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Sample records for recombinant polyester-cleaving hydrolase

  1. EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RECOMBINANT JUVENILE HORMONE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE (JHEH) FROM MANDUCA SEXTA. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cDNA of the microsomal Juvenile Hormone Epoxide Hydrolase (JHEH) from Manduca sexta was expressed in vitro in the baculovirus system. In insect cell culture, the recombinant enzyme (Ms-JHEH) was produced at a high level (100 fold over background EH catalytic activit...

  2. Direct production of ethanol from neoagarobiose using recombinant yeast that secretes α-neoagarooligosaccharide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Syazni; Yanagisawa, Mitsunori; Kasuu, Masahiro; Ariga, Osamu; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko

    2016-04-01

    An α-neoagarooligosaccharide hydrolase, AgaNash, was purified from Cellvibrio sp. OA-2007, which utilizes agarose as a substrate. The agaNash gene, which encodes AgaNash, was obtained by comparing the N-terminal amino acid sequence of AgaNash with that deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the full-length OA-2007 genome. The agaNash gene combined with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae signal peptide α-mating factor was transformed into the YPH499 strain of S. cerevisiae to generate YPH499/pTEF-MF-agaNash, and the recombinant yeast was confirmed to produce AgaNash, though it was mainly retained within the recombinant cell. To enhance AgaNash secretion from the cell, the signal peptide was replaced with a combination of the signal peptide and a threonine- and serine-rich tract (T-S region) of the S. diastaticus STA1 gene. The new recombinant yeast, YPH499/pTEF-STA1SP-agaNash, was demonstrated to secrete AgaNash and hydrolyze neoagarobiose with an efficiency of as high as 84%, thereby producing galactose, which is a fermentable sugar for the yeast, and ethanol, at concentrations of up to 1.8 g/L, directly from neoagarobiose. PMID:26920485

  3. Isolation and characterization of novel multifunctional recombinant family 26 glycoside hydrolase from Mehsani buffalo rumen metagenome.

    PubMed

    Patel, Avani B; Patel, Amrutlal K; Shah, Mihir P; Parikh, Ishan K; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2016-01-01

    Rumen microbiota harbor a diverse set of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), which play a crucial role in the degradation of a complex plant polysaccharide thereby providing metabolic energy to the host animals. Earlier, we reported CAZYme analysis from the buffalo rumen metagenome by high throughput shotgun sequencing. Among the various CAZymes, glycoside hydrolase family 26 (GH26) enzymes have a number of industrial applications including in paper, oil, biofuel, food, feed, pharmaceutical, coffee, and detergent industries. Here, we report isolation and characterization of GH26 enzyme from the buffalo rumen metagenome. A novel GH26 gene composed of 1,119 base pairs was successfully amplified using the gene-specific primers inferred based on the contig generated from metagenome sequence assembly and cloned in a pET32a (+) expression vector as an N-terminal histidine tag fusion protein. A novel GH26 protein from an unknown rumen microorganism shared a maximum of 68% identity with the Prevotella ruminicola 23 encoded carbohydrate esterase family 7 and 46% with Bacteroides sp. 2_1_33B encoded mannan endo-1, 4-β-mannosidase. The recombinant GH26-histidine tag fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme displayed multifunctional activities against various carbohydrate substrates including locust bean gum, beechwood xylan, pectin, and carboxymethyl cellulose suggesting mannanase, xylanase, pectin esterase, and endoglucanase activities, respectively. PMID:25644118

  4. Expression of recombinant organophosphorus hydrolase in the original producer of the enzyme, Sphingobium fuliginis ATCC 27551.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kosuke; Ohmori, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Iwata, Natsumi; Seto, Yasuo; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    The plasmid encoding His-tagged organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) cloned from Sphingobium fuliginis was modified to be transferred back to this bacterium. The replication function of S. amiense plasmid was inserted at downstream of OPH gene, and S. fuliginis was transformed with this plasmid. The transformant produced larger amount of active OPH with His-tag than E. coli. PMID:26784883

  5. Dramatic differences in organophosphorus hydrolase activity between human and chimeric recombinant mammalian paraoxonase-1 enzymes†

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Tamara C.; Harsch, Christina K.; Yeung, David T.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Cerasoli, Douglas M.; Lenz, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Human serum paraoxonase-1 (HuPON1) has the capacity to hydrolyze aryl esters, lactones, oxidized phospholipids, and organophosphorus (OP) compounds. HuPON1 and bacterially expressed chimeric recombinant PON1s (G2E6 and G3C9) differ by multiple amino acids, none of which are in the putative enzyme active site. To address the importance of these amino acid differences, the abilities of HuPON1, G2E6, G3C9, and several variants to hydrolyze phenyl acetate, paraoxon, and V-type OP nerve agents were examined. HuPON1 and G2E6 have a ten-fold greater catalytic efficiency toward phenyl acetate than G3C9. In contrast, bacterial PON1s are better able to promote hydrolysis of paraoxon, whereas HuPON1 is considerably better at catalyzing the hydrolysis of the nerve agents VX and VR. These studies demonstrate that mutations distant from the active site of PON1 have large and unpredictable effects on the substrate specificities and possibly the hydrolytic mechanisms of HuPON1, G2E6, and G3C9. The replacement of residue H115 in the putative active site with tryptophan (H115W) has highly disparate effects on HuPON1 and G2E6. In HuPON1, variant H115W loses the ability to hydrolyze VR but has improved activity toward paraoxon and VX. The H115W variant of G2E6 has similar paraoxonase activity to wild type G2E6, modest activity with phenyl acetate and VR, and increased VX hydrolysis. VR inhibits H115W HuPON1 competitively when paraoxon is the substrate and non-competitively when VX is the substrate. We have identified the first variant of HuPON1, H115W, that displays significantly enhanced catalytic activity against an authentic V-type nerve agent. PMID:19764813

  6. Hydrolysis of filter-paper cellulose to glucose by two recombinant endogenous glycosyl hydrolases of Coptotermes formosanus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes encoding for glycosyl hydrolases in multiple families were recovered from an EST library of Coptotermes formosanus, a wood-eating insect. Functional analyses of these genes not only shed light on the mechanisms the insect employs to successfully use cellulosic materials as energy sources, whic...

  7. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a family 101 glycoside hydrolase from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Katie J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2009-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a serious human pathogen that is responsible for a wide range of diseases including pneumonia, meningitis, septicaemia and otitis media. The full virulence of this bacterium is reliant on carbohydrate processing and metabolism, as revealed by biochemical and genetic studies. One carbohydrate-processing enzyme is a family 101 glycoside hydrolase (SpGH101) that is responsible for catalyzing the liberation of galactosyl beta1,3-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Galbeta1,3GalNAc) alpha-linked to serine or threonine residues of mucin-type glycoproteins. The 124 kDa catalytic module of this enzyme (SpGH101CM) was cloned and overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals were obtained in space group P2(1) and diffracted to 2.0 A resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.86, b = 88.91, c = 88.77 A, beta = 112.46 degrees. SpGH101CM also qualitatively displayed good activity towards the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-alpha-D-galactopyranoside, which is consistent with the classification of this enzyme as an endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. PMID:19194003

  8. Recombinant production, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic structure determination of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Vandavasi, Venugopal; Taylor-Creel, Kasey; McFeeters, Robert L.; Coates, Leighton; McFeeters, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth; EC 3.1.1.29) from the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X-ray analysis. Crystals were grown using hanging-drop vapor diffusion against a reservoir solution consisting of 0.03 M citric acid, 0.05 M bis-tris propane, 1% glycerol, 3% sucrose, 25% PEG 6000 pH 7.6. Crystals were used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the native protein at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement of the crystallographic data processed in space group P212121 with unit-cell parameters a = 62.1, b = 64.9, c = 110.5 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit of the crystallographic lattice was composed of two copies of the enzyme molecule with a 51% solvent fraction, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 2.02 Å3 Da−1. The structural coordinates reported serve as a foundation for computational and structure-guided efforts towards novel small-molecule Pth1 inhibitors and potential antibacterial development. PMID:25005080

  9. Recombinant production, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic structure determination of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Ronny C.; McFeeters, Hana; Coates, Leighton; McFeeters, Robert L.

    2014-10-15

    The peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase enzyme from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pth; EC 3.1.1.29) has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X-ray structural analysis. Suitable crystals were grown using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method after one week of incubation against a reservoir solution consisting of 20% polyethylene glycol 4000, 100 mM Tris pH 7.5, 10%(v/v) isopropyl alcohol. The crystals were used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the native protein at 1.77 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement of the crystallographic data processed in space group P6122 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 63.62,c = 155.20 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The asymmetric unit of the crystallographic lattice was composed of a single copy of the enzyme molecule with a 43% solvent fraction, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 2.43 Å3 Da-1. The crystallographic structure reported here will serve as the foundation for future structure-guided efforts towards the development of novel small-molecule inhibitors specific to bacterial Pths.

  10. Silica Gel for Enhanced Activity and Hypochlorite Protection of Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase in Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Radian, Adi; Aukema, Kelly G.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chlorinated isocyanuric acids are widely used water disinfectants that generate hypochlorite, but with repeated application, they build up cyanuric acid (CYA) that must be removed to maintain disinfection. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-treated Escherichia coli cells expressing cyanuric acid hydrolase (CAH) from Moorella thermoacetica exhibited significantly high CYA degradation rates and provided protection against enzyme inactivation by hypochlorite (chlorine). APTES coating or encapsulation of cells had two benefits: (i) overcoming diffusion limitations imposed by the cell wall and (ii) protecting against hypochlorite inactivation of CAH activity. Cells encapsulated in APTES gels degraded CYA three times faster than nonfunctionalized tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) gels, and cells coated with APTES degraded CYA at a rate of 29 µmol/min per mg of CAH protein, similar to the rate with purified enzyme. UV spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy showed that the higher rates were due to APTES increasing membrane permeability and enhancing cyanuric acid diffusion into the cytoplasm to reach the CAH enzyme. Purified CAH enzyme was shown to be rapidly inactivated by hypochlorite. APTES aggregates surrounding cells protected via the amine groups reacting with hypochlorite as shown by pH changes, zeta potential measurements, and infrared spectroscopy. APTES-encapsulated E. coli cells expressing CAH degraded cyanuric acid at high rates in the presence of 1 to 10 ppm hypochlorite, showing effectiveness under swimming pool conditions. In contrast, CAH activity in TEOS gels or free cells was completely inactivated by hypochlorite. These studies show that commercially available silica materials can selectively enhance, protect, and immobilize whole-cell biocatalysts for specialized applications. PMID:26530383

  11. Biosensor for Direct Determination of Fenitrothion and EPN Using Recombinant Pseudomonas putida JS444 with Surface Expressed Organophosphorus Hydrolase. 1. Modified Clark Oxygen Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yu; Mulchandani, Priti; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports a first microbial biosensor for rapid and cost-effective determination of organophosphorus pesticides fenitrothion and EPN. The biosensor consisted of recombinant PNP-degrading/oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida JS444 anchoring and displaying organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on its cell surface as biological sensing element and a dissolved oxygen electrode as the transducer. Surface-expressed OPH catalyzed the hydrolysis of fenitrothion and EPN to release 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol and p-nitrophenol, respectively, which were oxidized by the enzymatic machinery of Pseudomonas putida JS444 to carbon dioxide while consuming oxygen, which was measured and correlated to the concentration of organophosphates. Under the optimum operating conditions, the biosensor was able to measure as low as 277 ppb of fenitrothion and 1.6 ppm of EPN without interference from phenolic compounds and other commonly used pesticides such as carbamate pesticides, triazine herbicides and organophosphate pesticides without nitrophenyl substituent. The applicability of the biosensor to lake water was also demonstrated.

  12. Interaction of hepatic microsomal epoxide hydrolase derived from a recombinant baculovirus expression system with an azarene oxide and an aziridine substrate analogue.

    PubMed

    Lacourciere, G M; Vakharia, V N; Tan, C P; Morris, D I; Edwards, G H; Moos, M; Armstrong, R N

    1993-03-16

    A recombinant baculovirus (vEHX) encoding rat hepatic microsomal epoxide hydrolase has been constructed. Infection of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells with the recombinant virus results in the expression of the enzyme at a level estimated to be between 5% and 10% of the cellular protein. The enzyme, which can be purified in 15% yield by a simple three-step procedure involving detergent extraction, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and removal of the detergent on hydroxylapatite, has physical and kinetic properties very close to those of the enzyme obtained from rat liver microsomes. The interaction of the enzyme with two nitrogen-containing analogues of the substrate phenanthrene 9,10-oxide (1) was investigated in order to delineate the contributions of the oxirane group and the hydrophobic surface of the substrate to substrate recognition. The enzyme exhibits altered kinetic properties toward 1,10-phenanthroline 5,6-oxide (2) in which the biphenyl group of 1 is replaced with a bipyridyl group, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction between the complementary surfaces of the substrate and active site has an influence on catalysis. The conjugate acid of the aziridine analogue of 1, phenanthrene 9,10-imine (3), in which the oxirane oxygen is replaced with NH, has a pKa of 6.1, which allows the characterization of both the neutral and protonated aziridine (3H+) as substrate analogues for the enzyme. The pH dependence of the solvolysis reveals that 3H+ rearranges to a 65/35 mixture of 9-aminophenanthrene and 9-amino-10-hydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene 10(3)-fold faster than does 3. The neutral aziridine is a competitive inhibitor (Ki = 26 microM) of the enzyme at pH 8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8383521

  13. Biosensor for direct determination of organophosphate nerve agents using recombinant Escherichia coli with surface-expressed organophosphorus hydrolase. 2. Fiber-optic microbial biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mulchandani, A; Kaneva, I; Chen, W

    1998-12-01

    A fiber-optic microbial biosensor suitable for direct measurement of organophosphate nerve agents was developed. The unique features of this novel microbial biosensor were the recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase on the cell surface and the optical detection of the products of enzyme-catalyzed organophosphate hydrolysis. The use of cells with the metabolic enzyme expressed on the cell surface as a biological sensing element provides advantages of no resistance to mass transport of the analyte and product across the cell membrane and low cost due to elimination of enzyme purification, over the conventional microbial biosensors based on cells expressing enzyme intracellularly and enzyme-based sensors, respectively. The use of an optical transducer allows the detection of different organophosphates in a mixture, presently not feasible with acetylcholinesterase-based biosensors. E. coli cells expressing organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on the cell surface were immobilized in low melting temperature agarose on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated fiber-optic bundle. OPH-expressing E. coli cells catalyzed the hydrolysis of organophosphorus pesticides to form stoichiometric amounts of chromophoric products that absorb light at specific wavelengths. The backscattered radiation of the specific wavelength incident light was measured using a photomultiplier detector and correlated to the organophosphate concentration. The best sensitivity and response time were obtained using a sensor constructed with 1.5 mg of cells operating in pH 9, 50 mM HEPES buffer with 100 mM NaCl and 0.05 mM CoCl2 at 30 degrees C. At optimized conditions, the biosensor measured paraoxon, parathion, and coumaphos pesticides with high selectivity against triazine and carbamate pesticides in approximately 10 min. The lower detection limits were 3 microM for paraoxon and parathion and 5 microM for coumaphos. When stored in the

  14. NatB Domain-Containing CRA-1 Antagonizes Hydrolase ACER-1 Linking Acetyl-CoA Metabolism to the Initiation of Recombination during C. elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinmin; Kim, Hyun-Min; Elia, Andrew E.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) must take place during meiosis to ensure the formation of crossovers, which are required for accurate chromosome segregation, therefore avoiding aneuploidy. However, DSB formation must be tightly regulated to maintain genomic integrity. How this regulation operates in the context of different chromatin architectures and accessibility, and how it is linked to metabolic pathways, is not understood. We show here that global histone acetylation levels undergo changes throughout meiotic progression. Moreover, perturbations to global histone acetylation levels are accompanied by changes in the frequency of DSB formation in C. elegans. We provide evidence that the regulation of histone acetylation requires CRA-1, a NatB domain-containing protein homologous to human NAA25, which controls the levels of acetyl-Coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) by antagonizing ACER-1, a previously unknown and conserved acetyl-CoA hydrolase. CRA-1 is in turn negatively regulated by XND-1, an AT-hook containing protein. We propose that this newly defined protein network links acetyl-CoA metabolism to meiotic DSB formation via modulation of global histone acetylation. PMID:25768301

  15. Biosensor for direct determination of organophosphate nerve agents using recombinant Escherichia coli with surface-expressed organophosphorus hydrolase. 1. Potentiometric microbial electrode.

    PubMed

    Mulchandani, A; Mulchandani, P; Kaneva, I; Chen, W

    1998-10-01

    A potentiometric microbial biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate (OP) nerve agents was developed by modifying a pH electrode with an immobilized layer of Escherichia coli cells expressing organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on the cell surface. OPH catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosporus pesticides to release protons, the concentration of which is proportional to the amount of hydrolyzed substrate. The sensor signal and response time were optimized with respect to the buffer pH, ionic concentration of buffer, temperature, and weight of cells immobilized using paraoxon as substrate. The best sensitivity and response time were obtained using a sensor constructed with 2.5 mg of cells and operating in pH 8.5, 1 mM HEPES buffer. Using these conditions, the biosensor was used to measure as low as 2 microM of paraoxon, methyl parathion, and diazinon. The biosensor had very good storage and multiple use stability. The use of cells with the metabolic enzyme expressed on cell surface as a biological transducer provides advantages of no resistances to mass transport of the analyte and product across the cell membrane and low cost due to elimination of enzyme purification, over the conventional microbial biosensors based on cells expressing enzyme intracellularly and enzyme-based sensors, respectively. PMID:9784751

  16. Thermostable Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingyan; Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2009-01-01

    Cyanuric acid, a metabolic intermediate in the degradation of many s-triazine compounds, is further metabolized by cyanuric acid hydrolase. Cyanuric acid also accumulates in swimming pools due to the breakdown of the sanitizing agents di- and trichloroisocyanuric acid. Structurally stable cyanuric acid hydrolases are being considered for usage in pool water remediation. In this study, cyanuric acid hydrolase from the thermophile Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. The recombinant enzyme was found to have a broader temperature range and greater stability, at both elevated and low temperatures, than previously described cyanuric acid hydrolases. The enzyme had a narrow substrate specificity, acting only on cyanuric acid and N-methylisocyanuric acid. The M. thermoacetica enzyme did not require metals or other discernible cofactors for activity. Cyanuric acid hydrolase from M. thermoacetica is the most promising enzyme to use for cyanuric acid remediation applications. PMID:19767460

  17. Bacterial Expression and HTS Assessment of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Klingler, Franca-Maria; Wolf, Markus; Wittmann, Sandra; Gribbon, Philip; Proschak, Ewgenij

    2016-08-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme that possesses an epoxide hydrolase and lipid phosphatase activity (sEH-P) at two distinct catalytic domains. While the physiological role of the epoxide hydrolase domain is well understood, the consequences of the phosphatase activity remain unclear. Herein we describe the bacterial expression of the recombinant N-terminal domain of sEH-P and the development of a high-throughput screening protocol using a sensitive and commercially available substrate fluorescein diphosphate. The usability of the assay system was demonstrated and novel inhibitors of sEH-P were identified. PMID:27009944

  18. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  19. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  20. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2015-10-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. PMID:26187963

  1. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. PMID:26187963

  2. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Dimerization Is Required for Hydrolase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan W.; Subrahmanyan, Rishi M.; Summers, Sol A.; Xiao, Xiangshu; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a key role in the metabolic conversion of the protective eicosanoid 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid to 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. Accordingly, inhibition of sEH hydrolase activity has been shown to be beneficial in multiple models of cardiovascular diseases, thus identifying sEH as a valuable therapeutic target. Recently, a common human polymorphism (R287Q) was identified that reduces sEH hydrolase activity and is localized to the dimerization interface of the protein, suggesting a relationship between sEH dimerization and activity. To directly test the hypothesis that dimerization is essential for the proper function of sEH, we generated mutations within the sEH protein that would either disrupt or stabilize dimerization. We quantified the dimerization state of each mutant using a split firefly luciferase protein fragment-assisted complementation system. The hydrolase activity of each mutant was determined using a fluorescence-based substrate conversion assay. We found that mutations that disrupted dimerization also eliminated hydrolase enzymatic activity. In contrast, a mutation that stabilized dimerization restored hydrolase activity. Finally, we investigated the kinetics of sEH dimerization and found that the human R287Q polymorphism was metastable and capable of swapping dimer partners faster than the WT enzyme. These results indicate that dimerization is required for sEH hydrolase activity. Disrupting sEH dimerization may therefore serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for reducing sEH hydrolase activity. PMID:23362272

  3. Soluble epoxide hydrolase dimerization is required for hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonathan W; Subrahmanyan, Rishi M; Summers, Sol A; Xiao, Xiangshu; Alkayed, Nabil J

    2013-03-15

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a key role in the metabolic conversion of the protective eicosanoid 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid to 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. Accordingly, inhibition of sEH hydrolase activity has been shown to be beneficial in multiple models of cardiovascular diseases, thus identifying sEH as a valuable therapeutic target. Recently, a common human polymorphism (R287Q) was identified that reduces sEH hydrolase activity and is localized to the dimerization interface of the protein, suggesting a relationship between sEH dimerization and activity. To directly test the hypothesis that dimerization is essential for the proper function of sEH, we generated mutations within the sEH protein that would either disrupt or stabilize dimerization. We quantified the dimerization state of each mutant using a split firefly luciferase protein fragment-assisted complementation system. The hydrolase activity of each mutant was determined using a fluorescence-based substrate conversion assay. We found that mutations that disrupted dimerization also eliminated hydrolase enzymatic activity. In contrast, a mutation that stabilized dimerization restored hydrolase activity. Finally, we investigated the kinetics of sEH dimerization and found that the human R287Q polymorphism was metastable and capable of swapping dimer partners faster than the WT enzyme. These results indicate that dimerization is required for sEH hydrolase activity. Disrupting sEH dimerization may therefore serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for reducing sEH hydrolase activity. PMID:23362272

  4. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  5. Orally Bioavailable Potent Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Liu, Jun-Yan; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    A series of N,N′-disubstituted ureas having a conformationally restricted cis- or trans-1,4-cyclohexane α to the urea were prepared and tested as soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors. This series of compounds showed low nanomolar to picomolar activities against recombinant human sEH. Both isomers showed similar potencies, but the trans isomers were more metabolically stable in human hepatic microsomes. Furthermore, these new potent inhibitors show a greater metabolic stability in vivo than previously described sEH inhibitors. We demonstrated that trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid 13g (t-AUCB, IC50 = 1.3 ± 0.05 nM) had excellent oral bioavailability (98%, n = 2) and blood area under the curve in dogs and was effective in vivo to treat hypotension in lipopolysaccharide challenged murine models. PMID:17616115

  6. Polyglycine hydrolases secreted by pathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogens are known to produce proteases that target host defense proteins. Here we describe polyglycine hydrolases, fungal proteases that selectively cleave glycine-glycine peptide bonds within the polyglycine interdomain linker of targeted plant defense chitinases. Polyglycine hydrolases were puri...

  7. Potent Urea and Carbamate Inhibitors of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisseau, Christophe; Goodrow, Marvin H.; Dowdy, Deanna; Zheng, Jiang; Greene, Jessica F.; Sanborn, James R.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    1999-08-01

    The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a significant role in the biosynthesis of inflammation mediators as well as xenobiotic transformations. Herein, we report the discovery of substituted ureas and carbamates as potent inhibitors of sEH. Some of these selective, competitive tightbinding inhibitors with nanomolar Ki values interacted stoichiometrically with the homogenous recombinant murine and human sEHs. These inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of trans-stilbene oxide, which is active as the epoxide, but reduce cytotoxicity of leukotoxin, which is activated by epoxide hydrolase to its toxic diol. They also reduce toxicity of leukotoxin in vivo in mice and prevent symptoms suggestive of acute respiratory distress syndrome. These potent inhibitors may be valuable tools for testing hypotheses of involvement of diol and epoxide lipids in chemical mediation in vitro or in vivo systems.

  8. Human valacyclovir hydrolase/biphenyl hydrolase-like protein is a highly efficient homocysteine thiolactonase.

    PubMed

    Marsillach, Judit; Suzuki, Stephanie M; Richter, Rebecca J; McDonald, Matthew G; Rademacher, Peter M; MacCoss, Michael J; Hsieh, Edward J; Rettie, Allan E; Furlong, Clement E

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteinylation of lysine residues by homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL), a reactive homocysteine metabolite, results in protein aggregation and malfunction, and is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular, autoimmune and neurological diseases. Human plasma paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and bleomycin hydrolase (Blmh) have been reported as the physiological HCTL detoxifying enzymes. However, the catalytic efficiency of HCTL hydrolysis by Blmh is low and not saturated at 20 mM HCTL. The catalytic efficiency of PON1 for HCTL hydrolysis is 100-fold lower than that of Blmh. A homocysteine thiolactonase (HCTLase) was purified from human liver and identified by mass spectrometry (MS) as the previously described human biphenyl hydrolase-like protein (BPHL). To further characterize this newly described HCTLase activity, BPHL was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The sequence of the recombinant BPHL (rBPHL) and hydrolytic products of the substrates HCTL and valacyclovir were verified by MS. We found that the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of rBPHL for HCTL hydrolysis was 7.7 × 10(4) M(-1)s(-1), orders of magnitude higher than that of PON1 or Blmh, indicating a more significant physiological role for BPHL in detoxifying HCTL. PMID:25333274

  9. Human Valacyclovir Hydrolase/Biphenyl Hydrolase-Like Protein Is a Highly Efficient Homocysteine Thiolactonase

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Matthew G.; Rademacher, Peter M.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Hsieh, Edward J.; Rettie, Allan E.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteinylation of lysine residues by homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL), a reactive homocysteine metabolite, results in protein aggregation and malfunction, and is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular, autoimmune and neurological diseases. Human plasma paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and bleomycin hydrolase (Blmh) have been reported as the physiological HCTL detoxifying enzymes. However, the catalytic efficiency of HCTL hydrolysis by Blmh is low and not saturated at 20 mM HCTL. The catalytic efficiency of PON1 for HCTL hydrolysis is 100-fold lower than that of Blmh. A homocysteine thiolactonase (HCTLase) was purified from human liver and identified by mass spectrometry (MS) as the previously described human biphenyl hydrolase-like protein (BPHL). To further characterize this newly described HCTLase activity, BPHL was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The sequence of the recombinant BPHL (rBPHL) and hydrolytic products of the substrates HCTL and valacyclovir were verified by MS. We found that the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of rBPHL for HCTL hydrolysis was 7.7 × 104 M−1s−1, orders of magnitude higher than that of PON1 or Blmh, indicating a more significant physiological role for BPHL in detoxifying HCTL. PMID:25333274

  10. Cloning, Expression and Characterization of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 39 Xylosidase from Bacillus Halodurans C-125

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding a glycoside hydrolase family 39 xylosidase (BH1068) from the alkaliphile Bacillus halodurans strain C-125 was cloned with a C-terminal His-tag and the recombinant gene product termed XylBH1068 was expressed in E. coli. Of the artificial substrates tested, XylBH1068 hydrolyzed nitro...

  11. Hierarchical classification of glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Naumoff, D G

    2011-06-01

    This review deals with structural and functional features of glycoside hydrolases, a widespread group of enzymes present in almost all living organisms. Their catalytic domains are grouped into 120 amino acid sequence-based families in the international classification of the carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZy database). At a higher hierarchical level some of these families are combined in 14 clans. Enzymes of the same clan have common evolutionary origin of their genes and share the most important functional characteristics such as composition of the active center, anomeric configuration of cleaved glycosidic bonds, and molecular mechanism of the catalyzed reaction (either inverting, or retaining). There are now extensive data in the literature concerning the relationship between glycoside hydrolase families belonging to different clans and/or included in none of them, as well as information on phylogenetic protein relationship within particular families. Summarizing these data allows us to propose a multilevel hierarchical classification of glycoside hydrolases and their homologs. It is shown that almost the whole variety of the enzyme catalytic domains can be brought into six main folds, large groups of proteins having the same three-dimensional structure and the supposed common evolutionary origin. PMID:21639842

  12. Structure-guided engineering of molinate hydrolase for the degradation of thiocarbamate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Leite, José P; Duarte, Márcia; Paiva, Ana M; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Matias, Pedro M; Nunes, Olga C; Gales, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Molinate is a recalcitrant thiocarbamate used to control grass weeds in rice fields. The recently described molinate hydrolase, from Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T, plays a key role in the only known molinate degradation pathway ending in the formation of innocuous compounds. Here we report the crystal structure of recombinant molinate hydrolase at 2.27 Å. The structure reveals a homotetramer with a single mononuclear metal-dependent active site per monomer. The active site architecture shows similarities with other amidohydrolases and enables us to propose a general acid-base catalysis mechanism for molinate hydrolysis. Molinate hydrolase is unable to degrade bulkier thiocarbamate pesticides such as thiobencarb which is used mostly in rice crops. Using a structural-based approach, we were able to generate a mutant (Arg187Ala) that efficiently degrades thiobencarb. The engineered enzyme is suitable for the development of a broader thiocarbamate bioremediation system. PMID:25905461

  13. Structure-Guided Engineering of Molinate Hydrolase for the Degradation of Thiocarbamate Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Ana M.; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Matias, Pedro M.; Nunes, Olga C.; Gales, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Molinate is a recalcitrant thiocarbamate used to control grass weeds in rice fields. The recently described molinate hydrolase, from Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T, plays a key role in the only known molinate degradation pathway ending in the formation of innocuous compounds. Here we report the crystal structure of recombinant molinate hydrolase at 2.27 Å. The structure reveals a homotetramer with a single mononuclear metal-dependent active site per monomer. The active site architecture shows similarities with other amidohydrolases and enables us to propose a general acid-base catalysis mechanism for molinate hydrolysis. Molinate hydrolase is unable to degrade bulkier thiocarbamate pesticides such as thiobencarb which is used mostly in rice crops. Using a structural-based approach, we were able to generate a mutant (Arg187Ala) that efficiently degrades thiobencarb. The engineered enzyme is suitable for the development of a broader thiocarbamate bioremediation system. PMID:25905461

  14. Identification of oxidized protein hydrolase of human erythrocytes as acylpeptide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Fujino, T; Watanabe, K; Beppu, M; Kikugawa, K; Yasuda, H

    2000-03-16

    Partial amino acid sequence of 80 kDa oxidized protein hydrolase (OPH), a serine protease present in human erythrocyte cytosol (Fujino et al., J. Biochem. 124 (1998) 1077-1085) that is adherent to oxidized erythrocyte membranes and preferentially degrades oxidatively damaged proteins (Beppu et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1196 (1994) 81-87; Fujino et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1374 (1998) 47-55) was determined. The N-terminal amino acid of diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP)-labeled OPH was suggested to be masked. Six peptide fragments of OPH obtained by digestion of DFP-labeled OPH with lysyl endopeptidase were isolated by use of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and the sequence of more than eight amino acids from the N-terminal position of each peptide was determined. Results of homology search of amino acid sequence of each peptide strongly suggested that the protein was identical with human liver acylpeptide hydrolase (ACPH). OPH showed ACPH activity when N-acetyl-L-alanine p-nitroanilide and N-acetylmethionyl L-alanine were used as substrates. Glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged recombinant ACPH (rACPH) was prepared by use of baculovirus expression system as a 107-kDa protein from cDNA of human erythroleukemic cell line K-562. rACPH reacted with anti-OPH antiserum from rabbit. rACPH showed OPH activity when hydrogen peroxide-oxidized or glycated bovine serum albumin was used as substrates. As well as the enzyme activities of OPH, those of rACPH were inhibited by DFP. The results clearly demonstrate that ACPH, whose physiological function has not yet been well characterized, can play an important role as OPH in destroying oxidatively damaged proteins in living cells. PMID:10719179

  15. Prunus serotina Amygdalin Hydrolase and Prunasin Hydrolase 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun Ping; Swain, Elisabeth; Poulton, Jonathan E.

    1992-01-01

    In black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) seed homogenates, amygdalin hydrolase (AH) participates with prunasin hydrolase (PH) and mandelonitrile lyase in the sequential degradation of (R)-amygdalin to HCN, benzaldehyde, and glucose. Four isozymes of AH (designated AH I, I′, II, II′) were purified from mature cherry seeds by concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and chromatofocusing. All isozymes were monomeric glycoproteins with native molecular masses of 52 kD. They showed similar kinetic properties (pH optima, Km, Vmax) but differed in their isoelectric points and N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analytical isoelectric focusing revealed the presence of subisozymes of each isozyme. The relative abundance of these isozymes and/or subisozymes varied from seed to seed. Three isozymes of PH (designated PH I, IIa, and IIb) were purified to apparent homogeneity by affinity, ion-exchange, and hydroxyapatite chromatography and by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PH I and PH IIb are 68-kD monomeric glycoproteins, whereas PH IIa is dimeric (140 kD). The N-terminal sequences of all PH and AH isozymes showed considerable similarity. Polyclonal antisera raised in rabbits against deglycosylated AH I or a mixture of the three deglycosylated PH isozymes were not monospecific as judged by immunoblotting analysis, but also cross-reacted with the opposing glucosidase. Monospecific antisera deemed suitable for immunocytochemistry and screening of expression libraries were obtained by affinity chromatography. Each antiserum recognized all known isozymes of the specific glucosidase used as antigen. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:16652959

  16. 3-D QSAR ANALYSIS OF INHIBITION OF MURINE SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE (MSEH) BY BENZOYLUREAS, ARYLUREAS, AND THEIR ANALOGUES. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two hundred and seventy-one compounds including benzoylureas, arylureas and related compounds were assayed using recombinant murine soluble epoxide hydrolase (MsEH) produced from a baculovirus expression system. Among all the insect growth regulators assayed, 18 benzoylphenylu...

  17. Assays for the classification of two types of esterases: carboxylic ester hydrolases and phosphoric triester hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Anspaugh, Douglas D; Roe, R Michael

    2002-11-01

    Assays for the Classification of Two Types of Esterases: Carboxylic Ester Hydrolase and Phosphoric Triester Hydrolase (Douglas D. Anspaugh and Michael Roe, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina). This unit describes assays that quantitate two types of esterase the carboxylic ester hydrolases and the phosphoric triester hydrolases. Carboxylic ester hydrolases include the B-esterases, which are inhibited by organophosphorus compounds. Among the phosphoric triester hydrolases is aryldialkylphosphatase, which has been called A-esterase or paraoxonase due to its ability to oxidize paraoxon and other organophosphates. These assays are colorimetric and miniaturized for rapid simultaneous testing of multiple, small-volume samples in a microtiter plate format. There is also a discussion of the history of esterase nomenclature and the reasons why this large group of enzymes is so difficult to classify. PMID:20945297

  18. Effect of Bile Salt Hydrolase Inhibitors on a Bile Salt Hydrolase from Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Negga, Rekek; Zeng, Ximin; Smith, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Bile salt hydrolase (BSH), a widely distributed function of the gut microbiota, has a profound impact on host lipid metabolism and energy harvest. Recent studies suggest that BSH inhibitors are promising alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) for enhanced animal growth performance and food safety. Using a high-purity BSH from Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we have identified a panel of BSH inhibitors. However, it is still unknown if these inhibitors also effectively inhibit the function of the BSH enzymes from other bacterial species with different sequence and substrate spectrum. In this study, we performed bioinformatics analysis and determined the inhibitory effect of identified BSH inhibitors on a BSH from L. acidophilus. Although the L. acidophilus BSH is phylogenetically distant from the L. salivarius BSH, sequence analysis and structure modeling indicated the two BSH enzymes contain conserved, catalytically important amino residues and domain. His-tagged recombinant BSH from L. acidophilus was further purified and used to determine inhibitory effect of specific compounds. Previously identified BSH inhibitors also exhibited potent inhibitory effects on the L. acidophilus BSH. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the BSH from L. salivarius is an ideal candidate for screening BSH inhibitors, the promising alternatives to AGP for enhanced feed efficiency, growth performance and profitability of food animals. PMID:25526498

  19. Protective mechanisms against homocysteine toxicity: the role of bleomycin hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Zimny, Jaroslaw; Sikora, Marta; Guranowski, Andrzej; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2006-08-11

    Homocysteine (Hcy) editing by methionyl-tRNA synthetase results in the formation of Hcy-thiolactone and initiates a pathway that has been implicated in human disease. In addition to being cleared from the circulation by urinary excretion, Hcy-thiolactone is detoxified by the serum Hcy-thiolactonase/paraoxonase carried on high density lipoprotein. Whether Hcy-thiolactone is detoxified inside cells was unknown. Here we show that Hcy-thiolactone is hydrolyzed by an intracellular enzyme, which we have purified to homogeneity from human placenta and identified by proteomic analyses as human bleomycin hydrolase (hBLH). We have also purified an Hcy-thiolactonase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified it as yeast bleomycin hydrolase (yBLH). BLH belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved cysteine aminopeptidases, and its only known biologically relevant function was deamidation of the anticancer drug bleomycin. Recombinant hBLH or yBLH, expressed in Escherichia coli, exhibits Hcy-thiolactonase activity similar to that of the native enzymes. Active site mutations, C73A for hBLH and H369A for yBLH, inactivate Hcy-thiolactonase activities. Yeast blh1 mutants are deficient in Hcy-thiolactonase activity in vitro and in vivo, produce more Hcy-thiolactone, and exhibit greater sensitivity to Hcy toxicity than wild type yeast cells. Our data suggest that BLH protects cells against Hcy toxicity by hydrolyzing intracellular Hcy-thiolactone. PMID:16769724

  20. Molecular Identification of β-Citrylglutamate Hydrolase as Glutamate Carboxypeptidase 3*

    PubMed Central

    Collard, François; Vertommen, Didier; Constantinescu, Stefan; Buts, Lieven; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2011-01-01

    β-Citrylglutamate (BCG), a compound present in adult testis and in the CNS during the pre- and perinatal periods is synthesized by an intracellular enzyme encoded by the RIMKLB gene and hydrolyzed by an as yet unidentified ectoenzyme. To identify β-citrylglutamate hydrolase, this enzyme was partially purified from mouse testis and characterized. Interestingly, in the presence of Ca2+, the purified enzyme specifically hydrolyzed β-citrylglutamate and did not act on N-acetyl-aspartylglutamate (NAAG). However, both compounds were hydrolyzed in the presence of Mn2+. This behavior and the fact that the enzyme was glycosylated and membrane-bound suggested that β-citrylglutamate hydrolase belonged to the same family of protein as glutamate carboxypeptidase 2 (GCP2), the enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-aspartylglutamate. The mouse tissue distribution of β-citrylglutamate hydrolase was strikingly similar to that of the glutamate carboxypeptidase 3 (GCP3) mRNA, but not that of the GCP2 mRNA. Furthermore, similarly to β-citrylglutamate hydrolase purified from testis, recombinant GCP3 specifically hydrolyzed β-citrylglutamate in the presence of Ca2+, and acted on both N-acetyl-aspartylglutamate and β-citrylglutamate in the presence of Mn2+, whereas recombinant GCP2 only hydrolyzed N-acetyl-aspartylglutamate and this, in a metal-independent manner. A comparison of the structures of the catalytic sites of GCP2 and GCP3, as well as mutagenesis experiments revealed that a single amino acid substitution (Asn-519 in GCP2, Ser-509 in GCP3) is largely responsible for GCP3 being able to hydrolyze β-citrylglutamate. Based on the crystal structure of GCP3 and kinetic analysis, we propose that GCP3 forms a labile catalytic Zn-Ca cluster that is critical for its β-citrylglutamate hydrolase activity. PMID:21908619

  1. Molecular identification of β-citrylglutamate hydrolase as glutamate carboxypeptidase 3.

    PubMed

    Collard, François; Vertommen, Didier; Constantinescu, Stefan; Buts, Lieven; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2011-11-01

    β-Citrylglutamate (BCG), a compound present in adult testis and in the CNS during the pre- and perinatal periods is synthesized by an intracellular enzyme encoded by the RIMKLB gene and hydrolyzed by an as yet unidentified ectoenzyme. To identify β-citrylglutamate hydrolase, this enzyme was partially purified from mouse testis and characterized. Interestingly, in the presence of Ca(2+), the purified enzyme specifically hydrolyzed β-citrylglutamate and did not act on N-acetyl-aspartylglutamate (NAAG). However, both compounds were hydrolyzed in the presence of Mn(2+). This behavior and the fact that the enzyme was glycosylated and membrane-bound suggested that β-citrylglutamate hydrolase belonged to the same family of protein as glutamate carboxypeptidase 2 (GCP2), the enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-aspartylglutamate. The mouse tissue distribution of β-citrylglutamate hydrolase was strikingly similar to that of the glutamate carboxypeptidase 3 (GCP3) mRNA, but not that of the GCP2 mRNA. Furthermore, similarly to β-citrylglutamate hydrolase purified from testis, recombinant GCP3 specifically hydrolyzed β-citrylglutamate in the presence of Ca(2+), and acted on both N-acetyl-aspartylglutamate and β-citrylglutamate in the presence of Mn(2+), whereas recombinant GCP2 only hydrolyzed N-acetyl-aspartylglutamate and this, in a metal-independent manner. A comparison of the structures of the catalytic sites of GCP2 and GCP3, as well as mutagenesis experiments revealed that a single amino acid substitution (Asn-519 in GCP2, Ser-509 in GCP3) is largely responsible for GCP3 being able to hydrolyze β-citrylglutamate. Based on the crystal structure of GCP3 and kinetic analysis, we propose that GCP3 forms a labile catalytic Zn-Ca cluster that is critical for its β-citrylglutamate hydrolase activity. PMID:21908619

  2. Sulfonyl fluoride inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Alapafuja, Shakiru O; Nikas, Spyros P; Bharathan, Indu T; Shukla, Vidyanand G; Nasr, Mahmoud L; Bowman, Anna L; Zvonok, Nikolai; Li, Jing; Shi, Xiaomeng; Engen, John R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2012-11-26

    Sulfonyl fluorides are known to inhibit esterases. Early work from our laboratory has identified hexadecyl sulfonylfluoride (AM374) as a potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). We now report on later generation sulfonyl fluoride analogs that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of FAAH. Using recombinant rat and human FAAH, we show that 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)pentanesulfonyl fluoride (AM3506) has similar inhibitory activity for both the rat and the human enzyme, while rapid dilution assays and mass spectrometry analysis suggest that the compound is a covalent modifier for FAAH and inhibits its action in an irreversible manner. Our SAR results are highlighted by molecular docking of key analogs. PMID:23083016

  3. Purification and Characterization of TrzF: Biuret Hydrolysis by Allophanate Hydrolase Supports Growth

    PubMed Central

    Shapir, Nir; Cheng, Gang; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2006-01-01

    TrzF, the allophanate hydrolase from Enterobacter cloacae strain 99, was cloned, overexpressed in the presence of a chaperone protein, and purified to homogeneity. Native TrzF had a subunit molecular weight of 65,401 and a subunit stoichiometry of α2 and did not contain significant levels of metals. TrzF showed time-dependent inhibition by phenyl phosphorodiamidate and is a member of the amidase signature protein family. TrzF was highly active in the hydrolysis of allophanate but was not active with urea, despite having been previously considered a urea amidolyase. TrzF showed lower activity with malonamate, malonamide, and biuret. The allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, AtzF, was also shown to hydrolyze biuret slowly. Since biuret and allophanate are consecutive metabolites in cyanuric acid metabolism, the low level of biuret hydrolase activity can have physiological significance. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain containing atzD, encoding cyanuric acid hydrolase that produces biuret, and atzF grew slowly on cyanuric acid as a source of nitrogen. The amount of growth produced was consistent with the liberation of 3 mol of ammonia from cyanuric acid. In vitro, TrzF was shown to hydrolyze biuret to liberate 3 mol of ammonia. The biuret hydrolyzing activity of TrzF might also be physiologically relevant in native strains. E. cloacae strain 99 grows on cyanuric acid with a significant accumulation of biuret. PMID:16597948

  4. λ Recombination and Recombineering.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kenan C

    2016-05-01

    The bacteriophage λ Red homologous recombination system has been studied over the past 50 years as a model system to define the mechanistic details of how organisms exchange DNA segments that share extended regions of homology. The λ Red system proved useful as a system to study because recombinants could be easily generated by co-infection of genetically marked phages. What emerged from these studies was the recognition that replication of phage DNA was required for substantial Red-promoted recombination in vivo, and the critical role that double-stranded DNA ends play in allowing the Red proteins access to the phage DNA chromosomes. In the past 16 years, however, the λ Red recombination system has gained a new notoriety. When expressed independently of other λ functions, the Red system is able to promote recombination of linear DNA containing limited regions of homology (∼50 bp) with the Escherichia coli chromosome, a process known as recombineering. This review explains how the Red system works during a phage infection, and how it is utilized to make chromosomal modifications of E. coli with such efficiency that it changed the nature and number of genetic manipulations possible, leading to advances in bacterial genomics, metabolic engineering, and eukaryotic genetics. PMID:27223821

  5. Hydrolase-catalyzed biotransformations in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Gorke, Johnathan T; Srienc, Friedrich; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2008-03-14

    Hydrolases show good catalytic activity in deep eutectic solvents, despite the presence of urea, which can denature enzymes, or alcohols, which can interfere with hydrolase-catalyzed reactions. PMID:18309428

  6. γ-PGA Hydrolases of Phage Origin in Bacillus subtilis and Other Microbial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Mamberti, Stefania; Prati, Paola; Cremaschi, Paolo; Seppi, Claudio; Morelli, Carlo F; Galizzi, Alessandro; Fabbi, Massimo; Calvio, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamate (γ-PGA) is an industrially interesting polymer secreted mainly by members of the class Bacilli which forms a shield able to protect bacteria from phagocytosis and phages. Few enzymes are known to degrade γ-PGA; among them is a phage-encoded γ-PGA hydrolase, PghP. The supposed role of PghP in phages is to ensure access to the surface of bacterial cells by dismantling the γ-PGA barrier. We identified four unannotated B. subtilis genes through similarity of their encoded products to PghP; in fact these genes reside in prophage elements of B. subtilis genome. The recombinant products of two of them demonstrate efficient polymer degradation, confirming that sequence similarity reflects functional homology. Genes encoding similar γ-PGA hydrolases were identified in phages specific for the order Bacillales and in numerous microbial genomes, not only belonging to that order. The distribution of the γ-PGA biosynthesis operon was also investigated with a bioinformatics approach; it was found that the list of organisms endowed with γ-PGA biosynthetic functions is larger than expected and includes several pathogenic species. Moreover in non-Bacillales bacteria the predicted γ-PGA hydrolase genes are preferentially found in species that do not have the genetic asset for polymer production. Our findings suggest that γ-PGA hydrolase genes might have spread across microbial genomes via horizontal exchanges rather than via phage infection. We hypothesize that, in natural habitats rich in γ-PGA supplied by producer organisms, the availability of hydrolases that release glutamate oligomers from γ-PGA might be a beneficial trait under positive selection. PMID:26158264

  7. γ-PGA Hydrolases of Phage Origin in Bacillus subtilis and Other Microbial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Mamberti, Stefania; Prati, Paola; Cremaschi, Paolo; Seppi, Claudio; Morelli, Carlo F.; Galizzi, Alessandro; Fabbi, Massimo; Calvio, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamate (γ-PGA) is an industrially interesting polymer secreted mainly by members of the class Bacilli which forms a shield able to protect bacteria from phagocytosis and phages. Few enzymes are known to degrade γ-PGA; among them is a phage-encoded γ-PGA hydrolase, PghP. The supposed role of PghP in phages is to ensure access to the surface of bacterial cells by dismantling the γ-PGA barrier. We identified four unannotated B. subtilis genes through similarity of their encoded products to PghP; in fact these genes reside in prophage elements of B. subtilis genome. The recombinant products of two of them demonstrate efficient polymer degradation, confirming that sequence similarity reflects functional homology. Genes encoding similar γ-PGA hydrolases were identified in phages specific for the order Bacillales and in numerous microbial genomes, not only belonging to that order. The distribution of the γ-PGA biosynthesis operon was also investigated with a bioinformatics approach; it was found that the list of organisms endowed with γ-PGA biosynthetic functions is larger than expected and includes several pathogenic species. Moreover in non-Bacillales bacteria the predicted γ-PGA hydrolase genes are preferentially found in species that do not have the genetic asset for polymer production. Our findings suggest that γ-PGA hydrolase genes might have spread across microbial genomes via horizontal exchanges rather than via phage infection. We hypothesize that, in natural habitats rich in γ-PGA supplied by producer organisms, the availability of hydrolases that release glutamate oligomers from γ-PGA might be a beneficial trait under positive selection. PMID:26158264

  8. Involvement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae hydrolase Ldh1p in lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Debelyy, Mykhaylo O; Thoms, Sven; Connerth, Melanie; Daum, Günther; Erdmann, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Here, we report the functional characterization of the newly identified lipid droplet hydrolase Ldh1p. Recombinant Ldh1p exhibits esterase and triacylglycerol lipase activities. Mutation of the serine in the hydrolase/lipase motif GXSXG completely abolished esterase activity. Ldh1p is required for the maintenance of a steady-state level of the nonpolar and polar lipids of lipid droplets. A characteristic feature of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δldh1 strain is the appearance of giant lipid droplets and an excessive accumulation of nonpolar lipids and phospholipids upon growth on medium containing oleic acid as a sole carbon source. Ldh1p is thought to play a role in maintaining the lipid homeostasis in yeast by regulating both phospholipid and nonpolar lipid levels. PMID:21478434

  9. Twisting of glycosidic bonds by hydrolases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patterns of scissile bond twisting have been found in crystal structures of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that are complexed with substrates and inhibitors. To estimate the increased potential energy in the substrates that results from this twisting, we have plotted torsion angles for the scissile bond...

  10. Structure and function of polyglycine hydrolases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyglycine hydrolases (PGH)s are secreted fungal endoproteases that cleave polyglycine linkers of targeted plant defense chitinases. Unlike typical endoproteases that cleave a specific peptide bond, these 640 amino acid glycoproteins selectively cleave one of multiple peptide bonds within polyglyci...

  11. PLANT FATTY ACID (ETHANOL) AMIDE HYDROLASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) plays a central role in modulating endogenous N-acylethanolamine (NAE) levels in vertebrates, and, in part, constitutes an “endocannabinoid” signaling pathway that regulates diverse physiological and behavioral processes in animals. Recently, an Arabidopsis FAAH hom...

  12. Pyrazole phenylcyclohexylcarbamates as inhibitors of human fatty acid amide hydrolases (FAAH).

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh Tabrizi, Mojgan; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Ruggiero, Emanuela; Saponaro, Giulia; Baraldi, Stefania; Romagnoli, Romeo; Martinelli, Adriano; Tuccinardi, Tiziano

    2015-06-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors have gained attention as potential therapeutic targets in the management of neuropathic pain. Here, we report a series of pyrazole phenylcyclohexylcarbamate derivatives standing on the known carbamoyl FAAH inhibitor URB597. Structural modifications led to the recognition of compound 22 that inhibited human recombinant FAAH (hrFAAH) in the low nanomolar range (IC50 = 11 nM). The most active compounds of this series showed significant selectivity toward monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) enzyme. In addition, molecular modeling and reversibility behavior of the new class of FAAH inhibitors are presented in this article. PMID:26002335

  13. Cloning and analysis of bile salt hydrolase genes from Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC No. 8198.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiang-Chao; Luo, Xue-Gang; Wang, Chong-Xi; Ma, De-Yun; Wang, Yan; He, Ying-Ying; Li, Wen; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2014-05-01

    Genes coding for bile salt hydrolase of Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 8198, a novel probiotic strain isolated from silage, were identified, analyzed and cloned. L. plantarum strongly resisted the inhibitory effects of bile salts and also decreased serum cholesterol levels by 20% in mice with hypercholesterolemia. Using RT-PCR analysis, bsh2, bsh3 and bsh4 were upregulated by bile salts in a dose-dependent manner. All three bsh genes had high similarity with those of other Lactobacillus strains. All three recombinant BSHs had high activities for the hydrolysis of glycodeoxycholic acids and taurodeoxycholic acids. PMID:24375235

  14. Structure of HsaD, a steroid-degrading hydrolase, from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lack, Nathan; Lowe, Edward D.; Liu, Jie; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Noble, Martin E. M.; Sim, Edith; Westwood, Isaac M.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of HsaD, a carbon–carbon bond serine hydrolase involved in steroid catabolism that is critical for the survival of M. tuberculosis inside human macrophages, has been solved by X-ray crystallography. Data were collected at the Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire, England: this paper describes one of the first structures determined at the new synchrotron. Tuberculosis is a major cause of death worldwide. Understanding of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been advanced by gene analysis and has led to the identification of genes that are important for intracellular survival in macrophages. One of these genes encodes HsaD, a meta-cleavage product (MCP) hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of a carbon–carbon bond in cholesterol metabolism. This paper describes the production of HsaD as a recombinant protein and, following crystallization, the determination of its three-dimensional structure to 2.35 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography at the Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire, England. To the authors’ knowledge, this study constitutes the first report of a structure determined at the new synchrotron facility. The volume of the active-site cleft of the HsaD enzyme is more than double the corresponding active-site volumes of related MCP hydrolases involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, consistent with the specificity of HsaD for steroids such as cholesterol. Knowledge of the structure of the enzyme facilitates the design of inhibitors.

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of plant S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (Lupinus luteus)

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Bujacz, Grzegorz; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2008-07-01

    Single crystals of recombinant S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase from L. luteus in complex with adenosine diffract X-rays to 1.17 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals are tetragonal, space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, and contain one copy of the dimeric enzyme in the asymmetric unit. By degrading S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine, which is a byproduct of S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methylation reactions, S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHase) acts as a regulator of cellular methylation processes. S-Adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase from the leguminose plant yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus), LlSAHase, which is composed of 485 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 55 kDa, has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals of LlSAHase in complex with adenosine were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 20%(w/v) PEG 4000 and 10%(v/v) 2-propanol as precipitants in 0.1 M Tris–HCl buffer pH 8.0. The crystals were tetragonal, space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.4, c = 126.5 Å and contained two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit, corresponding to the functional dimeric form of the enzyme. Atomic resolution (1.17 Å) X-ray diffraction data have been collected using synchrotron radiation.

  16. Synergistic action modes of arabinan degradation by exo- and endo-arabinosyl hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Mi; Jang, Myoung-Uoon; Oh, Gyo Won; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kang, Jung-Hyun; Song, Yeong-Bok; Han, Nam Soo; Kim, Tae-Jip

    2015-02-01

    Two recombinant arabinosyl hydrolases, α-L-arabinofuranosidase from Geobacillus sp. KCTC 3012 (GAFase) and endo-(1,5)-α-L-arabinanase from Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 (BlABNase), were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and their synergistic modes of action against sugar beet (branched) arabinan were investigated. Whereas GAFase hydrolyzed 35.9% of L-arabinose residues from sugar beet (branched) arabinan, endo-action of BlABNase released only 0.5% of L-arabinose owing to its extremely low accessibility towards branched arabinan. Interestingly, the simultaneous treatment of GAFase and BlABNase could liberate approximately 91.2% of L-arabinose from arabinan, which was significantly higher than any single exo-enzyme treatment (35.9%) or even stepwise exo- after endo-enzyme treatment (75.5%). Based on their unique modes of action, both exo- and endo-arabinosyl hydrolases can work in concert to catalyze the hydrolysis of arabinan to L-arabinose. At the early stage in arabinan degradation, exo-acting GAFase could remove the terminal arabinose branches to generate debranched arabinan, which could be successively hydrolyzed into arabinooligosaccharides via the endoaction of BlABNase. At the final stage, the simultaneous actions of exo- and endo-hydrolases could synergistically accelerate the L-arabinose production with high conversion yield. PMID:25433551

  17. Structural analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 glycoside hydrolase from CAZy family GH105

    SciTech Connect

    Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Sund, Christian J.; Hurley, Margaret M.

    2015-07-29

    The crystal structure of the protein product of the C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA-C0359 is structurally similar to YteR, an unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase from B. subtilis strain 168. Substrate modeling and electrostatic studies of the active site of the structure of CA-C0359 suggests that the protein can now be considered to be part of CAZy glycoside hydrolase family 105. Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA-C0359 encodes a putative unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase (URH) with distant amino-acid sequence homology to YteR of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. YteR, like other URHs, has core structural homology to unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolases, but hydrolyzes the unsaturated disaccharide derivative of rhamnogalacturonan I. The crystal structure of the recombinant CA-C0359 protein was solved to 1.6 Å resolution by molecular replacement using the phase information of the previously reported structure of YteR (PDB entry (http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/cr.cgi?rm)) from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The YteR-like protein is a six-α-hairpin barrel with two β-sheet strands and a small helix overlaying the end of the hairpins next to the active site. The protein has low primary protein sequence identity to YteR but is structurally similar. The two tertiary structures align with a root-mean-square deviation of 1.4 Å and contain a highly conserved active pocket. There is a conserved aspartic acid residue in both structures, which has been shown to be important for hydration of the C=C bond during the release of unsaturated galacturonic acid by YteR. A surface electrostatic potential comparison of CA-C0359 and proteins from CAZy families GH88 and GH105 reveals the make-up of the active site to be a combination of the unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase and the unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. Structural and electrostatic comparisons suggests that the protein may have a slightly different substrate

  18. Structures and Mechanisms of Nudix Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Mildvan,A.; Xia, Z.; Azurmendi, H.; saraswat, V.; Legler, P.; Massiah, M.; Gabelli, S.; Bianchet, M.; Kang, L.; Amzel, L.

    2005-01-01

    Nudix hydrolases are a family of proteins that contain the characteristic sequence GX(5)EX(7)REUXEEXG(I/L/V), the Nudix box. They catalyze the hydrolysis of a variety of nucleoside diphosphate derivatives such as ADP-ribose, Ap(n)A (3 hydrolases from several species, ranging from bacteria to humans, have been characterized, including, in some cases, the determination of their three-dimensional structures. The product of the Rv1700 gene of M. tuberculosis is a Nudix hydrolase specific for ADP-ribose (ADPR). We have determined the crystal structures of MT-ADPRase alone, and in complex with substrate, with substrate and the nonactivating metal ion Gd(3+), and in complex with a nonhydrolyzable ADPR analog and the activating metal ion Mn(2+). These structures, refined with data extending to resolutions between 2.0 and 2.3 A, showed that there are sequence differences in binding site residues between MT-ADPRase and a human homolog that may be exploited for antituberculosis drug development.

  19. Investigation of the Microheterogeneity and Aglycone Specificity-Conferring Residues of Black Cherry Prunasin Hydrolases1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiming; Hartmann, Stefanie; Shepherd, Brianne K.; Poulton, Jonathan E.

    2002-01-01

    In black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) seed homogenates, (R)-amygdalin is degraded to HCN, benzaldehyde, and glucose by the sequential action of amygdalin hydrolase (AH), prunasin hydrolase (PH), and mandelonitrile lyase. Leaves are also highly cyanogenic because they possess (R)-prunasin, PH, and mandelonitrile lyase. Taking both enzymological and molecular approaches, we demonstrate here that black cherry PH is encoded by a putative multigene family of at least five members. Their respective cDNAs (designated Ph1, Ph2, Ph3, Ph4, and Ph5) predict isoforms that share 49% to 92% amino acid identity with members of glycoside hydrolase family 1, including their catalytic asparagine-glutamate-proline and isoleucine-threonine-glutamate-asparagine-glycine motifs. Furthermore, consistent with the vacuolar/protein body location and glycoprotein character of these hydrolases, their open reading frames predict N-terminal signal sequences and multiple potential N-glycosylation sites. Genomic sequences corresponding to the open reading frames of these PHs and of the previously isolated AH1 isoform are interrupted at identical positions by 12 introns. Earlier studies established that native AH and PH display strict specificities toward their respective glucosidic substrates. Such behavior was also shown by recombinant AH1, PH2, and PH4 proteins after expression in Pichia pastoris. Three amino acid moieties that may play a role in conferring such aglycone specificities were predicted by structural modeling and comparative sequence analysis and tested by introducing single and multiple mutations into isoform AH1 by site-directed mutagenesis. The double mutant AH ID (Y200I and G394D) hydrolyzed prunasin at approximately 150% of the rate of amygdalin hydrolysis, whereas the other mutations failed to engender PH activity. PMID:12114579

  20. Structural analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 glycoside hydrolase from CAZy family GH105.

    PubMed

    Germane, Katherine L; Servinsky, Matthew D; Gerlach, Elliot S; Sund, Christian J; Hurley, Margaret M

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA_C0359 encodes a putative unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase (URH) with distant amino-acid sequence homology to YteR of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. YteR, like other URHs, has core structural homology to unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolases, but hydrolyzes the unsaturated disaccharide derivative of rhamnogalacturonan I. The crystal structure of the recombinant CA_C0359 protein was solved to 1.6 Å resolution by molecular replacement using the phase information of the previously reported structure of YteR (PDB entry 1nc5) from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The YteR-like protein is a six-α-hairpin barrel with two β-sheet strands and a small helix overlaying the end of the hairpins next to the active site. The protein has low primary protein sequence identity to YteR but is structurally similar. The two tertiary structures align with a root-mean-square deviation of 1.4 Å and contain a highly conserved active pocket. There is a conserved aspartic acid residue in both structures, which has been shown to be important for hydration of the C=C bond during the release of unsaturated galacturonic acid by YteR. A surface electrostatic potential comparison of CA_C0359 and proteins from CAZy families GH88 and GH105 reveals the make-up of the active site to be a combination of the unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase and the unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. Structural and electrostatic comparisons suggests that the protein may have a slightly different substrate specificity from that of YteR. PMID:26249707

  1. Structural analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 glycoside hydrolase from CAZy family GH105

    PubMed Central

    Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Sund, Christian J.; Hurley, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA_C0359 encodes a putative unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase (URH) with distant amino-acid sequence homology to YteR of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. YteR, like other URHs, has core structural homology to unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolases, but hydrolyzes the unsaturated disaccharide derivative of rhamnogalacturonan I. The crystal structure of the recombinant CA_C0359 protein was solved to 1.6 Å resolution by molecular replacement using the phase information of the previously reported structure of YteR (PDB entry 1nc5) from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The YteR-like protein is a six-α-hairpin barrel with two β-sheet strands and a small helix overlaying the end of the hairpins next to the active site. The protein has low primary protein sequence identity to YteR but is structurally similar. The two tertiary structures align with a root-mean-square deviation of 1.4 Å and contain a highly conserved active pocket. There is a conserved aspartic acid residue in both structures, which has been shown to be important for hydration of the C=C bond during the release of unsaturated galacturonic acid by YteR. A surface electrostatic potential comparison of CA_C0359 and proteins from CAZy families GH88 and GH105 reveals the make-up of the active site to be a combination of the unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase and the unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. Structural and electrostatic comparisons suggests that the protein may have a slightly different substrate specificity from that of YteR. PMID:26249707

  2. Epoxide hydrolase of Trichoderma reesei: Biochemical properties and conformational characterization.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Stephani; Adriani, Patricia Pereira; Borges, Flavia Garcia; Lopes, Adriana Rios; Campana, Patricia T; Chambergo, Felipe S

    2016-08-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that are present in all living organisms and catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides to the corresponding vicinal diols. EHs have biotechnological potential in chiral chemistry. We report the cloning, purification, enzymatic activity, and conformational analysis of the TrEH gene from Trichoderma reesei strain QM9414 using circular dichroism spectroscopy. The EH gene has an open reading frame encoding a protein of 343 amino acid residues, resulting in a molecular mass of 38.2kDa. The enzyme presents an optimum pH of 7.2, and it is highly active at temperatures ranging from 23 to 50°C and thermally inactivated at 70°C (t1/2=7.4min). The Michaelis constants (Km) were 4.6mM for racemic substrate, 21.7mM for (R)-(+)-styrene oxide and 3.0mM for (S)-(-)-styrene oxide. The kcat/Km analysis indicated that TrEH is enantioselective and preferentially hydrolyzes (S)-(-)-styrene oxide. The conformational stability studies suggested that, despite the extreme conditions (high temperatures and extremely acid and basic pHs), TrEH is able to maintain a considerable part of its regular structures, including the preservation of the native cores in some cases. The recombinant protein showed enantioselectivity that was distinct from other fungus EHs, making this protein a potential biotechnological tool. PMID:27177457

  3. A Novel Saponin Hydrolase from Neocosmospora vasinfecta var. vasinfecta

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Manabu; Sumida, Naomi; Yanai, Koji; Murakami, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    We isolated a soybean saponin hydrolase from Neocosmospora vasinfecta var. vasinfecta PF1225, a filamentous fungus that can degrade soybean saponin and generate soyasapogenol B. This enzyme was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of about 77 kDa and a glycoprotein. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the corresponding gene (sdn1) indicated that this enzyme consisted of 612 amino acids and had a molecular mass of 65,724 Da, in close agreement with that of the apoenzyme after the removal of carbohydrates. The sdn1 gene was successfully expressed in Trichoderma viride under the control of the cellobiohydrolase I gene promoter. The molecular mass of the recombinant enzyme, about 69 kDa, was smaller than that of the native enzyme due to fewer carbohydrate modifications. Examination of the degradation products obtained by treatment of soyasaponin I with the recombinant enzyme showed that the enzyme hydrolyzed soyasaponin I to soyasapogenol B and triose [α-l-rhamnopyranosyl (1→2)-β-d-galactopyranosyl (1→2)-d-glucuronopyranoside]. Also, when soyasaponin II and soyasaponin V, which are different from soyasaponin I only in constituent saccharides, were treated with the enzyme, the ratio of the reaction velocities for soyasaponin I, soyasaponin II, and soyasaponin V was 2,680:886:1. These results indicate that this enzyme recognizes the fine structure of the carbohydrate moiety of soyasaponin in its catalytic reaction. The amino acid sequence of this enzyme predicted from the DNA sequence shows no clear homology with those of any of the enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of carbohydrates. PMID:14766566

  4. Purification and characterization of a cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase from Nocardia tartaricans CAS-52, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziqiang; Wang, Yunshan; Su, Zhiguo

    2013-03-01

    A highly enantioselective cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase from Nocardia tartaricans was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme was purified 184-fold with a yield of 18.8 %. The purified cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase had a monomeric molecular weight of 28 kDa, and its optimum conditions were 37 °C and pH 7-9. With sodium cis-epoxysuccinate as the substrate, Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics analysis gave a Km value of 35.71 mM and a Vmax of 2.65 mM min(-1). The enzyme was activated by Ni(2+) and Al(3+), while strongly inhibited by Fe(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Ag(+). The cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase gene was cloned, and its open reading frame sequence predicted a protein composed of 253 amino acids. A pET11a expression plasmid carrying the gene under the control of the T7 promoter was introduced into Escherichia coli, and the cis-epoxysuccinic acid hydrolase gene was successfully expressed in the recombinant strains. PMID:22552902

  5. Direct detection, cloning and characterization of a glucoside hydrolase from forest soil.

    PubMed

    Hua, Mei; Zhao, Shubo; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Li, Fan; Chen, Shan

    2015-06-01

    A glucoside hydrolase gene, egl01, was cloned from the soil DNA of Changbai Mountain forest by homologous PCR amplification. The deduced sequence of 517 amino acids included a catalytic domain of glycoside hydrolase family 5 and was homologous to a putative cellulase from Bacillus licheniformis. The recombinant enzyme, Egl01, was maximally active at pH 5 and 50 °C and it was stable at pH 3-9, 4-50 °C, and also stable in the presence of metal ions, organic solvents, surfactants and salt. Its activity was above 120 % in 2-3 M NaCl/KCl and over 70 % was retained in 1-4 M NaCl/KCl for 6d. Egl01 hydrolyzed carboxymethyl cellulose, beechwood xylan, crop stalk, laminarin, filter paper, and avicel but not pNPG, indicating its broad substrate specificity. These properties make this recombinant enzyme a promising candidate for industrial applications. PMID:25700816

  6. Characterization and functional analysis of Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Long, Shao Rong; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Ruo Dan; Qi, Xin; Liu, Pei; Ren, Hui Jun; Shi, Hai Ning; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase (TsNd) was identified by screening a T7 phage display cDNA library from T. spiralis intestinal infective larvae (IIL), and vaccination of mice with recombinant TsNd protein (rTsNd) or TsNd DNA vaccine produced a partial protective immunity. The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics and biological functions of TsNd in the process of invasion and development of T. spiralis larvae. Transcription and expression of TsNd gene at all developmental stages of T. spiralis were observed by qPCR and immunofluorescent test (IFT). The rTsNd had the Nd enzymatic activity to dGTP, NAD, NADP and CoA. Its kinetic properties on the preferred substrate dGTP were calculated, and the Vmax, Km, and kcat/Km values at pH 8.0 were 3.19 μM min(-1) μg(-1), 370 μM, and 144 s(-1) M(-1), respectively, in reaction matrix containing 5 mM Zn(2+) and 2 mM DTT. The rTsNd was active from 25 °C to 50 °C, with optimal activity at 37 °C. rTsNd was able to bind specifically to mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and promoted the larval invasion of IECs, whereas anti-rTsNd antibodies inhibited the larval invasion of IECs in a dose-dependent manner. Anti-rTsNd antibodies could kill T. spiralis infective larvae by an ADCC-mediated mechanism. Our results showed that the rTsNd protein was able to interact with host IECs, had the Nudix hydrolasing activity and the enzymatic activity appeared to be essential indispensable for the T. spiralis larval invasion, development and survival in host. PMID:26545353

  7. Expression, purification, and buffer solubility optimization of the putative human peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase PTRHD1.

