually explained to students in the context of Newton's third law. Typically, when a projectile is fired, the recoil of the launch mechanism is interpreted as a reaction to the ejection of the smaller projectile. The same phenomenon is also interpreted in the context of the conservation of linear momentum, which is…

  9. In-beam separation and mass determination of superheavy nuclei. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, O. N.; Yeremin, A. V.; Popeko, A. G.; Belozerov, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Hofmann, S.; Itkis, M. G.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Šáro, Š.; Shutov, A. V.; Svirikhin, A. I.

    2004-01-01

    Within the past 15 years, the recoil separator VASSILISSA has been used for the investigations of evaporation residues produced in complete fusion reactions induced by heavy ions. The study of decay properties and formation of cross-sections of the isotopes of elements 110, 112 and 114 was performed using high-intensity 48Ca beams and 232Th, 238U, 242Pu targets. For further experiments aimed at the synthesis of the superheavy element isotopes ( Z⩾110) with the use of intense 48Ca extracted beams, improvements in the ion optical system of the separator and the focal plane detector system have been made. The results from the test reactions and new results for the isotope 283112 are presented.

  10. Recoil Based Fuel Breeding Fuel Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Popa-Simil, Liviu

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear transmutation reactions are based on the absorption of a smaller particle as neutron, proton, deuteron, alpha, etc. The resulting compound nucleus gets out of its initial lattice mainly by taking the recoil, also with help from its sudden change in chemical properties. The recoil implantation is used in correlation with thin and ultra thin materials mainly for producing radiopharmaceuticals and ultra-thin layer radioactive tracers. In nuclear reactors, the use of nano-particulate pellets could facilitate the recoil implantation for breeding, transmutation and partitioning purposes. Using enriched {sup 238}U or {sup 232}Th leads to {sup 239}Pu and {sup 233}U production while using other actinides as {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am etc. leads to actinide burning. When such a lattice is immersed into a radiation resistant fluid (water, methanol, etc.), the recoiled product is transferred into the flowing fluid and removed from the hot area using a concentrator/purifier, preventing the occurrence of secondary transmutation reactions. The simulation of nuclear collision and energy transfer shows that the impacted nucleus recoils in the interstitial space creating a defect or lives small lattices. The defect diffuses, and if no recombination occurs it stops at the lattices boundaries. The nano-grains are coated in thin layer to get a hydrophilic shell to be washed by the collection liquid the particle is immersed in. The efficiency of collection depends on particle magnitude and nuclear reaction channel parameters. For {sup 239}Pu the direct recoil extraction rate is about 70% for {sup 238}UO{sub 2} grains of 5 nm diameters and is brought up to 95% by diffusion due to {sup 239}Neptunium incompatibility with Uranium dioxide lattice. Particles of 5 nm are hard to produce so a structure using particles of 100 nm have been tested. The particles were obtained by plasma sputtering in oxygen atmosphere. A novel effect as nano-cluster radiation damage robustness and cluster

  11. RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN SPIN-FLIP RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Wang Dong; Chen Xian

    2012-02-20

    Numerical relativity simulations predict that coalescence of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries leads not only to a spin flip but also to a recoiling of the merger remnant SMBHs. In the literature, X-shaped radio sources are popularly suggested to be candidates for SMBH mergers with spin flip of jet-ejecting SMBHs. Here we investigate the spectral and spatial observational signatures of the recoiling SMBHs in radio sources undergoing black hole spin flip. Our results show that SMBHs in most spin-flip radio sources have mass ratio q {approx}> 0.3 with a minimum possible value q{sub min} {approx_equal} 0.05. For major mergers, the remnant SMBHs can get a kick velocity as high as 2100 km s{sup -1} in the direction within an angle {approx}< 40 Degree-Sign relative to the spin axes of remnant SMBHs, implying that recoiling quasars are biased to be with high Doppler-shifted broad emission lines while recoiling radio galaxies are biased to large apparent spatial off-center displacements. We also calculate the distribution functions of line-of-sight velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacements for spin-flip radio sources with different apparent jet reorientation angles. Our results show that the larger the apparent jet reorientation angle is, the larger the Doppler-shifting recoiling velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacement will be. We investigate the effects of recoiling velocity on the dust torus in spin-flip radio sources and suggest that recoiling of SMBHs would lead to 'dust-poor' active galactic nuclei. Finally, we collect a sample of 19 X-shaped radio objects and for each object give the probability of detecting the predicted signatures of recoiling SMBH.

  12. Photodissociation of methyl iodide at 229. 4 nm: A determination of the fragment recoil anisotropy using energy-selective electron impact ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, S.M.; Hayden, C.C.; Carlson Muyskens, K.J.; Crim, F.F.

    1988-09-01

    Energy-selective electron impact ionization of laser-produced photofragments together with time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a general and sensitive means of studying primary photodissociation processes. Low-energy electrons ionize photofragments without the production of background fragment ions from dissociative ionization of the parent molecules, and the time-of-flight mass spectral peak shapes provide direct information on the photofragment recoil anisotropy. In the first application of this combination of techniques, we have studied the photodissociation of methyl iodide at 229.4 nm, the short-wavelength end of the A band, in order to assess the contribution of transitions to the /sup 1/Q/sub 1/ state to the absorption profile. The results presented here show that I(/sup 2/P/sub 1//sub ///sub 2/) is the primary iodine--atom product and that the transition is largely parallel (..beta.. = (1.6 +- 0.1) for I(/sup 2/P/sub 1//sub ///sub 2/)) at 229.4 nm. These data together with previous photofragmentation results suggest that excitation to the /sup 3/Q/sub 0/ state dominates the entire A band absorption profile.

  13. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation.

    PubMed

    Schlösser, Magnus; Rudnev, Vitaly; González Ureña, Ángel

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated. PMID:26520948

  14. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation

    SciTech Connect

    Schlösser, Magnus Rudnev, Vitaly; Ureña, Ángel González

    2015-10-15

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated.

  15. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Yu-chen

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent.

  16. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, Y.C.

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent. 8 figs.

  17. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Shchepunov, V. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Gulbekyan, G. G.; Khabarov, M. V.; Bekhterev, V. V.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Efremov, A. A.; Pashenko, S. V.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Yeremin, A. V.; Yavor, M. I.; Kalimov, A. G.

    2003-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 -3. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A≈20 to A≈500, its mass acceptance is as large as ±2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90° electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given.

  18. Mass Transport in Nanocomposite Materials for Membrane Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galizia, Michele; Puccini, Ilaria; Messori, Massimo; Grazia De Angelis, Maria; Sarti, Giulio C.

    2010-06-01

    The vapor transport properties of nanocomposite materials obtained with different techniques and based on a high free volume glassy polymer suitable for membrane separations, poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-propyne] (PTMSP), have been determined and modeled. The simple mixing in solution of hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles with PTMSP leads to mixed matrix membranes, which show higher free volume and higher values of diffusivity and permeability than the pure polymeric material. If a sol-gel route is followed, with PTMSP and Tetraethoxysylane (TEOS) as precursor of the silica phase, one obtains hybrid matrices characterized by lower vapor diffusion and sorption values with respect to the pure polymer. Although the trends observed are very regular functions of the silica content in the composite, none of the behavior observed obeys traditional models for composites permeability, such as the Maxwell's one. Both types of behaviors were modeled considering the variation of polymer fractional free volume induced by the inorganic phase: in the mixed matrices the poor interactions between silica and polymer chains favor the formation of nanovoids at the interface, increasing the free volume and the vapor diffusivity, while in the more interconnected hybrid matrices the inorganic domains act as constraints, reducing the volume occupied by the polymeric phase, which is naturally endowed with a very high excess free volume.

  19. Compact E ×B mass separator for heavy ion beamsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Hashino, T.; Hirata, F.; Kasuya, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nishiura, M.

    2008-02-01

    A compact E ×B mass separator that deflects beam by 30° has been designed and built to prove its principle of operation. The main part of the separator is contained in a shielding box of 11cm long, 9cm wide, and 1.5cm high. An electromagnet of 7cm pole diameter produced variable magnetic field in the mass separation region instead of a couple of permanent magnets which is to be used in the final design. The experimental result agreed well with the theoretical prediction, and larger mass ions is bent with less magnetic field with the aid of the deflection electric field. The reduction in resolving power for mass separation due to the deflection electric field has been investigated experimentally.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques for Direct Coupling of Planar Separations with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    Planar separations, which include thin layer chromatography and gel electrophoresis, are in widespread use as important and powerful tools for conducting separations of complex mixtures. To increase the utility of planar separations, new methods are needed that allow in-situ characterization of the individual components of the separated mixtures. A large number of atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques for use with mass spectrometry have emerged in the past several years, and several have been investigated as a means for mass spectrometric read-out of planar separations. In this article, we review the atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques that have been used for the read-out of planar separation media. For each technique, we briefly explain the operational basics and discuss the analyte type for which it is appropriate and some specific applications from the literature.

  1. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry separation of water-soluble metabolites.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Jacob N; Horvath, Krisztian; Gooding, Jessica R; Campagna, Shawn R; Guiochon, Georges

    2010-12-24

    Off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection (2D-LC/MS-MS) was used to separate a set of metabolomic species. Water-soluble metabolites were extracted from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisae cultures and were immediately analyzed using strong cation exchange (SCX)-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). Metabolite mixtures are well-suited for multidimensional chromatography as the range of components varies widely with respect to polarity and chemical makeup. Some currently used methods employ two different separations for the detection of positively and negatively ionized metabolites by mass spectrometry. Here we developed a single set of chromatographic conditions for both ionization modes and were able to detect a total of 141 extracted metabolite species, with an overall peak capacity of ca. 2500. We show that a single two-dimensional separation method is sufficient and practical when a pair or more of unidimensional separations are used in metabolomics. PMID:21094946

  2. First operation and mass separation with the CARIBU MR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsh, Tsviki Y.; Paul, Nancy; Burkey, Mary; Aprahamian, Ani; Buchinger, Fritz; Caldwell, Shane; Clark, Jason A.; Levand, Anthony F.; Ying, Lin Ling; Marley, Scott T.; Morgan, Graeme E.; Nystrom, Andrew; Orford, Rodney; Galván, Adrian Pérez; Rohrer, John; Savard, Guy; Sharma, Kumar S.; Siegl, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    The recent installation of a Multi-Reflection Time-of-Flight (MR-TOF) isobar separator at the CARIBU facility has the promising potential to significantly improve the mass separation and selection of short-lived neutron-rich beams. Ions cycled in the km-long isochronous trajectories between two electrostatic mirrors can be separated to high levels of mass-resolving power within a short time (tens of ms). The installation process is described and results from the first operation are discussed. Following an optimization of the mirror voltages a mass-resolving power of 6.8 ·104 was achieved and a separation of isobars was demonstrated. The higher purity beams provided by the MR-TOF and delivered to the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) will provide access to further measurements of neutron-rich nuclei along the astrophysical r-process path.

  3. Delayed bunching for multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbusch, M.; Chauveau, P.; Delahaye, P.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Wienholtz, F.; Wolf, R. N.

    2015-06-01

    Many experiments are handicapped when the ion sources do not only deliver the ions of interest but also contaminations, i.e., unwanted ions of similar mass. In the recent years, multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separation has become a promising method to isolate the ions of interest from the contaminants, in particular for measurements with low-energy short-lived nuclides. To further improve the performance of multi-reflection mass separators with respect to the limitations by space-charge effects, the simultaneously trapped ions are spatially widely distributed in the apparatus. Thus, the ions can propagate with reduced Coulomb interactions until, finally, they are bunched by a change in the trapping conditions for high-resolution mass separation. Proof-of-principle measurements are presented.

  4. Delayed bunching for multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbusch, M.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Wienholtz, F.; Chauveau, P.; Delahaye, P.

    2015-06-29

    Many experiments are handicapped when the ion sources do not only deliver the ions of interest but also contaminations, i.e., unwanted ions of similar mass. In the recent years, multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separation has become a promising method to isolate the ions of interest from the contaminants, in particular for measurements with low-energy short-lived nuclides. To further improve the performance of multi-reflection mass separators with respect to the limitations by space-charge effects, the simultaneously trapped ions are spatially widely distributed in the apparatus. Thus, the ions can propagate with reduced Coulomb interactions until, finally, they are bunched by a change in the trapping conditions for high-resolution mass separation. Proof-of-principle measurements are presented.

  5. MASS SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheimer, F.; Bell, J.W.

    1959-02-17

    An improvement in the mounting arrangement for the ion source within the vacuum tank of a calutron is presented. The entire source is supported by the vacuum envelope through the medium of a bracket secured to a removable face plate. The bracket forms a supporting platform that is generally transverse to the magnetic field. The ion generator is mounted on a pedestal-type insulator supported on the bracket, and the hot leads are brought into the vacuum envelope through a tubular elbow connected to the vacuum envelope, having the axis of its outer opening aligned with the magnetic field at which point a bushing-type insulator is employed. With this arrangement thc ion source is maintained at a positive potential with respect to the vacuum tank and the problem of electron bombardment of the insulator is considerably reduced.

  6. The Outcome of Supernovae in Massive Binaries; Removed Mass, and its Separation Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Ryosuke; Sawai, Hidetomo; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-09-01

    The majority of massive stars are formed in binary systems. It is hence reasonable to expect that most core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) take place in binaries and the existence of a companion star may leave some imprints in observed features. Having this in mind, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the collisions of CCSNe ejecta with the companion star in an almost-equal-mass (~10 M ⊙) binary to find out possible consequences of such events. In particular we pay attention to the amount of mass removed and its dependence on the binary separation. In contrast to the previous surmise, we find that the companion mass is stripped not by momentum transfer but by shock heating. Up to 25% of the original mass can be removed for the closest separations and the removed mass decreases as M ubvpropa -4.3 with the binary separation a. By performing some experimental computations with artificially modified densities of incident ejecta, we show that if the velocity of ejecta is fixed, the density of incident ejecta is the single important parameter that actually determines the removed mass as Mub \\propto ρ ej 1.4. On the other hand, another set of simulations with modified velocities of incident ejecta demonstrate that the strength of the forward shock, which heats up the stellar material and causes the mass loss of the companion star, is actually the key parameter for the removed mass.

  7. In-beam studies of proton emitters using the Recoil-Decay Tagging method

    SciTech Connect

    Seweryniak, D.; Woods, P. J.; Ressler, J.; Davids, C. N.; Heinz, A.; Sonzogni, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.; Caggiano, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Cizewski, J. A.; Davinson, T.; Ding, K. Y.; Fotiades, N.; Garg, U.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T.-L.; Kondev, F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Reiter, P.; Shergur, J.; Wiedenhoever, I.

    2000-01-19

    The last five years have witnessed a rapid increase in the volume of data on proton decaying nuclei. The path was led by decay studies with recoil mass separators equipped with double-sided Si strip detectors. The properties of many proton-decaying states were deduced, which triggered renewed theoretical interest in the process of proton decay. The decay experiments were closely followed by in-beam {gamma}-ray studies which extended one's knowledge of high-spin states of proton emitters. The unparalleled selectivity of the Recoil-Decay Tagging method combined with the high efficiency of large arrays of Ge detectors allowed, despite small cross sections and overwhelming background from strong reaction channels, the observation of excited states in several proton emitters. Recently, in-beam studies of the deformed proton emitters {sup 141}Ho and {sup 131}Eu have been performed with the GAMMASPHERE array of Ge detectors and the Fragment Mass Analyzer at ATLAS. Evidence was found for rotational bands in {sup 141}Ho and {sup 131}Eu. The deformations and the single-particle configurations proposed for the proton emitting states from the earlier proton-decay studies were confronted with the assignments deduced based on the in-beam data. It should be noted that the cross section for populating {sup 131}Eu is only about 50 nb, and it represents the weakest channel ever studied in an in-beam experiment.

  8. Optimal control of gun recoil in direct fire using magnetorheological absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harinder J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-05-01

    Optimal control of a gun recoil absorber is investigated for minimizing recoil loads and maximizing rate of fire. A multi-objective optimization problem was formulated by considering the mechanical model of the recoil absorber employing a spring and a magnetorheological (MR) damper. The damper forces are predicted by evaluating pressure drops using a nonlinear Bingham-plastic model. The optimization methodology provides multiple optimal design configurations with a trade-off between recoil load minimization and increased rate of fire. The configurations with low or high recoil loads imply low or high rate of fire, respectively. The gun recoil absorber performance is also analyzed for perturbations in the firing forces. The adaptive control of the MR damper for varying gun firing forces provides a smooth operation by returning the recoil mass to its battery position (ready to reload and fire) without incurring an end-stop impact. Furthermore, constant load transmissions are observed with respect to the recoil stroke by implementing optimal control during the simulated firing events.

  9. A membrane-separator interface for mass-spectrometric analysis of blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Gerasimov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of rapid mass-spectrometric determination of the content of anesthetic agents in blood plasma with the aid of a membrane-separator interface. The interface employs a hydrophobic selective membrane that is capable of separating various anesthetic drugs (including inhalation anesthetic sevofluran, noninhalation anesthetic thiopental, hypnotic propofol, and opioid analgesic fentanyl) from the blood plasma and introducing samples into a mass spectrometer. Analysis of the blood plasma was not accompanied by the memory effect and did not lead to membrane degradation. Results of clinical investigation of the concentration of anesthetics in the blood plasma of patients are presented.

  10. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat and mass transfer has been completed. This research provided enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms governing important heat and mass transfer flow processes. This report summarizes the work conducted under the project. This research has provided considerable new knowledge on flow and heat transfer situations of great interest in a number of energy conversion devices, including heat exchangers, gas turbines, solar energy systems and general heat transfer systems.

  11. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.J.

    1994-09-13

    A time-of-flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line is disclosed. The beam line includes an ion source which injects ions into pulse deflection regions and separated by a drift space. A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly. The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions. 23 figs.

  12. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Lamich, George J.

    1994-01-01

    A time of flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line (10). The beam line (10) includes an ion source (12) which injects ions into pulse deflection regions (14) and (16) separated by a drift space (18). A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly (22). The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions (14) and (16).

  13. Ion exchange separation of chromium from natural water matrix for stable isotope mass spectrometric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Bassett, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for separating the Cr dissolved in natural water from matrix elements and determination of its stable isotope ratios using solid-source thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The separation method takes advantage of the existence of the oxidized form of Cr as an oxyanion to separate it from interfering cations using anion-exchange chromatography, and of the reduced form of Cr as a positively charged ion to separate it from interfering anions such as sulfate. Subsequent processing of the separated sample eliminates residual organic material for application to a solid source filament. Ratios for 53Cr/52Cr for National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 979 can be measured using the silica gel-boric acid technique with a filament-to-filament standard deviation in the mean 53Cr/52Cr ratio for 50 replicates of 0.00005 or less. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid separation of phosphopeptides by microchip electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Elisa; Bonabi, Ashkan; Nordman, Nina; Jokinen, Ville; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto; Sikanen, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a significant biological process, but separation of phosphorylated peptide isomers is often challenging for many analytical techniques. We developed a microchip electrophoresis (MCE) method for rapid separation of phosphopeptides with on-chip electrospray ionization (ESI) facilitating online sample introduction to the mass spectrometer (MS). With the method, two monophosphorylated positional isomers of insulin receptor peptide (IR1A and IR1B) and a triply phosphorylated insulin receptor peptide (IR3), all with the same amino acid sequence, were separated from the nonphosphorylated peptide (IR0) in less than one minute. For efficient separation of the positional peptide isomers from each other derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl reagents (either chloroformate, Fmoc-Cl, or N-succinimidyl carbonate, Fmoc-OSu) was required before the analysis. The derivatization improved not only the separation of the monophosphorylated positional peptide isomers in MCE, but also identification of the phosphorylation site based on MS/MS. PMID:26931427

  15. Mass Separation of Nuclear Waste Surrogates in the Archimedes Demonstration Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, D. L.

    2005-10-01

    The Archimedes Demonstration Unit (ADU) has successfully separated a nuclear waste surrogate into light and heavy waste streams. ADU is a large scale (L = 3.9 m, a=0.37 m) cylindrical Plasma Mass Filter^1 that utilizes perpendicular electric and magnetic fields to generate a low-pass filter on atomic mass. This technology could reduce the volume of high level nuclear waste at the Hanford site in Richland, Washington. Over the last year, several techniques have been used to evaporate and inject waste surrogates into a rotating sodium metal plasma in ADU. Both spectroscopic and material collection techniques show that the Filter reduces the amount of heavy material in the light waste stream by a factor of 20 or more, with mass collection rates of about 0.25 g/s. Results of the experimental mass separation tests, parameter scaling of the mass separation, and supporting modeling will be presented. ^1T. Ohkawa, ``Plasma Mass Filter'', U.S. Patent 6 096 220, August 1, 2000.

  16. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Scott M.

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS~II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for "background-free'' operation of CDMS~II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space. These results, like any others, are subject to a variety of systematic effects that may alter their final interpretations. A primary focus of this dissertation will be difficulties in precisely calibrating the energy scale for nuclear recoil events like those from WIMPs. Nuclear recoils have suppressed ionization signals relative to electron recoils of the same recoil energy, so the response of the detectors is calibrated differently for each recoil type. The overall normalization and linearity of the energy scale for electron recoils in CDMS~II detectors is clearly established by peaks of known gamma energy in the ionization spectrum of calibration data from a 133Ba source. This electron-equivalent keVee) energy scale enables calibration of the total phonon signal (keVt) by enforcing unity

  17. Application of a Plasma Mass Separator to Advanced LWR Spent Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Richard; Miller, Robert; Papay, Larry; Wagoner, John; Ahlfeld, Charles; Czerwinski, Ken

    2006-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating spent fuel reprocessing for the purposes of increasing the effective capacity of a deep geological repository, reducing the radiotoxicity of waste placed in the repository and conserving nuclear fuel resources. DOE is considering hydro-chemical processing of the spent fuel after cutting the fuel cladding and fuel dissolution in nitric acid. The front end process, known as UREX, is largely based on the PUREX process and extracts U, Tc as well as fission product gases. A number of additional processing steps have become known as UREX+. One of the steps includes a further chemical treatment of remove Cs and Sr to reduce repository heat load. Other steps include successive extraction of the actinides from residual fission products, including the lanthanides. The additional UREX+ processing renders the actinides suitable for burning as reactor fuel in an advanced reactor to convert actinides to shorter-lived fission products and to produce power. New methods for separating groups of elements by their atomic mass have been developed and can be exploited to enhance spent fuel reprocessing. These physical processes dry the waste streams so that they can be vaporized and singly ionized in plasma that is contained in longitudinal magnetic and perpendicular electric fields. Proper configuration of the fields causes the plasma to rapidly rotate and expel heavier mass ions at the center of the machine. Lower mass ions form closed orbits within the cylindrical plasma column and are transported to either end of the machine. This plasma mass separator was originally developed to reduce the mass of material that must be immobilized in borosilicate glass from DOE defense waste at former weapons production facilities. The plasma mass separator appears to be well-suited for processing the UREX raffinate and solids streams by exploiting the large atomic mass gap that exists between lanthanides (< {approx}180 amu) and actinides

  18. Angular Momentum Ejection and Recoil*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohia, O.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    The spontaneous rotation phenomenon observed in axisymmetric magnetically confined plasmas has been explained by the ``accretion theory'' [1] that considers the plasma angular momentum as gained from its interaction with the magnetic field and the surrounding material wall. The ejection of angular momentum to the wall, and the consequent recoil are attributed to modes excited at the edge while the transport of the (recoil) angular momentum from the edge toward the center is attributed to a different kind of mode. The toroidal phase velocity of the edge mode, to which the sign of the ejected angular momentum is related, is considered to change its direction in the transition from the H-regime to the L-regime. For the latter case, edge modes with phase velocity in the direction of vdi are driven by the temperature gradient of a cold ion population at the edge and damped on the ``hot'' ion population. The ``balanced'' double interaction [2] of the mode with the two populations, corresponding to a condition of marginal stability, leads to ejection of hot ions and loss of angular momentum in the direction of vdi while the cold population acquires angular momentum in the opposite direction. In the H-regime resistive ballooning modes with phase velocities in the direction of vde are viewed as the best candidates for the excited edge modes. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. DOE. [1] B. Coppi, Nucl. Fusion 42, 1 (2002) [2] B. Coppi and F. Pegoraro, Nucl. Fusion 17, 969 (1977)

  19. The outcome of supernovae in massive binaries; removed mass, and its separation dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Ryosuke; Sawai, Hidetomo; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-09-01

    The majority of massive stars are formed in binary systems. It is hence reasonable to expect that most core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) take place in binaries and the existence of a companion star may leave some imprints in observed features. Having this in mind, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the collisions of CCSNe ejecta with the companion star in an almost-equal-mass (∼10 M {sub ☉}) binary to find out possible consequences of such events. In particular we pay attention to the amount of mass removed and its dependence on the binary separation. In contrast to the previous surmise, we find that the companion mass is stripped not by momentum transfer but by shock heating. Up to 25% of the original mass can be removed for the closest separations and the removed mass decreases as M {sub ub}∝a {sup –4.3} with the binary separation a. By performing some experimental computations with artificially modified densities of incident ejecta, we show that if the velocity of ejecta is fixed, the density of incident ejecta is the single important parameter that actually determines the removed mass as M{sub ub}∝ρ{sub ej}{sup 1.4}. On the other hand, another set of simulations with modified velocities of incident ejecta demonstrate that the strength of the forward shock, which heats up the stellar material and causes the mass loss of the companion star, is actually the key parameter for the removed mass.

  20. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ˜0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-2 Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10-6 Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  1. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ∼0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10(-6)-5.0 × 10(-2) Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2 ) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10(-6) Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning. PMID:27036832

  2. A Novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W {yields} {ell}{nu} events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z {yields} {ell}{ell} data events and overlaid on a simulated W {yields} {ell}{nu} event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the properties of the measured recoil as a function of the true, rather than the measured, transverse momentum of the boson. We address this issue using a multidimensional Bayesian unfolding technique. We estimate the statistical and systematic uncertainties from this method for the W boson mass and width measurements assuming 1 fb{sup -1} of data from the Fermilab Tevatron. The uncertainties are found to be small and comparable to those of a more traditional parameterized recoil model. For the high precision measurements that will be possible with data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron and from the CERN LHC, the method presented in this paper may be advantageous, since it does not require an understanding of the measured recoil from first principles.

  3. Real-time 2D separation by LC × differential ion mobility hyphenated to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Varesio, Emmanuel; Le Blanc, J C Yves; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2012-03-01

    The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of complex samples such as biological fluid extracts is widespread when searching for new biomarkers as in metabolomics. The success of this hyphenation resides in the orthogonality of both separation techniques. However, there are frequent cases where compounds are co-eluting and the resolving power of mass spectrometry (MS) is not sufficient (e.g., isobaric compounds and interfering isotopic clusters). Different strategies are discussed to solve these cases and a mixture of eight compounds (i.e., bromazepam, chlorprothixene, clonapzepam, fendiline, flusilazol, oxfendazole, oxycodone, and pamaquine) with identical nominal mass (i.e., m/z 316) is taken to illustrate them. Among the different approaches, high-resolution mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography (i.e., UHPLC) can easily separate these compounds. Another technique, mostly used with low resolving power MS analyzers, is differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS), where analytes are gas-phase separated according to their size-to-charge ratio. Detailed investigations of the addition of different polar modifiers (i.e., methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol) into the transport gas (nitrogen) to enhance the peak capacity of the technique were carried out. Finally, a complex urine sample fortified with 36 compounds of various chemical properties was analyzed by real-time 2D separation LC×DMS-MS(/MS). The addition of this orthogonal gas-phase separation technique in the LC-MS(/MS) hyphenation greatly improved data quality by resolving composite MS/MS spectra, which is mandatory in metabolomics when performing database generation and search. PMID:22006241

  4. Ion Mobility-Mass Correlation Trend Line Separation of Glycoprotein Digests without Deglycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Bendiak, Brad; Siems, William F.; Gang, David R.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    A high-throughput ion mobility mass spectrometer (IMMS) was used to rapidly separate and analyze peptides and glycopeptides derived from glycoproteins. Two glycoproteins, human α-1-acid glycoprotein and antithrombin III were digested with trypsin and subjected to electrospray traveling wave IMMS analysis. No deglycosylation steps were performed; samples were complex mixtures of peptides and glycopeptides. Peptides and glycosylated peptides with different charge states (up to 4 charges) were observed and fell on distinguishable trend lines in 2-D IMMS spectra in both positive and negative modes. The trend line separation patterns matched between both modes. Peptide sequence was identified based on the corresponding extracted mass spectra and collision induced dissociated (CID) experiments were performed for selected compounds to prove class identification. The signal-to-noise ratio of the glycopeptides was increased dramatically with ion mobility trend line separation compared to non-trend line separation, primarily due to selection of precursor ion subsets within specific mobility windows. In addition, isomeric mobility peaks were detected for specific glycopeptides. IMMS demonstrated unique capabilities and advantages for investigating and separating glycoprotein digests in this study and suggests a novel strategy for rapid glycoproteomics studies in the future. PMID:23914139

  5. Binary Cepheids: Separations and Mass Ratios in 5 M ⊙ Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Evans; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D.; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan

    2013-10-01

    Deriving the distribution of binary parameters for a particular class of stars over the full range of orbital separations usually requires the combination of results from many different observing techniques (radial velocities, interferometry, astrometry, photometry, direct imaging), each with selection biases. However, Cepheids—cool, evolved stars of ~5 M ⊙—are a special case because ultraviolet (UV) spectra will immediately reveal any companion star hotter than early type A, regardless of the orbital separation. We have used International Ultraviolet Explorer UV spectra of a complete sample of all 76 Cepheids brighter than V = 8 to create a list of all 18 Cepheids with companions more massive than 2.0 M ⊙. Orbital periods of many of these binaries are available from radial-velocity studies, or can be estimated for longer-period systems from detected velocity variability. In an imaging survey with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, we resolved three of the companions (those of η Aql, S Nor, and V659 Cen), allowing us to make estimates of the periods out to the long-period end of the distribution. Combining these separations with orbital data in the literature, we derive an unbiased distribution of binary separations, orbital periods, and mass ratios. The distribution of orbital periods shows that the 5 M ⊙ binaries have systematically shorter periods than do 1 M ⊙ stars. Our data also suggest that the distribution of mass ratios depends on both binary separation and system multiplicity. The distribution of mass ratios as a function of orbital separation, however, does not depend on whether a system is a binary or a triple. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  6. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions. PMID:25216897

  7. Star-galaxy separation strategies for WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, András; Szapudi, István

    2015-04-01

    We combine photometric information of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) all-sky infrared data bases, and demonstrate how to produce clean and complete galaxy catalogues for future analyses. Adding 2MASS colours to WISE photometry improves star-galaxy separation efficiency substantially at the expense of losing a small fraction of the galaxies. We find that 93 per cent of the WISE objects within W1 < 15.2 mag have a 2MASS match, and that a class of supervised machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM), are efficient classifiers of objects in our multicolour data set. We constructed a training set from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation, and determined redshift distribution of our sample from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly spectroscopic survey. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm we show that W1WISE - J2MASS is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multidimensional SVM classification. We present a detailed description of our star-galaxy separation methods, and characterize the robustness of our tools in terms of contamination, completeness, and accuracy. We explore systematics of the full sky WISE-2MASS galaxy map, such as contamination from moon glow. We show that the homogeneity of the full sky galaxy map is improved by an additional J2MASS < 16.5 mag flux limit. The all-sky galaxy catalogue we present in this paper covers 21 200 deg2 with dusty regions masked out, and has an estimated stellar contamination of 1.2 per cent and completeness of 70.1 per cent among 2.4 million galaxies with zmed ≈ 0.14. WISE-2MASS galaxy maps with well controlled stellar contamination will be useful for spatial statistical analyses, including cross-correlations with other cosmological random fields, such as the cosmic microwave background. The same techniques also yield a

  8. Design and performance of mass-produced sideband separating SIS mixers for ALMA band 4 receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takafumi; Kuroiwa, Koichi; Takahashi, Toshikazu; Fujii, Yumi; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Asayama, Shin'ichiro; Noguchi, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    We have designed and mass-produced low-noise sideband separating superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) band 4 over the frequency range of 125-163 GHz. An integrated design was adopted for the band 4 sideband separating (2SB) mixer block because of the advantages it offers in terms of compactness, reduced testing time and lower cost. The mixer chip was designed to be robust for handling errors to avoid performance degradation caused by generation of the higher order mode in the mixer chip slot. Detailed analyses revealed its robustness and ability to ensure mass production of the 2SB mixers. Using the robust mixer design in addition to well-established waveguide technologies, all of the 2SB mixers met ALMA specifications for noise temperature and image rejection ratio.

  9. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2016-02-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC.

  10. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2016-05-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC.

  11. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2016-05-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26914233

  12. Separation of actinides using capillary extraction chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dominic S

    2008-01-01

    Trace levels of actinides have been separated on extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), which was coupled with the extraction chromatography system. In this study we compare 30 cm long, 4.6 mm ID columns to capillary columns (750 {micro}m ID) with lengths from 30 cm up to 150 cm. The columns that were tested were packed with TRU resin. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}pU, {sup 241}Am). This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as for automated separations of actinide materials.

  13. Analysis of hemodynamic fluid phase mass transport in a separated flow region.

    PubMed

    Lutostansky, Elizabeth M; Karner, Gerhard; Rappitsch, Gerhard; Ku, David N; Perktold, Karl

    2003-04-01

    The mass transfer behavior in the recirculation region downstream of an axisymmetric sudden expansion was examined. The Reynolds number, 500, and Schmidt number, 3200, were selected to model the mass transfer of molecules, such as ADP, in the arterial system. In a first step the transient mass transport applying zero diffusive flux at the wall was analyzed using experiments and two computational codes. The two codes were FLUENT, a commercially available finite volume method, and FTSP, a finite element code developed at Graz University of Technology. The comparison of the transient wall concentration values determined by the three methods was excellent and provides a measure of confidence for computational mass transfer calculations in convection dominated, separated flows. In a second step the effect of the flow separation on the stationary mass transport applying a permeability boundary condition at the water-permeable wall was analyzed using the finite element code FTSP. The results show an increase of luminal ADP surface concentration in the upstream and in the downstream tube of the sudden expansion geometry in the range of six and twelve percent of the bulk flow concentration. The effect of flow separation in the downstream tube on the wall concentration is a decrease of about ten percent of the difference between wall concentration and bulk concentration occurring at nearly fully developed flow at the downstream region at a distance of 66 downstream tube diameters from the expansion. The decrease of ADP flux into the wall is in the range of three percent of the flux at the downstream region. PMID:12751280

  14. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T.J.

    1996-03-01

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of {sup 31}Cl, {sup 27}P and {sup 28}P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas {Delta}E-gas {Delta}E-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in {sup 31}Cl and {sub 27}P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of {sup 31}Cl were shown to be from the decay of {sup 25}Si. In {sup 27}P, two proton groups at 459 {+-} 14 keV and 610 {+-} 11 keV, with intensities of 7 {+-} 3% and 92 {+-} 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the {beta}-decay of {sup 28}P, at 1,444 {+-} 12 keV with a 1.7 {+-} 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 {+-} 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of {sup 17}Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar were resolved.

  15. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Yonas, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  16. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  17. Estimation of Separation Shock of the Marman Clamp System by Using a Simple Band-Mass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Shinsuke; Onoda, Junjiro

    To prevent satellite failure during inter stage separation, the magnitude of separation shock must be estimated. The Marman Clamp System is a separation joint often used to mount satellites on a launch vehicle. This paper proposes a method of estimating separation shock for the Marman Clamp System. First, experimental results are discussed and the dominant parameters of separation shock are identified for the system. Next, a simple band-mass model is proposed to estimate the system’s separation shock. The differences between the model and experimental results are discussed. Radial and axial, but not tangential, separation shocks were estimated well by this method.

  18. Structural Mass Spectrometry: Rapid Methods for Separation and Analysis of Peptide Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Cody R.; Fenn, Larissa S.; Derewacz, Dagmara K.; Bachmann, Brian O.; McLean, John A.

    2012-01-01

    A significant challenge in natural product discovery is the initial discrimination of discrete secondary metabolites alongside functionally similar primary metabolic cellular components within complex biological samples. A property that has yet to be fully exploited for natural product identification and characterization is the gas phase collision cross section, or, more generally, the mobility-mass correlation. Peptide natural products possess many of the properties that distinguish natural products as they are frequently characterized by a high degree of intramolecular bonding, and possess extended and compact conformations among other structural modifications. This report describes a rapid structural mass spectrometry technique based on ion mobility-mass spectrometry for the comparison of peptide natural products to their primary metabolic congeners using mobility-mass correlation. This property is empirically determined using ion mobility-mass spectrometry, applied to the analysis of linear versus modified peptides, and used to discriminate peptide natural products in a crude microbial extract. Complementary computational approaches are utilized to understand the structural basis for the separation of primary metabolism derived linear peptides from secondary metabolite cyclic and modified cyclic species. These findings provide a platform for enhancing the identification of secondary metabolic peptides with distinct mobility-mass ratios within complex biological samples. PMID:22216918

  19. Separation of catechin epimers by complexation using ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Troć, Anna; Zimnicka, Magdalena; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2015-03-01

    Ion mobility coupled with mass spectrometry provides a fast and repeatable method to separate catechin epimers by previous complexation with selected chiral modifiers and transition metals. Several combinations with chiral ligands such as D- and L-amino acids and/or additional metal cations, chiral crown ethers, tartaric acid and heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin were screened for their ability to affect the separation efficiency. The clusters having the form of [2M + D-amino acid + Cu(2+) - 3H](-) (M stands for (-)-epicatechin or (+)-catechin) showed improvement in stereodifferentiation between two epimeric catechins in comparison to the analysis of pure epimers, where no separation was observed or the separation was hampered by the formation of mixed dimer complexes. Among various examined D-amino acids only those possessing hydrophobic side chains induced the improvement of separation efficiency. The best peak-to-peak resolution (Rp-p) was determined to be 0.71 for [2M + D-Leucine + Cu(2+) - 3H](-) clusters. PMID:25800190

  20. Fast liquid chromatography separation and multiple-reaction monitoring mass spectrometric detection of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Loubna A; Neely, Matthew; Bridge, Bob; Mechref, Yehia

    2009-07-01

    We describe here the fast LC-MS/MS separation of a mixture of neurotransmitters consisting of dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxybenzylamine (DHBA), salsolinol, serotonin, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The new UltiMate 3000 Rapid Separation system (RSLC) was successfully coupled to the 4000 QTRAP mass spectrometer operating in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The separation was attained using a 100 mm length, 2.2 microm particle size Acclaim column at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The column back pressure was 350 bar, while the total run time including column re-equilibration was 5.2 min. The peak resolution was minimally affected by the fast separation. The RSLC-MRM separation was found to have a precision range based on peak area for 50 replicate runs of 2-5% CV for all analytes, and the reproducibility of the retention time for all analytes was found to range from 0-2% CV. The described method represents an almost seven times shorter analysis time of neurotransmitters using LC/MRM which is very useful in screening large quantities of biological samples for various neurotransmitters. PMID:19569096

  1. Spallation recoil and age of presolar grains in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Begemann, F.

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the recoil losses from silicon carbide grain size fractions of spallation neon produced by irradiation with 1.6 GeV protons. During the irradiation the SiC grains were dispersed in paraffin wax in order to avoid re-implantation into neighboring grains. Analysis for spallogenic 21Ne of grain size separates in the size range 0.3 μm to 6 μm and comparison with the 22Na activity of the SiC+paraffin mixture indicates an effective recoil range of 2-3 μm with no apparent effect from acid treatments such as routinely used in the isolation of meteoritic SiC grains. Our results indicate that the majority of presolar SiC grains in primitive meteorites, which are ~μm-sized, will have lost essentially all spallogenic Ne produced by cosmic ray interaction in the interstellar medium. This argues against the validity of previously published presolar ages of Murchison SiC (~10 to ~130 Ma; increasing with grain size; Lewis et al., 1994), where recoil losses had been based on calculated recoil energies. It is argued that the observed variations in meteoritic SiC grain size fractions of 21Ne/22Ne ratios are more likely due to the effects of nucleosynthesis in the He burning shell of the parent AGB stars which imposes new boundary conditions on nuclear parameters and stellar models. It is suggested that spallation-Xe produced on the abundant Ba and REE in presolar SiC, rather than spallogenic Ne, may be a promising approach to the presolar age problem. There is a hint in the currently available Xe data (Lewis et al., 1994) that the large (>1 μm) grains may be younger than the smaller (<1 μm) ones.

  2. Hidden in Starlight: A Search for Widely Separated Substellar-Mass Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulsebus, Alan; Marengo, Massimo; Carson, Joseph; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2014-06-01

    Relatively few widely separated substellar-mass companions of planetary systems are known. These companions can alter the dynamics of planets through Kozai-mechanism-style secular perturbations, and may be a cause of the high mean eccentricity of exoplanets. The orbital periods of such companions are expected to be of the order of tens to thousands of years, making them undetectable by time-domain observations such as transit- and radial velocity searches. We have conducted a Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6 and 4.5 µm imaging search for widely separated substellar-mass companions with projected separation between 5 to 40 arcsec from their parent star. The 36 stars in my sample range from 4 to 15 pc from the sun, giving a typical sensitivity of 10 MJ for objects with an orbital radius in the range of 50 to 300 au. This search required advanced PSF-subtraction techniques in order to minimize the inner working angle and increase sensitivity. In this talk I present the results of this search and discuss the data analysis methods we developed for it.

  3. Advanced nanoscale separations and mass spectrometry for sensitive high-throughput proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-06-01

    We review recent development in separations and mass spectrometric instrumentation for sensitive and high-throughput proteomic analyses. These efforts have been primarily focused on the development of high-efficiency (separation peak capacity of ~103) nanoscale liquid chromatography (nanoLC; e.g., flow rates extending down to ~20 nL/min at optimal separation linear velocities through narrow packed capillaries) in combination with advanced mass spectrometry (MS), including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS. This technology enables MS analysis of low nanogram-level proteomic samples (i.e., nanoscale proteomics) with individual protein identification sensitivity at the low zeptomole-level. The resultant protein measurement dynamic range can reach 106 for nanogram-sized proteomic samples, while more abundant proteins can be detected from complex sub-picogram size proteome samples. The average proteome identification throughput using MS/MS is >200 proteins/h for a ~3 h analysis. These qualities provide the foundation for proteomics studies of single or small populations of cells. The instrumental robustness required for automation and providing high quality routine performance nanoscale proteomic analyses is also discussed.

  4. Integrated microfluidic device for automated single cell analysis using electrophoretic separation and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mellors, J Scott; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M; Ramsey, J Michael

    2010-02-01

    A microfabricated fluidic device was developed for the automated real-time analysis of individual cells using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The microfluidic structure incorporates a means for rapid lysis of single cells within a free solution electrophoresis channel, where cellular constituents were separated, and an integrated electrospray emitter for ionization of separated components. The eluent was characterized using mass spectrometry. Human erythrocytes were used as a model system for this study. In this monolithically integrated device, cell lysis occurs at a channel intersection using a combination of rapid buffer exchange and an increase in electric field strength. An electroosmotic pump is incorporated at the end of the electrophoretic separation channel to direct eluent to the integrated electrospray emitter. The dissociated heme group and the alpha and beta subunits of hemoglobin from individual erythrocytes were detected as cells continuously flowed through the device. The average analysis throughput was approximately 12 cells per minute, demonstrating the potential of this method for high-throughput single cell analysis. PMID:20058879

  5. Integrated Microfluidic Device for Automated Single Cell Analysis using Electrophoretic Separation and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mellors, J. Scott; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    A microfabricated fluidic device was developed for the automated real-time analysis of individual cells using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The microfluidic structure incorporates a means for rapid lysis of single cells within a free solution electrophoresis channel where cellular constituents were separated and an integrated electrospray emitter for ionization of separated components. The eluent was characterized using mass spectrometry. Human erythrocytes were used as a model system for this study. In this monolithically integrated device, cell lysis occurs at a channel intersection using a combination of rapid buffer exchange and an increase in electric field strength. An electroosmotic pump is incorporated at the end of the electrophoretic separation channel to direct eluent to the integrated electrospray emitter. The dissociated heme group and the α and β subunits of hemoglobin from individual erythrocytes were detected as cells continuously flowed through the device. The average analysis throughput was approximately 12 cells per minute demonstrating the potential of this method for high-throughput single cell analysis. PMID:20058879

  6. Diffusion mass transfer of KOH through Ni/Zn battery membrane separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poa, D. S.; Cook, G. M.; Yao, N. P.

    1983-01-01

    Three elements that influence KOH electrolyte diffusion fluxes through nickel/zinc battery separators are discussed: (1) concentration gradient; (2) temperature dependence; and (3) ordering of multilayer membranes. The KOH diffusion fluxes through three different Ni/Zn battery separators (193 PUDO cellophane, Celgard 3401 and 3501, and Permion P-2291 40/30) increase linearly with an increasing KOH concentration gradient from 10 to 40 wt%. The flux approaches a constant value as the concentration gradient is further increased from 45 to 60 wt%. This increase in diffusion mass transfer resistance, in the 45 to 60 wt% KOH concentration range, was analyzed by the modified Wilson plots and found to be related to an increase in the phase boundary resistance. It is shown that the temperature dependences of the KOH diffusion fluxes through these three separators are not the same and they do not always explicitly follow liquid phase diffusion theory. In the case of two layer composite membrane separators, in which one layer bears fixed negative charges and the other layer is an ideal Fickian membrane the KOH diffusion flux is higher when the charge bearing layer faces the concentrated side of the diffusion cell.

  7. Diffusion mass transfer of KOH through Ni/Zn battery membrane separators

    SciTech Connect

    Poa, D.S.; Cook, G.M.; Yao, N.P.