    PubMed

    Burks, Geordan L; McFeeters, Hana; McFeeters, Robert L

    2016-10-01

    Performing the essential function of recycling peptidyl-tRNAs, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases are ubiquitous in all domains of life. The multicomponent eukaryotic Pth system differs greatly from the bacterial system composed predominantly of a single Pth1 enzyme. While bacterial Pth1s are structurally well characterized and promising new targets for antibiotic development, eukaryotic Pths are largely understudied. From amino acid sequence alignment and secondary structure predictions, the human gene product PTRHD1 was classified as a eukaryotic Pth. Herein, we report cloning, recombinant bacterial expression, and weak binding to peptidyl-tRNA for PTRHD1. Additionally, we report binding to tRNA but absence of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase activity. Thus, PTRHD1 is not a Pth and the functional consequence of nucleotide binding remains undefined. PMID:27235175

  8. Expression and purification of an engineered, yeast-expressed Leishmania donovani nucleoside hydrolase with immunogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, Elissa M; Wang, Qian; Seid, Christopher A; Hammond, Molly; Wei, Junfei; Liu, Zhuyun; Zhan, Bin; Pollet, Jeroen; Heffernan, Michael J; McAtee, C Patrick; Engler, David A; Matsunami, Risë K; Strych, Ulrich; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-07-01

    Leishmania donovani is the major cause of visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), now recognized as the parasitic disease with the highest level of mortality second only to malaria. No human vaccine is currently available. A 36 kDa L. donovani nucleoside hydrolase (LdNH36) surface protein has been previously identified as a potential vaccine candidate antigen. Here we present data on the expression of LdNH36 in Pichia pastoris and its purification at the 20 L scale to establish suitability for future pilot scale manufacturing. To improve efficiency of process development and ensure reproducibility, 4 N-linked glycosylation sites shown to contribute to heterogeneous high-mannose glycosylation were mutated to glutamine residues. The mutant LdNH36 (LdNH36-dg2) was expressed and purified to homogeneity. Size exclusion chromatography and light scattering demonstrated that LdNH36-dg2 existed as a tetramer in solution, similar to the wild-type recombinant L. major nucleoside hydrolase. The amino acid mutations do not affect the tetrameric interface as confirmed by theoretical modeling, and the mutated amino acids are located outside the major immunogenic domain. Immunogenic properties of the LdNH36-dg2 recombinant protein were evaluated in BALB/c mice using formulations that included a synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, together with a microparticle delivery platform (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)). Mice exhibited high levels of IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b antibodies that were reactive to both LdNH36-dg2 and LdNH36 wild-type. While the point mutations did affect the hydrolase activity of the enzyme, the IgG antibodies elicited by LdNH36-dg2 were shown to inhibit the hydrolase activity of the wild-type LdNH36. The results indicate that LdNH36-dg2 as expressed in and purified from P. pastoris is suitable for further scale-up, manufacturing, and testing in support of future first-in-humans phase 1 clinical trials. PMID:26839079

  9. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  10. Human Carboxymethylenebutenolidase as a Bioactivating Hydrolase of Olmesartan Medoxomil in Liver and Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Fujimori, Izumi; Kato, Mitsunori; Noji-Sakikawa, Chisa; Saito, Motoko; Yoshigae, Yasushi; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Okazaki, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Olmesartan medoxomil (OM) is a prodrug type angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist widely prescribed as an antihypertensive agent. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of the OM bioactivating enzyme that hydrolyzes the prodrug and converts to its pharmacologically active metabolite olmesartan in human liver and intestine. The protein was purified from human liver cytosol by successive column chromatography and was identified by mass spectrometry to be a carboxymethylenebutenolidase (CMBL) homolog. Human CMBL, whose endogenous function has still not been reported, is a human homolog of Pseudomonas dienelactone hydrolase involved in the bacterial halocatechol degradation pathway. The ubiquitous expression of human CMBL gene transcript in various tissues was observed. The recombinant human CMBL expressed in mammalian cells was clearly shown to activate OM. By comparing the enzyme kinetics and chemical inhibition properties between the recombinant protein and human tissue preparations, CMBL was demonstrated to be the primary OM bioactivating enzyme in the liver and intestine. The recombinant CMBL also converted other prodrugs having the same ester structure as OM, faropenem medoxomil and lenampicillin, to their active metabolites. CMBL exhibited a unique sensitivity to chemical inhibitors, thus, being distinguishable from other known esterases. Site-directed mutagenesis on the putative active residue Cys132 of the recombinant CMBL caused a drastic reduction of the OM-hydrolyzing activity. We report for the first time that CMBL serves as a key enzyme in the bioactivation of OM, hydrolyzing the ester bond of the prodrug type xenobiotics. PMID:20177059

  11. Human carboxymethylenebutenolidase as a bioactivating hydrolase of olmesartan medoxomil in liver and intestine.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Fujimori, Izumi; Kato, Mitsunori; Noji-Sakikawa, Chisa; Saito, Motoko; Yoshigae, Yasushi; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Okazaki, Osamu

    2010-04-16

    Olmesartan medoxomil (OM) is a prodrug type angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist widely prescribed as an antihypertensive agent. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of the OM bioactivating enzyme that hydrolyzes the prodrug and converts to its pharmacologically active metabolite olmesartan in human liver and intestine. The protein was purified from human liver cytosol by successive column chromatography and was identified by mass spectrometry to be a carboxymethylenebutenolidase (CMBL) homolog. Human CMBL, whose endogenous function has still not been reported, is a human homolog of Pseudomonas dienelactone hydrolase involved in the bacterial halocatechol degradation pathway. The ubiquitous expression of human CMBL gene transcript in various tissues was observed. The recombinant human CMBL expressed in mammalian cells was clearly shown to activate OM. By comparing the enzyme kinetics and chemical inhibition properties between the recombinant protein and human tissue preparations, CMBL was demonstrated to be the primary OM bioactivating enzyme in the liver and intestine. The recombinant CMBL also converted other prodrugs having the same ester structure as OM, faropenem medoxomil and lenampicillin, to their active metabolites. CMBL exhibited a unique sensitivity to chemical inhibitors, thus, being distinguishable from other known esterases. Site-directed mutagenesis on the putative active residue Cys(132) of the recombinant CMBL caused a drastic reduction of the OM-hydrolyzing activity. We report for the first time that CMBL serves as a key enzyme in the bioactivation of OM, hydrolyzing the ester bond of the prodrug type xenobiotics. PMID:20177059

  12. Re-characterization of mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate hydrolase belonging to the serine hydrolase family.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Makoto; Imaoka, Takuya; Nishiyama, Takashi; Fujii, Takao

    2016-08-01

    A novel bacterium assimilating di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate as a sole carbon source was isolated, and identified as a Rhodococcus species and the strain was named EG-5. The strain has a mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) hydrolase (EG-5 MehpH), which exhibits some different enzymatic features when compared with the previously reported MEHP hydrolase (P8219 MehpH) from Gordonia sp. These differences include different pH optimum activity, maximal reaction temperature and heat stability. The Km and Vmax values of EG-5 MehpH were significantly higher than those of P8219 MehpH. The primary structure of EG-5 MehpH showed the highest sequence identity to that of P8219 MehpH (39%) among hydrolases. The phylogenetic tree suggested that EG-5 MehpH and P8219 MehpH were categorized in different groups of the novel MEHP hydrolase family. Mutation of a conserved R(109) residue of EG-5 MehpH to a hydrophobic residue resulted in a dramatic reduction in the Vmax value towards MEHP without affecting the Km value. These results indicate that this residue may neutralize the negative charge of a carboxylate anion of MEHP, and thus inhibit the catalytic nucleophile from attacking the ester bond. In other words, the R residue blocks inhibition from the carboxylate anion of MEHP. Recently, registered hypothetical proteins exhibiting 98% or 99% identities for EG-5 MehpH or for P8219 MehpH were found from some pathogens belonging to Actinomycetes. The protein may have other activities besides MEHP hydrolysis and function in other physiological reactions in some Actinomycetes. PMID:26868518

  13. Aspergillus niger DLFCC-90 rhamnoside hydrolase, a new type of flavonoid glycoside hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingqiang; Yu, Hongshan; Zhang, Chunzhi; Lu, Mingchun; Piao, Yongzhe; Ohba, Masashi; Tang, Minqian; Yuan, Xiaodong; Wei, Shenghua; Wang, Kan; Ma, Anzhou; Feng, Xue; Qin, Siqing; Mukai, Chisato; Tsuji, Akira; Jin, Fengxie

    2012-07-01

    A novel rutin-α-L-rhamnosidase hydrolyzing α-L-rhamnoside of rutin, naringin, and hesperidin was purified and characterized from Aspergillus niger DLFCC-90, and the gene encoding this enzyme, which is highly homologous to the α-amylase gene, was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The novel enzyme was classified in glycoside-hydrolase (GH) family 13. PMID:22544243

  14. Lysophosphatidic acids are new substrates for the phosphatase domain of soluble epoxide hydrolase[S

    PubMed Central

    Oguro, Ami; Imaoka, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme that has a C-terminus epoxide hydrolase domain and an N-terminus phosphatase domain. The endogenous substrates of epoxide hydrolase are known to be epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, but the endogenous substrates of the phosphatase activity are not well understood. In this study, to explore the substrates of sEH, we investigated the inhibition of the phosphatase activity of sEH toward 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate by using lecithin and its hydrolyzed products. Although lecithin itself did not inhibit the phosphatase activity, the hydrolyzed lecithin significantly inhibited it, suggesting that lysophospholipid or fatty acid can inhibit it. Next, we investigated the inhibition of phosphatase activity by lysophosphatidyl choline, palmitoyl lysophosphatidic acid, monopalmitoyl glycerol, and palmitic acid. Palmitoyl lysophosphatidic acid and fatty acid efficiently inhibited phosphatase activity, suggesting that lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs) are substrates for the phosphatase activity of sEH. As expected, palmitoyl, stearoyl, oleoyl, and arachidonoyl LPAs were efficiently dephosphorylated by sEH (Km, 3–7 μM; Vmax, 150–193 nmol/min/mg). These results suggest that LPAs are substrates of sEH, which may regulate physiological functions of cells via their metabolism. PMID:22217705

  15. Miniaturization of hydrolase assays in thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Severino A; Moraes, Caroline S; Costa, Samara G; de Souza, Wanderley; Azambuja, Patrícia; Garcia, Eloi S; Genta, Fernando A

    2013-03-01

    We adapted the protocols of reducing sugar measurements with dinitrosalicylic acid and bicinchoninic acid for thermocyclers and their use in enzymatic assays for hydrolases such as amylase and β-1,3-glucanase. The use of thermocyclers for these enzymatic assays resulted in a 10 times reduction in the amount of reagent and volume of the sample needed when compared with conventional microplate protocols. We standardized absorbance readings from the polymerase chain reaction plates, which allowed us to make direct readings of the techniques above, and a β-glycosidase assay was also established under the same conditions. Standardization of the enzymatic reaction in thermocyclers resulted in less time-consuming temperature calibrations and without loss of volume through leakage or evaporation from the microplate. Kinetic parameters were successfully obtained, and the use of the thermocycler allowed the measurement of enzymatic activities in biological samples from the field with a limited amount of protein. PMID:23123426

  16. A simplified electrostatic model for hydrolase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Pessoa Filho, Pedro de Alcantara; Prausnitz, John M

    2015-07-01

    Toward the development of an electrostatic model for enzyme catalysis, the active site of the enzyme is represented by a cavity whose surface (and beyond) is populated by electric charges as determined by pH and the enzyme's structure. The electric field in the cavity is obtained from electrostatics and a suitable computer program. The key chemical bond in the substrate, at its ends, has partial charges with opposite signs determined from published force-field parameters. The electric field attracts one end of the bond and repels the other, causing bond tension. If that tension exceeds the attractive force between the atoms, the bond breaks; the enzyme is then a successful catalyst. To illustrate this very simple model, based on numerous assumptions, some results are presented for three hydrolases: hen-egg white lysozyme, bovine trypsin and bovine ribonuclease. Attention is given to the effect of pH. PMID:25881958

  17. The pharmacological landscape and therapeutic potential of serine hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydrolases perform crucial roles in many biological processes, and several of these enzymes are targets of approved drugs for indications such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and infectious diseases. Despite this, most of the human serine hydrolases (of which there are more than 200) remain poorly characterized with respect to their physiological substrates and functions, and the vast majority lack selective, in vivo-active inhibitors. Here, we review the current state of pharmacology for mammalian serine hydrolases, including marketed drugs, compounds that are under clinical investigation and selective inhibitors emerging from academic probe development efforts. We also highlight recent methodological advances that have accelerated the rate of inhibitor discovery and optimization for serine hydrolases, which we anticipate will aid in their biological characterization and, in some cases, therapeutic validation. PMID:22212679

  18. The Pharmacological Landscape and Therapeutic Potential of Serine Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    Serine hydrolases play critical roles in many biological processes, and several are targets of approved drugs for indications such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and infectious disease. Despite this, most of the 200+ human serine hydrolases remain poorly characterized with respect to their physiological substrates and functions, and the vast majority lack selective, in vivo-active inhibitors. Here, we review the current state of pharmacology for mammalian serine hydrolases, including marketed drugs, compounds under clinical investigation, and selective inhibitors emerging from academic probe development efforts. We also highlight recent methodological advances that have accelerated the rate of inhibitor discovery and optimization for serine hydrolases, which we anticipate will aid in their biological characterization and, in some cases, therapeutic validation. PMID:22212679

  19. Identification of the Major Prostaglandin Glycerol Ester Hydrolase in Human Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Joseph D.; Wepy, James A.; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Chang, Jae Won; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-Gs) are produced as a result of the oxygenation of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, by cyclooxygenase 2. Understanding the role that PG-Gs play in a biological setting has been difficult because of their sensitivity to enzymatic hydrolysis. By comparing PG-G hydrolysis across human cancer cell lines to serine hydrolase activities determined by activity-based protein profiling, we identified lysophospholipase A2 (LYPLA2) as a major enzyme responsible for PG-G hydrolysis. The principal role played by LYPLA2 in PGE2-G hydrolysis was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Purified recombinant LYPLA2 hydrolyzed PG-Gs in the following order of activity: PGE2-G > PGF2α-G > PGD2-G; LYPLA2 hydrolyzed 1- but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol or arachidonoylethanolamide. Chemical inhibition of LYPLA2 in the mouse macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7, elicited an increase in PG-G production. Our data indicate that LYPLA2 serves as a major PG-G hydrolase in human cells. Perturbation of this enzyme should enable selective modulation of PG-Gs without alterations in endocannabinoids, thereby providing a means to decipher the unique functions of PG-Gs in biology and disease. PMID:25301951

  20. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of acylpeptide hydrolase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ping; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Ze

    2016-04-10

    Acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) can catalyze the release of the N-terminal amino acid from acetylated peptides. There were many documented examples of this enzyme in various prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. However, knowledge about APH in insects still remains unknown. In this study, we cloned and sequenced a putative silkworm Bombyx mori APH (BmAPH) gene. The BmAPH gene encodes a protein of 710 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 78.5kDa. The putative BmAPH and mammal APHs share about 36% amino acid sequence identity, yet key catalytic residues are conserved (Ser566, Asp654, and His686). Expression and purification of the recombinant BmAPH in Escherichia coli showed that it has acylpeptide hydrolase activity toward the traditional substrate, Ac-Ala-pNA. Furthermore, organophosphorus (OP) insecticides, chlorpyrifos, phoxim, and malathion, significantly inhibited the activity of the APH both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, BmAPH was expressed in all tested tissues and developmental stages of the silkworm. Finally, immunohistochemistry analysis showed that BmAPH protein was localized in the basement membranes. These results suggested that BmAPH may be involved in enhancing silkworm tolerance to the OP insecticides. In a word, our results provide evidence for understanding of the biological function of APH in insects. PMID:26778207

  1. Molecular characterization of human ABHD2 as TAG lipase and ester hydrolase.

    PubMed

    M, Naresh Kumar; V B S C, Thunuguntla; G K, Veeramachaneni; B, Chandra Sekhar; Guntupalli, Swapna; J S, Bondili

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been progressively documented as a characteristic property of cancer cells. Though, human ABHD2 gene was found to be highly expressed in breast and lung cancers, its biochemical functionality is yet uncharacterized. In the present study we report, human ABHD2 as triacylglycerol (TAG) lipase along with ester hydrolysing capacity. Sequence analysis of ABHD2 revealed the presence of conserved motifs G(205)XS(207)XG(209) and H(120)XXXXD(125) Phylogenetic analysis showed homology to known lipases, Drosophila melanogaster CG3488. To evaluate the biochemical role, recombinant ABHD2 was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using pYES2/CT vector and His-tag purified protein showed TAG lipase activity. Ester hydrolase activity was confirmed with pNP acetate, butyrate and palmitate substrates respectively. Further, the ABHD2 homology model was built and the modelled protein was analysed based on the RMSD and root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) of the 100 ns simulation trajectory. Docking the acetate, butyrate and palmitate ligands with the model confirmed covalent binding of ligands with the Ser(207) of the GXSXG motif. The model was validated with a mutant ABHD2 developed with alanine in place of Ser(207) and the docking studies revealed loss of interaction between selected ligands and the mutant protein active site. Based on the above results, human ABHD2 was identified as a novel TAG lipase and ester hydrolase. PMID:27247428

  2. The Cloning and Characterization of a Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T. R.; Morisseau, C.; Walzem, R. L.; Ma, S. J.; Hammock, B. D.

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a role in the regulation of blood pressure and vascular homeostasis through its hydrolysis of the endothelial-derived messenger molecules, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids. This study reports the cloning and expression of a sEH homolog from chicken liver. The resulting 63-kDa protein has an isoelectric point of 6.1. The recombinant enzyme displayed epoxide hydrolase activity when assayed with [3H]-trans-1,3-diphenylpropene oxide (t-DPPO), as well as trans-9,10-epoxystearate and the cis-8,9-, 11,12-, and 14,15- epoxyeicosatrienoic acids. The chicken enzyme displayed a lower kcat:Km for t-DPPO than the mammalian enzymes. The enzyme was sensitive to urea-based inhibitors developed for mammalian sEH. Such compounds could be used to study the role of chicken sEH in conditions in which endothelial-derived vasodilation is believed to be impaired, such as pulmonary hypertension syndrome. PMID:16523628

  3. Novel Strategies for Upstream and Downstream Processing of Tannin Acyl Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Durán, Luis V.; Valdivia-Urdiales, Blanca; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C.; Rodríguez-Herrera, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal N.

    2011-01-01

    Tannin acyl hydrolase also referred as tannase is an enzyme with important applications in several science and technology fields. Due to its hydrolytic and synthetic properties, tannase could be used to reduce the negative effects of tannins in beverages, food, feed, and tannery effluents, for the production of gallic acid from tannin-rich materials, the elucidation of tannin structure, and the synthesis of gallic acid esters in nonaqueous media. However, industrial applications of tannase are still very limited due to its high production cost. Thus, there is a growing interest in the production, recovery, and purification of this enzyme. Recently, there have been published a number of papers on the improvement of upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme. These papers dealt with the search for new tannase producing microorganisms, the application of novel fermentation systems, optimization of culture conditions, the production of the enzyme by recombinant microorganism, and the design of efficient protocols for tannase recovery and purification. The present work reviews the state of the art of basic and biotechnological aspects of tannin acyl hydrolase, focusing on the recent advances in the upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme. PMID:21941633

  4. Molecular characterization of human ABHD2 as TAG lipase and ester hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    M., Naresh Kumar; V.B.S.C., Thunuguntla; G.K., Veeramachaneni; B., Chandra Sekhar; Guntupalli, Swapna; J.S., Bondili

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been progressively documented as a characteristic property of cancer cells. Though, human ABHD2 gene was found to be highly expressed in breast and lung cancers, its biochemical functionality is yet uncharacterized. In the present study we report, human ABHD2 as triacylglycerol (TAG) lipase along with ester hydrolysing capacity. Sequence analysis of ABHD2 revealed the presence of conserved motifs G205XS207XG209 and H120XXXXD125. Phylogenetic analysis showed homology to known lipases, Drosophila melanogaster CG3488. To evaluate the biochemical role, recombinant ABHD2 was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using pYES2/CT vector and His-tag purified protein showed TAG lipase activity. Ester hydrolase activity was confirmed with pNP acetate, butyrate and palmitate substrates respectively. Further, the ABHD2 homology model was built and the modelled protein was analysed based on the RMSD and root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) of the 100 ns simulation trajectory. Docking the acetate, butyrate and palmitate ligands with the model confirmed covalent binding of ligands with the Ser207 of the GXSXG motif. The model was validated with a mutant ABHD2 developed with alanine in place of Ser207 and the docking studies revealed loss of interaction between selected ligands and the mutant protein active site. Based on the above results, human ABHD2 was identified as a novel TAG lipase and ester hydrolase. PMID:27247428

  5. Structural and functional attributes of malaria parasite diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arvind; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Malaria symptoms are driven by periodic multiplication cycles of Plasmodium parasites in human red blood corpuscles (RBCs). Malaria infection still accounts for ~600,000 annual deaths, and hence discovery of both new drug targets and drugs remains vital. In the present study, we have investigated the malaria parasite enzyme diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) hydrolase that regulates levels of signalling molecules like Ap4A by hydrolyzing them to ATP and AMP. We have tracked the spatial distribution of parasitic Ap4A hydrolase in infected RBCs, and reveal its unusual localization on the infected RBC membrane in subpopulation of infected cells. Interestingly, enzyme activity assays reveal an interaction between Ap4A hydrolase and the parasite growth inhibitor suramin. We also present a high resolution crystal structure of Ap4A hydrolase in apo- and sulphate- bound state, where the sulphate resides in the enzyme active site by mimicking the phosphate of substrates like Ap4A. The unexpected infected erythrocyte localization of the parasitic Ap4A hydrolase hints at a possible role of this enzyme in purinerigic signaling. In addition, atomic structure of Ap4A hydrolase provides insights for selective drug targeting. PMID:26829485

  6. Structural and functional attributes of malaria parasite diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Malaria symptoms are driven by periodic multiplication cycles of Plasmodium parasites in human red blood corpuscles (RBCs). Malaria infection still accounts for ~600,000 annual deaths, and hence discovery of both new drug targets and drugs remains vital. In the present study, we have investigated the malaria parasite enzyme diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) hydrolase that regulates levels of signalling molecules like Ap4A by hydrolyzing them to ATP and AMP. We have tracked the spatial distribution of parasitic Ap4A hydrolase in infected RBCs, and reveal its unusual localization on the infected RBC membrane in subpopulation of infected cells. Interestingly, enzyme activity assays reveal an interaction between Ap4A hydrolase and the parasite growth inhibitor suramin. We also present a high resolution crystal structure of Ap4A hydrolase in apo- and sulphate- bound state, where the sulphate resides in the enzyme active site by mimicking the phosphate of substrates like Ap4A. The unexpected infected erythrocyte localization of the parasitic Ap4A hydrolase hints at a possible role of this enzyme in purinerigic signaling. In addition, atomic structure of Ap4A hydrolase provides insights for selective drug targeting. PMID:26829485

  7. Cosmological Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wan Yan

    2008-11-01

    In this thesis we focus on studying the physics of cosmological recombination and how the details of recombination affect the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We present a detailed calculation of the spectral line distortions on the CMB spectrum arising from the Lyman-alpha and the lowest two-photon transitions in the recombination of hydrogen (H), and the corresponding lines from helium (He). The peak of these distortions mainly comes from the Lyman-alpha transition and occurs at about 170 microns, which is the Wien part of the CMB. The major theoretical limitation for extracting cosmological parameters from the CMB sky lies in the precision with which we can calculate the cosmological recombination process. With this motivation, we perform a multi-level calculation of the recombination of H and He with the addition of the spin-forbidden transition for neutral helium (He I), plus the higher order two-photon transitions for H and among singlet states of He I. We find that the inclusion of the spin-forbidden transition results in more than a percent change in the ionization fraction, while the other transitions give much smaller effects. Last we modify RECFAST by introducing one more parameter to reproduce recent numerical results for the speed-up of helium recombination. Together with the existing hydrogen `fudge factor', we vary these two parameters to account for the remaining dominant uncertainties in cosmological recombination. By using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method with Planck forecast data, we find that we need to determine the parameters to better than 10% for He I and 1% for H, in order to obtain negligible effects on the cosmological parameters.

  8. Design and Synthesis of Activity-Based Probes and Inhibitors for Bleomycin Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Wouter A; Segal, Ehud; Child, Matthew A; Byzia, Anna; Drąg, Marcin; Bogyo, Matthew

    2015-08-20

    Bleomycin hydrolase (BLMH) is a neutral cysteine aminopeptidase that has been ascribed roles in many physiological and pathological processes, yet its primary biological function remains enigmatic. In this work, we describe the results of screening of a library of fluorogenic substrates to identify non-natural amino acids that are optimally recognized by BLMH. This screen identified several substrates with kcat/KM values that are substantially improved over the previously reported fluorogenic substrates for this enzyme. The substrate sequences were used to design activity-based probes that showed potent labeling of recombinant BLMH as well as endogenously expressed BLMH in cell extracts, and in intact cells. Importantly, we identify potent BLMH inhibitors that are able to fully inhibit endogenous BLMH activity in intact cells. These probes and inhibitors will be valuable new reagents to study BLMH function in cellular and animal models of human diseases where BLMH is likely to be involved. PMID:26256478

  9. Fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases bind starch and β-cyclodextrin similarly to amylolytic hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Nekiunaite, Laura; Isaksen, Trine; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2016-08-01

    Starch-binding modules of family 20 (CBM20) are present in 60% of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) catalyzing the oxidative breakdown of starch, which highlights functional importance in LPMO activity. The substrate-binding properties of starch-active LMPOs, however, are currently unexplored. Affinities and binding-thermodynamics of two recombinant fungal LPMOs toward starch and β-cyclodextrin were shown to be similar to fungal CBM20s. Amplex Red assays showed ascorbate and Cu-dependent activity, which was inhibited in the presence of β-cylodextrin and amylose. Phylogenetically, the clustering of CBM20s from starch-targeting LPMOs and hydrolases was in accord with taxonomy and did not correlate to appended catalytic activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the CBM20-binding scaffold is retained in the evolution of hydrolytic and oxidative starch-degrading activities. PMID:27397613

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of tetrathionate hydrolase from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Kanao, Tadayoshi; Kosaka, Megumi; Yoshida, Kyoya; Nakayama, Hisayuki; Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota; Yamada, Hidenori; Takada, Jun; Kamimura, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Tetrathionate hydrolase (4THase) from the iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans catalyses the disproportionate hydrolysis of tetrathionate to elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and sulfate. The gene encoding 4THase (Af-tth) was expressed as inclusion bodies in recombinant Escherichia coli. Recombinant Af-Tth was activated by refolding under acidic conditions and was then purified to homogeneity. The recombinant protein was crystallized in 20 mM glycine buffer pH 10 containing 50 mM sodium chloride and 33%(v/v) PEG 1000 using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal was a hexagonal cylinder with dimensions of 0.2 × 0.05 × 0.05 mm. X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the crystal diffracted to 2.15 Å resolution and belongs to space group P31 or P32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 92.1, c = 232.6 Å. PMID:23722856

  11. Comparative gene identification 58/α/β hydrolase domain 5 lacks lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Derek; Dinh, Anna; Kurz, Daniel; Shah, Dharika; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.; Brasaemle, Dawn L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58)/α/β hydrolase domain 5 (ABHD5) cause Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, characterized by excessive triacylglycerol storage in cells and tissues. CGI-58 has been identified as a coactivator of adipose TG lipase (ATGL) and a lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT). We developed a molecular model of CGI-58 structure and then mutated predicted active site residues and performed LPAAT activity assays of recombinant WT and mutated CGI-58. When mutations of predicted catalytic residues failed to reduce LPAAT activity, we determined that LPAAT activity was due to a bacterial contaminant of affinity purification procedures, plsC, the sole LPAAT in Escherichia coli. Purification protocols were optimized to reduce plsC contamination, in turn reducing LPAAT activity. When CGI-58 was expressed in SM2-1(DE3) cells that lack plsC, lysates lacked LPAAT activity. Additionally, mouse CGI-58 expressed in bacteria as a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein and human CGI-58 expressed in yeast lacked LPAAT activity. Previously reported lipid binding activity of CGI-58 was revisited using protein-lipid overlays. Recombinant CGI-58 failed to bind lysophosphatidic acid, but interestingly, bound phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] and phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate [PI(5)P]. Prebinding CGI-58 with PI(3)P or PI(5)P did not alter its coactivation of ATGL in vitro. In summary, purified recombinant CGI-58 that is functional as an ATGL coactivator lacks LPAAT activity. PMID:24879803

  12. Investigation of the mechanism of phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Hepburn, T.W.; Olsen, D.B.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Mariano, P.S.

    1986-05-01

    The authors are presently studying enzymes which catalyze the formation and cleavage of carbon phosphorous bonds. In 1970 LaNauze et. al. reported the isolation of one enzyme of interest - phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase from a mutant of Bacillus cereus. This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphonoaldehyde to acetaldehyde and inorganic phosphate. They have isolated phosphonatase from wild type B. cereus (grown on 2-aminoethylphosphonate as the P/sub i/ source) and have used /sup 1/H-NMR and /sup 31/P-NMR techniques to determine the products of the enzyme reaction as phosphate and acetaldehyde. The mechanism of the enzyme could involve the formation of a Schiff base between phosphonoacetaldehyde and lysine or it might only require Mg/sup + +/, an essential cofactor for activity. To distinguish between these possibilities they have begun to look at the Schiff base formation in more detail. NaBH/sub 4/ was found to inactivate the enzyme in the presence of substrate but not in its absence. This is consistent with results obtained for the enzyme isolated from the mutant bacteria. In addition treatment of the wild type enzyme with tritiated NaBH/sub 4/ resulted in significant incorporation of radiolabel into the protein as compared to the control. These results tentatively suggest that hydrolysis proceeds via a covalent imine intermediate.

  13. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  14. TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION UNDERWATER HYDROLASING PHASE 0 & 1 & 2 TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    CHRONISTER, G.B.

    2005-06-08

    From September 10 through December 17th, 2003, S.A.Robotics executed Phases 0, I, and II of the Technology Demonstration - Underwater Hydrolasing. Phase 0 was performed at the S.A.Robotics facility in Loveland, Colorado, while Phases I and II were performed at the Hanford K-Basin East Site. The purpose of the demonstrations was to show (1) underwater hydrolasing is a feasible method of removing contaminated concrete underwater to a required depth, (2) the hydrolasing head could be controlled during operation, (3) the depth of contamination in the concrete structure could be accurately measured, and (4) a characterization of the waste stream during hydrolasing activities could be recorded. Video monitoring was also used during all demonstrations. All phases of the demonstration were completed and deemed a success by both the observers and the demonstration team. Single and multiple passes were made using variable cutting rates, different stand-off distances were tested, and stationary cuts were executed. Hot and cold hyrdolasing was performed with radiological and depth scans of the affected surfaces. Specially designed equipment was installed and operated within the contaminated environment of 100-K East Basin. Separate results are documented below by phase. The Phase II radiological demonstration was performed to determine the feasibility of underwater hydrolasing technology for decontamination of the DOE spent fuel basins at Hanford 100-K area. This project demonstration was conducted at 105 KE Basin with the expectation that, once proven, this technology can be implemented at Hanford and other DOE sites.

  15. High level expression of organophosphorus hydrolase in Pichia pastoris by multicopy ophcM assembly.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Shu, Min; Ma, Lixin; Ni, Hong; Yan, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The residues of organophosphorus pesticides bring serious impact on the environmental safety and people's health. Biodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides is recognized as an ideal method. An organophosphorus hydrolase (OPHCM) from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes was synthesized and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The yield reached approximately 470 mg/l after a 6-d induction in shake flasks. To improve the enzyme production, we describe a novel approach to express OPHCM efficiently with a biobrick assembly method in vitro. Four recombinant plasmids containing 1-4 copies of ophcM-expressing cassettes were constructed and transformed into P. pastoris. Increasing the copy number of ophcM gene enhanced the expression level of OPHCM. The maximum yield and specific activity in P. pastoris harboring two-copy tandem ophcM-expressing cassettes reached 610 mg/l after a 6-d induction in shake flasks and 7.8 g/l in high-density fermentation with specific activity of 13.7 U/mg. The optimum pH and temperature of the recombinant OPHCM activity were 11.0 and 50 °C, respectively. In addition, the enzyme activity of recombinant OPHCM enhanced 57.6% and 30.1% in the presence of 1 mM Cd(2+) and 5% glycerol, respectively. The high expression and good properties of recombinant OPHCM provide an effective solution to solve the pollution of organophosphorus pesticides in the environment. Moreover, the approach for generating multicopy gene expressing vectors here will benefit the study for enhancing the expression level of genes of interest. PMID:26611611

  16. Expression of key hydrolases for soy sauce fermentation in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii.

    PubMed

    Yuzuki, Masanobu; Matsushima, Kenichiro; Koyama, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Several key hydrolases in soy sauce fermentation such as proteases, peptidases, and glutaminases are supplied by Aspergillus sojae or Aspergillus oryzae. The genes encoding these hydrolases were successfully expressed in salt-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. These transformants are expected to supply extra hydrolases during soy sauce fermentation process. PMID:25073685

  17. Multi-functional glycoside hydrolase: Blon_0625 from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Shimada, Shota; Hata, Yuto; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    We here describe a unique β-D-glucosidase (BGL; Blon_0625) derived from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697. The Blon_0625 gene was expressed by recombinant Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant Blon_0625 retains hydrolyzing activity against both p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (pNPG; 17.3±0.24Umg(-1)) and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside (pNPX; 16.7±0.32Umg(-1)) at pH 6.0, 30°C. To best of our knowledge, no previously described BGL retains the same level of both pNPGase and pNPXase activity. Furthermore, Blon_0625 also retains the activity against 4-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofranoside (pNPAf; 5.6±0.09Umg(-1)). In addition, the results of the degradation of phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC) or xylan using endoglucanase from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu_0901) or xylanase from Kitasatospora setae KM-6054 (KSE_59480) show that Blon_0625 acts as a BGL and as a β-D-xylosidase (XYL) for hydrolyzing oligosaccharides. These results clearly indicate that Blon_0625 is a multi-functional glycoside hydrolase which retains the activity of BGL, XYL, and also α-l-arabinofuranosidase. Therefore, the utilization of multi-functional Blon_0625 may contribute to facilitating the efficient degradation of lignocellulosic materials and help enhance bioconversion processes. PMID:25435500

  18. Cloning and characterization of an epoxide hydrolase from Cupriavidus metallidurans-CH34.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjai; Wani, Shadil Ibrahim; Chauhan, Nar Singh; Sharma, Rakesh; Sareen, Dipti

    2011-09-01

    A putative epoxide hydrolase-encoding gene was identified from the genome sequence of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. The gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with His(6)-tag at its N-terminus. The epoxide hydrolase (CMEH) was purified to near homogeneity and was found to be a homodimer, with subunit molecular weight of 36 kDa. The CMEH had broad substrate specificity as it could hydrolyze 13 epoxides, out of 15 substrates tested. CMEH had high specific activity with 1,2-epoxyoctane, 1,2-epoxyhexane, styrene oxide (SO) and was also found to be active with meso-epoxides. The enzyme had optimum pH and temperature of 7.5 and 37°C respectively, with racemic SO. Biotransformation of 80 mM SO with recombinant whole E. coli cells expressing CMEH led to 56% ee(P) of (R)-diol with 77.23% conversion in 30 min. The enzyme could hydrolyze (R)-SO, ∼2-fold faster than (S)-SO, though it accepted both (R)- and (S)-SO with similar affinity as K(m)(R) and K(m)(S) of CMEH were 2.05±0.42 and 2.11±0.16 mM, respectively. However, the k(cat)(R) and k(cat)(S) for the two enantiomers of SO were 4.80 and 3.34 s(-1), respectively. The wide substrate spectrum exhibited by CMEH combined with the fast conversion rate makes it a robust biocatalyst for industrial use. Regioselectivity studies with enantiopure (R)- and (S)-SO revealed that with slightly altered regioselectivity, CMEH has a high potential to synthesize an enantiopure (R)-PED, through an enantioconvergent hydrolytic process. PMID:21515382

  19. Curation of characterized glycoside hydrolases of fungal origin.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Caitlin; Powlowski, Justin; Wu, Min; Butler, Greg; Tsang, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Fungi produce a wide range of extracellular enzymes to break down plant cell walls, which are composed mainly of cellulose, lignin and hemicellulose. Among them are the glycoside hydrolases (GH), the largest and most diverse family of enzymes active on these substrates. To facilitate research and development of enzymes for the conversion of cell-wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars, we have manually curated a comprehensive set of characterized fungal glycoside hydrolases. Characterized glycoside hydrolases were retrieved from protein and enzyme databases, as well as literature repositories. A total of 453 characterized glycoside hydrolases have been cataloged. They come from 131 different fungal species, most of which belong to the phylum Ascomycota. These enzymes represent 46 different GH activities and cover 44 of the 115 CAZy GH families. In addition to enzyme source and enzyme family, available biochemical properties such as temperature and pH optima, specific activity, kinetic parameters and substrate specificities were recorded. To simplify comparative studies, enzyme and species abbreviations have been standardized, Gene Ontology terms assigned and reference to supporting evidence provided. The annotated genes have been organized in a searchable, online database called mycoCLAP (Characterized Lignocellulose-Active Proteins of fungal origin). It is anticipated that this manually curated collection of biochemically characterized fungal proteins will be used to enhance functional annotation of novel GH genes. Database URL: http://mycoCLAP.fungalgenomics.ca/. PMID:21622642

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF METABOLICALLY STABLE INHIBITORS OF MAMMALIAN MICROSOMAL EPOXIDE HYDROLASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) plays a significant role in the metabolism of xenobiotics such as polyaromatic toxicants. Additionally, polymorphism studies have underlined a potential role of this enzyme in relation to a number of diseases, such as emphysema, spontaneous abortion, eclampsia ...

  1. Peptidyl-urea based inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We prepared a series of amino acid derived cyclohexyl and adamantyl ureas and tested them as inhibitors of the human soluble epoxide hydrolase, and obtained very potent compounds (K(I)=15nM) that are >10-fold more soluble than previously described sEH inhibitors. While our lead compound 2 showed low...

  2. Carbocyclic pyrimidine nucleosides as inhibitors of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Sylvester L; Bakke, Brian A; Sadler, Joshua M; Sunkara, Naresh K; Dorgan, Kathleen M; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L

    2006-12-01

    The design, synthesis, and unexpected inhibitory activity against S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH) hydrolase (SAHase, EC 3.3.1.1) for a series of truncated carbocyclic pyrimidine nucleoside analogues is presented. Of the four nucleosides obtained, 10 was found to be active with a Ki value of 5.0 microM against SAHase. PMID:16904326

  3. Curation of characterized glycoside hydrolases of Fungal origin

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin; Powlowski, Justin; Wu, Min; Butler, Greg; Tsang, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Fungi produce a wide range of extracellular enzymes to break down plant cell walls, which are composed mainly of cellulose, lignin and hemicellulose. Among them are the glycoside hydrolases (GH), the largest and most diverse family of enzymes active on these substrates. To facilitate research and development of enzymes for the conversion of cell-wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars, we have manually curated a comprehensive set of characterized fungal glycoside hydrolases. Characterized glycoside hydrolases were retrieved from protein and enzyme databases, as well as literature repositories. A total of 453 characterized glycoside hydrolases have been cataloged. They come from 131 different fungal species, most of which belong to the phylum Ascomycota. These enzymes represent 46 different GH activities and cover 44 of the 115 CAZy GH families. In addition to enzyme source and enzyme family, available biochemical properties such as temperature and pH optima, specific activity, kinetic parameters and substrate specificities were recorded. To simplify comparative studies, enzyme and species abbreviations have been standardized, Gene Ontology terms assigned and reference to supporting evidence provided. The annotated genes have been organized in a searchable, online database called mycoCLAP (Characterized Lignocellulose-Active Proteins of fungal origin). It is anticipated that this manually curated collection of biochemically characterized fungal proteins will be used to enhance functional annotation of novel GH genes. Database URL: http://mycoCLAP.fungalgenomics.ca/ PMID:21622642

  4. ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE-BASED ASSAY FOR ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a rapid and versatile Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH)-based method for measurement of organophosphates. This assay is based on a substrate-dependent change in pH at the local vicinity of the enzyme. The pH change is monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), ...

  5. ENGINEERING OF PEPTIDOGLYCAN HYDROLASES FOR CONTROL OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophages are viruses exclusively infecting bacteria and therefore offer suitable tools for their detection and control. At the end of their multiplication cycle, most phages lyse their hosts from within by means of an endolysin (peptidoglycan hydrolase), thereby enabling release of the phage p...

  6. Bacteriophage virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases: potential new enzybiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases (VAPGH) are phage-encoded lytic enzymes that locally degrade the peptidoglycan (PG) of the bacterial cell wall during infection. Their action usually generates a small hole through which the phage tail crosses the cell envelope to inject the phage genetic m...

  7. Polyglycine hydrolases: Fungal β-lactamase-like endoproteases that cleave polyglycine regions within plant class IV chitinases

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Todd A; Naldrett, Michael J; Ward, Todd J; Price, Neil P J

    2015-01-01

    Polyglycine hydrolases are secreted fungal proteases that cleave glycine–glycine peptide bonds in the inter-domain linker region of specific plant defense chitinases. Previously, we reported the catalytic activity of polyglycine hydrolases from the phytopathogens Epicoccum sorghi (Es-cmp) and Cochliobolus carbonum (Bz-cmp). Here we report the identity of their encoding genes and the primary amino acid sequences of the proteins responsible for these activities. Peptides from a tryptic digest of Es-cmp were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and the spectra obtained were matched to a draft genome sequence of E. sorghi. From this analysis, a 642 amino acid protein containing a predicted β-lactamase catalytic region of 280 amino acids was identified. Heterologous strains of the yeast Pichia pastoris were created to express this protein and its homolog from C. carbonum from their cDNAs. Both strains produced recombinant proteins with polyglycine hydrolase activity as shown by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-MS based assays. Site directed mutagenesis was used to mutate the predicted catalytic serine of Es-cmp to glycine, resulting in loss of catalytic activity. BLAST searching of publicly available fungal genomes identified full-length homologous proteins in 11 other fungi of the class Dothideomycetes, and in three fungi of the related class Sordariomycetes while significant BLAST hits extended into the phylum Basidiomycota. Multiple sequence alignment led to the identification of a network of seven conserved tryptophans that surround the β-lactamase-like region. This is the first report of a predicted β-lactamase that is an endoprotease. PMID:25966977

  8. A novel β-xylosidase structure from Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius: the first crystal structure of a glycoside hydrolase family GH52 enzyme reveals unpredicted similarity to other glycoside hydrolase folds.

    PubMed

    Espina, Giannina; Eley, Kirstin; Pompidor, Guillaume; Schneider, Thomas R; Crennell, Susan J; Danson, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius is a thermophilic bacterium that is able to ferment both C6 and C5 sugars to produce ethanol. During growth on hemicellulose biomass, an intracellular β-xylosidase catalyses the hydrolysis of xylo-oligosaccharides to the monosaccharide xylose, which can then enter the pathways of central metabolism. The gene encoding a G. thermoglucosidasius β-xylosidase belonging to CAZy glycoside hydrolase family GH52 has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme has been characterized and a high-resolution (1.7 Å) crystal structure has been determined, resulting in the first reported structure of a GH52 family member. A lower resolution (2.6 Å) structure of the enzyme-substrate complex shows the positioning of the xylobiose substrate to be consistent with the proposed retaining mechanism of the family; additionally, the deep cleft of the active-site pocket, plus the proximity of the neighbouring subunit, afford an explanation for the lack of catalytic activity towards the polymer xylan. Whilst the fold of the G. thermoglucosidasius β-xylosidase is completely different from xylosidases in other CAZy families, the enzyme surprisingly shares structural similarities with other glycoside hydrolases, despite having no more than 13% sequence identity. PMID:24816105

  9. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolases and PAA biodegradation: current knowledge and impact on applications.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tomohiro

    2016-02-01

    Thermally synthesized poly(aspartic acid) (tPAA) is a bio-based, biocompatible, biodegradable, and water-soluble polymer that has a high proportion of β-Asp units and equivalent moles of D- and L-Asp units. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolase-1 and hydrolase-2 are tPAA biodegradation enzymes purified from Gram-negative bacteria. PAA hydrolase-1 selectively cleaves amide bonds between β-Asp units via an endo-type process, whereas PAA hydrolase-2 catalyzes the exo-type hydrolysis of the products of tPAA hydrolysis by PAA hydrolase-1. The novel reactivity of PAA hydrolase-1 makes it a good candidate for a biocatalyst in β-peptide synthesis. This mini-review gives an overview of PAA hydrolases with emphasis on their biochemical and functional properties, in particular, PAA hydrolase-1. Functionally related enzymes, such as poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerases and β-aminopeptidases, are compared to PAA hydrolases. This mini-review also provides findings that offer an insight into the catalytic mechanisms of PAA hydrolase-1 from Pedobacter sp. KP-2. PMID:26695157

  10. OpdA, a bacterial organophosphorus hydrolase, prevents lethality in rats after poisoning with highly toxic organophosphorus pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Steven B.; Sutherland, Tara D.; Gresham, Chip; Oakeshott, John; Scott, Colin; Eddleston, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides poison more than 3,000,000 people every year in the developing world, mostly through intentional self-poisoning. Advances in medical therapy for OP poisoning have lagged, and current treatment is not highly effective with mortality of up to 40% in even the most advanced Western medical facilities. Administration of a broadly active bacterial OP hydrolase to patients in order to hydrolyze OPs in circulation might allow current therapies to be more effective. The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of a new recombinant bacterial OP hydrolase (OpdA), cloned from Agrobacterium radiobacter, in rat models of two chemically distinct but highly toxic and rapidly acting OP pesticides: dichlorvos and parathion. Without OpdA treatment, median time to death in rats poisoned with 3 × LD50 of dichlorvos or parathion was 6 minutes and 25.5 minutes, respectively. Administration of a single dose of OpdA immediately after dichlorvos resulted in 100% survival at 24 hours, with no additional antidotal therapy. After parathion poisoning, OpdA alone caused only a delay to death. However, an additional two doses of OpdA resulted in 62.5% survival at 24 hours after parathion poisoning. In combination with pralidoxime therapy, a single dose of OpdA increased survival to 75% after parathion poisoning. Our results demonstrate that OpdA is able to improve survival after poisoning by two chemically distinct and highly toxic OP pesticides. PMID:18378376

  11. The PEP4 gene encodes an aspartyl protease implicated in the posttranslational regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar hydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Woolford, C A; Daniels, L B; Park, F J; Jones, E W; Van Arsdell, J N; Innis, M A

    1986-01-01

    pep4 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae accumulate inactive precursors of vacuolar hydrolases. The PEP4 gene was isolated from a genomic DNA library by complementation of the pep4-3 mutation. Deletion analysis localized the complementing activity to a 1.5-kilobase pair EcoRI-XhoI restriction enzyme fragment. This fragment was used to identify an 1,800-nucleotide mRNA capable of directing the synthesis of a 44,000-dalton polypeptide. Southern blot analysis of yeast genomic DNA showed that the PEP4 gene is unique; however, several related sequences exist in yeasts. Tetrad analysis and mitotic recombination experiments localized the PEP4 gene proximal to GAL4 on chromosome XVI. Analysis of the DNA sequence indicated that PEP4 encodes a polypeptide with extensive homology to the aspartyl protease family. A comparison of the PEP4 predicted amino acid sequence with the yeast protease A protein sequence revealed that the two genes are, in fact, identical (see also Ammerer et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:2490-2499, 1986). Based on our observations, we propose a model whereby inactive precursor molecules produced from the PEP4 gene self-activate within the yeast vacuole and subsequently activate other vacuolar hydrolases. Images PMID:3537721

  12. [GH10 Family of Glycoside Hydrolases: Structure and Evolutionary Connections].

    PubMed

    Naumoff, D G

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary connections were analyzed for endo-β-xylanases, which possess the GH10 family catalytic domains. A homology search yielded thrice as many proteins as are available from the Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZy) database. Lateral gene transfer was shown to play an important role in evolution of bacterial proteins of the family, especially in the phyla Acidobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes, and Verrucomicrobia. In the case of Verrucomicrobia, 23 lateral transfers from organisms of other phyla were detected. Evolutionary relationships were observed between the GH10 family domains and domains with the TIM-barrel tertiary structure from several other glycosidase families. The GH39 family of glycoside hydrolases showed the closest relationship. Unclassified homologs were grouped into 12 novel families of putative glycoside hydrolases (GHL51-GHL62). PMID:27028821

  13. Isolation and characterization of Xenopus soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Purba, Endang R; Oguro, Ami; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-07-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) contributes to cell growth, but the contribution of sEH to embryonic development is not well understood. In this study, Xenopus sEH cDNA was isolated from embryos of Xenopus laevis. The Xenopus sEH was expressed in Escherichia coli and was purified. The epoxide hydrolase and phosphatase activities of purified sEH were investigated. The Xenopus sEH did not show phosphatase activity toward 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate or several lysophosphatidic acids although it had EH activity. The amino acid sequence of Xenopus sEH was compared with that reported previously. We found amino acid substitutions of the 29th Thr to Asn and the 146th Arg to His and prepared a sEH mutant (N29T/H146R), designed as mutant 1. Neither wild-type sEH nor mutant 1 had phosphatase activity. Additional substitution of the 11th Gly with Asp was found by comparison with human sEH which has phosphatase activity, but the Xenopus sEH mutant G11D prepared as mutant 2 did not have phosphatase activity. The epoxide hydrolase activity of sEH seemed to be similar to that of human sEH, while Xenopus sEH did not have phosphatase activity toward several substrates that human sEH metabolizes. PMID:24681163

  14. Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Ludmila; Bragg, Jennifer; Wu, Jiajie; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Vogel, John

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycoside hydrolases cleave the bond between a carbohydrate and another carbohydrate, a protein, lipid or other moiety. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolases are found in a wide range of organisms, from archea to animals, and are relatively abundant in plant genomes. In plants, these enzymes are involved in diverse processes, including starch metabolism, defense, and cell-wall remodeling. Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast-growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally and in grasses specifically, we annotated the glycoside hydrolase genes in the grasses Brachypodium distachyon (an emerging monocotyledonous model) and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum). We then compared the glycoside hydrolases across species, both at the whole-genome level and at the level of individual glycoside hydrolase families. Results We identified 356 glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium and 404 in sorghum. The corresponding proteins fell into the same 34 families that are represented in rice, Arabidopsis, and poplar, helping to define a glycoside hydrolase family profile which may be common to flowering plants. Examination of individual glycoside hydrolase familes (GH5, GH13, GH18, GH19, GH28, and GH51) revealed both similarities and distinctions between monocots and dicots, as well as between species. Shared evolutionary histories appear to be modified by lineage-specific expansions or deletions. Within families, the Brachypodium and sorghum proteins generally cluster with those from other monocots. Conclusions This work provides the foundation for further comparative and functional analyses of plant glycoside hydrolases. Defining the Brachypodium glycoside hydrolases sets the stage for Brachypodium to be a monocot model for investigations of these enzymes and their diverse roles in planta. Insights

  15. Click-generated triazole ureas as ultrapotent in vivo-active serine hydrolase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Adibekian, Alexander; Martin, Brent R; Wang, Chu; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Niessen, Sherry; Hoover, Heather; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2011-07-01

    Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class representing ∼1% of all human proteins. The biological functions of most serine hydrolases remain poorly characterized owing to a lack of selective inhibitors to probe their activity in living systems. Here we show that a substantial number of serine hydrolases can be irreversibly inactivated by 1,2,3-triazole ureas, which show negligible cross-reactivity with other protein classes. Rapid lead optimization by click chemistry-enabled synthesis and competitive activity-based profiling identified 1,2,3-triazole ureas that selectively inhibit enzymes from diverse branches of the serine hydrolase class, including peptidases (acyl-peptide hydrolase, or APEH), lipases (platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase-2, or PAFAH2) and uncharacterized hydrolases (α,β-hydrolase-11, or ABHD11), with exceptional potency in cells (sub-nanomolar) and mice (<1 mg kg(-1)). We show that APEH inhibition leads to accumulation of N-acetylated proteins and promotes proliferation in T cells. These data indicate 1,2,3-triazole ureas are a pharmacologically privileged chemotype for serine hydrolase inhibition, combining broad activity across the serine hydrolase class with tunable selectivity for individual enzymes. PMID:21572424

  16. Molecular and biochemical characterization of juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Rui; Xu, Wei-Hua; Chen, Fu-Sheng; Li, Sheng

    2005-02-01

    One major route of insect juvenile hormone (JH) degradation is epoxide hydration by JH epoxide hydrolase (JHEH). A full-length cDNA (1536 bp) encoding a microsomal JHEH was isolated from the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Bommo-JHEH cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a 461-amino acid protein (52 kDa), which reveals a high degree of similarity to the previously reported insect JHEHs. The residues Tyr298, Tyr373, and the HGWP motif corresponding to the oxyanion hole of JHEHs and the residues Asp227, His430, and Glu403 in the catalytic triad are well conserved in Bommo-JHEH. Bommo-JHEH was highly expressed in the fat body, where its mRNA expression pattern was in contrast to the pattern of hemolymph levels of JH during the larval development, suggesting that Bommo-JHEH plays an important role in JH degradation. Recombinant Bommo-JHEH (52 kDa) expressed in Sf9 insect cells was membrane-bound and had a high level of enzyme activity (300-fold over the control activity). This Bommo-JHEH study provides a better understanding of how JH levels are regulated in the domesticated silkworm. PMID:15681225

  17. Destructuring plant biomass: focus on fungal and extremophilic cell wall hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ertan, Haluk; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2015-05-01

    The use of plant biomass as feedstock for biomaterial and biofuel production is relevant in the current bio-based economy scenario of valorizing renewable resources. Fungi, which degrade complex and recalcitrant plant polymers, secrete different enzymes that hydrolyze plant cell wall polysaccharides. The present review discusses the current research trends on fungal, as well as extremophilic cell wall hydrolases that can withstand extreme physico-chemical conditions required in efficient industrial processes. Secretomes of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota and Neocallimastigomycota are presented along with metabolic cues (nutrient sensing, coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism) affecting their composition. We conclude the review by suggesting further research avenues focused on the one hand on a comprehensive analysis of the physiology and epigenetics underlying cell wall degrading enzyme production in fungi and on the other hand on the analysis of proteins with unknown function and metagenomics of extremophilic consortia. The current advances in consolidated bioprocessing, altered secretory pathways and creation of designer plants are also examined. Furthermore, recent developments in enhancing the activity, stability and reusability of enzymes based on synergistic, proximity and entropic effects, fusion enzymes, structure-guided recombination between homologous enzymes and magnetic enzymes are considered with a view to improving saccharification. PMID:25804821

  18. Identification and Characterization of a Periplasmic Aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol Hydrolase Responsible for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipid Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Wiebke; Groenewold, Maike K.; Hebecker, Stefanie; Dickschat, Jeroen S.; Moser, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Specific aminoacylation of the phospholipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG) with alanine (or with lysine) was shown to render various organisms less susceptible to antimicrobial agents and environmental stresses. In this study, we make use of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to decode ORF PA0919-dependent lipid homeostasis. Analysis of the polar lipid content of the deletion mutant ΔPA0919 indicated significantly enlarged levels of alanyl-PG. The resulting phenotype manifested an increased susceptibility to several antimicrobial compounds when compared with the wild type. A pH-dependent PA0919 promoter located within the upstream gene PA0920 was identified. Localization experiments demonstrated that the PA0919 protein is anchored to the periplasmic surface of the inner bacterial membrane. The recombinant overproduction of wild type and several site-directed mutant proteins in the periplasm of Escherichia coli facilitated a detailed in vitro analysis of the enzymatic PA0919 function. A series of artificial substrates (p-nitrophenyl esters of various amino acids/aliphatic acids) indicated enzymatic hydrolysis of the alanine, glycine, or lysine moiety of the respective ester substrates. Our final in vitro activity assay in the presence of radioactively labeled alanyl-PG then revealed hydrolysis of the aminoacyl linkage, resulting in the formation of alanine and PG. Consequently, PA0919 was termed alanyl-PG hydrolase. The elucidated enzymatic activity implies a new regulatory circuit for the appropriate tuning of cellular alanyl-PG concentrations. PMID:23792962

  19. Synthesis of Phenoxyacyl-Ethanolamides and Their Effects on Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Lionel; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Hwang, Hyeondo; Montgomery, Christa L.; Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; John, George; Koulen, Peter; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Chapman, Kent D.

    2014-01-01

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are involved in numerous biological activities in plant and animal systems. The metabolism of these lipids by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a key regulatory point in NAE signaling activity. Several active site-directed inhibitors of FAAH have been identified, but few compounds have been described that enhance FAAH activity. Here we synthesized two sets of phenoxyacyl-ethanolamides from natural products, 3-n-pentadecylphenolethanolamide and cardanolethanolamide, with structural similarity to NAEs and characterized their effects on the hydrolytic activity of FAAH. Both compounds increased the apparent Vmax of recombinant FAAH proteins from both plant (Arabidopsis) and mammalian (Rattus) sources. These NAE-like compounds appeared to act by reducing the negative feedback regulation of FAAH activity by free ethanolamine. Both compounds added to seedlings relieved, in part, the negative growth effects of exogenous NAE12:0. Cardanolethanolamide reduced neuronal viability and exacerbated oxidative stress-mediated cell death in primary cultured neurons at nanomolar concentrations. This was reversed by FAAH inhibitors or exogenous NAE substrate. Collectively, our data suggest that these phenoxyacyl-ethanolamides act to enhance the activity of FAAH and may stimulate the turnover of NAEs in vivo. Hence, these compounds might be useful pharmacological tools for manipulating FAAH-mediated regulation of NAE signaling in plants or animals. PMID:24558037

  20. Synthesis of phenoxyacyl-ethanolamides and their effects on fatty acid amide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Faure, Lionel; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Hwang, Hyeondo; Montgomery, Christa L; Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; John, George; Koulen, Peter; Blancaflor, Elison B; Chapman, Kent D

    2014-03-28

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are involved in numerous biological activities in plant and animal systems. The metabolism of these lipids by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a key regulatory point in NAE signaling activity. Several active site-directed inhibitors of FAAH have been identified, but few compounds have been described that enhance FAAH activity. Here we synthesized two sets of phenoxyacyl-ethanolamides from natural products, 3-n-pentadecylphenolethanolamide and cardanolethanolamide, with structural similarity to NAEs and characterized their effects on the hydrolytic activity of FAAH. Both compounds increased the apparent Vmax of recombinant FAAH proteins from both plant (Arabidopsis) and mammalian (Rattus) sources. These NAE-like compounds appeared to act by reducing the negative feedback regulation of FAAH activity by free ethanolamine. Both compounds added to seedlings relieved, in part, the negative growth effects of exogenous NAE12:0. Cardanolethanolamide reduced neuronal viability and exacerbated oxidative stress-mediated cell death in primary cultured neurons at nanomolar concentrations. This was reversed by FAAH inhibitors or exogenous NAE substrate. Collectively, our data suggest that these phenoxyacyl-ethanolamides act to enhance the activity of FAAH and may stimulate the turnover of NAEs in vivo. Hence, these compounds might be useful pharmacological tools for manipulating FAAH-mediated regulation of NAE signaling in plants or animals. PMID:24558037

  1. Cloning, Expression and Characterization of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 39 Xylosidase from Bacillus Halodurans C-125

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagschal, Kurt; Franqui-Espiet, Diana; Lee, Charles C.; Robertson, George H.; Wong, Dominic W. S.

    The gene encoding a glycoside hydrolase family 39 xylosidase (BH1068) from the alkaliphile Bacillus halodurans strain C-125 was cloned with a C-terminal His-tag, and the recombinant gene product termed BH1068(His)6 was expressed in Escherichia coli. Of the artificial substrates tested, BH1068(His)6 hydrolyzed nitrophenyl derivatives of β-d-xylopyranose, α-l-arabinofuranose, and α-l-arabinopyranose. Deviation from Michaelis-Menten kinetics at higher substrate concentrations indicative of transglycosylation was observed, and k cat and K m values were measured at both low and high substrate concentrations to illuminate the relative propensities to proceed along this alternate reaction pathway. The pH maximum was 6.5, and under the conditions tested, maximal activity was at 47°C, and thermal instability occurred above 45°C. BH1068(His)6 was inactive on arabinan, hydrolyzed xylooligosaccharides, and released only xylose from oat, wheat, rye, beech, and birch arabinoxylan, and thus, can be classified as a xylosidase with respect to natural substrate specificity. The enzyme was not inhibited by up to 200 mM xylose. The oligomerization state was tetrameric under the size-exclusion chromatography conditions employed.