    1983-01-01

    This report discusses three elements that influence KOH electrolyte diffusion fluxes through nickel/zinc battery separators: concentration gradient, temperature dependence, and ordering of multilayer membranes. The KOH diffusion fluxes through three different Ni/Zn battery separators (193 PUDO cellophane, Celgard 3401 and 3501, and Permion P-2291 40/30) are found to increase linearly with an increasing KOH concentration gradient from 10 to 40 wt% (the dilute side of the diffusion cell was filled with distilled water). Typically, the flux approaches a constant value as the concentration gradient is further increased from 45 to 60 wt%. This increase in diffusion mass transfer resistance, in the 45 to 60 wt% KOH concentration range, was analyzed by the method of modified Wilson plots and found to be related to an increase in the phase boundary resistance. It was also shown that the temperature dependences of the KOH diffusion fluxes through these three separators are not the same. Furthermore, they do not always explicitly follow liquid phase diffusion theory. In the case of two-layer composite membrance separators, in which one layer bears fixed negative charges and the other layer is an ideal Fickian membrane (simple porous structure), the KOH diffusion flux is higher when the charge-bearing layer faces the concentrated side of the diffusion cell.

  8. Improving sensitivity for microchip electrophoresis interfaced with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using parallel multichannel separation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Heyong; Liu, Jinhua; Xu, Zigang; Wang, Yuanchao; Ye, Meiying

    2016-08-26

    We reported sensitivity enhancement using multichannel parallel separation for microchip electrophoresis hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MCE-ICP-MS) in this study. By using 2-20 array lanes for parallel separation, the sensitivity of the MCE-ICP-MS system was proportionally improved by 2-20 folds. No significantly adverse effect of parallel separation on column efficiency and resolution was observed. Rapid separation of Hg(2+) and methylmercuric (MeHg) ion within 36s under an electric field of 800Vcm(-1) was achieved in the 2-cm twenty-channels with a background electrolyte of 5mmolL(-1) borate buffer (pH 9.2). Detection limits of Hg(2+) and MeHg by the proposed system were decreased to 6.8-7.1ngL(-1). Good agreement between determined values and certified values of a certified reference fish was obtained with recoveries ranged between 94-98%. All results prove its advantages including high sensitivity, high efficiency and low operation cost, which are beneficial to routine analysis of metal speciation in environmental, biological and food fields. PMID:27488720

  9. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-03-01

    Searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ˜ 1 and significances often well beyond 5 σ. The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] signature, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb-1. By 300 fb-1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the "stealth" point at {m}_{overline{t}}={m}_t and potentially overlapping with limits from toverline{t} cross section and spin correlation measurements.

  10. Evaluation of injection methods for fast, high peak capacity separations with low thermal mass gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fitz, Brian D; Mannion, Brandyn C; To, Khang; Hoac, Trinh; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-05-01

    Low thermal mass gas chromatography (LTM-GC) was evaluated for rapid, high peak capacity separations with three injection methods: liquid, headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME), and direct vapor. An Agilent LTM equipped with a short microbore capillary column was operated at a column heating rate of 250 °C/min to produce a 60s separation. Two sets of experiments were conducted in parallel to characterize the instrumental platform. First, the three injection methods were performed in conjunction with in-house built high-speed cryo-focusing injection (HSCFI) to cryogenically trap and re-inject the analytes onto the LTM-GC column in a narrower band. Next, the three injection methods were performed natively with LTM-GC. Using HSCFI, the peak capacity of a separation of 50 nl of a 73 component liquid test mixture was 270, which was 23% higher than without HSCFI. Similar peak capacity gains were obtained when using the HSCFI with HS-SPME (25%), and even greater with vapor injection (56%). For the 100 μl vapor sample injected without HSCFI, the preconcentration factor, defined as the ratio of the maximum concentration of the detected analyte peak relative to the analyte concentration injected with the syringe, was determined to be 11 for the earliest eluting peak (most volatile analyte). In contrast, the preconcentration factor for the earliest eluting peak using HSCFI was 103. Therefore, LTM-GC is demonstrated to natively provide in situ analyte trapping, although not to as great an extent as with HSCFI. We also report the use of LTM-GC applied with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) detection for rapid, high peak capacity separations from SPME sampled banana peel headspace. PMID:25814332

  11. Base flow separation: A comparison of analytical and mass balance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, Darline A.; Stewart, Mark T.

    2016-04-01

    Base flow is the ground water contribution to stream flow. Many activities, such as water resource management, calibrating hydrological and climate models, and studies of basin hydrology, require good estimates of base flow. The base flow component of stream flow is usually determined by separating a stream hydrograph into two components, base flow and runoff. Analytical methods, mathematical functions or algorithms used to calculate base flow directly from discharge, are the most widely used base flow separation methods and are often used without calibration to basin or gage-specific parameters other than basin area. In this study, six analytical methods are compared to a mass balance method, the conductivity mass-balance (CMB) method. The base flow index (BFI) values for 35 stream gages are obtained from each of the seven methods with each gage having at least two consecutive years of specific conductance data and 30 years of continuous discharge data. BFI is cumulative base flow divided by cumulative total discharge over the period of record of analysis. The BFI value is dimensionless, and always varies from 0 to 1. Areas of basins used in this study range from 27 km2 to 68,117 km2. BFI was first determined for the uncalibrated analytical methods. The parameters of each analytical method were then calibrated to produce BFI values as close to the CMB derived BFI values as possible. One of the methods, the power function (aQb + cQ) method, is inherently calibrated and was not recalibrated. The uncalibrated analytical methods have an average correlation coefficient of 0.43 when compared to CMB-derived values, and an average correlation coefficient of 0.93 when calibrated with the CMB method. Once calibrated, the analytical methods can closely reproduce the base flow values of a mass balance method. Therefore, it is recommended that analytical methods be calibrated against tracer or mass balance methods.

  12. Extension of the two-dimensional mass channel cluster plot method to fast separations utilizing low thermal mass gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitz, Brian D; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-03-24

    Implementation of a data reduction and visualization method for use with high-speed gas chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) is reported. The method, called the "2D m/z cluster method" facilitates analyte detection, deconvolution, and identification, by accurately measuring peak widths and retention times using a fast TOFMS sampling frequency (500 Hz). Characteristics and requirements for high speed GC are taken into consideration: fast separations with narrow peak widths and high peak capacity, rapid data collection rate, and effective peak deconvolution. Transitioning from standard GC (10-60+ minute separations) to fast GC (1-10 min separations) required consideration of how to properly analyze the data. This report validates use of the 2D m/z cluster method with newly developed GC technology that produces ultra-fast separations (∼1 min) with narrow analyte peak widths. Low thermal mass gas chromatography (LTM-GC) operated at a heating rate of 250 °C/min coupled to a LECO Pegasus III TOFMS analyzed a 115 component test mixture in 120 s with peak widths-at-base, wb (4σ), of 350 ms (average) to produce a separation with a high peak capacity, nc ∼ 340 (at unit resolution Rs = 1). The 2D m/z cluster method is shown to separate overlapped analytes to a limiting Rs ∼ 0.03, so the effective peak capacity was increased nearly 30-fold to nc ∼10,000 in the 120 s separation. The method, when coupled with LTM-GC-TOFMS, is demonstrated to provide unambiguous peak rank (i.e. the number of analytes per overlapped peak in the total ion current (TIC)), by visualizing locations of pure and chromatographically overlapped m/z. Hence, peak deconvolution and identification using MCR-ALS (multivariate curve resolution - alternating least squares) is demonstrated. PMID:26945000

  13. Toward a Human Blood Serum Proteome: Analysis by Multidimensional Separation Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.); Varnum, Susan M.); Auberry, Kenneth J.); Moore, Ronald J.); Angell, Nicolas; Smith, Richard D.); Springer, David L.); Pounds, Joel G.)

    2002-12-01

    Blood serum is a complex bodily fluid that contains proteins ranging in concentration over at least nine orders of magnitude. Using a combination of powerful mass spectrometry technologies with improvements in sample preparation, we have performed a proteomic analysis with sub-mL quantities of serum, and increased the measurable concentration range for proteins in blood serum beyond previous reports. We have detected 490 proteins in serum by online reversed-phase microcapillary liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectrometry. To perform this analysis, immunoglobulins were removed from serum using protein A/G, and the remaining proteins were digested with trypsin. Resulting peptides were separated by strong-cation exchange chromatography into distinct fractions prior to analysis. This separation resulted in an increase in the number of proteins detected in an individual serum sample by 3 to 5 fold. With this increase in the number of proteins identified we have detected some lower abundance serum proteins (ng/mL range) including human growth hormone, interleukin-12, and prostate-specific antigen. We also used SEQUEST to compare different protein databases with and without filtering. This comparison is plotted to allow for a quick visual assessment of different databases, as a subjective measure of quality. With this study, we have performed the most extensive analysis of serum proteins to date and laid the foundation for future refinements in the identification of novel protein biomarkers of disease.

  14. Mass spectrometric characterization of gentamicin components separated by the new European Pharmacopoeia method.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Van Schepdael, A; Hoogmartens, J; Adams, E

    2011-04-28

    Liquid chromatography combined with pulsed electrochemical detection (LC-PED) is the method of choice in the European Pharmacopoeia for the determination of gentamicin and its related substances. A recently approved improved LC-PED method, with a reversed-phase C(18) column and a mobile phase consisting of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), pentafluoropropionic acid (PFPA), sodium hydroxide and acetonitrile, showed better separation and more sensitive detection of the gentamicin components than the previous method using a polymer column. More unknown peaks can be separated from the main components and from each other. As the LC-PED method cannot be directly coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS), the unknown substances were collected after the LC column, desalted and analyzed by MS. The structures of the unknown compounds were deduced based on comparison of their fragmentation patterns with those of reference substances investigated by MS(n) experiments using an electrospray ion trap mass spectrometer. A comparison was also made with an already previously published LC-MS method using a volatile mobile phase. PMID:21316176

  15. Ion Mobility Separation of Isomeric Carbohydrate Precursor Ions and Acquisition of their Independent Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Maolei; Bendiak, Brad; Clowers, Brian; Hill, Herbert H.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid separation of isomeric precursor ions of oligosaccharides prior to their analysis by MSn was demonstrated using an ambient pressure ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) interfaced with a quadrupole ion trap. Separations were not limited to specific types of isomers; representative isomers differing solely in the stereochemistry of sugars, in their anomeric configurations, and in their overall branching patterns and linkage positions could be resolved in the millisecond time frame. Physical separation of precursor ions permitted independent mass spectra of individual oligosaccharide isomers to be acquired to at least MS3, the number of stages of dissociation limited only practically by the abundance of specific product ions. IMS-MSn analysis was particularly valuable in the evaluation of isomeric oligosaccharides that yielded identical sets of product ions in MS/MS experiments, revealing pairs of isomers that would otherwise not be known to be present in a mixture if evaluated solely by MS dissociation methods alone. A practical example of IMS-MSn analysis of a set of isomers included within a single HPLC fraction of oligosaccharides released from bovine submaxillary mucin is described. PMID:19562326

  16. [Separation of tannins in Rhubarb and its analysis by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingyu; Ni, Weiwei

    2004-11-01

    In order to investigate the pharmaceutical actions of rhubarb, a method for extracting, separating and analyzing the tannin components in rhubarb was studied. At first, a procedure for the group separation of tannins from the water-ethanol extract of rhubarb was established based on the formation of tannins-caffein precipitation. Then, a high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the analysis of tannins in rhubarb was developed. This HPLC method is based on a reversed-phase C18 column and polar mobile-phase such as water and methanol with gradient elution, and the tannins can be well separated. Finally, the identification of the tannin components in rhubarb was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The structures of the main tannin components (gallic acid, catechin, the dimer, trimer, tetramer and pentamer of catechin) in rhubarb are suggested. The fragmentation laws of the tannin components are summarized. In comparing with previous methods, it is simple and without the interference of co-existed compounds. PMID:15807111

  17. Fast separation of triterpenoid saponins using supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with single quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Haibo; Feng, Ying; Fan, Chunlin; Chen, Weijia; Crommen, Jacques; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2016-03-20

    Triterpenoid saponins (TSs) are the most important components of some traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) and have exhibited valuable pharmacological properties. In this study, a rapid and efficient method was developed for the separation of kudinosides, stauntosides and ginsenosides using supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with single quadrupole mass spectrometry (SFC-MS). The separation conditions for the selected TSs were carefully optimized after the initial screening of eight stationary phases. The best compromise for all compounds in terms of chromatographic performance and MS sensitivity was obtained when water (5-10%) and formic acid (0.05%) were added to the supercritical carbon dioxide/MeOH mobile phase. Beside the composition of the mobile phase, the nature of the make-up solvent for interfacing SFC with MS was also evaluated. Compared to reversed phase liquid chromatography, the SFC approach showed higher resolution and shorter running time. The developed SFC-MS methods were successfully applied to the separation and identification of TSs present in Ilex latifolia Thunb., Panax quinquefolius L. and Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer. These results suggest that this SFC-MS approach could be employed as a useful tool for the quality assessment of natural products containing TSs as active components. PMID:26773536

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Energetic Uranium Recoil Damage in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2006-10-11

    Defect production and amorphization due to energetic uranium recoils in zircon (ZrSiO4), which is a promising ceramic nuclear waste form, is studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a partial charge model. An algorithm that distinguishes between undamaged crystal, crystalline defects and amorphous regions is used to develop a fundamental understanding of the primary damage state. The amorphous cascade core is separated from the surrounding crystal by a defect-rich region. Small, chemically inhomogeneous amorphous clusters are also produced around the core. The amorphous regions consist of under-coordinated Zr and polymerized Si leading to amorphization and phase separation on a nanometer scale into Zr- and Si-rich regions. This separation could play an important role in the experimentally observed formation of nanoscale ZrO2 in ZrSiO4 irradiated at elevated temperatures.

  19. Separation and identification of oligomeric vinylmethoxysiloxanes by gradient elution chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guiying; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2015-05-22

    A high-performance liquid chromatography with online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) has been used to separate and identify the reaction products resulting from controlled acid-catalyzed hydrolytic polycondensation of vinyltrimethoxysilane (VMS). The reaction products were prepared in the molar ratio of water to VMS (r1) ranging from 0.6 to 1.2, characterized by standard spectroscopic techniques, and subsequently analyzed by HPLC-UV absorbance detection and HPLC-ESI-MS. Linear vinylmethoxysiloxane oligomers with the number of repeat units (n) ranging from 3 to 11 are predominant species at the beginning of the reaction (for r1=0.6). Then they transform into monocyclic (for r1=1.0) and bicyclic (for r1=1.2) species with gradually increasing amount of water in the reaction mixture. The oligomer conversions suggest that structure growth of vinylmetoxysiloxanes proceeds by nonrandom cyclization reactions, which are favored over chain extension under the chosen reaction conditions. Direct ESI-MS, HPLC-ESI-MS and HPLC-UV were used to determine the molar mass distributions for the vinylmethoxysiloxane oligomers prepared in three different values of r1. The molar mass averages increase slightly with the amount of water in the reaction mixture and vary somewhat with the method used. Our results indicate that with the combined capability of separation, sensitivity and identification, HPLC-ESI-MS is especially useful to study highly complex silicon-based compounds with hyperbranched, caged or cubic structures as building blocks for hybrid materials. PMID:25890439

  20. Elastic recoil changes in early emphysema.

    PubMed Central

    Silvers, G W; Petty, T L; Stanford, R E

    1980-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine if emphysema and static lung recoil were related in a group of 65 excised human lungs. We studied 23 normal lungs, 24 lungs with an emphysema score of 5 or less, and 18 lungs with an emphysema score greater than 5. A comparison of the percentage of predicted elastic recoil revealed that both emphysema groups were significantly different from normal lungs. In addition, the total lung capacities were significantly different between the three groups. In the group with an emphysema score greater than 5 we found a linear negative correlation between the extent of emphysema and percent of predicted elastic recoil at 90% total lung capacity (r = -0.696, p < 0.01). We found a negative correlation between the percentage of predicted elastic recoil and the lung volume (r = -0.612, p < 0.01). We conclude that a significant loss of elastic recoil and a significant increase in total lung capacity occurs in the early stages of emphysema. PMID:7434309

  1. Americium and plutonium separation by extraction chromatography for determination by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Zakir H; Cornett, Jack R; Zhao, Xaiolei; Kieser, Liam

    2014-06-01

    A simple method was developed to separate Pu and Am using single column extraction chromatography employing N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide (DGA) resin. Isotope dilution measurements of Am and Pu were performed using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and alpha spectrometry. For maximum adsorption Pu was stabilized in the tetra valent oxidation state in 8M HNO3 with 0.05 M NaNO2 before loading the sample onto the resin. Am(III) was adsorbed also onto the resin from concentrated HNO3, and desorbed with 0.1 M HCl while keeping the Pu adsorbed. The on-column reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) with 0.02 M TiCl3 facilitated the complete desorption of Pu. Interferences (e.g. Ca(2+), Fe(3+)) were washed off from the resin bed with excess HNO3. Using NdF3, micro-precipitates of the separated isotopes were prepared for analysis by both AMS and alpha spectrometry. The recovery was 97.7±5.3% and 95.5±4.6% for (241)Am and (242)Pu respectively in reagents without a matrix. The recoveries of the same isotopes were 99.1±6.0 and 96.8±5.3% respectively in garden soil. The robustness of the method was validated using certified reference materials (IAEA 384 and IAEA 385). The measurements agree with the certified values over a range of about 1-100 Bq kg(-1). The single column separation of Pu and Am saves reagents, separation time, and cost. PMID:24856406

  2. Contribution of mass density heterogeneities to the quasigeoid-to-geoid separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Robert; Hirt, Christian; Novák, Pavel; Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The geoid-to-quasigeoid separation is often computed only approximately as a function of the simple planar Bouguer gravity anomaly and the height of the computation point while disregarding the contributions of terrain geometry and anomalous topographic density as well as the sub-geoid masses. In this study we demonstrate that these contributions are significant and, therefore, should be taken into consideration when investigating the relation between the normal and orthometric heights particularly in the mountainous, polar and geologically complex regions. These contributions are evaluated by applying the spectral expressions for gravimetric forward modelling and using the EIGEN-6C4 gravity model, the Earth2014 datasets of terrain, ice thickness and inland bathymetry and the CRUST1.0 sediment and (consolidated) crustal density data. Since the global crustal density models currently available (e.g. CRUST1.0) have a limited accuracy and resolution, the comparison of individual density contributions is—for consistency—realized with a limited spectral resolution up to a spherical harmonic degree 360 (or 180). The results reveal that the topographic contribution globally varies between -0.33 and 0.57 m, with maxima in Himalaya and Tibet. The contribution of ice considerably modifies the geoid-to-quasigeoid separation over large parts of Antarctica and Greenland, where it reaches ˜ 0.2 m. The contributions of sediments and bedrock are less pronounced, with the values typically varying only within a few centimetres. These results, however, have still possibly large uncertainties due to the lack of information on the actual sediment and bedrock density. The contribution of lakes is mostly negligible; its maxima over the Laurentian Great Lakes and the Baikal Lake reach only several millimetres. The contribution of the sub-geoid masses is significant. It is everywhere negative and reaches extreme values of -4.43 m. According to our estimates, the geoid

  3. COMMERCIAL APPLICATION OF PLASMA MASS SEPARATION IN THE ARCHIMEDES FILTER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlfeld, C.E.; Gilleland, J.G.; Wagoner, J.D.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the commercial application of an innovative plasma mass separator called the Archimedes Filter to a pre-treatment plant that can be integrated into the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford and Savannah River Sites to significantly enhance the treatment of radioactive high-level waste. The output of the Archimedes Filter is completely compatible with existing waste immobilization processes such as vitrification and requires no new waste form to be developed. A full-geometric-scale Demonstration Filter Unit (DEMO) has been constructed and is undergoing initial testing at the Archimedes Technology Group Development Facilities in San Diego. Some of the technology and engineering development is being performed by other organizations in collaboration with Archimedes. The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) is developing the plasma calcination technology and all of the associated systems for AFP feed preparation. Two Russian institutes are involved in the development of the ICP torch and injector system. The Remote System Group (UT-Battelle) at ORNL is developing the remote maintenance system for the filter units. Conceptual design of the Archimedes Filter Plant (AFP) is being developed concurrently with the DEMO testing program. The AFP mission is to significantly reduce the cost and accelerate the rate of vitrification of high-level waste by separating low activity waste from the sludge removed from underground storage tanks. Mass separation is accomplished by vaporizing the sludge feed and injecting it into a partially ionized, neutral plasma. In a single pass, heavy ions are deposited near the center of the filter and light mass ions are transported by the plasma to the ends of the cylindrically-shaped vacuum vessel. Responding to the DOE programs for cost reduction and cleanup acceleration, the AFP Project is planned on an expeditious schedule that executes all phases of the project with private sector funding. The initial AFP

  4. A Mass Spectrometry Study of Isotope Separation in the Laser Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, Timothy Wu

    Accurate quantification of isotope ratios is critical for both preventing the development of illicit weapons programs in nuclear safeguards and identifying the source of smuggled material in nuclear forensics. While isotope analysis has traditionally been performed by mass spectrometry, the need for in situ measurements has prompted the development of optical techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). These optical measurements rely on laser ablation for direct solid sampling, but several past studies have suggested that the distribution of isotopes in the ablation plume is not uniform. This study seeks to characterize isotope separation in the laser plume through the use of orthogonal-acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A silver foil was ablated with a Nd:YAG at 355 nm at an energy of 50 muJ with a spot size of 71 mum, for a fluence of 1.3 J/cm2 and an irradiance of 250 MW/cm2. Flat-plate repellers were used to sample the plume, and a temporal profile of the ions was obtained by varying the time delay on the high-voltage pulse. A spatial profile along the axis of the plume was generated by changing the position of the sample, which yielded snapshots of the isotopic composition with time. In addition, the reflectron time-of-flight system was used as an energy filter in conjunction with the repellers to sample slices of the laser plasma orthogonal to the plume axis. Mass spectrometry of the plume revealed a fast ion distribution and a slow ion distribution. Measurements taken across the entire plume showed the fast 109Ag ions slightly ahead in both space and time, causing the 107Ag fraction to drop to 0.34 at 3 mus, 4 mm from the sample surface. Although measurements centered on the near side of the plume did not show isotope separation, the slow ions on the far side of the plume included much more 109Ag than 107Ag. In addition to examining the isotope content of the ablation

  5. Identifying Gel-Separated Proteins Using In-Gel Digestion, Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching: Consider the Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Jessica C.; Dassenko, David J.; Mohamed, Essa A.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is an important bioanalytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. This is an especially powerful tool when combined with gel separation of proteins and database mining using the mass spectral data. Currently, few hands-on…

  6. Preparation of high-purity Cu films by non-mass separated ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J.-W.; Mimura, K.; Miyake, K.; Yamashita, M.; Isshiki, M.

    2003-05-01

    Cu films were deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrates by applying a negative substrate bias voltage using non-mass separated ion beam deposition (IBD) method. By the SIMS results with Cs + ion beam, the Cu film deposited at VS=0 V was found to contain more impurities than the Cu film deposited at VS=-50 V. On the other hand, from the SIMS results with O 2+ ion beam, it was found that elements which are easy to be positive ions such as B, Mg, Na, Al, K, Ca and Fe seem to be increased slightly as compared to the those of the Cu film deposited at VS=0 V. As a result, higher-purity Cu film deposited at VS=-50 V could be obtained in comparison with the film deposited at VS=0 V. The purification effect of the Cu film deposited at VS=-50 V was described in details.