  2. Destructuring plant biomass: Focus on fungal and extremophilic cell wall hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ertan, Haluk; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2016-01-01

    The use of plant biomass as feedstock for biomaterial and biofuel production is relevant in the current bio-based economy scenario of valorizing renewable resources. Fungi, which degrade complex and recalcitrant plant polymers, secrete different enzymes that hydrolyze plant cell wall polysaccharides. The present review discusses the current research trends on fungal, as well as extremophilic cell wall hydrolases that can withstand extreme physico-chemical conditions required in efficient industrial processes. Secretomes of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota and Neocalli-mastigomycota are presented along with metabolic cues (nutrient sensing, coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism) affecting their composition. We conclude the review by suggesting further research avenues focused on the one hand on a comprehensive analysis of the physiology and epigenetics underlying cell wall degrading enzyme production in fungi and on the other hand on the analysis of proteins with unknown function and metagenomics of extremophilic consortia. The current advances in consolidated bioprocessing, altered secretory pathways and creation of designer plants are also examined. Furthermore, recent developments in enhancing the activity, stability and reusability of enzymes based on synergistic, proximity and entropic effects, fusion enzymes, structure-guided recombination between homologous enzymes and magnetic enzymes are considered with a view to improving saccharification. PMID:25804821

  3. Substrate recognition by glycoside hydrolase family 74 xyloglucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takuya; Yaoi, Katsuro; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    2007-11-01

    The basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces xyloglucanase Xgh74B, which has the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 74 catalytic domain and family 1 carbohydrate-binding module, in cellulose-grown culture. The recombinant enzyme, which was heterologously expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris, had high hydrolytic activity toward xyloglucan from tamarind seed (TXG), whereas other beta-1,4-glucans examined were poor substrates for the enzyme. The existence of the carbohydrate-binding module significantly affects adsorption of the enzyme on crystalline cellulose, but has no effect on the hydrolysis of xyloglucan, indicating that the domain may contribute to the localization of the enzyme. HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS analyses of the hydrolytic products of TXG clearly indicated that Xgh74B hydrolyzes the glycosidic bonds of unbranched glucose residues, like other GH family 74 xyloglucanases. However, viscometric analysis suggested that Xgh74B hydrolyzes TXG in a different manner from other known GH family 74 xyloglucanases. Gel permeation chromatography showed that Xgh74B initially produced oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization (DP) 16-18, and these oligosaccharides were then slowly hydrolyzed to final products of DP 7-9. In addition, the ratio of oligosaccharides of DP 7-9 versus those of DP 16-18 was dependent upon the pH of the reaction mixture, indicating that the affinity of Xgh74B for the oligosaccharides of DP 16-18 is affected by the ionic environment at the active site. PMID:17922847

  4. The Responses of Rat Intestinal Brush Border and Cytosol Peptide Hydrolase Activities to Variation in Dietary Protein Content DIETARY REGULATION OF INTESTINAL PEPTIDE HYDROLASES

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, J. Alex; McCarthy, Denis M.; Kim, Young S.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of variation in dietary protein content on small intestinal brush border and cytosol peptide hydrolase activities have been investigated. One group of rats was fed a high protein diet (55% casein) and another group was fed a low protein diet (10% casein). After 1 wk, brush border peptide hydrolase activity (L-leucyl-β-naphthylamide as substrate) and cytosol peptide hydrolase activity (L-prolyl-L-leucine as substrate) were determined in mucosae taken from the proximal, middle, and distal small intestine. As judged by several parameters, brush border peptide hydrolase activity was significantly greater in rats fed the high protein diet when data for corresponding segments were compared. In contrast, no significant difference was seen in cytosol peptide hydrolase activity. In a second study, brush border and cytosol peptide hydrolase activities were determined in the proximal intestine by utilizing an additional three peptide substrates: L-leucyl-L-alanine, L-phenylalanylglycine, and glycyl-L-phenylalanine. Sucrase, maltase, and alkaline phosphatase activities were also determined. As before, brush border peptide hydrolase activities were significantly greater in rats fed the high protein diet. However, activities of the nonproteolytic brush border enzymes did not vary significantly with diet. In contrast to the results obtained with L-prolyl-L-leucine as substrate for the cytosol enzymes, cytosol activity against the three additional peptide substrates was greater in rats fed the high protein diet. It is suggested that the brush border peptide hydrolase response to variation in dietary protein content represents a functional adaptation analogous to the regulation of intestinal disaccharidases by dietary carbohydrates. The implication of the differential responses of the cytosol peptide hydrolases is uncertain, since little is known of the functional role of these nonorgan-specific enzymes. PMID:4430719

  5. Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase Terminal Domains in Cross-Protective Immunotherapy Against Leishmania amazonensis Murine Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nico, Dirlei; Gomes, Daniele Crespo; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Iam; Morrot, Alexandre; Palatnik, Marcos; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoside hydrolases of the Leishmania genus are vital enzymes for the replication of the DNA and conserved phylogenetic markers of the parasites. Leishmania donovani nucleoside hydrolase (NH36) induced a main CD4+ T cell driven protective response against L. chagasi infection in mice which is directed against its C-terminal domain. In this study, we used the three recombinant domains of NH36: N-terminal domain (F1, amino acids 1–103), central domain (F2 aminoacids 104–198), and C-terminal domain (F3 amino acids 199–314) in combination with saponin and assayed their immunotherapeutic effect on Balb/c mice previously infected with L. amazonensis. We identified that the F1 and F3 peptides determined strong cross-immunotherapeutic effects, reducing the size of footpad lesions to 48 and 64%, and the parasite load in footpads to 82.6 and 81%, respectively. The F3 peptide induced the strongest anti-NH36 antibody response and intradermal response (IDR) against L. amazonenis and a high secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α with reduced levels of IL-10. The F1 vaccine, induced similar increases of IgG2b antibodies and IFN-γ and TNF-α levels, but no IDR and no reduction of IL-10. The multiparameter flow cytometry analysis was used to assess the immune response after immunotherapy and disclosed that the degree of the immunotherapeutic effect is predicted by the frequencies of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IL-2 or TNF-α or both. Total frequencies and frequencies of double-cytokine CD4 T cell producers were enhanced by F1 and F3 vaccines. Collectively, our multifunctional analysis disclosed that immunotherapeutic protection improved as the CD4 responses progressed from 1+ to 2+, in the case of the F1 and F3 vaccines, and as the CD8 responses changed qualitatively from 1+ to 3+, mainly in the case of the F1 vaccine, providing new correlates of immunotherapeutic protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in mice based on T-helper TH1 and CD8+ mediated immune responses

  6. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  7. Active site and laminarin binding in glycoside hydrolase family 55.

    PubMed

    Bianchetti, Christopher M; Takasuka, Taichi E; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S; Yik, Eric J; Bergeman, Lai F; Fox, Brian G

    2015-05-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100-10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  8. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs) were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8). The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are metal-dependent hydrolases

  9. Allophanate hydrolase, not urease, functions in bacterial cyanuric acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Shapir, Nir; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2005-08-01

    Growth substrates containing an s-triazine ring are typically metabolized by bacteria to liberate 3 mol of ammonia via the intermediate cyanuric acid. Over a 25-year period, a number of original research papers and reviews have stated that cyanuric acid is metabolized in two steps to the 2-nitrogen intermediate urea. In the present study, allophanate, not urea, was shown to be the 2-nitrogen intermediate in cyanuric acid metabolism in all the bacteria examined. Six different experimental results supported this conclusion: (i) synthetic allophanate was shown to readily decarboxylate to form urea under acidic extraction and chromatography conditions used in previous studies; (ii) alkaline extraction methods were used to stabilize and detect allophanate in bacteria actively metabolizing cyanuric acid; (iii) the kinetic course of allophanate formation and disappearance was consistent with its being an intermediate in cyanuric acid metabolism, and no urea was observed in those experiments; (iv) protein extracts from cells grown on cyanuric acid contained allophanate hydrolase activity; (v) genes encoding the enzymes AtzE and AtzF, which produce and hydrolyze allophanate, respectively, were found in several cyanuric acid-metabolizing bacteria; and (vi) TrzF, an AtzF homolog found in Enterobacter cloacae strain 99, was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and shown to have allophanate hydrolase activity. In addition, we have observed that there are a large number of genes homologous to atzF and trzF distributed in phylogenetically distinct bacteria. In total, the data indicate that s-triazine metabolism in a broad class of bacteria proceeds through allophanate via allophanate hydrolase, rather than through urea using urease. PMID:16085834

  10. Inverting hydrolases and their use in enantioconvergent biotransformations

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Markus; Faber, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the more abundant occurrence of racemic compounds compared to prochiral or meso forms, most enantiomerically pure products are obtained via racemate resolution. This review summarizes (chemo)enzymatic enantioconvergent processes based on the use of hydrolytic enzymes, which are able to invert a stereocenter during catalysis that can overcome the 50%-yield limitation of kinetic resolution. Recent developments are presented in the fields of inverting or retaining sulfatases, epoxide hydrolases and dehalogenases, which allow the production of secondary alcohols or vicinal diols at a 100% theoretical yield from a racemate via enantioconvergent processes. PMID:23809848

  11. Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast-growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally and in grasses specifically, we ann...

  12. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  13. Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T Molinate Hydrolase, a Novel Cobalt-Dependent Amidohydrolase ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Márcia; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Junca, Howard; Gales, Luís; Pieper, Dietmar H.; Nunes, Olga C.

    2011-01-01

    A new pathway of molinate mineralization has recently been described. Among the five members of the mixed culture able to promote such a process, Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T has been observed to promote the initial breakdown of the herbicide into ethanethiol and azepane-1-carboxylate. In the current study, the gene encoding the enzyme responsible for molinate hydrolysis was identified and heterologously expressed, and the resultant active protein was purified and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the gene encodes a 465-amino-acid protein of the metal-dependent hydrolase A subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily with a predicted molecular mass of 50.9 kDa. Molinate hydrolase shares the highest amino acid sequence identity (48 to 50%) with phenylurea hydrolases of Arthrobacter globiformis and Mycobacterium brisbanense. However, in contrast to previously described members of the metal-dependent hydrolase A subfamily, molinate hydrolase contains cobalt as the only active-site metal. PMID:21840982

  14. A constitutive expression system for glycosyl hydrolase family 7 cellobiohydrolases in Hypocrea jecorina

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Baker, John O.; Vander Wall, Todd; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Podkaminer, Kara; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.

    2015-03-18

    One of the primary industrial-scale cellulase producers is the ascomycete fungus, Hypocrea jecorina, which produces and secretes large quantities of diverse cellulolytic enzymes. Perhaps the single most important biomass degrading enzyme is cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1or Cel7A) due to its enzymatic proficiency in cellulose depolymerization. However, production of Cel7A with native-like properties from heterologous expression systems has proven difficult. In this study, we develop a protein expression system in H. jecorina (Trichoderma reesei) useful for production and secretion of heterologous cellobiohydrolases from glycosyl hydrolase family 7. Building upon previous work in heterologous protein expression in filamentous fungi, we have integrated amore » native constitutive enolase promoter with the native cbh1 signal sequence. The results are the following: The constitutive eno promoter driving the expression of Cel7A allows growth on glucose and results in repression of the native cellulase system, severely reducing background endo- and other cellulase activity and greatly simplifying purification of the recombinant protein. Coupling this system to a Δcbh1 strain of H. jecorina ensures that only the recombinant Cel7A protein is produced. Two distinct transformant colony morphologies were observed and correlated with high and null protein production. Production levels in ‘fast’ transformants are roughly equivalent to those in the native QM6a strain of H. jecorina, typically in the range of 10 to 30 mg/L when grown in continuous stirred-tank fermenters. ‘Slow’ transformants showed no evidence of Cel7A production. Specific activity of the purified recombinant Cel7A protein is equivalent to that of native protein when assayed on pretreated corn stover, as is the thermal stability and glycosylation level. Purified Cel7A produced from growth on glucose demonstrated remarkably consistent specific activity. Purified Cel7A from the same strain grown on lactose

  15. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  16. Structure of unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase complexed with substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Takafumi; Ochiai, Akihito; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku . E-mail: kmurata@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-09-08

    Bacillus subtilis strain 168 YteR has been identified as a novel enzyme 'unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase' classified in glycoside hydrolase family 105. This enzyme acts specifically on unsaturated rhamnogalacturonan (RG) produced from plant cell wall RG type-I treated with RG lyases, releasing unsaturated galacturonic acid ({delta}GalA) from the substrate. The most likely candidate catalytic residue is Asp-143. Here, we show the structure of D143N in complex with unsaturated RG disaccharide (substrate) determined at 1.9 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. This structural feature directly contributes to the postulation of the enzyme reaction mechanism. YteR triggers the hydration of vinyl ether group in {delta}GalA, but not of glycoside bond, by using Asp-143 as a general acid and base catalyst. Asp-143 donates proton to the double bond of {delta}GalA as an acid catalyst and also deprotonates a water molecule as a base catalyst. Deprotonated water molecule attacks the C5 atom of {delta}GalA.

  17. Marine extremophiles: a source of hydrolases for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-04-01

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications. PMID:25854643

  18. Mechanistic Investigations of Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens*

    PubMed Central

    Jongkees, Seino A. K.; Yoo, Hayoung; Withers, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to probe the details of the hydration-initiated hydrolysis catalyzed by the Clostridium perfringens unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase of glycoside hydrolase family 88 in the CAZy classification system. Direct 1H NMR monitoring of the enzymatic reaction detected no accumulated reaction intermediates in solution, suggesting that rearrangement of the initial hydration product occurs on-enzyme. An attempt at mechanism-based trapping of on-enzyme intermediates using a 1,1-difluoro-substrate was unsuccessful because the probe was too deactivated to be turned over by the enzyme. Kinetic isotope effects arising from deuterium-for-hydrogen substitution at carbons 1 and 4 provide evidence for separate first-irreversible and overall rate-determining steps in the hydration reaction, with two potential mechanisms proposed to explain these results. Based on the positioning of catalytic residues in the enzyme active site, the lack of efficient turnover of a 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-substrate, and several unsuccessful attempts at confirmation of a simpler mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, the most plausible mechanism is one involving an intermediate bearing an epoxide on carbons 1 and 2. PMID:24573682

  19. Mechanistic investigations of unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Jongkees, Seino A K; Yoo, Hayoung; Withers, Stephen G

    2014-04-18

    Experiments were carried out to probe the details of the hydration-initiated hydrolysis catalyzed by the Clostridium perfringens unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase of glycoside hydrolase family 88 in the CAZy classification system. Direct (1)H NMR monitoring of the enzymatic reaction detected no accumulated reaction intermediates in solution, suggesting that rearrangement of the initial hydration product occurs on-enzyme. An attempt at mechanism-based trapping of on-enzyme intermediates using a 1,1-difluoro-substrate was unsuccessful because the probe was too deactivated to be turned over by the enzyme. Kinetic isotope effects arising from deuterium-for-hydrogen substitution at carbons 1 and 4 provide evidence for separate first-irreversible and overall rate-determining steps in the hydration reaction, with two potential mechanisms proposed to explain these results. Based on the positioning of catalytic residues in the enzyme active site, the lack of efficient turnover of a 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-substrate, and several unsuccessful attempts at confirmation of a simpler mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, the most plausible mechanism is one involving an intermediate bearing an epoxide on carbons 1 and 2. PMID:24573682

  20. Catalysis of potato epoxide hydrolase, StEH1

    PubMed Central

    Elfström, Lisa T.; Widersten, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of epoxide hydrolase (EC 3.3.2.3) from potato, StEH1 (Solanum tuberosum epoxide hydrolase 1), was studied by presteady-state and steady-state kinetics as well as by pH dependence of activity. The specific activities towards the different enantiomers of TSO (trans-stilbene oxide) as substrate were 43 and 3 μmol·min−1·mg−1 with the R,R- or S,S-isomers respectively. The enzyme was, however, enantioselective in favour of the S,S enantiomer due to a lower Km value. The pH dependences of kcat with R,R or S,S-TSO were also distinct and supposedly reflecting the pH dependences of the individual kinetic rates during substrate conversion. The rate-limiting step for TSO and cis- and trans-epoxystearate was shown by rapid kinetic measurements to be the hydrolysis of the alkylenzyme intermediate. Functional characterization of point mutants verified residues Asp105, Tyr154, Tyr235 and His300 as crucial for catalytic activity. All mutants displayed drastically decreased enzymatic activities during steady state. Presteady-state measurements revealed the base-deficient H300N (His300→Asn) mutant to possess greatly reduced efficiencies in catalysis of both chemical steps (alkylation and hydrolysis). PMID:15882148

  1. Marine Extremophiles: A Source of Hydrolases for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications. PMID:25854643

  2. Recombineering homologous recombination constructs in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Scoggin, Shane; Shalaby, Nevine A; Williams, Nathan David; Hiesinger, P Robin; Buszczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The continued development of techniques for fast, large-scale manipulation of endogenous gene loci will broaden the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism for human-disease related research. Recent years have seen technical advancements like homologous recombination and recombineering. However, generating unequivocal null mutations or tagging endogenous proteins remains a substantial effort for most genes. Here, we describe and demonstrate techniques for using recombineering-based cloning methods to generate vectors that can be used to target and manipulate endogenous loci in vivo. Specifically, we have established a combination of three technologies: (1) BAC transgenesis/recombineering, (2) ends-out homologous recombination and (3) Gateway technology to provide a robust, efficient and flexible method for manipulating endogenous genomic loci. In this protocol, we provide step-by-step details about how to (1) design individual vectors, (2) how to clone large fragments of genomic DNA into the homologous recombination vector using gap repair, and (3) how to replace or tag genes of interest within these vectors using a second round of recombineering. Finally, we will also provide a protocol for how to mobilize these cassettes in vivo to generate a knockout, or a tagged gene via knock-in. These methods can easily be adopted for multiple targets in parallel and provide a means for manipulating the Drosophila genome in a timely and efficient manner. PMID:23893070

  3. Oral vaccination of mice with Trichinella spiralis nudix hydrolase DNA vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella elicited protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Wang, Zhong Quan; Liu, Ruo Dan; Jiang, Peng; Long, Shao Rong; Liu, Li Na; Zhang, Xin Zhuo; Cheng, Xiang Chao; Yu, Chuan; Ren, Hui Jun; Cui, Jing

    2015-06-01

    We have previously reported that Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase (TsNd) bound to intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), and the vaccination of mice with recombinant TsNd protein (rTsNd) produced a partial protective immunity against challenge infection in mice. In this study, the full-length cDNA sequence of TsNd gene was cloned into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1, and the recombinant TsNd DNA was transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain ⊿cyaSL1344. Oral immunization of mice with TsNd/S. typhimurium elicited a significant local mucosal IgA response and a systemic Th1/Th2 immune response. Cytokine profiling also showed a significant increase in the Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4, 10) responses in splenocytes of immunized mice upon stimulation with the rTsNd. The oral immunization of mice with TsNd/S. typhimurium displayed a statistically significant 73.32% reduction in adult worm burden and a 49.5% reduction in muscle larvae after challenge with T. spiralis muscle larvae, compared with PBS control group. Our results demonstrated that TsNd DNA delivered by attenuated live S. typhimurium elicited a local IgA response and a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response, and produced a partial protection against T. spiralis infection in mice. PMID:25733024

  4. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  5. A β-l-Arabinopyranosidase from Streptomyces avermitilis Is a Novel Member of Glycoside Hydrolase Family 27*

    PubMed Central

    Ichinose, Hitomi; Fujimoto, Zui; Honda, Mariko; Harazono, Koichi; Nishimoto, Yukifumi; Uzura, Atsuko; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a family of plant cell surface proteoglycans and are considered to be involved in plant growth and development. Because AGPs are very complex molecules, glycoside hydrolases capable of degrading AGPs are powerful tools for analyses of the AGPs. We previously reported such enzymes from Streptomyces avermitilis. Recently, a β-l-arabinopyranosidase was purified from the culture supernatant of the bacterium, and its corresponding gene was identified. The primary structure of the protein revealed that the catalytic module was highly similar to that of glycoside hydrolase family 27 (GH27) α-d-galactosidases. The recombinant protein was successfully expressed as a secreted 64-kDa protein using a Streptomyces expression system. The specific activity toward p-nitrophenyl-β-l-arabinopyranoside was 18 μmol of arabinose/min/mg, which was 67 times higher than that toward p- nitrophenyl-α-d-galactopyranoside. The enzyme could remove 0.1 and 45% l-arabinose from gum arabic or larch arabinogalactan, respectively. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that the protein had a GH27 catalytic domain, an antiparallel β-domain containing Greek key motifs, another antiparallel β-domain forming a jellyroll structure, and a carbohydrate-binding module family 13 domain. Comparison of the structure of this protein with that of α-d-galactosidase showed a single amino acid substitution (aspartic acid to glutamic acid) in the catalytic pocket of β-l-arabinopyranosidase, and a space for the hydroxymethyl group on the C-5 carbon of d-galactose bound to α-galactosidase was changed in β-l-arabinopyranosidase. Mutagenesis study revealed that the residue is critical for modulating the enzyme activity. This is the first report in which β-l-arabinopyranosidase is classified as a new member of the GH27 family. PMID:19608743

  6. Relationship between Glycosyl Hydrolase Inventory and Growth Physiology of the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus on Carbohydrate-Based Media

    PubMed Central

    Driskill, Lance E.; Kusy, Kevin; Bauer, Michael W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    Utilization of a range of carbohydrates for growth by the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated by examining the spectrum of glycosyl hydrolases produced by this microorganism and the thermal labilities of various saccharides. Previously, P. furiosus had been found to grow in batch cultures on several α-linked carbohydrates and cellobiose but not on glucose or other β-linked sugars. Although P. furiosus was not able to grow on any nonglucan carbohydrate or any form of cellulose in this study (growth on oat spelt arabinoxylan was attributed to glucan contamination of this substrate), significant growth at 98°C occurred on β-1,3- and β-1,3–β-1,4-linked glucans. Oligosaccharides generated by digestion with a recombinant laminarinase derived from P. furiosus were the compounds that were most effective in stimulating growth of the microorganism. In several cases, periodic addition of β-glucan substrates to fed-batch cultures limited adverse thermochemical modifications of the carbohydrates (i.e., Maillard reactions and caramelization) and led to significant increases (as much as two- to threefold) in the cell yields. While glucose had only a marginally positive effect on growth in batch culture, the final cell densities nearly tripled when glucose was added by the fed-batch procedure. Nonenzymatic browning reactions were found to be significant at 98°C for saccharides with degrees of polymerization (DP) ranging from 1 to 6; glucose was the most labile compound on a mass basis and the least labile compound on a molar basis. This suggests that for DP of 2 or greater protection of the nonreducing monosaccharide component may be a factor in substrate availability. For P. furiosus, carbohydrate utilization patterns were found to reflect the distribution of the glycosyl hydrolases which are known to be produced by this microorganism. PMID:10049838

  7. A Novel Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Glycoside Hydrolase from Ustilago esculenta Functions in β-1,3-Glucan Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Masahiro; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Machiko; Nakano, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    A glycoside hydrolase responsible for laminarin degradation was partially purified to homogeneity from a Ustilago esculenta culture filtrate by weak-cation-exchange, strong-cation-exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. Three proteins in enzymatically active fractions were digested with chymotrypsin followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis, resulting in the identification of three peptide sequences that shared significant similarity to a putative β-1,3-glucanase, a member of glucoside hydrolase family 16 (GH16) from Sporisorium reilianum SRZ2. A gene encoding a laminarin-degrading enzyme from U. esculenta, lam16A, was isolated by PCR using degenerate primers designed based on the S. reilianum SRZ2 β-1,3-glucanase gene. Lam16A possesses a GH16 catalytic domain with an N-terminal signal peptide and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor peptide. Recombinant Lam16A fused to an N-terminal FLAG peptide (Lam16A-FLAG) overexpressed in Aspergillus oryzae exhibited hydrolytic activity toward β-1,3-glucan specifically and was localized both in the extracellular and in the membrane fractions but not in the cell wall fraction. Lam16A without a GPI anchor signal peptide was secreted extracellularly and was not detected in the membrane fraction. Membrane-anchored Lam16A-FLAG was released completely by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. These results suggest that Lam16A is anchored in the plasma membrane in order to modify β-1,3-glucan associated with the inner cell wall and that Lam16A is also used for the catabolism of β-1,3-glucan after its release in the extracellular medium. PMID:22685137

  8. Relationship between glycosyl hydrolase inventory and growth physiology of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus on carbohydrate-based media.

    PubMed

    Driskill, L E; Kusy, K; Bauer, M W; Kelly, R M

    1999-03-01

    Utilization of a range of carbohydrates for growth by the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated by examining the spectrum of glycosyl hydrolases produced by this microorganism and the thermal labilities of various saccharides. Previously, P. furiosus had been found to grow in batch cultures on several alpha-linked carbohydrates and cellobiose but not on glucose or other beta-linked sugars. Although P. furiosus was not able to grow on any nonglucan carbohydrate or any form of cellulose in this study (growth on oat spelt arabinoxylan was attributed to glucan contamination of this substrate), significant growth at 98 degrees C occurred on beta-1,3- and beta-1,3-beta-1,4-linked glucans. Oligosaccharides generated by digestion with a recombinant laminarinase derived from P. furiosus were the compounds that were most effective in stimulating growth of the microorganism. In several cases, periodic addition of beta-glucan substrates to fed-batch cultures limited adverse thermochemical modifications of the carbohydrates (i.e., Maillard reactions and caramelization) and led to significant increases (as much as two- to threefold) in the cell yields. While glucose had only a marginally positive effect on growth in batch culture, the final cell densities nearly tripled when glucose was added by the fed-batch procedure. Nonenzymatic browning reactions were found to be significant at 98 degrees C for saccharides with degrees of polymerization (DP) ranging from 1 to 6; glucose was the most labile compound on a mass basis and the least labile compound on a molar basis. This suggests that for DP of 2 or greater protection of the nonreducing monosaccharide component may be a factor in substrate availability. For P. furiosus, carbohydrate utilization patterns were found to reflect the distribution of the glycosyl hydrolases which are known to be produced by this microorganism. PMID:10049838

  9. Immunoprotective responses of T helper type 1 stimulatory protein-S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Khare, P; Jaiswal, A K; Tripathi, C D P; Sundar, S; Dube, A

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that a patient in clinical remission of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) remains immune to reinfection, which provides a rationale for the feasibility of a vaccine against this deadly disease. In earlier studies, observation of significant cellular responses in treated Leishmania patients as well as in hamsters against leishmanial antigens from different fractions led to its further proteomic characterization, wherein S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (AdoHcy) was identified as a helper type 1 (Th1) stimulatory protein. The present study includes immunological characterization of this protein, its cellular responses [lymphoproliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production and cytokine responses] in treated Leishmania-infected hamsters and patients as well as prophylactic efficacy against Leishmania challenge in hamsters and the immune responses generated thereof. Significantly higher cellular responses were noticed against recombinant L. donovani S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (rLdAdoHcy) compared to soluble L. donovani antigen in treated samples. Moreover, stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with rLdAdoHcy up-regulated the levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12 and down-regulated IL-10. Furthermore, vaccination with rLdAdoHcy generated perceptible delayed-type hypersensitivity response and exerted considerably good prophylactic efficacy (∼70% inhibition) against L. donovani challenge. The efficacy was confirmed by the increased expression levels of inducible NO synthase and Th1-type cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-12 and down-regulation of IL-4, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The results indicate the potentiality of rLdAdoHcy protein as a suitable vaccine candidate against VL. PMID:26898994

  10. A Proton Wire and Water Channel Revealed in the Crystal Structure of Isatin Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Sommer, Theis; Jensen, Jan K.; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Etzerodt, Michael; Morth, J. Preben

    2014-01-01

    The high resolution crystal structures of isatin hydrolase from Labrenzia aggregata in the apo and the product state are described. These are the first structures of a functionally characterized metal-dependent hydrolase of this fold. Isatin hydrolase converts isatin to isatinate and belongs to a novel family of metalloenzymes that include the bacterial kynurenine formamidase. The product state, mimicked by bound thioisatinate, reveals a water molecule that bridges the thioisatinate to a proton wire in an adjacent water channel and thus allows the proton released by the reaction to escape only when the product is formed. The functional proton wire present in isatin hydrolase isoform b represents a unique catalytic feature common to all hydrolases is here trapped and visualized for the first time. The local molecular environment required to coordinate thioisatinate allows stronger and more confident identification of orthologous genes encoding isatin hydrolases within the prokaryotic kingdom. The isatin hydrolase orthologues found in human gut bacteria raise the question as to whether the indole-3-acetic acid degradation pathway is present in human gut flora. PMID:24917679

  11. Development of the aza-crown ether metal complexes as artificial hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Li, Fang-zhen; Wu, Jiao-yi; Xie, Jia-qing; Li, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Hydrolases play a crucial role in the biochemical process, which can catalyze the hydrolysis of various compounds like carboxylic esters, phosphoesters, amides, nucleic acids, peptides, and so on. The design of artificial hydrolases has attracted extensive attention due to their scientific significance and potential applications in the field of gene medicine and molecular biology. Numerous macrocyclic metal complexes have been used as artificial hydrolase in the catalytic hydrolysis of the organic substrate. Aza-crown ether for this comment is a special class of the macrocyclic ligand containing both the nitrogen atoms and oxygen atoms in the ring. The studies showed that the aza-crown complexes exhibited high activity of hydrolytic enzyme. However, the aza-crown ether metal complex as artificial hydrolase is still very limited because of its difficulty in synthesis. This review summarizes the development of the aza-crown ether metal complexes as the artificial hydrolase, including the synthesis and catalysis of the transition metal complexes and lanthanide metal complexes of aza-crown ethers. The purpose of this review is to highlight: (1) the relationship between the structure and hydrolytic activity of synthetic hydrolase; (2) the synergistic effect of metal sites and ligands in the course of organic compound hydrolysis; and (3) the design strategies of the aza-crown ethers as hydrolase. PMID:26460062

  12. Cloning and characterization of two rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase genes from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed Central

    Suykerbuyk, M E; Kester, H C; Schaap, P J; Stam, H; Musters, W; Visser, J

    1997-01-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase gene of Aspergillus aculeatus was used as a probe for the cloning of two rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase genes of Aspergillus niger. The corresponding proteins, rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases A and B, are 78 and 72% identical, respectively, with the A. aculeatus enzyme. In A. niger cultures which were shifted from growth on sucrose to growth on apple pectin as a carbon source, the expression of the rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase A gene (rhgA) was transiently induced after 3 h of growth on apple pectin. The rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase B gene was not induced by apple pectin, but the rhgB gene was derepressed after 18 h of growth on either apple pectin or sucrose. Gene fusions of the A. niger rhgA and rhgB coding regions with the strong and inducible Aspergillus awamori exlA promoter were used to obtain high-producing A. awamori transformants which were then used for the purification of the two A. niger rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography of oligomeric degradation products showed that optimal degradation of an isolated highly branched pectin fraction by A. niger rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases A and B occurred at pH 3.6 and 4.1, respectively. The specific activities of rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases A and B were then 0.9 and 0.4 U/mg, respectively, which is significantly lower than the specific activity of A. aculeatus rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase (2.5 U/mg at an optimal pH of 4.5). Compared to the A enzymes, the A. niger B enzyme appears to have a different substrate specificity, since additional oligomers are formed. PMID:9212401

  13. Effects of synthetic alkamides on Arabidopsis fatty acid amide hydrolase activity and plant development.

    PubMed

    Faure, Lionel; Cavazos, Ronaldo; Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; Petros, Robby A; Koulen, Peter; Blancaflor, Elison B; Chapman, Kent D

    2015-02-01

    Alkamides and N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are bioactive, amide-linked lipids that influence plant development. Alkamides are restricted to several families of higher plants and some fungi, whereas NAEs are widespread signaling molecules in both plants and animals. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) has been described as a key contributor to NAE hydrolysis; however, no enzyme has been associated with alkamide degradation in plants. Herein reported is synthesis of 12 compounds structurally similar to a naturally occurring alkamide (N-isobutyl-(2E,6Z,8E)decatrienamide or affinin) with different acyl compositions more similar to plant NAEs and various amino alkyl head groups. These "hybrid" synthetic alkamides were tested for activity toward recombinant Arabidopsis FAAH and for their effects on plant development (i.e., cotyledon expansion and primary root length). A substantial increase in FAAH activity was discovered toward NAEs in vitro in the presence of some of these synthetic alkamides, such as N-ethyllauroylamide (4). This "enhancement" effect was found to be due, at least in part, to relief from product inhibition of FAAH by ethanolamine, and not due to an alteration in the oligomerization state of the FAAH enzyme. For several of these alkamides, an inhibition of seedling growth was observed with greater results in FAAH knockouts and less in FAAH over-expressing plants, suggesting that these alkamides could be hydrolyzed by FAAH in planta. The tight regulation of NAE levels in vivo appears to be important for proper seedling establishment, and as such, some of these synthetic alkamides may be useful pharmacological tools to manipulate the effects of NAEs in situ. PMID:25491532

  14. Clostridium beijerinckii Cells Expressing Neocallimastix patriciarum Glycoside Hydrolases Show Enhanced Lichenan Utilization and Solvent Production

    PubMed Central

    López-Contreras, Ana M.; Smidt, Hauke; van der Oost, John; Claassen, Pieternel A. M.; Mooibroek, Hans; de Vos, Willem M.

    2001-01-01

    Growth and the production of acetone, butanol, and ethanol by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 on several polysaccharides and sugars were analyzed. On crystalline cellulose, growth and solvent production were observed only when a mixture of fungal cellulases was added to the medium. On lichenan growth and solvent production occurred, but this polymer was only partially utilized. To increase utilization of these polymers and subsequent solvent production, the genes for two new glycoside hydrolases, celA and celD from the fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum, were cloned separately into C. beijerinckii. To do this, a secretion vector based on the pMTL500E shuttle vector and containing the promoter and signal sequence coding region of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP262 eglA gene was constructed and fused either to the celA gene or the celD gene. Stable C. beijerinckii transformants were obtained with the resulting plasmids, pWUR3 (celA) and pWUR4 (celD). The recombinant strains showed clear halos on agar plates containing carboxymethyl cellulose upon staining with Congo red. In addition, their culture supernatants had significant endoglucanase activities (123 U/mg of protein for transformants harboring celA and 78 U/mg of protein for transformants harboring celD). Although C. beijerinckii harboring either celA or celD was not able to grow, separately or in mixed culture, on carboxymethyl cellulose or microcrystalline cellulose, both transformants showed a significant increase in solvent production during growth on lichenan and more extensive degradation of this polymer than that exhibited by the wild-type strain. PMID:11679336

  15. Clostridium beijerinckii cells expressing Neocallimastix patriciarum glycoside hydrolases show enhanced lichenan utilization and solvent production.

    PubMed

    López-Contreras, A M; Smidt, H; van der Oost, J; Claassen, P A; Mooibroek, H; de Vos, W M

    2001-11-01

    Growth and the production of acetone, butanol, and ethanol by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 on several polysaccharides and sugars were analyzed. On crystalline cellulose, growth and solvent production were observed only when a mixture of fungal cellulases was added to the medium. On lichenan growth and solvent production occurred, but this polymer was only partially utilized. To increase utilization of these polymers and subsequent solvent production, the genes for two new glycoside hydrolases, celA and celD from the fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum, were cloned separately into C. beijerinckii. To do this, a secretion vector based on the pMTL500E shuttle vector and containing the promoter and signal sequence coding region of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP262 eglA gene was constructed and fused either to the celA gene or the celD gene. Stable C. beijerinckii transformants were obtained with the resulting plasmids, pWUR3 (celA) and pWUR4 (celD). The recombinant strains showed clear halos on agar plates containing carboxymethyl cellulose upon staining with Congo red. In addition, their culture supernatants had significant endoglucanase activities (123 U/mg of protein for transformants harboring celA and 78 U/mg of protein for transformants harboring celD). Although C. beijerinckii harboring either celA or celD was not able to grow, separately or in mixed culture, on carboxymethyl cellulose or microcrystalline cellulose, both transformants showed a significant increase in solvent production during growth on lichenan and more extensive degradation of this polymer than that exhibited by the wild-type strain. PMID:11679336

  16. Characterization of Five β-Glycoside Hydrolases from Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Cellulomonas fimi produces a large array of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Analysis of the collection of carbohydrate-active enzymes from the recent genome sequence of C. fimi ATCC 484 shows a large number of uncharacterized genes for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes potentially involved in biomass utilization. To investigate the enzymatic activity of potential β-glucosidases in C. fimi, genes encoding several GH3 enzymes and one GH1 enzyme were cloned and recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. Biochemical analysis of these proteins revealed that the enzymes exhibited different substrate specificities for para-nitrophenol-linked substrates (pNP), disaccharides, and oligosaccharides. Celf_2726 encoded a bifunctional enzyme with β-d-xylopyranosidase and α-l-arabinofuranosidase activities, based on pNP-linked substrates (CfXyl3A). Celf_0140 encoded a β-d-glucosidase with activity on β-1,3- and β-1,6-linked glucosyl disaccharides as well as pNP-β-Glc (CfBgl3A). Celf_0468 encoded a β-d-glucosidase with hydrolysis of pNP-β-Glc and hydrolysis/transglycosylation activities only on β-1,6-linked glucosyl disaccharide (CfBgl3B). Celf_3372 encoded a GH3 family member with broad aryl-β-d-glycosidase substrate specificity. Celf_2783 encoded the GH1 family member (CfBgl1), which was found to hydrolyze pNP-β-Glc/Fuc/Gal, as well as cellotetraose and cellopentaose. CfBgl1 also had good activity on β-1,2- and β-1,3-linked disaccharides but had only very weak activity on β-1,4/6-linked glucose. PMID:25225266

  17. The Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Expression Levels and Folding of Organophosphorus Hydrolase Enzyme in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Khajeh, Khosro; Farnoosh, Gholamreza; Hassanpour, Kazem; Khodi, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) is a type of organophosphate-degrading enzyme which is widely used in the bioremediation process. Objectives: In this study, the periplasmic and cytoplasmic productions and the activity of recombinant OPH in Escherichia coli were investigated and compared using two pET systems (pET21a and pET26b). Materials and Methods: The sequence encoding the opd gene was synthesized and expressed in the form of inclusion body using pET21a-opd and in the periplasmic space in pET26b-opd. Results: Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed a band of about 37 kDa with a maximum expression level at 30°C from pET21a-opd.However, the obtained results of the periplasmic space extraction of OPH (pET26b-opd) showed a very weak band, while the cytoplasmic expression of OPH (pET21a-opd) produced a strong protein band. Conclusions: The activities studied by the production of PNP were determined by following the increase at 410 nm. The maximum PNP was produced at 30°C with an optical density of 10.62 in the presence of cytoplasmic expression of OPH (pET21a-opd). Consequently, our results suggest cytoplasmic expression system as an appropriate candidate with a high amount of OPH in spite of inclusion body formation, which needs an additional refolding step. PMID:26870308

  18. Multidomain, Surface Layer-associated Glycoside Hydrolases Contribute to Plant Polysaccharide Degradation by Caldicellulosiruptor Species.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jonathan M; Pierce, William S; Le, Jaycee H; Harper, George W; Wright, John H; Tucker, Allyson L; Zurawski, Jeffrey V; Lee, Laura L; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Kelly, Robert M

    2016-03-25

    The genome of the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor kronotskyensisencodes 19 surface layer (S-layer) homology (SLH) domain-containing proteins, the most in any Caldicellulosiruptorspecies genome sequenced to date. These SLH proteins include five glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and one polysaccharide lyase, the genes for which were transcribed at high levels during growth on plant biomass. The largest GH identified so far in this genus, Calkro_0111 (2,435 amino acids), is completely unique toC. kronotskyensisand contains SLH domains. Calkro_0111 was produced recombinantly inEscherichia colias two pieces, containing the GH16 and GH55 domains, respectively, as well as putative binding and spacer domains. These displayed endo- and exoglucanase activity on the β-1,3-1,6-glucan laminarin. A series of additional truncation mutants of Calkro_0111 revealed the essential architectural features required for catalytic function. Calkro_0402, another of the SLH domain GHs inC. kronotskyensis, when produced inE. coli, was active on a variety of xylans and β-glucans. Unlike Calkro_0111, Calkro_0402 is highly conserved in the genus Caldicellulosiruptorand among other biomass-degrading Firmicutes but missing from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii As such, the gene encoding Calkro_0402 was inserted into the C. besciigenome, creating a mutant strain with its S-layer extensively decorated with Calkro_0402. This strain consequently degraded xylans more extensively than wild-typeC. bescii The results here provide new insights into the architecture and role of SLH domain GHs and demonstrate that hemicellulose degradation can be enhanced through non-native SLH domain GHs engineered into the genomes of Caldicellulosiruptorspecies. PMID:26814128

  19. Genomic and expression analysis of glycosyl hydrolase family 35 genes from rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Chantarangsee, Mallika; Maneesan, Janjira; Ketudat-Cairns, James

    2008-01-01

    Background Many plant β-galactosidases (Bgals) have been well characterized and their deduced biological functions mainly involve degradation of structural pectins, xyloglucans or arabinogalactoproteins in plant cell walls. However, gene multiplicity in glycosyl hydrolase family 35 (GH35), to which these proteins belong, implies diverse functions. In this study, the gene multiplicity, apparent evolutionary relationships and transcript expression of rice Bgal genes were examined, in order to predict their biological functions. Results Fifteen rice Bgal genes were identified in the plant genome, one of which encodes a protein similar to animal Bgals (OsBgal9), and the remaining 14 fall in a nearly plant-specific subfamily of Bgals. The presence of both classes of Bgals in bryophytes, as well as vascular plants, suggests both gene lineages were present early in plant evolution. All 15 proteins were predicted to contain secretory signal sequences, suggesting they have secretory pathway or external roles. RT-PCR and database analysis found two distinct lineages to be expressed nearly exclusively in reproductive tissues and to be closely related to Arabidopsis Bgals expressed most highly in flower and pollen. On the other hand, OsBgal6 is expressed primarily in young vegetative tissues, and alternative splicing in panicle prevents its production of full-length protein in this reproductive tissue. OsBgal11 also showed alternative splicing to produce different length proteins. OsBgal13 produced by recombinant expression in Escherichia coli hydrolyzed α-L-arabinoside in addition to β-D-galactoside and β-(1→3)-, β-(1→4)- and β-(1→6)- linked galacto-oligosaccharides. Conclusion Rice GH35 contains fifteen genes with a diversity of protein sequences, predicted locations and expression and splicing patterns that suggest that OsBgals enzymes may play a variety of roles in metabolism of cell wall polysaccharides, glycoproteins and glycolipids. PMID:18664295

  20. Inhibition of peptidoglycan hydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro by energy uncouplers in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodionov, D G; Ishiguro, E E

    1996-01-01

    The effects of energy uncouplers on in vivo and in vitro peptidoglycan hydrolase activities in Escherichia coli were determined. Sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone all inhibited ampicillin-induced lysis of exponential phase cultures, even when they were added to lysis-committed cultures. These energy uncouplers also inhibited the solubilization of radiolabeled peptidoglycan by bacterial suspensions that had been treated with 5% trichloroacetic acid by the method of Hartmann et al.3 to activate the peptidoglycan hydrolases. Therefore, the in vivo and in vitro activities of peptidoglycan hydrolases in E. coli are dependent on membrane energization. PMID:9158735

  1. Rapid development of a potent photo-triggered inhibitor of the serine hydrolase RBBP9.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodan; Dix, Melissa; Speers, Anna E; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Zuhl, Andrea M; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Kodadek, Thomas J

    2012-09-24

    The serine hydrolases constitute a large class of enzymes that play important roles in physiology. There is great interest in the development of potent and selective pharmacological inhibitors of these proteins. Traditional active-site inhibitors often have limited selectivity within this superfamily and are tedious and expensive to discover. Using the serine hydrolase RBBP9 as a model target, we designed a rapid and relatively inexpensive route to highly selective peptoid-based inhibitors that can be activated by visible light. This technology provides rapid access to photo-activated tool compounds capable of selectively blocking the function of particular serine hydrolases. PMID:22907802

  2. Rapid Development of a Potent Photo-Triggered Inhibitor of the Serine Hydrolase RBBP9

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaodan; Dix, Melissa; Speers, Anna E.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Zuhl, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    The serine hydrolases constitute a large class of enzymes that play important roles in physiology. There is great interest in the development of potent and selective pharmacological inhibitors to these proteins. Traditional active site inhibitors often have limited selectivity within this superfamily and are tedious and expensive to discover. Using the serine hydrolase RBBP9 as a model target, we report here a rapid and relatively inexpensive route to highly selective peptoid-based inhibitors that can be activated with visible light. This technology provides rapid access to photo-activated tool compounds capable of selectively blocking the function of particular serine hydrolases. PMID:22907802

  3. Retinyl ester hydrolases and their roles in vitamin A homeostasis☆

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Renate; Taschler, Ulrike; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, dietary vitamin A intake is essential for the maintenance of adequate retinoid (vitamin A and metabolites) supply of tissues and organs. Retinoids are taken up from animal or plant sources and subsequently stored in form of hydrophobic, biologically inactive retinyl esters (REs). Accessibility of these REs in the intestine, the circulation, and their mobilization from intracellular lipid droplets depends on the hydrolytic action of RE hydrolases (REHs). In particular, the mobilization of hepatic RE stores requires REHs to maintain steady plasma retinol levels thereby assuring constant vitamin A supply in times of food deprivation or inadequate vitamin A intake. In this review, we focus on the roles of extracellular and intracellular REHs in vitamin A metabolism. Furthermore, we will discuss the tissue-specific function of REHs and highlight major gaps in the understanding of RE catabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Retinoid and Lipid Metabolism. PMID:21586336

  4. Glycerol Ester Hydrolase Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Oterholm, Anders; Ordal, Z. John; Witter, Lloyd D.

    1968-01-01

    Seventeen strains of lactic acid bacteria were assayed for their glycerol ester hydrolase activity by using an improved agar-well technique, and eight strains by determining the activity in cell-free extracts using a pH-stat procedure. All cultures tested showed activity and hydrolyzed tributyrin more actively than they did tricaproin. The cell extract studies demonstrated that the cells contained intracellular esterases and lipases. The culture supernatant fluid was without activity. The lipase and the esterase differed in their relative activity to each other in the different extracts and in the ease by which they could be freed from the cellular debris. It is suggested that the lipase of these organisms is an endoenzyme and the esterase an ectoenzyme. PMID:5649866

  5. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: Gene structure, expression and deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Todd R.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) converts epoxides to their corresponding diols through the addition of a water molecule. sEH readily hydrolyzes lipid signaling molecules, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), epoxidized lipids produced from arachidonic acid by the action of cytochrome p450s. Through its metabolism of the EETs and other lipid mediators, sEH contributes to the regulation of vascular tone, nociception, angiogenesis and the inflammatory response. Because of its central physiological role in disease states such as cardiac hypertrophy, diabetes, hypertension, and pain sEH is being investigated as a therapeutic target. This review begins with a brief introduction to sEH protein structure and function. sEH evolution and gene structure are then discussed before human small nucleotide polymorphisms and mammalian gene expression are described in the context of several disease models. The review ends with an overview of studies that have employed the sEH knockout mouse model. PMID:23701967

  6. Crystal structure of bile salt hydrolase from Lactobacillus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuzhou; Guo, Fangfang; Hu, Xiao Jian; Lin, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Bile salt hydrolase (BSH) is a gut-bacterial enzyme that negatively influences host fat digestion and energy harvesting. The BSH enzyme activity functions as a gateway reaction in the small intestine by the deconjugation of glycine-conjugated or taurine-conjugated bile acids. Extensive gut-microbiota studies have suggested that BSH is a key mechanistic microbiome target for the development of novel non-antibiotic food additives to improve animal feed production and for the design of new measures to control obesity in humans. However, research on BSH is still in its infancy, particularly in terms of the structural basis of BSH function, which has hampered the development of BSH-based strategies for improving human and animal health. As an initial step towards the structure-function analysis of BSH, C-terminally His-tagged BSH from Lactobacillus salivarius NRRL B-30514 was crystallized in this study. The 1.90 Å resolution crystal structure of L. salivarius BSH was determined by molecular replacement using the structure of Clostridium perfringens BSH as a starting model. It revealed this BSH to be a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. Crystals of apo BSH belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.79, b = 87.35, c = 86.76 Å (PDB entry 5hke). Two BSH molecules packed perfectly as a dimer in one asymmetric unit. Comparative structural analysis of L. salivarius BSH also identified potential residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity. PMID:27139829

  7. Expanding the Catalytic Triad in Epoxide Hydrolases and Related Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Potato epoxide hydrolase 1 exhibits rich enantio- and regioselectivity in the hydrolysis of a broad range of substrates. The enzyme can be engineered to increase the yield of optically pure products as a result of changes in both enantio- and regioselectivity. It is thus highly attractive in biocatalysis, particularly for the generation of enantiopure fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The present work aims to establish the principles underlying the activity and selectivity of the enzyme through a combined computational, structural, and kinetic study using the substrate trans-stilbene oxide as a model system. Extensive empirical valence bond simulations have been performed on the wild-type enzyme together with several experimentally characterized mutants. We are able to computationally reproduce the differences between the activities of different stereoisomers of the substrate and the effects of mutations of several active-site residues. In addition, our results indicate the involvement of a previously neglected residue, H104, which is electrostatically linked to the general base H300. We find that this residue, which is highly conserved in epoxide hydrolases and related hydrolytic enzymes, needs to be in its protonated form in order to provide charge balance in an otherwise negatively charged active site. Our data show that unless the active-site charge balance is correctly treated in simulations, it is not possible to generate a physically meaningful model for the enzyme that can accurately reproduce activity and selectivity trends. We also expand our understanding of other catalytic residues, demonstrating in particular the role of a noncanonical residue, E35, as a “backup base” in the absence of H300. Our results provide a detailed view of the main factors driving catalysis and regioselectivity in this enzyme and identify targets for subsequent enzyme design efforts. PMID:26527505

  8. Biochemical properties of Glu-SH3 as a family 13 glycoside hydrolase with remarkable substrate specificity for trehalose: Implications to sequence-based classification of CAZymes.

    PubMed

    Ghadikolaei, Kamran Khalili; Shojaei, Maral; Ghaderi, Armin; Hojjati, Farzaneh; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani

    2016-08-01

    A novel glycoside hydrolase from Exiguobacterium sp. SH3 was characterized. The enzyme, designated as Glu-SH3, was predicted by in silico analysis to have structural similarity with members of oligo-1,6-glucosidase and trehalose-6-phosphate hydrolase subfamilies in the GH-13 family of glycoside hydrolases. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme was purified as a His-tagged protein of about 60 kDa. The enzyme was shown to have remarkable substrate specificity for trehalose. The characteristic ability of Glu-SH3 to hydrolyze trehalose was ascertained by zymography, thin layer chromatography, and NMR spectroscopy. The maximum activity of Glu-SH3 was obtained at 35 °C and pH 7, but it was able to exhibit more than 90% of the activity within the pH range of 5-8. The Vmax and Km values were estimated to be 170 U and 4.5 mg ml(-1), respectively. By comparison with trehalases, Glu-SH3 with Kcat and Kcat/Km values of 1552 s(-1) and 119.4 mM(-1) s(-1) can be recognized as a very efficient trehalose-hydrolyzing glycosidase. Given the phylogeny and the substrate specificity of Glu-SH3, it may be assumed that the enzyme shares a common ancestor with oligo-1,6-glucosidases but have evolved distinctly to serve a physiological function in trehalose metabolism. PMID:27177969

  9. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  10. Recombination in electron coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A.; Gwinner, G.; Linkemann, J.; Saghiri, A. A.; Schmitt, M.; Schwalm, D.; Grieser, M.; Beutelspacher, M.; Bartsch, T.; Brandau, C.; Hoffknecht, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Uwira, O.; Savin, D. W.

    2000-02-01

    An introduction to electron-ion recombination processes is given and recent measurements are described as examples, focusing on low collision energies. Discussed in particular are fine-structure-mediated dielectronic recombination of fluorine-like ions, the moderate recombination enhancement by factors of typically 1.5-4 found for most ion species at relative electron-ion energies below about 10 meV, and the much larger enhancement occurring for specific highly charged ions of complex electronic structure, apparently caused by low-energy dielectronic recombination resonances. Recent experiments revealing dielectronic resonances with very large natural width are also described.

  11. A Novel α-L-Arabinofuranosidase of Family 43 Glycoside Hydrolase (Ct43Araf) from Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shadab; Luis, Ana Sofia; Bras, Joana L. A.; Ghosh, Arabinda; Gautam, Saurabh; Gupta, Munishwar N.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Goyal, Arun

    2013-01-01

    The study describes a comparative analysis of biochemical, structural and functional properties of two recombinant derivatives from Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 belonging to family 43 glycoside hydrolase. The family 43 glycoside hydrolase encoding α-L-arabinofuranosidase (Ct43Araf) displayed an N-terminal catalytic module CtGH43 (903 bp) followed by two carbohydrate binding modules CtCBM6A (405 bp) and CtCBM6B (402 bp) towards the C-terminal. Ct43Araf and its truncated derivative CtGH43 were cloned in pET-vectors, expressed in Escherichia coli and functionally characterized. The recombinant proteins displayed molecular sizes of 63 kDa (Ct43Araf) and 34 kDa (CtGH43) on SDS-PAGE analysis. Ct43Araf and CtGH43 showed optimal enzyme activities at pH 5.7 and 5.4 and the optimal temperature for both was 50°C. Ct43Araf and CtGH43 showed maximum activity with rye arabinoxylan 4.7 Umg−1 and 5.0 Umg−1, respectively, which increased by more than 2-fold in presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ salts. This indicated that the presence of CBMs (CtCBM6A and CtCBM6B) did not have any effect on the enzyme activity. The thin layer chromatography and high pressure anion exchange chromatography analysis of Ct43Araf hydrolysed arabinoxylans (rye and wheat) and oat spelt xylan confirmed the release of L-arabinose. This is the first report of α-L-arabinofuranosidase from C. thermocellum having the capacity to degrade both p-nitrophenol-α-L-arabinofuranoside and p-nitrophenol-α-L-arabinopyranoside. The protein melting curves of Ct43Araf and CtGH43 demonstrated that CtGH43 and CBMs melt independently. The presence of Ca2+ ions imparted thermal stability to both the enzymes. The circular dichroism analysis of CtGH43 showed 48% β-sheets, 49% random coils but only 3% α-helices. PMID:24039988

  12. DETOXIFICATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES BY IMMOBILIZED ESCHERICHIA COLI EXPRESSING ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE ON CELL SURFACE. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved whole-cell technology for detoxifying organophosphate nerve agents was recently developed based on genetically engineered Escherichia coli with organophosphorus hydrolase anchored on the surface. This article reports the immobilization of these novel biocatalys...

  13. Structural and Enzymatic Characterization of a Nucleoside Diphosphate Sugar Hydrolase from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Duong-ly, Krisna C.; Schoeffield, Andrew J.; Pizarro-Dupuy, Mario A.; Zarr, Melissa; Pineiro, Silvia A.; Amzel, L. Mario; Gabelli, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Given the broad range of substrates hydrolyzed by Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to X) enzymes, identification of sequence and structural elements that correctly predict a Nudix substrate or characterize a family is key to correctly annotate the myriad of Nudix enzymes. Here, we present the structure determination and characterization of Bd3179 –- a Nudix hydrolase from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus–that we show localized in the periplasmic space of this obligate Gram-negative predator. We demonstrate that the enzyme is a nucleoside diphosphate sugar hydrolase (NDPSase) and has a high degree of sequence and structural similarity to a canonical ADP-ribose hydrolase and to a nucleoside diphosphate sugar hydrolase (1.4 and 1.3 Å Cα RMSD respectively). Examination of the structural elements conserved in both types of enzymes confirms that an aspartate-X-lysine motif on the C-terminal helix of the α-β-α NDPSase fold differentiates NDPSases from ADPRases. PMID:26524597

  14. Characterization and high expression of recombinant Ustilago maydis xylanase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongjuan; You, Shuang; Zhu, Bo; Fu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Baihui; Qiu, Jin; Yu, Chengye; Chen, Lei; Peng, Rihe; Yao, Quanhong

    2015-03-01

    A recombinant xylanase gene (rxynUMB) from Ustilago maydis 521 was expressed in Pichia pastoris, and the enzyme was purified and characterized. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that rxynUMB belongs to glycosyl hydrolase family 11. The Trp84, Trp95, Glu93, and Glu189 residues are proposed to be present at the active site. The apparent molecular mass of the recombinant xylananse was approximately 24 kDa, and the optimum pH and temperature were 4.3 and 50 °C, respectively. Xylanase activity was enhanced by 166 and 115% with Fe(2+) and Mn(2+), respectively. The biochemical properties of this recombinant xylanase suggest that it may be a useful candidate for a variety of commercial applications. PMID:25381595

  15. Molecular cloning and expression of a new α-neoagarobiose hydrolase from Agarivorans gilvus WH0801 and enzymatic production of 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Yang, Meng; Mao, Xiangzhao; Mu, Bozhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-03-01

    A new α-neoagarobiose hydrolase (NABH) called AgaWH117 was cloned from Agarivorans gilvus WH0801. The gene encoding this hydrolase consists of 1,086 bp and encodes a protein containing 361 amino acids. This new NABH showed 74% amino acid sequence identity with other known NABHs. The molecular mass of the recombinant AgaWH117 was estimated to be 41 kDa. Purified AgaWH117 showed endolytic activity during neoagarobiose degradation, yielding 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (l-AHG) and d-galactose as products. It showed a maximum activity at a temperature of 30 °C and a pH of 6.0 and was stable at temperatures below 30 °C. Its Km and Vmax values were 2.094 mg/mL and 6.982 U/mg, respectively. The cloning strategy used and AgaWH117 isolated in this study will provide information on the saccharification process of marine biomass. This study provides a method to produce l-AHG from agarose by using AgaWH117 without an acid and describes its one-step purification by using Bio-Gel P2 chromatography. PMID:25676340

  16. Endo-β-1,3-Glucanase GLU1, from the Fruiting Body of Lentinula edodes, Belongs to a New Glycoside Hydrolase Family ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yuichi; Nakade, Keiko; Konno, Naotake

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall of the fruiting body of the mushroom Lentinula edodes is degraded after harvesting by enzymes such as β-1,3-glucanase. In this study, a novel endo-type β-1,3-glucanase, GLU1, was purified from L. edodes fruiting bodies after harvesting. The gene encoding it, glu1, was isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR using primers designed from the N-terminal amino acid sequence of GLU1. The putative amino acid sequence of the mature protein contained 247 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 26 kDa and a pI of 3.87, and recombinant GLU1 expressed in Pichia pastoris exhibited β-1,3-glucanase activity. GLU1 catalyzed depolymerization of glucans composed of β-1,3-linked main chains, and reaction product analysis by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) clearly indicated that the enzyme had an endolytic mode. However, the amino acid sequence of GLU1 showed no significant similarity to known glycoside hydrolases. GLU1 has similarity to several hypothetical proteins in fungi, and GLU1 and highly similar proteins should be classified as a novel glycoside hydrolase family (GH128). PMID:21965406

  17. Compositional profile of α/β-hydrolase fold proteins in mangrove soil metagenomes: prevalence of epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in oil-contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Ottoni, Júlia Ronzella; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of genes encoding biotechnologically relevant α/β-hydrolases in mangrove soil microbial communities was assessed using data obtained by whole-metagenome sequencing of four mangroves areas, denoted BrMgv01 to BrMgv04, in São Paulo, Brazil. The sequences (215 Mb in total) were filtered based on local amino acid alignments against the Lipase Engineering Database. In total, 5923 unassembled sequences were affiliated with 30 different α/β-hydrolase fold superfamilies. The most abundant predicted proteins encompassed cytosolic hydrolases (abH08; ∼ 23%), microsomal hydrolases (abH09; ∼ 12%) and Moraxella lipase-like proteins (abH04 and abH01; < 5%). Detailed analysis of the genes predicted to encode proteins of the abH08 superfamily revealed a high proportion related to epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in polluted mangroves BrMgv01-02-03. This suggested selection and putative involvement in local degradation/detoxification of the pollutants. Seven sequences that were annotated as genes for putative epoxide hydrolases and five for putative haloalkane dehalogenases were found in a fosmid library generated from BrMgv02 DNA. The latter enzymes were predicted to belong to Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria. Our integrated approach thus identified 12 genes (complete and/or partial) that may encode hitherto undescribed enzymes. The low amino acid identity (< 60%) with already-described genes opens perspectives for both production in an expression host and genetic screening of metagenomes. PMID:25171437

  18. Compositional profile of α / β-hydrolase fold proteins in mangrove soil metagenomes: prevalence of epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in oil-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Ottoni, Júlia Ronzella; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of genes encoding biotechnologically relevant α/β-hydrolases in mangrove soil microbial communities was assessed using data obtained by whole-metagenome sequencing of four mangroves areas, denoted BrMgv01 to BrMgv04, in São Paulo, Brazil. The sequences (215 Mb in total) were filtered based on local amino acid alignments against the Lipase Engineering Database. In total, 5923 unassembled sequences were affiliated with 30 different α/β-hydrolase fold superfamilies. The most abundant predicted proteins encompassed cytosolic hydrolases (abH08; ∼ 23%), microsomal hydrolases (abH09; ∼ 12%) and Moraxella lipase-like proteins (abH04 and abH01; < 5%). Detailed analysis of the genes predicted to encode proteins of the abH08 superfamily revealed a high proportion related to epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in polluted mangroves BrMgv01-02-03. This suggested selection and putative involvement in local degradation/detoxification of the pollutants. Seven sequences that were annotated as genes for putative epoxide hydrolases and five for putative haloalkane dehalogenases were found in a fosmid library generated from BrMgv02 DNA. The latter enzymes were predicted to belong to Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria. Our integrated approach thus identified 12 genes (complete and/or partial) that may encode hitherto undescribed enzymes. The low amino acid identity (< 60%) with already-described genes opens perspectives for both production in an expression host and genetic screening of metagenomes. PMID:25171437

  19. SARS coronavirus protein 7a interacts with human Ap4A-hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) open reading frame 7a (ORF 7a) encodes a 122 amino acid accessory protein. It has no significant sequence homology with any other known proteins. The 7a protein is present in the virus particle and has been shown to interact with several host proteins; thereby implicating it as being involved in several pathogenic processes including apoptosis, inhibition of cellular protein synthesis, and activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. In this study we present data demonstrating that the SARS-CoV 7a protein interacts with human Ap4A-hydrolase (asymmetrical diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase, EC 3.6.1.17). Ap4A-hydrolase is responsible for metabolizing the "allarmone" nucleotide Ap4A and therefore likely involved in regulation of cell proliferation, DNA replication, RNA processing, apoptosis and DNA repair. The interaction between 7a and Ap4A-hydrolase was identified using yeast two-hybrid screening. The interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from cultured human cells transiently expressing V5-His tagged 7a and HA tagged Ap4A-hydrolase. Human tissue culture cells transiently expressing 7a and Ap4A-hydrolase tagged with EGFP and Ds-Red2 respectively show these proteins co-localize in the cytoplasm. PMID:20144233

  20. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  1. Expression of Nudix hydrolase genes in barley under UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Sayuri; Sugimoto, Manabu; Kihara, Makoto

    Seed storage and cultivation should be necessary to self-supply foods when astronauts would stay and investigate during long-term space travel and habitation in the bases on the Moon and Mars. Thought the sunlight is the most importance to plants, both as the ultimate energy source and as an environmental signal regulating growth and development, UV presenting the sunlight can damage many aspects of plant processes at the physiological and DNA level. Especially UV-C, which is eliminated by the stratospheric ozone layer, is suspected to be extremely harmful and give a deadly injury to plants in space. However, the defense mechanism against UV-C irradiation damage in plant cells has not been clear. In this study, we investigated the expression of Nudix hydrolases, which defense plants from biotic / abiotic stress, in barley under UV irradiation. The genes encoding the amino acid sequences, which show homology to those of 28 kinds of Nudix hydrolases in Arabidopsis thaliana, were identified in the barley full-length cDNA library. BLAST analysis showed 14 kinds of barley genes (HvNUDX1-14), which encode the Nudix motif sequence. A phylogenetic tree showed that HvNUDX1, HvNUDX7, HvNUDX9 and HvNUDX11 belonged to the ADP-ribose pyrophosphohydrolase, ADP-sugar pyrophosphohydrolase, NAD(P)H pyrophosphohydrolase and FAD pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, respectively, HvNUDX3, HvNUDX6, and HvNUDX8 belonged to the Ap _{n}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX5 and HvNUDX14 belonged to the coenzyme A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX12 and HvNUDX13 belonged to the Ap _{4}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies. Induction of HvNUDX genes by UV-A (340nm), UV-B (312nm), and UV-C (260nm) were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that HvNUDX4 was induced by UV-A and UV-B, HvNUDX6 was induced by UV-B and UV-C, and HvNUDX7 and HvNUDX14 were induced by UV-C, significantly. Our results suggest that the response of HvNUDXs to UV irradiation is different by UV

  2. Nudix hydrolases degrade protein-conjugated ADP-ribose.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Casey M; Thirawatananond, Puchong; Ong, Shao-En; Gabelli, Sandra B; Leung, Anthony K L

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the transfer of the ADP-ribose group from NAD(+) to target proteins post-translationally, either attached singly as mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR) or in polymeric chains as poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Though ADP-ribosylation is therapeutically important, investigation of this protein modification has been limited by a lack of proteomic tools for site identification. Recent work has demonstrated the potential of a tag-based pipeline in which MAR/PAR is hydrolyzed down to phosphoribose, leaving a 212 Dalton tag at the modification site. While the pipeline has been proven effective by multiple groups, a barrier to application has become evident: the enzyme used to transform MAR/PAR into phosphoribose must be purified from the rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus venom, which is contaminated with proteases detrimental for proteomic applications. Here, we outline the steps necessary to purify snake venom phosphodiesterase I (SVP) and describe two alternatives to SVP-the bacterial Nudix hydrolase EcRppH and human HsNudT16. Importantly, expression and purification schemes for these Nudix enzymes have already been proven, with high-quality yields easily attainable. We demonstrate their utility in identifying ADP-ribosylation sites on Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) with mass spectrometry and discuss a structure-based rationale for this Nudix subclass in degrading protein-conjugated ADP-ribose, including both MAR and PAR. PMID:26669448