  7. Advanced Multidimensional Separations in Mass Spectrometry: Navigating the Big Data Deluge.

    PubMed

    May, Jody C; McLean, John A

    2016-06-12

    Hybrid analytical instrumentation constructed around mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming the preferred technique for addressing many grand challenges in science and medicine. From the omics sciences to drug discovery and synthetic biology, multidimensional separations based on MS provide the high peak capacity and high measurement throughput necessary to obtain large-scale measurements used to infer systems-level information. In this article, we describe multidimensional MS configurations as technologies that are big data drivers and review some new and emerging strategies for mining information from large-scale datasets. We discuss the information content that can be obtained from individual dimensions, as well as the unique information that can be derived by comparing different levels of data. Finally, we summarize some emerging data visualization strategies that seek to make highly dimensional datasets both accessible and comprehensible. PMID:27306312

  8. Advanced Multidimensional Separations in Mass Spectrometry: Navigating the Big Data Deluge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Jody C.; McLean, John A.

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid analytical instrumentation constructed around mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming the preferred technique for addressing many grand challenges in science and medicine. From the omics sciences to drug discovery and synthetic biology, multidimensional separations based on MS provide the high peak capacity and high measurement throughput necessary to obtain large-scale measurements used to infer systems-level information. In this article, we describe multidimensional MS configurations as technologies that are big data drivers and review some new and emerging strategies for mining information from large-scale datasets. We discuss the information content that can be obtained from individual dimensions, as well as the unique information that can be derived by comparing different levels of data. Finally, we summarize some emerging data visualization strategies that seek to make highly dimensional datasets both accessible and comprehensible.

  9. Hollow fiber apparatus and use thereof for fluids separations and heat and mass transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Bikson, Benjamin; Etter, Stephen; Ching, Nathaniel

    2014-06-10

    A hollow fiber device includes a hollow fiber bundle, comprising a plurality of hollow fibers, a first tubesheet and a second tubesheet encapsulating respective distal ends of the hollow fiber bundle. The tubesheets have boreholes in fluid communication with bores of the hollow fibers. In at least one of the tubesheets, the boreholes are formed radially. The hollow fiber device can be utilized in heat exchange, in gas/gas, liquid/liquid and gas/liquid heat transfer, in combined heat and mass transfer and in fluid separation assemblies and processes. The design disclosed herein is light weight and compact and is particularly advantageous when the pressure of a first fluid introduced into the bores of hollow fibers is higher than the pressure on the shell side of the device.

  10. A new acceleration switch based on separated mass component and elastic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liping; Hu, Jun; Yang, Bo; Shao, Qing; Peng, Gang

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new linear inertial acceleration switch which senses inertial acceleration and gives a signal of switchpoint. It is an entire mechanical device has two particular characters: a simple structure and an environmental interference-free capability. The structure and work principle of the switch is introduced, then the design process to the spring is analyzed and simulated, and finally the rationality of this acceleration switch's design is given according to the sample's testing data. In this acceleration switch, the elastic component is a leaf spring, and the mass component is a standard steel ball. The spring and the ball are separated instead of rigidly connected, which make the whole structure is simple. When the switch is on the work direction the ball and the spring are interact, and the spring is on work; when the switch isn't on the work direction, the ball and the spring are separated; environmental external force is on the mass instead of on the spring. The spring is insusceptible on this condition. This particularity determines that the switch is highly environmental interference-free, and doesn't easily affected by environmental influence. Some parameters of the inertial switch are given as followings: (1) Overall dimension of the inertial switch is about 28mm×12mm×12mm (2) systemic precision of the inertial switch is 1.5%; (3) the inertial switch can endure 0.2g2/Hz stochastic vibration. It is suggested that this inertial switch can be applied in high consequence system.

  11. Separation and characterization of oxidized isomeric lipid-peptide adducts by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Milic, Ivana; Kipping, Marc; Hoffmann, Ralf; Fedorova, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Phospholipids are major components of cell membranes and lipoprotein complexes. They are prone to oxidation by endogenous and exogenous reactive oxygen species yielding a large variety of modified lipids including small aliphatic and phospholipid bound aldehydes and ketones. These carbonyls are strong electrophiles that can modify proteins and, thereby, alter their structures and functions triggering various pathophysiological conditions. The analysis of lipid-protein adducts by liquid chromatography-MS is challenged by their mixed chemical nature (polar peptide and hydrophobic lipid), low abundance in biological samples, and formation of multiple isomers. Thus, we investigated traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) to analyze lipid-peptide adducts generated by incubating model peptides corresponding to the amphipathic β1 sheet sequence of apolipoprotein B-100 with 1-palmitoyl-2-(oxo-nonanoyl)-sn-glycerophosphatidylcholine (PONPC). The complex mixture of peptides, lipids, and peptide-lipid adducts was separated by TWIMS, which was especially important for the identification of two mono-PONPC-peptide isomers containing Schiff bases at different lysine residues. Moreover, TWIMS separated structural conformers of one peptide-lipid adduct possessing most likely different orientations of the hydrophobic sn-1 fatty acyl residue and head group of PONPC, relative to the peptide backbone. PMID:26634972

  12. Separation and Analysis of Boron Isotope in High Plant by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingcai; Dong, Yuliang; Zhu, Huayu; Sun, Aide

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of boron and its isotope in plants is useful to better understand the transposition and translocation of boron within plant, the geochemical behavior in the interface between soil and plant, and the biogeochemical cycle of boron. It is critical to develop a useful method to separate boron from the plant for the geochemical application of boron and its isotope. A method was developed for the extraction of boron in plant sample, whose isotope was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results indicated that this method of dry ashing coupled with two-step ion-exchange chromatography is powerful for the separation of boron in plant sample with large amounts of organic matters completely. The ratios of boron isotope composition in those plant tissue samples ranged from −19.45‰ to +28.13‰ (total range: 47.58‰) with a mean value of 2.61 ± 11.76‰ SD. The stem and root isotopic compositions were lower than those in flower and leaf. The molecular mechanism of boron isotope may be responsible for the observed variation of boron isotopic composition and are considered as a useful tool for the better understanding of boron cycling process in the environment and for the signature of living systems. PMID:26819618

  13. Separation and Analysis of Boron Isotope in High Plant by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingcai; Dong, Yuliang; Zhu, Huayu; Sun, Aide

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of boron and its isotope in plants is useful to better understand the transposition and translocation of boron within plant, the geochemical behavior in the interface between soil and plant, and the biogeochemical cycle of boron. It is critical to develop a useful method to separate boron from the plant for the geochemical application of boron and its isotope. A method was developed for the extraction of boron in plant sample, whose isotope was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results indicated that this method of dry ashing coupled with two-step ion-exchange chromatography is powerful for the separation of boron in plant sample with large amounts of organic matters completely. The ratios of boron isotope composition in those plant tissue samples ranged from -19.45‰ to +28.13‰ (total range: 47.58‰) with a mean value of 2.61 ± 11.76‰ SD. The stem and root isotopic compositions were lower than those in flower and leaf. The molecular mechanism of boron isotope may be responsible for the observed variation of boron isotopic composition and are considered as a useful tool for the better understanding of boron cycling process in the environment and for the signature of living systems. PMID:26819618

  14. Proteomic profiling of intact proteins using WAX-RPLC 2-D separations and FTICR mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Seema; Simpson, David C.; Tolic, Nikola; Jaitly, Navdeep; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the combination of weak anion exchange (WAX) fractionation and on-line reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) separation using a 12 T FTICR mass spectrometer for the detection of intact proteins from a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell lysate. 715 intact proteins were detected and the combined results from the WAX fractions and the unfractionated cell lysate were aligned using LC-MS features to facilitate protein abundance measurements. Protein identifications and post translational modifications were assigned for ~10% of the detected proteins by comparing intact protein mass measurements to proteins identified in peptide MS/MS analysis of an aliquot of the same fraction. Intact proteins were also detected for S. oneidensis lysates obtained from cells grown on 13C, 15N depleted media under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. This work aimed at optimizing intact protein detection for profiling proteins at a level that incorporates their modification complement. The strategy can be readily applied for measuring differential protein abundances, and provides a platform for high-throughput selection of biologically relevant targets for further characterization.

  15. Many overlapping peptides for protein hydrogen exchange experiments by the fragment separation-mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Leland; Kan, Zhong-Yuan; Chetty, Palaniappan Sevugan; Ricciuti, Alec; Walters, Benjamin T; Englander, S Walter

    2011-11-01

    Measurement of the naturally occurring hydrogen exchange (HX) behavior of proteins can in principle provide highly resolved thermodynamic and kinetic information on protein structure, dynamics, and interactions. The HX fragment separation-mass spectrometry method (HX-MS) is able to measure hydrogen exchange in biologically important protein systems that are not accessible to NMR methods. In order to achieve high structural resolution in HX-MS experiments, it will be necessary to obtain many sequentially overlapping peptide fragments and be able to identify and analyze them efficiently and accurately by mass spectrometry. This paper describes operations which, when applied to four different proteins ranging in size from 140 to 908 residues, routinely provides hundreds of useful unique peptides, covering the entire protein length many times over. Coverage in terms of the average number of peptide fragments that span each amino acid exceeds 10. The ability to achieve these results required the integrated application of experimental methods that are described here and a computer analysis program, called ExMS, described in a following paper. PMID:21952777

  16. Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

    2009-03-29

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

  17. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  18. Imprints of recoiling massive black holes on the hot gas of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devecchi, B.; Rasia, E.; Dotti, M.; Volonteri, M.; Colpi, M.

    2009-04-01

    Anisotropic gravitational radiation from a coalescing black hole (BH) binary is known to impart recoil velocities of up to ~1000kms-1 to the remnant BH. In this context, we study the motion of a recoiling BH inside a galaxy modelled as a Hernquist sphere, and the signature that the hole imprints on the hot gas, using N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Ejection of the BH results in a sudden expansion of the gas ending with the formation of a gaseous core, similarly to what is seen for the stars. A cometary tail of particles bound to the BH is initially released along its trail. As the BH moves on a return orbit, a nearly spherical swarm of hot gaseous particles forms at every apocentre: this feature can live up to ~108 years. If the recoil velocity exceeds the sound speed initially, the BH shocks the gas in the form of a Mach cone in density near each supersonic pericentric passage. We find that the X-ray fingerprint of a recoiling BH can be detected in Chandra X-ray maps out to a distance of Virgo. For exceptionally massive BHs, the Mach cone and the wakes can be observed out to a few hundred of milliparsec. The detection of the Mach cone is of twofold importance as it can be a probe of high-velocity recoils, and an assessment of the scatter of the MBH - Mbulge relation at large BH masses.

  19. Enriching and Separating Primary Copper Impurity from Pb-3 Mass Pct Cu Melt by Super-Gravity Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuhou; Song, Bo; Song, Gaoyang; Yang, Zhanbing; Xin, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, super-gravity technology was introduced in the lead bullion-refining process to investigate the enriching and separating laws of copper impurity from Pb-3 mass pct Cu melt. With the gravity coefficient G = 700 at the cooling rate of ν = 5 K min-1, the entire copper phase gathers at the upper area of the sample, and it is hard to find any copper particles at the bottom area of the sample. The floatation movement of copper phase was greatly intensified by super gravity and the mass pct of copper in tailing lead is up to 8.631 pct, while that in the refined lead is only 0.113 pct. The refining rate of lead bullion reached up to 94.27 pct. Copper-phase impurity can be separated effectively from Pb-3 mass pct Cu melt by filtration method in super-gravity field, and the separation efficiency increased with the increasing gravity coefficient in the range of G ≥ 10. After filtration at 613 K (340 °C) with gravity coefficient G = 100 for 10 minutes, the refined lead, with just 0.157 mass pct copper impurity, was separated to the bottom of the crucible, and the copper dross containing only 23.56 mass pct residual lead was intercepted by the carbon fiber felt, leading to the separation efficiency up to 96.18 pct (meaning a great reduction in metal loss).

  20. Medium modifications with recoil polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.F.J. van den; Ent, R.

    1994-04-01

    The authors show that the virtual Compton scattering process allows for a precise study of the off-shell electron-nucleon vertex. In a separable model, they show the sensitivity to new unconstrained structure functions of the nucleon, beyond the usual Dirac and Pauli form factors. In addition, they show the sensitivity to bound nucleon form factors using the reaction 4He({rvec e},e{prime},{rvec p}){sup 3}H. A nucleon embedded in a nucleus represents a complex system. Firstly, the bound nucleon is necessarily off-shell and in principle a complete understanding of the dynamical structure of the nucleon is required in order to calculate its off-shell electromagnetic interaction. Secondly, one faces the possibility of genuine medium effects, such as for example quark-exchange contributions. Furthermore, the electromagnetic coupling to the bound nucleon is dependent on the nuclear dynamics through the self-energy of the nucleon in the nuclear medium.

  1. Design and characterization of a neutron calibration facility for the study of sub-keV nuclear recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbeau, P. S.; Collar, J. I.; Whaley, P. M.

    2007-05-01

    We have designed and built a highly monochromatic 24 keV neutron beam at the Kansas State University Triga Mark-II reactor, as part of an experimental effort to demonstrate sensitivity in a large-mass detector to the ultra-low energy recoils expected from coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering. The beam characteristics were chosen so as to mimic the soft recoil energies expected from reactor antineutrinos in a variety of targets, allowing to understand the response of dedicated detector technologies in this yet unexplored sub-keV recoil range. A full characterization of the beam properties (intensity, monochromaticity, contaminations, beam profile) is presented, together with first tests of the calibration facility using proton recoils in organic scintillator.

  2. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Shuman, D.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Dias, T. H. V. T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gil, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jinete, M. A.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Moiseenko, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Natal da Luz, H.; Navarro, G.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Palma, R.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Tomás, A.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R. C.; White, J.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  3. Protein Folding-How and Why: By Hydrogen Exchange, Fragment Separation, and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Englander, S Walter; Mayne, Leland; Kan, Zhong-Yuan; Hu, Wenbing

    2016-07-01

    Advanced hydrogen exchange (HX) methodology can now determine the structure of protein folding intermediates and their progression in folding pathways. Key developments over time include the HX pulse labeling method with nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, the fragment separation method, the addition to it of mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, and recent improvements in the HX MS technique and data analysis. Also, the discovery of protein foldons and their role supplies an essential interpretive link. Recent work using HX pulse labeling with MS analysis finds that a number of proteins fold by stepping through a reproducible sequence of native-like intermediates in an ordered pathway. The stepwise nature of the pathway is dictated by the cooperative foldon unit construction of the protein. The pathway order is determined by a sequential stabilization principle; prior native-like structure guides the formation of adjacent native-like structure. This view does not match the funneled energy landscape paradigm of a very large number of folding tracks, which was framed before foldons were known and is more appropriate for the unguided residue-level search to surmount an initial kinetic barrier rather than for the overall unfolded-state to native-state folding pathway. PMID:27145881

  4. Numerical simulations of spiral galaxy formation and recoiling black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Javiera M.

    This thesis discusses two major topics in regard to the formation and evolution of galaxies and their central massive black holes (MBH). Part 1 explores the detectability of recoiling massive back as kinematically and spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGN). Chapter 3 is devoted to understanding the effect of an aspherical dark matter potential on the trajectories of the MBHs. This is done through collisionless N-body simulations of kicked black holes in the Via Lactea I halo and through a semi-analytical model that accounts for the evolution of the halo's triaxiality as a function of radius over cosmic time. We find that the return time of MBHs that wander through a differentially triaxial halo is significantly extended in comparison with spherical models. This is because their trajectories are become highly non-radial which prevents them from passing near the halo's center, where dynamical friction is most efficient. Chapter 4 puts recoiling MBHs into context. Here we carry out N-body + SPH simulations of recoiling MBHs in high-resolution galaxy mergers with mass ratios 1:1 (Mayer et al. 2007), 1:4, and 1:10 (Callegari et al. 2009). We study not only the trajectories and return times of these black holes, but also their detectability as spatially/kinematically offset AGN. We find that the probability of detection of these MBHs is extremely low. The detection of large kinematic offsets requires that the MBH have relative offset velocities Deltav > 600km s-1 at the time of observation. This is unlikely due to (1) the low probability of large recoils to occur from a general-relativistic viewpoint, and (2) the short time scale during which the MBH can sustain large velocities even if the initial kick is high. The large amounts of gas funneled to the center of the host potential during mergers also prevents MBHs from reaching large apocenter distances, which hampers their detection as spatially offset AGN, especially at high redshift when recoil events are

  5. A Measurement of the Recoil Polarization of Electroproduced {Lambda}(1116)

    SciTech Connect

    Simeon McAleer

    2002-01-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory was used to study the reaction e + p {yields} e{prime} + K{sup +} + {Lambda}(1116) for events where {Lambda}(1116) subsequently decayed via the channel {Lambda}(1116) {yields} p + {pi}{sup -}. Data were taken at incident electron beam energies of 2.5, 4.0, and 4.2 GeV during the 1999 E1C run period. They hyperon production spectra span the Q{sup 2} range from 0.5 to 2.8 GeV{sup 2} and nearly the entire range in the center of mass angles. The proton angular distribution in the {Lambda}(1116) rest frame is used to deduce the recoil polarization of the hyperon, and the W and cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} dependence of the recoil polarization will be presented. The data show sizeable negative polarizations for the {Lambda}(1116) as a function of both cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} and W.

  6. Recoil polarization and beam-recoil double polarization measurement of eta electroproduction on the proton in the region of the S11(1535) resonance.

    PubMed

    Merkel, H; Achenbach, P; Ayerbe Gayoso, C; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Cheymol, B; Distler, M O; Doria, L; Fonvieille, H; Friedrich, J; Janssens, P; Makek, M; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Sánchez Majos, S; Schlimme, B S; Sirca, S; Tiator, L; Walcher, Th; Weinriefer, M

    2007-09-28

    The beam-recoil double polarization P(x')(h) and P(z')(h) and the recoil polarization P(y') were measured for the first time for the p(e,e'p)eta reaction at a four-momentum transfer of Q(2) = 0.1 GeV(2)/c(2) and a center of mass production angle of theta = 120 degrees at the Mainz Microtron MAMI-C. With a center of mass energy range of 1500 MeV

  7. Cavity cooling below the recoil limit.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Matthias; Klinner, Julian; Keßler, Hans; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Conventional laser cooling relies on repeated electronic excitations by near-resonant light, which constrains its area of application to a selected number of atomic species prepared at moderate particle densities. Optical cavities with sufficiently large Purcell factors allow for laser cooling schemes, avoiding these limitations. Here, we report on an atom-cavity system, combining a Purcell factor above 40 with a cavity bandwidth below the recoil frequency associated with the kinetic energy transfer in a single photon scattering event. This lets us access a yet-unexplored regime of atom-cavity interactions, in which the atomic motion can be manipulated by targeted dissipation with sub-recoil resolution. We demonstrate cavity-induced heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequent cooling at particle densities and temperatures incompatible with conventional laser cooling. PMID:22767925

  8. Recoil Polarization for {delta} Excitation in Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.J.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C.C.; Chant, N.S.; Roos, P.G.; Roche, R.E.; McAleer, S.; Meekins, D.; Chai, Z.; Gayou, O.; Bertozzi, W.; Gilad, S.; Higinbotham, D.W.; Rvachev, M.; Sirca, S.; Suleiman, R.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Jones, M.K.

    2005-09-02

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W=1.23 GeV at Q{sup 2}=1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re (S{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+})=-(6.84{+-}0.15)% and Re (E{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+})=-(2.91{+-}0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M{sub 1+} dominance and l{sub {pi}}{<=}1 truncation.

  9. Recoil polarization for delta excitation in pion electroproduction.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J J; Roché, R E; Chai, Z; Jones, M K; Gayou, O; Sarty, A J; Frullani, S; Aniol, K; Beise, E J; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Boeglin, W U; Botto, T; Brash, E J; Breuer, H; Brown, E; Burtin, E; Calarco, J R; Cavata, C; Chang, C C; Chant, N S; Chen, J-P; Coman, M; Crovelli, D; De Leo, R; Dieterich, S; Escoffier, S; Fissum, K G; Garde, V; Garibaldi, F; Georgakopoulus, S; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glashausser, C; Hansen, J-O; Higinbotham, D W; Hotta, A; Huber, G M; Ibrahim, H; Iodice, M; de Jager, C W; Jiang, X; Klimenko, A; Kozlov, A; Kumbartzki, G; Kuss, M; Lagamba, L; Laveissière, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R A; Liyanage, N; Lolos, G J; Lourie, R W; Margaziotis, D J; Marie, F; Markowitz, P; McAleer, S; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Milbrath, B D; Mitchell, J; Nappa, J; Neyret, D; Perdrisat, C F; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V A; Pussieux, T; Ransome, R D; Roos, P G; Rvachev, M; Saha, A; Sirca, S; Suleiman, R; Strauch, S; Templon, J A; Todor, L; Ulmer, P E; Urciuoli, G M; Weinstein, L B; Wijesooriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2005-09-01

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W = 1.23 GeV at Q(2) = 1.0 (GeV/c)(2), obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re (S(1+)/M(1+)) = -(6.84 +/- 0.15)% and Re (E(1+)/M(1+)) = -(2.91 +/- 0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M1+ dominance and ll(pi) < or = 1 truncation. PMID:16196919

  10. Recoil Polarization for Delta Excitation in Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Kelly; R. E. Roche; Z. Chai; M. K. Jones; O. Gayou; A. J. Sarty; S. Frullani; K. Aniol; E. J. Beise; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; W. U. Boeglin; T. Botto; E. J. Brash; H. Breuer; E. Brown; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; C. Cavata; C. C. Chang; N. S. Chant; J.-P. Chen; M. Coman; D. Crovelli; R. De Leo; S. Dieterich; S. Escoffier; K. G. Fissum; V. Garde; F. Garibaldi; S. Georgakopoulus; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; J.-O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; A. Hotta; G. M. Huber; H. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; C. W. de Jager; X. Jiang; A. Klimenko; A. Kozlov; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; L. Lagamba; G. Laveissiere; J. J. LeRose; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; D. J. Margaziotis; F. Marie; P. Markowitz; S. McAleer; D. Meekins; R. Michaels; B. D. Milbrath; J. Mitchell; J. Nappa; D. Neyret; C. F. Perdrisat; M. Potokar; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; R. D. Ransome; P. G. Roos; M. Rvachev; A. Saha; S. Sirca; R. Suleiman; S. Strauch; J. A. Templon; L. Todor; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; and L. Zhu

    2005-08-01

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W=1.23 GeV at Q{sup 2}=1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re(S1+/M1+)=-(6.84+/-0.15)% and Re(E1+/M1+)=-(2.91+/-0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M1+ dominance and sp truncation.

  11. Isobar separation by time-of-flight mass spectrometry for low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Dickel, Timo; Czok, Ulrich; Geissel, Hans; Petrick, Martin; Reinheimer, Katrin; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Yavor, Mikhail I.

    2008-10-01

    A multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) system for low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities has been developed, which can be used for (i) isobar separation and (ii) direct mass measurements of very short-lived nuclei with half-lives of about 1 ms or longer, and (iii) for identification and diagnosis of the ion beam by mass spectrometry. The system has been designed and simulated, and individual subsystems have been built and characterized experimentally. An injection trap for cooling and bunching of the ion beam has been developed, and cooling times of less than one millisecond have been achieved. The performance of the MR-TOF-MS was characterized using the isobaric doublet of carbon monoxide and nitrogen molecular ions. A mass resolving power of 105 (FWHM) has been obtained even with an uncooled ion population. The separator capabilities of the MR-TOF-MS have been demonstrated by removing either carbon monoxide or nitrogen ions from the beam in a Bradbury-Nielsen Gate after a flight time of 320 μs. The separation power achieved is thus at least 7000 (FWHM) and increases for longer time-of-flight. An energy buncher stage has been designed that compresses the energy spread of the beam after the separation and facilitates efficient injection of the selected ions into an accumulation trap prior to transfer of the ions to experiments downstream of the MR-TOF-MS.

  12. Two-dimensional separation of ionic species by hyphenation of capillary ion chromatography × capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beutner, Andrea; Kochmann, Sven; Mark, Jonas Josef Peter; Matysik, Frank-Michael

    2015-03-17

    The separation of complex mixtures such as biological or environmental samples requires high peak capacities, which cannot be established with a single separation technique. Therefore, multidimensional systems are in demand. In this work, we present the hyphenation of the two most important (orthogonal) techniques in ion analysis, namely, ion chromatography (IC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE), in combination with mass spectrometry. A modulator was developed ensuring a well-controlled coupling of IC and CE separations. Proof-of-concept measurements were performed using a model system consisting of nucleotides and cyclic nucleotides. The data are presented in a multidimensional contour plot. Analyte stacking in the CE separation could be exploited on the basis of the fact that the suppressed IC effluent is pure water. PMID:25708415

  13. Sound production by a recoiling system in the pempheridae and terapontidae.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Eric; Fine, Michael L; Mok, Hin-Kiu

    2016-06-01

    Sound-producing mechanisms in fishes are extraordinarily diversified. We report here original mechanisms of three species from two families: the pempherid Pempheris oualensis, and the terapontids Terapon jarbua and Pelates quadrilineatus. All sonic mechanisms are built on the same structures. The rostral part of the swimbladder is connected to a pair of large sonic muscles from the head whereas the posterior part is fused with bony widenings of vertebral bodies. Two bladder regions are separated by a stretchable fenestra that allows forward extension of the anterior bladder during muscle contraction. A recoiling apparatus runs between the inner face of the anterior swimbladder and a vertebral body expansion. The elastic nature of the recoiling apparatus supports its role in helping the swimbladder to recover its initial position during sonic muscle relaxation. This system should aid fast contraction (between 100 and 250Hz) of sonic muscles. There are many differences between species in terms of the swimbladder and its attachments to the vertebral column, muscle origins, and morphology of the recoiling apparatus. The recoiling apparatus found in the phylogenetically-related families (Glaucosomatidae, Pempheridae, Terapontidae) could indicate a new character within the Percomorpharia. J. Morphol. 277:717-724, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27021214

  14. Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Separation by Polarity or Shape for the Characterization of Sugar-Based Nonionic Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Katzenmeyer, Bryan C; Hague, Shayna F; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) were interfaced with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and ion mobility (IM) separation to characterize a complex nonionic surfactant, consisting of a methylated glucose core (glucam) conjugated with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO(n)) branches that were partially esterified with stearic acid to form ethoxylated glucam (PEO(n)-glucam) stearates. Reverse-phase LC-MS afforded fast separation according to polarity into five major fractions. Accurate mass measurements of the ions in the mass spectra extracted from these fractions enabled conclusive identification of six components in the surfactant, including PEO(n)-glucam mono-, di-, and tristearates as well as free and esterified PEO(n) as byproducts. MS/MS experiments provided corroborating evidence for the fatty acid content in each fraction based on the number of stearic acid losses observed. With IM-MS, the total surfactant ions were separated according to charge and shape into four distinct bands. Extracted mass spectra confirmed the presence of two disaccharide stearates in the surfactant, which were undetectable by LC-MS. PEO(n)-glucam tristearates were, however, not observed upon IM-MS. Hence, LC-MS and IM-MS unveiled complementary compositional insight. With each method, certain components were particularly well separated from other ingredients (by either polarity or shape), to be detected with confidence. Consequently, combined LC-MS and IM-MS offer a superior approach for the characterization of surfactants and other amphiphilic polymers and for the differentiation of similarly composed amphiphilic blends. It is finally noteworthy that NH4(+) charges minimized chemical noise in MS mode and Li(+) charges maximized the fragmentation efficiency in MS/MS mode. PMID:26642239

  15. Protein separation and characterization by np-RP-HPLC followed by intact MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and peptide mass mapping analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dauly, Claire; Perlman, David H.; Costello, Catherine E.; McComb, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Due to their complexity, the separation of intact proteins from complex mixtures is an important step to comparative proteomics and the identification and characterization of the proteins by mass spectrometry (MS). In the study reported, we evaluated the use of non-porous-reversed-phase (np-RP) HPLC for intact protein separation prior to MS analyses. The separation system was characterized and compared to 1D-SDS-PAGE electrophoresis in terms of resolution and sensitivity. We demonstrate that np-RP HPLC protein separation is highly reproducible and provides intact protein fractions which can be directly analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS for intact molecular weight determination. An in-well digestion protocol was developed, allowing for rapid protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and resulted in comparable or improved peptide recovery compared with in-gel digestion. The np-RP sensitivity of detection by UV absorbance at 214 nm for intact proteins was at the low ng level and the sensitivity of peptide analysis by MALDI-TOF MS was in the 10–50 pg level. A membrane protein fraction was characterized to demonstrate application of this methodology. Among the identified proteins, multiple forms of vimentin were observed. Overall we demonstrate that np-RP HPLC followed by MALDI-TOF MS allows for rapid, sensitive and reproducible protein fractionation and very specific protein characterization by integration of PMF analysis with MS intact molecular weight information. PMID:16823977

  16. Thermal recoil force, telemetry, and the Pioneer anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Viktor T.; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2009-02-15

    Precision navigation of spacecraft requires accurate knowledge of small forces, including the recoil force due to anisotropies of thermal radiation emitted by spacecraft systems. We develop a formalism to derive the thermal recoil force from the basic principles of radiative heat exchange and energy-momentum conservation. The thermal power emitted by the spacecraft can be computed from engineering data obtained from flight telemetry, which yields a practical approach to incorporate the thermal recoil force into precision spacecraft navigation. Alternatively, orbit determination can be used to estimate the contribution of the thermal recoil force. We apply this approach to the Pioneer anomaly using a simulated Pioneer 10 Doppler data set.

  17. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fallows, Scott Mathew

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  18. Direct analysis of nine pharmaceuticals in culture media by use of cartridge separation with electrospray mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Fang; Ma, Mingsheng; Tam, Yun K

    2002-09-01

    A 2-cm cartridge has been used for separation before electrospray mass spectrometric analysis of pharmaceutical compounds in cell culture media, alleviating the need for sample extraction and desalting procedures. Nine representative pharmaceuticals listed in the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) were chosen as the candidate compounds and Hank's balanced salt solution with Hepes buffer (HBSS-Hepes buffer) was used as the cell-culture medium in an effort to study permeability of chemicals through cell monolayers. Effects of several conditions, e.g. pH and buffer concentration in the mobile phase, flow rate, and temperature on separation efficiency were examined. The nine pharmaceuticals were separated within 2 min by use of a 2-cm C(8) cartridge. Relative standard deviations (RSD) from repeated analysis within the same day or over five days were 0.03-0.2% for retention times and 0.6-5.3% for peak areas; antipyrine was used as internal standard. Calibration curves based on peak-area measurements were linear over the range 0.1-20 micro mol L(-1). The HBSS-Hepes buffer did not interfere with separation and detection; identical separation and peak intensity were obtained when the samples were separately prepared in distilled water or in the culture medium. PMID:12207243

  19. Resolving Trends in Antarctic Ice Sheet Mass Loss and Glacio-isostatic Adjustment Through Spatio-temporal Source-separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamber, J. L.; Schoen, N.; Zammit-Mangion, A.; Rougier, J.; Flament, T.; Luthcke, S. B.; Petrie, E. J.; Rémy, F.

    2013-12-01

    There remains considerable inconsistency between different methods and approaches for determining ice mass trends for Antarctica from satellite observations. There are three approaches that can provide near global coverage for mass trends: altimetry, gravimetry and mass budget calculations. All three approaches suffer from a source separation problem where other geophysical processes limit the capability of the method to resolve the origin and magnitude of a mass change. A fourth approach, GPS vertical motion, provides localised estimates of mass change due to elastic uplift and an indirect estimate of GIA. Each approach has different source separation issues and different spatio-temporal error characteristics. In principle, it should be possible to combine the data and process covariances to minimize the uncertainty in the solution and to produce robust, posterior errors for the trends. In practice, this is a challenging problem in statistics because of the large number of degrees of freedom, the variable spatial and temporal sampling between the different observations and the fact that some processes remain under-sampled, such as firn compaction. Here, we present a novel solution to this problem using the latest methods in statistical modelling of spatio-temporal processes. We use Bayesian hierarchical modelling and employ stochastic partial differential equations to capture our physical understanding of the key processes that influence our observations. Due to the huge number of observations involved (> 10^8) methods are required to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and care is required in treatment of the observations as they are not independent. Here, we focus mainly on the results rather than the full suite of methods and we present time evolving fields of surface mass balance, ice dynamic-driven mass loss, and firn compaction for the period 2003-2009, derived from a combination of ICESat, ENVISAT, GRACE, InSAR, GPS and regional climate model output

  20. Heat and mass transfer in porous media phase separation at temperatures below the lambda-point of He-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1986-01-01

    Newtonian fluid motion, coupled to heat transfer via latent heat of phase transition, is well known from numerous studies of condensation and boiling. Considerably less knowledge is available for vapor-liquid phase separation in the absence of gravity effect on the transport phenomena. The present studies are focused on heat and mass transfer associated with vapor-liquid phase separation required for long-term storage of the cryogen liquid He II in space vessels. Though space conditions are the dominant mode of interest in advanced equipment, e.g. IR telescopes, the systems may be operated in principle during terrestrial conditions. The latter are considered in the present work. It emphasizes the linear regime including an extrapolation based on variable thermophysical properties. Data taken with a phase separation approach show departures from the linear regime prediction. They agree with a transport equation proposed for the nonlinear, turbulent regime.

  1. Neutron star recoils from anisotropic supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, H.-T.; Mueller, E.

    1994-10-01

    Refering to recent hydrodynamical computations (Herant et al. 1992; Janka & Mueller 1993a) it is argued that neutron star kicks up to a few hundred km/s might be caused by a turbulent overturn of the matter between proto-neutron star and supernova shock during the early phase of the supernova explosion. These recoil speeds ("kick velocities") may be of the right size to explain the measured proper motions of most pulsars and do not require the presence of magnetic fields in the star. It is also possible that anisotropic neutrino emission associated with convective processes in the surface layers of the nascent neutron star (Burrows & Fryxell 1992; Janka & Mueller 1993b; Mueller 1993) provides an acceleration mechanism (Woosley 1987), although our estimates indicate that the maximum attainable velocities are around 200km/s. Yet, it turns out to be very unlikely that the considered stochastic asymmetries of supernova explosions are able to produce large enough recoils to account for pulsar velocities in excess of about 500km/s, which can be found in the samples of Harrison et al. (1993) and Taylor et al. (1993). It is concluded that other acceleration mechanisms have to be devised to explain the fast motion of PSR 2224+65 (transverse speed >=800km/s Cordes et al. 1993) and the high-velocities deduced from associations between supernova remnants and nearby young pulsars (e.g., Frail & Kulkarni 1991; Stewart et al. 1993; Caraveo 1993).

  2. α -decay chains of recoiled superheavy nuclei: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyti, Sawhney, Gudveen; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-05-01

    A systematic theoretical study of α -decay half-lives in the superheavy mass region of the periodic table of elements is carried out by extending the quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory based on the preformed cluster model (PCM) to include temperature (T ) dependence in its built-in preformation and penetration probabilities of decay fragments. Earlier, the α -decay chains of the isotopes of Z =115 were investigated by using the standard PCM for spontaneous decays, with"hot-optimum" orientation effects included, which required a constant scaling factor of 104 to approach the available experimental data. In the present approach of the PCM (T ≠0 ), the temperature effects are included via the recoil energy of the residual superheavy nucleus (SHN) left after x -neutron emission from the superheavy compound nucleus. The important result is that the α -decay half-lives calculated by the PCM (T ≠0 ) match the experimental data nearly exactly, without using any scaling factor of the type used in the PCM. Note that the PCM (T ≠0 ) is an equivalent of the dynamical cluster-decay model for heavy-ion collisions at angular momentum ℓ =0 . The only parameter of model is the neck-length parameter Δ R , which for the calculated half-lives of α -decay chains of various isotopes of Z =113 to 118 nuclei formed in "hot-fusion" reactions is found to be nearly constant, i.e., Δ R ≈0.95 ±0.05 fm for all the α -decay chains studied. The use of recoiled residue nucleus as a secondary heavy-ion beam for nuclear reactions has also been suggested in the past.

  3. Relativistic calculations of the nuclear recoil effect in highly charged Li-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubova, N. A.; Shabaev, V. M.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Plunien, G.

    2013-09-01

    Relativistic theory of the nuclear recoil effect in highly charged Li-like ions is considered within the Breit approximation. The normal mass shift (NMS) and the relativistic NMS (RNMS) are calculated by perturbation theory to zeroth and first orders in the parameter 1/Z. The calculations are performed using the dual kinetic balance method with the basis functions constructed from B-splines. The results of the calculations are compared with the theoretical values obtained by other methods.

  4. New reagents for enhanced liquid chromatographic separation and charging of intact protein ions for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Valeja, Santosh G; Tipton, Jeremiah D; Emmett, Mark R; Marshall, Alan G

    2010-09-01

    Electrospray ionization produces multiply charged ions, thereby lowering the mass-to-charge ratio for peptides and small proteins to a range readily accessed by quadrupole ion trap, orbitrap, and ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass analyzers (m/z = 400-2000). For Fourier transform mass analyzers (orbitrap and ICR), higher charge also improves signal-to-noise ratio, mass resolution, and mass accuracy. Addition of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) or sulfolane has previously been shown to increase the charge states of proteins. Moreover, polar aprotic dimethylformamide (DMF) improves chromatographic separation of proteolytic peptides for mass analysis of solution-phase protein hydrogen/deuterium exchange for improved (78-96%) sequence coverage. Here, we show that addition of each of the various modifiers (DMF, thiodiglycol, dimethylacetamide, dimethylsulfoxide, and N-methylpyrrolidone) can significantly increase the charge states of proteins up to 78 kDa. Moreover, incorporation of the same modifiers into reversed-phase liquid chromatography solvents improves sensitivity, charging, and chromatographic resolution for intact proteins. PMID:20704305

  5. Constraints on the Nature of CID-42: Recoil Kick or Supermassive Black Hole Pair?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blecha, Laura; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The galaxy CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, is a highly unusual object. An apparent galaxy merger remnant, it displays signatures of both an inspiraling, kiloparsecscale active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair and of a recoiling AGN with a kick velocity approximately greater than 1300 km s(exp -1). Among recoiling AGN candidates, CID-42 alone has both spatial offsets (in optical and X-ray bands) and spectroscopic offsets. In order to constrain the relative likelihood of both scenarios, we develop models using hydrodynamic galaxy merger simulations coupled with radiative transfer calculations. Our gas-rich, major merger models are generally well matched to the galactic morphology and to the inferred stellar mass and star formation rate. We show that a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in CID-42 should be observable as an AGN at the time of observation. However, in order for the recoiling AGN to produce narrow-line emission, it must be observed shortly after the kick while it still inhabits a dense gaseous region, implying a large total kick velocity (vk approximately greater than 2000 km s(exp -1)). For the dual AGN scenario, an unusually large broad-line offset is required, and the best match to the observed morphology requires a galaxy that is less luminous than CID-42. Further, the lack of X-ray emission from one of the two optical nuclei is not easily attributed to an intrinsically quiescent SMBH or to a Compton-thick galactic environment. While the current data do not allow either the recoiling or the dual AGN scenario for CID-42 to be excluded, our models highlight the most relevant parameters for distinguishing these possibilities with future observations. In particular, high-quality, spatially-resolved spectra that can pinpoint the origin of the broad and narrow line features will be critical for determining the nature of this unique source.

  6. Constraints on the nature of CID-42: recoil kick or supermassive black hole pair?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    The galaxy CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, is a highly unusual object. As an apparent galaxy merger remnant, it displays signatures of both an inspiraling, kiloparsec-scale active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair and of a recoiling AGN with a kick velocity of ≳ 1300 km s-1. Among recoiling AGN candidates, CID-42 alone has both spatial offsets (in optical and X-ray bands) and spectroscopic offsets. In order to constrain the relative likelihood of both scenarios, we develop models using hydrodynamic galaxy merger simulations coupled with radiative transfer calculations. Our gas-rich, major merger models are generally well matched to the galactic morphology and to the inferred stellar mass and star formation rate. We show that a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in CID-42 should be observable as an AGN at the time of observation. However, in order for the recoiling AGN to produce narrow-line emission, it must be observed shortly after the kick while it still inhabits a dense gaseous region, implying a large total kick velocity (vk ≳ 2000 km s-1). For the dual AGN scenario, an unusually large broad-line offset is required, and the best match to the observed morphology requires a galaxy that is less luminous than CID-42. Further, the lack of X-ray emission from one of the two optical nuclei is not easily attributed to an intrinsically quiescent SMBH or to a Compton thick galactic environment. While the current data do not allow either the recoiling or the dual AGN scenario for CID-42 to be excluded, our models highlight the most relevant parameters for distinguishing these possibilities with future observations. In particular, high-quality, spatially resolved spectra that can pinpoint the origin of the broad-line and narrow-line features will be critical for determining the nature of this unique source.

  7. Target protein separation and preparation by free-flow electrophoresis coupled with charge-to-mass ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiao-Yi; Guo, Chen-Gang; Yan, Jian; Zhang, Qiang; Xie, Hai-Yang; Jahan, Sharmin; Fan, Liu-Yin; Xiao, Hua; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2015-06-01

    Herein, a novel strategy was developed to separate and prepare target protein from complex sample by free-flow electrophoresis (FFE), which mainly based on the charge-to-mass ratio (C/M) analysis of proteins. The C/M values of three model proteins, namely Cytochrome C (Cyt C), myoglobin (Mb) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were analyzed under different pH and the separation of these proteins was predicted by CLC Protein Workbench software. Series of experiments were performed to validate the proposed method. The obtained data showed high accordance with our prediction. In addition, the chamber buffer (CB) of FFE system was optimized to improve the resolution of separation. Meanwhile, in order to evaluate the analytical performance of the proposed method, Cyt C was extracted from swine heart and further separated by FFE based on C/M analysis. Results showed that Cyt C was completely separated from the crude sample and a purity of 96.9% was achieved. The activity of prepared Cyt C was 98.3%, which indicate that the proposed method is promising in a wide variety of research areas where the native properties of proteins should be maintained for downstream analysis. PMID:25890440

  8. Strong Lensing by Subhalos in the Dwarf Galaxy Mass Range. I. Image Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackrisson, E.; Riehm, T.; Möller, O.; Wiik, K.; Nurmi, P.

    2008-09-01

    The cold dark matter scenario predicts that a large number of dark subhalos should be located within the halo of each Milky Way-sized galaxy. One telltale signature of such dark subhalos could be additional milliarcsecond-scale image splitting of quasars previously known to be multiply imaged on arcsecond scales. Here we estimate the image separations for the subhalo density profiles favored by recent N-body simulations and compare these to the angular resolution of both existing and upcoming observational facilities. We find that the image separations produced are very sensitive to the exact subhalo density profile assumed, but in all cases they are considerably smaller than previous estimates based on the premise that subhalos can be approximated by singular isothermal spheres. Only the most optimistic subhalo models produce image separations that would be detectable with current technology, and many models produce image separations that will remain unresolved with all telescopes expected to become available in the foreseeable future. Detections of dark subhalos through image-splitting effects will therefore be far more challenging than currently believed, albeit not necessarily impossible.

  9. On the minimum core mass for giant planet formation at wide separations

    SciTech Connect

    Piso, Ana-Maria A.; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2014-05-01

    In the core accretion hypothesis, giant planets form by gas accretion onto solid protoplanetary cores. The minimum (or critical) core mass to form a gas giant is typically quoted as 10 M {sub ⊕}. The actual value depends on several factors: the location in the protoplanetary disk, atmospheric opacity, and the accretion rate of solids. Motivated by ongoing direct imaging searches for giant planets, this study investigates core mass requirements in the outer disk. To determine the fastest allowed rates of gas accretion, we consider solid cores that no longer accrete planetesimals, as this would heat the gaseous envelope. Our spherical, two-layer atmospheric cooling model includes an inner convective region and an outer radiative zone that matches onto the disk. We determine the minimum core mass for a giant planet to form within a typical disk lifetime of 3 Myr. The minimum core mass declines with disk radius, from ∼8.5 M {sub ⊕} at 5 AU to ∼3.5 M {sub ⊕} at 100 AU, with standard interstellar grain opacities. Lower temperatures in the outer disk explain this trend, while variations in disk density are less influential. At all distances, a lower dust opacity or higher mean molecular weight reduces the critical core mass. Our non-self-gravitating, analytic cooling model reveals that self-gravity significantly affects early atmospheric evolution, starting when the atmosphere is only ∼10% as massive as the core.

  10. A mass-balance model to separate and quantify colloidal and solute redistributions in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, C.R.; Chadwick, O.A.; Hartshorn, A.S.; Khomo, L.M.; Chorover, J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of weathering and pedogenesis have long used calculations based upon low solubility index elements to determine mass gains and losses in open systems. One of the questions currently unanswered in these settings is the degree to which mass is transferred in solution (solutes) versus suspension (colloids). Here we show that differential mobility of the low solubility, high field strength (HFS) elements Ti and Zr can trace colloidal redistribution, and we present a model for distinguishing between mass transfer in suspension and solution. The model is tested on a well-differentiated granitic catena located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Ti and Zr ratios from parent material, soil and colloidal material are substituted into a mixing equation to quantify colloidal movement. The results show zones of both colloid removal and augmentation along the catena. Colloidal losses of 110kgm-2 (-5% relative to parent material) are calculated for one eluviated soil profile. A downslope illuviated profile has gained 169kgm-2 (10%) colloidal material. Elemental losses by mobilization in true solution are ubiquitous across the catena, even in zones of colloidal accumulation, and range from 1418kgm-2 (-46%) for an eluviated profile to 195kgm-2 (-23%) at the bottom of the catena. Quantification of simultaneous mass transfers in solution and suspension provide greater specificity on processes within soils and across hillslopes. Additionally, because colloids include both HFS and other elements, the ability to quantify their redistribution has implications for standard calculations of soil mass balances using such index elements. ?? 2011.