  3. Discovery of enantioselectivity of urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Manoj; Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Boggu, PullaReddy; Venkateswararao, Eeda; Jalani, Hitesh B; Kim, Nam-Doo; Lee, Seul Ki; Jeon, Jang Su; Kim, Sang Kyum; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2016-07-19

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) hydrolyzes epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) in the metabolic pathway of arachidonic acid and has been considered as an important therapeutic target for chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and inflammation. Although many urea derivatives are known as sEH inhibitors, the enantioselectivity of the inhibitors is not highlighted in spite of the stereoselective hydrolysis of EETs by sEH. In an effort to explore the importance of enantioselectivity in the urea scaffold, a series of enantiomers with the stereocenter adjacent to the urea nitrogen atom were prepared. The selectivity of enantiomers of 1-(α-alkyl-α-phenylmethyl)-3-(3-phenylpropyl)ureas showed wide range differences up to 125 fold with the low IC50 value up to 13 nM. The S-configuration with planar phenyl and small alkyl groups at α-position is crucial for the activity and selectivity. However, restriction of the free rotation of two α-groups with indan-1-yl or 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl moiety abolishes the selectivity between the enantiomers, despite the increase in activity up to 13 nM. The hydrophilic group like sulfonamido group at para position of 3-phenylpropyl motif of 1-(α-alkyl-α-phenylmethyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea improves the activity as well as enantiomeric selectivity. All these ureas are proved to be specific inhibitor of sEH without inhibition against mEH. PMID:27092411

  4. Cyanuric acid hydrolase: evolutionary innovation by structural concatenation

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S; Balotra, Sahil; Wilding, Matthew; French, Nigel G; Briggs, Lyndall J; Panjikar, Santosh; Cowieson, Nathan; Newman, Janet; Scott, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The cyanuric acid hydrolase, AtzD, is the founding member of a newly identified family of ring-opening amidases. We report the first X-ray structure for this family, which is a novel fold (termed the ‘Toblerone’ fold) that likely evolved via the concatenation of monomers of the trimeric YjgF superfamily and the acquisition of a metal binding site. Structures of AtzD with bound substrate (cyanuric acid) and inhibitors (phosphate, barbituric acid and melamine), along with mutagenesis studies, allowed the identification of the active site. The AtzD monomer, active site and substrate all possess threefold rotational symmetry, to the extent that the active site possesses three potential Ser–Lys catalytic dyads. A single catalytic dyad (Ser85–Lys42) is hypothesized, based on biochemical evidence and crystallographic data. A plausible catalytic mechanism based on these observations is also presented. A comparison with a homology model of the related barbiturase, Bar, was used to infer the active-site residues responsible for substrate specificity, and the phylogeny of the 68 AtzD-like enzymes in the database were analysed in light of this structure–function relationship. PMID:23651355

  5. Soluble epoxide hydrolase: A potential target for metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    He, Jinlong; Wang, Chunjiong; Zhu, Yi; Ai, Ding

    2016-05-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), important lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid, have many beneficial effects in metabolic diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and kidney disease. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids can be further hydrolyzed to less active diols by the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Increasing evidence suggests that inhibition of sEH increases levels of EETs, which have anti-inflammatory effects and can prevent the development of hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart failure, fatty liver, and multiple organ fibrosis. Arachidonic acid is the most abundant omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and shares the same set of enzymes with omega-3 PUFAs, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. The omega-3 PUFAs and metabolites, such as regioisomeric epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids and epoxydocosapentaenoic acids, have been reported to have strong vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, sEH may be a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. In this review, we focus on our and other recent studies of the functions of sEH, including the effects of its eicosanoid products from both omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs, in various metabolic diseases. We also discuss the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of sEH. PMID:26621325

  6. Soluble epoxide hydrolase deficiency ameliorates acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce; Haj, Fawaz

    2014-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a frequent gastrointestinal disorder that causes significant morbidity and its incidence has been progressively increasing. AP starts as a local inflammation in the pancreas that often leads to systemic inflammatory response and complications. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a cytosolic enzyme whose inhibition in murine models has beneficial effects in inflammatory diseases, but its significance in AP remains unexplored. To investigate whether sEH may have a causal role in AP we utilized sEH knockout (KO) mice to determine the effects of sEH deficiency on ceruelin- and arginine-induced AP. sEH expression increased at the protein and messenger RNA levels, as well as sEH activity in the early phase of cerulein- and arginine-induced AP in mice. In addition, amylase and lipase levels were lower in cerulein-treated sEH KO mice compared with non-treated controls. Moreover, pancreatic mRNA and serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1ß and IL-6 were lower in sEH KO mice compared with controls. Further, sEH KO mice exhibited decreased cerulein- and arginine-induced NF-?B inflammatory response, MAPKs activation and decreased cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel role for sEH in the progression of cerulein- and arginine-induced AP. PMID:26461340

  7. Extracellular Glycoside Hydrolase Activities in the Human Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Inui, Taichi; Walker, Lauren C; Dodds, Michael W J; Hanley, A Bryan

    2015-08-15

    Carbohydrate availability shifts when bacteria attach to a surface and form biofilm. When salivary planktonic bacteria form an oral biofilm, a variety of polysaccharides and glycoproteins are the primary carbon sources; however, simple sugar availabilities are limited due to low diffusion from saliva to biofilm. We hypothesized that bacterial glycoside hydrolase (GH) activities would be higher in a biofilm than in saliva in order to maintain metabolism in a low-sugar, high-glycoprotein environment. Salivary bacteria from 13 healthy individuals were used to grow in vitro biofilm using two separate media, one with sucrose and the other limiting carbon sources to a complex carbohydrate. All six GHs measured were higher in vitro when grown in the medium with complex carbohydrate as the sole carbon source. We then collected saliva and overnight dental plaque samples from the same individuals and measured ex vivo activities for the same six enzymes to determine how oral microbial utilization of glycoconjugates shifts between the planktonic phase in saliva and the biofilm phase in overnight dental plaque. Overall higher GH activities were observed in plaque samples, in agreement with in vitro observation. A similar pattern was observed in GH activity profiles between in vitro and ex vivo data. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that plaque samples had a higher abundance of microorganisms with larger number of GH gene sequences. These results suggest differences in sugar catabolism between the oral bacteria located in the biofilm and those in saliva. PMID:26048943

  8. Nudix hydrolases degrade protein-conjugated ADP-ribose

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Casey M.; Thirawatananond, Puchong; Ong, Shao-En; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the transfer of the ADP-ribose group from NAD+ to target proteins post-translationally, either attached singly as mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR) or in polymeric chains as poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Though ADP-ribosylation is therapeutically important, investigation of this protein modification has been limited by a lack of proteomic tools for site identification. Recent work has demonstrated the potential of a tag-based pipeline in which MAR/PAR is hydrolyzed down to phosphoribose, leaving a 212 Dalton tag at the modification site. While the pipeline has been proven effective by multiple groups, a barrier to application has become evident: the enzyme used to transform MAR/PAR into phosphoribose must be purified from the rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus venom, which is contaminated with proteases detrimental for proteomic applications. Here, we outline the steps necessary to purify snake venom phosphodiesterase I (SVP) and describe two alternatives to SVP—the bacterial Nudix hydrolase EcRppH and human HsNudT16. Importantly, expression and purification schemes for these Nudix enzymes have already been proven, with high-quality yields easily attainable. We demonstrate their utility in identifying ADP-ribosylation sites on Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) with mass spectrometry and discuss a structure-based rationale for this Nudix subclass in degrading protein-conjugated ADP-ribose, including both MAR and PAR. PMID:26669448

  9. Disrupting Dimerization Translocates Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase to Peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan W.; Das, Anjali J.; Barnes, Anthony P.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) neutralizing enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a neuronal enzyme, which has been localized in both the cytosol and peroxisomes. The molecular basis for its dual localization remains unclear as sEH contains a functional peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS). Recently, a missense polymorphism was identified in human sEH (R287Q) that enhances its peroxisomal localization. This same polymorphism has also been shown to generate weaker sEH homo-dimers. Taken together, these observations suggest that dimerization may mask the sEH PTS and prevent peroxisome translocation. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that dimerization is a key regulator of sEH subcellular localization. Specifically, we altered the dimerization state of sEH by introducing substitutions in amino acids responsible for the dimer-stabilizing salt-bridge. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusions of each of mutants were co-transfected into mouse primary cultured cortical neurons together with a PTS-linked red fluorescent protein to constitutively label peroxisomes. Labeled neurons were analyzed using confocal microscopy and co-localization of sEH with peroxisomes was quantified using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. We find that dimer-competent sEH constructs preferentially localize to the cytosol, whereas constructs with weakened or disrupted dimerization were preferentially targeted to peroxisomes. We conclude that the sEH dimerization status is a key regulator of its peroxisomal localization. PMID:27203283

  10. Thermus thermophilus Glycoside Hydrolase Family 57 Branching Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Palomo, Marta; Pijning, Tjaard; Booiman, Thijs; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; van der Vlist, Jeroen; Kralj, Slavko; Planas, Antoni; Loos, Katja; Kamerling, Johannis P.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; van der Maarel, Marc J. E. C.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Leemhuis, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Branching enzyme (EC 2.4.1.18; glycogen branching enzyme; GBE) catalyzes the formation of α1,6-branching points in glycogen. Until recently it was believed that all GBEs belong to glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13). Here we describe the cloning and expression of the Thermus thermophilus family GH57-type GBE and report its biochemical properties and crystal structure at 1.35-Å resolution. The enzyme has a central (β/α)7-fold catalytic domain A with an inserted domain B between β2 and α5 and an α-helix-rich C-terminal domain, which is shown to be essential for substrate binding and catalysis. A maltotriose was modeled in the active site of the enzyme which suggests that there is insufficient space for simultaneously binding of donor and acceptor substrates, and that the donor substrate must be cleaved before acceptor substrate can bind. The biochemical assessment showed that the GH57 GBE possesses about 4% hydrolytic activity with amylose and in vitro forms a glucan product with a novel fine structure, demonstrating that the GH57 GBE is clearly different from the GH13 GBEs characterized to date. PMID:21097495

  11. Bacterial 2,4-Dioxygenases: New Members of the α/β Hydrolase-Fold Superfamily of Enzymes Functionally Related to Serine Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Frank; Künne, Stefan; Fetzner, Susanne

    1999-01-01

    1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinoline 2,4-dioxygenase (Qdo) from Pseudomonas putida 33/1 and 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase (Hod) from Arthrobacter ilicis Rü61a catalyze an N-heterocyclic-ring cleavage reaction, generating N-formylanthranilate and N-acetylanthranilate, respectively, and carbon monoxide. Amino acid sequence comparisons between Qdo, Hod, and a number of proteins belonging to the α/β hydrolase-fold superfamily of enzymes and analysis of the similarity between the predicted secondary structures of the 2,4-dioxygenases and the known secondary structure of haloalkane dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 strongly suggested that Qdo and Hod are structurally related to the α/β hydrolase-fold enzymes. The residues S95 and H244 of Qdo were found to be arranged like the catalytic nucleophilic residue and the catalytic histidine, respectively, of the α/β hydrolase-fold enzymes. Investigation of the potential functional significance of these and other residues of Qdo through site-directed mutagenesis supported the hypothesis that Qdo is structurally as well as functionally related to serine hydrolases, with S95 being a possible catalytic nucleophile and H244 being a possible catalytic base. A hypothetical reaction mechanism for Qdo-catalyzed 2,4-dioxygenolysis, involving formation of an ester bond between the catalytic serine residue and the carbonyl carbon of the substrate and subsequent dioxygenolysis of the covalently bound anionic intermediate, is discussed. PMID:10482514

  12. Genome analysis of the staphylococcal temperate phage DW2 and functional studies on the endolysin and tail hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Keary, Ruth; McAuliffe, Olivia; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin; O’Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the genome of temperate Siphoviridae phage DW2, which is routinely propagated on Staphylococcus aureus DPC5246. The 41941 bp genome revealed an open reading frame (ORF1) which has a high level of homology with members of the resolvase subfamily of site-specific serine recombinase, involved in chromosomal integration and excision. In contrast, the majority of staphylococcal phages reported to date encode tyrosine recombinases. Two putative genes encoded by phage DW2 (ORF15 and ORF24) were highly homologous to the NWMN0273 and NWMN0280 genes encoding virulence factors carried on the genome of ϕNM4, a prophage in the genome of S. aureus Newman. Phage DW2 also encodes proteins highly homologous to two well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island derepressors encoded by the staphylococcal helper phage 80α indicating that it may similarly act as a helper phage for mobility of pathogenicity islands in S. aureus. This study also focused on the enzybiotic potential of phage DW2. The structure of the putative endolysin and tail hydrolase were investigated and used as the basis for a cloning strategy to create recombinant peptidoglycan hydrolyzing proteins. After overexpression in E. coli, four of these proteins (LysDW2, THDW2, CHAPE1-153, and CHAPE1-163) were demonstrated to have hydrolytic activity against peptidoglycan of S. aureus and thus represent novel candidates for exploitation as enzybiotics. PMID:25105056

  13. High Phylogenetic Diversity of Glycosyl Hydrolase Family 10 and 11 Xylanases in the Sediment of Lake Dabusu in China

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiu Yun

    2014-01-01

    Soda lakes are one of the most stable naturally occurring alkaline and saline environments, which harbor abundant microorganisms with diverse functions. In this study, culture-independent molecular methods were used to explore the genetic diversity of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 and GH11 xylanases in Lake Dabusu, a soda lake with a pH value of 10.2 and salinity of 10.1%. A total of 671 xylanase gene fragments were obtained, representing 78 distinct GH10 and 28 GH11 gene fragments respectively, with most of them having low homology with known sequences. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the GH10 xylanase sequences mainly belonged to Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Verrucomicrobia, while the GH11 sequences mainly consisted of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Fungi. A full-length GH10 xylanase gene (xynAS10-66) was directly cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzymes showed high activity at alkaline pH. These results suggest that xylanase gene diversity within Lake Dabusu is high and that most of the identified genes might be novel, indicating great potential for applications in industry and agriculture. PMID:25392912

  14. Purification of His6-organophosphate hydrolase using monolithic supermacroporous polyacrylamide cryogels developed for immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Efremenko, E; Votchitseva, Y; Plieva, F; Galaev, I; Mattiasson, B

    2006-05-01

    Organophosphate hydrolase containing hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus of recombinant protein (His6-OPH) and expressed in Escherichia coli cells was purified using supermacroporous polyacrylamide-based monolith columns with immobilized metal affinity matrices [Me2+-iminodiacetic acid (IDA)-polyacrylamide cryogel (PAA) and Me2+-N,N,N'-tris (carboxymethyl) ethylendiamine (TED)-PAA]. Enzyme preparation with 50% purity was obtained by direct chromatography of nonclarified cell homogenate, whereas the combination of addition of 10 mM imidazole to buffers for cell sonication and sample loading, the use of precolumn with IDA-PAA matrix noncharged with metal ions, and the application of high flow rate provided the 99% purity of enzyme isolated directly from crude cell homogenate. Co2+-IDA-PAA provided the highest level of selectivity for His6-OPH. Comparative analysis of purification using Co2+-IDA-PAA and Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid-agarose showed obvious advantages of the former in process time, specific activity of purified enzyme, and simplicity of adsorbent regeneration. PMID:16088350

  15. Codon and Propeptide Optimizations to Improve the Food-grade Expression of Bile Salt Hydrolase in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zixing; Zhang, Juan; Li, Huazhong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Lee, Byonghoon

    2015-01-01

    To achieve the food-grade expression of bile salt hydrolase (BSH, EC 3.5.1.24) from Lactobacillus plantarum BBE7, the nisin controlled gene expression system (NICE), food-grade selection maker and signal peptide of Lactococcus lactis were used in this study. The open reading frame of BSH was optimized based on the codon bias of L. lactis, resulting in 12-fold and 9.5% increases in the intracellular and extracellular BSH activities, respectively. Three synthetic propeptides, LEISSTCDA (acidic), LGISSTCNA (neutral) and LKISSTCHA (basic) were also fused with signal peptide SPusp45 of vector pNZ8112 and introduced into the food-grade expression vector pNZ8149, respectively. Among these propeptides, acidic propeptide was effective in increasing the secretion efficiency and yield of BSH in recombinant bacteria, while neutral propeptide had no significant effect on the secretion of BSH. In contrast, basic propeptide strongly reduced the extracellular expression of BSH. By using codon optimization and the acidic propeptide together, the extracellular BSH activity was increased by 11.3%, reaching its maximum of 3.56 U/mg. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the intracellular and extracellular expression of BSH using food-grade expression system, which would lay a solid foundation for large-scale production of BSH and other heterologous proteins in L. lactis. PMID:26059800

  16. Sphingomonas paucimobilis beta-glucosidase Bgl1: a member of a new bacterial subfamily in glycoside hydrolase family 1.

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Pedro M; Videira, Paula; Fialho, Arsénio M; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    The Sphingomonas paucimobilis beta-glucosidase Bgl1 is encoded by the bgl1 gene, associated with an 1308 bp open reading frame. The deduced protein has a potential signal peptide of 24 amino acids in the N-terminal region, and experimental evidence is consistent with the processing and export of the Bgl1 protein through the inner membrane to the periplasmic space. A His(6)-tagged 44.3 kDa protein was over-produced in the cytosol of Escherichia coli from a recombinant plasmid, which contained the S. paucimobilis bgl1 gene lacking the region encoding the putative signal peptide. Mature beta-glucosidase Bgl1 is specific for aryl-beta-glucosides and has no apparent activity with oligosaccharides derived from cellulose hydrolysis and other saccharides. A structure-based alignment established structural relations between S. paucimobilis Bgl1 and other members of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 1 enzymes. At subsite -1, the conserved residues required for catalysis by GH1 enzymes are present in Bgl1 with only minor differences. Major differences are found at subsite +1, the aglycone binding site. This alignment seeded a sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of GH1 enzymes, revealing an absence of horizontal transfer between phyla. Bootstrap analysis supported the definition of subfamilies and revealed that Bgl1, the first characterized beta-glucosidase from the genus Sphingomonas, represents a very divergent bacterial subfamily, closer to archaeal subfamilies than to others of bacterial origin. PMID:12444924

  17. beta-Glucosidase in cellulosome of the anaerobic fungus Piromyces sp. strain E2 is a family 3 glycoside hydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Steenbakkers, Peter J M; Harhangi, Harry R; Bosscher, Mirjam W; van der Hooft, Marlous M C; Keltjens, Jan T; van der Drift, Chris; Vogels, Godfried D; op den Camp, Huub J M

    2003-01-01

    The cellulosomes of anaerobic fungi convert crystalline cellulose solely into glucose, in contrast with bacterial cellulosomes which produce cellobiose. Previously, a beta-glucosidase was identified in the cellulosome of Piromyces sp. strain E2 by zymogram analysis, which represented approx. 25% of the extracellular beta-glucosidase activity. To identify the component in the fungal cellulosome responsible for the beta-glucosidase activity, immunoscreening with anti-cellulosome antibodies was used to isolate the corresponding gene. A 2737 bp immunoclone was isolated from a cDNA library. The clone encoded an extracellular protein containing a eukaryotic family 3 glycoside hydrolase domain homologue and was therefore named cel3A. The C-terminal end of the encoded Cel3A protein consisted of an auxiliary domain and three fungal dockerins, typical for cellulosome components. The Cel3A catalytic domain was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified. Biochemical analyses of the recombinant protein showed that the Cel3A catalytic domain was specific for beta-glucosidic bonds and functioned as an exoglucohydrolase on soluble substrates as well as cellulose. Comparison of the apparent K (m) and K (i) values of heterologous Cel3A and the fungal cellulosome for p -nitrophenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside and D-glucono-1,5-delta-lactone respectively indicated that cel3A encodes the beta-glucosidase activity of the Piromyces sp. strain E2 cellulosome. PMID:12485115

  18. Isolation and Characterization of a Glycosyl Hydrolase Family 16 β-Agarase from a Mangrove Soil Metagenomic Library

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Zhimao; Su, Hongfei; Zhang, Si

    2016-01-01

    A mangrove soil metagenomic library was constructed and a β-agarase gene designated as AgaML was isolated by functional screening. The gene encoded for a 659-amino-acids polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 71.6 kDa. The deduced polypeptide sequences of AgaML showed the highest identity of 73% with the glycoside hydrolase family 16 β-agarase from Microbulbifer agarilyticus in the GenBank database. AgaML was cloned and highly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified recombinant protein, AgaML, showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 7.0. The kinetic parameters of Km and Vmax values toward agarose were 4.6 mg·mL−1 and 967.5 μM·min−1·mg−1, respectively. AgaML hydrolyzed the β-1,4-glycosidic linkages of agar to generate neoagarotetraose (NA4) and neoagarohexaose (NA6) as the main products. These characteristics suggest that AgaML has potential application in cosmetic, pharmaceuticals and food industries. PMID:27548158

  19. Isolation and Characterization of a Glycosyl Hydrolase Family 16 β-Agarase from a Mangrove Soil Metagenomic Library.

    PubMed

    Mai, Zhimao; Su, Hongfei; Zhang, Si

    2016-01-01

    A mangrove soil metagenomic library was constructed and a β-agarase gene designated as AgaML was isolated by functional screening. The gene encoded for a 659-amino-acids polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 71.6 kDa. The deduced polypeptide sequences of AgaML showed the highest identity of 73% with the glycoside hydrolase family 16 β-agarase from Microbulbifer agarilyticus in the GenBank database. AgaML was cloned and highly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified recombinant protein, AgaML, showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 7.0. The kinetic parameters of Km and Vmax values toward agarose were 4.6 mg·mL(-1) and 967.5 μM·min(-1)·mg(-1), respectively. AgaML hydrolyzed the β-1,4-glycosidic linkages of agar to generate neoagarotetraose (NA4) and neoagarohexaose (NA6) as the main products. These characteristics suggest that AgaML has potential application in cosmetic, pharmaceuticals and food industries. PMID:27548158

  20. Discovery of Triterpenoids as Reversible Inhibitors of α/β-hydrolase Domain Containing 12 (ABHD12)

    PubMed Central

    Parkkari, Teija; Haavikko, Raisa; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Rytilahti, Roosa; Vaara, Miia; Lehtonen, Marko; Alakurtti, Sami; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Nevalainen, Tapio; Savinainen, Juha R.; Laitinen, Jarmo T.

    2014-01-01

    Background α/β-hydrolase domain containing (ABHD)12 is a recently discovered serine hydrolase that acts in vivo as a lysophospholipase for lysophosphatidylserine. Dysfunctional ABHD12 has been linked to the rare neurodegenerative disorder called PHARC (polyneuropathy, hearing loss, ataxia, retinosis pigmentosa, cataract). In vitro, ABHD12 has been implicated in the metabolism of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Further studies on ABHD12 function are hampered as no selective inhibitor have been identified to date. In contrast to the situation with the other endocannabinoid hydrolases, ABHD12 has remained a challenging target for inhibitor development as no crystal structures are available to facilitate drug design. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the unexpected discovery that certain triterpene-based structures inhibit human ABHD12 hydrolase activity in a reversible manner, the best compounds showing submicromolar potency. Based on structure activity relationship (SAR) data collected for 68 natural and synthetic triterpenoid structures, a pharmacophore model has been constructed. A pentacyclic triterpene backbone with carboxyl group at position 17, small hydrophobic substituent at the position 4, hydrogen bond donor or acceptor at position 3 accompanied with four axial methyl substituents was found crucial for ABHD12 inhibitor activity. Although the triterpenoids typically may have multiple protein targets, we witnessed unprecedented selectivity for ABHD12 among the metabolic serine hydrolases, as activity-based protein profiling of mouse brain membrane proteome indicated that the representative ABHD12 inhibitors did not inhibit other serine hydrolases, nor did they target cannabinoid receptors. Conclusions/Significance We have identified reversibly-acting triterpene-based inhibitors that show remarkable selectivity for ABHD12 over other metabolic serine hydrolases. Based on SAR data, we have constructed the first pharmacophore

  1. Expression, purification, and characterization of a bifunctional 99-kDa peptidoglycan hydrolase from Pediococcus acidilactici ATCC 8042.

    PubMed

    García-Cano, Israel; Campos-Gómez, Manuel; Contreras-Cruz, Mariana; Serrano-Maldonado, Carlos Eduardo; González-Canto, Augusto; Peña-Montes, Carolina; Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Sánchez, Sergio; Farrés, Amelia

    2015-10-01

    Pediococcus acidilactici ATCC 8042 is a lactic acid bacteria that inhibits pathogenic microorganisms such as Staphylococcus aureus through the production of two proteins with lytic activity, one of 110 kDa and the other of 99 kDa. The 99-kDa one has high homology to a putative peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH) enzyme reported in the genome of P. acidilactici 7_4, where two different lytic domains have been identified but not characterized. The aim of this work was the biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme of 99 kDa. The enzyme was cloned and expressed successfully and retains its activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus. It has a higher N-acetylglucosaminidase activity, but the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase can also be detected spectrophotometrically. The protein was then purified using gel filtration chromatography. Antibacterial activity showed an optimal pH of 6.0 and was stable between 5.0 and 7.0. The optimal temperature for activity was 60 °C, and all activity was lost after 1 h of incubation at 70 °C. The number of strains susceptible to the recombinant 99-kDa enzyme was lower than that susceptible to the mixture of the 110- and 99-kDa PGHs of P. acidilactici, a result that suggests synergy between these two enzymes. This is the first PGH from LAB that has been shown to possess two lytic sites. The results of this study will aid in the design of new antibacterial agents from natural origin that can combat foodborne disease and improve hygienic practices in the industrial sector. PMID:25940238

  2. [Recombinant antibodies against bioweapons].

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibaut; Vidal, Dominique

    2009-12-01

    The threat posed by bioweapons (BW) could lead to the re-emergence of such deadly diseases as plague or smallpox, now eradicated from industrialized countries. The development of recombinant antibodies allows tackling this risk because these recombinant molecules are generally well tolerated in human medicine, may be utilized for prophylaxis and treatment, and because antibodies neutralize many BW. Recombinant antibodies neutralizing the lethal toxin of anthrax, botulinum toxins and the smallpox virus have in particular been isolated recently, with different technologies. Our approach, which uses phage-displayed immune libraries built from non-human primates (M. fascicularis) to obtain recombinant antibodies, which may later be super-humanized (germlinized), has allowed us to obtain such BWs-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20035695

  3. Identification of N-acylethanolamines in Dictyostelium discoideum and confirmation of their hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase[S

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Alexander C.; Stupak, Jacek; Li, Jianjun; Cox, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are endogenous lipid-based signaling molecules best known for their role in the endocannabinoid system in mammals, but they are also known to play roles in signaling pathways in plants. The regulation of NAEs in vivo is partly accomplished by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which hydrolyses NAEs to ethanolamine and their corresponding fatty acid. Inhibition of FAAH has been shown to increase the levels of NAEs in vivo and to produce desirable phenotypes. This has led to the development of pharmaceutical-based therapies for a variety of conditions targeting FAAH. Recently, our group identified a functional FAAH homolog in Dictyostelium discoideum, leading to our hypothesis that D. discoideum also possesses NAEs. In this study, we provide a further characterization of FAAH and identify NAEs in D. discoideum for the first time. We also demonstrate the ability to modulate their levels in vivo through the use of a semispecific FAAH inhibitor and confirm that these NAEs are FAAH substrates through in vitro studies. We believe the demonstration of the in vivo modulation of NAE levels suggests that D. discoideum could be a good simple model organism in which to study NAE-mediated signaling. PMID:23187822

  4. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  5. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  6. John Montgomery's legacy: carbocyclic adenosine analogues as SAH hydrolase inhibitors with broad-spectrum antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Ever since the S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy, SAH) hydrolase was recognized as a pharmacological target for antiviral agents (J. A. Montgomery et al., J. Med. Chem. 25:626-629, 1982), an increasing number of adenosine, acyclic adenosine, and carbocyclic adenosine analogues have been described as potent SAH hydrolase inhibitors endowed with broad-spectrum antiviral activity. The antiviral activity spectrum of the SAH hydrolase inhibitors include pox-, rhabdo-, filo-, arena-, paramyxo-, reo-, and retroviruses. Among the most potent SAH hydrolase inhibitors and antiviral agents rank carbocyclic 3-deazaadenosine (C-c3 Ado), neplanocin A, 3-deazaneplanocin A, the 5'-nor derivatives of carbocyclic adenosine (C-Ado, aristeromycin), and the 2-halo (i.e., 2-fluoro) and 6'-R-alkyl (i.e., 6'-R-methyl) derivatives of neplanocin A. These compounds are particularly active against poxviruses (i.e., vaccinia virus), and rhabdoviruses (i.e., vesicular stomatitis virus). The in vivo efficacy of C-c3 Ado and 3-deazaneplanocin A has been established in mouse models for vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Ebola virus. SAH hydrolase inhibitors such as C-c3Ado and 3-deazaneplanocin A should in thefirst place be considered for therapeutic (or prophylactic) use against poxvirus infections, including smallpox, and hemorrhagic fever virus infections such as Ebola. PMID:16438025

  7. A Bifunctional Enzyme That Has Both Monoacylglycerol Acyltransferase and Acyl Hydrolase Activities1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraj, Panneerselvam; Jashal, Charnitkaur B.; Vijayakumar, Anitha; Rani, Sapa Hima; Venkata Rao, D.K.; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) catalyzes the synthesis of diacylglycerol, the precursor of triacylglycerol biosynthesis and an important signaling molecule. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of the peanut (Arachis hypogaea) MGAT gene. The soluble enzyme utilizes invariant histidine-62 and aspartate-67 residues of the acyltransferase motif for its MGAT activity. A sequence analysis revealed the presence of a hydrolase (GXSXG) motif, and enzyme assays revealed the presence of monoacylglycerol (MAG) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) hydrolytic activities, indicating the bifunctional nature of the enzyme. The overexpression of the MGAT gene in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) caused an increase in triacylglycerol accumulation. Similar to the peanut MGAT, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog (At1g52760) also exhibited both acyltransferase and hydrolase activities. Interestingly, the yeast homolog lacks the conserved HX4D motif, and it is deficient in the acyltransferase function but exhibits MAG and LPC hydrolase activities. This study demonstrates the presence of a soluble MGAT/hydrolase in plants. The predicted three-dimensional homology modeling and substrate docking suggested the presence of two separate substrate (MAG and LPC)-binding sites in a single polypeptide. Our study describes a soluble bifunctional enzyme that has both MGAT and hydrolase functions. PMID:22915575

  8. Development of a differential medium for bile salt hydrolase-active Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Dashkevicz, M P; Feighner, S D

    1989-01-01

    An agar plate assay was developed to detect bile salt hydrolase activity in lactobacilli. On Lactobacillus-selective MRS or Rogosa SL medium supplemented with taurodeoxycholic, taurocholic, or taurochenodeoxycholic acids, bile salt hydrolysis was manifested at two intensities: (i) the formation of precipitate halos around colonies or (ii) the formation of opaque granular white colonies. Sixty-six lactobacilli were tested for bile salt hydrolase activity by both the plate assay and a sensitive radiochemical assay. No false-positive or false-negative results were detected by the plate assay. Based on results of experiments with Eubacterium lentum and Bacteroides species, the plate assay was dependent on two factors: (i) the presence of bile salt hydrolytic activity and (ii) the ability of the organism to sufficiently acidify the medium to protonate free bile acids. The availability of a differential medium for determination of bile salt hydrolase activity will provide a rapid method for determining shifts in a specific functional activity of intestinal Lactobacillus species and provide a rapid screening capability for identifying bile salt hydrolase-deficient mutants. The latter application should allow bile salt hydrolase activity to be used as a marker enzyme in genetic experiments. Images PMID:2705765

  9. Soluble epoxide hydrolase limits mechanical hyperalgesia during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytochrome-P450 (CYP450) epoxygenases metabolise arachidonic acid (AA) into four different biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) regioisomers. Three of the EETs (i.e., 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-EET) are rapidly hydrolysed by the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Here, we investigated the role of sEH in nociceptive processing during peripheral inflammation. Results In dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we found that sEH is expressed in medium and large diameter neurofilament 200-positive neurons. Isolated DRG-neurons from sEH-/- mice showed higher EET and lower DHET levels. Upon AA stimulation, the largest changes in EET levels occurred in culture media, indicating both that cell associated EET concentrations quickly reach saturation and EET-hydrolyzing activity mostly effects extracellular EET signaling. In vivo, DRGs from sEH-deficient mice exhibited elevated 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-EET-levels. Interestingly, EET levels did not increase at the site of zymosan-induced inflammation. Cellular imaging experiments revealed direct calcium flux responses to 8,9-EET in a subpopulation of nociceptors. In addition, 8,9-EET sensitized AITC-induced calcium increases in DRG neurons and AITC-induced calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sciatic nerve axons, indicating that 8,9-EET sensitizes TRPA1-expressing neurons, which are known to contribute to mechanical hyperalgesia. Supporting this, sEH-/- mice showed increased nociceptive responses to mechanical stimulation during zymosan-induced inflammation and 8,9-EET injection reduced mechanical thresholds in naive mice. Conclusion Our results show that the sEH can regulate mechanical hyperalgesia during inflammation by inactivating 8,9-EET, which sensitizes TRPA1-expressing nociceptors. Therefore we suggest that influencing the CYP450 pathway, which is actually highly considered to treat cardiovascular diseases, may cause pain side effects. PMID:21970373

  10. Bioprospecting metagenomics of decaying wood: mining for new glycoside hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant plant biomass to fermentable sugars in industrial processes, biocatalysts of higher performance and lower cost are required. The genetic diversity found in the metagenomes of natural microbial biomass decay communities may harbor such enzymes. Our goal was to discover and characterize new glycoside hydrolases (GHases) from microbial biomass decay communities, especially those from unknown or never previously cultivated microorganisms. Results From the metagenome sequences of an anaerobic microbial community actively decaying poplar biomass, we identified approximately 4,000 GHase homologs. Based on homology to GHase families/activities of interest and the quality of the sequences, candidates were selected for full-length cloning and subsequent expression. As an alternative strategy, a metagenome expression library was constructed and screened for GHase activities. These combined efforts resulted in the cloning of four novel GHases that could be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Further characterization showed that two enzymes showed significant activity on p-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinofuranoside, one enzyme had significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, and one enzyme showed significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside. Enzymes were also tested in the presence of ionic liquids. Conclusions Metagenomics provides a good resource for mining novel biomass degrading enzymes and for screening of cellulolytic enzyme activities. The four GHases that were cloned may have potential application for deconstruction of biomass pretreated with ionic liquids, as they remain active in the presence of up to 20% ionic liquid (except for 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate). Alternatively, ionic liquids might be used to immobilize or stabilize these enzymes for minimal solvent processing of biomass. PMID:21816041

  11. Conformational diversity and enantioconvergence in potato epoxide hydrolase 1.

    PubMed

    Bauer, P; Carlsson, Å Janfalk; Amrein, B A; Dobritzsch, D; Widersten, M; Kamerlin, S C L

    2016-06-28

    Potato epoxide hydrolase 1 (StEH1) is a biocatalytically important enzyme that exhibits rich enantio- and regioselectivity in the hydrolysis of chiral epoxide substrates. In particular, StEH1 has been demonstrated to enantioconvergently hydrolyze racemic mixes of styrene oxide (SO) to yield (R)-1-phenylethanediol. This work combines computational, crystallographic and biochemical analyses to understand both the origins of the enantioconvergent behavior of the wild-type enzyme, as well as shifts in activities and substrate binding preferences in an engineered StEH1 variant, R-C1B1, which contains four active site substitutions (W106L, L109Y, V141K and I155V). Our calculations are able to reproduce both the enantio- and regioselectivities of StEH1, and demonstrate a clear link between different substrate binding modes and the corresponding selectivity, with the preferred binding modes being shifted between the wild-type enzyme and the R-C1B1 variant. Additionally, we demonstrate that the observed changes in selectivity and the corresponding enantioconvergent behavior are due to a combination of steric and electrostatic effects that modulate both the accessibility of the different carbon atoms to the nucleophilic side chain of D105, as well as the interactions between the substrate and protein amino acid side chains and active site water molecules. Being able to computationally predict such subtle effects for different substrate enantiomers, as well as to understand their origin and how they are affected by mutations, is an important advance towards the computational design of improved biocatalysts for enantioselective synthesis. PMID:27049844

  12. Optical solid-state detection of organophosphates using organophosphorus hydrolase.

    PubMed

    White, Brandy J; Harmon, H James

    2005-04-15

    We have developed a sensor surface for optical detection of organophosphates based on reversible inhibition of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) by copper complexed meso-tri(4-sulfonato phenyl) mono(4-carboxy phenyl) porphyrin (CuC1TPP). OPH immobilized onto glass microscope slides retains catalytic activity for more than 232 days. CuC1TPP is a reversible, competitive inhibitor of OPH, binding at the active site of the immobilized enzyme. The absorbance spectrum of the porphyrin-enzyme complex is measured via planar waveguide evanescent wave absorbance spectroscopy using a blue LED as a light source and an Ocean Optics USB2000 as the spectrophotometer. The characteristics of the absorbance spectrum of CuC1TPP are specific and different when the porphyrin is bound to the enzyme or is bound non-specifically to the surface of the slide. Addition of a substrate of OPH such as one of the organophosphates paraoxon, coumaphos, diazinon, or malathion displaces the porphyrin from the enzyme resulting in reduced absorbance intensity at 412 nm. Absorbance changes at 412 nm show log-linear dependence on substrate concentration. Paraoxon concentrations between 7 parts per trillion (ppt) and 14 parts per million (ppm) were investigated and a 3:1 S/N detection limit of 7 ppt was determined. Concentrations of 700 ppt to 40 ppm were investigated for diazinon, malathion, and coumaphos with detection limits of 800 ppt, 1 part per billion, and 250 ppt, respectively. This optical technique does not require the addition of reagents or solutions other than the sample and absorbance spectra can be collected in less than 6 s. PMID:15741066

  13. Prunasin hydrolases during fruit development in sweet and bitter almonds.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Raquel; Belmonte, Fara Sáez; Borch, Jonas; Dicenta, Federico; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Jørgensen, Kirsten

    2012-04-01

    Amygdalin is a cyanogenic diglucoside and constitutes the bitter component in bitter almond (Prunus dulcis). Amygdalin concentration increases in the course of fruit formation. The monoglucoside prunasin is the precursor of amygdalin. Prunasin may be degraded to hydrogen cyanide, glucose, and benzaldehyde by the action of the β-glucosidase prunasin hydrolase (PH) and mandelonitirile lyase or be glucosylated to form amygdalin. The tissue and cellular localization of PHs was determined during fruit development in two sweet and two bitter almond cultivars using a specific antibody toward PHs. Confocal studies on sections of tegument, nucellus, endosperm, and embryo showed that the localization of the PH proteins is dependent on the stage of fruit development, shifting between apoplast and symplast in opposite patterns in sweet and bitter cultivars. Two different PH genes, Ph691 and Ph692, have been identified in a sweet and a bitter almond cultivar. Both cDNAs are 86% identical on the nucleotide level, and their encoded proteins are 79% identical to each other. In addition, Ph691 and Ph692 display 92% and 86% nucleotide identity to Ph1 from black cherry (Prunus serotina). Both proteins were predicted to contain an amino-terminal signal peptide, with the size of 26 amino acid residues for PH691 and 22 residues for PH692. The PH activity and the localization of the respective proteins in vivo differ between cultivars. This implies that there might be different concentrations of prunasin available in the seed for amygdalin synthesis and that these differences may determine whether the mature almond develops into bitter or sweet. PMID:22353576

  14. Long-acting cocaine hydrolase for addiction therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiabin; Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Jin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Ting; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-12

    Cocaine abuse is a world-wide public health and social problem without a US Food and Drug Administration-approved medication. An ideal anticocaine medication would accelerate cocaine metabolism, producing biologically inactive metabolites by administration of an efficient cocaine-specific exogenous enzyme. Our recent studies have led to the discovery of the desirable, highly efficient cocaine hydrolases (CocHs) that can efficiently detoxify and inactivate cocaine without affecting normal functions of the CNS. Preclinical and clinical data have demonstrated that these CocHs are safe for use in humans and are effective for accelerating cocaine metabolism. However, the actual therapeutic use of a CocH in cocaine addiction treatment is limited by its short biological half-life (e.g., 8 h or shorter in rats). Here we demonstrate a novel CocH form, a catalytic antibody analog, which is a fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fused CocH dimer (CocH-Fc) constructed by using CocH to replace the Fab region of human IgG1. The CocH-Fc not only has a high catalytic efficiency against cocaine but also, like an antibody, has a considerably longer biological half-life (e.g., ∼107 h in rats). A single dose of CocH-Fc was able to accelerate cocaine metabolism in rats even after 20 d and thus block cocaine-induced hyperactivity and toxicity for a long period. Given the general observation that the biological half-life of a protein drug is significantly longer in humans than in rodents, the CocH-Fc reported in this study could allow dosing once every 2-4 wk, or longer, for treatment of cocaine addiction in humans. PMID:26712009

  15. Bioprospecting metagenomics of decaying wood: mining for new glycoside hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Li L. L.; van der Lelie D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Blewitt, M. G.; Brunecky, R.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Brumm, P.; Drinkwater, C.; Mead, D. A.; Tringe, S. G.

    2011-08-01

    To efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant plant biomass to fermentable sugars in industrial processes, biocatalysts of higher performance and lower cost are required. The genetic diversity found in the metagenomes of natural microbial biomass decay communities may harbor such enzymes. Our goal was to discover and characterize new glycoside hydrolases (GHases) from microbial biomass decay communities, especially those from unknown or never previously cultivated microorganisms. From the metagenome sequences of an anaerobic microbial community actively decaying poplar biomass, we identified approximately 4,000 GHase homologs. Based on homology to GHase families/activities of interest and the quality of the sequences, candidates were selected for full-length cloning and subsequent expression. As an alternative strategy, a metagenome expression library was constructed and screened for GHase activities. These combined efforts resulted in the cloning of four novel GHases that could be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Further characterization showed that two enzymes showed significant activity on p-nitrophenyl-{alpha}-L-arabinofuranoside, one enzyme had significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside, and one enzyme showed significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-xylopyranoside. Enzymes were also tested in the presence of ionic liquids. Metagenomics provides a good resource for mining novel biomass degrading enzymes and for screening of cellulolytic enzyme activities. The four GHases that were cloned may have potential application for deconstruction of biomass pretreated with ionic liquids, as they remain active in the presence of up to 20% ionic liquid (except for 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate). Alternatively, ionic liquids might be used to immobilize or stabilize these enzymes for minimal solvent processing of biomass.

  16. Evaluation of fish models of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J W; Denton, D L; Morisseau, C; Koger, C S; Wheelock, C E; Hinton, D E; Hammock, B D

    2001-01-01

    Substituted ureas and carbamates are mechanistic inhibitors of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). We screened a set of chemicals containing these functionalities in larval fathead minnow (Pimphales promelas) and embryo/larval golden medaka (Oryzias latipes) models to evaluate the utility of these systems for investigating sEH inhibition in vivo. Both fathead minnow and medaka sEHs were functionally similar to the tested mammalian orthologs (murine and human) with respect to substrate hydrolysis and inhibitor susceptibility. Low lethality was observed in either larval or embryonic fish exposed to diuron [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl), N'-dimethyl urea], desmethyl diuron [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl), N'-methyl urea], or siduron [N-(1-methylcyclohexyl), N'-phenyl urea]. Dose-dependent inhibition of sEH was a sublethal effect of substituted urea exposure with the potency of siduron < desmethyl diuron = diuron, differing from the observed in vitro sEH inhibition potency of siduron > desmethyl diuron > diuron. Further, siduron exposure synergized the toxicity of trans-stilbene oxide in fathead minnows. Medaka embryos exposed to diuron, desmethyl diuron, or siduron displayed dose-dependent delays in hatch, and elevated concentrations of diuron and desmethyl diuron produced developmental toxicity. The dose-dependent toxicity and in vivo sEH inhibition correlated, suggesting a potential, albeit undefined, relationship between these factors. Additionally, the observed inversion of in vitro to in vivo potency suggests that these fish models may provide tools for investigating the in vivo stability of in vitro inhibitors while screening for untoward effects. PMID:11171526

  17. Reward and Toxicity of Cocaine Metabolites Generated by Cocaine Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Vishakantha; Geng, Liyi; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Jordan D; Reyes, Santiago; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) gene therapy is emerging as a promising concept for treatment of cocaine addiction. BChE levels after gene transfer can rise 1000-fold above those in untreated mice, making this enzyme the second most abundant plasma protein. For months or years, gene transfer of a BChE mutated into a cocaine hydrolase (CocH) can maintain enzyme levels that destroy cocaine within seconds after appearance in the blood stream, allowing little to reach the brain. Rapid enzyme action causes a sharp rise in plasma levels of two cocaine metabolites, benzoic acid (BA) and ecgonine methyl ester (EME), a smooth muscle relaxant that is mildly hypotensive and, at best, only weakly rewarding. The present study, utilizing Balb/c mice, tested reward effects and cardiovascular effects of administering EME and BA together at molar levels equivalent to those generated by a given dose of cocaine. Reward was evaluated by conditioned place preference. In this paradigm, cocaine (20 mg/kg) induced a robust positive response but the equivalent combined dose of EME + BA failed to induce either place preference or aversion. Likewise, mice that had undergone gene transfer with mouse CocH (mCocH) showed no place preference or aversion after repeated treatments with a near-lethal 80 mg/kg cocaine dose. Furthermore, a single administration of that same high cocaine dose failed to affect blood pressure as measured using the noninvasive tail-cuff method. These observations confirm that the drug metabolites generated after CocH gene transfer therapy are safe even after a dose of cocaine that would ordinarily be lethal. PMID:25814464

  18. Alterations of intestinal glycoprotein hydrolases in congenital diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The diabetic BioBreed (BB{sub d}) rat was used for the study of the molecular structure of intestinal brush border sucrase-{alpha}-dextrinase (SD) and aminooligopeptidase (AOP) in diabetes mellitus. The specific catalytic activity of S-D and AOP in the BB{sub d} rat is normal. However, solid-phase radioimmunoassay revealed loss of some antigenic determinants in the BB{sub d} rat. S-D and AOP migrated abnormally on 6% SDS-gel electrophoresis in the BB{sub d} rat. S was larger (+5 kDa), D was either smaller (-5 kDa) or unaltered, and AOP was smaller (-5 kDa) in the BB{sub d} than in the normal Wistar. The structural abnormalities were independent of hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis and restored to normal by daily insulin treatment (NPH, 3-4 units/rat) for two to three weeks. Newly-synthesized brush border hydrolases were examined after 6 hours of intraperitoneal injection of ({sup 35}S) methionine (2 mCi) and found to be altered, suggesting that structural abnormality appeared acutely during intracellular synthesis rather than being due to slow extracellular modifications such as non-enzymatic glycosylation. Deglycosylation of brush border proteins by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid resulted in an apoprotein with normal electrophoretic migration in BB{sub d}, indicating that the alteration was due to the carbohydrates component of the glycoprotein. Pulse-chase studies with ({sup 35}S) methionine were consistent with normal protein an co-translational and initial N-linked carbohydrate assembly in association with the endoplasmic reticulum in BB{sub d}. However, the post-translational maturation of N-linked and addition of 0-linked carbohydrate chains in Golgi were prolonged, and produced a larger single-chain precursor of S-D in BB{sub d} than normal.

  19. Analyzing S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase gene sequences in deuterostome genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Nan; Wang, Yuan; Zhao, Bo-Sheng; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2009-12-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) gene sequences of sea-urchin, two amphioxus, sea-squirt and eight vertebrates are comparatively analyzed in the current analysis. Although SAHH protein sequences are highly conserved in these species, their nucleotide sequences are much different, ranging from 5,446 bp in amphioxus to 40,174 bp in zebra fish. The length divergence is mainly caused by distinct introns in some species. SAHH genes in amphioxus (or sea-urchin), sea-squirt and vertebrates are composed of eight, nine and ten exons, respectively. Sequence alignment shows that exon 3 in amphioxus and sea-urchin is similar to exons 3 + 4 in vertebrates, exon 5 in amphioxus and sea-urchin is similar to exons 5 + 6 in sea-squirt, and the two exons are fused into exon 6 in vertebrates. Furthermore, exon 7 in sea-squirt is similar to exons 7 + 8 in vertebrates, indicating that exon-fission and exon-fusion events have been taken place during the evolution of deuterostome SAHH genes. Active sites and NAD+-binding sites are located in exons 2 7 in amphioxus, which are dispersed into much more exons along with the evolution of vertebrates. It is speculated that ten-exon organization of SAHH gene occurred after the separation of invertebrates and vertebrates. Synonymous and non-synonymous substitution analysis shows that negative selection plays a dominant role in the evolution of SAHH genes. Phylogenetic analysis shows that SAHH genes in amphioxus, sea-urchin and sea-squirt form a cluster and locate at the base of neighbor-joining tree, suggesting that they are the archetype of vertebrate SAHH genes. PMID:19795919

  20. GENETIC VARIATION IN SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE (EPHX2) AND RISK OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE: THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK IN COMMUNITIES (ARIC) STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). Soluble epoxide hydrolase metabolizes epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in the vasculature and regulates endothelial function. We sought to determine whether genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2) was ass...

  1. Genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2) and risk of coronary heart disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). Soluble epoxide hydrolase metabolizes epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in the vasculature and regulates endothelial function. We sought to determine whether genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2) was ass...

  2. Evaluation of NHS Carbamates as a Potent and Selective Class of Endocannabinoid Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is a principal metabolic enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing the endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Selective inhibitors of MAGL offer valuable probes to further understand the enzyme’s function in biological systems and may lead to drugs for treating a variety of diseases, including psychiatric disorders, neuroinflammation, and pain. N-Hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) carbamates have recently been identified as a promising class of serine hydrolase inhibitors that shows minimal cross-reactivity with other proteins in the proteome. Here, we explore NHS carbamates more broadly and demonstrate their potential as inhibitors of endocannabinoid hydrolases and additional enzymes from the serine hydrolase class. We extensively characterize an NHS carbamate 1a (MJN110) as a potent, selective, and in-vivo-active MAGL inhibitor. Finally, we demonstrate that MJN110 alleviates mechanical allodynia in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy, marking NHS carbamates as a promising class of MAGL inhibitors. PMID:23731016

  3. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  4. Competitive Activity-Based Protein Profiling Identifies Aza-β-Lactams as a Versatile Chemotype for Serine Hydrolase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zuhl, Andrea M.; Mohr, Justin T.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Niessen, Sherry; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Berlin, Jacob M.; Dochnahl, Maximilian; López-Alberca, María P.; Fu, Gregory C.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydrolases are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in Nature. Most serine hydrolases lack selective inhibitors, which are needed for assigning functions to these enzymes. We recently discovered a set of aza-β-lactams (ABLs) that act as potent and selective inhibitors of the mammalian serine hydrolase protein-phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1). The ABLs inactivate PME-1 by covalent acylation of the enzyme’s serine nucleophile, suggesting that they could offer a general scaffold for serine hydrolase inhibitor discovery. Here, we have tested this hypothesis by screening ABLs more broadly against cell and tissue proteomes by competitive activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), leading to the discovery of lead inhibitors for several serine hydrolases, including the uncharacterized enzyme alpha, beta-hydrolase-10 (ABHD10). ABPP-guided medicinal chemistry yielded a compound ABL303 that potently (IC50 value ~ 30 nM) and selectively inactivated ABHD10 in vitro and in living cells. A comparison of optimized inhibitors for PME-1 and ABHD10 indicates that modest structural changes that alter steric bulk can tailor the ABL to selectively react with distinct, sequence-unrelated serine hydrolases. Our findings, taken together, designate the ABL as a versatile reactive group for creating first-in-class serine hydrolase inhibitors. PMID:22400490

  5. Competitive activity-based protein profiling identifies aza-β-lactams as a versatile chemotype for serine hydrolase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Andrea M; Mohr, Justin T; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Niessen, Sherry; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Berlin, Jacob M; Dochnahl, Maximilian; López-Alberca, María P; Fu, Gregory C; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2012-03-21

    Serine hydrolases are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in Nature. Most serine hydrolases lack selective inhibitors, which are valuable probes for assigning functions to these enzymes. We recently discovered a set of aza-β-lactams (ABLs) that act as potent and selective inhibitors of the mammalian serine hydrolase protein-phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1). The ABLs inactivate PME-1 by covalent acylation of the enzyme's serine nucleophile, suggesting that they could offer a general scaffold for serine hydrolase inhibitor discovery. Here, we have tested this hypothesis by screening ABLs more broadly against cell and tissue proteomes by competitive activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), leading to the discovery of lead inhibitors for several serine hydrolases, including the uncharacterized enzyme α,β-hydrolase domain-containing 10 (ABHD10). ABPP-guided medicinal chemistry yielded a compound ABL303 that potently (IC(50) ≈ 30 nM) and selectively inactivated ABHD10 in vitro and in living cells. A comparison of optimized inhibitors for PME-1 and ABHD10 indicates that modest structural changes that alter steric bulk can tailor the ABL to selectively react with distinct, distantly related serine hydrolases. Our findings, taken together, designate the ABL as a versatile reactive group for creating first-in-class serine hydrolase inhibitors. PMID:22400490

  6. Polyglycine hydrolases: fungal b-lactamase-like endoproteases that cleave polyglycine regions within plant class IV chitinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyglycine hydrolases are secreted fungal proteases that cleave glycine-glycine peptide bonds in the inter-domain linker region of specific plant defense chitinases. Previously, we reported the catalytic activity of polyglycine hydrolases from the phytopathogens Epicoccum sorghi (Es-cmp) and Cochli...

  7. Structural Determinants Allowing Transferase Activity in SENSITIVE TO FREEZING 2, Classified as a Family I Glycosyl Hydrolase*

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Rebecca L.; Wang, Kun; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Benning, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    SENSITIVE TO FREEZING 2 (SFR2) is classified as a family I glycosyl hydrolase but has recently been shown to have galactosyltransferase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. Natural occurrences of apparent glycosyl hydrolases acting as transferases are interesting from a biocatalysis standpoint, and knowledge about the interconversion can assist in engineering SFR2 in crop plants to resist freezing. To understand how SFR2 evolved into a transferase, the relationship between its structure and function are investigated by activity assay, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis. SFR2 has no detectable hydrolase activity, although its catalytic site is highly conserved with that of family 1 glycosyl hydrolases. Three regions disparate from glycosyl hydrolases are identified as required for transferase activity as follows: a loop insertion, the C-terminal peptide, and a hydrophobic patch adjacent to the catalytic site. Rationales for the effects of these regions on the SFR2 mechanism are discussed. PMID:25100720

  8. A constitutive expression system for glycosyl hydrolase family 7 cellobiohydrolases in Hypocrea jecorina

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Baker, John O.; Vander Wall, Todd; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Podkaminer, Kara; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.

    2015-03-18

    One of the primary industrial-scale cellulase producers is the ascomycete fungus, Hypocrea jecorina, which produces and secretes large quantities of diverse cellulolytic enzymes. Perhaps the single most important biomass degrading enzyme is cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1or Cel7A) due to its enzymatic proficiency in cellulose depolymerization. However, production of Cel7A with native-like properties from heterologous expression systems has proven difficult. In this study, we develop a protein expression system in H. jecorina (Trichoderma reesei) useful for production and secretion of heterologous cellobiohydrolases from glycosyl hydrolase family 7. Building upon previous work in heterologous protein expression in filamentous fungi, we have integrated a native constitutive enolase promoter with the native cbh1 signal sequence. The results are the following: The constitutive eno promoter driving the expression of Cel7A allows growth on glucose and results in repression of the native cellulase system, severely reducing background endo- and other cellulase activity and greatly simplifying purification of the recombinant protein. Coupling this system to a Δcbh1 strain of H. jecorina ensures that only the recombinant Cel7A protein is produced. Two distinct transformant colony morphologies were observed and correlated with high and null protein production. Production levels in ‘fast’ transformants are roughly equivalent to those in the native QM6a strain of H. jecorina, typically in the range of 10 to 30 mg/L when grown in continuous stirred-tank fermenters. ‘Slow’ transformants showed no evidence of Cel7A production. Specific activity of the purified recombinant Cel7A protein is equivalent to that of native protein when assayed on pretreated corn stover, as is the thermal stability and glycosylation level. Purified Cel7A produced from growth on glucose demonstrated remarkably consistent specific activity. Purified Cel7A from the same strain grown on lactose

  9. Immunocytochemical Localization of Prunasin Hydrolase and Mandelonitrile Lyase in Stems and Leaves of Prunus serotina.

    PubMed Central

    Swain, E.; Poulton, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In macerates of black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) leaves and stems, (R)-prunasin is catabolized to HCN, benzaldehyde, and D-glucose by the sequential action of prunasin hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.21) and (R)-(+)-mandelonitrile lyase (EC 4.1.2.10). Immuno-cytochemical techniques have shown that within these organs prunasin hydrolase occurs within the vacuoles of phloem parenchyma cells. In arborescent leaves, mandelonitrile lyase was also located in phloem parenchyma vacuoles, but comparison of serial sections revealed that these two degradative enzymes are usually localized within different cells. PMID:12232409

  10. Data set of optimal parameters for colorimetric red assay of epoxide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel Stephani; Adriani, Patricia Pereira; Borges, Flavia Garcia; Lopes, Adriana Rios; Campana, Patricia T; Chambergo, Felipe S

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Epoxide hydrolase of Trichoderma reesei: Biochemical properties and conformational characterization" [1]. Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides to the corresponding vicinal diols. This article describes the optimal parameters for the colorimetric red assay to determine the enzymatic activity, with an emphasis on the characterization of the kinetic parameters, pH optimum and thermal stability of this enzyme. The effects of reagents that are not resistant to oxidation by sodium periodate on the reactions can generate false positives and interfere with the final results of the red assay. PMID:27366781

  11. Molecular Models to Emulate Confinement Effects on the Internal Dynamics of Organophosphorous Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Diego Enry B.; Lins, Roberto D.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Straatsma, TP; Soares, Thereza A.

    2008-09-28

    The confinement of the metalloenzyme organophosphorous hydrolase in functionalized mesoporous silica (FMS) enhances the stability and increases catalytic specific activity by 200% compared to the enzyme in solution. The mechanism by which these processes take place is not well understood. We have developed two coarse-grain models of confinement to provide insights into how the nanocage environment steers enzyme conformational dynamics towards enhanced stability and enzymatic activity. The structural dynamics of organophosphorous hydrolase under the two confinement models are very distinct from each other. Comparisons of the present simulations show that only one model leads to an accurate depiction of the internal dynamics of the enzyme.

  12. Diversity of glycosyl hydrolase enzymes from metagenome and their application in food industry.

    PubMed

    Sathya, T A; Khan, Mahejibin

    2014-11-01

    Traditional use of enzymes for food processing and production of food ingredients resulted in fast-growing enzyme industries world over. The advances in technologies gave rise to exploring newer enzymes and/or modified enzymes for specific application. Search for novel enzymes that can augment catalytic efficiency and advances in molecular biology techniques including sequencing has targeted microbial diversity through metagenomic approaches for sourcing enzymes from difficult to culture organisms. Such mining studies have received more attention in characterizing hydrolases, their prevalence, broad substrate specificities, stability, and independence of cofactors. The focus on glycosyl hydrolases from metagenome for their application in food sector is reviewed. PMID:25311940

  13. Conformational Variability of Organophosphorus Hydrolase upon Soman and Paraoxon Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Diego Eb; Lins, Roberto D.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Lei, Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A.

    2011-12-31

    The bacterial enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) exhibits both catalytic and substrate promiscuity. It hydrolyzes bonds in a variety of phosphotriester (P-O), phosphonothioate (P-S), phosphofluoridate (P-F) and phosphonocyanate (F-CN) compounds. However, its catalytic efficiency varies markedly for different substrates, limiting the broad-range application of OPH as catalyst in the bioremediation of pesticides and chemical war agents. In the present study, pK{sub a} calculations and multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to characterize and contrast the structural dynamics of OPH bound to two substrates hydrolyzed with very distinct catalytic efficiencies: the nerve agent soman (O-pinacolyl-methyl-phosphonofluoridate) and the pesticide paraoxon (diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate). pK{sub a} calculations for the substrate-bound and unbound enzyme showed a significant pK{sub a} shift from standard values ({Delta}pK{sub a} = {+-} 3 units) for residues 254His and 275Arg. MD simulations of the doubly protonated 254His revealed a dynamic hydrogen bond network connecting the catalytic residue 301Asp via 254His to 232Asp, 233Asp, 275Arg and 235Asp, and is consistent with a previously postulated proton relay mechanism to ferry protons away from the active site with substrates that do not require activation of the leaving group. Hydrogen bonds between 301Asp and 254His were persistent in the OPH-paraoxon complex but not in the OPH-soman one, suggesting a potential role for such interaction in the more efficient hydrolysis of paraoxon over soman by OPH. These results are in line with previous mutational studies of residue 254His, which led to an increase of the catalytic efficiency of OPH over soman yet decreased its efficiency for paraoxon. In addition, comparative analysis of the molecular trajectories for OPH bound to soman and paraoxon suggests that binding of the latter facilitates the conformational transition of OPH from the

  14. Conformational Variability of Organophosphorous Hydrolase upon Soman and Paraoxon Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Diego E.B.; Lins, Roberto D.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Lei, Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial enzyme organophosphorous hydrolase (OPH) exhibits both catalytic and substrate promiscuity. It hydrolyzes bonds in a variety of phosphotriester (P-O), phosphonothioate (P-S), phosphofluoridate (P-F) and phosphonocyanate (F-CN) compounds. However, its catalytic efficiency varies markedly for different substrates, limiting the broad-range application of OPH as catalyst in the bioremediation of pesticides and chemical war agents. In the present study, pKa calculations and multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to characterize and contrast the structural dynamics of OPH bound to two substrates hydrolyzed with very distinct catalytic efficiencies: the nerve agent soman (O-pinacolyl-methyl-phosphonofluoridate) and the pesticide paraoxon (diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate). pKa calculations for the substrate-bound and unbound enzyme showed a significant pKa shift from standard values (ΔpKa=±3 units) for residues 254His and 275Arg. MD simulations of the doubly protonated 254His revealed a dynamic hydrogen bond network connecting the catalytic residue 301Asp via 254His to 232Asp, 233Asp, 275Arg and 235Asp, and is consistent with a previously postulated proton relay mechanism to ferry protons away from the active site with substrates that do not require activation of the leaving group. Hydrogen bonds between 301Asp and 254His were persistent in the OPH-paraoxon complex but not in the OPH-soman one, suggesting a potential role for such interaction in the more efficient hydrolysis of paraoxon over soman by OPH. These results are in line with previous mutational studies of residue 254His, which led to an increase of the catalytic efficiency of OPH over soman yet decreased its efficiency for paraoxon. In addition, comparative analysis of the molecular trajectories for OPH bound to soman and paraoxon suggests that binding of the latter facilitates the conformational transition of OPH from the open to the closed substate

  15. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of peptidoglycan hydrolases of Lactobacillus sakei.

    PubMed

    Najjari, Afef; Amairi, Houda; Chaillou, Stéphane; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Zagorec, Monique; Ouzari, Hadda

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei, a lactic acid bacterium naturally found in fresh meat and sea products, is considered to be one of the most important bacterial species involved in meat fermentation and bio-preservation. Several enzymes of Lb. sakei species contributing to microbial safeguarding and organoleptic properties of fermented-meat were studied. However, the specific autolytic mechanisms and associated enzymes involved in Lb. sakei are not well understood. The autolytic phenotype of 22 Lb. sakei strains isolated from Tunisian meat and seafood products was evaluated under starvation conditions, at pH 6.5 and 8.5, and in the presence of different carbon sources. A higher autolytic rate was observed when cells were grown in the presence of glucose and incubated at pH 6.5. Almost all strains showed high resistance to mutanolysin, indicating a minor role of muramidases in Lb. sakei cell lysis. Using Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells as a substrate in activity gels zymogram, peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH) patterns for all strains was characterized by two lytic bands of ∼80 (B1) and ∼70 kDa (B2), except for strain BMG.167 which harbored two activity signals at a lower MW. Lytic activity was retained in high salt and in acid/basic conditions and was active toward cells of Lb. sakei, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria ivanovii and Listeria innocua. Analysis of five putative PGH genes found in the Lb. sakei 23 K model strain genome, indicated that one gene, lsa1437, could encode a PGH (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) containing B1 and B2 as isoforms. According to this hypothesis, strain BMG.167 showed an allelic version of lsa1437 gene deleted of one of the five LysM domains, leading to a reduction in the MW of lytic bands and the high autolytic rate of this strain. Characterization of autolytic phenotype of Lb. sakei should expand the knowledge of their role in fermentation processes where they represent the dominant species. PMID:26843981

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of peptidoglycan hydrolases of Lactobacillus sakei

    PubMed Central

    Najjari, Afef; Amairi, Houda; Chaillou, Stéphane; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Zagorec, Monique; Ouzari, Hadda

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei, a lactic acid bacterium naturally found in fresh meat and sea products, is considered to be one of the most important bacterial species involved in meat fermentation and bio-preservation. Several enzymes of Lb. sakei species contributing to microbial safeguarding and organoleptic properties of fermented-meat were studied. However, the specific autolytic mechanisms and associated enzymes involved in Lb. sakei are not well understood. The autolytic phenotype of 22 Lb. sakei strains isolated from Tunisian meat and seafood products was evaluated under starvation conditions, at pH 6.5 and 8.5, and in the presence of different carbon sources. A higher autolytic rate was observed when cells were grown in the presence of glucose and incubated at pH 6.5. Almost all strains showed high resistance to mutanolysin, indicating a minor role of muramidases in Lb. sakei cell lysis. Using Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells as a substrate in activity gels zymogram, peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH) patterns for all strains was characterized by two lytic bands of ∼80 (B1) and ∼70 kDa (B2), except for strain BMG.167 which harbored two activity signals at a lower MW. Lytic activity was retained in high salt and in acid/basic conditions and was active toward cells of Lb. sakei, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria ivanovii and Listeria innocua. Analysis of five putative PGH genes found in the Lb. sakei 23 K model strain genome, indicated that one gene, lsa1437, could encode a PGH (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) containing B1 and B2 as isoforms. According to this hypothesis, strain BMG.167 showed an allelic version of lsa1437 gene deleted of one of the five LysM domains, leading to a reduction in the MW of lytic bands and the high autolytic rate of this strain. Characterization of autolytic phenotype of Lb. sakei should expand the knowledge of their role in fermentation processes where they represent the dominant species. PMID:26843981

  17. Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase As a New-Age Bioscavenger Drug: Development of the Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Ilyushin, D.G.; Haertley, O.M.; Bobik, T.V.; Shamborant, O.G.; Surina, E.A.; Knorre, V.D.; Masson, P.; Smirnov, I.V.; Gabibov, A.G.; Ponomarenko, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is a serine hydrolase (EC 3.1.1.8) which can be found in most animal tissues. This enzyme has a broad spectrum of efficacy against organophosphorus compounds, which makes it a prime candidate for the role of stoichiometric bioscavenger. Development of a new-age DNA-encoded bioscavenger is a vival task. Several transgenic expression systems of human BChE were developed over the past 20 years; however, none of them has been shown to make economic sense or has been approved for administration to humans. In this study, a CHO-based expression system was redesigned, resulting in a significant increase in the production level of functional recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase as compared to the hitherto existing systems. The recombinant enzyme was characterized with Elman and ELISA methods. PMID:23556132

  18. Meiotic recombination mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division at the origin of the haploid cells that eventually develop into the gametes. It therefore lies at the heart of Mendelian heredity. Recombination and redistribution of the homologous chromosomes arising during meiosis constitute an important source of genetic diversity, conferring to meiosis a particularly important place in the evolution and the diversification of the species. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing meiotic recombination has considerably progressed these last decades, benefiting from complementary approaches led on various model species. An overview of these mechanisms will be provided as well as a discussion on the implications of these recent discoveries. PMID:27180110

  19. Biodegradation of fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (FE) by Acinetobacter sp. strain DL-2 and cloning of FE hydrolase gene afeH.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Jiang, Sheng; Shi, Kaiwen; Wang, Fei; Li, Shuhuan; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Fei; Wang, Yicheng; Zheng, Yuxiao; Hou, Ying; Huang, Yan; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-06-01

    Fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (FE) is widely used as a post-emergence aryloxyphenoxy propionate (AOPP) herbicide in agriculture. An efficient FE-degrading strain DL-2 was isolated from the enrichment culture and identified as Acinetobacter sp. and the metabolite fenoxaprop acid (FA) was identified by HPLC/MS analysis. The strain DL-2 could also degrade a wide range of other AOPP herbicides. A novel FE hydrolase esterase gene afeH was cloned from strain DL-2 and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The specific activities of recombinant AfeH was 216.39 U mg(-1) for FE with Km and Vmax values of 0.82 μM and 7.94 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). AfeH could also hydrolyze various AOPP herbicides, p-nitrophenyl esters and triglycerides. The optimal pH and temperature for recombinant AfeH were 9.0 and 50°C, respectively; the enzyme was activated by Co(2+) and inhibited by Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Ba(2+). AfeH was inhibited strongly by phenylmethylsulfonyl and SDS and weakly by dimethyl sulfoxide. PMID:25812814

  20. Potent Natural Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors from Pentadiplandra brazzeana Baillon: Synthesis, Quantification, and Measurement of Biological Activities In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Seiya; Morisseau, Christophe; Inceoglu, Bora; Kamita, Shizuo G.; De Nicola, Gina R.; Nyegue, Maximilienne; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here three urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors from the root of the plant Pentadiplandra brazzeana. The concentration of these ureas in the root was quantified by LC-MS/MS, showing that 1, 3-bis (4-methoxybenzyl) urea (MMU) is the most abundant (42.3 μg/g dry root weight). All of the ureas were chemically synthesized, and their inhibitory activity toward recombinant human and recombinant rat sEH was measured. The most potent compound, MMU, showed an IC50 of 92 nM via fluorescent assay and a Ki of 54 nM via radioactivity-based assay on human sEH. MMU effectively reduced inflammatory pain in a rat nociceptive pain assay. These compounds are among the most potent sEH inhibitors derived from natural sources. Moreover, inhibition of sEH by these compounds may mechanistically explain some of the therapeutic effects of P. brazzeana. PMID:25659109

  1. A Versatile Family 3 Glycoside Hydrolase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis Hydrolyzes β-Glucosides of the Fusarium Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol, Nivalenol, and HT-2 Toxin in Cereal Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Elisabeth; Malachova, Alexandra; Nguyen, Nhung Thi; Lorenz, Cindy; Haltrich, Dietmar; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation plays a central role in plant defense against xenobiotics, including mycotoxins. Glucoconjugates of Fusarium toxins, such as deoxynivalenol-3-O-β-d-glucoside (DON-3G), often cooccur with their parental toxins in cereal-based food and feed. To date, only limited information exists on the occurrence of glucosylated mycotoxins and their toxicological relevance. Due to a lack of analytical standards and the requirement of high-end analytical instrumentation for their direct determination, hydrolytic cleavage of β-glucosides followed by analysis of the released parental toxins has been proposed as an indirect determination approach. This study compares the abilities of several fungal and recombinant bacterial β-glucosidases to hydrolyze the model analyte DON-3G. Furthermore, substrate specificities of two fungal and two bacterial (Lactobacillus brevis and Bifidobacterium adolescentis) glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-glucosidases were evaluated on a broader range of substrates. The purified recombinant enzyme from B. adolescentis (BaBgl) displayed high flexibility in substrate specificity and exerted the highest hydrolytic activity toward 3-O-β-d-glucosides of the trichothecenes deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol, and HT-2 toxin. A Km of 5.4 mM and a Vmax of 16 μmol min−1 mg−1 were determined with DON-3G. Due to low product inhibition (DON and glucose) and sufficient activity in several extracts of cereal matrices, this enzyme has the potential to be used for indirect analyses of trichothecene-β-glucosides in cereal samples. PMID:25979885

  2. Biochemical characterization of Aspergillus oryzae native tannase and the recombinant enzyme expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Shiono, Yoshihito; Koseki, Takuya

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the biochemical properties of the recombinant tannase from Aspegillus oryzae were compared with those of the native enzyme. Extracellular native tannase was purified from a commercial enzyme source. Recombinant tannase highly expressed in Pichia pastoris was prepared as an active extracellular protein. Purified native and recombinant tannases produced smeared bands with apparent molecular masses of 45-80 kDa and 45-75 kDa, respectively, by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After N-deglycosylation, the native enzyme yielded molecular masses of 33 kDa and 30 kDa, whereas the recombinant enzyme yielded molecular masses of 34 kDa and 30 kDa. Purified native and recombinant tannases had an optimum pH of 4.0-5.0 and 5.0, respectively, and were stable up to 40°C. After N-deglycosylation, both enzymes exhibited reduced thermostability. Catalytic efficiencies of both purified enzymes were greater with natural substrates, such as (-)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallates, than those with synthetic substrates, such as methyl, ethyl, and propyl gallates. However, there were no activities against the methyl esters of ferulic, p-coumaric, caffeic, and sinapic acids, which indicate feruloyl esterase activity, or the ethyl, propyl, and butyl esters of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, which indicate paraben hydrolase activity. PMID:24856589

  3. Immunogenicity of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum SERA proteins in rodents.

    PubMed

    Barr, P J; Inselburg, J; Green, K M; Kansopon, J; Hahm, B K; Gibson, H L; Lee-Ng, C T; Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Bathurst, I C

    1991-03-01

    We have expressed defined regions of the serine-repeat antigen (SERA) of the Honduras-1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Amino-terminal domains of the natural SERA protein have been shown previously to be targets for parasite-inhibitory murine monoclonal antibodies. Two recombinant SERA antigens were selected for purification and immunological analysis. The first (SERA 1), corresponding to amino acids 24-285 of the natural SERA precursor, was expressed by the ubiquitin fusion method. This allowed for in vivo cleavage by endogenous yeast ubiquitin hydrolase, and subsequent isolation of the mature polypeptide. The second, larger protein (SERA N), encompassing amino acids 24-506, was expressed at only low levels using this system, but could be isolated in high yields when fused to human gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN). Each purified protein was used to immunize mice with either Freund's adjuvant or a muramyl tripeptide adjuvant that has been used in humans. Sera from immunized mice were shown to be capable of in vitro inhibition of invasion of erythrocytes by the Honduras-1 strain of P. falciparum. The results suggest that a recombinant SERA antigen may be an effective component of a candidate malaria vaccine. PMID:2052035

  4. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  5. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  6. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  7. Oligonucleotide recombination in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Today, there are more than 1,500 completed or draft bacterial genome sequences available for public access. To functionally analyze these genomes and to test the hypotheses that are generated from the sequence information we require new and generically useful tools. Recombineering (genetic engineer...

  8. The Activation of Phytophthora Effector Avr3b by Plant Cyclophilin is Required for the Nudix Hydrolase Activity of Avr3b

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Jing, Maofeng; Huang, Jie; Yang, Jin; Xia, Yeqiang; Kong, Liang; Ye, Wenwu; Xiong, Qin; Qiao, Yongli; Dong, Suomeng; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogens secrete an arsenal of effector proteins to impair host immunity. Some effectors possess enzymatic activities that can modify their host targets. Previously, we demonstrated that a Phytophthora sojae RXLR effector Avr3b acts as a Nudix hydrolase when expressed in planta; and this enzymatic activity is required for full virulence of P. sojae strain P6497 in soybean (Glycine max). Interestingly, recombinant Avr3b produced by E. coli does not have the hydrolase activity unless it was incubated with plant protein extracts. Here, we report the activation of Avr3b by a prolyl-peptidyl isomerase (PPIase), cyclophilin, in plant cells. Avr3b directly interacts with soybean cyclophilin GmCYP1, which activates the hydrolase activity of Avr3b in a PPIase activity-dependent manner. Avr3b contains a putative Glycine-Proline (GP) motif; which is known to confer cyclophilin-binding in other protein substrates. Substitution of the Proline (P132) in the putative GP motif impaired the interaction of Avr3b with GmCYP1; as a result, the mutant Avr3bP132A can no longer be activated by GmCYP1, and is also unable to promote Phytophthora infection. Avr3b elicits hypersensitive response (HR) in soybean cultivars producing the resistance protein Rps3b, but Avr3bP132A lost its ability to trigger HR. Furthermore, silencing of GmCYP1 rendered reduced cell death triggered by Avr3b, suggesting that GmCYP1-mediated Avr3b maturation is also required for Rps3b recognition. Finally, cyclophilins of Nicotiana benthamiana can also interact with Avr3b and activate its enzymatic activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that cyclophilin is a “helper” that activates the enzymatic activity of Avr3b after it is delivered into plant cells; as such, cyclophilin is required for the avirulence and virulence functions of Avr3b. PMID:26317500

  9. Oxidoreductive cellulose depolymerization by the enzymes cellobiose dehydrogenase and glycoside hydrolase 61.

    PubMed

    Langston, James A; Shaghasi, Tarana; Abbate, Eric; Xu, Feng; Vlasenko, Elena; Sweeney, Matt D

    2011-10-01

    Several members of the glycoside hydrolase 61 (GH61) family of proteins have recently been shown to dramatically increase the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass by microbial hydrolytic cellulases. However, purified GH61 proteins have neither demonstrable direct hydrolase activity on various polysaccharide or lignacious components of biomass nor an apparent hydrolase active site. Cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) is a secreted flavocytochrome produced by many cellulose-degrading fungi with no well-understood biological function. Here we demonstrate that the binary combination of Thermoascus aurantiacus GH61A (TaGH61A) and Humicola insolens CDH (HiCDH) cleaves cellulose into soluble, oxidized oligosaccharides. TaGH61A-HiCDH activity on cellulose is shown to be nonredundant with the activities of canonical endocellulase and exocellulase enzymes in microcrystalline cellulose cleavage, and while the combination of TaGH61A and HiCDH cleaves highly crystalline bacterial cellulose, it does not cleave soluble cellodextrins. GH61 and CDH proteins are coexpressed and secreted by the thermophilic ascomycete Thielavia terrestris in response to environmental cellulose, and the combined activities of T. terrestris GH61 and T. terrestris CDH are shown to synergize with T. terrestris cellulose hydrolases in the breakdown of cellulose. The action of GH61 and CDH on cellulose may constitute an important, but overlooked, biological oxidoreductive system that functions in microbial lignocellulose degradation and has applications in industrial biomass utilization. PMID:21821740

  10. Inhibitory activity of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors against human cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Snoeck, R; Andrei, G; Neyts, J; Schols, D; Cools, M; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1993-07-01

    Various acyclic and carbocyclic adenosine analogues, which are apparently targeted at the S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) hydrolase have been reported to inhibit the replication of a number of pox-, rhabdo-, paramyxo-, arena-, and reoviruses. Here we show that this activity spectrum extends to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Of the compounds tested, neplanocin A, 3-deazaneplanocin A, 6'-C-methylneplanocin A and 5'-noraristeromycin were found to be the most potent inhibitors of HCMV replication in vitro. Their 50% inhibitory concentration ranged from 0.05 to 1.35 micrograms/ml. In general, the anti-HCMV activity of the adenosine analogues correlated well with their affinity (Ki) for AdoHcy hydrolase, suggesting that AdoHcy hydrolase may be considered as a target enzyme for anti-HCMV agents. For four compounds (3-deazaneplanocin A, 6'-C-methylneplanocin A (isomers I and II) and 3-deazaadenosine), anti-HCMV potency was greater than could be expected solely from their interaction with AdoHcy hydrolase, suggesting that these compounds may be functioning by an additional mechanism. PMID:8215298

  11. In Silico Investigation of Flavonoids as Potential Trypanosomal Nucleoside Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Christina Hung Hung; Fatima, Ayesha; Gaurav, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis is endemic to 37 countries of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by two related species of Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies suffer from resistance and public accessibility of expensive medicines. Finding safer and effective therapies of natural origin is being extensively explored worldwide. Pentamidine is the only available therapy for inhibiting the P2 adenosine transporter involved in the purine salvage pathway of the trypanosomatids. The objective of the present study is to use computational studies for the investigation of the probable trypanocidal mechanism of flavonoids. Docking experiments were carried out on eight flavonoids of varying level of hydroxylation, namely, flavone, 5-hydroxyflavone, 7-hydroxyflavone, chrysin, apigenin, kaempferol, fisetin, and quercetin. Using AutoDock 4.2, these compounds were tested for their affinity towards inosine-adenosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase and the inosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase, the major enzymes of the purine salvage pathway. Our results showed that all of the eight tested flavonoids showed high affinities for both hydrolases (lowest free binding energy ranging from −10.23 to −7.14 kcal/mol). These compounds, especially the hydroxylated derivatives, could be further studied as potential inhibitors of the nucleoside hydrolases. PMID:26640486

  12. Click-generated triazole ureas as ultrapotent, in vivo-active serine hydrolase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Adibekian, Alexander; Martin, Brent R.; Wang, Chu; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Niessen, Sherry; Hoover, Heather; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    Serine hydrolases (SHs) are a diverse enzyme class representing > 1% of all human proteins. The biological functions for most SHs remain poorly characterized due to a lack of selective inhibitors to probe their activity in living systems. Here, we show that a substantial number of SHs can be irreversibly inactivated by 1,2,3-triazole ureas, which exhibit negligible cross-reactivity with other protein classes. Rapid lead optimization by click chemistry-enabled synthesis and competitive activity-based profiling identified 1,2,3-triazole ureas that selectively inhibit enzymes from diverse branches of the SH superfamily, including peptidases (acyl-peptide hydrolase or APEH), lipases (platelet-activating factor acetylhyrolase-2 or PAFAH2), and uncharacterized hydrolases (α, β-hydrolase 11 or ABHD11), with exceptional potency in cells (sub-nM) and mice (< 1 mg/kg). We show that APEH inhibition leads to accumulation of N-acetylated proteins and promotes proliferation in T-cells. These data designate 1,2,3-triazole ureas as a pharmacologically privileged chemotype for SH inhibition that shows broad activity across the SH class coupled with tunable selectivity for individual enzymes. PMID:21572424

  13. A novel meta-cleavage product hydrolase from Flavobacterium sp. ATCC27551

    SciTech Connect

    Khajamohiddin, Syed; Babu, Pakala Suresh; Chakka, Deviprasanna; Merrick, Mike; Bhaduri, Anirban; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Siddavattam, Dayananda . E-mail: sdsl@uohyd.ernet.in

    2006-12-22

    The organophosphate degrading (opd) gene cluster of plasmid pPDL2 of Flavobacterium sp. ATCC27551 contains a novel open-reading frame, orf243. This was predicted to encode an {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase distantly related to the meta-fission product (MFP) hydrolases such as XylF, PhnD, and CumD. By homology modeling Orf243 has most of the structural features of MFP hydrolases including the characteristic active site catalytic triad. The purified protein (designated MfhA) is a homotetramer and shows similar affinity for 2-hydroxy-6-oxohepta-2,4-dienoate (HOHD), 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde (HMSA), and 2-hydroxy-5-methylmuconic semialdehyde (HMMSA), the meta-fission products of 3-methyl catechol, catechol, and 4-methyl catechol. The unique catalytic properties of MfhA and the presence near its structural gene of cis-elements required for transposition suggest that mfhA has evolved towards encoding a common hydrolase that can act on meta-fission products containing either aldehyde or ketone groups.

  14. Extracellular xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolase production by A. flavus isolates contributes to crop invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates, including some biocontrol agents, and one toxigenic isolate were surveyed for the ability to produce extracellular xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolases. All of the tested isolates displayed good production of endoxylanases when grown on a medium ut...

  15. Proteomic Analysis of a Novel Bacillus Jumbo Phage Revealing Glycoside Hydrolase As Structural Component

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Tailed phages with genomes of larger than 200 kbp are classified as Jumbo phages and exhibited extremely high uncharted diversity. The genomic annotation of Jumbo phage is often disappointing because most of the predicted proteins, including structural proteins, failed to make good hits to the sequences in the databases. In this study, 23 proteins of a novel Bacillus Jumbo phage, vB_BpuM_BpSp, were identified as phage structural proteins by the structural proteome analysis, including 14 proteins of unknown function, 5 proteins with predicted function as structural proteins, a glycoside hydrolase, a Holliday junction resolvase, a RNA-polymerase β-subunit, and a host-coding portal protein, which might be hijacked from the host strain during phage virion assembly. The glycoside hydrolase (Gp255) was identified as phage virion component and was found to interact with the phage baseplate protein. Gp255 shows specific lytic activity against the phage host strain GR8 and has high temperature tolerance. In situ peptidoglycan-hydrolyzing activities analysis revealed that the expressed Gp255 and phage structural proteome exhibited glycoside hydrolysis activity against the tested GR8 cell extracts. This study identified the first functional individual structural glycoside hydrolase in phage virion. The presence of activated glycoside hydrolase in phage virions might facilitate the injection of the phage genome during infection by forming pores on the bacterial cell wall. PMID:27242758

  16. Rehabilitation of faulty kinetic determinations and misassigned glycoside hydrolase family of retaining mechanism ß-xylosidases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We obtained Cx1 from a commercial supplier, whose catalog listed it as a ß-xylosidase of glycoside hydrolase family 43. NMR experiments indicate retention of anomeric configuration in its reaction stereochemistry, opposing the assignment of GH43, which follows an inverting mechanism. Partial protein...

  17. Highly active ß-xylosidases of glycoside hydrolase family 43 operating on natural and artificial substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hemicellulose xylan constitutes a major portion of plant biomass, a renewable feedstock available for conversion to biofuels and other bioproducts. ß-xylosidase operates in the deconstruction of the polysaccharide to fermentable sugars. Glycoside hydrolase family 43 has been identified as a so...

  18. High-Throughput In Vitro Glycoside Hydrolase (HIGH) Screening for Enzyme Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Hess, Matthias; Dana, Craig M.; Baer, Zachary; Sczyrba, Alexander; Rubin, Edward M.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2011-09-16

    A high-throughput protein-expression and screening method (HIGH method, see picture) provides a rapid approach to the discovery of active glycoside hydrolases in environmental samples. Finally, HIGH screening combines cloning, protein expression, and enzyme hydrolysis in one pot; thus, the entire process from gene expression to activity detection requires only three hours.

  19. BIODEGRADATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES BY SURFACE-EXPRESSED ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) was displayed and anchored onto the surface of
    Escherichia coli using an Lpp-OmpA fusion system. Production of the fusion proteins in membrane
    fractions was verified by immunoblotting with OmpA antisera. inclusion of the organophosphorus
    ...

  20. ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE-BASED AMPEROMETRIC SENSOR: MODULATION OF SENSITIVITY AND SUBSTRATE SELECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detection of organophosphate (OP) insecticides with nitrophenyl substituents is reported using an enzyme electrode composed of Organophosphorus Hydrolase (OPH) and albumin co-immobilized to a nylon net and attached to a carbon paste electrode. The mechanism for this biosen...

  1. Epoxide hydrolase activities and epoxy fatty acids in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiawen; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Mamatha, Dadala M.

    2015-01-01

    Culex mosquitoes have emerged as important model organisms for mosquito biology, and are disease vectors for multiple mosquito-borne pathogens, including West Nile virus. We characterized epoxide hydrolase activities in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, which suggested multiple forms of epoxide hydrolases were present. We found EH activities on epoxy eicosatrienoic acids (EETs). EETs and other eicosanoids are well-established lipid signaling molecules in vertebrates. We showed EETs can be synthesized in vitro from arachidonic acids by mosquito lysate, and EETs were also detected in vivo both in larvae and adult mosquitoes by LC-MS/MS. The EH activities on EETs can be induced by blood feeding, and the highest activity was observed in the midgut of female mosquitoes. The enzyme activities on EETs can be inhibited by urea-based inhibitors designed for mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases (sEH). The sEH inhibitors have been shown to play diverse biological roles in mammalian systems, and they can be useful tools to study the function of EETs in mosquitoes. Besides juvenile hormone metabolism and detoxification, insect epoxide hydrolases may also play a role in regulating lipid signaling molecules, such as EETs and other epoxy fatty acids, synthesized in vivo or obtained from blood feeding by female mosquitoes. PMID:25686802

  2. Proteomic Analysis of a Novel Bacillus Jumbo Phage Revealing Glycoside Hydrolase As Structural Component.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Tailed phages with genomes of larger than 200 kbp are classified as Jumbo phages and exhibited extremely high uncharted diversity. The genomic annotation of Jumbo phage is often disappointing because most of the predicted proteins, including structural proteins, failed to make good hits to the sequences in the databases. In this study, 23 proteins of a novel Bacillus Jumbo phage, vB_BpuM_BpSp, were identified as phage structural proteins by the structural proteome analysis, including 14 proteins of unknown function, 5 proteins with predicted function as structural proteins, a glycoside hydrolase, a Holliday junction resolvase, a RNA-polymerase β-subunit, and a host-coding portal protein, which might be hijacked from the host strain during phage virion assembly. The glycoside hydrolase (Gp255) was identified as phage virion component and was found to interact with the phage baseplate protein. Gp255 shows specific lytic activity against the phage host strain GR8 and has high temperature tolerance. In situ peptidoglycan-hydrolyzing activities analysis revealed that the expressed Gp255 and phage structural proteome exhibited glycoside hydrolysis activity against the tested GR8 cell extracts. This study identified the first functional individual structural glycoside hydrolase in phage virion. The presence of activated glycoside hydrolase in phage virions might facilitate the injection of the phage genome during infection by forming pores on the bacterial cell wall. PMID:27242758

  3. Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome cycle is a complex, non-lysosomal biochemical process for intracellular protein degradation. This process involves many enzymes. One of them is ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCT). In this report, we cloned, sequenced and characterized the channel catfish UCT L5 cDNA....

  4. Acylpeptide hydrolase: inhibitors and some active site residues of the human enzyme.

    PubMed

    Scaloni, A; Jones, W M; Barra, D; Pospischil, M; Sassa, S; Popowicz, A; Manning, L R; Schneewind, O; Manning, J M

    1992-02-25

    Acylpeptide hydrolase may be involved in N-terminal deacetylation of nascent polypeptide chains and of bioactive peptides. The activity of this enzyme from human erythrocytes is sensitive to anions such as chloride, nitrate, and fluoride. Furthermore, blocked amino acids act as competitive inhibitors of the enzyme. Acetyl leucine chloromethyl ketone has been employed to identify one active site residue as His-707. Diisopropylfluorophosphate has been used to identify a second active site residue as Ser-587. Chemical modification studies with a water-soluble carbodiimide implicate a carboxyl group in catalytic activity. These results and the sequence around these active site residues, especially near Ser-587, suggest that acylpeptide hydrolase contains a catalytic triad. The presence of a cysteine residue in the vicinity of the active site is suggested by the inactivation of the enzyme by sulfhydryl-modifying agents and also by a low amount of modification by the peptide chloromethyl ketone inhibitor. Ebelactone A, an inhibitor of the formyl aminopeptidase, the bacterial counterpart of eukaryotic acylpeptide hydrolase, was found to be an effective inhibitor of this enzyme. These findings suggest that acylpeptidase hydrolase is a member of a family of enzymes with extremely diverse functions. PMID:1740429

  5. Functional characterization and structural modeling of synthetic polyester-degrading hydrolases from Thermomonospora curvata

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata is a thermophilic actinomycete phylogenetically related to Thermobifida fusca that produces extracellular hydrolases capable of degrading synthetic polyesters. Analysis of the genome of T. curvata DSM43183 revealed two genes coding for putative polyester hydrolases Tcur1278 and Tcur0390 sharing 61% sequence identity with the T. fusca enzymes. Mature proteins of Tcur1278 and Tcur0390 were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli TOP10. Tcur1278 and Tcur0390 exhibited an optimal reaction temperature against p-nitrophenyl butyrate at 60°C and 55°C, respectively. The optimal pH for both enzymes was determined at pH 8.5. Tcur1278 retained more than 80% and Tcur0390 less than 10% of their initial activity following incubation for 60 min at 55°C. Tcur0390 showed a higher hydrolytic activity against poly(ε-caprolactone) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanoparticles compared to Tcur1278 at reaction temperatures up to 50°C. At 55°C and 60°C, hydrolytic activity against PET nanoparticles was only detected with Tcur1278. In silico modeling of the polyester hydrolases and docking with a model substrate composed of two repeating units of PET revealed the typical fold of α/β serine hydrolases with an exposed catalytic triad. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the superior thermal stability of Tcur1278 considered as the main reason for its higher hydrolytic activity on PET. PMID:25405080

  6. A novel activity of microsomal epoxide hydrolase: metabolism of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol

    PubMed Central

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Endsley, Michael P.; Pfeiffer, Adam W.; Falck, John R.; Campbell, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1, EC 3.3.2.9) is a highly abundant α/β-hydrolase enzyme that is known for its catalytical epoxide hydrolase activity. A wide range of EPHX1 functions have been demonstrated including xenobiotic metabolism; however, characterization of its endogenous substrates is limited. In this study, we present evidence that EPHX1 metabolizes the abundant endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to free arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol. The EPHX1 metabolism of 2-AG was demonstrated using commercially available EPHX1 microsomes as well as PC-3 cells overexpressing EPHX1. Conversely, EPHX1 siRNA markedly reduced the EPHX1 expression and 2-AG metabolism in HepG2 cells and LNCaP cells. A selective EPHX1 inhibitor, 10-hydroxystearamide, inhibited 2-AG metabolism and hydrolysis of a well-known EPHX1 substrate, cis-stilbene oxide. Among the inhibitors studied, a serine hydrolase inhibitor, methoxy-arachidonyl fluorophosphate, was the most potent inhibitor of 2-AG metabolism by EPHX1 microsomes. These results demonstrate that 2-AG is an endogenous substrate for EPHX1, a potential role of EPHX1 in the endocannabinoid signaling and a new AA biosynthetic pathway. PMID:24958911

  7. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  8. Different types of dienelactone hydrolase in 4-fluorobenzoate-utilizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Schlömann, M; Schmidt, E; Knackmuss, H J

    1990-01-01

    Of various benzoate-utilizing bacteria tested, Alcaligenes eutrophus 335, A. eutrophus H16, A. eutrophus JMP222, A. eutrophus JMP134, Alcaligenes strain A7, and Pseudomonas cepacia were able to grow with 4-fluorobenzoate as the sole source of carbon and energy. P. cepacia also utilizes 3-fluorobenzoate. Except for A. eutrophus JMP134, which is known to grow with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate and 3-chlorobenzoate (R. H. Don and J. M. Pemberton, J. Bacteriol. 145:681-686, 1981), the strains were unable to grow at the expense of these compounds or 4-chlorobenzoate. Assays of cell extracts revealed that all strains express dienelactone hydrolase and maleylacetate reductase activities in addition to enzymes of the catechol branch of the 3-oxoadipate pathway when growing with 4-fluorobenzoate. Induction of dienelactone hydrolase and maleylacetate reductase apparently is not necessarily connected to synthesis of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase type II and chloromuconate cycloisomerase activities, which are indispensable for the degradation of chlorocatechols. Substrate specificities of the dienelactone hydrolases provisionally differentiate among three types of this activity. (i) Extracts of A. eutrophus 335, A. eutrophus H16, A. eutrophus JMP222, and Alcaligenes strain A7 convert trans-4-carboxymethylenebut-2-en-4-olide (trans-dienelactone) much faster than the cis-isomer (type I). (ii) The enzyme present in P. cepacia shows the opposite preference for the isomeric substrates (type II). (iii) Cell extracts of A. eutrophus JMP134, as well as purified dienelactone hydrolase from Pseudomonas strain B13 (E. Schmidt and H.-J. Knackmuss, Biochem. J. 192:339-347, 1980), hydrolyze both dienelactones at rates that are of the same order of magnitude (type III). This classification implies that A. eutrophus JMP134 possesses at least two different dienelactone hydrolases, one of type III encoded by the plasmid pJP4 and one of type I, which is also present in the cured strain JMP222. PMID

  9. Characteristics, protein engineering and applications of microbial thermostable pullulanases and pullulan hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2016-07-01

    Pullulan hydrolyzing enzymes are endoacting, classified based on the substrate specificity and hydrolysis products as pullulanases (type I and II) and pullulan hydrolases (type I, II and III). Pullulanases and pullulan hydrolase type I are produced by bacteria and archaea. Among bacteria, many mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic bacteria produce pullulanases and neopullulanases. While pullulan hydrolase type II and type III are produced by fungi and archaea, respectively. These are multi-domain proteins with three conserved catalytic acidic residues of the glycosyl hydrolases. The recent advances in molecular biology and protein engineering via mutagenesis and truncation led to improvement in thermostability, catalytic activity and substrate specificity. Pullulanases are debranching enzymes, which are widely employed in starch saccharification that minimizes the use of glucoamylase (approx. 50 %) and reduces the total reaction time of the industrial starch conversion process. The thermostable amylopullulanases are useful in one-step starch liquefaction and saccharification, which replaces amylolytic enzymes like α-amylase and glucoamylase, thus resulting in the reduction in the cost of sugar production. The enzymes also find application in making resistant starches and as an antistale in bread making. Panose and isopanose containing syrups are useful as prebiotics, while panose has also been reported to display anticarcinogenic activity. This review focuses on the distinguishing features of these enzymes based on the analysis of amino acid sequences and domain structure, besides highlighting recent advances in the molecular biology and protein engineering for enhancing their thermostability, catalytic activity and substrate specificity. This review also briefly summarizes the potential applications of pullulanases and pullulan hydrolases. PMID:27142298

  10. Cell- and ligand-specific dephosphorylation of acid hydrolases: Evidence that the mannose 6-phosphatase is controlled by compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect

    Einstein, R.; Gabel, C.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Mouse L cells that possess the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (Man 6-P)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II receptor change the extent to which they dephosphorylate endocytosed acid hydrolases in response to serum. To investigate the mechanism by which dephosphorylation competence is regulated, the dephosphorylation of individual acid hydrolases was studied in Man 6-P/IGF II receptor-positive and -deficient cell lines. 125I-labeled Man 6-P-containing acid hydrolases were proteolytically processed but remained phosphorylated when endocytosed by receptor-positive L cells maintained in the absence of serum; after the addition of serum, however, the cell-associated hydrolases were dephosphorylated. Individual hydrolases were dephosphorylated at distinct rates and to different extents. In contrast, the same hydrolases were dephosphorylated equally and completely after entry into Man 6-P/IGF II receptor-positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The dephosphorylation competence of Man 6-P/IGF II receptor-deficient mouse J774 cells was more limited. beta-Glucuronidase produced by these cells underwent a limited dephosphorylation in transit to lysosomes such that diphosphorylated oligosaccharides were converted to monophosphorylated species. The overall quantity of phosphorylated oligosaccharides associated with the enzyme, however, did not decrease within the lysosomal compartment. Likewise, beta-glucuronidase was not dephosphorylated when introduced into J774 cells via Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis. The CHO and J774 cell lysosomes, therefore, display opposite extremes with respect to their capacity to dephosphorylate acid hydrolases; within CHO cell lysosomes acid hydrolases are rapidly and efficiently dephosphorylated, but within J774 cell lysosomes the same acid hydrolases remain phosphorylated.

  11. Cloning and identification of novel hydrolase genes from a dairy cow rumen metagenomic library and characterization of a cellulase gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Interest in cellulose degrading enzymes has increased in recent years due to the expansion of the cellulosic biofuel industry. The rumen is a highly adapted environment for the degradation of cellulose and a promising source of enzymes for industrial use. To identify cellulase enzymes that may be of such use we have undertaken a functional metagenomic screen to identify cellulase enzymes from the bacterial community in the rumen of a grass-hay fed dairy cow. Results Twenty five clones specifying cellulose activity were identified. Subcloning and sequence analysis of a subset of these hydrolase-positive clones identified 10 endoglucanase genes. Preliminary characterization of the encoded cellulases was carried out using crude extracts of each of the subclones. Zymogram analysis using carboxymethylcellulose as a substrate showed a single positive band for each subclone, confirming that only one functional cellulase gene was present in each. One cellulase gene, designated Cel14b22, was expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli and purified for further characterization. The purified recombinant enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 6.0 and 50°C. It was stable over a broad pH range, from pH 4.0 to 10.0. The activity was significantly enhanced by Mn2+ and dramatically reduced by Fe3+ or Cu2+. The enzyme hydrolyzed a wide range of beta-1,3-, and beta-1,4-linked polysaccharides, with varying activities. Activities toward microcrystalline cellulose and filter paper were relatively high, while the highest activity was toward Oat Gum. Conclusion The present study shows that a functional metagenomic approach can be used to isolate previously uncharacterized cellulases from the rumen environment. PMID:23062472

  12. Cel5I, a SLH-Containing Glycoside Hydrolase: Characterization and Investigation on Its Role in Ruminiclostridium cellulolyticum.

    PubMed

    Franche, Nathalie; Tardif, Chantal; Ravachol, Julie; Harchouni, Seddik; Ferdinand, Pierre-Henri; Borne, Romain; Fierobe, Henri-Pierre; Perret, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Ruminiclostridium cellulolyticum (Clostridium cellulolyticum) is a mesophilic cellulolytic anaerobic bacterium that produces a multi-enzymatic system composed of cellulosomes and non-cellulosomal enzymes to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides. We characterized one of the non-cellulosomal enzymes, Cel5I, composed of a Family-5 Glycoside Hydrolase catalytic module (GH5), a tandem of Family-17 and -28 Carbohydrate Binding Modules (CBM), and three S-layer homologous (SLH) modules, where the latter are expected to anchor the protein on the cell surface. Cel5I is the only putative endoglucanase targeting the cell surface as well as the only putative protein in R. cellulolyticum containing CBM17 and/or CBM28 modules. We characterized different recombinant structural variants from Cel5I. We showed that Cel5I has an affinity for insoluble cellulosic substrates through its CBMs, that it is the most active endoglucanase on crystalline cellulose of R. cellulolyticum characterized to date and mostly localized in the cell envelope of R. cellulolyticum. Its role in vivo was analyzed using a R. cellulolyticum cel5I mutant strain. Absence of Cel5I in the cell envelope did not lead to a significant variation of the phenotype compared to the wild type strain. Neither in terms of cell binding to cellulose, nor for its growth on crystalline cellulose, thus indicating that the protein has a rather subtle role in tested conditions. Cel5I might be more important in a natural environment, at low concentration of degradable glucose polymers, where its role might be to generate higher concentration of short cellodextrins close to the cell surface, facilitating their uptake or for signalization purpose. PMID:27501457

  13. Purification, characterization, and molecular cloning of a novel keratan sulfate hydrolase, endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, from Bacillus circulans.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Kiwamu; Suzuki, Kiyoshi; Imai, Kyoko; Mochizuki, Hideo; Morikawa, Kiyoshi; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Kimata, Koji; Watanabe, Hideto

    2003-07-11

    Keratan sulfate (KS) is degraded by various enzymes including endo-beta-galactosidase, keratanase, and keratanase II, which are used for the structural analysis of KS. We purified a novel KS hydrolase, endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, from the cell pellet and conditioned medium of Bacillus circulans, by sequential chromatography using DE52 and phenyl-Sepharose columns with approximately 63- and 180-fold purity and 58 and 12.5% recovery, respectively. Like keratanase II of Bacillus sp. Ks36, the enzyme, designated Bc keratanase II, hydrolyzed KS between the 4GlcNAcbeta1-3Gal1 structure (endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase), but not hyaluronan, heparan sulfate, heparin, and chondroitin sulfate C, demonstrating a strict specificity to KS. The enzyme digested shark cartilage KS to disaccharides and tetrasaccharides and bovine cornea KS to hexasaccharide, indicating that it prefers highly sulfated KS. Distinct from keratanase II of strain Ks36, the enzyme digested shark cartilage KS at an optimal temperature of 55 degrees C. Based on partial peptide sequencing of the enzyme, we molecularly cloned the gene, which encodes a protein with a predicted molecular mass of approximately 200 kDa. From the deduced protein sequence, Bc keratanase II contained a domain at the C terminus, homologous to the S-layer-like domain of pullulanase from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes and endoxylanase from Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum, and a carbohydrate-binding domain, which may serve to specifically recognize KS chains. A full-length recombinant enzyme showed keratanase II activity. These results may prove useful for the structural analysis of KS toward achieving an understanding of its function. PMID:12732618

  14. The Details of Glycolipid Glycan Hydrolysis by the Structural Analysis of a Family 123 Glycoside Hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Noach, Ilit; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Laurie, Cassandra; Abe, Kento T; Alteen, Matthew G; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2016-08-14

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen of humans and animals whose genome encodes a wide variety of putative carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes that are increasingly being shown to be directed toward the cleavage of host glycans. Among these putative enzymes is a member of glycoside hydrolase family 123. Here we show that the recombinant enzyme (referred to as CpNga123) encoded by the gene cloned from C. perfringens strain ATCC 13124 (locus tag CPF_1473) is a β-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, similar to NgaP from Paenibacillus sp. TS12. Like NgaP, CpNga123 was able to cleave the terminal β-D-GalNAc-(1→4)-D-Gal and β-D-GalNAc-(1→3)-D-Gal motifs that would be found in glycosphigolipids. The X-ray crystal structure of CpNga123 revealed it to have an N-terminal β-sandwich domain and a (β/α)8-barrel catalytic domain with a C-terminal α-helical elaboration. The structures determined in complex with reaction products provide details of the -1 subsite architecture, catalytic residues, and a structural change in the active site that is likely required to enable hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond by promoting engagement of the substrate by the catalytic residues. The features of the active site support the likelihood of a substrate-assisted catalytic mechanism for this enzyme. The structures of an inactive mutant of CpNga123 in complex with intact GA2 and Gb4 glycosphingolipid motifs reveal insight into aglycon recognition and suggest that the kinked or pleated conformation of GA2 caused by the β-1,4-linkage between N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose, and the accommodation of this conformation by the enzyme active site, may be responsible for greater activity on GA2. PMID:27038508

  15. Stereochemical features of the hydrolysis of 9,10-epoxystearic acid catalysed by plant and mammalian epoxide hydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Summerer, Stephan; Hanano, Abdulsamie; Utsumi, Shigeru; Arand, Michael; Schuber, Francis; Blée, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid was used as a tool to probe the active sites of epoxide hydrolases (EHs) of mammalian and plant origin. We have compared the stereochemical features of the hydrolysis of this substrate catalysed by soluble and membrane-bound rat liver EHs, by soluble EH (purified to apparent homogeneity) obtained from maize seedlings or celeriac roots, and by recombinant soybean EH expressed in yeast. Plant EHs were found to differ in their enantioselectivity, i.e. their ability to discriminate between the two enantiomers of 9,10-epoxystearic acid. For example, while the maize enzyme hydrated both enantiomers at the same rate, the EH from soybean exhibited very high enantioselectivity in favour of 9R,10S-epoxystearic acid. This latter enzyme also exhibited a strict stereoselectivity, i.e. it hydrolysed the racemic substrate with a very high enantioconvergence, yielding a single chiral diol product, threo-9R,10R-dihydroxystearic acid. Soybean EH shared these distinctive stereochemical features with the membrane-bound rat liver EH. The stereochemical outcome of these enzymes probably results from a stereoselective attack by the nucleophilic residue on the oxirane ring carbon having the (S)-configuration, leading to the presumed (in plant EH) covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. In sharp contrast, the reactions catalysed by cytosolic rat liver EH exhibited a complete absence of enantioselectivity and enantioconvergence; this latter effect might be ascribed to a regioselective formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate involving C-10 of 9,10-epoxystearic acid, independent of its configuration. Thus, compared with soybean EH, the active site of rat liver soluble EH displays a very distinct means of anchoring the oxirane ring of the fatty acid epoxides, and therefore appears to be a poor model for mapping the catalytic domain of plant EHs. PMID:12020347

  16. Functional Diversity of Four Glycoside Hydrolase Family 3 Enzymes from the Rumen Bacterium Prevotella bryantii B14 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Dylan; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac K. O.

    2010-01-01

    Prevotella bryantii B14 is a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes and contributes to the degradation of hemicellulose in the rumen. The genome of P. bryantii harbors four genes predicted to encode glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 3 (GH3) enzymes. To evaluate whether these genes encode enzymes with redundant biological functions, each gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant proteins revealed that the enzymes exhibit different substrate specificities. One gene encoded a cellodextrinase (CdxA), and three genes encoded β-xylosidase enzymes (Xyl3A, Xyl3B, and Xyl3C) with different specificities for either para-nitrophenyl (pNP)-linked substrates or substituted xylooligosaccharides. To identify the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity within this family of enzymes, the roles of conserved residues (R177, K214, H215, M251, and D286) in Xyl3B were probed by site-directed mutagenesis. Each mutation led to a severely decreased catalytic efficiency without a change in the overall structure of the mutant enzymes. Through amino acid sequence alignments, an amino acid residue (E115) that, when mutated to aspartic acid, resulted in a 14-fold decrease in the kcat/Km for pNP-β-d-xylopyranoside (pNPX) with a concurrent 1.1-fold increase in the kcat/Km for pNP-β-d-glucopyranoside (pNPG) was identified. Amino acid residue E115 may therefore contribute to the discrimination between β-xylosides and β-glucosides. Our results demonstrate that each of the four GH3 enzymes has evolved to perform a specific role in lignopolysaccharide hydrolysis and provide insight into the role of active-site residues in catalysis and substrate specificity for GH3 enzymes. PMID:20190048

  17. Stereochemical features of the hydrolysis of 9,10-epoxystearic acid catalysed by plant and mammalian epoxide hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Summerer, Stephan; Hanano, Abdulsamie; Utsumi, Shigeru; Arand, Michael; Schuber, Francis; Blée, Elizabeth

    2002-09-01

    cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid was used as a tool to probe the active sites of epoxide hydrolases (EHs) of mammalian and plant origin. We have compared the stereochemical features of the hydrolysis of this substrate catalysed by soluble and membrane-bound rat liver EHs, by soluble EH (purified to apparent homogeneity) obtained from maize seedlings or celeriac roots, and by recombinant soybean EH expressed in yeast. Plant EHs were found to differ in their enantioselectivity, i.e. their ability to discriminate between the two enantiomers of 9,10-epoxystearic acid. For example, while the maize enzyme hydrated both enantiomers at the same rate, the EH from soybean exhibited very high enantioselectivity in favour of 9R,10S-epoxystearic acid. This latter enzyme also exhibited a strict stereoselectivity, i.e. it hydrolysed the racemic substrate with a very high enantioconvergence, yielding a single chiral diol product, threo-9R,10R-dihydroxystearic acid. Soybean EH shared these distinctive stereochemical features with the membrane-bound rat liver EH. The stereochemical outcome of these enzymes probably results from a stereoselective attack by the nucleophilic residue on the oxirane ring carbon having the (S)-configuration, leading to the presumed (in plant EH) covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. In sharp contrast, the reactions catalysed by cytosolic rat liver EH exhibited a complete absence of enantioselectivity and enantioconvergence; this latter effect might be ascribed to a regioselective formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate involving C-10 of 9,10-epoxystearic acid, independent of its configuration. Thus, compared with soybean EH, the active site of rat liver soluble EH displays a very distinct means of anchoring the oxirane ring of the fatty acid epoxides, and therefore appears to be a poor model for mapping the catalytic domain of plant EHs. PMID:12020347

  18. Cel5I, a SLH-Containing Glycoside Hydrolase: Characterization and Investigation on Its Role in Ruminiclostridium cellulolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Franche, Nathalie; Tardif, Chantal; Ravachol, Julie; Harchouni, Seddik; Ferdinand, Pierre-Henri; Borne, Romain; Fierobe, Henri-Pierre; Perret, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Ruminiclostridium cellulolyticum (Clostridium cellulolyticum) is a mesophilic cellulolytic anaerobic bacterium that produces a multi-enzymatic system composed of cellulosomes and non-cellulosomal enzymes to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides. We characterized one of the non-cellulosomal enzymes, Cel5I, composed of a Family-5 Glycoside Hydrolase catalytic module (GH5), a tandem of Family-17 and -28 Carbohydrate Binding Modules (CBM), and three S-layer homologous (SLH) modules, where the latter are expected to anchor the protein on the cell surface. Cel5I is the only putative endoglucanase targeting the cell surface as well as the only putative protein in R. cellulolyticum containing CBM17 and/or CBM28 modules. We characterized different recombinant structural variants from Cel5I. We showed that Cel5I has an affinity for insoluble cellulosic substrates through its CBMs, that it is the most active endoglucanase on crystalline cellulose of R. cellulolyticum characterized to date and mostly localized in the cell envelope of R. cellulolyticum. Its role in vivo was analyzed using a R. cellulolyticum cel5I mutant strain. Absence of Cel5I in the cell envelope did not lead to a significant variation of the phenotype compared to the wild type strain. Neither in terms of cell binding to cellulose, nor for its growth on crystalline cellulose, thus indicating that the protein has a rather subtle role in tested conditions. Cel5I might be more important in a natural environment, at low concentration of degradable glucose polymers, where its role might be to generate higher concentration of short cellodextrins close to the cell surface, facilitating their uptake or for signalization purpose. PMID:27501457

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Two Persimmon Xyloglucan Endotransglycosylase/Hydrolase (XTH) Genes That Have Divergent Functions in Cell Wall Modification and Fruit Postharvest Softening

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Ban, Qiuyan; Hou, Yali; Meng, Kun; Suo, Jiangtao; Rao, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Fruit cell wall modification is the primary factor affecting fruit softening. Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), a cell wall-modifying enzyme, is involved in fruit softening. In this study, two novel XTH genes (DkXTH6 and DkXTH7) were identified from persimmon fruit. Transcriptional profiles of both of the two genes were analyzed in different tissues of persimmon, and in response to multiple hormonal and environmental treatments [gibberellic acid (GA3), abscisic acid (ABA), propylene, and low temperature]. Expression of DkXTH6 was positively up-regulated during ethylene production and by propylene and ABA treatments, and suppressed by GA3 and cold treatment. In contrast, DkXTH7 exhibited its highest transcript levels in GA3-treated fruit and cold-treated fruit, which had higher fruit firmness. We found that DkXTH6 protein was localized in cell wall by its signal peptide, while cytoplasmic DkXTH7 protein contained no signal peptide. When expressed in vitro, the recombinant proteins of both DkXTH6 and DkXTH7 exhibited strict xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) activity but no xyloglucan endohydrolase (XEH) activity. The recombinant protein of DkXTH6 showed a higher affinity with small acceptor molecules than the recombinant DkXTH7. Taken together with their opposing expression patterns and subcellular localizations, these results suggested that DkXTH6 might take part in cell wall restructuring and DkXTH7 was likely to be involved in cell wall assembly, indicating their special roles in persimmon fruit softening. PMID:27242828

  20. Human α/β hydrolase domain containing 10 (ABHD10) is responsible enzyme for deglucuronidation of mycophenolic acid acyl-glucuronide in liver.

    PubMed

    Iwamura, Atsushi; Fukami, Tatsuki; Higuchi, Ryota; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-03-16

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active metabolite of the immunosuppressant mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), is primarily metabolized by glucuronidation to a phenolic glucuronide (MPAG) and an acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG). It is known that AcMPAG, which may be an immunotoxic metabolite, is deglucuronidated in human liver. However, it has been reported that recombinant β-glucuronidase does not catalyze this reaction. AcMPAG deglucuronidation activity was detected in both human liver cytosol (HLC) and microsomes (HLM). In this study, the enzyme responsible for AcMPAG deglucuronidation was identified by purification from HLC with column chromatographic purification steps. The purified enzyme was identified as α/β hydrolase domain containing 10 (ABHD10) by amino acid sequence analysis. Recombinant ABHD10 expressed in Sf9 cells efficiently deglucuronidated AcMPAG with a K(m) value of 100.7 ± 10.2 μM, which was similar to those in HLM, HLC, and human liver homogenates (HLH). Immunoblot analysis revealed ABHD10 protein expression in both HLC and HLM. The AcMPAG deglucuronidation by recombinant ABHD10, HLC, and HLH were potently inhibited by AgNO(3), CdCl(2), CuCl(2), PMSF, bis-p-nitrophenylphosphate, and DTNB. The CL(int) value of AcMPAG formation from MPA, which was catalyzed by human UGT2B7, in HLH was increased by 1.8-fold in the presence of PMSF. Thus, human ABHD10 would affect the formation of AcMPAG, the immunotoxic metabolite. PMID:22294686

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Two Persimmon Xyloglucan Endotransglycosylase/Hydrolase (XTH) Genes That Have Divergent Functions in Cell Wall Modification and Fruit Postharvest Softening.

    PubMed

    Han, Ye; Ban, Qiuyan; Hou, Yali; Meng, Kun; Suo, Jiangtao; Rao, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Fruit cell wall modification is the primary factor affecting fruit softening. Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), a cell wall-modifying enzyme, is involved in fruit softening. In this study, two novel XTH genes (DkXTH6 and DkXTH7) were identified from persimmon fruit. Transcriptional profiles of both of the two genes were analyzed in different tissues of persimmon, and in response to multiple hormonal and environmental treatments [gibberellic acid (GA3), abscisic acid (ABA), propylene, and low temperature]. Expression of DkXTH6 was positively up-regulated during ethylene production and by propylene and ABA treatments, and suppressed by GA3 and cold treatment. In contrast, DkXTH7 exhibited its highest transcript levels in GA3-treated fruit and cold-treated fruit, which had higher fruit firmness. We found that DkXTH6 protein was localized in cell wall by its signal peptide, while cytoplasmic DkXTH7 protein contained no signal peptide. When expressed in vitro, the recombinant proteins of both DkXTH6 and DkXTH7 exhibited strict xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) activity but no xyloglucan endohydrolase (XEH) activity. The recombinant protein of DkXTH6 showed a higher affinity with small acceptor molecules than the recombinant DkXTH7. Taken together with their opposing expression patterns and subcellular localizations, these results suggested that DkXTH6 might take part in cell wall restructuring and DkXTH7 was likely to be involved in cell wall assembly, indicating their special roles in persimmon fruit softening. PMID:27242828

  2. Recombinant vaccines against leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Dellagostin, Odir A; Grassmann, André A; Hartwig, Daiane D; Félix, Samuel R; da Silva, Éverton F; McBride, Alan J A

    2011-11-01

    Leptospirosis is an important neglected infectious disease that occurs in urban environments, as well as in rural regions worldwide. Rodents, the principal reservoir hosts of pathogenic Leptospira spp., and other infected animals shed the bacteria in their urine. During occupational or even recreational activities, humans that come into direct contact with infected animals or with a contaminated environment, particularly water, are at risk of infection. Prevention of urban leptospirosis is largely dependent on sanitation measures that are often difficult to implement, especially in developing countries. Vaccination with inactivated whole-cell preparations (bacterins) has limited efficacy due to the wide antigenic variation of the pathogen. Intensive efforts towards developing improved recombinant vaccines are ongoing. During the last decade, many reports on the evaluation of recombinant vaccines have been published. Partial success has been obtained with some surface-exposed protein antigens. The combination of protective antigens and new adjuvants or delivery systems may result in the much-needed effective vaccine. PMID:22048111

  3. Recombinant influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sedova, E S; Shcherbinin, D N; Migunov, A I; Smirnov, Iu A; Logunov, D Iu; Shmarov, M M; Tsybalova, L M; Naroditskiĭ, B S; Kiselev, O I; Gintsburg, A L

    2012-10-01

    This review covers the problems encountered in the construction and production of new recombinant influenza vaccines. New approaches to the development of influenza vaccines are investigated; they include reverse genetics methods, production of virus-like particles, and DNA- and viral vector-based vaccines. Such approaches as the delivery of foreign genes by DNA- and viral vector-based vaccines can preserve the native structure of antigens. Adenoviral vectors are a promising gene-delivery platform for a variety of genetic vaccines. Adenoviruses can efficiently penetrate the human organism through mucosal epithelium, thus providing long-term antigen persistence and induction of the innate immune response. This review provides an overview of the practicability of the production of new recombinant influenza cross-protective vaccines on the basis of adenoviral vectors expressing hemagglutinin genes of different influenza strains. PMID:23346377

  4. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  5. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  6. Asymmetric fluorogenic organophosphates for the development of active organophosphate hydrolases with reversed stereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Amitai, Gabi; Adani, Rellie; Yacov, Guy; Yishay, Shelly; Teitlboim, Shai; Tveria, Liat; Limanovich, Osnat; Kushnir, Moshe; Meshulam, Haim

    2007-04-20

    In order to enhance the enzymatic detoxification rate of organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents we have searched for more active variants of recombinant mammalian paraoxonase (PON1). We have previously identified three key positions in PON1 that affect OP hydrolysis: Leu69, Val346 and His115, that significantly enhance the hydrolysis of cyclosarin (GF), soman, chlorpyrifos-oxon (ChPo), O-isopropyl-O-(p-nitrophenyl)methylphosphonate (IMP-pNP) and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). GC/FPD analysis compared to residual AChE inhibition assay displayed stereoselective hydrolysis of GF, soman and IMP-pNP, indicating that wild type PON1 and its variant V346A are more active toward the less toxic P(+) optical isomer. In order to obtain new PON1 variants with reversed stereoselectivity, displaying augmented activity toward the more toxic isomer P(-) of nerve agents, we synthesized new asymmetric fluorogenic OPs (Flu-OPs). Six Flu-OPs were prepared containing either ethyl (E), cyclohexyl (C) or pinacolyl (P) alkyl radicals attached to methyl-phosphonyl (MP) moiety analogous to the structure of VX, GF and soman, respectively. The fluorescent moieties are either 3-cyano-4-methyl-7-hydroxy coumarin (MeCyC) or 1,3-dichloro-7-hydroxy-9,9-dimethyl-9H-acridin-2-one (DDAO). The kinetics of AChE and BChE inhibition by these new Flu-OPs display k(i) values 8.5x10(4) to 8.5x10(7) and 5x10(4) to 2x10(6)M(-1)min(-1), respectively. EMP-MeCyC and EMP-DDAO are the most active inhibitors of AChE whereas CMP-MeCyC and CMP-DDAO are better inhibitors of BChE than AChE, indicating accommodation of bulky cyclohexyl group inside the active site of BChE. PMP-MeCyC and PMP-DDAO are the least active inhibitors of both AChE and BChE. CMP-MeCyC and CMP-DDAO were significantly detoxified only by the five-site mutations PON1 variant L69V/S138L/S193P/N287D/V346A. Degradation kinetics of Flu-OPs measured by increase in absorbance of the released fluorogenic group was fit by a two exponential function

  7. Subtherapeutic levels of antibiotics in poultry feeds and their effects on weight gain, feed efficiency, and bacterial cholyltaurine hydrolase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Feighner, S D; Dashkevicz, M P

    1987-01-01

    A radiochemical method was developed to estimate cholyltaurine hydrolase potentials and rates of cholyltaurine hydrolysis in chicken intestinal homogenates. This method was used to monitor the effects of antibiotic feed additives on cholyltaurine hydrolase activity. Avoparcin, bacitracin methylenedisalisylic acid, efrotomycin, lincomycin, penicillin G procaine, and virginiamycin improved rate of weight gain and feed conversion of chicks and decreased cholyltaurine hydrolase activity in ileal homogenates relative to those of nonmedicated control birds. The results provided the first evidence that feeding selected antibiotics at subtherapeutic levels can affect bile acid-transforming enzymes in small-intestinal homogenates. The inverse relationship between growth performance and cholyltaurine hydrolase activity raises the possibility that specific inhibitors of this enzyme may promote weight gain and feed conversion in livestock and thereby reduce or eliminate the need for antibiotic feed additives. PMID:3566269

  8. The cytotoxic activity of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor is inhibited by leukotriene A4 hydrolase and metallopeptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Menard, A; Papini, E; Mock, M; Montecucco, C

    1996-01-01

    The lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis is central to the pathogenesis of anthrax. Its mechanism of action is still unknown. Recently, on the basis of sequence similarities, we suggested that lethal factor might act similarly to leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4), a bifunctional enzyme also endowed with a metallopeptidase activity. Here we show that some inhibitors of the LTA4 hydrolase and metallopeptidase activities of LTA4 hydrolase also affect the cytotoxicity of the anthrax lethal factor on macrophage cell lines, without interfering with the ability of the lethal factor to enter cells. These results support the proposal that anthrax lethal factor might display in the cytosol of intoxicated cells a peptidase activity similar to that of LTA4 hydrolase. PMID:8973585

  9. Structure Determination and Characterization of the Vitamin B[superscript 6] Degradative Enzyme (E)-2-(Acetamidomethylene)succinate Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, Kathryn M.; Mukherjee, Tathagata; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-06-22

    The gene identification and kinetic characterization of (E)-2-(acetamidomethylene)succinate (E-2AMS) hydrolase has recently been described. This enzyme catalyzes the final reaction in the degradation of vitamin B{sub 6} and produces succinic semialdehyde, acetate, ammonia, and carbon dioxide from E-2AMS. The structure of E-2AMS hydrolase was determined to 2.3 {angstrom} using SAD phasing. E-2AMS hydrolase is a member of the {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase superfamily and utilizes a serine/histidine/aspartic acid catalytic triad. Mutation of either the nucleophilic serine or the aspartate resulted in inactive enzyme. Mutation of an additional serine residue in the active site causes the enzyme to be unstable and is likely structurally important. The structure also provides insight into the mechanism of hydrolysis of E-2AMS and identifies several potential catalytically important residues.

  10. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing. PMID:25856528

  11. Dielectronic recombination theory

    SciTech Connect

    LaGattuta, K.J.

    1991-12-31

    A theory now in wide use for the calculation of dielectronic recombination cross sections ({sigma}{sup DR}) and rate coefficients ({alpha}{sup DR}) was one introduced originally by Feshbach for nuclear physics applications, and then later adapted for atomic scattering problems by Hahn. In the following, we briefly review this theory in a very general form, which allows one to account for the effects of overlapping and interacting resonances, as well as continuum-continuum coupling. An extension of our notation will then also allow for the inclusion of the effects of direct radiative recombination, along with a treatment of the interference between radiative and dielectronic recombination. Other approaches to the calculation of {sigma}{sup DR} have been described by Fano and by Seaton. We will not consider those theories here. Calculations of {alpha}{sup DR} have progressed considerably over the last 25 years, since the early work of Burgess. Advances in the reliability of theoretical predictions have also been promoted recently b a variety of direct laboratory measurements of {sigma}{sup DR}. While the measurements of {sigma}{sup DR} for {delta}n {ne} 0 excitations have tended to agree very well with calculations, the case of {delta}n = 0 has been much problematic. However, by invoking a mechanism originally proposed by Jacobs, which takes into account the effect of stray electric fields on high Rydberg states (HRS) participating in the DR process, new calculations have improved the agreement between theory and experiment for these cases. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies still remain.

  12. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  13. Did the universe recombine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, James G.; Stebbins, Albert

    1991-01-01

    The Zel'dovich-Sunyaev model-independent arguments for the existence of a neutral hydrogen phase is reviewed in light of new limits on the Compton y parameter from COBE. It is concluded that with baryon densities compatible with standard cosmological nucleosynthesis, the universe could have remained fully ionized throughout its history without producing a detectable spectral distortion. It is argued that it is unlikely that spectral observations of the cosmic microwave background will ever require the universe to have recombined for flat cosmologies.

  14. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase from Shigella flexneri 2a

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wenxin; Wang, Qihai; Bi, Ruchang

    2005-12-01

    The 31.3 kDa Ap{sub 4}A hydrolase from Shigella flexneri 2a has been cloned, expressed and purified using an Escherichia coli expression system. Crystals of Ap{sub 4}A hydrolase have been obtained by the hanging-drop technique at 291 K using PEG 550 MME as precipitant. Diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap{sub 4}A) hydrolase (EC 3.6.1.41) hydrolyzes Ap{sub 4}A symmetrically in prokaryotes. It plays a potential role in organisms by regulating the concentration of Ap{sub 4}A in vivo. To date, no three-dimensional structures of proteins with significant sequence homology to this protein have been determined. The 31.3 kDa Ap{sub 4}A hydrolase from Shigella flexneri 2a has been cloned, expressed and purified using an Escherichia coli expression system. Crystals of Ap{sub 4}A hydrolase have been obtained by the hanging-drop technique at 291 K using PEG 550 MME as precipitant. Ap{sub 4}A hydrolase crystals diffract X-rays to 3.26 Å and belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 118.9, b = 54.6, c = 128.5 Å, β = 95.7°.

  15. A New Insight into the Physiological Role of Bile Salt Hydrolase among Intestinal Bacteria from the Genus Bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jarocki, Piotr; Podleśny, Marcin; Glibowski, Paweł; Targoński, Zdzisław

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence of bile salt hydrolase in fourteen strains belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium. Deconjugation activity was detected using a plate test, two-step enzymatic reaction and activity staining on a native polyacrylamide gel. Subsequently, bile salt hydrolases from B. pseudocatenulatum and B. longum subsp. suis were purified using a two-step chromatographic procedure. Biochemical characterization of the bile salt hydrolases showed that the purified enzymes hydrolyzed all of the six major human bile salts under the pH and temperature conditions commonly found in the human gastrointestinal tract. Next, the dynamic rheometry was applied to monitor the gelation process of deoxycholic acid under different conditions. The results showed that bile acids displayed aqueous media gelating properties. Finally, gel-forming abilities of bifidobacteria exhibiting bile salt hydrolase activity were analyzed. Our investigations have demonstrated that the release of deconjugated bile acids led to the gelation phenomenon of the enzymatic reaction solution containing purified BSH. The presented results suggest that bile salt hydrolase activity commonly found among intestinal microbiota increases hydrogel-forming abilities of certain bile salts. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that bile salt hydrolase activity among Bifidobacterium is directly connected with the gelation process of bile salts. In our opinion, if such a phenomenon occurs in physiological conditions of human gut, it may improve bacterial ability to colonize the gastrointestinal tract and their survival in this specific ecological niche. PMID:25470405

  16. Plant Microsomal Phospholipid Acyl Hydrolases Have Selectivities for Uncommon Fatty Acids.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, U.; Banas, A.; Stymne, S.