  11. Reaction mechanisms in the system {sup 20}Ne+{sup 165}Ho: Measurement and analysis of forward recoil range distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Ali, R.; Ansari, M. Afzal; Rashid, M. H.; Guin, R.; Das, S. K.

    2009-05-15

    Keeping in view the study of complete and incomplete fusion of heavy ions with a target, the forward recoil range distributions of several evaporation residues produced at 164 MeV {sup 20}Ne-ion beam energy have been measured for the system {sup 20}Ne+{sup 165}Ho. The recoil catcher activation technique followed by off-line gamma spectroscopy has been employed. Measured forward recoil range distributions of these evaporation residues show evidence of several incomplete fusion channels in addition to complete fusion. The entire and partial linear momentum transfers inferred from these recoil range distributions were used to identify the evaporation residues formed by complete and incomplete fusion mechanisms. The results indicate the occurrence of incomplete fusion involving the breakup of {sup 20}Ne into {sup 4}He+{sup 16}O and/or {sup 8}Be+{sup 12}C followed by fusion of one of the fragments with target nucleus {sup 165}Ho. Complete and incomplete fusion reaction channels have been identified in the production of various evaporation residues and an attempt has been made to separate out relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion components from the analysis of the measured recoil range distribution data. The total contribution of complete and incomplete fusion channels has also been estimated.

  12. Chemical Effects in the Separation Process of a Differential Mobility / Mass Spectrometer System

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Covey, Thomas R.; Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2013-01-01

    In differential mobility spectrometry (DMS, also referred to as high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry, FAIMS), ions are separated on the basis of the difference in their mobility under high and low electric fields. The addition of polar modifiers to the gas transporting the ions through a DMS enhances the formation of clusters in a field-dependent way and thus amplifies the high and low field mobility difference resulting in increased peak capacity and separation power. Observations of the increase in mobility field dependence are consistent with a cluster formation model, also referred to as the dynamic cluster-decluster model. The uniqueness of chemical interactions that occur between an ion and cluster-forming neutrals increases the selectivity of the separation and the depression of low-field mobility relative to high-field mobility increases the compensation voltage and peak capacity. The effect of polar modifiers on the peak capacity across a broad range of chemicals has been investigated. We discuss the theoretical underpinnings which explain the observed effects. In contrast to the result from polar modifiers, we find that using mixtures of inert gases as the transport gas improve resolution by reducing peak width but has very little effect on peak capacity or selectivity. Inert gases do not cluster and thus do not reduce low field mobility relative to high-field mobility. The observed changes in the differential mobility α parameter exhibited by different classes of compounds when the transport gas contains polar modifiers or has a significant fraction of inert gas can be explained on the basis of the physical mechanisms involved in the separation processes. PMID:20121077

  13. First spatial separation of a heavy ion isomeric beam with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Ayet San Andres, S.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Hornung, C.; Miskun, I.; Pietri, S.; Purushothaman, S.; Reiter, M. P.; Rink, A.-K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.; Diwisch, M.; Greiner, F.; Heiße, F.; Knöbel, R.; Lippert, W.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Prochazka, A.; Ranjan, M.; Takechi, M.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.

    2015-05-01

    211Po ions in the ground and isomeric states were produced via 238U projectile fragmentation at 1000 MeV/u. The 211Po ions were spatially separated in flight from the primary beam and other reaction products by the fragment separator FRS. The ions were energy-bunched, slowed-down and thermalized in a gas-filled cryogenic stopping cell (CSC). They were then extracted from the CSC and injected into a high-resolution multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS). The excitation energy of the isomer and, for the first time, the isomeric-to-ground state ratio were determined from the measured mass spectrum. In the subsequent experimental step, the isomers were spatially separated from the ions in the ground state by an ion deflector and finally collected with a silicon detector for decay spectroscopy. This pioneering experimental result opens up unique perspectives for isomer-resolved studies. With this versatile experimental method new isomers with half-lives longer than a few milliseconds can be discovered and their decay properties can be measured with highest sensitivity and selectivity. These experiments can be extended to studies with isomeric beams in nuclear reactions.

  14. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  15. Masses and proton separation energies obtained from Q{sub a} and Q{sub p} measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C. N.; Woods, P. J.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Blumenthal, D. J.; Brown, L. T.; Carpenter, L. F.; Henderson, D. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Penttila, H. T.; Seweryniak, D.

    2000-10-20

    For many nuclei beyond the proton drip line in the Z>72, N>82 region, both proton and a emission are energetically allowed. In the case of some proton emitters, there are {alpha}-decay chains emanating from both parent and daughter nuclei. This means that if the mass excess of one member of an {alpha}-decay chain is known, then the mass excesses for all members of both chains can be obtained. In addition, proton separation energies may be derived for nuclei in the {alpha}-decay chain of the proton emitter. The method of time- and space-correlations also allows the identification of isomeric states in these nuclei. As an example, a large number of mass excesses and proton separation energies for ground and metastable states have been derived from Q{sub a} and Q{sub p} values obtained from the proton emitters {sup 165,166,167}Ir, {sup 171}Au, {sup 177}Tl, and their daughters.

  16. Ion separation in imperfect fields of the quadrupole mass analyzer Part I. Ion beam dynamics in the phase-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Vladimir V.

    1995-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of ion separation in imperfect fields of the quadrupole mass analyzer are discussed by applying analysis of the beam dynamics in a phase-space. The analytical method which uses an approximate solution of the Hill equation with a small heterogeneous part which indicates that the trap mechanism of ion separation is conditioned by the properties of characteristic solutions is improved. These solutions are reduced to an approximate solution in the form of a general solution of a homogeneous Mathieu equation with combined factors taking into account a small heterogeneous part which defines the region of beam capture (acceptance) in a phase-space. The estimation criterion of simulation accuracy is the relative deviation of an operating point on the Mathieu diagram from the top of a stability triangle. The infringement of independence principle of ion oscillations about each of the positional axes caused by distortions increases the cross-sectional area of the beam. The beam is cut out by the mass analyzer aperture. This causes transmission losses which depend on phase. Therefore, the ion current at the mass analyzer exit is amplitude modulated by the frequency of the alternate component of field. The maximum current is at zero phase. The modulation depth is proportional to the relative value of the distortions.

  17. Determination of the extraction efficiency for 233U source α-recoil ions from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v. d. Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2015-03-01

    Following the α decay of 233U, 229Th recoil ions are shown to be extracted in a significant amount from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell. The produced recoil ions and subsequent daughter nuclei are mass purified with the help of a customized quadrupole mass spectrometer. The combined extraction and mass purification efficiency for 229Th3+ is determined via MCP-based measurements and via the direct detection of the 229Th α decay. A large value of (10±2)% for the combined extraction and mass purification efficiency of 229Th3+ is obtained at a mass resolution of about 1u/e. In addition to 229Th, also other α-recoil ions of the 233, 232U decay chains are addressed.

  18. PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS (PALMS). II. A LOW-MASS COMPANION TO THE YOUNG M DWARF GJ 3629 SEPARATED BY 0.''2

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-09-01

    We present the discovery of a 0.''2 companion to the young M dwarf GJ 3629 as part of our high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets around low-mass stars with the Keck-II and Subaru telescopes. Two epochs of imaging confirm that the pair is comoving and reveal signs of orbital motion. The primary exhibits saturated X-ray emission which, together with its UV photometry from GALEX, points to an age younger than {approx}300 Myr. At these ages the companion lies below the hydrogen burning limit with a model-dependent mass of 46 {+-} 16 M{sub Jup} based on the system's photometric distance of 22 {+-} 3 pc. Resolved YJHK photometry of the pair indicates a spectral type of M7 {+-} 2 for GJ 3629 B. With a projected separation of 4.4 {+-} 0.6 AU and an estimated orbital period of 21 {+-} 5 yr, GJ 3629 AB is likely to yield a dynamical mass in the next several years, making it one of only a handful of brown dwarfs to have a measured mass and an age constrained from the stellar primary.

  19. A Miniature System for Separating Aerosol Particles and Measuring Mass Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dao; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chen, Chuin-Shan; Dai, Chi-An

    2010-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a new sensing system which consists of two virtual impactors and two quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors for measuring particle mass concentration and size distribution. The virtual impactors utilized different inertial forces of particles in air flow to classify different particle sizes. They were designed to classify particle diameter, d, into three different ranges: d < 2.28 μm, 2.28 μm ≤ d ≤ 3.20 μm, d > 3.20 μm. The QCM sensors were coated with a hydrogel, which was found to be a reliable adhesive for capturing aerosol particles. The QCM sensor coated with hydrogel was used to measure the mass loading of particles by utilizing its characteristic of resonant frequency shift. An integrated system has been demonstrated. PMID:22319317

  20. Recent advances in enrichment and separation strategies for mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chenxi; Zhong, Xuefei; Li, Lingjun

    2016-01-01

    Due to the significance of protein phosphorylation in various biological processes and signaling events, new analytical techniques for enhanced phosphoproteomics have been rapidly introduced in recent years. The combinatorial use of the phospho-specific enrichment techniques and prefractionation methods prior to MS analysis enables comprehensive profiling of the phosphoproteome and facilitates deciphering the critical roles that phosphorylation plays in signaling pathways in various biological systems. This review places special emphasis on the recent five-year (2009–2013) advances for enrichment and separation techniques that have been utilized for phosphopeptides prior to MS analysis. PMID:24687451

  1. Atom interferometric studies of light scattering - A new technique for measuring atomic recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Scott

    This dissertation presents two techniques for measuring the atomic recoil frequency, oq, using a single-state atom interferometer that utilizes a dilute cloud of laser-cooled 85Rb atoms. An important motivation for these measurements is that o q, which is related to the ratio of Planck's constant and the atomic mass of rubidium hmRb , can be used to infer the atomic fine structure constant, alpha. The two techniques presented here involve time domain measurements carried out with standing-wave laser fields that manipulate atoms in the same atomic ground state and exploit the wave nature of cold atoms. The first technique uses two off-resonant standing-wave pulses to interfere momentum states so that the recoil frequency can be determined. However, to model the signal shape it is necessary to include effects of spontaneous emission during the interaction with light and the spatial profile of the laser beam. The second technique provides a robust alternative approach for measuring the recoil frequency because the signal shape is considerably simpler and can be modeled easily. We report measurements of atomic recoil using both techniques that are precise to ˜ 1 part per million. The precision was limited mainly by the time scale of the experiment (˜ 20 ms) due to the presence of magnetic field gradients. The dissertation also discusses recent improvements that have extended the time scale to the transit time limit for cold atoms. This is the time of travel of cold atoms through the region of interaction defined by the laser beams. The interferometer uses two standing-wave pulses separated by time T to put the atoms in a superposition of momentum states. Interference between momentum states produce a density grating echo signal at time 2 T. The echo time, 2T, corresponds to the time at which the Doppler phases of the momentum states associated with all atoms in the sample cancel. The echo technique is, therefore, a general method to overcome the effect of the

  2. Rapid chiral separation of racemic cetirizine in human plasma using subcritical fluid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eom, Han Young; Kang, Myunghee; Kang, Seung Woo; Kim, Unyong; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Junghyun; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Jung, Yura; Yang, Dong-Hyug; Han, Sang Beom

    2016-01-01

    A method for fast chiral separation of cetirizine and quantitation of levocetirizine in human plasma using subcritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. The chromatographic separation was performed using a Chiralpak IE column (2.1 mm×150 mm, 5 μm) with an isocratic elution of CO2/organic modifier (55/45, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.85 mL/min. The organic modifier was composed of water/methanol (5/95, v/v). The makeup flow was optimized at water/methanol (10/90, v/v) and 0.2 mL/min. The most influential parameters on the separation of cetirizine affecting resolution, retention time and sensitivity were selected by fractional factorial design. The 3 selected factors were optimized by response surface methodology. Tandem mass spectrometry was used at electrospray ionization, positive ion mode, and multiple-reaction monitoring mode. Isotope-labeled cetirizine-d4 was used as the internal standard. The sample preparation of human plasma was conducted by solid phase extraction of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) type. The developed method was validated for selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery, limit of quantitation (LOQ), and limit of detection (LOD). The real human plasma samples were analyzed and the pharmacokinetic results were compared with results of previous research. The developed method was found to be reliable based on the similarity between the results of the current and previous methods. The chiral separation for cetirizine and economic feasibility were compared with those of previous studies using normal phase-HPLC or reversed phase-HPLC. The established analytical method could be successfully applied to pharmacokinetic study with reduction in the analysis time and costs. PMID:26440285

  3. Control of Chemical Effects in the Separation Process of a Differential Mobility / Mass Spectrometer System

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2013-01-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) separates ions on the basis of the difference in their migration rates under high versus low electric fields. Several models describing the physical nature of this field mobility dependence have been proposed but emerging as a dominant effect is the clusterization model sometimes referred to as the dynamic cluster-decluster model. DMS resolution and peak capacity is strongly influenced by the addition of modifiers which results in the formation and dissociation of clusters. This process increases selectivity due to the unique chemical interactions that occur between an ion and neutral gas phase molecules. It is thus imperative to bring the parameters influencing the chemical interactions under control and find ways to exploit them in order to improve the analytical utility of the device. In this paper we describe three important areas that need consideration in order to stabilize and capitalize on the chemical processes that dominate a DMS separation. The first involves means of controlling the dynamic equilibrium of the clustering reactions with high concentrations of specific reagents. The second area involves a means to deal with the unwanted heterogeneous cluster ion populations emitted from the electrospray ionization process that degrade resolution and sensitivity. The third involves fine control of parameters that affect the fundamental collision processes, temperature and pressure. PMID:20065515

  4. Size, separation, structural order, and mass density of molecules packing in water and ice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongli; Zhang, Xi; Ma, Zengsheng; Li, Wen; Zhou, Yichun; Zhou, Ji; Zheng, Weitao; Sun, Chang Q.

    2013-01-01

    The structural symmetry and molecular separation in water and ice remain uncertain. We present herewith a solution to unifying the density, the structure order and symmetry, the size (H-O length dH), and the separation (dOO = dL + dH or the O:H length dL) of molecules packing in water and ice in terms of statistic mean. This solution reconciles: i) the dL and the dH symmetrization of the O:H-O bond in compressed ice, ii) the dOO relaxation of cooling water and ice and, iii) the dOO expansion of a dimer and between molecules at water surface. With any one of the dOO, the density ρ(g·cm−3), the dL, and the dH, as a known input, one can resolve the rest quantities using this solution that is probing conditions or methods independent. We clarified that: i) liquid water prefers statistically the mono-phase of tetrahedrally-coordinated structure with fluctuation, ii) the low-density phase (supersolid phase as it is strongly polarized with even lower density) exists only in regions consisting molecules with fewer than four neighbors and, iii) repulsion between electron pairs on adjacent oxygen atoms dictates the cooperative relaxation of the segmented O:H-O bond, which is responsible for the performance of water and ice. PMID:24141643

  5. Nuclear Recoil Effect in the Lamb Shift of Light Hydrogenlike Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    We report high-precision calculations of the nuclear recoil effect to the Lamb shift of hydrogenlike atoms to the first order in the electron-nucleus mass ratio and to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter Z α . The results are in excellent agreement with the known terms of the Z α expansion and allow an accurate identification of the nonperturbative higher-order remainder. For hydrogen, the higher-order remainder was found to be much larger than anticipated. This result resolves the long-standing disagreement between the numerical all-order and analytical Z α -expansion approaches to the recoil effect and completely removes the second-largest theoretical uncertainty in the hydrogen Lamb shift of the 1 S and 2 S states.

  6. A gun recoil system employing a magnetorheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. C.; Wang, J.

    2012-10-01

    This research aims to design and control a full scale gun recoil buffering system which works under real firing impact loading conditions. A conventional gun recoil absorber is replaced with a controllable magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper. Through dynamic analysis of the gun recoil system, a theoretical model for optimal design and control of the MR fluid damper for impact loadings is derived. The optimal displacement, velocity and optimal design rules are obtained. By applying the optimal design theory to protect against impact loadings, an MR fluid damper for a full scale gun recoil system is designed and manufactured. An experimental study is carried out on a firing test rig which consists of a 30 mm caliber, multi-action automatic gun with an MR damper mounted to the fixed base through a sliding guide. Experimental buffering results under passive control and optimal control are obtained. By comparison, optimal control is better than passive control, because it produces smaller variation in the recoil force while achieving less displacement of the recoil body. The optimal control strategy presented in this paper is open-loop with no feedback system needed. This means that the control process is sensor-free. This is a great benefit for a buffering system under impact loading, especially for a gun recoil system which usually works in a harsh environment.

  7. Searching for Scatterers: High-Contrast Imaging of Young Stars Hosting Wide-Separation Planetary-Mass Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Marta L.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Hinkley, Sasha; Mawet, Dimitri; Nielsen, Eric L.; Blunt, Sarah C.

    2016-08-01

    We have conducted an angular differential imaging survey with NIRC2 at Keck in search of close-in substellar companions to a sample of seven systems with confirmed planetary-mass companions (PMCs) on wide orbits (>50 au). These wide-separation PMCs pose significant challenges to all three possible formation mechanisms: core accretion plus scattering, disk instability, and turbulent fragmentation. We explore the possibility that these companions formed closer in and were scattered out to their present-day locations by searching for other massive bodies at smaller separations. The typical sensitivity for this survey is ΔK ∼ 12.5 at 1″. We identify eight candidate companions, whose masses would reach as low as one Jupiter mass if gravitationally bound. From our multi-epoch astrometry we determine that seven of these are conclusively background objects, while the eighth near DH Tau is ambiguous and requires additional monitoring. We rule out the presence of >7 M Jup bodies in these systems down to 15–50 au that could be responsible for scattering. This result combined with the totality of evidence suggests that dynamical scattering is unlikely to have produced this population of PMCs. We detect orbital motion from the companions ROXs 42B b and ROXs 12 b, and from this determine 95% upper limits on the companions’ eccentricities of 0.58 and 0.83 respectively. Finally, we find that the 95% upper limit on the occurrence rate of additional planets with masses between 5 and 15 M Jup outside of 40 au in systems with PMCs is 54%.

  8. Searching for Scatterers: High-Contrast Imaging of Young Stars Hosting Wide-Separation Planetary-Mass Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Marta L.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Hinkley, Sasha; Mawet, Dimitri; Nielsen, Eric L.; Blunt, Sarah C.

    2016-08-01

    We have conducted an angular differential imaging survey with NIRC2 at Keck in search of close-in substellar companions to a sample of seven systems with confirmed planetary-mass companions (PMCs) on wide orbits (>50 au). These wide-separation PMCs pose significant challenges to all three possible formation mechanisms: core accretion plus scattering, disk instability, and turbulent fragmentation. We explore the possibility that these companions formed closer in and were scattered out to their present-day locations by searching for other massive bodies at smaller separations. The typical sensitivity for this survey is ΔK ˜ 12.5 at 1″. We identify eight candidate companions, whose masses would reach as low as one Jupiter mass if gravitationally bound. From our multi-epoch astrometry we determine that seven of these are conclusively background objects, while the eighth near DH Tau is ambiguous and requires additional monitoring. We rule out the presence of >7 M Jup bodies in these systems down to 15–50 au that could be responsible for scattering. This result combined with the totality of evidence suggests that dynamical scattering is unlikely to have produced this population of PMCs. We detect orbital motion from the companions ROXs 42B b and ROXs 12 b, and from this determine 95% upper limits on the companions’ eccentricities of 0.58 and 0.83 respectively. Finally, we find that the 95% upper limit on the occurrence rate of additional planets with masses between 5 and 15 M Jup outside of 40 au in systems with PMCs is 54%.

  9. Application of combined mass spectrometry and partial amino acid sequence to the identification of gel-separated proteins.

    PubMed

    Patterson, S D; Thomas, D; Bradshaw, R A

    1996-05-01

    The combined use of peptide mass information with amino acid sequence information derived by chemical sequencing or mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches provides a powerful means of protein identification. We have used a two-part strategy to identify proteins from nerve growth factor (NGF)-stimulated rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 cell lysates that associate with the adaptor protein Shc (Shc homologous and collagen protein). Initial experiments with metabolically radiolabeled cell extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed a number of proteins that coimmunoprecipitated with anti-Shc antibody compared with control (unstimulated) cell extracts. The experiment was scaled up and cell lysate from NGF-stimulated PC-12 cells was applied to a glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-Shc affinity column, eluted, separated by SDS-PAGE and blotted to Immobilon-CD. The blotted proteins were proteolytically digested in situ, and the masses obtained from the extracted peptides were used in a peptide-mass search program in an attempt to identify the protein. Even if a strong candidate was found using this search, an additional step was performed to confirm the identification. The mixtures were fractionated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and subjected to chemical sequencing to obtain (partial) sequence information, or post-source decay (PSD-) matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization (MALDI)-MS to obtain sequence-specific fragment ions. This data was used in a peptide-sequence tag search to confirm the identity of the proteins. This combined approach allowed identification of four proteins of M(r) 43,000 to 200,000. In one case the identified protein clearly did not correspond to the radiolabeled band, but to a protein contaminant from the column. The advantages and pitfalls of the approach are discussed. PMID:8783013

  10. Electrophoretic separation techniques and their hyphenation to mass spectrometry in biological inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Hannah; Grabmann, Gerlinde; Hartinger, Christian G

    2016-04-01

    Electrophoretic methods have been widely applied in research on the roles of metal complexes in biological systems. In particular, CE, often hyphenated to a sensitive MS detector, has provided valuable information on the modes of action of metal-based pharmaceuticals, and more recently new methods have been added to the electrophoretic toolbox. The range of applications continues to expand as a result of enhanced CE-to-MS interfacing, with sensitivity often at picomolar level, and evolved separation modes allowing for innovative sample analysis. This article is a followup to previous reviews about CE methods in metallodrug research (Electrophoresis, 2003, 24, 2023-2037; Electrophoresis, 2007, 28, 3436-3446; Electrophoresis, 2012, 33, 622-634), also providing a comprehensive overview of metal species studied by electrophoretic methods hyphenated to MS. It highlights the latest CE developments, takes a sneak peek into gel electrophoresis, traces biomolecule labeling, and focuses on the importance of early-stage drug development. PMID:26643265

  11. Kinematically Identified Recoiling Supermassive Black Hole Candidates in SDSS QSOs with z > 0.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-C.; Evans, A. S.; Stierwalt, S.; Privon, G. C.

    2016-06-01

    We have performed a spectral decomposition to search for recoiling supermassive black holes (rSMBHs) in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) with z < 0.25. Out of 1271 QSOs, we have identified 26 rSMBH candidates that are recoiling toward us. The projected recoil velocities range from ‑76 to ‑307 km s‑1 with a mean of ‑149 ± 58 km s‑1. Most of the rSMBH candidates are hosted by gas-rich luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs)/ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), but only 23% of them show signs of tidal features, which suggests that a majority of them are advanced mergers. We find that the black hole masses M BH of the rSMBH candidates are on average ∼5 times smaller than those of their stationary counterparts and cause a scatter in the {M}{BH}-{σ }\\ast relation. The Eddington ratios of all of the rSMBH candidates are larger than 0.1, with a mean of 0.52 ± 0.27, suggesting that they are actively accreting mass. Velocity shifts in high-excitation coronal lines suggest that the rSMBH candidates are recoiling with an average velocity of about ‑265 km s‑1. The electron density in the narrow line region of the H ii rSMBH candidates is about 1/10 of that in active galactic nucleus (AGN) rSMBH candidates, probably because the AGN in the former was more spatially offset than that in the latter. The estimated spatial offsets between the rSMBH candidate and the center of the host galaxy range from 0.″21 to 1.″97 and need to be confirmed spatially with high-resolution adaptive optics imaging observations.