    1995-01-01

    Developing endosperms and embryos accumulating triacylglycerols rich in caproyl (decanoyl) groups (i.e. developing embryos of Cuphea procumbens and Ulmus glabra) had microsomal acyl hydrolases with high selectivities toward phosphatidylcholine with this acyl group. Similarly, membranes from Euphorbia lagascae and Ricinus communis endosperms, which accumulate triacylglycerols with vernoleate (12-epoxy-octadeca-9-enoate) and ricinoleate (12-hydroxy-octadeca-9-enoate), respectively, had acyl hydrolases that selectively removed their respective oxygenated acyl group from the phospholipids. The activities toward phospholipid substrates with epoxy, hydroxy, and medium-chain acyl groups varied greatly between microsomal preparations from different plant species. Epoxidated and hydroxylated acyl groups in sn-1 and sn-2 positions of phosphatidylcholine and in sn-1-lysophosphatidylcholine were hydrolyzed to a similar extent, whereas the hydrolysis of caproyl groups was highly dependent on the positional localization. PMID:12228415

  17. Carbocyclic adenosine analogues as S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors and antiviral agents: recent advances.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E

    1998-01-01

    Various carbocyclic analogues of adenosine, including aristeromycin (carbocyclic adenosine), carbocyclic 3-deazaadenosine, neplanocin A, 3-deazaneplanocin A, the 5'-nor derivatives of aristeromycin, carbocylic 3-deazaadenosine, neplanocin A and 3-deazaneplanocin A, and the 2-halo (i.e., 2-fluoro) and 6'-R-alkyl (i.e., 6'-R-methyl) derivatives of neplanocin A have been recognized as potent inhibitors of S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) hydrolase. This enzyme plays a key role in methylation reactions depending on S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) as methyl donor. AdoHcy hydrolase inhibitors have been shown to exert broad-spectrum antiviral activity against pox-, paramyxo-, rhabdo-, filo-, bunya-, arena-, and reoviruses. They also interfere with the replication of human immunodeficiency virus through inhibition of the Tat transactivation process. PMID:9708366

  18. Malbranchea cinnamomea: A thermophilic fungal source of catalytically efficient lignocellulolytic glycosyl hydrolases and metal dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Chhavi; Basotra, Neha; Singh, Surender; Di Falco, Marcos; Tsang, Adrian; Chadha, B S

    2016-01-01

    This study reports thermophilic fungus Malbranchea cinnamomea as an important source of lignocellulolytic enzymes. The secretome analysis using LC-MS/MS orbitrap showed that fungus produced a spectrum of glycosyl hydrolases (cellulase/hemicellulase), polysaccharide lyases (PL) and carbohydrate esterases (CE) in addition to cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) indicating the presence of functional classical and oxidative cellulolytic mechanisms. The protein fractions in the secretome resolved by ion exchange chromatography were analyzed for ability to hydrolyze alkali treated carrot grass (ATCG) in the presence of Mn(2+)/Cu(2+). This strategy in tandem with peptide mass fingerprinting led to identification of metal dependent protein hydrolases with no apparent hydrolytic activity, however, showed 5.7 folds higher saccharification in presence of Mn(2+). Furthermore, adding different protein fractions to commercial cellulase (Novozymes: Cellic CTec2) resulted in enhanced hydrolysis of ATCG ranging between 1.57 and 3.43 folds indicating the enzymes from M. cinnamomea as catalytically efficient. PMID:26476165

  19. [Effect of chitosan on the cell ultrastructure and activity of hydrolases in tobacco leaves].

    PubMed

    Nagorskaia, V P; Reunov, A V; Lapshina, L A; Davydova, V N; Ermak, I M

    2012-01-01

    Effect of chitosan on the mesophyll cell ultrastucture and activity of hydrolases in leaves of tobacco cv. Samsun was studied. It was shown that, in many cells, chitosan treatment stimulated the protein-synthesizing apparatus (nucleolus dimension and amount of both mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes increased) and, at the same time, caused some activation of lytic compartment expressed in the stimulation of the formation of dictyosomes, smooth ER elements and cytoplasmic vacuoles, which are all prominent constituents of this compartment. In biochemical experiments, it was established that chitosan substantially enhanced activity of hydrolases (acid phosphatase, RNase, proteases) in the leaves as compared to untreated leaves. In some cells chitosan treatment caused considerable destructive changes (condensation of nuclear chromatin, collapse of cytoplasm and so on) that can be classified as a result of programmed cell death development. PMID:23461036

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of neoagarobiose hydrolase from Saccharophagus degradans 2-40

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Saeyoung; Lee, Jonas Yun; Ha, Sung Chul; Jung, Jina; Shin, Dong Hae; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2009-01-01

    Many agarolytic bacteria degrade agar polysaccharide into the disaccharide unit neoagarobiose [O-3,6-anhydro-α-l-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)-d-galactose] using various β-agarases. Neoagarobiose hydrolase is an enzyme that acts on the α-­1,3 linkage in neoagarobiose to yield d-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose. This activity is essential in both the metabolism of agar by agarolytic bacteria and the production of fermentable sugars from agar biomass for bioenergy production. Neoagarobiose hydrolase from the marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 129.83, b = 76.81, c = 90.11 Å, β = 101.86°. The crystals diffracted to 1.98 Å resolution and possibly contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:20054134

  1. New families in the classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Bairoch, A

    1993-01-01

    301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes corresponding to 39 EC entries of the I.U.B. classification system have been classified into 35 families on the basis of amino-acid-sequence similarities [Henrissat (1991) Biochem. J. 280, 309-316]. Approximately half of the families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number), whereas the other half were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). A > 60% increase in sequence data for glycosyl hydrolases (181 additional enzymes or enzyme domains sequences have since become available) allowed us to update the classification not only by the addition of more members to already identified families, but also by the finding of ten new families. On the basis of a comparison of 482 sequences corresponding to 52 EC entries, 45 families, out of which 22 are polyspecific, can now be defined. This classification has been implemented in the SWISS-PROT protein sequence data bank. PMID:8352747

  2. Discovery of a Novel Microsomal Epoxide Hydrolase-Catalyzed Hydration of a Spiro Oxetane.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Qing; Hayes, Martin A; Grönberg, Gunnar; Berggren, Kristina; Castagnoli, Neal; Weidolf, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Oxetane moieties are increasingly being used by the pharmaceutical industry as building blocks in drug candidates because of their pronounced ability to improve physicochemical parameters and metabolic stability of drug candidates. The enzymes that catalyze the biotransformation of the oxetane moiety are, however, not well studied. The in vitro metabolism of a spiro oxetane-containing compound AZD1979 [(3-(4-(2-oxa-6-azaspiro[3.3]heptan-6-ylmethyl)phenoxy)azetidin-1-yl)(5-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)methanone] was studied and one of its metabolites, M1, attracted our interest because its formation was NAD(P)H independent. The focus of this work was to elucidate the structure of M1 and to understand the mechanism(s) of its formation. We established that M1 was formed via hydration and ring opening of the oxetanyl moiety of AZD1979. Incubations of AZD1979 using various human liver subcellular fractions revealed that the hydration reaction leading to M1 occurred mainly in the microsomal fraction. The underlying mechanism as a hydration, rather than an oxidation reaction, was supported by the incorporation of (18)O from H2 (18)O into M1. Enzyme kinetics were performed probing the formation of M1 in human liver microsomes. The formation of M1 was substantially inhibited by progabide, a microsomal epoxide hydrolase inhibitor, but not by trans-4-[4-(1-adamantylcarbamoylamino)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid, a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor. On the basis of these results, we propose that microsomal epoxide hydrolase catalyzes the formation of M1. The substrate specificity of microsomal epoxide hydrolase should therefore be expanded to include not only epoxides but also the oxetanyl ring system present in AZD1979. PMID:27256986

  3. Biosynthesis, glycosylation, and intracellular transport of intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase in rat.

    PubMed

    Büller, H A; Montgomery, R K; Sasak, W V; Grand, R J

    1987-12-15

    The biosynthesis of rat intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase was studied by pulse-labeling of jejunal explants from 5-day-old suckling rats in organ culture. Explants were either continuously labeled with [35S] methionine for 15, 30, and 60 min or pulse-labeled for 30 min and chased for various periods of time up to 6 h in the presence or absence of protease inhibitors (PI), leupeptin, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and soybean trypsin inhibitor. Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase was immunoprecipitated from microvillus membrane (MVM) and ER-Golgi fractions with monoclonal antibodies. After pulse-labeling, lactase-phlorizin hydrolase from the ER-Golgi fraction appeared on SDS-PAGE as one band of approximately 220 kDa, regardless of the presence or absence of PI in the culture media. The 220-kDa protein band could also be labeled after incubation with [2-3H]mannose. In the absence of PI, the 220-kDa band appeared in the MVM by 30 min chase, simultaneously with a 180-kDa band, and by 60 min of chase an additional band of 130 kDa was seen. With increasing time of chase, the relative intensity of the 130-kDa band increased, whereas that of the 220-kDa band decreased, suggesting a precursor-product relationship. When PI were added to the medium, the formation of the 180-kDa band was not affected, but the conversion of the 180-kDa protein to the 130-kDa protein was virtually blocked. These findings suggest that lactase-phlorizin hydrolase is initially synthesized as a glycosylated precursor of 220 kDa, which is transported to the MVM. There it undergoes the following two cleavages: first, to the 180-kDa form, which is not prevented by PI used in these experiments, and second, to the 130-kDa form inhibited by PI. PMID:3119597

  4. Dual roles of brain serine hydrolase KIAA1363 in ether lipid metabolism and organophosphate detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Daniel K.; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Issa, Roger S.; Ward, Anna M.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Casida, John E.

    2008-04-01

    Serine hydrolase KIAA1363 is an acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE) hydrolase involved in tumor cell invasiveness. It is also an organophosphate (OP) insecticide-detoxifying enzyme. The key to understanding these dual properties was the use of KIAA1363 +/+ (wildtype) and -/- (gene deficient) mice to define the role of this enzyme in brain and other tissues and its effectiveness in vivo in reducing OP toxicity. KIAA1363 was the primary AcMAGE hydrolase in brain, lung, heart and kidney and was highly sensitive to inactivation by chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) (IC{sub 50} 2 nM) [the bioactivated metabolite of the major insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF)]. Although there was no difference in hydrolysis product monoalkylglycerol ether (MAGE) levels in +/+ and -/- mouse brains in vivo, isopropyl dodecylfluorophosphonate (30 mg/kg) and CPF (100 mg/kg) resulted in 23-51% decrease in brain MAGE levels consistent with inhibition of AcMAGE hydrolase activity. On incubating +/+ and -/- brain membranes with AcMAGE and cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine, the absence of KIAA1363 activity dramatically increased de novo formation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and lyso-PAF, signifying that metabolically-stabilized AcMAGE can be converted to this bioactive lipid in brain. On considering detoxification, KIAA1363 -/- mice were significantly more sensitive than +/+ mice to ip-administered CPF (100 mg/kg) and parathion (10 mg/kg) with increased tremoring and mortality that correlated for CPF with greater brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Docking AcMAGE and CPO in a KIAA1363 active site model showed similar positioning of their acetyl and trichloropyridinyl moieties, respectively. This study establishes the relevance of KIAA1363 in ether lipid metabolism and OP detoxification.

  5. Hydrolysis of VX and related compounds by organophosphorus hydrolase. Final report, Februray-December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kolakowski, J.E.; DeFrank, J.J.; Lai, K.; Wild, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Organophosphorus Hydrolase (OPH) is a fully characterized and cloned enzyme, derived from Pseudomonas diminuta, consisting of 365 amino acids with a total molecular weight of 38,0(X). The enzyme has a leader sequence of 29 amino acids which has been removed in the construction used in this study. OPH was evaluated for its effectiveness in catalyzing the S-(2-diisopwpylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate (VX) and its analogs.

  6. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  7. Recombinant factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Michael G

    2004-01-01

    Human coagulation factor (F) VII is a single chain protease that circulates in the blood as a weakly active zymogen at concentrations of approximately 10 nmol/L. When converted to the active 2 chain form (FVIIa), it is a powerful initiator of haemostasis. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa, eptacog alfa, NovoSeven) is a genetically engineered product that was first introduced in 1988 for the treatment of patients with haemophilia A and B with high inhibitory antibody titres to factors VIII and IX. Recent reports in the form of case studies and series, and early trial data, have suggested a role for rFVIIa across a diverse range of indications including bleeding associated with trauma, surgery, thrombocytopaenia, liver disease and oral anticoagulant toxicity. This review describes the physiology of the coagulation pathway and in particular the role of recombinant factor VIIa. It will also focus on the emerging role of rFVIIa in both trauma and non-trauma bleeding and its potential use in the ED. PMID:15537408

  8. Phosphonoacetate hydrolase from Penicillium oxalicum: purification and properties, phosphate starvation-independent expression, and partial sequencing.

    PubMed

    Klimek-Ochab, Magdalena; Raucci, Giuseppe; Lejczak, Barbara; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2006-03-01

    The enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of phosphonoacetic acid, a non-biogenic C-P compound, was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from a wild-type strain of Penicillium oxalicum. A 50-fold enrichment was obtained by a combination of anion exchange, hydrophobic interaction and MonoQ-fast protein liquid chromatography, with a yield of one-third of the initial activity. A characterization of the protein showed both similarities and differences with respect to the well-characterized bacterial counterpart. The fungal phosphonoacetate hydrolase is a 43-kDa monomeric protein showing low affinity toward its substrate and high sensitivity to even mildly acidic pH values. Enzyme activity neither required nor was stimulated by the presence of divalent cations. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in mouse against the purified protein, allowing the study of enzyme induction as a function of the phosphate status of the cell. Peptide mass mapping led to the determination of about 20% of the primary structure. Despite the biochemical differences, amino acid alignment showed a high degree of similarity of the fungal hydrolase with the few sequences available to date for the bacterial enzyme. The possible physiological role of a phosphonoacetate hydrolase is discussed. PMID:16129582

  9. Characterization of tunable piperidine and piperazine carbamates as inhibitors of endocannabinoid hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jonathan Z.; Jin, Xin; Adibekian, Alexander; Li, Weiwei; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are two enzymes from the serine hydrolase superfamily that degrade the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide, respectively. We have recently discovered that MAGL and FAAH are both inhibited by carbamates bearing an N-piperidine/piperazine group. Piperidine/piperazine carbamates show excellent in vivo activity, raising brain endocannabinoid levels and producing CB1-dependent behavioral effects in mice, suggesting that they represent a promising class of inhibitors for studying the endogenous functions of MAGL and FAAH. Herein, we disclose a full account of the syntheses, structure-activity relationships, and inhibitory activities of piperidine/piperazine carbamates against members of the serine hydrolase family. These scaffolds can be tuned for MAGL-selective or dual MAGL-FAAH inhibition by the attachment of an appropriately substituted bisarylcarbinol or aryloxybenzyl moiety, respectively, on the piperidine/piperazine ring. Modifications to the piperidine/piperazine ring ablated inhibitory activity, suggesting a strict requirement for a six-member ring to maintain potency. PMID:20099888

  10. Strategies to reduce end-product inhibition in family 48 glycoside hydrolases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Mo; Bu, Lintao; Alahuhta, Markus; Brunecky, Roman; Xu, Qi; Lunin, Vladimir V.; Brady, John W.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Bomble, Yannick J.

    2016-02-01

    Family 48 cellobiohydrolases are some of the most abundant glycoside hydrolases in nature. They are able to degrade cellulosic biomass and therefore serve as good enzyme candidates for biofuel production. Family 48 cellulases hydrolyze cellulose chains via a processive mechanism, and produce end products composed primarily of cellobiose as well as other cellooligomers (dp ≤ 4). The challenge of utilizing cellulases in biofuel production lies in their extremely slow turnover rate. A factor contributing to the low enzyme activity is suggested to be product binding to enzyme and the resulting performance inhibition. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the productmore » inhibitory effect of four family 48 glycoside hydrolases using molecular dynamics simulations and product expulsion free-energy calculations. We also suggested a series of single mutants of the four family 48 glycoside hydrolases with theoretically reduced level of product inhibition. As a result, the theoretical calculations provide a guide for future experimental studies designed to produce mutant cellulases with enhanced activity.« less

  11. Identification of Neutral Cholesterol Ester Hydrolase, a Key Enzyme Removing Cholesterol from Macrophages*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Masaki; Nishi, Makiko; Sekiya, Motohiro; Tajima, Makiko; Takase, Satoru; Takanashi, Mikio; Ohta, Keisuke; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Sachiko; Yahagi, Naoya; Ohashi, Ken; Amemiya-Kudo, Michiyo; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Nagai, Ryozo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Ishibashi, Shun

    2008-01-01

    Unstable lipid-rich plaques in atherosclerosis are characterized by the accumulation of macrophage foam cells loaded with cholesterol ester (CE). Although hormone-sensitive lipase and cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) have been proposed to mediate the hydrolysis of CE in macrophages, circumstantial evidence suggests the presence of other enzymes with neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (nCEH) activity. Here we show that the murine orthologue of KIAA1363, designated as neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH), is a microsomal nCEH with high expression in murine and human macrophages. The effect of various concentrations of NaCl on its nCEH activity resembles that on endogenous nCEH activity of macrophages. RNA silencing of NCEH decreases nCEH activity at least by 50%; conversely, its overexpression inhibits the CE formation in macrophages. Immunohistochemistry reveals that NCEH is expressed in macrophage foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions. These data indicate that NCEH is responsible for a major part of nCEH activity in macrophages and may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:18782767

  12. Brucella abortus Choloylglycine Hydrolase Affects Cell Envelope Composition and Host Cell Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C.; Mujer, Cesar V.; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization. PMID:22174816

  13. Conserved catalytic machinery and the prediction of a common fold for several families of glycosyl hydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Callebaut, I; Fabrega, S; Lehn, P; Mornon, J P; Davies, G

    1995-01-01

    The regions surrounding the catalytic amino acids previously identified in a few "retaining" O-glycosyl hydrolases (EC 3.2.1) have been analyzed by hydrophobic cluster analysis and have been used to define sequence motifs. These motifs have been found in more than 150 glycosyl hydrolase sequences representing at least eight established protein families that act on a large variety of substrates. This allows the localization and the precise role of the catalytic residues (nucleophile and acid catalyst) to be predicted for each of these enzymes, including several lysosomal glycosidases. An identical arrangement of the catalytic nucleophile was also found for S-glycosyl hydrolases (myrosinases; EC 3.2.3.1) for which the acid catalyst is lacking. A (beta/alpha)8 barrel structure has been reported for two of the eight families of proteins that have been grouped. It is suggested that the six other families also share this fold at their catalytic domain. These enzymes illustrate how evolutionary events led to a wide diversification of substrate specificity with a similar disposition of identical catalytic residues onto the same ancestral (beta/alpha)8 barrel structure. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7624375

  14. Properties of a β-(1→4)-glucan hydrolase from Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, A. E.; Stone, B. A.

    1965-01-01

    1. A β-(1→4)-glucan hydrolase prepared from Aspergillus niger, as described by Clarke & Stone (1965a), showed a pH optimum in the range 4·5–6 and Km 0·25% when acting on a cellulose dextrin sulphate substrate. 2. The hydrolase rapidly decreased the specific viscosity of carboxymethylcellulose with a small increase in the production of reducing sugars. The identity of the products of hydrolysis of cellotetraose, cellopentaose and their reduced analogues indicate a preferential cleavage of non-terminal glucosidic linkages. The enzyme may be described as β-(1→4)-glucan 4-glucanohydrolase (EC 3.2.1.4). 3. In addition to carboxymethylcellulose, cellulose dextrins, cellopentaose and cellotetraose the enzyme fraction hydrolysed lichenin, oat and barley glucans, ivory-nut mannan and a glucomannan from Konjak flour. No hydrolysis of wheat-straw β-(1→4)-xylan, Lupinus albus β-(1→4)-galactan, pneumococcal type III polysaccharide, chitin, hyaluronic acid, laminarin, pachydextrins, carboxymethylpachyman or β-(1→3)-oligoglucosides was detected. 4. The hydrolase showed no transglycosylase activity from cellodextrin or cellopentaose substrates to glucose or methanol acceptors. 5. The hydrolysis of cellodextrins was inhibited completely by 1·0mm-Hg2+, 0·7mm-phenylmercuric nitrate and 1·0mm-iodine. PMID:5862418

  15. Properties of a beta-(1-4)-glucan hydrolase from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A E; Stone, B A

    1965-09-01

    1. A beta-(1-->4)-glucan hydrolase prepared from Aspergillus niger, as described by Clarke & Stone (1965a), showed a pH optimum in the range 4.5-6 and K(m) 0.25% when acting on a cellulose dextrin sulphate substrate. 2. The hydrolase rapidly decreased the specific viscosity of carboxymethylcellulose with a small increase in the production of reducing sugars. The identity of the products of hydrolysis of cellotetraose, cellopentaose and their reduced analogues indicate a preferential cleavage of non-terminal glucosidic linkages. The enzyme may be described as beta-(1-->4)-glucan 4-glucanohydrolase (EC 3.2.1.4). 3. In addition to carboxymethylcellulose, cellulose dextrins, cellopentaose and cellotetraose the enzyme fraction hydrolysed lichenin, oat and barley glucans, ivory-nut mannan and a glucomannan from Konjak flour. No hydrolysis of wheat-straw beta-(1-->4)-xylan, Lupinus albus beta-(1-->4)-galactan, pneumococcal type III polysaccharide, chitin, hyaluronic acid, laminarin, pachydextrins, carboxymethylpachyman or beta-(1-->3)-oligoglucosides was detected. 4. The hydrolase showed no transglycosylase activity from cellodextrin or cellopentaose substrates to glucose or methanol acceptors. 5. The hydrolysis of cellodextrins was inhibited completely by 1.0mm-Hg(2+), 0.7mm-phenylmercuric nitrate and 1.0mm-iodine. PMID:5862418

  16. Inhibition of Diabrotica Larval Growth by Patatin, the Lipid Acyl Hydrolase from Potato Tubers.

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, J. A.; Orr, G. L.; Walsh, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    Patatin, the nonspecific lipid acyl hydrolase from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, dose-dependently inhibits the growth of southern corn rootworm (SCR) and western corn rootworm when fed to them on artificial diet. The 50% growth reduction levels are somewhat cultivar dependent, ranging from 60 to 150 [mu]g/g diet for neonate SCR larvae. A single patatin isoform also inhibits larval growth. Neonate SCR continuously exposed to patatin are halted in larval development. Treatment with di-isopropylfluorophosphate essentially eliminates patatin's phospholipase, galactolipase, and acyl hydrolase activities. SCR growth inhibition is eliminated also, indicating that patatin's serine hydrolase activity is responsible for the observed activities. Patatin-mediated phospholipolysis is highly pH and cultivar dependent, with specific activities up to 300-fold less at pH 5.5 than at pH 8.5. Esterase or phospholipase activities do not correlate with insect growth inhibition. Galactolipase activity, being cultivar and pH independent, correlates significantly with SCR growth inhibition. Insect-growth inhibition of patatin is significantly reduced with increased dietary cholesterol levels. In conclusion, patatin represents a new class of insect-control proteins with a novel mode of action possibly involving lipid metabolism. PMID:12228621

  17. Inhibition of Diabrotica Larval Growth by Patatin, the Lipid Acyl Hydrolase from Potato Tubers.

    PubMed

    Strickland, J. A.; Orr, G. L.; Walsh, T. A.

    1995-10-01

    Patatin, the nonspecific lipid acyl hydrolase from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, dose-dependently inhibits the growth of southern corn rootworm (SCR) and western corn rootworm when fed to them on artificial diet. The 50% growth reduction levels are somewhat cultivar dependent, ranging from 60 to 150 [mu]g/g diet for neonate SCR larvae. A single patatin isoform also inhibits larval growth. Neonate SCR continuously exposed to patatin are halted in larval development. Treatment with di-isopropylfluorophosphate essentially eliminates patatin's phospholipase, galactolipase, and acyl hydrolase activities. SCR growth inhibition is eliminated also, indicating that patatin's serine hydrolase activity is responsible for the observed activities. Patatin-mediated phospholipolysis is highly pH and cultivar dependent, with specific activities up to 300-fold less at pH 5.5 than at pH 8.5. Esterase or phospholipase activities do not correlate with insect growth inhibition. Galactolipase activity, being cultivar and pH independent, correlates significantly with SCR growth inhibition. Insect-growth inhibition of patatin is significantly reduced with increased dietary cholesterol levels. In conclusion, patatin represents a new class of insect-control proteins with a novel mode of action possibly involving lipid metabolism. PMID:12228621

  18. Probiotic characterization of potential hydrolases producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from pickled yam.

    PubMed

    Bhanwar, Seema; Singh, Arashdeep; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize potential probiotic strain co-producing α-amylase and β-galactosidase. Sixty-three strains, isolated from pickle samples were screened for their hydrolase producing capacity by utilizing different starches as carbon source. One out of 63 strains, isolated from traditionally fermented pickled yam showing maximum hydrolase activity (α-amylase (36.9 U/ml) and β-galactosidase (42.6 U/ml)) within a period of 48 hours was identified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Further, it was assessed for the probiotic characteristics under gastrointestinal conditions like acidic, alkaline, proteolytic enzymes, bile stress and found to exhibit tolerance to these stresses. The therapeutic potential of the isolate is implicated because of its antagonistic effect against enteric foodborne pathogens (Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Aeromonas hydrophila). The results of this study entail a potential applicability of the isolate in developing future probiotic foods besides the production of industrially significant hydrolases. PMID:24020495

  19. Functions, structures, and applications of cellobiose 2-epimerase and glycoside hydrolase family 130 mannoside phosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Saburi, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    Carbohydrate isomerases/epimerases are essential in carbohydrate metabolism, and have great potential in industrial carbohydrate conversion. Cellobiose 2-epimerase (CE) reversibly epimerizes the reducing end d-glucose residue of β-(1→4)-linked disaccharides to d-mannose residue. CE shares catalytic machinery with monosaccharide isomerases and epimerases having an (α/α)6-barrel catalytic domain. Two histidine residues act as general acid and base catalysts in the proton abstraction and addition mechanism. β-Mannoside hydrolase and 4-O-β-d-mannosyl-d-glucose phosphorylase (MGP) were found as neighboring genes of CE, meaning that CE is involved in β-mannan metabolism, where it epimerizes β-d-mannopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-mannose to β-d-mannopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-glucose for further phosphorolysis. MGPs form glycoside hydrolase family 130 (GH130) together with other β-mannoside phosphorylases and hydrolases. Structural analysis of GH130 enzymes revealed an unusual catalytic mechanism involving a proton relay and the molecular basis for substrate and reaction specificities. Epilactose, efficiently produced from lactose using CE, has superior physiological functions as a prebiotic oligosaccharide. PMID:27031293

  20. A novel nucleoside hydrolase from Lactobacillus buchneri LBK78 catalyzing hydrolysis of 2'-O-methylribonucleosides.

    PubMed

    Mitsukawa, Yuuki; Hibi, Makoto; Matsutani, Narihiro; Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Satomi; Ogawa, Jun

    2016-08-01

    2'-O-Methylribonucleosides (2'-OMe-NRs) are promising raw materials for nucleic acid drugs because of their high thermal stability and nuclease tolerance. In the course of microbial screening for metabolic activity toward 2'-OMe-NRs, Lactobacillus buchneri LBK78 was found to decompose 2'-O-methyluridine (2'-OMe-UR). The enzyme responsible was partially purified from L. buchneri LBK78 cells by a four-step purification procedure, and identified as a novel nucleoside hydrolase. This enzyme, LbNH, belongs to the nucleoside hydrolase superfamily, and formed a homotetrameric structure composed of subunits with a molecular mass around 34 kDa. LbNH hydrolyzed 2'-OMe-UR to 2'-O-methylribose and uracil, and the kinetic constants were Km of 0.040 mM, kcat of 0.49 s(-1), and kcat/Km of 12 mM(-1) s(-1). In a substrate specificity analysis, LbNH preferred ribonucleosides and 2'-OMe-NRs as its hydrolytic substrates, but reacted weakly with 2'-deoxyribonucleosides. In a phylogenetic analysis, LbNH showed a close relationship with purine-specific nucleoside hydrolases from trypanosomes. PMID:27180876

  1. Characterization of an epoxide hydrolase from the Florida red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengfei; Leeson, Cristian; Zhi, Xiaoduo; Leng, Fenfei; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Michael S; Rein, Kathleen S

    2016-02-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EH, EC 3.3.2.3) have been proposed to be key enzymes in the biosynthesis of polyether (PE) ladder compounds such as the brevetoxins which are produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. These enzymes have the potential to catalyze kinetically disfavored endo-tet cyclization reactions. Data mining of K. brevis transcriptome libraries revealed two classes of epoxide hydrolases: microsomal and leukotriene A4 (LTA4) hydrolases. A microsomal EH was cloned and expressed for characterization. The enzyme is a monomeric protein with molecular weight 44kDa. Kinetic parameters were evaluated using a variety of epoxide substrates to assess substrate selectivity and enantioselectivity, as well as its potential to catalyze the critical endo-tet cyclization of epoxy alcohols. Monitoring of EH activity in high and low toxin producing cultures of K. brevis over a three week period showed consistently higher activity in the high toxin producing culture implicating the involvement of one or more EH in brevetoxin biosynthesis. PMID:26626160

  2. Optimization of synergism of a recombinant auxiliary activity 9 from Chaetomium globosum with cellulase in cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Nam, Ki Hyun; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Sooah; Youn, Hak Jin; Lee, Hee Jin; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-10-01

    Auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9, formerly known as glycoside hydrolase family 61 or polysaccharide monooxygenase) is a group of fungal proteins that were recently found to have a significant synergism with cellulase in cellulose hydrolysis via the oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds of cellulose chains. In this study, we report the active expression of a recombinant fungal AA9 from Chaetomium globosum (CgAA9) in a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, and the optimization of its synergistic activity in cellulose hydrolysis by using cellulase. The recombinant CgAA9 (0.9 mg/g cellulose) exhibited 1.7-fold synergism in the hydrolysis of Avicel when incubated with 0.9 filter paper units of Celluclast 1.5 L/g cellulose. The first study of the active expression of AA9 using a bacterial host and its synergistic optimization could be useful for the industrial application of AA9 for the saccharification of lignocellulose. PMID:25936375

  3. Unraveling recombination rate evolution using ancestral recombination maps

    PubMed Central

    Munch, Kasper; Schierup, Mikkel H; Mailund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recombination maps of ancestral species can be constructed from comparative analyses of genomes from closely related species, exemplified by a recently published map of the human-chimpanzee ancestor. Such maps resolve differences in recombination rate between species into changes along individual branches in the speciation tree, and allow identification of associated changes in the genomic sequences. We describe how coalescent hidden Markov models are able to call individual recombination events in ancestral species through inference of incomplete lineage sorting along a genomic alignment. In the great apes, speciation events are sufficiently close in time that a map can be inferred for the ancestral species at each internal branch - allowing evolution of recombination rate to be tracked over evolutionary time scales from speciation event to speciation event. We see this approach as a way of characterizing the evolution of recombination rate and the genomic properties that influence it. PMID:25043668

  4. Algebraic theory of recombination spaces.

    PubMed

    Stadler, P F; Wagner, G P

    1997-01-01

    A new mathematical representation is proposed for the configuration space structure induced by recombination, which we call "P-structure." It consists of a mapping of pairs of objects to the power set of all objects in the search space. The mapping assigns to each pair of parental "genotypes" the set of all recombinant genotypes obtainable from the parental ones. It is shown that this construction allows a Fourier decomposition of fitness landscapes into a superposition of "elementary landscapes." This decomposition is analogous to the Fourier decomposition of fitness landscapes on mutation spaces. The elementary landscapes are obtained as eigenfunctions of a Laplacian operator defined for P-structures. For binary string recombination, the elementary landscapes are exactly the p-spin functions (Walsh functions), that is, the same as the elementary landscapes of the string point mutation spaces (i.e., the hypercube). This supports the notion of a strong homomorphism between string mutation and recombination spaces. However, the effective nearest neighbor correlations on these elementary landscapes differ between mutation and recombination and among different recombination operators. On average, the nearest neighbor correlation is higher for one-point recombination than for uniform recombination. For one-point recombination, the correlations are higher for elementary landscapes with fewer interacting sites as well as for sites that have closer linkage, confirming the qualitative predictions of the Schema Theorem. We conclude that the algebraic approach to fitness landscape analysis can be extended to recombination spaces and provides an effective way to analyze the relative hardness of a landscape for a given recombination operator. PMID:10021760

  5. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Claudia; Späte, Kira; Krampe, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still unsatisfactory and essentially non-existing for the progressive course of the disease. Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) may be a promising neuroprotective/neuroregenerative treatment of MS. In the nervous system, EPO acts anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic and plasticity-modulating. Beneficial effects have been shown in animal models of various neurological and psychiatric diseases, including different models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. EPO is also effective in human brain disease, as shown in double-blind placebo-controlled clinical studies on ischemic stroke and chronic schizophrenia. An exploratory study on chronic progressive MS yielded lasting improvement in motor and cognitive performance upon high-dose long-term EPO treatment. PMID:21180577

  6. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  7. The immunolocation of a xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase specific to elongating tissues in Cicer arietinum suggests a role in the elongation of vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Teresa; Martín, Ignacio; Labrador, Emilia; Dopico, Berta

    2006-01-01

    In a previous work, a Cicer arietinum cDNA clone (CaXTH1) encoding a xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH1) protein was isolated and characterized. CaXTH1 showed an expression pattern specific to growing tissue: mostly epicotyls and the upper growing internodes of adult stems. CaXTH1 mRNA was not detected in any other organs of either seedlings or adult plants, suggesting an involvement of the putative XTH encoded by CaXTH1 in the chickpea cell expansion process. After the generation of polyclonal antibodies by using the XTH1 recombinant protein and the analysis of the specificity of the antibodies for XTH proteins, here the specific location of the chickpea XTH1-cross-reacting protein in cell walls of epicotyls, radicles, and stems is reported, evaluated by western blot and immunocytochemical studies. The results indicate a function for this protein in the elongation of parenchyma cells of epicotyls and also in developing vascular tissue, suggesting a role in the elongation of vascular cells. PMID:17075081

  8. Legionella pneumophila Secretes an Endoglucanase That Belongs to the Family-5 of Glycosyl Hydrolases and Is Dependent upon Type II Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Meghan M.; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    Examination of cell-free culture supernatants revealed that Legionella pneumophila strains secrete an endoglucanase activity. L. pneumophila lspF mutants were deficient for this activity, indicating that the endoglucanase is secreted by the bacterium’s type II protein secretion system. Inactivation of celA, encoding a member of the family-5 of glycosyl hydrolases, abolished the endoglucanase activity in L. pneumophila culture supernatants. The cloned celA gene conferred activity upon recombinant Escherichia coli. Thus, CelA is the major secreted endoglucanase of L. pneumophila. Mutants inactivated for celA grew normally in protozoa and macrophage, indicating that CelA is not required for the intracellular phase of L. pneumophila. The CelA endoglucanase is one of at least 25 proteins secreted by the type II system of L. pneumophila and the seventeenth type of enzyme effector associated with this pathway. Only a subset of the other Legionella species tested expressed secreted endoglucanase activity, suggesting that the type II secretion output differs among the different legionellae. Overall, this study represents the first documentation of an endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) being produced by a strain of Legionella. PMID:19817866

  9. Characterization of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 27 α-Galactosidase from Pontibacter Reveals Its Novel Salt-Protease Tolerance and Transglycosylation Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junpei; Liu, Yu; Lu, Qian; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Qian; Li, Chunyan; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Han, Nanyu; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-03-23

    α-Galactosidases are of great interest in various applications. A glycoside hydrolase family 27 α-galactosidase was cloned from Pontibacter sp. harbored in a saline soil and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme (rAgaAHJ8) was little or not affected by 3.5-30.0% (w/v) NaCl, 10.0-100.0 mM Pb(CH3COO)2, 10.0-60.0 mM ZnSO4, or 8.3-100.0 mg mL(-1) trypsin and by most metal ions and chemical reagents at 1.0 and 10.0 mM concentrations. The degree of synergy on enzymatic degradation of locust bean gum and guar gum by an endomannanase and rAgaAHJ8 was 1.22-1.54. In the presence of trypsin, the amount of reducing sugars released from soybean milk treated by rAgaAHJ8 was approximately 3.8-fold compared with that treated by a commercial α-galactosidase. rAgaAHJ8 showed transglycosylation activity when using sucrose, raffinose, and 3-methyl-1-butanol as the acceptors. Furthermore, potential factors for salt adaptation of the enzyme were presumed. PMID:26948050

  10. The recombination of genetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic recombination is the major mechanism by which new arrangements of genetic elements are produced in all living organisms, from the simplest bacterial viruses to humans. This volume presents an overview of the types of recombination found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  11. Inhibition of recombinant human maltase glucoamylase by salacinol and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elena J; Sim, Lyann; Kuntz, Douglas A; Hahn, Dagmar; Johnston, Blair D; Ghavami, Ahmad; Szczepina, Monica G; Kumar, Nag S; Sterchi, Erwin E; Nichols, Buford L; Pinto, B M; Rose, David R

    2006-06-01

    Inhibitors targeting pancreatic alpha-amylase and intestinal alpha-glucosidases delay glucose production following digestion and are currently used in the treatment of Type II diabetes. Maltase-glucoamylase (MGA), a family 31 glycoside hydrolase, is an alpha-glucosidase anchored in the membrane of small intestinal epithelial cells responsible for the final step of mammalian starch digestion leading to the release of glucose. This paper reports the production and purification of active human recombinant MGA amino terminal catalytic domain (MGAnt) from two different eukaryotic cell culture systems. MGAnt overexpressed in Drosophila cells was of quality and quantity suitable for kinetic and inhibition studies as well as future structural studies. Inhibition of MGAnt was tested with a group of prospective alpha-glucosidase inhibitors modeled after salacinol, a naturally occurring alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, and acarbose, a currently prescribed antidiabetic agent. Four synthetic inhibitors that bind and inhibit MGAnt activity better than acarbose, and at comparable levels to salacinol, were found. The inhibitors are derivatives of salacinol that contain either a selenium atom in place of sulfur in the five-membered ring, or a longer polyhydroxylated, sulfated chain than salacinol. Six-membered ring derivatives of salacinol and compounds modeled after miglitol were much less effective as MGAnt inhibitors. These results provide information on the inhibitory profile of MGAnt that will guide the development of new compounds having antidiabetic activity. PMID:16817895

  12. Coalescent Simulation of Intracodon Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Miguel; Posada, David

    2010-01-01

    The coalescent with recombination is a very useful tool in molecular population genetics. Under this framework, genealogies often represent the evolution of the substitution unit, and because of this, the few coalescent algorithms implemented for the simulation of coding sequences force recombination to occur only between codons. However, it is clear that recombination is expected to occur most often within codons. Here we have developed an algorithm that can evolve coding sequences under an ancestral recombination graph that represents the genealogies at each nucleotide site, thereby allowing for intracodon recombination. The algorithm is a modification of Hudson's coalescent in which, in addition to keeping track of events occurring in the ancestral material that reaches the sample, we need to keep track of events occurring in ancestral material that does not reach the sample but that is produced by intracodon recombination. We are able to show that at typical substitution rates the number of nonsynonymous changes induced by intracodon recombination is small and that intracodon recombination does not generally result in inflated estimates of the overall nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratio (ω). On the other hand, recombination can bias the estimation of ω at particular codons, resulting in apparent rate variation among sites and in the spurious identification of positively selected sites. Importantly, in this case, allowing for variable synonymous rates across sites greatly reduces the false-positive rate and recovers statistical power. Finally, coalescent simulations with intracodon recombination could be used to better represent the evolution of nuclear coding genes or fast-evolving pathogens such as HIV-1.We have implemented this algorithm in a computer program called NetRecodon, freely available at http://darwin.uvigo.es. PMID:19933876

  13. Esterase SeE of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi is a Novel Non-specific Carboxylic Ester Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gang; Liu, Mengyao; Zhu, Hui; Lei, Benfang

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular carboxylic ester hydrolases are produced by many bacterial pathogens and have been shown recently to be important for virulence of some pathogens. However, these hydrolases are poorly characterized in enzymatic activity. This study prepared and characterized the secreted ester hydrolase of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi (designated SeE for S. equi esterase). SeE hydrolyzes ethyl acetate, acetylsalicylic acid, and tributyrin but not ethyl butyrate. This substrate specificity pattern does not match those of the three conventional types of non-specific carboxylic ester hydrolases (carboxylesterases, arylesterases, and acetylesterases). To determine whether SeE has lipase activity, a number of triglycerides and vinyl esters were tested in SeE-catalyzed hydrolysis. SeE does not hydrolyze triglycerides and vinyl esters of long chain carboxylic acids nor display interfacial activation, indicating that SeE is not a lipase. Like the conventional carboxylesterases, SeE is inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate. These findings indicate that SeE is a novel non-specific carboxylic ester hydrolase that has broader substrate specificity than the conventional carboxylesterases. PMID:19054107

  14. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  15. Domain-structure analysis of recombinant rat hormone-sensitive lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Osterlund, T; Danielsson, B; Degerman, E; Contreras, J A; Edgren, G; Davis, R C; Schotz, M C; Holm, C

    1996-01-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) plays a key role in lipid metabolism and overall energy homoeostasis, by controlling the release of fatty acids from stored triglycerides in adipose tissue. Lipases and esterases form a protein superfamily with a common structural fold, called the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and a catalytic triad of serine, aspartic or glutamic acid and histidine. Previous alignments between HSL and lipase 2 of Moraxella TA144 have been extended to cover a much larger part of the HSL sequence. From these extended alignments, possible sites for the catalytic triad and alpha/beta-hydrolase fold are suggested. Furthermore, it is proposed that HSL contains a structural domain with catalytic capacity and a regulatory module attached, as well as a structural N-terminal domain unique to this enzyme. In order to test the proposed domain structure, rat HSL was overexpressed and purified to homogeneity using a baculovirus/insect-cell expression system. The purification, resulting in > 99% purity, involved detergent solubilization followed by anion-exchange chromatography and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. The purified recombinant enzyme was identical to rat adipose-tissue HSL with regard to specific activity, substrate specificity and ability to serve as a substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The recombinant HSL was subjected to denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride and limited proteolysis. These treatments resulted in more extensive loss of activity against phospholipid-stabilized lipid substrates than against water-soluble substrates, suggesting that the hydrolytic activity can be separated from recognition of lipid substrates. These data support the concept that HSL has at least two major domains. PMID:8912675

  16. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legler, Patricia; Boisvert, Susanne; Compton, Jaimee; Millard, Charles

    2014-07-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine O?. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its kcat/Km for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. pNBE was tested as a surrogate scaffold for mammalian esterases. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1. We discuss the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases.

  17. Haloalkylphosphorus Hydrolases Purified from Sphingomonas sp. Strain TDK1 and Sphingobium sp. Strain TCM1

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yuto; Mori, Junichi; Doi, Yuka; Takahashi, Shouji; Kera, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Phosphotriesterases catalyze the first step of organophosphorus triester degradation. The bacterial phosphotriesterases purified and characterized to date hydrolyze mainly aryl dialkyl phosphates, such as parathion, paraoxon, and chlorpyrifos. In this study, we purified and cloned two novel phosphotriesterases from Sphingomonas sp. strain TDK1 and Sphingobium sp. strain TCM1 that hydrolyze tri(haloalkyl)phosphates, and we named these enzymes haloalkylphosphorus hydrolases (TDK-HAD and TCM-HAD, respectively). Both HADs are monomeric proteins with molecular masses of 59.6 (TDK-HAD) and 58.4 kDa (TCM-HAD). The enzyme activities were affected by the addition of divalent cations, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis suggested that zinc is a native cofactor for HADs. These enzymes hydrolyzed not only chlorinated organophosphates but also a brominated organophosphate [tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate], as well as triaryl phosphates (tricresyl and triphenyl phosphates). Paraoxon-methyl and paraoxon were efficiently degraded by TCM-HAD, whereas TDK-HAD showed weak activity toward these substrates. Dichlorvos was degraded only by TCM-HAD. The enzymes displayed weak or no activity against trialkyl phosphates and organophosphorothioates. The TCM-HAD and TDK-HAD genes were cloned and found to encode proteins of 583 and 574 amino acid residues, respectively. The primary structures of TCM-HAD and TDK-HAD were very similar, and the enzymes also shared sequence similarity with fenitrothion hydrolase (FedA) of Burkholderia sp. strain NF100 and organophosphorus hydrolase (OphB) of Burkholderia sp. strain JBA3. However, the substrate specificities and quaternary structures of the HADs were largely different from those of FedA and OphB. These results show that HADs from sphingomonads are novel members of the bacterial phosphotriesterase family. PMID:25038092

  18. Exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases can be utilized to disrupt and prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Perrin; Hill, Preston J.; Snarr, Brendan D.; Alnabelseya, Noor; Pestrak, Matthew J.; Lee, Mark J.; Jennings, Laura K.; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A.; Parsek, Matthew R.; Sheppard, Donald C.; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms present a significant medical challenge because they are recalcitrant to current therapeutic regimes. A key component of biofilm formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl, which are involved in the formation and maintenance of the structural biofilm scaffold and protection against antimicrobials and host defenses. Given that the glycoside hydrolases PelAh and PslGh encoded in the pel and psl biosynthetic operons, respectively, are utilized for in vivo exopolysaccharide processing, we reasoned that these would provide specificity to target P. aeruginosa biofilms. Evaluating these enzymes as potential therapeutics, we demonstrate that these glycoside hydrolases selectively target and degrade the exopolysaccharide component of the biofilm matrix. PelAh and PslGh inhibit biofilm formation over a 24-hour period with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 69.3 ± 1.2 and 4.1 ± 1.1 nM, respectively, and are capable of disrupting preexisting biofilms in 1 hour with EC50 of 35.7 ± 1.1 and 12.9 ± 1.1 nM, respectively. This treatment was effective against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa isolates and reduced biofilm biomass by 58 to 94%. These noncytotoxic enzymes potentiated antibiotics because the addition of either enzyme to a sublethal concentration of colistin reduced viable bacterial counts by 2.5 orders of magnitude when used either prophylactically or on established 24-hour biofilms. In addition, PelAh was able to increase neutrophil killing by ~50%. This work illustrates the feasibility and benefits of using bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases to develop novel antibiofilm therapeutics. PMID:27386527

  19. New perspective on glycoside hydrolase binding to lignin from pretreated corn stover

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Sammond, Deanne W.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Crowley, Michael F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; et al

    2015-12-18

    In this study, non-specific binding of cellulases to lignin has been implicated as a major factor in the loss of cellulase activity during biomass conversion to sugars. It is believed that this binding may strongly impact process economics through loss of enzyme activities during hydrolysis and enzyme recycling scenarios. The current model suggests glycoside hydrolase activities are lost though non-specific/non-productive binding of carbohydrate-binding domains to lignin, limiting catalytic site access to the carbohydrate components of the cell wall.

  20. Novel glycoside hydrolases identified by screening a Chinese Holstein dairy cow rumen-derived metagenome library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Jiaqi; Bu, Dengpan; Liu, Kailang; Zhu, Yaxin; Dong, Zhiyang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2010-10-01

    One clone encoding glycoside hydrolases was identified through functional screening of a rumen bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Of the 68 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted, one ORF encodes a novel endo-β-1,4-xylanase with two catalytic domains of family GH43 and two cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) of family IV. Partial characterization showed that this endo-xylanase has a greater specific activity than a number of other xylanases over a wide temperature range at neutral pH and could be useful in some industrial applications. PMID:20709844

  1. Detection and determination of lipase (acylglycerol hydrolase) activity from various sources.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R G

    1983-09-01

    Methods for the detection and determination of lipases (acylglycerol hydrolases) and preparation of assays are reviewed including substrates, conditions and screening. Some newer methods for the determination of lipase activity are discussed. Several of these are: (a) titrimetry, (b) colorimetry of Cu soaps of free fatty acids (FFA), (c) colorimetry of chromophores in the acyl chain of FFA or in glycerol, (d) radioassay, (e) gas liquid chromatography, (f) enzymatic treatment of FFA and measurement of the resulting products, and (g) direct immunological determination of the lipase. Examples and sensitivities are given and advantages and disadvantages are described. PMID:6633171

  2. Radiometric assay of ghrelin hydrolase activity and 3H-ghrelin distribution into mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vicky Ping; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2015-12-15

    A high-throughput radiometric assay was developed to characterize enzymatic hydrolysis of ghrelin and to track the peptide's fate in vivo. The assay is based on solvent partitioning of [(3)H]-octanoic acid liberated from [(3)H]-octanoyl ghrelin during enzymatic hydrolysis. This simple and cost-effective method facilitates kinetic analysis of ghrelin hydrolase activity of native and mutated butyrylcholinesterases or carboxylesterases from multiple species. In addition, the assay's high sensitivity facilitates ready evaluation of ghrelin's pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution in mice after i.v. bolus administration of radiolabeled peptide. PMID:26514871

  3. Characterization of organophosphorus hydrolases and the genetic manipulation of the phosphotriesterase from pseudomonas diminuta

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, K.I.; Miller, C.E.; Wild, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    There are a variety of enzymes which are specifically capable of hydrolyzing organophosphorus esters with different phosphoryl bonds from the typical phosphotriester bonds of common insecticidal neurotoxins (e.g. paraoxon or coumaphos) to the phosphonate-fluoride bonds of chemical warfare agents (e.g. soman or sarin). These enzymes comprise a diverse set of enzymes whose basic architecture and substrate specificities vary dramatically, yet they appear to be ubiquitous throughout nature. The most thoroughly studied of these enzymes is the organophosphate hydrolase (opd gene product) of Pseudomonas diminuta and Ftavobacterium sp. ATCC 27551, and the heterologous expression, post-translational modification, and genetic engineering studies undertaken with this enzyme are described.

  4. Discovery of MK-3168: A PET Tracer for Imaging Brain Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Hamill, Terence G; Chioda, Marc; Chobanian, Harry; Fung, Selena; Guo, Yan; Chang, Linda; Bakshi, Raman; Hong, Qingmei; Dellureficio, James; Lin, Linus S; Abbadie, Catherine; Alexander, Jessica; Jin, Hong; Mandala, Suzanne; Shiao, Lin-Lin; Li, Wenping; Sanabria, Sandra; Williams, David; Zeng, Zhizhen; Hajdu, Richard; Jochnowitz, Nina; Rosenbach, Mark; Karanam, Bindhu; Madeira, Maria; Salituro, Gino; Powell, Joyce; Xu, Ling; Terebetski, Jenna L; Leone, Joseph F; Miller, Patricia; Cook, Jacquelynn; Holahan, Marie; Joshi, Aniket; O'Malley, Stacey; Purcell, Mona; Posavec, Diane; Chen, Tsing-Bau; Riffel, Kerry; Williams, Mangay; Hargreaves, Richard; Sullivan, Kathleen A; Nargund, Ravi P; DeVita, Robert J

    2013-06-13

    We report herein the discovery of a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) positron emission tomography (PET) tracer. Starting from a pyrazole lead, medicinal chemistry efforts directed toward reducing lipophilicity led to the synthesis of a series of imidazole analogues. Compound 6 was chosen for further profiling due to its appropriate physical chemical properties and excellent FAAH inhibition potency across species. [(11)C]-6 (MK-3168) exhibited good brain uptake and FAAH-specific signal in rhesus monkeys and is a suitable PET tracer for imaging FAAH in the brain. PMID:24900701

  5. Biosensing Paraoxon in Simulated Environmental Samples by Immobilized Organophosphorus Hydrolase in Functionalized Mesoporous Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Saripalli, Prasad; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    There is a critical need for highly sensitive, cost-effective sensors to conduct ecological analyses for environmental and homeland security related applications. We report here on a method which significantly overcomes this difficulty, and demonstrate its application in a biosensor for aquatic environmental applications. A fast-responding and stable biosensor was developed via immobilization of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) in functionalized mesoporous silica (FMS) with pore sizes in tens of nanometers. The sensor was tested for detection of paraoxon in simulated environmental samples, under wide ranging physico-chemical conditions.

  6. Inhibition of recombinant human carboxylesterase 1 and 2 and monoacylglycerol lipase by chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon and methyl paraoxon

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, J. Allen; Bittles, Victoria; Herring, Katye L.; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2012-01-01

    Oxons are the bioactivated metabolites of organophosphorus insecticides formed via cytochrome P450 monooxygenase-catalyzed desulfuration of the parent compound. Oxons react covalently with the active site serine residue of serine hydrolases, thereby inactivating the enzyme. A number of serine hydrolases other than acetylcholinesterase, the canonical target of oxons, have been reported to react with and be inhibited by oxons. These off-target serine hydrolases include carboxylesterase 1 (CES1), CES2, and monoacylglycerol lipase. Carboxylesterases (CES, EC 3.1.1.1) metabolize a number of xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds containing ester, amide, and thioester bonds and are important in the metabolism of many pharmaceuticals. Monoglyceride lipase (MGL, EC 3.1.1.23) hydrolyzes monoglycerides including the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). The physiological consequences and toxicity related to the inhibition of off-target serine hydrolases by oxons due to chronic, low level environmental exposures are poorly understood. Here, we determined the potency of inhibition (IC{sub 50} values; 15 min preincubation, enzyme and inhibitor) of recombinant CES1, CES2, and MGL by chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon and methyl paraoxon. The order of potency for these three oxons with CES1, CES2, and MGL was chlorpyrifos oxon > paraoxon > methyl paraoxon, although the difference in potency for chlorpyrifos oxon with CES1 and CES2 did not reach statistical significance. We also determined the bimolecular rate constants (k{sub inact}/K{sub I}) for the covalent reaction of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon and methyl paraoxon with CES1 and CES2. Consistent with the results for the IC{sub 50} values, the order of reactivity for each of the three oxons with CES1 and CES2 was chlorpyrifos oxon > paraoxon > methyl paraoxon. The bimolecular rate constant for the reaction of chlorpyrifos oxon with MGL was also determined and was less than the values determined for chlorpyrifos oxon with CES1

  7. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  8. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  9. Recombinant DNA means and method

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, B.L.; Mao, J.I.; Moir, D.T.; Taunton-Rigby, A.; Vovis, G.F.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a transformed living cell selected from the group consisting of fungi, yeast and bacteria, and containing genetic material derived from recombinant DNA material and coding for bovine rennin.

  10. Stable recombination hotspots in birds.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M; Strand, Alva I; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Griffith, Simon C; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-11-20

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but it appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking the gene that encodes PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species: the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, and the long-tailed finch, Poephila acuticauda. We found that both species have recombination hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, most hotspots are shared between the two species, and their conservation seems to extend over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution. PMID:26586757

  11. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  12. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Helmut; Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  13. Structural genomics analysis of uncharacterized protein families overrepresented in human gut bacteria identifies a novel glycoside hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteroides spp. form a significant part of our gut microbiome and are well known for optimized metabolism of diverse polysaccharides. Initial analysis of the archetypal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome identified 172 glycosyl hydrolases and a large number of uncharacterized proteins associated with polysaccharide metabolism. Results BT_1012 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 is a protein of unknown function and a member of a large protein family consisting entirely of uncharacterized proteins. Initial sequence analysis predicted that this protein has two domains, one on the N- and one on the C-terminal. A PSI-BLAST search found over 150 full length and over 90 half size homologs consisting only of the N-terminal domain. The experimentally determined three-dimensional structure of the BT_1012 protein confirms its two-domain architecture and structural analysis of both domains suggests their specific functions. The N-terminal domain is a putative catalytic domain with significant similarity to known glycoside hydrolases, the C-terminal domain has a beta-sandwich fold typically found in C-terminal domains of other glycosyl hydrolases, however these domains are typically involved in substrate binding. We describe the structure of the BT_1012 protein and discuss its sequence-structure relationship and their possible functional implications. Conclusions Structural and sequence analyses of the BT_1012 protein identifies it as a glycosyl hydrolase, expanding an already impressive catalog of enzymes involved in polysaccharide metabolism in Bacteroides spp. Based on this we have renamed the Pfam families representing the two domains found in the BT_1012 protein, PF13204 and PF12904, as putative glycoside hydrolase and glycoside hydrolase-associated C-terminal domain respectively. PMID:24742328

  14. Partial purification and characterization of an inducible indole-3-acetyl-L-aspartic acid hydrolase from Enterobacter agglomerans

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Jyh-Ching |; Cohen, J.D.; Mulbry, W.W.

    1996-11-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-amino acid conjugate hydrolases are believed to be important in the regulation of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) metabolism in plants and therefore have potential uses for the alteration of plant IAA metabolism. To isolate bacterial strains exhibiting significant indole-3-acetyl-aspartate (IAA-Asp) hydrolase activity, a sewage sludge inoculation was cultured under conditions in which IAA-Asp served as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. One isolate, Enterobacter agglomerans, showed hydrolase activity inducible by IAA-L-Asp or N-acetyl-L-Asp but not by IAA, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, urea, or indoleacetamide. Among a total of 17 IAA conjugates tested as potential substrates, the enzyme had an exclusively high substrate specificity for IAA-L-Asp of 13.5 mM. The optimal pH for this enzyme was between 8.0 and 8.5. In extraction buffer containing 0.8 mM Mg{sup 2+} the hydrolase activity was inhibited to 80% by 1 mM dithiothreitol and to 60% by 1 mm CuSO{sub 4}; the activity was increased by 40% with 1mM MnSO{sub 4}. However, in extraction buffer with no trace elements, the hydrolase activity was inhibited to 50% by either 1 mM dithiothreitol or 1% Triton X-100 (Sigma). These results suggest that disulfide bonding might be essential for enzyme activity. Purification of the hydrolase by hydroxyapatite and TSK-phenyl (HP-Genenchem, South San Francisco, CA) preparative high-performance liquid chromatography yielded a major 45-kD polypeptide as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. 45 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Expression and characterization of an epoxide hydrolase from Anopheles gambiae with high activity on epoxy fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiawen; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    In insects, epoxide hydrolases (EHs) play critical roles in the metabolism of xenobiotic epoxides from the food resources and in the regulation of endogenous chemical mediators, such as juvenile hormones. Using the baculovirus expression system, we expressed and characterized an epoxide hydrolase from Anopheles gambiae (AgEH) that is distinct in evolutionary history from insect juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolases (JHEHs). We partially purified the enzyme by ion exchange chromatography and isoelectric focusing. The experimentally determined molecular weight and pI were estimated to be 35kD and 6.3 respectively, different than the theoretical ones. The AgEH had the greatest activity on long chain epoxy fatty acids such as 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (14,15-EET) and 9,10-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic acids (9,10-EpOME or leukotoxin) among the substrates evaluated. Juvenile hormone III, a terpenoid insect growth regulator, was the next best substrate tested. The AgEH showed kinetics comparable to the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases, and the activity could be inhibited by AUDA [12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido) dodecanoic acid], a urea-based inhibitor designed to inhibit the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases. The rabbit serum generated against the soluble epoxide hydrolase of Mus musculus can both cross-react with natural and denatured forms of the AgEH, suggesting immunologically they are similar. The study suggests there are mammalian sEH homologs in insects, and epoxy fatty acids may be important chemical mediators in insects. PMID:25173592

  16. [Antithrombotic recombinant antibodies].

    PubMed

    Muzard, Julien; Loyau, Stéphane; Ajzenberg, Nadine; Billiald, Philippe; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine

    2006-01-01

    Coronary syndromes, stroke and other ischaemic arterial diseases are the leading cause of death in the world and will probably remain it at least until 2020. Cardiovascular diseases kill 17 million people each year with an expected increase to 20 million in 2020 and 24 million in 2030. The global impact of recurrence and death during the 6 months following an acute coronary syndrome remains at 8-15% in the present state of medical practice. Acute ischaemic syndromes have a common aetiology that is the formation of a platelet-rich clot at the site of severe coronary stenosis and of eroded atherosclerotic plaques. Therapy consists of medical treatments associating thrombolysis, antiplatelet drugs, and the re-opening of the coronary artery by angioplasty. But these treatments do not prevent morbidity and mortality reaching 15% at 6 months. Finally the treatment of stroke is very limited. There is thus a real clinical need to improve existing treatments and to discover new molecules. Platelet activation is a critical step in ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. This is the reason why antiplatelet drugs are most often prescribed in these cases. Currently, only one recombinant antithrombotic antibody is used in therapy. This is a chimeric Fab, c7E3 or abciximab, which inhibits the final phase of platelet aggregation. Abciximab is prescribed in acute coronary syndromes treated by angioplasty. However, treatment by abciximab can induce severe complications, principally, hemorrages and thrombopenia. Other platelet receptors involved in the earlier steps of platelet activation, such as the phases of contact with and of activation by the subendothelium matrix, have been identified as potential targets for the development of antithrombotic antibodies and are described in this revue. PMID:17652972

  17. Genetic recombination in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed Central

    Parag, Y

    1978-01-01

    Low-frequency (10(-6)) genetic recombination was observed in a cephamycin-producing strain of Streptomyces griseus. The recombinants were predominantly heteroclones. Heteroclone analysis was performed involving four heteroclones of one cross. In 100 mutants correlation was found between the type of auxotrophy and the level of antibiotic activity. A cross of this strain with a streptomycin-producing strain of S. griesus is described. PMID:415037

  18. [Vaccine application of recombinant herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, N; Xuan, X; Mikami, T

    2000-04-01

    Recently, genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques has been applied to design new viral vaccines in order to reduce some problems which the present viral vaccines have. Up to now, many viruses have been investigated for development of recombinant attenuated vaccines or live viral vectors for delivery of foreign genes coding immunogenic antigens. In this article, we introduced the new vaccine strategy using genetically engineered herpesviruses. PMID:10774221

  19. Combinatorics in Recombinational Population Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Laxmi

    The work that I will discuss is motivated by the need for understanding, and processing, the manifestations of recombination events in chromosome sequences. In this talk, we focus on two related problems. First, we explore the very general problem of reconstructability of pedigree history. How plausible is it to unravel the history of a complete unit (chromosome) of inheritance? The second problem deals with reconstructing the recombinational history of a collection of chromosomes.

  20. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: γα<0.39 and γi<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  1. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  2. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  3. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  4. Oxime esters as selective, covalent inhibitors of the serine hydrolase retinoblastoma-binding protein 9 (RBBP9).

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Wolfe, Monique R; Masuda, Kim; Brown, Steven J; Spicer, Timothy P; Fernandez-Vega, Virneliz; Chase, Peter; Hodder, Peter S; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-04-01

    We recently described a fluorescence polarization platform for competitive activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) that enables high-throughput inhibitor screening for enzymes with poorly characterized biochemical activity. Here, we report the discovery of a class of oxime ester inhibitors for the unannotated serine hydrolase RBBP9 from a full-deck (200,000+ compound) fluopol-ABPP screen conducted in collaboration with the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network (MLSCN). We show that these compounds covalently inhibit RBBP9 by modifying enzyme's active site serine nucleophile and, based on competitive ABPP in cell and tissue proteomes, are selective for RBBP9 relative to other mammalian serine hydrolases. PMID:20207142

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the amidase domain of allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP

    SciTech Connect

    Balotra, Sahil; Newman, Janet; French, Nigel G.; Briggs, Lyndall J.; Peat, Thomas S.; Scott, Colin

    2014-02-19

    The amidase domain of the allophanate hydrolase AtzF from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP has been crystallized and preliminary X-ray diffraction data have been collected. The allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was expressed and purified, and a tryptic digest fragment was subsequently identified, expressed and purified. This 50 kDa construct retained amidase activity and was crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and adopted space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.4, b = 179.2, c = 112.6 Å, β = 106.6°.

  6. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of piperidine-derived non-urea soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pecic, Stevan; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Newcomer, Marcia E.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian

    2013-09-27

    A series of potent amide non-urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is disclosed. The inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase leads to elevated levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), and thus inhibitors of sEH represent one of a novel approach to the development of vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory drugs. Structure–activities studies guided optimization of a lead compound, identified through high-throughput screening, gave rise to sub-nanomolar inhibitors of human sEH with stability in human liver microsomal assay suitable for preclinical development.

  7. Structural insights into the reaction mechanism of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Kusakabe, Yoshio; Ishihara, Masaaki; Umeda, Tomonobu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Nakanishi, Masayuki; Kitade, Yukio; Gouda, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kazuo T.; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2015-01-01

    S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SAH hydrolase or SAHH) is a highly conserved enzyme that catalyses the reversible hydrolysis of SAH to L-homocysteine (HCY) and adenosine (ADO). High-resolution crystal structures have been reported for bacterial and plant SAHHs, but not mammalian SAHHs. Here, we report the first high-resolution crystal structure of mammalian SAHH (mouse SAHH) in complex with a reaction product (ADO) and with two reaction intermediate analogues—3’-keto-aristeromycin (3KA) and noraristeromycin (NRN)—at resolutions of 1.55, 1.55, and 1.65 Å. Each of the three structures constitutes a structural snapshot of one of the last three steps of the five-step process of SAH hydrolysis by SAHH. In the NRN complex, a water molecule, which is an essential substrate for ADO formation, is structurally identified for the first time as the candidate donor in a Michael addition by SAHH to the 3’-keto-4’,5’-didehydroadenosine reaction intermediate. The presence of the water molecule is consistent with the reaction mechanism proposed by Palmer & Abeles in 1979. These results provide insights into the reaction mechanism of the SAHH enzyme. PMID:26573329

  8. Extracellular Xylanolytic and Pectinolytic Hydrolase Production by Aspergillus flavus Isolates Contributes to Crop Invasion.

    PubMed

    Mellon, Jay E

    2015-08-01

    Several atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates, including some being used as biocontrol agents, and one toxigenic isolate were surveyed for the ability to produce extracellular xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolases. All of the tested isolates displayed good production of endoxylanases when grown on a medium utilizing larch xylan as a sole carbon substrate. Four of the tested isolates produced reasonably high levels of esterase activity, while the atoxigenic biocontrol agent NRRL 21882 isolate esterase level was significantly lower than the others. Atoxigenic A. flavus isolates 19, 22, K49, AF36 (the latter two are biocontrol agents) and toxigenic AF13 produced copious levels of pectinolytic activity when grown on a pectin medium. The pectinolytic activity levels of the atoxigenic A. flavus 17 and NRRL 21882 isolates were significantly lower than the other tested isolates. In addition, A. flavus isolates that displayed high levels of pectinolytic activity in the plate assay produced high levels of endopolygalacturonase (pectinase) P2c, as ascertained by isoelectric focusing electrophoresis. Isolate NRRL 21882 displayed low levels of both pectinase P2c and pectin methyl esterase. A. flavus appears capable of producing these hydrolytic enzymes irrespective of aflatoxin production. This ability of atoxigenic isolates to produce xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolases mimics that of toxigenic isolates and, therefore, contributes to the ability of atoxigenic isolates to occupy the same niche as A. flavus toxigenic isolates. PMID:26295409

  9. Crystal structure of the glycosidase family 73 peptidoglycan hydrolase FlgJ

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Wataru; Ochiai, Akihito; Momma, Keiko; Itoh, Takafumi; Mikami, Bunzo; Maruyama, Yukie; Murata, Kousaku

    2009-03-27

    Glycoside hydrolase (GH) categorized into family 73 plays an important role in degrading bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. The flagellar protein FlgJ contains N- and C-terminal domains responsible for flagellar rod assembly and peptidoglycan hydrolysis, respectively. A member of family GH-73, the C-terminal domain (SPH1045-C) of FlgJ from Sphingomonas sp. strain A1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. SPH1045-C exhibited bacterial cell lytic activity most efficiently at pH 6.0 and 37 deg. C. The X-ray crystallographic structure of SPH1045-C was determined at 1.74 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. The enzyme consists of two lobes, {alpha} and {beta}. A deep cleft located between the two lobes can accommodate polymer molecules, suggesting that the active site is located in the cleft. Although SPH1045-C shows a structural homology with family GH-22 and GH-23 lysozymes, the arrangement of the nucleophile/base residue in the active site is specific to each peptidoglycan hydrolase.