  12. Enantiomeric separation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sung-Tong; Nolvachai, Yada; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Chiral comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC) coupled to quadrupole-accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was evaluated for its capability to report the chiral composition of several monoterpenes, namely, α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene in cardamom oil. Enantiomers in a standard mixture were fully resolved by direct enantiomeric-GC analysis with a 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-t-butylsilyl derivatized β-cyclodextrin phase; however, the (+)-(R)-limonene enantiomer in cardamom oil was overlapped with other background components including cymene and cineole. Verification of (+)-(R)-limonene components based on characteristic ions at m/z 136, 121, and 107 acquired by chiral single-dimension GC-QTOFMS in the alternate MS/MSMS mode of operation was unsuccessful due to similar parent/daughter ions generated by interfering or co-eluting cymene and cineole. Column phases SUPELCOWAX, SLB-IL111, HP-88, and SLB-IL59, were incorporated as the second dimension column ((2)D) in chiral GC×GC analysis; the SLB-IL59 offered the best resolution for the tested monoterpene enantiomers from the matrix background. Enantiomeric ratios for α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were determined to be 1.325, 2.703, and 1.040, respectively, in the cardamom oil sample based on relative peak area data. PMID:24420979

  13. Separation and identification of oligomeric phenylethoxysiloxanols by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuting; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2015-05-15

    Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been applied to qualitative analysis of oligomeric phenylethoxysiloxanols, a class of organosilanols as active intermediates to polyhedral silsesquioxanes. The phenylethoxysiloxanol samples were prepared by controlled acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of phenyltriethoxysilane at various molar equivalents of water (r1) and characterized by standard spectroscopic techniques. Using a gradient binary water-methanol mobile phase, these reaction products were resolved on octadecylsiloxane silica stationary phase and subsequently identified by online electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection. Results show that the reaction products are composed of a multitude of linear and monocyclic siloxanol oligomers with various numbers of silicon atoms and hydroxyl groups, depending upon the reaction conditions used. With the r1 value increasing from 0.5 to 2.0, the chain lengths of the oligomers increase slightly but the numbers of hydroxyl groups increase considerably, accompanying by structural evolution from chains to rings. Characterization of the retention behavior of these oligomers indicates that hydrophobic interactions of phenyl and ethoxy groups with the stationary phase are responsible for their retention in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. PMID:25843423

  14. Difference between a Photon's Momentum and an Atom's Recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Gibble, Kurt

    2006-08-18

    When an atom absorbs a photon from a laser beam that is not an infinite plane wave, the atom's recoil is less than ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})k in the propagation direction. We show that the recoils in the transverse directions produce a lensing of the atomic wave functions, which leads to a frequency shift that is not discrete but varies linearly with the field amplitude and strongly depends on the atomic state detection. The same lensing effect is also important for microwave atomic clocks. The frequency shifts are of the order of the naive recoil shift for the transverse wave vector of the photons.

  15. Ricin as a weapon of mass terror--separating fact from fiction.

    PubMed

    Schep, Leo J; Temple, Wayne A; Butt, Grant A; Beasley, Michael D

    2009-11-01

    In recent years there has been an increased concern regarding the potential use of chemical and biological weapons for mass urban terror. In particular, there are concerns that ricin could be employed as such an agent. This has been reinforced by recent high profile cases involving ricin, and its use during the cold war to assassinate a high profile communist dissident. Nevertheless, despite these events, does it deserve such a reputation? Ricin is clearly toxic, though its level of risk depends on the route of entry. By ingestion, the pathology of ricin is largely restricted to the gastrointestinal tract where it may cause mucosal injuries; with appropriate treatment, most patients will make a full recovery. As an agent of terror, it could be used to contaminate an urban water supply, with the intent of causing lethality in a large urban population. However, a substantial mass of pure ricin powder would be required. Such an exercise would be impossible to achieve covertly and would not guarantee success due to variables such as reticulation management, chlorination, mixing, bacterial degradation and ultra-violet light. By injection, ricin is lethal; however, while parenteral delivery is an ideal route for assassination, it is not realistic for an urban population. Dermal absorption of ricin has not been demonstrated. Ricin is also lethal by inhalation. Low doses can lead to progressive and diffuse pulmonary oedema with associated inflammation and necrosis of the alveolar pneumocytes. However, the risk of toxicity is dependent on the aerodynamic equivalent diameter (AED) of the ricin particles. The AED, which is an indicator of the aerodynamic behaviour of a particle, must be of sufficiently low micron size as to target the human alveoli and thereby cause major toxic effects. To target a large population would also necessitate a quantity of powder in excess of several metric tons. The technical and logistical skills required to formulate such a mass of powder to

  16. Design of a single magnet separator with mass resolving power m/Δm ≈/20,000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenfeldt, Martin; Augustin, Mathieu; Catherall, Richard; Giles, Tim; Schoerling, Daniel; Tveten, Gry M.

    2016-06-01

    ISOLDE at CERN is a leading radioactive ion beam facility. With its upgrade, the HIE-ISOLDE project, an increase in primary beam intensity and energy is envisaged and the aim is a significant increase in intensity of the exotic beams. The high resolution separator (HRS) after the upgrade is required to suppress contaminations almost completely when the masses differ to the beam of interest by Δm / m > 1 / 20, 000 . Here a 120° magnet with a bending radius of 1.25 m has been chosen. The magnetic rigidity is 0.625 Tm (B-field of 0.5 T) to allow for separation of molecules of up to a mass of 300 u. The magnet comprises a yoke in wedged H-type configuration for stability and precision and pole face conductors for focusing and compensation of aberrations. The concept was derived analytically, refined with the OPERA 2D software and tested with the ray-tracing module of OPERA 3D.

  17. Identification by mass spectrometry of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-separated proteins extracted from lager brewing yeast.

    PubMed

    Joubert, R; Strub, J M; Zugmeyer, S; Kobi, D; Carte, N; Van Dorsselaer, A; Boucherie, H; Jaquet-Guffreund, L

    2001-08-01

    As two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis allows the separation of several hundred proteins in a single gel, this technique has become an important tool for proteome studies and for investigating the cellular physiology. In order to take advantage of information provided by the comparison of proteome pictures, the mass spectrometry technique is the way chosen for a rapid and an accurate identification of proteins of interest. Unfortunately, in the case of industrial yeasts, due to the high level of complexity of their genome, the whole DNA sequence is not yet available and all encoded protein sequences are still unknown. Nevertheless, this study presents here 30 lager brewing yeast proteins newly identified with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and database searching against the protein sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The identified proteins of the industrial strain correspond to proteins which do not comigrate with known proteins of S. cerevisiae separated on 2-D gels. This study presents an application of the MS technique for the identification of industrial yeast proteins which are only homologous to the corresponding S. cerevisiae proteins. PMID:11565791

  18. Application of mass-separated focused ion beams in nano-technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, L.

    2008-04-01

    FIB applications like writing ion implantation, ion beam mixing or ion beam synthesis in the μm- or nm range often require ion species other than gallium. Therefore alloy liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) have to be developed and applied in FIB tools. The energy distribution of ions emitted from an alloy LMIS is one of the crucial parameters for the performance of a FIB column. Different source materials like AuGe, AuSi, AuGeSi, CoNd, ErNi, ErFeNiCr, MnGe, GaBi, GaBiLi, SnPb, … were investigated with respect to the energy spread of the different ion species as a function of emission current, ion mass and emitter temperature. Different alloy LMIS's have been developed and used in the FZD - FIB system especially for writing implantation to fabricate sub-μm pattern without any lithographic steps. Co and various other ion species were applied to generate CoSi2 nano-structures, like dots and wires by ion beam synthesis or to manipulate the properties of magnetic films. Additionally, the possibility of varying the flux in the FIB by changing the pixel dwell-time can be used for the investigation of the radiation damage and dynamic annealing in Si, Ge and SiC at elevated implantation temperatures. Furthermore, a broad spectrum of ions was employed to study in a fast manner the sputtering process depending on temperature, angle of incidence and ion mass on a couple of target materials. These studies are important for the 3D-fabrication of various kinds of micro-tools by FIB milling.

  19. Determination of heavy metals by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after on-line separation and preconcentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, Valderi L.; Pozebon, Dirce; Curtius, Adilson J.

    1998-10-01

    A method for the determination of Cu, As, Se, Cd, In, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi in waters and in biological materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, after an on-line separation, is described. The matrix separation and analyte preconcentration is accomplished by retention of the analytes complexed with the ammonium salt of O,O-diethyl dithiophosphoric acid in a HNO 3 solution on C 18 immobilized on silica in a minicolumn. Methanol, as eluent, is introduced in the conventional pneumatic nebulizer of the instrument. In order to use the best compromise conditions, concerning the ligand and acid concentrations, the analytes were determined in two separate groups. The enrichment factors were in the range from 5 to 61, depending on the analyte. The limits of detection varied from 0.43 ng L -1 for Bi to 33 ng L -1 for Cu. The sample consumption is only 2.3 mL for each group and the sampling frequency is 21 h -1. The accuracy was tested by analysing five certified reference materials: water, riverine water, urine, bovine muscle and bovine liver. The agreement between obtained and certified concentrations was very good, except for As. The relatively small volume of methanol, used as eluent, minimizes the problems produced by the introduction of organic solvent into the plasma.

  20. Exerpts from the history of alpha recoils.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Christer

    2011-05-01

    Any confined air volume holding radon ((222)Rn) gas bears a memory of past radon concentrations due to (210)Pb (T(1/2) = 22 y) and its progenies entrapped in all solid objects in the volume. The efforts of quantifying past radon exposures by means of the left-behind long-lived radon progenies started in 1987 with this author's unsuccessful trials of removing (214)Po from radon exposed glass objects. In this contribution the history and different techniques of assessing radon exposure to man in retrospect will be overviewed. The main focus will be on the implantation of alpha recoils into glass surfaces, but also potential traps in radon dwellings will be discussed. It is concluded that for a successful retrospective application, three crucial imperatives must be met, i.e. firstly, the object must persistently store a certain fraction of the created (210)Pb atoms, secondly, be resistant over decades towards disturbances from the outside and thirdly, all (210)Pb atoms analysed must originate from airborne radon only. For large-scale radon epidemiological studies, non-destructive and inexpensive measurement techniques are essential. Large-scale studies cannot be based on objects rarely found in dwellings or not available for measurements. PMID:21306801

  1. First Measurement of Beam-Recoil Observables Cx and Cz

    SciTech Connect

    R. Bradford; R.A. Schumacher; G. Adams; M.J. Amaryan; P. Ambrozewicz; E. Anciant; M. Anghinolfi; B. Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; G. Audit; H. Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; N. Baillie; J.P. Ball; N.A. Baltzell; S. Barrow; V. Batourine; M. Battaglieri; K. Beard; I. Bedlinskiy; M. Bektasoglu; M. Bellis; N. Benmouna; B.L. Berman; N. Bianchi; A.S. Biselli; B.E. Bonner; S. Bouchigny; S. Boiarinov; D. Branford; W.J. Briscoe; W.K. Brooks; S. B¨ultmann; V.D. Burkert; C. Butuceanu; J.R. Calarco; S.L. Careccia; D.S. Carman; B. Carnahan; S. Chen; P.L. Cole; A. Coleman; P. Collins; P. Coltharp; D. Cords; † P. Corvisiero; D. Crabb; H. Crannell; V. Crede; J.P. Cummings; R. De Masi; E. De Sanctis; R. De Vita; P.V. Degtyarenko; H. Denizli; L. Dennis; A. Deur; K.V. Dharmawardane; R. Dickson; C. Djalali; G.E. Dodge; J. Donnelly; D. Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; M. Dugger; S. Dytman; O.P. Dzyubak; H. Egiyan; K.S. Egiyan; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; P. Eugenio; R. Fatemi; G. Fedotov; G. Feldman; R.J. Feuerbach; T.A. Forest; H. Funsten; M. Garcon; G. Gavalian; G.P. Gilfoyle; K.L. Giovanetti; F.X. Girod; J.T. Goetz; A. Gonenc; R.W. Gothe; K.A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; M. Guillo; N. Guler; L. Guo; V. Gyurjyan; C. Hadjidakis; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; R.S. Hakobyan; J. Hardie; D. Heddle; F.W. Hersman; K. Hicks; I. Hleiqawi; M. Holtrop; J. Hu; M. Huertas; C.E. Hyde-Wright; Y. Ilieva; D.G. Ireland; B.S. Ishkhanov; E.L. Isupov; M.M. Ito; D. Jenkins; H.S. Jo; K. Joo; H.G. Juengst; N. Kalantarians; J.D. Kellie; M. Khandaker; K.Y. Kim; K. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F.J. Klein; M. Klusman; M. Kossov; L.H. Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; J. Kuhn; S.E. Kuhn; S.V. Kuleshov; J. Lachniet; J.M. Laget; J. Langheinrich; D. Lawrence; A.C.S. Lima; K. Livingston; H.Y. Lu; K. Lukashin; M. MacCormick; J.J. Manak; C. Marchand; N. Markov; S. McAleer; B. McKinnon; J.W.C. McNabb; B.A. Mecking; M.D. Mestayer; C.A. Meyer; T. Mibe; K. Mikhailov; M. Mirazita; R. Miskimen; V. Mokeev; K. Moriya; S.A. Morrow; M. Moteabbed; V. Muccifora; J. Mueller; G.S. Mutchler; P. Nadel-Turonski; J. Napolitano; R. Nasseripour; N. Natasha; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; B.B. Niczyporuk; M.R. Niroula; R.A. Niyazov; M. Nozar; G.V. O’Rielly; M. Osipenko; A.I. Ostrovidov; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; C. Paterson; S.A. Philips; J. Pierce; N. Pivnyuk; D. Pocanic; O. Pogorelko; E. Polli; I. Popa; S. Pozdniakov; B.M. Preedom; J.W. Price; Y. Prok; D. Protopopescu; L.M. Qin; B.P. Quinn; B.A. Raue; G. Riccardi; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; B.G. Ritchie; F. Ronchetti; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; D. Rowntree; P.D. Rubin; F. Sabatie; J. Salamanca; C. Salgado; J.P. Santoro; V. Sapunenko; V.S. Serov; A. Shafi; Y.G. Sharabian; J. Shaw; N.V. Shvedunov; S. Simionatto; A.V. Skabelin; E.S. Smith; L.C. Smith; D.I. Sober; D. Sokhan; M. Spraker; A. Stavinsky; S.S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; B.E. Stokes; P. Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; S. Taylor; D.J. Tedeschi; U. Thoma; R. Thompson; A. Tkabladze; S. Tkachenko; L. Todor; C. Tur; M. Ungaro; M.F. Vineyard; A.V. Vlassov; K. Wang; D.P. Watts; L.B. Weinstein; H. Weller; D.P. Weygand; M. Williams; E. Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; J. Yun; L. Zana; J. Zhang; B. Zhao; and Z.W. Zhao

    2007-03-01

    Spin transfer from circularly polarized real photons to recoiling hyperons has been measured for the reactions $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Lambda$ and $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Sigma^0$. The data were obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies $W$ between 1.6 and 2.53 GeV, and for $-0.85<\\cos\\theta_{K^+}^{c.m.}< +0.95$. For the $\\Lambda$, the polarization transfer coefficient along the photon momentum axis, $C_z$, was found to be near unity for a wide range of energy and kaon production angles. The associated transverse polarization coefficient, $C_x$, is smaller than $C_z$ by a roughly constant difference of unity. Most significantly, the {\\it total} $\\Lambda$ polarization vector, including the induced polarization $P$, has magnitude consistent with unity at all measured energies and production angles when the beam is fully polarized. For the $\\Sigma^0$ this simple phenomenology does not hold. All existing hadrodynamic models are in poor agreement with these results.

  2. Scintillation Efficiency of Liquid Xenon for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongjirad, Taritree; Ni, Kaixuan; Manzur, Angel; Kastens, Louis; McKinsey, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    In early 2006, the XENON and ZEPLIN collaborations announced highly stringent upper limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section. However, the dominant systematic uncertainty in these limits is due to the uncertainty in the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency (NRSE) for liquid xenon. The NRSE is defined as the amount of scintillation produced by nuclear recoils, divided by the amount of scintillation produced by electron recoils, per unit energy. Though the NRSE has been measured by several groups, its value at the low energies most important for the liquid xenon WIMP searches has a large uncertainty. Furthermore, the NRSE may vary with the strength of the electric field in the liquid xenon. In an attempt to reduce these uncertainties, we have measured the NRSE down to 5 keV nuclear recoil energy for various electric fields.

  3. Simultaneous separation and determination of organic acids in blueberry juices by capillary electrophoresis- electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Yongku, Li; Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Fen; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yanfang; Meng, Xianjun

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive and expeditious capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry(CE-ESIMS) method for the separation, identification and determination of succinic, citric, salicylic, malic, benzoic, sorbic, ascorbic, and tartaric acid in blueberry juices has been developed. In order to obtain the analytical separation, CE-MS interface parameters(e.g., buffer pH and composition, sheath liquid and gas flow rates, sheath liquid composition, electrospray voltage, etc.) were carefully optimized. Eight organic acids were baseline separated in 8 min under optimum experimental conditions. The precisions for eight replicate separations of a standard mixture solution were 2.54-4.12 % for peak area and 0.85-2.12 % for migration time respectively. The linear ranges were 10.0-1000.0, 8.0-1000.0, 13.0-1000.0, 6.0-1000.0, 9.0-1000.0, 3.2-600.0, 6.0-1000.0 and 18.0-1000.0 μg/L for succinic, citric, salicylic, malic, benzoic, sorbic, ascorbic, and tartaric acid with detection limits of 2.5, 2.0, 3.4, 1.5, 2.2, 0.8, 1.5, 4.5 μg/L, respectively. The average recoveries of the eight components were between 86.8 and 99.8 % with RSDs of 1.8-5.3 %. The proposed method was applied to the simultaneous analysis of eight analytes in Blueberry Juice samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26243946

  4. INVESTIGATION OF THE FORMATION AND SEPARATION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE FROM THE EXPANSION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Olmedo, O.; Vourlidas, A.; Liu, Y. E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu

    2012-01-20

    We address the nature of EUV waves through direct observations of the formation of a diffuse wave driven by the expansion of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and its subsequent separation from the CME front. The wave and the CME on 2011 June 7 were well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Following the solar eruption onset, marked by the beginning of the rapid increasing of the CME velocity and the X-ray flux of accompanying flare, the CME exhibits a strong lateral expansion. During this impulsive expansion phase, the expansion speed of the CME bubble increases from 100 km s{sup -1} to 450 km s{sup -1} in only six minutes. An important finding is that a diffuse wave front starts to separate from the front of the expanding bubble shortly after the lateral expansion slows down. Also a type II burst is formed near the time of the separation. After the separation, two distinct fronts propagate with different kinematic properties. The diffuse front travels across the entire solar disk, while the sharp front rises up, forming the CME ejecta with the diffuse front ahead of it. These observations suggest that the previously termed EUV wave is a composite phenomenon and driven by the CME expansion. While the CME expansion is accelerating, the wave front is cospatial with the CME front, thus the two fronts are indiscernible. Following the end of the acceleration phase, the wave moves away from the CME front with a gradually increasing distance between them.

  5. A microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometric platform for fast separation and identification of enantiomers employing the partial filling technique

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangtang; Xiao, Dan; Ou, Xiao-Ming; McCullumn, Cassandra; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    A microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometric (MCE-MS) method was developed for fast chiral analysis. The proposed MCE-MS platform deployed a glass /PDMS hybrid microchip with an easy-to-fabricate monolithic nanoelectrospray emitter. Enantiomeric MCE separation was achieved by means of the partial filling technique. A novel chip design with an arm channel connecting to the middle of the MCE separation channel for delivering the chiral selector was tested and proven valid. Enantiomeric separation of 3.4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), glutamic acid (Glu), and serine (Ser), the selected test compounds, were achieved within 130 s with resolution values (Rs) of 2.4, 1.1, and 1.0, respectively. The proposed chiral MCE-MS assay was sensitive and had detection limits of 43 nM for L-DOPA and 47 nM for D-DOPA. The analytical platform was well suited for studies of stereochemical preference in living cells because it integrated cell culture, sample injection, chiral separation, and MS detection into a single platform. Metabolism of DOPA in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells was studied as a model system. On-chip incubation of SH-SY5Y cells with racemic DOPA was carried out, and the incubation solution was injected and in-line assayed at time intervals. It was found that L-DOPA concentration decreased gradually as incubation time increased while the concentration of coexisting D-DOPA remained constant. The results firmly indicated that SH-SY5Y cells metabolized L-DOPA effectively while left D-DOPA intact. PMID:24354006

  6. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Time Ion Mobility and Mass Spectrometry (µFAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2015-06-30

    We report the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (µFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The µFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional information of detected features from the measured FAIMS compensation fields and IMS drift times, while also obtaining accurate ion masses. These separations thereby increase the overall separation power, resulting increased information content, and provide more complete characterization of more complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by e.g. improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by “chemical noise” and other interfering peaks.

  7. Recoil splitting of x-ray-induced optical fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, S.; Aagren, H.; Gel'mukhanov, F.; Sun, Y.-P.; Levin, S.

    2010-03-15

    We show that the anisotropy of the recoil velocity distribution of x-ray-ionized atoms or molecules leads to observable splittings in subsequent optical fluorescence or absorption when the polarization vector of the x rays is parallel to the momentum of the fluorescent photons. The order of the magnitude of the recoil-induced splitting is about 10 {mu}eV, which can be observed using Fourier or laser-absorption spectroscopic techniques.

  8. Recoil velocity at second post-Newtonian order for spinning black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racine, Étienne; Buonanno, Alessandra; Kidder, Larry

    2009-08-01

    We compute the flux of linear momentum carried by gravitational waves emitted from spinning binary black holes at second post-Newtonian (2PN) order for generic orbits. In particular we provide explicit expressions of three new types of terms, namely, next-to-leading order spin-orbit terms at 1.5 post-Newtonian (1.5PN) order, spin-orbit tail terms at 2PN order, and spin-spin terms at 2PN order. Restricting ourselves to quasicircular orbits, we integrate the linear-momentum flux over time to obtain the recoil velocity as function of orbital frequency. We find that in the so-called superkick configuration the higher-order spin corrections can increase the recoil velocity up to a factor ˜3 with respect to the leading-order PN prediction. Whereas the recoil velocity computed in PN theory within the adiabatic approximation can accurately describe the early inspiral phase, we find that its fast increase during the late inspiral and plunge, and the arbitrariness in determining until when it should be trusted, makes the PN predictions for the total recoil not very accurate and robust. Nevertheless, the linear-momentum flux at higher PN orders can be employed to build more reliable resummed expressions aimed at capturing the nonperturbative effects until merger. Furthermore, we provide expressions valid for generic orbits, and accurate at 2PN order, for the energy and angular momentum carried by gravitational waves emitted from spinning binary black holes. Specializing to quasicircular orbits we compute the spin-spin terms at 2PN order in the expression for the evolution of the orbital frequency and found agreement with Mikóczi, Vasúth, and Gergely. We also verified that in the limit of extreme mass ratio our expressions for the energy and angular momentum fluxes match the ones of Tagoshi, Shibata, Tanaka, and Sasaki obtained in the context of black hole perturbation theory.

  9. SIMULATIONS OF RECOILING MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN THE VIA LACTEA HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, J.; Madau, P.; Diemand, J.; Kuhlen, M.; Zemp, M.

    2009-09-10

    The coalescence of a massive black hole (MBH) binary leads to the gravitational-wave recoil of the system and its ejection from the galaxy core. We have carried out N-body simulations of the motion of a M{sub BH} = 3.7 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} MBH remnant in the 'Via Lactea I' simulation, a Milky Way-sized dark matter halo. The black hole receives a recoil velocity of V{sub kick} = 80, 120, 200, 300, and 400 km s{sup -1} at redshift 1.5, and its orbit is followed for over 1 Gyr within a 'live' host halo, subject only to gravity and dynamical friction against the dark matter background. We show that, owing to asphericities in the dark matter potential, the orbit of the MBH is highly nonradial, resulting in a significantly increased decay timescale compared to a spherical halo. The simulations are used to construct a semi-analytic model of the motion of the MBH in a time-varying triaxial Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo plus a spherical stellar bulge, where the dynamical friction force is calculated directly from the velocity dispersion tensor. Such a model should offer a realistic picture of the dynamics of kicked MBHs in situations where gas drag, friction by disk stars, and the flattening of the central cusp by the returning black hole are all negligible effects. We find that MBHs ejected with initial recoil velocities V{sub kick} {approx}> 500 km s{sup -1} do not return to the host center within a Hubble time. In a Milky Way-sized galaxy, a recoiling hole carrying a gaseous disk of initial mass {approx}M{sub BH} may shine as a quasar for a substantial fraction of its 'wandering' phase. The long decay timescales of kicked MBHs predicted by this study may thus be favorable to the detection of off-nuclear quasar activity.

  10. Chemical separation and mass spectrometry of Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Cu in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Akane; Yamashita, Katsuyuki; Makishima, Akio; Nakamura, Eizo

    2009-12-01

    A sequential chemical separation technique for Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Cu in terrestrial and extraterrestrial silicate rocks was developed for precise and accurate determination of elemental concentration by the isotope dilution method (ID). The technique uses a combination of cation-anion exchange chromatography and Eichrom nickel specific resin. The method was tested using a variety of matrixes including bulk meteorite (Allende), terrestrial peridotite (JP-1), and basalt (JB-1b). Concentrations of each element was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) using W filaments and a Si-B-Al type activator for Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn and a Re filament and silicic acid-H3PO4 activator for Cu. The method can be used to precisely determine the concentrations of these elements in very small silicate samples, including meteorites, geochemical reference samples, and mineral standards for microprobe analysis. Furthermore, the Cr mass spectrometry procedure developed in this study can be extended to determine the isotopic ratios of 53Cr/52Cr and 54Cr/52Cr with precision of approximately 0.05epsilon and approximately 0.10epsilon (1epsilon = 0.01%), respectively, enabling cosmochemical applications such as high precision Mn-Cr chronology and investigation of nucleosynthetic isotopic anomalies in meteorites. PMID:19886654

  11. Recoil Polarization and Beam-Recoil Double Polarization Measurement of {eta} Electroproduction on the Proton in the Region of the S{sub 11}(1535) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, H.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M. O.; Doria, L.; Friedrich, J.; Mueller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Tiator, L.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; Bosnar, D.; Makek, M.; Cheymol, B.; Fonvieille, H.

    2007-09-28

    The beam-recoil double polarization P{sub x{sup '}}{sup h} and P{sub z{sup '}}{sup h} and the recoil polarization P{sub y{sup '}} were measured for the first time for the p(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector){eta} reaction at a four-momentum transfer of Q{sup 2}=0.1 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} and a center of mass production angle of {theta}=120 deg. at the Mainz Microtron MAMI-C. With a center of mass energy range of 1500 MeV

  12. Geologic and seismic investigations, relocation of Route 3, grade separation at Route 62, southeast ramp in Bedford, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.

    1954-01-01

    The relocation of Route 3 in Bedford, Mass. requires extensive cuts for a grade separation at Route 62. This report contains only the results of the geologic and seismic studies that were made for the purpose of obtaining information that would aid in the construction of the inner and outer loops of the southeast ramp. The studies represent part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey. The work was performed in July 1953. The site is located in the Wilmington and Lexington 7-1/2-minute quadrangle maps of the United States Geological Survey. Mr. M. E. Chandler and Mr. W. L. Carney, Massachusetts Department of Public works' Engineers, performed all pertinent survey work required for this project, and prepared the essential plans and profiles. Mr. Chandler also operated the seismic equipment and assisted in the preparation of the seismic velocity data.

  13. Non-separative headspace solid phase microextraction-mass spectrometry profile as a marker to monitor coffee roasting degree.

    PubMed

    Liberto, Erica; Ruosi, Manuela R; Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bicchi, Carlo; Sgorbini, Barbara

    2013-02-27

    This study describes a non-separative headspace solid phase microextraction-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-MS) approach, in view of its application to online monitoring of a roasting process. The system can quickly provide representative and diagnostic fingerprints of the volatile fraction of samples and, in combination with appropriate chemometric pattern recognition and regression techniques, can successfully be applied to characterize, discriminate, and/or correlate patterns with the roasting process. Eighty coffee samples of different varieties, geographical origins, and blends were analyzed. The experimental HS-SPME-MS results show that the TIC fingerprint can be used to discriminate the degree of roasting; diagnostic ion abundance(s) or ratios were closely correlated with the roasting process; both could successfully be used as markers or analytical decision makers, to monitor roasting processes online, and to define quality and safety of roasted coffee. PMID:23088249

  14. Determination of rare earth impurities in high purity samarium oxide using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after extraction chromatographic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinquan; Liu, Jinglei; Yi, Yong; Liu, Yonglin; Li, Xiang; Su, Yaqin; Lin, Ping

    2007-01-01

    A method for the determination of trace of 14 rare earth elements (REEs) as impurities in high purity samarium oxide (Sm2O3) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was described. Analytes, such as La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Lu and Y were measured without Sm matrix separation because of no interference problems occurring that could affect the analysis of these elements. On the other hand, analytes, such as Dy, Ho, Er, Tm and Yb were carried out after Sm matrix being eliminated completely by means of 2-ethylhexyl hydrogen-ethylhexy phosphonate (EHEHP) extraction chromatographic separation. The inherent problem associated with matrix-induced suppression was effectively compensated with spiking In as internal standard element and the mass spectra isobaric interferences of atomic and molecular ions arose from Sm matrix had been overcome after the removal of Sm matrix. The limits of quantitations (LOQ) for 14 REEs impurities were from 0.01 to 0.07 [mu]g g-1 together with the recoveries of spiking sample of 14 REEs were found to be in the range of 85-110% and the proposed method precision was less than 5%. A synthetic standard Sm2O3 sample with well-known 14 REEs concentrations was prepared and analysed in order to prove the accuracy and precision of the proposed method together with another high purity Sm2O3 was also measured using ICP-MS. The methodology had been found to be suitable for the determination of trace of 14 REEs in 99.999-99.9999% high purity Sm2O3.

  15. Warm target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy for fragmentation of molecular hydrogen by ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wu, Jian; Czasch, Achim; Zeng, Heping

    2009-07-20

    We demonstrate warm target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy for the fragmentation dynamics of the warm hydrogen molecules at room temperature. The thermal movement effect of the warm molecule is removed by using a correction algorithm in the momentum space. Based on the reconstructed three-dimensional momentum vectors as well as the kinetic energy release spectra, different vibrational states of the H(2)(+) ground state are clearly visible and the internuclear separation for charge resonance enhanced ionization of the second electron is identified. The results show adequate accordance with the former experiments using other techniques. PMID:19654636

  16. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds from dry-blanched peanut skins by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Kerr, William L; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Swanson, Ruthann B; Pegg, Ronald B

    2014-08-22

    A large variety of phenolic compounds, including phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, and their esters), stilbenes (trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol), flavan-3-ols (e.g., (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, and their polymers {the proanthocyanidins, PACs}), other flavonoids (e.g., isoflavones, flavanols, and flavones, etc.) and biflavonoids (e.g., morelloflavone), were identified in dry-blanched peanut skins (PS) by this study. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) was applied to separate and identify the phenolic constituents. Reversed-phase HPLC was employed to separate free phenolic compounds as well as PAC monomers, dimers, and trimers. PACs with a degree of polymerization (DP) of >4 were chromatographed via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Tentative identification of the separated phenolics was based solely on molecular ions and MS(n) fragmentation patterns acquired by ESI-MS in the negative-ion mode. The connection sequence of PAC oligomers (DP <5) could be deduced mainly through characteristic quinone methide (QM) cleavage ions. When the DP reached 6, only a proportion of the flavan-3-ols could be ascertained in the PACs because of the extremely complicated fragmentation patterns involved. The identification of free phenolic acids, stilbenes, and flavonoids was achieved by authentic commercial standards and also by published literature data. Quantification was performed based on peak areas of the UV (free phenolic compounds) or fluorescence (PACs) signals from the HPLC chromatograms and calibration curves of commercial standards. Overall, PS contain significantly more PACs compared to free phenolic compounds. PMID:25016324

  17. Solvent Separating Secondary Metabolites Directly from Biosynthetic Tissue for Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioactive metabolites are often heterogeneously expressed in tissues both spatially and over time. Therefore, traditional solvent extraction methods benefit from an understanding of the in situ sites of biosynthesis and storage to deal with heterogeneity and maximize yield. Recently, surface-assisted mass spectrometry (MS) methods namely nanostructure-assisted laser desorption ionisation (NALDI) and desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) surfaces have been developed to enable the direct detection of low molecular weight metabolites. Since direct tissue NALDI-MS or DIOS-MS produce complex spectra due to the wide variety of other metabolites and fragments present in the low mass range, we report here the use of “on surface” solvent separation directly from mollusc tissue onto nanostructured surfaces for MS analysis, as a mechanism for simplifying data annotation and detecting possible artefacts from compound delocalization during the preparative steps. Water, ethanol, chloroform and hexane selectively extracted a range of choline esters, brominated indoles and lipids from Dicathais orbita hypobranchial tissue imprints. These compounds could be quantified on the nanostructured surfaces by comparison to standard curves generated from the pure compounds. Surface-assisted MS could have broad utility for detecting a broad range of secondary metabolites in complex marine tissue samples. PMID:25786067

  18. Comprehensive gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for the separation of pesticides in a very complex matrix.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Luigi; Casilli, Alessandro; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Lo Presti, Maria; Dugo, Paola; Dugo, Giovanni

    2007-11-01

    The present research is focused on the development of a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-rapid scanning quadrupole mass spectrometric (GC x GC-qMS) methodology for the analysis of trace-amount pesticides contained in a complex real-world sample. Reliable peak assignment was carried out by using a recently developed, dedicated pesticide MS library (for comprehensive GC analysis), characterized by a twin-filter search procedure, the first based on a minimum degree of spectral similarity and the second on the interactive use of linear retention indices (LRI). The library was constructed by subjecting mixtures of commonly used pesticides to GC x GC-qMS analysis and then deriving their pure mass spectra and LRI values. In order to verify the effectiveness of the approach, a pesticide-contaminated red grapefruit extract was analysed. The certainty of peak assignment was attained by exploiting both the enhanced separation power of dual-oven GC x GC and the highly effective search procedure. PMID:17589835

  19. Impact of the equivalent center of mass separating from the sliding surface on the isolation performance of friction pendulum bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Junyong; Ning, Xiangliang; Tan, Ping; Hao, Hongxiao; Chen, Guoping

    2015-12-01

    A new equivalent center of mass model of FPBs (friction pendulum bearings) is introduced, and based on this model, coefficient j of the equivalent center of mass separating from the sliding surface is defined. It is thought in theory that j has a significant impact on the isolation parameter of FPBs, since the equivalent post-yielding stiffness and friction coefficients are not simply determined by sliding radius and sliding friction pairs. The results of numerical simulation analysis using ABAQUS conducted on two groups of FPBs support this viewpoint. For FPBs with the same sliding radius and sliding friction pairs, the FPB modules of structural analysis software such as ETABS could only distinguish the equivalent transformation using j one by one. The seismic response data obtained in a base isolation calculation example of FPBs are very different, which reveals that j's impact on the isolation effectiveness of FPBs cannot be ignored. The introduction of j will help improve the classical structural theory of FPBs and the weak points of structural analysis software based on this theory, which is important in achieving more accurate analyses in structural design.

  20. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-01

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP “smoking gun.” If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of ˜2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  1. Stimulated Rayleigh resonances and recoil-induced effects

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, J.Y.; Grynberg, G.

    1996-12-31

    The organization of this paper is as follows. We present in Section II the basic ideas about stimulated Rayleigh scattering by considering more particularly the situation where it arises from a relaxation process going on in the material system, and we describe a few experimental observations made in atomic and molecular physics. We then consider the case of nonstationary two-level atoms, and we derive the shape and characteristics of the recoil-induced resonances (Section III). In particular, we show that these resonances can be interpreted either as originating from a stimulated Rayleigh effect or as a stimulated Raman phenomena between atomic energy-momentum states having different momenta. Finally, to make a clear distinction between the physical phenomena that pertain directly to recoil-induced processes (i.e., that actually permit the measurement of the photon recoil) and those for which the introduction of the recoil constitutes a mere physical convenience, we review in Section IV some indisputable manifestations of the photon recoil in atomic and molecular physics. 92 refs., 22 figs.

  2. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-15

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP 'smoking gun'. If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of {approx}2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  3. Calculation of recoil implantation profiles using known range statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C. D.; Avila, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed to calculate the depth distribution of recoil atoms that result from ion implantation onto a substrate covered with a thin surface layer. The calculation includes first order recoils considering projected range straggles, and lateral straggles of recoils but neglecting lateral straggles of projectiles. Projectile range distributions at intermediate energies in the surface layer are deduced from look-up tables of known range statistics. A great saving of computing time and human effort is thus attained in comparison with existing procedures. The method is used to calculate recoil profiles of oxygen from implantation of arsenic through SiO2 and of nitrogen from implantation of phosphorus through Si3N4 films on silicon. The calculated recoil profiles are in good agreement with results obtained by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation and they also compare very well with available experimental results in the literature. The deviation between calculated and experimental results is discussed in relation to lateral straggles. From this discussion, a range of surface layer thickness for which the method applies is recommended.

  4. AUTOMATICALLY DETECTING AND TRACKING CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. SEPARATION OF DYNAMIC AND QUIESCENT COMPONENTS IN CORONAGRAPH IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Huw; Byrne, Jason P.; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2012-06-20

    Automated techniques for detecting and tracking coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data are of ever increasing importance for space weather monitoring and forecasting. They serve to remove the biases and tedium of human interpretation, and provide the robust analysis necessary for statistical studies across large numbers of observations. An important requirement in their operation is that they satisfactorily distinguish the CME structure from the background quiescent coronal structure (streamers, coronal holes). Many studies resort to some form of time differencing to achieve this, despite the errors inherent in such an approach-notably spatiotemporal crosstalk. This article describes a new deconvolution technique that separates coronagraph images into quiescent and dynamic components. A set of synthetic observations made from a sophisticated model corona and CME demonstrates the validity and effectiveness of the technique in isolating the CME signal. Applied to observations by the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs, the structure of a faint CME is revealed in detail despite the presence of background streamers that are several times brighter than the CME. The technique is also demonstrated to work on SECCHI/COR2 data, and new possibilities for estimating the three-dimensional structure of CMEs using the multiple viewing angles are discussed. Although quiescent coronal structures and CMEs are intrinsically linked, and although their interaction is an unavoidable source of error in any separation process, we show in a companion paper that the deconvolution approach outlined here is a robust and accurate method for rigorous CME analysis. Such an approach is a prerequisite to the higher-level detection and classification of CME structure and kinematics.

  5. Hyphenation of supercritical fluid chromatography and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for group type separations.

    PubMed

    Potgieter, H; van der Westhuizen, R; Rohwer, E; Malan, D

    2013-06-14

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process produces a variety of compounds over a wide carbon number range and the synthetic crude oil produced by this process is rich in highly valuable olefins and oxygenates, which crude oil only contains at trace levels. The characterization of these products is very challenging even when using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOF-MS). The separation between cyclic paraffins and olefins is especially difficult since they elute in similar positions on the GC×GC chromatogram and since they have identical molecular masses with indistinguishable fragmentation patterns. Previously, a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation procedure was used prior to GC×GC-TOF-MS analysis to distinguish between alkenes and alkanes, both cyclic and non-cyclic, however, there was co-elution of the solvents used in the HPLC fractionation procedure, and the volatile components in the gasoline sample and the dilution introduced by the off-line fractionation procedure made it very difficult to investigate components present at very low concentrations. The hyphenation of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) to GC×GC is less complicated and the removal of the supercritical CO2 can be easily achieved without any loss of the volatile sample components, eliminating the introduction of co-eluting solvents as well as the dilution effect. This paper describes the on-line hyphenation of SFC to a GC×GC system in order to comprehensively characterize the chemical groups (saturates, unsaturates, oxygenates and aromatics) in an FT sample. PMID:23647609

  6. The effects of upstream mass injection by vortex generator jets on shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Pablo Cesar

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of upstream mass injection, by means of vortex generator jets (VGJs), on the shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction (SWTBLI) generated by cylinder in a Mach 2 flow. The objectives of the study were: (i) to characterize the changes to the global structure of the flowfield introduced by the VGJs, and (ii) to study how the injection affected the dynamics of the separation shock foot. The injection was provided by three high-speed valves, placed across the span of the test section, which generated underexpanded jets. Two jet orientations were studied: normal to the wall, and pitched at 60° and skewed at 90° with respect to the freestream. In addition, the effects of both continuous and pulsed injection were investigated. Velocity measurements of the upstream boundary layer, VGJs, and -shock system were made using a wide-field particle image velocimetry (PIV) system, and an array of fast-response pressure transducers was used to monitor the wall pressure under the intermittent region of the interaction. The velocity measurements of the baseline case captured nearly all the relevant flow structures including the -shock and primary and secondary vortices. However, neither mean supersonic reversed flow nor the supersonic jet that presumably exists downstream of the triple point were observed. When injection was applied, the scale of the separated flow changed considerably. For normal injection, the primary vortex was nearly suppressed, while for pitched/skewed injection, the secondary vortex increased in size. Mean streamwise and transverse velocity profiles upstream of the separation shock showed that, for both jet orientations, the VGJs caused the flow in the boundary layer to accelerate. However, for normal injection, the acceleration did not extend down to the wall. Phase-averaged velocity measurements of the opening phase of the valves indicated that there is a phase lag between the jets and the

  7. Nuclear Recoil Calibration of DarkSide-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edkins, Erin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    DarkSide-50 dark matter experiment is a liquid argon time projection chamber (TPC) surrounded by a liquid scintillator active neutron veto, designed for the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The success of such an experiment is dependent upon a detailed understanding of both the expected signal and backgrounds, achieved using radioactive calibration sources of known energies. Nuclear recoils provide a measurement of both the expected signal and the most dangerous background, as nuclear recoils from neutrons cannot be distinguished from a dark matter signal on an event-by-event basis in the TPC. In this talk, I will present the DS-50 calibration system, and analysis of the results of the calibration of DarkSide-50 to nuclear recoils using radioactive neutron sources. See also the DS-50 presentations by X. Xiang and G. Koh.

  8. Rupture and recoil of bent-core liquid crystal filaments.

    PubMed

    Salili, S M; Ostapenko, T; Kress, O; Bailey, C; Weissflog, W; Harth, K; Eremin, A; Stannarius, R; Jákli, A

    2016-05-25

    The recoil process of free-standing liquid crystal filaments is investigated experimentally and theoretically. We focus on two aspects, the contraction speed of the filament and a spontaneously formed undulation instability. At the moment of rupture, the filaments buckle similarly to the classical Euler buckling of elastic rods. The tip velocity decays with decreasing filament length. The wavelength of buckling affinely decreases with the retracting filament tip. The energy gain related to the decrease of the total length and surface area of the filaments is mainly dissipated by layer rearrangements during thickening of the fibre. A flow back into the meniscus is relevant only in the final stage of the recoil process. We introduce a model for the quantitative description of the filament retraction speed. The dynamics of this recoil behaviour may find relevance as a model for biology-related filaments. PMID:27140824

  9. Accounting for Recoil Effects in Geochronometers: A New Model Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, V. E.; Huber, C.

    2012-12-01

    A number of geologically important chronometers are affected by, or owe their utility to, the "recoil effect". This effect describes the physical displacement of a nuclide due to energetic nuclear processes such as radioactive alpha decay (as in the case of various parent-daughter pairs in the uranium-series decay chains, and Sm-Nd), as well as neutron irradiation (in the case of the methodology for the 40Ar/39Ar dating method). The broad range of affected geochronometers means that the recoil effect can impact a wide range of dating method applications in the geosciences, including but not limited to: Earth surface processes, paleoclimate, volcanic processes, and cosmochemistry and planetary evolution. In particular, the recoil effect can have a notable impact on the use of fine grains (silt- and clay-sized particles) for geochronometric dating purposes. This is because recoil-induced loss of a nuclide from the surfaces of a grain can create an isotopically-depleted outer rind, and for small grains, this depleted rind can be volumetrically significant. When this recoil loss is measurable and occurs in a known time-dependent fashion, it can usefully serve as the basis for chronometers (such as the U-series comminution age method); in other cases recoil loss from fine particles creates an unwanted deviation from expected isotope values (such as for the Ar-Ar method). To improve both the accuracy and precision of ages inferred from geochronometric systems that involve the recoil of a key nuclide from small domains, it is necessary to quantify the magnitude of the recoil loss of that particular nuclide. It is also necessary to quantitatively describe the effect of geological processes that can alter the outer surface of grains, and hence the isotopically-depleted rind. Here we present a new mathematical and numerical model that includes two main features that enable enhanced accuracy and precision of ages determined from geochronometers. Since the surface area of the

  10. Recoil release of fission products from nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, C.

    1985-10-01

    An analytical approximation is developed for calculating recoil release from nuclear fuel into gas filled interspaces. This expression is evaluated for a number of interspace geometries and shown to be generally accurate to within about 10% by comparison with numerical calculations. The results are applied to situations of physical interest and it is demonstrated that recoil can be important when modelling fission product release from low temperature CAGR pin failures. Furthermore, recoil can contribute significantly in experiments on low temperature fission product release, particularly where oxidation enhancement of this release is measured by exposing the fuel to CO 2. The calculations presented here are one way of allowing for this, other methods are suggested.