  10. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and –beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12345.001 PMID:26779719

  11. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Dimerization of aminopeptidase N and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, E.M. )

    1990-01-09

    The pig intestinal brush border enzymes aminopeptidase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase are present in the microvilla membrane as homodimers. Dimethyl adipimidate was used to cross-link the two ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled brush border enzymes from cultured mucosal explants. For aminopeptidase N, dimerization did not begin until 5-10 min after synthesis, and maximal dimerization by cross-linking of the transient form of the enzyme required 1 h, whereas the mature form of aminopeptidase N cross-linked with unchanged efficiency from 45 min to 3 h of labeling. Formation of dimers of this enzyme therefore occurs prior to the Golgi-associated processing, and the slow rate of dimerization may be the rate-limiting step in the transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex. For lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, the posttranslational processing includes a proteolytic cleavage of its high molecular weight precursor. Since only the mature form and not the precursor of this enzyme could be cross-linked, formation of tightly associated dimers only takes place after transport out of the endoplasmic reticulum. Dimerization of the two brush border enzymes therefore seems to occur in different organelles of the enterocyte.

  12. Human microsomal epoxide hydrolase: genetic polymorphism and functional expression in vitro of amino acid variants

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, Christopher; Aicher, Lauri; Sidhu, Jaspreet S.

    2016-01-01

    Human microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a biotransformation enzyme that metabolizes reactive epoxide intermediates to more water-soluble trans-dihydrodiol derivatives. We compared protein-coding sequences from six full-length human mEH DNA clones and assessed potential amino acid variation at seven positions. The prevalence of these variants was assessed in at least 37 unrelated individuals using polymerase chain reaction experiments. Only Tyr/His 113 (exon 3) and His/Arg 139 (exon 4) variants were observed. The genotype frequencies determined for residue 113 alleles indicate that this locus may not be in Hardy – Weinberg equilibrium, whereas frequencies observed for residue 139 alleles were similar to expected values. Nucleotide sequences coding for the variant amino acids were constructed in an mEH cDNA using site-directed mutagenesis, and each was expressed in vitro by transient transfection of COS-1 cells. Epoxide hydrolase mRNA level, catalytic activity, and immunoreactive protein were evaluated for each construct. The results of these analyses demonstrated relatively uniform levels of mEH RNA expression between the constructs. mEH enzymatic activity and immunoreactive protein were strongly correlated, indicating that mEH specific activity was similar for each variant. However, marked differences were noted in the relative amounts of immunoreactive protein and enzymatic activity resulting from the amino acid substitutions. These data suggest that common human mEH amino acid polymorphisms may alter enzymatic function, possibly by modifying protein stability. PMID:7516776

  13. Heavy chain single-domain antibodies to detect native human soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yongliang; Li, Dongyang; Morisseau, Christophe; Dong, Jie-Xian; Yang, Jun; Wan, Debin; Rossotti, Martín A; Gee, Shirley J; González-Sapienza, Gualberto G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-09-01

    The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a potential pharmacological target for treating hypertension, vascular inflammation, pain, cancer, and other diseases. However, there is not a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to estimate levels of active sEH in tissues. Toward developing such an assay, a polyclonal variable domain of heavy chain antibody (VHH) sandwich immunoassay was developed. Ten VHHs, which are highly selective for native human sEH, were isolated from a phage-displayed library. The ten VHHs have no significant cross-reactivity with human microsomal epoxide hydrolase, rat and mouse sEH, and denatured human sEH. There is a high correlation between protein levels of the sEH determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the catalytic activity of the enzyme in S9 fractions of human tissues (liver, kidney, and lung). The VHH-based ELISA appears to be a new reliable method for monitoring the sEH and may be useful as a diagnostic tool for diseases influenced by sEH. This study also demonstrates the broad utility of VHH in biochemical and pharmacological research. PMID:26229025

  14. Soluble epoxide hydrolase as an anti-inflammatory target of the thrombolytic stroke drug SMTP-7.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Eriko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Shirafuji, Takumi; Hasumi, Keiji

    2014-12-26

    Although ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, only a small fraction of patients benefit from the current thrombolytic therapy due to a risk of cerebral hemorrhage caused by inflammation. Thus, the development of a new strategy to combat inflammation during thrombolysis is an urgent demand. The small molecule thrombolytic SMTP-7 effectively treats ischemic stroke in several animal models with reducing cerebral hemorrhage. Here we revealed that SMTP-7 targeted soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to suppress inflammation. SMTP-7 inhibited both of the two sEH enzyme activities: epoxide hydrolase (which inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxy-fatty acids) and lipid phosphate phosphatase. SMTP-7 suppressed epoxy-fatty acid hydrolysis in HepG2 cells in culture, implicating the sEH inhibition in the anti-inflammatory mechanism. The sEH inhibition by SMTP-7 was independent of its thrombolytic activity. The simultaneous targeting of thrombolysis and sEH by a single molecule is a promising strategy to revolutionize the current stroke therapy. PMID:25361765

  15. Extracellular Xylanolytic and Pectinolytic Hydrolase Production by Aspergillus flavus Isolates Contributes to Crop Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Jay E.

    2015-01-01

    Several atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates, including some being used as biocontrol agents, and one toxigenic isolate were surveyed for the ability to produce extracellular xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolases. All of the tested isolates displayed good production of endoxylanases when grown on a medium utilizing larch xylan as a sole carbon substrate. Four of the tested isolates produced reasonably high levels of esterase activity, while the atoxigenic biocontrol agent NRRL 21882 isolate esterase level was significantly lower than the others. Atoxigenic A. flavus isolates 19, 22, K49, AF36 (the latter two are biocontrol agents) and toxigenic AF13 produced copious levels of pectinolytic activity when grown on a pectin medium. The pectinolytic activity levels of the atoxigenic A. flavus 17 and NRRL 21882 isolates were significantly lower than the other tested isolates. In addition, A. flavus isolates that displayed high levels of pectinolytic activity in the plate assay produced high levels of endopolygalacturonase (pectinase) P2c, as ascertained by isoelectric focusing electrophoresis. Isolate NRRL 21882 displayed low levels of both pectinase P2c and pectin methyl esterase. A. flavus appears capable of producing these hydrolytic enzymes irrespective of aflatoxin production. This ability of atoxigenic isolates to produce xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolases mimics that of toxigenic isolates and, therefore, contributes to the ability of atoxigenic isolates to occupy the same niche as A. flavus toxigenic isolates. PMID:26295409

  16. [Inhibition of adherence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae to human buccal epithelium by glycoside hydrolases from marine hydrobiontes].

    PubMed

    Zaporozhets, T S; Makarenkova, I D; Bakunina, I Iu; Burtseva, Iu V; Kusaĭkin, M I; Balabanova, L A; Zviagintseva, T N; Besednova, N N; Rasskazov, V A

    2010-01-01

    A possibility of adhesion inhibition of Corynebacterium diphtheriae to human buccal epithelium by glycoside hydrolases of marine hydrobiontes was investigated using alpha-galactosidase from marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. KMM 701, total enzyme preparation and beta-1,3-glucanase from marine fungi Chaetomium, total enzyme preparation and beta-1,3-glucanase from marine mollusk Littorina kurila, and total enzyme preparation from crystalline style of marine mollusk Spisula sachalinensis were used. The enzymes were added to test-tubes containing buccal epithelial cells and/or the toxigenic bacterial strain C. diphtheriae No 1129, v. gravis. All the investigated enzymes were able to abort C. diphtheriae adherence, to human buccal epithelocytes. Inhibition of adhesion was more pronounced in the case of treatment of epithelocytes with highly purified enzymes of marine hydrobiontes in comparison with total enzyme preparations. The significant inhibition of C. diphtheriae adhesion was observed when the enzymes were added to the epithelocytes with the attached microorganisms. The results obtained show that glycoside hydrolases of marine hydrobiontes degrade any carbohydrates expressed on cell surface of bacterium or human buccal epithelocytes, impair unique lectin-carbohydrate interaction and prevent the adhesion. PMID:20695214

  17. A multifunctional hybrid glycosyl hydrolase discovered in an uncultured microbial consortium from ruminant gut.

    PubMed

    Palackal, Nisha; Lyon, Christopher S; Zaidi, Seema; Luginbühl, Peter; Dupree, Paul; Goubet, Florence; Macomber, John L; Short, Jay M; Hazlewood, Geoffrey P; Robertson, Dan E; Steer, Brian A

    2007-02-01

    A unique multifunctional glycosyl hydrolase was discovered by screening an environmental DNA library prepared from a microbial consortium collected from cow rumen. The protein consists of two adjacent catalytic domains. Sequence analysis predicted that one domain conforms to glycosyl hydrolase family 5 and the other to family 26. The enzyme is active on several different beta-linked substrates and possesses mannanase, xylanase, and glucanase activities. Site-directed mutagenesis studies on the catalytic residues confirmed the presence of two functionally independent catalytic domains. Using site-specific mutations, it was shown that one catalytic site hydrolyzes beta-1,4-linked mannan substrates, while the second catalytic site hydrolyzes beta-1,4-linked xylan and beta-1,4-linked glucan substrates. Polysaccharide Analysis using Carbohydrate gel Electrophoresis (PACE) also confirmed that the enzyme has discrete domains for binding and hydrolysis of glucan- and mannan-linked polysaccharides. Such multifunctional enzymes have many potential industrial applications in plant processing, including biomass saccharification, animal feed nutritional enhancement, textile, and pulp and paper processing. PMID:17103163

  18. Cloning, expression and mutation of a triazophos hydrolase gene from Burkholderia sp. SZL-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Qiang; Guo, Su-Hui; Cheng, Ming-Gen; Zhao, Meng-Jun; Hong, Qing; Huang, Xing

    2016-06-01

    Triazophos is a broad-spectrum and highly effective insecticide, and the residues of triazophos have been frequently detected in the environment. A triazophos-degrading bacterium, Burkholderia sp. SZL-1, was isolated from a long-term triazophos-polluted soil. Strain SZL-1 could hydrolyze triazophos to 1-phenyl-3-hydroxy-1,2,4-triazole, which was further utilized as the carbon sources for growth. The triazophos hydrolase gene trhA, cloned from strain SZL-1, was expressed and homogenously purified using Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. TrhA is 55 kDa and displays maximum activity at 25°C, pH 8.0. This enzyme still has nearly 60% activity at the range of 15°C-50°C for 30 min. TrhA was mutated by sequential error prone PCR and screened for improved activity for triazophos degradation. One purified variant protein (Val89-Gly89) named TrhA-M1 showed up to 3-fold improvement in specific activity against triazophos, and the specificity constants of Kcat and Kcat/Km for TrhA-M1 were improved up to 2.3- and 8.28-fold, respectively, compared to the wild-type enzyme. The results in this paper provided potential material for the contaminated soil remediation and hydrolase genetic structure research. PMID:27190294

  19. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase as an Anti-inflammatory Target of the Thrombolytic Stroke Drug SMTP-7*

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Eriko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Shirafuji, Takumi; Hasumi, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Although ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, only a small fraction of patients benefit from the current thrombolytic therapy due to a risk of cerebral hemorrhage caused by inflammation. Thus, the development of a new strategy to combat inflammation during thrombolysis is an urgent demand. The small molecule thrombolytic SMTP-7 effectively treats ischemic stroke in several animal models with reducing cerebral hemorrhage. Here we revealed that SMTP-7 targeted soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to suppress inflammation. SMTP-7 inhibited both of the two sEH enzyme activities: epoxide hydrolase (which inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxy-fatty acids) and lipid phosphate phosphatase. SMTP-7 suppressed epoxy-fatty acid hydrolysis in HepG2 cells in culture, implicating the sEH inhibition in the anti-inflammatory mechanism. The sEH inhibition by SMTP-7 was independent of its thrombolytic activity. The simultaneous targeting of thrombolysis and sEH by a single molecule is a promising strategy to revolutionize the current stroke therapy. PMID:25361765

  20. Molecular Basis of Prodrug Activation by Human Valacyclovirase, an [alpha]-Amino Acid Ester Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Longsheng; Xu, Zhaohui; Zhou, Jiahai; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2008-07-08

    Chemical modification to improve biopharmaceutical properties, especially oral absorption and bioavailability, is a common strategy employed by pharmaceutical chemists. The approach often employs a simple structural modification and utilizes ubiquitous endogenous esterases as activation enzymes, although such enzymes are often unidentified. This report describes the crystal structure and specificity of a novel activating enzyme for valacyclovir and valganciclovir. Our structural insights show that human valacyclovirase has a unique binding mode and specificity for amino acid esters. Biochemical data demonstrate that the enzyme hydrolyzes esters of {alpha}-amino acids exclusively and displays a broad specificity spectrum for the aminoacyl moiety similar to tricorn-interacting aminopeptidase F1. Crystal structures of the enzyme, two mechanistic mutants, and a complex with a product analogue, when combined with biochemical analysis, reveal the key determinants for substrate recognition; that is, a flexible and mostly hydrophobic acyl pocket, a localized negative electrostatic potential, a large open leaving group-accommodating groove, and a pivotal acidic residue, Asp-123, after the nucleophile Ser-122. This is the first time that a residue immediately after the nucleophile has been found to have its side chain directed into the substrate binding pocket and play an essential role in substrate discrimination in serine hydrolases. These results as well as a phylogenetic analysis establish that the enzyme functions as a specific {alpha}-amino acid ester hydrolase. Valacyclovirase is a valuable target for amino acid ester prodrug-based oral drug delivery enhancement strategies.

  1. Exploration of the chlorpyrifos escape pathway from acylpeptide hydrolases using steered molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmei; Jin, Hanyong; Wang, Junling; Guan, Shanshan; Zhang, Zuoming; Han, Weiwei

    2016-04-01

    Acylpeptide hydrolases (APH) catalyze the removal of an N-acylated amino acid from blocked peptides. APH is significantly more sensitive than acetylcholinesterase, a target of Alzheimer's disease, to inhibition by organophosphorus (OP) compounds. Thus, OP compounds can be used as a tool to probe the physiological functions of APH. Here, we report the results of a computational study of molecular dynamics simulations of APH bound to the OP compounds and an exploration of the chlorpyrifos escape pathway using steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations. In addition, we apply SMD simulations to identify potential escape routes of chlorpyrifos from hydrolase hydrophobic cavities in the APH-inhibitor complex. Two previously proposed APH pathways were reliably identified by CAVER 3.0, with the estimated relative importance of P1 > P2 for its size. We identify the major pathway, P2, using SMD simulations, and Arg526, Glu88, Gly86, and Asn65 are identified as important residues for the ligand leaving via P2. These results may help in the design of APH-targeting drugs with improved efficacy, as well as in understanding APH selectivity of the inhibitor binding in the prolyl oligopeptidase family. PMID:26155973

  2. A remarkable activity of human leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) toward unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Byzia, Anna; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Salvesen, Guy S; Drag, Marcin

    2014-05-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H--EC 3.3.2.6) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme, which processes LTA4 through an epoxide hydrolase activity and is also able to trim one amino acid at a time from N-terminal peptidic substrates via its aminopeptidase activity. In this report, we have utilized a library of 130 individual proteinogenic and unnatural amino acid fluorogenic substrates to determine the aminopeptidase specificity of this enzyme. We have found that the best proteinogenic amino acid recognized by LTA4H is arginine. However, we have also observed several unnatural amino acids, which were significantly better in terms of cleavage rate (k cat/K m values). Among them, the benzyl ester of aspartic acid exhibited a k cat/K m value that was more than two orders of magnitude higher (1.75 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) as compared to L-Arg (1.5 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). This information can be used for design of potent inhibitors of this enzyme, but may also suggest yet undiscovered functions or specificities of LTA4H. PMID:24573245

  3. Computational insights into function and inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Cavalli, Andrea; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-02-16

    The Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme is a membrane-bound serine hydrolase responsible for the deactivating hydrolysis of a family of naturally occurring fatty acid amides. FAAH is a critical enzyme of the endocannabinoid system, being mainly responsible for regulating the level of its main cannabinoid substrate anandamide. For this reason, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH, which increases the level of endogenous anandamide, is a promising strategy to cure a variety of diseases including pain, inflammation, and cancer. Much structural, mutagenesis, and kinetic data on FAAH has been generated over the last couple of decades. This has prompted several informative computational investigations to elucidate, at the atomic-level, mechanistic details on catalysis and inhibition of this pharmaceutically relevant enzyme. Here, we review how these computational studies - based on classical molecular dynamics, full quantum mechanics, and hybrid QM/MM methods - have clarified the binding and reactivity of some relevant substrates and inhibitors of FAAH. We also discuss the experimental implications of these computational insights, which have provided a thoughtful elucidation of the complex physical and chemical steps of the enzymatic mechanism of FAAH. Finally, we discuss how computations have been helpful for building structure-activity relationships of potent FAAH inhibitors. PMID:25240419

  4. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Acylpeptide Hydrolase Bound to Chlorpyrifosmethyl Oxon and Dichlorvos

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hanyong; Zhou, Zhenhuan; Wang, Dongmei; Guan, Shanshan; Han, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    Acylpeptide hydrolases (APHs) catalyze the removal of N-acylated amino acids from blocked peptides. Like other prolyloligopeptidase (POP) family members, APHs are believed to be important targets for drug design. To date, the binding pose of organophosphorus (OP) compounds of APH, as well as the different OP compounds binding and inducing conformational changes in two domains, namely, α/β hydrolase and β-propeller, remain poorly understood. We report a computational study of APH bound to chlorpyrifosmethyl oxon and dichlorvos. In our docking study, Val471 and Gly368 are important residues for chlorpyrifosmethyl oxon and dichlorvos binding. Molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to explore the conformational changes between the chlorpyrifosmethyl oxon and dichlorvos bound to APH, which indicated that the structural feature of chlorpyrifosmethyl oxon binding in APH permitted partial opening of the β-propeller fold and allowed the chlorpyrifosmethyl oxon to easily enter the catalytic site. These results may facilitate the design of APH-targeting drugs with improved efficacy. PMID:25794283

  6. Substrate recognition and catalysis by LytB, a pneumococcal peptidoglycan hydrolase involved in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Lastres, Palma; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Bustamante, Noemí; Aldridge, Christine; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar; Gray, Joe; Vollmer, Waldemar; García, Pedro; Menéndez, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of life-threatening diseases worldwide. Here we provide an in-depth functional characterization of LytB, the peptidoglycan hydrolase responsible for physical separation of daughter cells. Identified herein as an N-acetylglucosaminidase, LytB is involved also in colonization and invasion of the nasopharynx, biofilm formation and evasion of host immunity as previously demonstrated. We have shown that LytB cleaves the GlcNAc-β-(1,4)-MurNAc glycosidic bond of peptidoglycan building units. The hydrolysis occurs at sites with fully acetylated GlcNAc moieties, with preference for uncross-linked muropeptides. The necessity of GlcN acetylation and the presence of a single acidic moiety (Glu585) essential for catalysis strongly suggest a substrate-assisted mechanism with anchimeric assistance of the acetamido group of GlcNAc moieties. Additionally, modelling of the catalytic region bound to a hexasaccharide tripentapeptide provided insights into substrate-binding subsites and peptidoglycan recognition. Besides, cell-wall digestion products and solubilisation rates might indicate a tight control of LytB activity to prevent unrestrained breakdown of the cell wall. Choline-independent localization at the poles of the cell, mediated by the choline-binding domain, peptidoglycan modification, and choline-mediated (lipo)teichoic-acid attachment contribute to the high selectivity of LytB. Moreover, so far unknown chitin hydrolase and glycosyltransferase activities were detected using GlcNAc oligomers as substrate. PMID:26537571

  7. Engineering of an epoxide hydrolase for efficient bioresolution of bulky pharmaco substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xu-Dong; Yuan, Shuguang; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Jiahai

    2014-01-01

    Optically pure epoxides are essential chiral precursors for the production of (S)-propranolol, (S)-alprenolol, and other β-adrenergic receptor blocking drugs. Although the enzymatic production of these bulky epoxides has proven difficult, here we report a method to effectively improve the activity of BmEH, an epoxide hydrolase from Bacillus megaterium ECU1001 toward α-naphthyl glycidyl ether, the precursor of (S)-propranolol, by eliminating the steric hindrance near the potential product-release site. Using X-ray crystallography, mass spectrum, and molecular dynamics calculations, we have identified an active tunnel for substrate access and product release of this enzyme. The crystal structures revealed that there is an independent product-release site in BmEH that was not included in other reported epoxide hydrolase structures. By alanine scanning, two mutants, F128A and M145A, targeted to expand the potential product-release site displayed 42 and 25 times higher activities toward α-naphthyl glycidyl ether than the wild-type enzyme, respectively. These results show great promise for structure-based rational design in improving the catalytic efficiency of industrial enzymes for bulky substrates. PMID:25331869

  8. Structure of a Trypanosoma brucei α/β-hydrolase fold protein with unknown function

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Ethan A.; Holmes, Margaret; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quartly, Erin; Phizicky, Eric M.; Lauricella, Angela; Luft, Joseph; DeTitta, George; Neely, Helen; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of a structural genomics target protein, Tbru020260AAA from Trypanosoma brucei, has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å using multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction at the Se K edge. This protein belongs to Pfam sequence family PF08538 and is only distantly related to previously studied members of the α/β-hydrolase fold family. Structural superposition onto representative α/β-hydrolase fold proteins of known function indicates that a possible catalytic nucleophile, Ser116 in the T. brucei protein, lies at the expected location. However, the present structure and by extension the other trypanosomatid members of this sequence family have neither sequence nor structural similarity at the location of other active-site residues typical for proteins with this fold. Together with the presence of an additional domain between strands β6 and β7 that is conserved in trypanosomatid genomes, this suggests that the function of these homologs has diverged from other members of the fold family. PMID:18540054

  9. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Homologs in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus Suggest a Gene Duplication Event and Subsequent Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Todd R.; Aronov, Pavel A.

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a multidomain enzyme composed of C- and N-terminal regions that contain active sites for epoxide hydrolase (EH) and phosphatase activities, respectively. We report the cloning of two 60 kDa multidomain enzymes from the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus displaying significant sequence similarity to both the N- and C-terminal domains of the mammalian sEH. While one urchin enzyme did not exhibit EH activity, the second enzyme hydrolyzed several lipid messenger molecules metabolized by the mammalian sEH, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids. Neither of the urchin enzymes displayed phosphatase activity. The urchin EH was inhibited by small molecule inhibitors of the mammalian sEH and is the likely ancestor of the enzyme. Sequence comparisons suggest that the urchin sEH homologs are the result of a gene fusion event between a gene encoding for an EH and a gene for an enzyme of undetermined function. This fusion event was followed by a duplication event to produce the urchin enzymes. PMID:18554159

  10. Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community

    PubMed Central

    Allgaier, Martin; Reddy, Amitha; Park, Joshua I.; Ivanova, Natalia; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Lowry, Steve; Sapra, Rajat; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake A.; VanderGheynst, Jean S.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Development of cellulosic biofuels from non-food crops is currently an area of intense research interest. Tailoring depolymerizing enzymes to particular feedstocks and pretreatment conditions is one promising avenue of research in this area. Here we added a green-waste compost inoculum to switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and simulated thermophilic composting in a bioreactor to select for a switchgrass-adapted community and to facilitate targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases. Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA-based community profiles revealed that the microbial community changed dramatically between the initial and switchgrass-adapted compost (SAC) with some bacterial populations being enriched over 20-fold. We obtained 225 Mbp of 454-titanium pyrosequence data from the SAC community and conservatively identified 800 genes encoding glycoside hydrolase domains that were biased toward depolymerizing grass cell wall components. Of these, ∼10% were putative cellulases mostly belonging to families GH5 and GH9. We synthesized two SAC GH9 genes with codon optimization for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and observed activity for one on carboxymethyl cellulose. The active GH9 enzyme has a temperature optimum of 50°C and pH range of 5.5 to 8 consistent with the composting conditions applied. We demonstrate that microbial communities adapt to switchgrass decomposition using simulated composting condition and that full-length genes can be identified from complex metagenomic sequence data, synthesized and expressed resulting in active enzyme. PMID:20098679

  11. Targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases from a switchgrass-adapted compost community

    SciTech Connect

    Allgaier, M.; Reddy, A.; Park, J. I.; Ivanova, N.; D'haeseleer, P.; Lowry, S.; Sapra, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Simmons, B.A.; VanderGheynst, J. S.; Hugenholtz, P.

    2009-11-15

    Development of cellulosic biofuels from non-food crops is currently an area of intense research interest. Tailoring depolymerizing enzymes to particular feedstocks and pretreatment conditions is one promising avenue of research in this area. Here we added a green-waste compost inoculum to switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and simulated thermophilic composting in a bioreactor to select for a switchgrass-adapted community and to facilitate targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases. Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA-based community profiles revealed that the microbial community changed dramatically between the initial and switchgrass-adapted compost (SAC) with some bacterial populations being enriched over 20-fold. We obtained 225 Mbp of 454-titanium pyrosequence data from the SAC community and conservatively identified 800 genes encoding glycoside hydrolase domains that were biased toward depolymerizing grass cell wall components. Of these, {approx}10% were putative cellulases mostly belonging to families GH5 and GH9. We synthesized two SAC GH9 genes with codon optimization for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and observed activity for one on carboxymethyl cellulose. The active GH9 enzyme has a temperature optimum of 50 C and pH range of 5.5 to 8 consistent with the composting conditions applied. We demonstrate that microbial communities adapt to switchgrass decomposition using simulated composting condition and that full-length genes can be identified from complex metagenomic sequence data, synthesized and expressed resulting in active enzyme.

  12. Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Amitha; Allgaier, Martin; Park, Joshua I.; Ivanoval, Natalia; Dhaeseleer, Patrik; Lowry, Steve; Sapra, Rajat; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake A.; VanderGheynst, Jean S.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2011-05-11

    Development of cellulosic biofuels from non-food crops is currently an area of intense research interest. Tailoring depolymerizing enzymes to particular feedstocks and pretreatment conditions is one promising avenue of research in this area. Here we added a green-waste compost inoculum to switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and simulated thermophilic composting in a bioreactor to select for a switchgrass-adapted community and to facilitate targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases. Smallsubunit (SSU) rRNA-based community profiles revealed that the microbial community changed dramatically between the initial and switchgrass-adapted compost (SAC) with some bacterial populations being enriched over 20-fold. We obtained 225 Mbp of 454-titanium pyrosequence data from the SAC community and conservatively identified 800 genes encoding glycoside hydrolase domains that were biased toward depolymerizing grass cell wall components. Of these, ,10percent were putative cellulasesmostly belonging to families GH5 and GH9. We synthesized two SAC GH9 genes with codon optimization for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and observed activity for one on carboxymethyl cellulose. The active GH9 enzyme has a temperature optimum of 50uC and pH range of 5.5 to 8 consistent with the composting conditions applied. We demonstrate that microbial communities adapt to switchgrass decomposition using simulated composting condition and that full-length genes can be identified from complex metagenomic sequence data, synthesized and expressed resulting in active enzyme.

  13. Determinants of Murein Hydrolase Targeting to Cross-wall of Staphylococcus aureus Peptidoglycan*

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Matthew B.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Cells of eukaryotic or prokaryotic origin express proteins with LysM domains that associate with the cell wall envelope of bacteria. The molecular properties that enable LysM domains to interact with microbial cell walls are not yet established. Staphylococcus aureus, a spherical microbe, secretes two murein hydrolases with LysM domains, Sle1 and LytN. We show here that the LysM domains of Sle1 and LytN direct murein hydrolases to the staphylococcal envelope in the vicinity of the cross-wall, the mid-cell compartment for peptidoglycan synthesis. LysM domains associate with the repeating disaccharide β-N-acetylmuramic acid, (1→4)-β-N-acetylglucosamine of staphylococcal peptidoglycan. Modification of N-acetylmuramic acid with wall teichoic acid, a ribitol-phosphate polymer tethered to murein linkage units, prevents the LysM domain from binding to peptidoglycan. The localization of LytN and Sle1 to the cross-wall is abolished in staphylococcal tagO mutants, which are defective for wall teichoic acid synthesis. We propose a model whereby the LysM domain ensures septal localization of LytN and Sle1 followed by processive cleavage of peptidoglycan, thereby exposing new LysM binding sites in the cross-wall and separating bacterial cells. PMID:22303016

  14. Structural and kinetic insights into the mechanism of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-08-01

    The crystal structure of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase from K. pneumoniae and the steady-state kinetic parameters of the native enzyme as well as several mutants provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme and the possible roles of the active-site residues. The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin has recently been demonstrated to proceed via two unstable intermediates and requires three separate enzymatic reactions. The second step of this reaction, the conversion of 5-hydroxyisourate (HIU) to 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline, is catalyzed by HIU hydrolase (HIUH). The high-resolution crystal structure of HIUH from the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpHIUH) has been determined. KpHIUH is a homotetrameric protein that, based on sequence and structural similarity, belongs to the transthyretin-related protein family. In addition, the steady-state kinetic parameters for this enzyme and four active-site mutants have been measured. These data provide valuable insight into the functional roles of the active-site residues. Based upon the structural and kinetic data, a mechanism is proposed for the KpHIUH-catalyzed reaction.

  15. Identification of the Gene Encoding Isoprimeverose-producing Oligoxyloglucan Hydrolase in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Mitsuishi, Yasushi; Kameyama, Akihiko; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2016-03-01

    Aspergillus oryzae produces a unique β-glucosidase, isoprimeverose-producing oligoxyloglucan hydrolase (IPase), that recognizes and releases isoprimeverose (α-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 6)-D-glucopyranose) units from the non-reducing ends of oligoxyloglucans. A gene encoding A. oryzae IPase, termed ipeA, was identified and expressed in Pichia pastoris. With the exception of cellobiose, IpeA hydrolyzes a variety of oligoxyloglucans and is a member of the glycoside hydrolase family 3. Xylopyranosyl branching at the non-reducing ends was vital for IPase activity, and galactosylation at a α-1,6-linked xylopyranosyl side chain completely abolished IpeA activity. Hepta-oligoxyloglucan saccharide (Xyl3Glc4) substrate was preferred over tri- (Xyl1Glc2) and tetra- (Xyl2Glc2) oligoxyloglucan saccharides substrates. IpeA transferred isoprimeverose units to other saccharides, indicating transglycosylation activity. The ipeA gene was expressed in xylose and xyloglucan media and was strongly induced in the presence of xyloglucan endo-xyloglucanase-hydrolyzed products. This is the first study to report the identification of a gene encoding IPase in eukaryotes. PMID:26755723

  16. HYDROLASING OF CONTAMINATED UNDERWATER BASIN SURFACES AT THE HANFORD K-AREA

    SciTech Connect

    CHRONISTER, G.B.

    2005-06-14

    This paper discusses selecting and Implementing hydrolasing technology to reduce radioactive contamination in preparing to dispose of the K Basins; two highly contaminated concrete basins at the Hanford Site. A large collection of spent nuclear fuel stored for many years underwater at the K Basins has been removed to stable, dry, safe storage. Remediation activities have begun for the remaining highly contaminated water, sludge, and concrete basin structures. Hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate and prepare the basin structures for disposal. The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is considered the world's largest environmental cleanup project. The site covers 1,517 Km{sup 2} (586 square miles) along the Columbia River in an arid region of the northwest United States (U.S.). Hanford is the largest of the US former nuclear defense production sites. From the World War II era of the mid-1940s until the late-1980s when production stopped, Hanford produced 60 percent of the plutonium for nuclear defense and, as a consequence, produced a significant amount of environmental pollution now being addressed. Spent nuclear fuel was among the major challenges for DOE's environmental cleanup mission at Hanford. The end of production left Hanford with about 105,000 irradiated, solid uranium metal fuel assemblies--representing approximately 2,100 metric tons (80 percent of DOE's spent nuclear fuel). The fuel was ultimately stored in the K Basins water-filled, concrete basins attached to Hanford's K East (KE) and K West (KW) reactors. K Basin's fuel accounted for 95 percent of the total radioactivity in Hanford's former reactor production areas. Located about 457 meters (500 yards) from the Columbia River, the K Basins are two indoor, rectangular structures of reinforced concrete; each filled with more than 3.8 million liters (one million gallons) of water that has become highly contaminated with long-lived radionuclides. At the KW Basin, fuel was packaged and

  17. Recombination Drives Vertebrate Genome Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kiwoong; Ellegren, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Selective and/or neutral processes may govern variation in DNA content and, ultimately, genome size. The observation in several organisms of a negative correlation between recombination rate and intron size could be compatible with a neutral model in which recombination is mutagenic for length changes. We used whole-genome data on small insertions and deletions within transposable elements from chicken and zebra finch to demonstrate clear links between recombination rate and a number of attributes of reduced DNA content. Recombination rate was negatively correlated with the length of introns, transposable elements, and intergenic spacer and with the rate of short insertions. Importantly, it was positively correlated with gene density, the rate of short deletions, the deletion bias, and the net change in sequence length. All these observations point at a pattern of more condensed genome structure in regions of high recombination. Based on the observed rates of small insertions and deletions and assuming that these rates are representative for the whole genome, we estimate that the genome of the most recent common ancestor of birds and lizards has lost nearly 20% of its DNA content up until the present. Expansion of transposable elements can counteract the effect of deletions in an equilibrium mutation model; however, since the activity of transposable elements has been low in the avian lineage, the deletion bias is likely to have had a significant effect on genome size evolution in dinosaurs and birds, contributing to the maintenance of a small genome. We also demonstrate that most of the observed correlations between recombination rate and genome contraction parameters are seen in the human genome, including for segregating indel polymorphisms. Our data are compatible with a neutral model in which recombination drives vertebrate genome size evolution and gives no direct support for a role of natural selection in this process. PMID:22570634

  18. Recombination processes in ionised plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, Robert

    The observational analysis of astrophysical plasmas relies on accurate calculations of the atomic processes involved. The recombination spectra of singly ionised oxygen (O il) and carbon (C il) present excellent tools for investigating regions such as planetary nebulae and H II regions. In this thesis, detailed treatments of the recombination processes of both O II and C II are presented. Using the R-matrix solution to the close coupling equations, I present the results of accurate photoionisation calculations. Bound state energy levels are determined and oscillator strengths calculated for both species. Recombination coefficients were evalu ated for low n and 1, for C II in LS-coupling, and 0 II in intermediate coupling, taking particular care to treat resonances effectively. Sample photoionisation cross-sections are presented for both species, and compared to previous work. A complete radiative-cascade model is treated for both species, in order to determine line emissivities under nebular conditions at a wide range of temperatures and densities. Collisional effects are treated for C II, along with, for the first time, the effects of high temperature dielectronic recombination, allowing the modelling of regions of much higher electron temperature than previous work. The O II calculations were performed under intermediate coupling for the first time, allowing the effects of non-statistical popula tions of the parent ion fine-structure levels and dielectronic recombination onto bound states within this fine-structure to be taken into account in line emissivities. Detailed comparison with previous theoretical work was made for both species. The application of the C II and 0 n recombination spectra to determining tempera ture and densities from the observed spectra of a number of ionised nebulae is considered. The potential for using the new recombination spectra as diagnostic tools to solve some of the key problems in the study of ionised nebulae is demonstrated.

  19. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  20. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  1. Recombinant allergens for specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Oliver; Häfner, Dietrich; Nandy, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    Recombinant DNA technology provides the means for producing allergens that are equivalent to their natural counterparts and also genetically engineered variants with reduced IgE-binding activity. The proteins are produced as chemically defined molecules with consistent structural and immunologic properties. Several hundred allergens have been cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins, and these provide the means for making a very detailed diagnosis of a patient's sensitization profile. Clinical development programs are now in progress to assess the suitability of recombinant allergens for both subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy. Recombinant hypoallergenic variants, which are developed with the aim of increasing the doses that can be administered while at the same time reducing the risks for therapy-associated side effects, are also in clinical trials for subcutaneous immunotherapy. Grass and birch pollen preparations have been shown to be clinically effective, and studies with various other allergens are in progress. Personalized or patient-tailored immunotherapy is still a very distant prospect, but the first recombinant products based on single allergens or defined mixtures could reach the market within the next 5 years. PMID:21377719

  2. THE SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE GENE HARBORS SEQUENCE VARIATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SUSCEPTIBILITY TO AND PROTECTION FROM INCIDENT ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stroke is the leading cause of severe disability and the third leading cause of death, accounting for one of every 15 deaths in the USA. We investigated the association of polymorphisms in the soluble epoxide hydrolase gene (EPHX2) with incident ischemic stroke in African-Americans and Whites. Twelv...

  3. Potential of the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 and its derivative fusion proteins in milk biopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage lytic enzymes have recently attracted considerable interest as novel antimicrobials against Gram-positive bacteria. In this work, antimicrobial activity in milk of HydH5 [(a virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase (VAPGH) encoded by the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-ph...

  4. Cloning, crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ying-Der; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Shr, Hui-Lin; Gao, Fei Philip; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2006-10-01

    A CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen X. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. CN-hydrolase superfamily proteins are involved in a wide variety of non-peptide carbon–nitrogen hydrolysis reactions, producing some important natural products such as auxin, biotin, precursors of antibiotics etc. These reactions all involve attack on a cyano or carbonyl carbon by a conserved novel catalytic triad Glu-Lys-Cys through a thiol acylenzyme intermediate. However, classification into the CN-hydrolase superfamily based on sequence similarity alone is not straightforward and further structural data are necessary to improve this categorization. Here, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc), are reported. The SeMet-substituted XC1258 crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.73 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 143.8, b = 154.63, c = 51.3 Å, respectively.

  5. A dual enzyme system composed of a polyester hydrolase and a carboxylesterase enhances the biocatalytic degradation of polyethylene terephthalate films.

    PubMed

    Barth, Markus; Honak, Annett; Oeser, Thorsten; Wei, Ren; Belisário-Ferrari, Matheus R; Then, Johannes; Schmidt, Juliane; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    TfCut2 from Thermobifida fusca KW3 and the metagenome-derived LC-cutinase are bacterial polyester hydrolases capable of efficiently degrading polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. Since the enzymatic PET hydrolysis is inhibited by the degradation intermediate mono-(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalate (MHET), a dual enzyme system consisting of a polyester hydrolase and the immobilized carboxylesterase TfCa from Thermobifida fusca KW3 was employed for the hydrolysis of PET films at 60°C. HPLC analysis of the reaction products obtained after 24 h of hydrolysis showed an increased amount of soluble products with a lower proportion of MHET in the presence of the immobilized TfCa. The results indicated a continuous hydrolysis of the inhibitory MHET by the immobilized TfCa and demonstrated its advantage as a second biocatalyst in combination with a polyester hydrolase for an efficient degradation oft PET films. The dual enzyme system with LC-cutinase produced a 2.4-fold higher amount of degradation products compared to TfCut2 after a reaction time of 24 h confirming the superior activity of his polyester hydrolase against PET films. PMID:27214855

  6. Crystal structure analysis of a glycosides hydrolase family 42 cold-adapted ß-galactosidase from Rahnella sp. R3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ß-galactosidase isolated from a psychrotrophic bacterium, Rahnella sp. R3 (R-ß-Gal), exhibits high activity at low temperature. R-ß-Gal is a member of the glycoside hydrolases family 42 (GH42), and forms a 225 kDa trimeric structure in solution. The X-ray crystal structure of R-ß-Gal was determi...

  7. Purification and characterization of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 Beta-xylosidase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans IT-08

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding a glycoside hydrolase family 43 enzyme termed deAX was isolated and subcloned from a culture seeded with a compost starter mixed bacterium population, expressed with a C-terminal His6-tag, and purified to apparent homogeneity. deAX was monomeric in solution, and had a broad pH maxi...

  8. New mode for divalent metal activation of glycoside hydrolases: X-ray structure of ß-xyloisdase-Ca2+

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the first X-ray structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 ß-xylosidase, RS223BX, which is strongly activated by the addition of divalent metal cations. The 2.69 Å structure reveals that the Ca2+ cation is located at the back of the active site pocket. The Ca2+ coordinates to H274 to sta...

  9. Emergent decarboxylase activity and attenuation of α/β-hydrolase activity during the evolution of methylketone biosynthesis in tomato.

    PubMed

    Auldridge, Michele E; Guo, Yongxia; Austin, Michael B; Ramsey, Justin; Fridman, Eyal; Pichersky, Eran; Noel, Joseph P

    2012-04-01

    Specialized methylketone-containing metabolites accumulate in certain plants, in particular wild tomatoes in which they serve as toxic compounds against chewing insects. In Solanum habrochaites f. glabratum, methylketone biosynthesis occurs in the plastids of glandular trichomes and begins with intermediates of de novo fatty acid synthesis. These fatty-acyl intermediates are converted via sequential reactions catalyzed by Methylketone Synthase2 (MKS2) and MKS1 to produce the n-1 methylketone. We report crystal structures of S. habrochaites MKS1, an atypical member of the α/β-hydrolase superfamily. Sequence comparisons revealed the MKS1 catalytic triad, Ala-His-Asn, as divergent to the traditional α/β-hydrolase triad, Ser-His-Asp. Determination of the MKS1 structure points to a novel enzymatic mechanism dependent upon residues Thr-18 and His-243, confirmed by biochemical assays. Structural analysis further reveals a tunnel leading from the active site consisting mostly of hydrophobic residues, an environment well suited for fatty-acyl chain binding. We confirmed the importance of this substrate binding mode by substituting several amino acids leading to an alteration in the acyl-chain length preference of MKS1. Furthermore, we employ structure-guided mutagenesis and functional assays to demonstrate that MKS1, unlike enzymes from this hydrolase superfamily, is not an efficient hydrolase but instead catalyzes the decarboxylation of 3-keto acids. PMID:22523203

  10. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  11. AMPEROMETRIC THICK-FILM STRIP ELECTRODES FOR MONITORING ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS BASED ON IMMOBILIZED ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An amperometric biosensor based on the immobilization of organophosphorus hydrolase
    (OPH) onto screen-printed carbon electrodes is shown useful for the rapid, sensitive, and low-cost
    detection of organophosphate (OP) nerve agents. The sensor relies upon the sensitive and ra...

  12. [The effect of antioxidants on the activity of acid hydrolases in blood leukocytes from patients with leukoplakia of mouth mucosa].

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Iu A; Mashkilleĭson, A L; Suleĭmanova, G G; Lagunov, A I

    1989-01-01

    Activity of acid hydrolases, alkaline phosphatase and leucine aminopeptidase was studied in leukocytes of patients with leukoplakia of mouth mucosa before and after the treatment involving antioxidant drugs. The enzymatic activity studied was increased in leukoplakia. Cryotherapy combined with antioxidants and the treatment with antioxidants only contributed to a decrease in these enzymes activity. PMID:2617939

  13. Targeted gene inactivation in Clostridium phytofermentans shows that cellulose degradation requires the family 9 hydrolase Cphy3367

    PubMed Central

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Chilaka, Amanda C; Church, George M

    2009-01-01

    Microbial cellulose degradation is a central part of the global carbon cycle and has great potential for the development of inexpensive, carbon-neutral biofuels from non-food crops. Clostridium phytofermentans has a repertoire of 108 putative glycoside hydrolases to break down cellulose and hemicellulose into sugars, which this organism then ferments primarily to ethanol. An understanding of cellulose degradation at the molecular level requires learning the different roles of these hydrolases. In this study, we show that interspecific conjugation with Escherichia coli can be used to transfer a plasmid into C. phytofermentans that has a resistance marker, an origin of replication that can be selectively lost, and a designed group II intron for efficient, targeted chromosomal insertions without selection. We applied these methods to disrupt the cphy3367 gene, which encodes the sole family 9 glycoside hydrolase (GH9) in the C. phytofermentans genome. The GH9-deficient strain grew normally on some carbon sources such as glucose, but had lost the ability to degrade cellulose. Although C. phytofermentans upregulates the expression of numerous enzymes to break down cellulose, this process thus relies upon a single, key hydrolase, Cphy3367. PMID:19775243

  14. Xyloglucan Endotransglucosylase-Hydrolase17 Interacts with Xyloglucan Endotransglucosylase-Hydrolase31 to Confer Xyloglucan Endotransglucosylase Action and Affect Aluminum Sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Wan, Jiang Xue; Sun, Ying; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Braam, Janet; Li, Gui Xin; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2014-06-19

    Previously, we reported that although the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Xyloglucan Endotransglucosylase-Hydrolase31 (XTH31) has predominately xyloglucan endohydrolase activity in vitro, loss of XTH31 results in remarkably reduced in vivo xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) action and enhanced Al resistance. Here, we report that XTH17, predicted to have XET activity, binds XTH31 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitations assays and that this interaction may be required for XTH17 XET activity in planta. XTH17 and XTH31 may be colocalized in plant cells because tagged XTH17 fusion proteins, like XTH31 fusion proteins, appear to target to the plasma membrane. XTH17 expression, like that of XTH31, was substantially reduced in the presence of aluminum (Al), even at concentrations as low as 10 µm for 24 h or 25 µm for just 30 min. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transfer DNA insertion mutant of XTH17, xth17, showed low XET action and had moderately shorter roots than the wild type but was more Al resistant than the wild type. Similar to xth31, xth17 had low hemicellulose content and retained less Al in the cell wall. These data suggest a model whereby XTH17 and XTH31 may exist as a dimer at the plasma membrane to confer in vivo XET action, which modulates cell wall Al-binding capacity and thereby affects Al sensitivity in Arabidopsis. PMID:24948835

  15. Stable recombination hotspots in birds

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M.; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M.; Strand, Alva I.; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Griffith, Simon C.; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species, the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata and the long-tailed finch Poephila acuticauda. We find that both species have hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, the two species share most hotspots, with conservation seemingly extending over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution. PMID:26586757

  16. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need for additional cofactors, but does not discriminate non-carboxylated prothrombin from biologically active γ-carboxylated prothrombin. Here we report that recombinant trocarin and oscutarin could not efficiently generate thrombin without additional protein co-factors. We confirm that both trocarin and oscutarin are similar to human coagulation Factor X (FX), explaining the need for additional cofactors. Sequencing of a genomic fragment containing 7 out of the 8 exons coding for oscutarin further confirmed the similarity to human FX. PMID:23111318

  17. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  18. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  19. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Legler, Patricia M; Boisvert, Susanne M; Compton, Jaimee R; Millard, Charles B

    2014-01-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine Oγ. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its k cat/K m for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1). We discuss the use of pNBE as a surrogate scaffold for the mammalian esterases, and the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases. PMID:25077141

  20. Three-dimensional Structure of Nylon Hydrolase and Mechanism of Nylon-6 Hydrolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Negoro, Seiji; Shibata, Naoki; Tanaka, Yusuke; Yasuhira, Kengo; Shibata, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Haruka; Lee, Young-Ho; Oshima, Shohei; Santa, Ryuji; Oshima, Shohei; Mochiji, Kozo; Goto, Yuji; Ikegami, Takahisa; Nagai, Keisuke; Kato, Dai-ichiro; Takeo, Masahiro; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    We performed x-ray crystallographic analyses of the 6-aminohexanoate oligomer hydrolase (NylC) from Agromyces sp. at 2.0 Å-resolution. This enzyme is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily that is responsible for the degradation of the nylon-6 industry byproduct. We observed four identical heterodimers (27 kDa + 9 kDa), which resulted from the autoprocessing of the precursor protein (36 kDa) and which constitute the doughnut-shaped quaternary structure. The catalytic residue of NylC was identified as the N-terminal Thr-267 of the 9-kDa subunit. Furthermore, each heterodimer is folded into a single domain, generating a stacked αββα core structure. Amino acid mutations at subunit interfaces of the tetramer were observed to drastically alter the thermostability of the protein. In particular, four mutations (D122G/H130Y/D36A/E263Q) of wild-type NylC from Arthrobacter sp. (plasmid pOAD2-encoding enzyme), with a heat denaturation temperature of Tm = 52 °C, enhanced the protein thermostability by 36 °C (Tm = 88 °C), whereas a single mutation (G111S or L137A) decreased the stability by ∼10 °C. We examined the enzymatic hydrolysis of nylon-6 by the thermostable NylC mutant. Argon cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses of the reaction products revealed that the major peak of nylon-6 (m/z 10,000–25,000) shifted to a smaller range, producing a new peak corresponding to m/z 1500–3000 after the enzyme treatment at 60 °C. In addition, smaller fragments in the soluble fraction were successively hydrolyzed to dimers and monomers. Based on these data, we propose that NylC should be designated as nylon hydrolase (or nylonase). Three potential uses of NylC for industrial and environmental applications are also discussed. PMID:22187439

  1. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Legler, Patricia M.; Boisvert, Susanne M.; Compton, Jaimee R.; Millard, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine Oγ. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its kcat/Km for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1). We discuss the use of pNBE as a surrogate scaffold for the mammalian esterases, and the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases. PMID:25077141

  2. Selenium incorporation using recombinant techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, Helen

    2010-04-01

    An overview of techniques for recombinant incorporation of selenium and subsequent purification and crystallization of the resulting labelled protein. Using selenomethionine to phase macromolecular structures is common practice in structure determination, along with the use of selenocysteine. Selenium is consequently the most commonly used heavy atom for MAD. In addition to the well established recombinant techniques for the incorporation of selenium in prokaryal expression systems, there have been recent advances in selenium labelling in eukaryal expression, which will be discussed. Tips and things to consider for the purification and crystallization of seleno-labelled proteins are also included.

  3. Isolation and characterization of an extracellular glycosylated protein complex from Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum with pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonate hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Van Rijssel, M; Gerwig, G J; Hansen, T A

    1993-03-01

    An extracellular protein complex was isolated from the supernatant of a pectin-limited continuous culture of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum Haren. The complex possessed both pectin methylesterase (EC 3.1.1.11) and exo-poly-alpha-galacturonate hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.82) activity and produced digalacturonate from the nonreducing end of the pectin chain. The protein consisted of 230- and 25-kDa subunits. The large subunit contained 10% (wt/wt) sugars (N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose). Under physiological conditions both activities acted in a coordinated manner: the ratio between methanol and digalacturonate released during degradation was constant and equal to the degree of esterification of the pectin used. Prolonged incubation of the enzyme with pectin led to a nondialyzable fraction that was enriched in neutral sugars, such as arabinose, rhamnose, and galactose; the high rhamnose/galacturonic acid ratio was indicative of hairy region-like structures. The smallest substrate utilized by the hydrolase was a tetragalacturonate. Vmax with oligogalacturonates increased with increasing chain length. The Km and Vmax for the polygalacturonate hydrolase with citrus pectate as a substrate were 0.8 g liter-1 and 180 mumol min-1 mg of protein-1, respectively. The Km and Vmax for the esterase with citrus pectin as a substrate were 1.2 g liter-1 and 440 mumol min-1 mg of protein-1, respectively. The temperature optima for the hydrolase and esterase were 70 and 60 degrees C, respectively. Both enzyme activities were stable for more than 1 h at 70 degrees C. The exo-polygalacturonate hydrolase of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes was partially purified while the methylesterase was also copurified. PMID:8481009

  4. Efficient Calculation of Enzyme Reaction Free Energy Profiles Using a Hybrid Differential Relaxation Algorithm: Application to Mycobacterial Zinc Hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Romero, Juan Manuel; Martin, Mariano; Ramirez, Claudia Lilián; Dumas, Victoria Gisel; Marti, Marcelo Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Determination of the free energy profile for an enzyme reaction mechanism is of primordial relevance, paving the way for our understanding of the enzyme's catalytic power at the molecular level. Although hybrid, mostly DFT-based, QM/MM methods have been extensively applied to this type of studies, achieving accurate and statistically converged results at a moderate computational cost is still an open challenge. Recently, we have shown that accurate results can be achieved in less computational time, combining Jarzynski's relationship with a hybrid differential relaxation algorithm (HyDRA), which allows partial relaxation of the solvent during the nonequilibrium steering of the reaction. In this work, we have applied this strategy to study two mycobacterial zinc hydrolases. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections are still a worldwide problem and thus characterization and validation of new drug targets is an intense field of research. Among possible drug targets, recently two essential zinc hydrolases, MshB (Rv1170) and MA-amidase (Rv3717), have been proposed and structurally characterized. Although possible mechanisms have been proposed by analogy to the widely studied human Zn hydrolases, several key issues, particularly those related to Zn coordination sphere and its role in catalysis, remained unanswered. Our results show that mycobacterial Zn hydrolases share a basic two-step mechanism. First, the attacking water becomes deprotonated by the conserved base and establishes the new C-O bond leading to a tetrahedral intermediate. The intermediate requires moderate reorganization to allow for proton transfer to the amide N and C-N bond breaking to occur in the second step. Zn ion plays a key role in stabilizing the tetrahedral intermediate and balancing the negative charge of the substrate during hydroxide ion attack. Finally, comparative analysis of other Zn hydrolases points to a convergent mechanistic evolution. PMID:26415840

  5. 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase, a Novel Enzyme That Structurally and Functionally Provides an Evolutionary Link between Glycoside Hydrolase Enzyme Families 13 and 70▿

    PubMed Central

    Kralj, Slavko; Grijpstra, Pieter; van Leeuwen, Sander S.; Leemhuis, Hans; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; van der Kaaij, Rachel M.; Malik, Amarila; Oetari, Ariyanti; Kamerling, Johannis P.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri 121 uses the glucosyltransferase A (GTFA) enzyme to convert sucrose into large amounts of the α-d-glucan reuteran, an exopolysaccharide. Upstream of gtfA lies another putative glucansucrase gene, designated gtfB. Previously, we have shown that the purified recombinant GTFB protein/enzyme is inactive with sucrose. Various homologs of gtfB are present in other Lactobacillus strains, including the L. reuteri type strain, DSM 20016, the genome sequence of which is available. Here we report that GTFB is a novel α-glucanotransferase enzyme with disproportionating (cleaving α1→4 and synthesizing α1→6 and α1→4 glycosidic linkages) and α1→6 polymerizing types of activity on maltotetraose and larger maltooligosaccharide substrates (in short, it is a 4,6-α-glucanotransferase). Characterization of the types of compounds synthesized from maltoheptaose by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), methylation analysis, and 1-dimensional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed that only linear products were made and that with increasing degrees of polymerization (DP), more α1→6 glycosidic linkages were introduced into the final products, ranging from 18% in the incubation mixture to 33% in an enriched fraction. In view of its primary structure, GTFB clearly is a member of the glycoside hydrolase 70 (GH70) family, comprising enzymes with a permuted (β/α)8 barrel that use sucrose to synthesize α-d-glucan polymers. The GTFB enzyme reaction and product specificities, however, are novel for the GH70 family, resembling those of the GH13 α-amylase type of enzymes in using maltooligosaccharides as substrates but differing in introducing a series of α1→6 glycosidic linkages into linear oligosaccharide products. We conclude that GTFB represents a novel evolutionary intermediate between the GH13 and GH70 enzyme families, and we speculate about its origin. PMID:21948833

  6. ZmXTH1, a new xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase in maize, affects cell wall structure and composition in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, Valeria; Fornalé, Silvia; Fry, Stephen C; Ruel, Katia; Ferrer, Pau; Encina, Antonio; Sonbol, Fathi-Mohamed; Bosch, Josep; Puigdomènech, Pere; Rigau, Joan; Caparrós-Ruiz, David

    2008-01-01

    Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases (XTHs; EC 2.4.1.207 and/or EC 3.2.1.151) are enzymes involved in the modification of cell wall structure by cleaving and, often, also re-joining xyloglucan molecules in primary plant cell walls. Using a pool of antibodies raised against an enriched cell wall protein fraction, a new XTH cDNA in maize, ZmXTH1, has been isolated from a cDNA expression library obtained from the elongation zone of the maize root. The predicted protein has a putative N-terminal signal peptide and possesses the typical domains of this enzyme family, such as a catalytic domain that is homologous to that of Bacillus macerans beta-glucanase, a putative N-glycosylation motif, and four cysteine residues in the central and C terminal regions of the ZmXTH1 protein. Phylogenetic analysis of ZmXTH1 reveals that it belongs to subgroup 4, so far only reported from Poaceae monocot species. ZmXTH1 has been expressed in Pichia pastoris (a methylotrophic yeast) and the recombinant enzyme showed xyloglucan endotransglucosylase but not xyloglucan endohydrolase activity, representing the first enzyme belonging to subgroup 4 characterized in maize so far. Expression data indicate that ZmXTH1 is expressed in elongating tissues, modulated by culture conditions, and induced by gibberellins. Transient expression assays in onion cells reveal that ZmXTH1 is directed to the cell wall, although weakly bound. Finally, Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing ZmXTH1 show slightly increased xyloglucan endohydrolase activity and alterations in the cell wall structure and composition. PMID:18316315

  7. Identification and molecular cloning of a novel glycoside hydrolase family of core 1 type O-glycan-specific endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase from Bifidobacterium longum.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kiyotaka; Oura, Fusako; Nagamine, Noriko; Katayama, Takane; Hiratake, Jun; Sakata, Kanzo; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2005-11-11

    We found endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase in most bifidobacterial strains, which are predominant bacteria in the human colon. This enzyme catalyzes the liberation of galactosyl beta1,3-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Galbeta1,3GalNAc) alpha-linked to serine or threonine residues from mucin-type glycoproteins. The gene (engBF) encoding the enzyme has been cloned from Bifidobacterium longum JCM 1217. The protein consisted of 1,966 amino acid residues, and the central domain (590-1381 amino acid residues) exhibited 31-53% identity to hypothetical proteins of several bacteria including Clostridium perfringens and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli liberated Galbeta1,3GalNAc disaccharide from Galbeta1,3GalNAcalpha1pNP and asialofetuin, but did not release GalNAc, Galbeta1,3(GlcNAcbeta1,6)GalNAc, GlcNAcbeta1,3GalNAc, and Galbeta1,3GlcNAc from each p-nitrophenyl (pNP) substrate, and also did not release sialo-oligosaccharides from fetuin, indicating its strict substrate specificity for the Core 1-type structure. The stereochemical course of hydrolysis was determined by (1)H NMR and was found to be retention. Site-directed mutagenesis of a total of 22 conserved Asp and Glu residues suggested that Asp-682 and Asp-789 are critical residues for the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The enzyme also exhibited transglycosylation activity toward various mono- and disaccharides and 1-alkanols, demonstrating its potential to synthesize neoglycoconjugates. This is the first report for the isolation of a gene encoding endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase from any organisms and for the establishment of a new glycoside hydrolase family (GH family 101). PMID:16141207

  8. Inhibition of mutant KrasG12D-initiated murine pancreatic carcinoma growth by a dual c-Raf and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-CUPM.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie; Hwang, Sung Hee; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Yang, Jun; Wecksler, Aaron T; Liu, Jun-Yan; Hammock, Bruce D; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-28

    Mutant Kras and chronic pancreatitis are the most common pathological events involved in human pancreatic cancer. It has been demonstrated that c-Raf is responsible for transmitting signals from mutant Ras to its downstream signals including MEK-ERK and for initiating carcinogenesis. The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a pro-inflammatory enzyme, generally inactivates anti-inflammatory and anti-pain epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Herein, we have synthesized a novel compound of trans-4-{4-[3-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ureido]-cyclohexyloxy}-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methylamide (t-CUPM) via modifying the central phenyl ring of sorafenib and confirmed its dual inhibition of sEH and c-Raf by recombinant kinase activity assay. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that oral dosing of t-CUPM resulted in higher blood levels than that of sorafenib throughout the complete time course (48 h). The effect of t-CUPM on the inhibition of mutant Kras(G12D)-initiated murine pancreatic cancer cell growth was determined using the mouse pancreatic carcinoma cell model obtained from LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx1-Cre mice and showed that t-CUPM significantly inhibited this murine pancreatic carcinoma cell growth both in vitro and in mice in vivo. Inhibition of mutant Kras-transmitted phosphorylations of cRAF/MEK/ERK was demonstrated in these pancreatic cancer cells using Western blot assay and immunohistochemical approach. Modulation of oxylipin profile, particularly increased EETs/DHET ratio by sEH inhibition, was observed in mice treated with t-CUPM. These results indicate that t-CUPM is a highly potential agent to treat pancreatic cancer via simultaneously targeting c-Raf and sEH. PMID:26683769

  9. A study on the relation between poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerases or oligomer hydrolases and molecular weight of polyhydroxyalkanoates accumulating in Cupriavidus necator H16.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hisashi; Sato, Shunsuke; Fujiki, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Keiji

    2016-06-10

    Cupriavidus necator H16 has nine genes of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) depolymerases or oligomer hydrolases (intracellular PHB mobilization enzymes). In this study, we evaluated the relation between these genes and the accumulation, consumption, and molecular weight of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) accumulating in strain H16 and in a recombinant C. necator strain, KNK-005, which harbors an NSDG mutant of the PHA synthase gene (phaCAc) from Aeromonas caviae. PhaZ6 had a significant influence on the molecular weight of PHA when palm kernel oil was used as a carbon source. The 005dZ6 strain (ΔphaZ6 mutant of KNK-005) could produce ultra-high-molecular-weight poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) with weight-average molecular weight (Mw) >3.0×10(6) (approximately double that of KNK-005). Under PHA consumption conditions, deletion of phaZ1 and phaZ2 had a significant and slight attenuating effect, respectively, on the reduction in PHA content of KNK-005 cells. Regardless of the PHA consumption, its Mw did not decrease. Thus, 005dZ126 (the ΔphaZ1ΔphaZ2ΔphaZ6 triple mutant of KNK-005) is a promising strain capable of producing PHBHHx of ultra-high-molecular-weight and barely degrades PHBHHx enzymatically intracellularly. This is the first report examining the relation between intracellular PHB mobilization enzymes and molecular weight of PHAs accumulating in C. necator H16 and the derivatives. PMID:27059479

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a glycosyl hydrolase family 9 cellulase distributed throughout the digestive tract of the cricket Teleogryllus emma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namjung; Choo, Young Moo; Lee, Kwang Sik; Hong, Seong Jin; Seol, Kwang Youl; Je, Yeon Ho; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2008-08-01

    A novel endogenous beta-1,4-endoglucanase (EG) gene belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase family 9 (GHF 9) that is distributed throughout the digestive tract of the cricket Teleogryllus emma was cloned and characterized. This gene, named TeEG-I, consists of eight exons encoding 453 amino acid residues and exists as a single copy in the T. emma genome. TeEG-I possesses all the features, including signature motifs and catalytic domains, of GHF 9 members, sharing high levels of identity with the termite, Mastotermes darwiniensis (64% protein sequence identity), and the cockroach, Panesthia cribrata (62%), GHF 9 cellulases. Recombinant TeEG-I, which is expressed as a 47-kDa polypeptide in baculovirus-infected insect Sf9 cells, showed an optimal pH and temperature of pH 5.0 and 40 degrees C. The K(m) and V(max) values for digestion of carboxymethyl cellulose were 5.4 mg/ml and 3118.4 U/mg, respectively. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that TeEG-I is present throughout the digestive tract, which correlated with the TeEG-I distribution and cellulase activity in the digestive tract as assayed by immunofluorescence staining and enzyme activity assay, respectively. These results indicate that TeEG-I is distributed throughout the entire digestive tract of T. emma, suggesting a functional role of endogenous TeEG-I in a sequential cellulose digestion process throughout the T. emma digestion tract. PMID:18514003

  11. Classifications and comparisons of multilocus recombination distributions

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Liberman, Uri

    1978-01-01

    Various classifications and representations of multilocus recombination structures are delineated based on generalized notions of linkage values and recombination rates. An important class of recombination distributions (called the count-location chiasma process) is parameterized by a distribution of the number of crossover events and, for each such crossover count, by a conditional distribution of crossover locations. A number of properties of this recombination structure are developed. A multilocus definition of a “natural” recombination range is set forth. Orderings among recombination distributions in the multilocus setting are also discussed. Comparisons are made in terms of complete linkage, free assortment and noninterference schemes serving as standards. PMID:16592601

  12. Development of a versatile organophosphorous-hydrolase-based assay for organophosphate pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Wang, Yi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Mulchandani, P.; Chen, Wilfred

    1999-02-01

    We report a rapid and versatile organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH)-based method for measurement of organophosphate pesticides. This assay is based on a substrate-dependant change in pH near the active site of the enzyme. The pH change is monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) which is covalently immobilized to the enzyme. This method employs FITC-labeled enzyme adsorbed to polymethylmethacrylate beads. Analytes were measured using a microbead fluorescence analyzer. The dynamic concentration range for the assay extends from 25 (mu) M to 400 (mu) M for paraoxon with a detection limit of 8 (mu) M. This assay compared favorably to an HPLC method for monitoring the concentration of coumaphos in bioremediation filtrate samples.

  13. Antibiotic growth promoters enhance animal production by targeting intestinal bile salt hydrolase and its producers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The growth-promoting effect of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) was correlated with the decreased activity of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization. Consistent with this finding, independent chicken studies have demonstrated that AGP usage significantly reduced population of Lactobacillus species, the major BSH-producers in the intestine. Recent finding also demonstrated that some AGPs, such as tetracycline and roxarsone, display direct inhibitory effect on BSH activity. Therefore, BSH is a promising microbiome target for developing novel alternatives to AGPs. Specifically, dietary supplementation of BSH inhibitor may promote host lipid metabolism and energy harvest, consequently enhancing feed efficiency and body weight gain in food animals. PMID:24575079

  14. Discovery of Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase Inhibitors Using Metabolomics Biased Fragment Crystallography†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel fragment library termed fragments of life (FOL) for structure-based drug discovery. The FOL library includes natural small molecules of life, derivatives thereof, and biaryl protein architecture mimetics. The choice of fragments facilitates the interrogation of protein active sites, allosteric binding sites, and protein−protein interaction surfaces for fragment binding. We screened the FOL library against leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) by X-ray crystallography. A diverse set of fragments including derivatives of resveratrol, nicotinamide, and indole were identified as efficient ligands for LTA4H. These fragments were elaborated in a small number of synthetic cycles into potent inhibitors of LTA4H representing multiple novel chemotypes for modulating leukotriene biosynthesis. Analysis of the fragment-bound structures also showed that the fragments comprehensively recapitulated key chemical features and binding modes of several reported LTA4H inhibitors. PMID:19618939

  15. Development and Properties of a Wax Ester Hydrolase in the Cotyledons of Jojoba Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Anthony H. C.; Moreau, Robert A.; Liu, Kitty D. F.

    1978-01-01

    The activity of a wax ester hydrolase in the cotyledons of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) seedlings increased drastically during germination, parallel to the development of the gluconeogenic process. The enzyme at its peak of development was obtained in association with the wax body membrane, and its properties were studied. It had an optimal activity at alkaline pH (8.5-9). The apparent Km value for N-methylindoxylmyristate was 93 μM. It was stable at 40 C for 30 min but was inactivated at higher temperature. Various divalent cations and ethylenediaminetetraacetate had little effect on the activity. p-Chloromercuribenzoate was a strong inhibitor of the enzyme activity, and its effect was reversed by subsequent addition of dithiothreitol. It had a broad substrate specificity with highest activities on monoglycerides, wax esters, and the native substrate (jojoba wax). PMID:16660288

  16. Determination of Organophosphate Pesticides at a Carbon Nanotube/Organophosphorus Hydrolase Electrochemical Biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, R P.; Wang, Joseph; Block, I; Mulchandani, Ashok; Joshi, K; Trojanowicz, M; Scholz, F; Chen, Wilfred; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-02-08

    An amperometric biosensor for organophosphorus (OP) pesticides based on a carbon-nanotube (CNT) modified transducer and an organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) biocatalyst is described. A bilayer approach with the OPH layer atop of the CNT film was used for preparing the CNT/OPH biosensor. The CNT layer leads to a greatly improved anodic detection of the enzymatically-generated p-nitrophenol product, including higher sensitivity and stability. The sensor performance was optimized with respect to the surface modification and operating conditions. Under the optimal conditions the biosensor was used to measure as low as 0.15 {micro}M paraoxon and 0.8 {micro}M methyl parathion with sensitivities of 25 and 6 nA/{micro}M, respectively.

  17. Use of Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry to Deduce Selectivity of Reaction in Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kai; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Chemically synthesized nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) probes derivatized with tetrasaccharides were used to study the reactivity of representative Clostridium thermocellum β-glucosidase, endoglucanases, and cellobiohydrolase. Diagnostic patterns for reactions of these different classes of enzymes were observed. Results show sequential removal of glucose by the β-glucosidase and a progressive increase in specificity of reaction from endoglucanases to cellobiohydrolase. Time-dependent reactions of these polysaccharide-selective enzymes were modeled by numerical integration, which provides a quantitative basis to make functional distinctions among a continuum of naturally evolved catalytic properties. Consequently, our method, which combines automated protein translation with high-sensitivity and time-dependent detection of multiple products, provides a new approach to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic trees with functional measurements. PMID:26579511

  18. Dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase synergistically suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hwang, Sung Hee; Yang, Jun; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Liu, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yanru; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Tam, Sarah; Kieran, Mark W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins derived from the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) from the cytochrome P450/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway are important eicosanoids that regulate angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors, which block the formation of prostaglandins, suppress tumor growth, whereas sEH inhibitors, which increase endogenous EETs, stimulate primary tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional interactions of these two pathways in cancer are unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors as probes, we show here that dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH synergistically inhibits primary tumor growth and metastasis by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. COX-2/sEH dual pharmacological inhibitors also potently suppress primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis via selective inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical interaction of these two lipid metabolism pathways on tumorigenesis and suggest dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25024195

  19. A glycoside hydrolase family 31 dextranase with high transglucosylation activity from Flavobacterium johnsoniae.

    PubMed

    Gozu, Yoshifumi; Ishizaki, Yuichi; Hosoyama, Yuhei; Miyazaki, Takatsugu; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Tonozuka, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family (GH) 31 enzymes exhibit various substrate specificities, although the majority of members are α-glucosidases. Here, we constructed a heterologous expression system of a GH31 enzyme, Fjoh_4430, from Flavobacterium johnsoniae NBRC 14942, using Escherichia coli, and characterized its enzymatic properties. The enzyme hydrolyzed dextran and pullulan to produce isomaltooligosaccharides and isopanose, respectively. When isomaltose was used as a substrate, the enzyme catalyzed disproportionation to form isomaltooligosaccharides. The enzyme also acted, albeit inefficiently, on p-nitrophenyl α-D-glucopyranoside, and p-nitrophenyl α-isomaltoside was the main product of the reaction. In contrast, Fjoh_4430 did not act on trehalose, kojibiose, nigerose, maltose, maltotriose, or soluble starch. The optimal pH and temperature were pH 6.0 and 60 °C, respectively. Our results indicate that Fjoh_4430 is a novel GH31 dextranase with high transglucosylation activity. PMID:27170214

  20. Cytochemical localization of some hydrolases in the pollen and pollen tubes of Amaryllis vittata Ait.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D

    1982-01-01

    Some hydrolases are localized cytochemically in the pollen and pollen tubes of Amaryllis vittata Ait. The function of different enzymes is discussed in relation to pollen tubes morphogenesis. Activity of most of the enzymes was confined to colpus region, pollen wall and general cytoplasm of pollen and pollen tube. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes like acid monophosphoesterase and lipase and was nil in the exine of both germinated and ungerminated pollen, whereas intense reaction for esterase was observed in exine. Enzyme activity increased after germination which suggest the hydrolysis of stored metabolites and synthesis of proteins and other metabolites for the active growth of pollen tube. Intense reaction for enzymes like alkaline phosphomonoesterase, ATP-ase, 5-nucleotidase etc. at the tip region of pollen tube suggest their role in physiological processes associated with exchange of materials through intercellular transport during tube wall polysaccharide biogenesis. PMID:6298081

  1. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2011-12-22

    Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases but with notable differences, such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional cocrystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently bound transition state mimic provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

  2. Searching for monooxygenases and hydrolases in bacteria from an extreme environment.

    PubMed

    da Cruz, Georgiana F; Angolini, Célio F F; de Oliveira, Luciana G; Lopes, Patrícia F; de Vasconcellos, Suzan P; Crespim, Elaine; de Oliveira, Valéria M; dos Santos Neto, Eugênio V; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2010-06-01

    Microbial oxidation potentials of extremophiles recovered from Pampo Sul oil field, Campos Basin, Brazil, in pure culture or in consortia, were investigated using high-throughput screening (HTS) and multibioreactions. Camphor (1), cis-jasmone (2), 2-methyl-cyclohexanone (3), 1,2-epoxyoctane (4), phenylethyl acetate (5), phenylethyl propionate (6), and phenylethyl octanoate (7) were used to perform multibioreaction assays. Eighty-two bacterial isolates were recovered from oil and formation water samples and those presenting outstanding activities in HTS assays were identified by sequencing their 16S rRNA genes. These results revealed that most microorganisms belonged to the genus Bacillus and presented alcohol dehydrogenase, monooxygenase, epoxide hydrolase, esterase, and lipase activities. PMID:20204614

  3. Effect of Bleomycin Hydrolase Gene Polymorphism on Late Pulmonary Complications of Treatment for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Miltényi, Zsófia; Póliska, Szilárd; Bálint, Bálint László; Illés, Árpád

    2016-01-01

    Background Bleomycin hydrolase (BLMH), an enzyme that inactivates bleomycin, may be a potential candidate that could influence pulmonary function in ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastin, dacarbasine)–treated Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. Patients and Methods We hypothesized that the BLMH gene SNP A1450G (rs1050565) influences BLMH activity and late pulmonary toxicity. St. George Respiratory Questionnaire, lung scintigraphy and spirometry were used to determine lung function. TaqMan genotyping assay was used to determine genotype distribution of 131 previously treated HL patients. Results Significantly more favorable results were seen in the wild-type A/A genotype group than those in the group containing the mutated allele: A/G+G/G in retrospective pulmonary tests of ABVD treated patients. Conclusion Besides limitations of the current study, bleomycin pharmacokinetics should be further evaluated in patients with BLMH variations, hence identify those cases even in the frontline setting, where bleomycin should be omitted and replaced with targeted therapy. PMID:27327270

  4. A formin-nucleated actin aster concentrates cell wall hydrolases for cell fusion in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Bendezú, Felipe O.; Groux, Raphael; Laroche, Thierry; Seitz, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is essential for fertilization. For fusion of walled cells, the cell wall must be degraded at a precise location but maintained in surrounding regions to protect against lysis. In fission yeast cells, the formin Fus1, which nucleates linear actin filaments, is essential for this process. In this paper, we show that this formin organizes a specific actin structure—the actin fusion focus. Structured illumination microscopy and live-cell imaging of Fus1, actin, and type V myosins revealed an aster of actin filaments whose barbed ends are focalized near the plasma membrane. Focalization requires Fus1 and type V myosins and happens asynchronously always in the M cell first. Type V myosins are essential for fusion and concentrate cell wall hydrolases, but not cell wall synthases, at the fusion focus. Thus, the fusion focus focalizes cell wall dissolution within a broader cell wall synthesis zone to shift from cell growth to cell fusion. PMID:25825517

  5. AIG1 and ADTRP are atypical integral membrane hydrolases that degrade bioactive FAHFAs.

    PubMed

    Parsons, William H; Kolar, Matthew J; Kamat, Siddhesh S; Iii, Armand B Cognetta; Hulce, Jonathan J; Saez, Enrique; Kahn, Barbara B; Saghatelian, Alan; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme classes may contain outlier members that share mechanistic, but not sequence or structural, relatedness with more common representatives. The functional annotation of such exceptional proteins can be challenging. Here, we use activity-based profiling to discover that the poorly characterized multipass transmembrane proteins AIG1 and ADTRP are atypical hydrolytic enzymes that depend on conserved threonine and histidine residues for catalysis. Both AIG1 and ADTRP hydrolyze bioactive fatty acid esters of hydroxy fatty acids (FAHFAs) but not other major classes of lipids. We identify multiple cell-active, covalent inhibitors of AIG1 and show that these agents block FAHFA hydrolysis in mammalian cells. These results indicate that AIG1 and ADTRP are founding members of an evolutionarily conserved class of transmembrane threonine hydrolases involved in bioactive lipid metabolism. More generally, our findings demonstrate how chemical proteomics can excavate potential cases of convergent or parallel protein evolution that defy conventional sequence- and structure-based predictions. PMID:27018888

  6. Peroxisomal translocation of soluble epoxide hydrolase protects against ischemic stroke injury

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jonathan W; Zhang, Wenri; Alkayed, Nabil J; Koerner, Ines P

    2015-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) contributes to cardiovascular disease, including stroke, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. While primarily a cytosolic enzyme, sEH can translocate into peroxisomes. The relevance of this for stroke injury is not understood. We tested the hypothesis that sEH-mediated injury is tied to the cytoplasmic localization. We found that a human sEH variant possessing increased affinity to peroxisomes reduced stroke injury in sEH-null mice, whereas infarcts were significantly larger when peroxisomal translocation of sEH was disrupted. We conclude that sEH contributes to stroke injury only when localized in the cytoplasm, while peroxisomal sEH may be protective. PMID:26126869

  7. [Molecular engineering of cellulase catalytic domain based on glycoside hydrolase family].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Li, Dandan; Wang, Lushan; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Guanjun

    2013-04-01

    Molecular engineering of cellulases can improve enzymatic activity and efficiency. Recently, the Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes Database (CAZy), including glycoside hydrolase (GH) families, has been established with the development of Omics and structural measurement technologies. Molecular engineering based on GH families can obviously decrease the probing space of target sequences and structures, and increase the odds of experimental success. Besides, the study of cellulase active-site architecture paves the way toward the explanation of catalytic mechanism. This review focuses on the main GH families and the latest progresses in molecular engineering of catalytic domain. Based on the combination of analysis of a large amount of data in the same GH family and their conservative active-site architecture information, rational design will be an important direction for molecular engineering and promote the rapid development of the conversion of biomass. PMID:23894816

  8. Chitosanases from Family 46 of Glycoside Hydrolases: From Proteins to Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Viens, Pascal; Lacombe-Harvey, Marie-Ève; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Chitosanases, enzymes that catalyze the endo-hydrolysis of glycolytic links in chitosan, are the subject of numerous studies as biotechnological tools to generate low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) or chitosan oligosaccharides (CHOS) from native, high molecular weight chitosan. Glycoside hydrolases belonging to family GH46 are among the best-studied chitosanases, with four crystallography-derived structures available and more than forty enzymes studied at the biochemical level. They were also subjected to numerous site-directed mutagenesis studies, unraveling the molecular mechanisms of hydrolysis. This review is focused on the taxonomic distribution of GH46 proteins, their multi-modular character, the structure-function relationships and their biological functions in the host organisms. PMID:26516868

  9. Chemical constituents from the root of Polygonum multiflorum and their soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya Nan; Li, Wei; Kim, Jang Hoon; Yan, Xi Tao; Kim, Ji Eun; Yang, Seo Young; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-06-01

    Fourteen compounds were isolated from a methanol extract of Polygonum multiflorum roots, and their structures were elucidated by comparing spectroscopic data to published spectra. The inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were then evaluated. Compounds 1-7 inhibited sEH activity potently, with IC50 values ranging from 6.2 ± 0.5 to 48.6 ± 3.1 μM. Moreover, a kinetic analysis of compounds 1-7 revealed that the inhibitory actions of compounds 1, 3 and 4 were non-competitive, whereas those of compounds 2 and 5-7 were mixed-type. PMID:25413971

  10. Inhibiting an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Protects CFTR.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; Hammock, Bruce D; Morisseau, Christophe; Madden, Dean R

    2015-08-17

    Opportunistic pathogens exploit diverse strategies to sabotage host defenses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the CFTR inhibitory factor Cif and thus triggers loss of CFTR, an ion channel required for airway mucociliary defense. However, the mechanism of action of Cif has remained unclear. It catalyzes epoxide hydrolysis, but there is no known role for natural epoxides in CFTR regulation. It was demonstrated that the hydrolase activity of Cif is strictly required for its effects on CFTR. A small-molecule inhibitor that protects this key component of the mucociliary defense system was also uncovered. These results provide a basis for targeting the distinctive virulence chemistry of Cif and suggest an unanticipated role of physiological epoxides in intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:26136396

  11. Use of Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry to Deduce Selectivity of Reaction in Glycoside Hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Takasuka, Taichi E; Bianchetti, Christopher M; Bergeman, Lai F; Adams, Paul D; Northen, Trent R; Fox, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Chemically synthesized nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) probes derivatized with tetrasaccharides were used to study the reactivity of representative Clostridium thermocellum β-glucosidase, endoglucanases, and cellobiohydrolase. Diagnostic patterns for reactions of these different classes of enzymes were observed. Results show sequential removal of glucose by the β-glucosidase and a progressive increase in specificity of reaction from endoglucanases to cellobiohydrolase. Time-dependent reactions of these polysaccharide-selective enzymes were modeled by numerical integration, which provides a quantitative basis to make functional distinctions among a continuum of naturally evolved catalytic properties. Consequently, our method, which combines automated protein translation with high-sensitivity and time-dependent detection of multiple products, provides a new approach to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic trees with functional measurements. PMID:26579511

  12. A classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B

    1991-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of 301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes have been compared. A total of 291 sequences corresponding to 39 EC entries could be classified into 35 families. Only ten sequences (less than 5% of the sample) could not be assigned to any family. With the sequences available for this analysis, 18 families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number) and 17 were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). Implications on the folding characteristics and mechanism of action of these enzymes and on the evolution of carbohydrate metabolism are discussed. With the steady increase in sequence and structural data, it is suggested that the enzyme classification system should perhaps be revised. PMID:1747104

  13. Towards a molecular-level theory of carbohydrate processivity in glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Beckham, Gregg T; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Knott, Brandon C; Himmel, Michael E; Crowley, Michael F; Sandgren, Mats; Sørlie, Morten; Payne, Christina M

    2014-06-01

    Polysaccharide depolymerization in nature is primarily accomplished by processive glycoside hydrolases (GHs), which abstract single carbohydrate chains from polymer crystals and cleave glycosidic linkages without dissociating after each catalytic event. Understanding the molecular-level features and structural aspects of processivity is of importance due to the prevalence of processive GHs in biomass-degrading enzyme cocktails. Here, we describe recent advances towards the development of a molecular-level theory of processivity for cellulolytic and chitinolytic enzymes, including the development of novel methods for measuring rates of key steps in processive action and insights gained from structural and computational studies. Overall, we present a framework for developing structure-function relationships in processive GHs and outline additional progress towards developing a fundamental understanding of these industrially important enzymes. PMID:24863902

  14. Antibiotic growth promoters enhance animal production by targeting intestinal bile salt hydrolase and its producers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The growth-promoting effect of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) was correlated with the decreased activity of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization. Consistent with this finding, independent chicken studies have demonstrated that AGP usage significantly reduced population of Lactobacillus species, the major BSH-producers in the intestine. Recent finding also demonstrated that some AGPs, such as tetracycline and roxarsone, display direct inhibitory effect on BSH activity. Therefore, BSH is a promising microbiome target for developing novel alternatives to AGPs. Specifically, dietary supplementation of BSH inhibitor may promote host lipid metabolism and energy harvest, consequently enhancing feed efficiency and body weight gain in food animals. PMID:24575079

  15. Discovery of Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase Inhibitors Using Metabolomics Biased Fragment Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, D.; Mamat, B; Magnusson, O; Christensen, J; Haraldsson, M; Mishra, R; Pease, B; Hansen, E; Singh, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel fragment library termed fragments of life (FOL) for structure-based drug discovery. The FOL library includes natural small molecules of life, derivatives thereof, and biaryl protein architecture mimetics. The choice of fragments facilitates the interrogation of protein active sites, allosteric binding sites, and protein-protein interaction surfaces for fragment binding. We screened the FOL library against leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) by X-ray crystallography. A diverse set of fragments including derivatives of resveratrol, nicotinamide, and indole were identified as efficient ligands for LTA4H. These fragments were elaborated in a small number of synthetic cycles into potent inhibitors of LTA4H representing multiple novel chemotypes for modulating leukotriene biosynthesis. Analysis of the fragment-bound structures also showed that the fragments comprehensively recapitulated key chemical features and binding modes of several reported LTA4H inhibitors.

  16. Synthesis of novel bioactive lactose-derived oligosaccharides by microbial glycoside hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Municio, Marina; Herrero, Miguel; Olano, Agustín; Moreno, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides are increasingly demanded within the Food Science domain because of the interesting healthy properties that these compounds may induce to the organism, thanks to their beneficial intestinal microbiota growth promotion ability. In this regard, the development of new efficient, convenient and affordable methods to obtain this class of compounds might expand even further their use as functional ingredients. This review presents an overview on the most recent interesting approaches to synthesize lactose-derived oligosaccharides with potential prebiotic activity paying special focus on the microbial glycoside hydrolases that can be effectively employed to obtain these prebiotic compounds. The most notable advantages of using lactose-derived carbohydrates such as lactosucrose, galactooligosaccharides from lactulose, lactulosucrose and 2-α-glucosyl-lactose are also described and commented. PMID:24690139

  17. Cellular viability effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on cerebellar neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The endocannabinoid anandamide (ANA) participates in the control of cell death inducing the formation of apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the ANA degrading enzyme, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), would induce cellular death. Experiments were performed in cerebellar granule neurons cultured with the FAAH inhibitor, URB597 (25, 50 or 100 nM) as well as endogenous lipids such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) or palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and cellular viability was determined by MTT test. Neurons cultured with URB597 (25, 50 or 100 nM) displayed a decrease in cellular viability. In addition, if cultured with OEA (25 nM) or PEA (100 nM), cellular death was found. These results further suggest that URB597, OEA or PEA promote cellular death. PMID:21854612

  18. Extensive hydrolysis of phosphonates as unexpected behaviour of the known His6-organophosphorus hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Lyagin, Ilya V; Andrianova, Mariia S; Efremenko, Elena N

    2016-07-01

    The catalytic activity of hexahistidine-tagged organophosphorus hydrolase (His6-OPH) in hydrolytic reactions of methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and its monoesters and diesters being decomposition products of R-VX was demonstrated for the first time. The catalytic constants of enzyme in such reactions were determined. The mechanism of C-P bond cleavage in the MPA by His6-OPH was proposed. Such reaction was estimated to be carried out with the soluble and nanocapsulated forms of His6-OPH. His6-OPH was demonstrated to be capable of degrading the key organophosphorus components of reaction masses (RMs) that are produced by the chemical detoxification of R-VX and RMs are multi-substrate mixtures for this enzyme. The kinetic model describing the behaviour of His6-OPH in RMs was proposed and was shown to adequately fit experimental points during degradation of the real samples of RMs. PMID:26932546

  19. Chitosanases from Family 46 of Glycoside Hydrolases: From Proteins to Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Viens, Pascal; Lacombe-Harvey, Marie-Ève; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2015-11-01

    Chitosanases, enzymes that catalyze the endo-hydrolysis of glycolytic links in chitosan, are the subject of numerous studies as biotechnological tools to generate low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) or chitosan oligosaccharides (CHOS) from native, high molecular weight chitosan. Glycoside hydrolases belonging to family GH46 are among the best-studied chitosanases, with four crystallography-derived structures available and more than forty enzymes studied at the biochemical level. They were also subjected to numerous site-directed mutagenesis studies, unraveling the molecular mechanisms of hydrolysis. This review is focused on the taxonomic distribution of GH46 proteins, their multi-modular character, the structure-function relationships and their biological functions in the host organisms. PMID:26516868

  20. Structural and kinetic insights into the mechanism of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-07-19

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin has recently been demonstrated to proceed via two unstable intermediates and requires three separate enzymatic reactions. The second step of this reaction, the conversion of 5-hydroxyisourate (HIU) to 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline, is catalyzed by HIU hydrolase (HIUH). The high-resolution crystal structure of HIUH from the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpHIUH) has been determined. KpHIUH is a homotetrameric protein that, based on sequence and structural similarity, belongs to the transthyretin-related protein family. In addition, the steady-state kinetic parameters for this enzyme and four active-site mutants have been measured. These data provide valuable insight into the functional roles of the active-site residues. Based upon the structural and kinetic data, a mechanism is proposed for the KpHIUH-catalyzed reaction.

  1. Structure of Acidothermus cellulolyticus family 74 glycoside hydrolase at 1.82 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Alahuhta, Markus; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Lunin, Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    Here, a 1.82 Å resolution X-ray structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 74 (GH74) enzyme from Acidothermus cellulolyticus is reported. The resulting structure was refined to an R factor of 0.150 and an R free of 0.196. Structural analysis shows that five related structures have been reported with a secondary-structure similarity of between 75 and 89%. The five similar structures were all either Clostridium thermocellum or Geotrichum sp. M128 GH74 xyloglucanases. Structural analysis indicates that the A. cellulolyticus GH74 enzyme is an endoxyloglucanase, as it lacks a characteristic loop that blocks one end of the active site in exoxyloglucanases. Superimposition with the C. thermocellum GH74 shows that Asp451 and Asp38 are the catalytic residues. PMID:24316824

  2. First Structural Insights into α-l-Arabinofuranosidases from the Two GH62 Glycoside Hydrolase Subfamilies*

    PubMed Central

    Siguier, Béatrice; Haon, Mireille; Nahoum, Virginie; Marcellin, Marlène; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Mourey, Lionel; O'Donohue, Michael J.; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Tranier, Samuel; Dumon, Claire

    2014-01-01

    α-l-Arabinofuranosidases are glycoside hydrolases that specifically hydrolyze non-reducing residues from arabinose-containing polysaccharides. In the case of arabinoxylans, which are the main components of hemicellulose, they are part of microbial xylanolytic systems and are necessary for complete breakdown of arabinoxylans. Glycoside hydrolase family 62 (GH62) is currently a small family of α-l-arabinofuranosidases that contains only bacterial and fungal members. Little is known about the GH62 mechanism of action, because only a few members have been biochemically characterized and no three-dimensional structure is available. Here, we present the first crystal structures of two fungal GH62 α-l-arabinofuranosidases from the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis (UmAbf62A) and ascomycete Podospora anserina (PaAbf62A). Both enzymes are able to efficiently remove the α-l-arabinosyl substituents from arabinoxylan. The overall three-dimensional structure of UmAbf62A and PaAbf62A reveals a five-bladed β-propeller fold that confirms their predicted classification into clan GH-F together with GH43 α-l-arabinofuranosidases. Crystallographic structures of the complexes with arabinose and cellotriose reveal the important role of subsites +1 and +2 for sugar binding. Intriguingly, we observed that PaAbf62A was inhibited by cello-oligosaccharides and displayed binding affinity to cellulose although no activity was observed on a range of cellulosic substrates. Bioinformatic analyses showed that UmAbf62A and PaAbf62A belong to two distinct subfamilies within the GH62 family. The results presented here provide a framework to better investigate the structure-function relationships within the GH62 family. PMID:24394409

  3. The Molecular Structure of Epoxide Hydrolase B From And Its Complex With Urea-Based Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, B.K.; Morisseau, C.; Garen, G.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.; Niu, C.; Hammock, B.D.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-11

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the intracellular pathogen that infects macrophages primarily, is the causative agent of the infectious disease tuberculosis in humans. The Mtb genome encodes at least six epoxide hydrolases (EHs A to F). EHs convert epoxides to trans-dihydrodiols and have roles in drug metabolism as well as in the processing of signaling molecules. Herein, we report the crystal structures of unbound Mtb EHB and Mtb EHB bound to a potent, low-nanomolar (IC(50) approximately 19 nM) urea-based inhibitor at 2.1 and 2.4 A resolution, respectively. The enzyme is a homodimer; each monomer adopts the classical alpha/beta hydrolase fold that composes the catalytic domain; there is a cap domain that regulates access to the active site. The catalytic triad, comprising Asp104, His333 and Asp302, protrudes from the catalytic domain into the substrate binding cavity between the two domains. The urea portion of the inhibitor is bound in the catalytic cavity, mimicking, in part, the substrate binding; the two urea nitrogen atoms donate hydrogen bonds to the nucleophilic carboxylate of Asp104, and the carbonyl oxygen of the urea moiety receives hydrogen bonds from the phenolic oxygen atoms of Tyr164 and Tyr272. The phenolic oxygen groups of these two residues provide electrophilic assistance during the epoxide hydrolytic cleavage. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding-site residues undergo subtle structural rearrangement. In particular, the side chain of Ile137 exhibits a rotation of around 120 degrees about its C(alpha)-C(beta) bond in order to accommodate the inhibitor. These findings have not only shed light on the enzyme mechanism but also have opened a path for the development of potent inhibitors with good pharmacokinetic profiles against all Mtb EHs of the alpha/beta type.

  4. Novel β-1,4-Mannanase Belonging to a New Glycoside Hydrolase Family in Aspergillus nidulans*

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Motoyuki; Kaneko, Yuhei; Ishihara, Saaya; Mochizuki, Mai; Sakai, Kiyota; Yamada, Miyuki; Murata, Shunsuke; Itoh, Eriko; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Sugimura, Yu; Hirano, Tatsuya; Takaya, Naoki; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Many filamentous fungi produce β-mannan-degrading β-1,4-mannanases that belong to the glycoside hydrolase 5 (GH5) and GH26 families. Here we identified a novel β-1,4-mannanase (Man134A) that belongs to a new glycoside hydrolase (GH) family (GH134) in Aspergillus nidulans. Blast analysis of the amino acid sequence using the NCBI protein database revealed that this enzyme had no similarity to any sequences and no putative conserved domains. Protein homologs of the enzyme were distributed to limited fungal and bacterial species. Man134A released mannobiose (M2), mannotriose (M3), and mannotetraose (M4) but not mannopentaose (M5) or higher manno-oligosaccharides when galactose-free β-mannan was the substrate from the initial stage of the reaction, suggesting that Man134A preferentially reacts with β-mannan via a unique catalytic mode. Man134A had high catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward mannohexaose (M6) compared with the endo-β-1,4-mannanase Man5C and notably converted M6 to M2, M3, and M4, with M3 being the predominant reaction product. The action of Man5C toward β-mannans was synergistic. The growth phenotype of a Man134A disruptant was poor when β-mannans were the sole carbon source, indicating that Man134A is involved in β-mannan degradation in vivo. These findings indicate a hitherto undiscovered mechanism of β-mannan degradation that is enhanced by the novel β-1,4-mannanase, Man134A, when combined with other mannanolytic enzymes including various endo-β-1,4-mannanases. PMID:26385921

  5. Engineered bacterial polyester hydrolases efficiently degrade polyethylene terephthalate due to relieved product inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ren; Oeser, Thorsten; Schmidt, Juliane; Meier, René; Barth, Markus; Then, Johannes; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies on the enzymatic degradation of synthetic polyesters have shown the potential of polyester hydrolases from thermophilic actinomycetes for modifying or degrading polyethylene terephthalate (PET). TfCut2 from Thermobifida fusca KW3 and LC-cutinase (LCC) isolated from a compost metagenome are remarkably active polyester hydrolases with high sequence and structural similarity. Both enzymes exhibit an exposed active site in a substrate binding groove located at the protein surface. By exchanging selected amino acid residues of TfCut2 involved in substrate binding with those present in LCC, enzyme variants with increased PET hydrolytic activity at 65°C were obtained. The highest activity in hydrolyzing PET films and fibers were detected with the single variant G62A and the double variant G62A/I213S. Both variants caused a weight loss of PET films of more than 42% after 50 h of hydrolysis, corresponding to a 2.7-fold increase compared to the wild type enzyme. Kinetic analysis based on the released PET hydrolysis products confirmed the superior hydrolytic activity of G62A with a fourfold higher hydrolysis rate constant and a 1.5-fold lower substrate binding constant than those of the wild type enzyme. Mono-(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalate is a strong inhibitor of TfCut2. A determination of the Rosetta binding energy suggested a reduced interaction of G62A with 2PET, a dimer of the PET monomer ethylene terephthalate. Indeed, G62A revealed a 5.5-fold lower binding constant to the inhibitor than the wild type enzyme indicating that its increased PET hydrolysis activity is the result of a relieved product inhibition by mono-(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalate. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1658-1665. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26804057

  6. Dysregulation of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase and Lipidomic Profiles in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Pei-an Betty; Yang, Jun; Morisseau, Christophe; German, J. Bruce; Van Zeeland, Ashley; Armando, Aaron M.; Quehenberger, Oswald; Bergen, Andrew W.; Magistretti, Pierre; Berrettini, Wade; Halmi, Katherine Ann; Schork, Nicholas; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kaye, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) restrict eating and become emaciated. AN tend to have an aversion to foods rich in fat. Because Epoxide Hydrolase 2 (EPHX2) was identified as a novel AN susceptibility gene, and because its protein product, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), converts bioactive epoxides of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) to the corresponding diols, lipidomic and metabolomic targets of EPHX2 were assessed to evaluate the biological functions of EPHX2 and their role in AN. Epoxide substrates of sEH and associated oxylipins were measured in ill AN, recovered AN, and gender- and race-matched controls. PUFA and oxylipin markers were tested as potential biomarkers for AN. Oxylipin ratios were calculated as proxy markers of in vivo sEH activity. Several free- and total PUFAs were associated with AN diagnosis and with AN recovery. AN displayed elevated n-3 PUFAs and may differ from controls in PUFA elongation and desaturation processes. Cytochrome P450 pathway oxylipins from arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid PUFAs are associated with AN diagnosis. The diol:epoxide ratios suggest the sEH activity is higher in AN compared to controls. Multivariate analysis illustrates normalization of lipidomic profiles in recovered ANs. EPHX2 influences AN risk through in vivo interaction with dietary PUFAs. PUFA composition and concentrations as well as sEH activity may contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of AN. Our data support the involvement of EPHX2-associated lipidomic and oxylipin dysregulations in AN, and reveal their potential as biomarkers to assess responsiveness to future intervention or treatment. PMID:25824304

  7. Determinants of Reactivity and Selectivity in Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase from Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is an enzyme involved in drug metabolism that catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxides to form their corresponding diols. sEH has a broad substrate range and shows high regio- and enantioselectivity for nucleophilic ring opening by Asp333. Epoxide hydrolases therefore have potential synthetic applications. We have used combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) umbrella sampling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (at the AM1/CHARMM22 level) and high-level ab initio (SCS-MP2) QM/MM calculations to analyze the reactions, and determinants of selectivity, for two substrates: trans-stilbene oxide (t-SO) and trans-diphenylpropene oxide (t-DPPO). The calculated free energy barriers from the QM/MM (AM1/CHARMM22) umbrella sampling MD simulations show a lower barrier for phenyl attack in t-DPPO, compared with that for benzylic attack, in agreement with experiment. Activation barriers in agreement with experimental rate constants are obtained only with the highest level of QM theory (SCS-MP2) used. Our results show that the selectivity of the ring-opening reaction is influenced by several factors, including proximity to the nucleophile, electronic stabilization of the transition state, and hydrogen bonding to two active site tyrosine residues. The protonation state of His523 during nucleophilic attack has also been investigated, and our results show that the protonated form is most consistent with experimental findings. The work presented here illustrates how determinants of selectivity can be identified from QM/MM simulations. These insights may also provide useful information for the design of novel catalysts for use in the synthesis of enantiopure compounds. PMID:22280021

  8. Role of leukotriene A4 hydrolase aminopeptidase in the pathogenesis of emphysema1

    PubMed Central

    Paige, Mikell; Wang, Kan; Burdick, Marie; Park, Sunhye; Cha, Josiah; Jeffrey, Erin; Sherman, Nicholas; Shim, Y. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) is a bi-functional enzyme with an epoxy hydrolase and aminopeptidase activities. We hypothesize that the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity alleviates neutrophilic inflammation, which contributes to cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema by clearing Proline-Glycine-Proline (PGP), a tri-amino acid chemokine known to induce chemotaxis of neutrophils. To investigate the biological contributions made by the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity in CS-induced emphysema, we exposed wild type mice to CS over five months while treating them with a vehicle or a pharmaceutical agent (4MDM) that selectively augments the LTA4H aminopeptidase without affecting the bio-production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Emphysematous phenotypes were assessed by pre mortem lung physiology with a small animal ventilator and by postmortem histologic morphometry. CS exposure acidified the airspaces and induced localization of the LTA4H protein into the nuclei of the epithelial cells. This resulted in accumulation of PGP in the airspaces by suppressing the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity. When the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity was selectively augmented by 4MDM, the levels of PGP in the BALF and infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs were significant reduced without affecting the levels of LTB4. This protected murine lungs from CS-induced emphysematous alveolar remodeling. In conclusion, CS exposure promotes the development of CS-induced emphysema by suppressing the enzymatic activities of the LTA4H aminopeptidase in lung tissues and accumulating PGP and neutrophils in the airspaces. However, restoring the LTA4 aminopeptidase activity with a pharmaceutical agent protected murine lungs from developing CS-induced emphysema. PMID:24771855

  9. Inhibition of endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase increases atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability in mice.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Friedrich Felix; Khoury, Mona; Slomka, Heike; Kebschull, Moritz; Lerner, Raissa; Lutz, Beat; Schott, Hans; Lütjohann, Dieter; Wojtalla, Alexandra; Becker, Astrid; Zimmer, Andreas; Nickenig, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The role of endocannabinoids such as anandamide during atherogenesis remains largely unknown. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) represents the key enzyme in anandamide degradation, and its inhibition is associated with subsequent higher levels of anandamide. Here, we tested whether selective inhibition of FAAH influences the progression of atherosclerosis in mice. Selective inhibition of FAAH using URB597 resulted in significantly increased plasma levels of anandamide compared to control, as assessed by mass spectrometry experiments in mice. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice were fed a high-fat, cholesterol-rich diet to induce atherosclerotic conditions. Simultaneously, mice received either the pharmacological FAAH inhibitor URB597 1mg/kg body weight (n=28) or vehicle (n=25) via intraperitoneal injection three times a week. After eight weeks, mice were sacrificed, and experiments were performed. Vascular superoxide generation did not differ between both groups, as measured by L012 assay. To determine whether selective inhibition of FAAH affects atherosclerotic plaque inflammation, immunohistochemical staining of the aortic root was performed. Atherosclerotic plaque formation, vascular macrophage accumulation, as well as vascular T cell infiltration did not differ between both groups. Interestingly, neutrophil cell accumulation was significantly increased in mice receiving URB597 compared to control. Vascular collagen structures in atherosclerotic plaques were significantly diminished in mice treated with URB597 compared to control, as assessed by picro-sirius-red staining. This was accompanied by an increased aortic expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase does not influence plaque size but increases plaque vulnerability in mice. PMID:24286707

  10. Characterization of a Serine Hydrolase Targeted by Acyl-protein Thioesterase Inhibitors in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Louise E.; Rusch, Marion; Adibekian, Alexander; Bullen, Hayley E.; Graindorge, Arnault; Freymond, Céline; Rottmann, Matthias; Braun-Breton, Catherine; Baumeister, Stefan; Porfetye, Arthur T.; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Hedberg, Christian; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, cysteine palmitoylation is an important reversible modification that impacts protein targeting, folding, stability, and interactions with partners. Evidence suggests that protein palmitoylation contributes to key biological processes in Apicomplexa with the recent palmitome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum reporting over 400 substrates that are modified with palmitate by a broad range of protein S-acyl transferases. Dynamic palmitoylation cycles require the action of an acyl-protein thioesterase (APT) that cleaves palmitate from substrates and conveys reversibility to this posttranslational modification. In this work, we identified candidates for APT activity in Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of parasites with low micromolar concentrations of β-lactone- or triazole urea-based inhibitors that target human APT1 showed varied detrimental effects at multiple steps of the parasite lytic cycle. The use of an activity-based probe in combination with these inhibitors revealed the existence of several serine hydrolases that are targeted by APT1 inhibitors. The active serine hydrolase, TgASH1, identified as the homologue closest to human APT1 and APT2, was characterized further. Biochemical analysis of TgASH1 indicated that this enzyme cleaves substrates with a specificity similar to APTs, and homology modeling points toward an APT-like enzyme. TgASH1 is dispensable for parasite survival, which indicates that the severe effects observed with the β-lactone inhibitors are caused by the inhibition of non-TgASH1 targets. Other ASH candidates for APT activity were functionally characterized, and one of them was found to be resistant to gene disruption due to the potential essential nature of the protein. PMID:23913689

  11. Phylogenetic analyses suggest multiple changes of substrate specificity within the Glycosyl hydrolase 20 family

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Beta-N-acetylhexosaminidases belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase 20 (GH20) family are involved in the removal of terminal β-glycosidacally linked N-acetylhexosamine residues. These enzymes, widely distributed in microorganisms, animals and plants, are involved in many important physiological and pathological processes, such as cell structural integrity, energy storage, pathogen defence, viral penetration, cellular signalling, fertilization, development of carcinomas, inflammatory events and lysosomal storage diseases. Nevertheless, only limited analyses of phylogenetic relationships between GH20 genes have been performed until now. Results Careful phylogenetic analyses of 233 inferred protein sequences from eukaryotes and prokaryotes reveal a complex history for the GH20 family. In bacteria, multiple gene duplications and lineage specific gene loss (and/or horizontal gene transfer) are required to explain the observed taxonomic distribution. The last common ancestor of extant eukaryotes is likely to have possessed at least one GH20 family member. At least one gene duplication before the divergence of animals, plants and fungi as well as other lineage specific duplication events have given rise to multiple paralogous subfamilies in eukaryotes. Phylogenetic analyses also suggest that a second, divergent subfamily of GH20 family genes present in animals derive from an independent prokaryotic source. Our data suggest multiple convergent changes of functional roles of GH20 family members in eukaryotes. Conclusion This study represents the first detailed evolutionary analysis of the glycosyl hydrolase GH20 family. Mapping of data concerning physiological function of GH20 family members onto the phylogenetic tree reveals that apparently convergent and highly lineage specific changes in substrate specificity have occurred in multiple GH20 subfamilies. PMID:18647384

  12. Blood acylpeptide hydrolase activity is a sensitive marker for exposure to some organophosphate toxicants.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-08-01

    Acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) unblocks N-acetyl peptides. It is a major serine hydrolase in rat blood, brain, and liver detected by derivatization with (3)H-diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) or a biotinylated fluorophosphonate. Although APH does not appear to be a primary target of acute poisoning by organophosphorus (OP) compounds, the inhibitor specificity of this secondary target is largely unknown. This study fills the gap and emphasizes blood APH as a potential marker of OP exposure. The most potent in vitro inhibitors for human erythrocyte and mouse brain APH are DFP (IC(50) 11-17 nM), chlorpyrifos oxon (IC(50) 21-71 nM), dichlorvos (IC(50) 230-560 nM), naled (IC(50) 370-870 nM), and their analogs with modified alkyl substituents. (3)H-diisopropyl fluorophosphate is a potent inhibitor of mouse blood and brain APH in vivo (ED(50) 0.09-0.2 mg/kg and 0.02-0.03 mg/l for ip and vapor exposure, respectively). Mouse blood and brain APH and blood butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) are of similar sensitivity to DFP in vitro and in vivo (ip and vapor exposure), but APH inhibition is much more persistent in vivo (still >80% inhibition after 4 days). The inhibitory potency of OP pesticides in vivo in mice varies from APH selective (dichlorvos, naled, and trichlorfon), to APH and BChE selective (profenofos and tribufos), to ChE selective or nonselective (many commercial insecticides). Sarin administered ip at a lethal dose to guinea pigs inhibits blood acetylcholinesterase and BChE completely but erythrocyte APH only partially. Blood APH activity is therefore a sensitive marker for exposure to some but not all OP pesticides and chemical warfare agents. PMID:15888665

  13. Dysregulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase and lipidomic profiles in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shih, P B; Yang, J; Morisseau, C; German, J B; Zeeland, A A Scott-Van; Armando, A M; Quehenberger, O; Bergen, A W; Magistretti, P; Berrettini, W; Halmi, K A; Schork, N; Hammock, B D; Kaye, W

    2016-04-01

    Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) restrict eating and become emaciated. They tend to have an aversion to foods rich in fat. Because epoxide hydrolase 2 (EPHX2) was identified as a novel AN susceptibility gene, and because its protein product, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), converts bioactive epoxides of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) to the corresponding diols, lipidomic and metabolomic targets of EPHX2 were assessed to evaluate the biological functions of EPHX2 and their role in AN. Epoxide substrates of sEH and associated oxylipins were measured in ill AN, recovered AN and gender- and race-matched controls. PUFA and oxylipin markers were tested as potential biomarkers for AN. Oxylipin ratios were calculated as proxy markers of in vivo sEH activity. Several free- and total PUFAs were associated with AN diagnosis and with AN recovery. AN displayed elevated n-3 PUFAs and may differ from controls in PUFA elongation and desaturation processes. Cytochrome P450 pathway oxylipins from arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid and docosahexaenoic acid PUFAs are associated with AN diagnosis. The diol:epoxide ratios suggest the sEH activity is higher in AN compared with controls. Multivariate analysis illustrates normalization of lipidomic profiles in recovered ANs. EPHX2 influences AN risk through in vivo interaction with dietary PUFAs. PUFA composition and concentrations as well as sEH activity may contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of AN. Our data support the involvement of EPHX2-associated lipidomic and oxylipin dysregulations in AN, and reveal their potential as biomarkers to assess responsiveness to future intervention or treatment. PMID:25824304

  14. Molecular Dynamics of Organophosphorous Hydrolases Bound to the Nerve Agent Soman

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Thereza A.; Osman, Mohamed A.; Straatsma, TP

    2007-07-01

    The organophosphorous hydrolase (OPH) from Pseudomonas diminuta is capable of degrading extremely toxic organophosphorous compounds with a high catalytic turnover and broad substrate specificity. The potential use of this enzyme for the detection and detoxification of warfare nerve agents has spurred efforts to engineer mutants of enhanced catalytic activity and modified stereospecificity towards the most toxic forms of organophosphate nerve agents. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type OPH and the complexes between the wild-type and the triple-mutant H254G/H257W/L303R forms and the substrate SpSc-soman have been carried out to enhance our molecular level understanding of its reaction mechanism. Comparison of the three simulations indicate that substrate binding induces conformational changes of the loops near the active site, suggesting an induced-fit mechanism. Likewise, the coordination of the zinc cations in the active site of the enzyme differs between the free enzyme and the complexes. In the absence of the substrate, the more exposed b-zinc is hexa-coordinated and the less exposed a-zinc is penta-coordinated. In the presence of the substrate, the b- zinc atom can be both penta- or hexa-coordinated while the a-zinc atom is tetra-coordinated. In addition, binding energies were calculated from electrostatic properties obtained by solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation combined with a surface area-dependent apolar contribution. The calculations indicate that the binding of SpSc-soman to OPH is driven by nonpolar interactions while electrostatic interactions determine binding specificity. These results provide a qualitative, molecular-level explanation for 2 the three-fold increase in catalytic efficiency of the triple-mutant towards SpSc-soman. Keywords: organophosphorous hydrolase, phosphotriesterase, nerve agents, soman, molecular dynamics, Poisson-Boltzmann equation, continuum electrostatics, metalloprotein.

  15. Product formation controlled by substrate dynamics in leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Tholander, Fredrik; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Qureshi, Abdul Aziz; Niegowski, Damian; Hasan, Mahmudul; Thunnissen, Marjolein; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2014-02-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase/aminopeptidase (LTA4H) (EC 3.3.2.6) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme with both an epoxide hydrolase and an aminopeptidase activity. LTA4H from the African claw toad, Xenopus laevis (xlLTA4H) has been shown to, unlike the human enzyme, convert LTA4 to two enzymatic metabolites, LTB4 and another biologically active product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4 (5(S),12R-dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid). In order to study the molecular aspect of the formation of this product we have characterized the structure and function of xlLTA4H. We solved the structure of xlLTA4H to a resolution of 2.3Å. It is a dimeric structure where each monomer has three domains with the active site in between the domains, similar as to the human structure. An important difference between the human and amphibian enzyme is the phenylalanine to tyrosine exchange at position 375. Our studies show that mutating F375 in xlLTA4H to tyrosine abolishes the formation of the LTB4 isomeric product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4. In an attempt to understand how one amino acid exchange leads to a new product profile as seen in the xlLTA4H, we performed a conformer analysis of the triene part of the substrate LTA4. Our results show that the Boltzmann distribution of substrate conformers correlates with the observed distribution of products. We suggest that the observed difference in product profile between the human and the xlLTA4H arises from different level of discrimination between substrate LTA4 conformers. PMID:24333438

  16. Long-term consequences of perinatal fatty acid amino hydrolase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Morgan, Daniel; Jew, Chris P; Haskins, Chris; Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Leishman, Emma; Spencer, Corinne M; Czyzyk, Traci; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeFatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors show promise as a treatment for anxiety, depression and pain. Here we investigated whether perinatal exposure to URB597, a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, alters brain development and affects behaviour in adult mice. Experimental ApproachMouse dams were treated daily from gestational day 10.5 to 16.5 with 1, 3 or 10 mg kg−1 URB597. MS was used to measure a panel of endocannabinoids and related lipid compounds and brain development was assessed at embryonic day 16.5. Separate cohorts of mouse dams were treated with 10 mg kg−1 URB597, from gestational day 10.5 to postnatal day 7, and the adult offspring were assessed with a battery of behavioural tests. Key ResultsPerinatal URB597 exposure elevated anandamide and related N-acyl amides. URB597 did not induce signs of toxicity or affect dam weight gain, neurogenesis or axonal development at embryonic day 16.5. It did lead to subtle behavioural deficits in adult offspring, manifested by reduced cocaine-conditioned preference, increased depressive behaviours and impaired working memory. Anxiety levels, motor function and sensory-motor gating were not significantly altered. Conclusions and ImplicationsTaken together, the present results highlight how exposure to elevated levels of anandamide and related N-acyl amides during brain development can lead to subtle alterations in behaviour in adulthood. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24730060

  17. Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 127 β-L-arabinofuranosidase from Bifidobacterium longum

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tasuku; Saikawa, Kyo; Kim, Seonah; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Ishiwata, Akihiro; Kaeothip, Sophon; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Beckham, Gregg T.; Ito, Yukishige; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2014-04-25

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HypBA1 β-L-arabinofuranosidase belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 127. • Crystal structure of HypBA1 was determined. • HypBA1 consists of a catalytic barrel and two additional β-sandwich domains. • The active site contains a Zn{sup 2+} coordinated by glutamate and three cysteines. • A possible reaction mechanism involving cysteine as the nucleophile is proposed. - Abstract: Enzymes acting on β-linked arabinofuranosides have been unknown until recently, in spite of wide distribution of β-L-arabinofuranosyl oligosaccharides in plant cells. Recently, a β-L-arabinofuranosidase from the glycoside hydrolase family 127 (HypBA1) was discovered in the newly characterized degradation system of hydroxyproline-linked β-L-arabinooligosaccharides in the bacterium Bifidobacterium longum. Here, we report the crystal structure of HypBA1 in the ligand-free and β-L-arabinofuranose complex forms. The structure of HypBA1 consists of a catalytic barrel domain and two additional β-sandwich domains, with one β-sandwich domain involved in the formation of a dimer. Interestingly, there is an unprecedented metal-binding motif with Zn{sup 2+} coordinated by glutamate and three cysteines in the active site. The glutamate residue is located far from the anomeric carbon of the β-L-arabinofuranose ligand, but one cysteine residue is appropriately located for nucleophilic attack for glycosidic bond cleavage. The residues around the active site are highly conserved among GH127 members. Based on biochemical experiments and quantum mechanical calculations, a possible reaction mechanism involving cysteine as the nucleophile is proposed.

  18. Improving recombinant protein purification yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of adequate amounts of recombinant proteins is essential for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. It’s technologically challenging and a limiting factor for tung oil research because analytical reagents such as high qua...

  19. CRMAGE: CRISPR Optimized MAGE Recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Sommer, Morten O. A.; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-01-01

    A bottleneck in metabolic engineering and systems biology approaches is the lack of efficient genome engineering technologies. Here, we combine CRISPR/Cas9 and λ Red recombineering based MAGE technology (CRMAGE) to create a highly efficient and fast method for genome engineering of Escherichia coli. Using CRMAGE, the recombineering efficiency was between 96.5% and 99.7% for gene recoding of three genomic targets, compared to between 0.68% and 5.4% using traditional recombineering. For modulation of protein synthesis (small insertion/RBS substitution) the efficiency was increased from 6% to 70%. CRMAGE can be multiplexed and enables introduction of at least two mutations in a single round of recombineering with similar efficiencies. PAM-independent loci were targeted using degenerate codons, thereby making it possible to modify any site in the genome. CRMAGE is based on two plasmids that are assembled by a USER-cloning approach enabling quick and cost efficient gRNA replacement. CRMAGE furthermore utilizes CRISPR/Cas9 for efficient plasmid curing, thereby enabling multiple engineering rounds per day. To facilitate the design process, a web-based tool was developed to predict both the λ Red oligos and the gRNAs. The CRMAGE platform enables highly efficient and fast genome editing and may open up promising prospective for automation of genome-scale engineering. PMID:26797514

  20. Inhomogeneous recombinations during cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobacchi, Emanuele; Mesinger, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    By depleting the ionizing photon budget available to expand cosmic H II regions, recombining systems (or Lyman limit systems) can have a large impact during (and following) cosmic reionization. Unfortunately, directly resolving such structures in large-scale reionization simulations is computationally impractical. Instead, here we implement a subgrid prescription for tracking inhomogeneous recombinations in the intergalactic medium. Building on previous work parametrizing photoheating feedback on star formation, we present large-scale, seminumeric reionization simulations which self-consistently track the local (subgrid) evolution of both sources and sinks of ionizing photons. Our simple, single-parameter model naturally results in both an extended reionization and a modest, slowly evolving emissivity, consistent with observations. Recombinations are instrumental in slowing the growth of large H II regions, and damping the rapid rise of the ionizing background in the late stages of (and following) reionization. As a result, typical H II regions are smaller by factors of ˜2 to 3 throughout reionization. The large-scale (k ≲ 0.2 Mpc-1) ionization power spectrum is suppressed by factors of ≳2-3 in the second half of reionization. Therefore properly modelling recombinations is important in interpreting virtually all reionization observables, including upcoming interferometry with the redshifted 21cm line. Consistent with previous works, we find the clumping factor of ionized gas to be C H II ˜ 4 at the end of reionization.

  1. Soluble epoxide hydrolase expression in a porcine model of arteriovenous graft stenosis and anti-inflammatory effects of a soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, William G.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Cheung, Alfred K.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts, placed between an artery and vein, are used for hemodialysis but often fail due to stenosis, typically at the vein-graft anastomosis. This study recorded T lymphocyte and macrophage accumulation at the vein-graft anastomosis, suggesting a role for inflammation in stenosis development. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), products of cytochrome P-450 epoxidation of arachidonic acid, have vasculoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects including inhibition of platelet activation, cell migration, and adhesion. EETs are hydrolyzed by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to less active diols. The effects of a specific inhibitor of sEH (sEHI) on cytokine release from human monocytes and mouse bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMMΦ) from wild-type (WT) and sEH knockout (KO) animals were investigated. Expression of sEH protein increased over time at the anastomosis as evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Pre-exposure of adherent human monocytes to sEHI (5 μM) significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α and enhanced the EET-to-diol ratio. Release of MCP-1 from WT BMMΦ was significantly inhibited but release from sEH KO BMMΦ was not attenuated indicating the specificity of the sEHI. In contrast, sEHI did not inhibit the release of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 or interleukin-6. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB, as assessed by immunocytochemical staining, was not decreased with sEHI in monocytes, but the phosphorylation of JNK was completely abrogated, suggesting this pathway is the target of sEHI effects in monocytes. These results suggest that sEHI may be useful for inhibition of inflammation and subsequently stenosis in AV grafts. PMID:22621785

  2. Recombinant DNA: History of the Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigue, Charles L.; Stanziale, William G.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards associated with recombinant DNA research are presented along with some social implications and the development of recombinant DNA research guidelines by the National Institutes of Health. (SA)

  3. Antibacterial activity of recombinant murine beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, T; Tanaka, A

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant murine beta interferon was protective and therapeutic for mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection in vivo. The recombinant murine beta interferon caused enhanced H2O2 release by macrophages in vivo, but not in vitro. PMID:3343048

  4. [Recombination in Drosophila in space flight].

    PubMed

    Filatova, L P; Vaulina, E N; Lapteva, N Sh; Grozdova, T Ia

    1988-04-01

    An experiment with Drosophila melanogaster males was performed aboard the Artificial Satellite "Kosmos-1667". Mutagenic effects of a 7-day space flight on intergene recombination in chromosome 2 were studied. The space flight factors decreased the frequency of recombination. A model experiment on a laboratory centrifuge demonstrated insignificant increase in recombination frequency caused by acceleration. PMID:3135244

  5. Evaluation of Th1/Th2-Related Immune Response against Recombinant Proteins of Brucella abortus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Im, Young Bin; Park, Woo Bin; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2016-06-28

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Brucella, a genus of gram-negative bacteria. Cytokines have key roles in the activation of innate and acquired immunities. Despite several research attempts to reveal the immune responses, the mechanism of Brucella infection remains unclear. Therefore, immune responses were analyzed in mice immunized with nine recombinant proteins. Cytokine production profiles were analyzed in the RAW 264.7 cells and naive splenocytes after stimulation with three recombinant proteins, metal-dependent hydrolase (r0628), bacterioferritin (rBfr), and thiamine transporter substrate-binding protein (rTbpA). Immune responses were analyzed by ELISA and ELISpot assay after immunization with proteins in mice. The production levels of NO, TNF-α, and IL-6 were time-dependently increased after having been stimulated with proteins in the RAW 264.7 cells. In naive splenocytes, the production of IFN-γ and IL-2 was increased after stimulation with the proteins. It was concluded that two recombinant proteins, r0628 and rTbpA, showed strong immunogenicity that was induced with Th1-related cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α more than Th2-related cytokines IL-6, IL-4, and IL-5 in vitro. Conversely, a humoral immune response was activated by increasing the number of antigen-secreting cells specifically. Furthermore, these could be candidate diagnosis antigens for better understanding of brucellosis. PMID:27012238

  6. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies. PMID:27236551

  7. Chemical kinetics of geminal recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, P.P.; Khudyakov, I.V.; Brin, E.F.; Kuz'min, V.A.

    1988-09-01

    The kinetics of geminal recombination of triplet radical pairs formed in photoreduction of benzophenone by p-cresol in glycerin solution was studied by pulsed laser photolysis. The experiments were conducted at several temperatures and in a constant magnetic field of H = 0.34 T. The parameters in six kinetic equations describing geminal recombination were determined with a computer. The values of the sums of the squares of the residual deviations of the approximation were obtained. It was found that the kinetics are best described by the functions proposed by Noyes and Shushin. It was shown that it is necessary to use the mutual diffusion coefficient of the radicals, which is significantly smaller than the sum of the estimations of the experimental values of the radical diffusion coefficients, for describing the kinetics due to the correlations of the molecular motions of the radicals in the cage.

  8. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  9. Surface recombination statistics at traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsberg, P. T.; Abrahams, M. S.

    1983-09-01

    The Shockley-Read-Hall recombination statistics was recently generalised by Dhariwal, Kothari and Jain to include the effect of a finite time of relaxation before the captured carrier settles into its ground state, and by Landsberg to allow for Auger effects and so-called "extra" carriers supplied to the semiconductor from the outside. The combined result of these effects is studied here theoretically, together with the consideration of a simple distribution of trap states. It is found that the surface recombination velocity s has the usual minimum in the near intrinsic state and that s passes through a maximum as a function of excess electron concentration. Both extrema are enhanced if the trap states are distributed over an energy range. Experimental plots of s as a function of excess electron and hole concentrations should yield insight concerning the numerical importance of (a) Auger effects with the participation of traps and (b) relaxation times.

  10. Recombinant Toxins for Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastan, Ira; Fitzgerald, David

    1991-11-01

    Recombinant toxins target cell surface receptors and antigens on tumor cells. They kill by mechanisms different from conventional chemotherapy, so that cross resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic agents should not be a problem. Furthermore, they are not mutagens and should not induce secondary malignancies or accelerate progression of benign malignancies. They can be mass-produced cheaply in bacteria as homogeneous proteins. Either growth factor-toxin fusions or antibody-toxin fusions can be chosen, depending on the cellular target.

  11. Introductory experiments in recombinant DNA.

    PubMed

    Tait, R C

    2000-07-01

    Nine practical exercises demonstrate the basic principles in recombinant DNA. The exercises explain the principles that DNA equals genes and that changes in DNA cause changes in genetic properties. The aim is to provide a teaching resource that can be used to illustrate the theory and applications of molecular biology to highschool students, undergraduate students, medics, dentists, doctors, nurses, life scientists, and anyone learning the basics of DNA technology. PMID:11471559

  12. Recombinant vector and eukaryotic host transformed thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Sugden, W.M.

    1987-08-11

    A recombinant plasmid is described comprising: a segment from a first plasmid which is not a lymphotrophic herpes virus segment and which facilitates the replication of the recombinant plasmid in a prokaryotic host; a segment from a lymphotrophic herpes virus which is linked to the first plasmid segment such that is a capable of assisting in maintaining the recombinant plasmid as a plasmid if the recombinant plasmid is inserted into a eukaryotic host that has been transformed by the lymphotrophic herpes virus; and a foreign eukaryotic gene component linked as part of the recombinant plasmid.

  13. Oxime esters as selective, covalent inhibitors of the serine hydrolase retinoblastoma-binding protein 9 (RBBP9)

    PubMed Central

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Wolfe, Monique R.; Masuda, Kim; Brown, Steven J.; Spicer, Timothy P.; Fernandez-Vega, Virneliz; Chase, Peter; Hodder, Peter S.; Rosen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    We recently described a fluorescence polarization platform for competitive activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) that enables high-throughput inhibitor screening for enzymes with poorly characterized biochemical activity. Here, we report the discovery of a class of oxime ester inhibitors for the unannotated serine hydrolase RBBP9 from a full-deck (200,000+ compound) fluopol-ABPP screen conducted in collaboration with the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network (MLSCN). We show that these compounds covalently inhibit RBBP9 by modifying the enzyme’s active site serine nucleophile and, based on competitive ABPP in cell and tissue proteomes, are selective for RBBP9 relative to other mammalian serine hydrolases. PMID:20207142

  14. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Organophosphorus and Thiocarbamate Pesticides Reveals Multiple Serine Hydrolase Targets in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    NOMURA, DANIEL K.; CASIDA, JOHN E.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) and thiocarbamate (TC) agrochemicals are used worldwide as insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides, but their safety assessment in terms of potential off-targets remains incomplete. In this study, we used a chemoproteomic platform, termed activity-based protein profiling, to broadly define serine hydrolase targets in mouse brain of a panel of 29 OP and TC pesticides. Among the secondary targets identified, enzymes involved in degradation of endocannabinoid signaling lipids, monoacylglycerol lipase and fatty acid amide hydrolase, were inhibited by several OP and TC pesticides. Blockade of these two enzymes led to elevations in brain endocannabinoid levels and dysregulated brain arachidonate metabolism. Other secondary targets include enzymes thought to also play important roles in the nervous system and unannotated proteins. This study reveals a multitude of secondary targets for OP and TC pesticides and underscores the utility of chemoproteomic platforms in gaining insights into biochemical pathways that are perturbed by these toxicants. PMID:21341672

  15. Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

  16. A coalescent model of recombination hotspots.

    PubMed Central

    Wiuf, Carsten; Posada, David

    2003-01-01

    Recent experimental findings suggest that the assumption of a homogeneous recombination rate along the human genome is too naive. These findings point to block-structured recombination rates; certain regions (called hotspots) are more prone than other regions to recombination. In this report a coalescent model incorporating hotspot or block-structured recombination is developed and investigated analytically as well as by simulation. Our main results can be summarized as follows: (1) The expected number of recombination events is much lower in a model with pure hotspot recombination than in a model with pure homogeneous recombination, (2) hotspots give rise to large variation in recombination rates along the genome as well as in the number of historical recombination events, and (3) the size of a (nonrecombining) block in the hotspot model is likely to be overestimated grossly when estimated from SNP data. The results are discussed with reference to the current debate about block-structured recombination and, in addition, the results are compared to genome-wide variation in recombination rates. A number of new analytical results about the model are derived. PMID:12750351

  17. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: Origin and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A.; Mutirangura, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. ); Langlois, S. ); Morris, M.A.; Malcolm, S.

    1993-09-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N=27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N-5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, more paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. 33 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  18. Effect of gamma radiation on retroviral recombination.

    PubMed

    Hu, W S; Temin, H M

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of retroviral recombination, we exposed virions to gamma radiation prior to infecting target cells. By using previously described spleen necrosis virus-based vectors containing multiple markers, recombinant proviruses were studied after a single round of retrovirus replication. The current models of retroviral recombination predict that breaking virion RNA should promote minus-strand recombination (forced copy-choice model), decrease or not affect plus-strand recombination (strand displacement/assimilation model), and shift plus-strand recombination towards the 3' end of the genome. However, we found that while gamma irradiation of virions reduced the amount of recoverable viral RNA, it did not primarily cause breaks. Thus, the frequency of selected recombinants was not significantly altered with greater doses of radiation. In spite of this, the irradiation did decrease the number of recombinants with only one internal template switch. As a result, the average number of additional internal template switches in the recombinant proviruses increased from 0.7 to 1.4 as infectivity decreased to 6%. The unselected internal template switches tended to be 5' of the selected crossover even in the recombinants from irradiated viruses, inconsistent with a plus-strand recombination mechanism. PMID:1602553

  19. The Peptidoglycan Hydrolase of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriophage ϕ11 Plays a Structural Role in the Viral Particle

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; Penadés, José R.

    2013-01-01

    The role of virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases (VAPGHs) in the phage infection cycle is not clear. gp49, the VAPGH from Staphylococcus aureus phage ϕ11, is not essential for phage growth but stabilizes the viral particles. ϕ11Δ49 phages showed a reduced burst size and delayed host lysis. Complementation of gp49 with HydH5 from bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 restored the wild-type phenotype. PMID:23892745

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the amidase domain of allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP

    PubMed Central

    Balotra, Sahil; Newman, Janet; French, Nigel G.; Briggs, Lyndall J.; Peat, Thomas S.; Scott, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was expressed and purified, and a tryptic digest fragment was subsequently identified, expressed and purified. This 50 kDa construct retained amidase activity and was crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and adopted space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.4, b = 179.2, c = 112.6 Å, β = 106.6°. PMID:24598916