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Sample records for recovery process field

  1. Economic Implementation and Optimization of Secondary Oil Recovery Process: St. Mary West Field, Lafayette County, Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Brock P.E., Cary D.

    2003-03-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the economic appropriateness of several enhanced oil recovery processes that are available to a small mature oil field located in southwest Arkansas and to implement the most economic efficient process evaluated. The State of Arkansas natural resource laws require that an oilfield is to be unitized before conducting a secondary recovery project. This requires all properties that can reasonably be determined to include the oil productive reservoir must be bound together as one common lease by a legal contract that must be approved to be fair and equitable to all property owners within the proposed unit area.

  2. Recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Apffel, F.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes a process for manufacturing char and hydrocarbons from discarded used tires. The process consists of: introducing the substantially whole tires into a reactor; pyrolyzing the substantially whole tires in a reaction chamber continuously at a temperature and pressure and for a reaction time sufficient to cause the tires to dissociate into a vapor and a solid phase; the pyrolyzing step including directly heating the tires with a radiant heat source at temperatures of 1000{sup 0} to 3000{sup 0}F; producing char from the solid phase; and processing the vapor phase to produce hydrocarbons.

  3. Recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Apffel, F.

    1987-03-03

    A process is described for manufacturing carbon black and hydrocarbons from discarded tires, comprising: introducing the tires into a reactor; pyrolyzing the tires in a pyrolysis reaction vessel substantially in the absence of artificially introduced oil heating media at a temperature and pressure and for a reaction time sufficient to cause the tires to dissociate into a vapor phase and a solid phase; the pyrolyzing step including directly, internally heating the tires in the reaction vessel using microwave energy; producing carbon black from the solid phase; and processing the vapor phase to produce hyrocarbons.

  4. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  5. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  6. Field experiments and numerical simulations of confined aquifer response to multi-cycle recharge-recovery process through a well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxiu; Wu, Yuanbin; Zhang, Xingsheng; Liu, Yan; Yang, Tianliang; Feng, Bo

    2012-09-01

    SummaryShanghai is one of the cities suffering from land subsidence in China. Land subsidence has caused serious financial losses. Thus, artificial recharge measures have been adopted to compensate the drawdown in shallow, confined aquifers and thereby control land subsidence. In this study, a multi-cycle recharge-recovery field experiment was performed to investigate the response of a shallow, confined aquifer to artificial recharge through a well. In the experiment, a series of recharge-recovery cycles with different recharge volumes and durations, with and without artificial pressure, were performed. The water levels monitored in the recharge and observation wells indicated the response of the aquifer to the multi-cycle recharge-recovery process. Meanwhile, a finite-difference method (FDM) numerical model was established, and its parameters were obtained via a reversed numerical analysis on the experimental data. The responses of the shallow, confined aquifer to the multi-cycle recharge-recovery process were simulated in detail using the model. The calculation results showed that the water level dropped significantly when the recharge ended. Moreover, the efficiency of a multi-cycle recharge was found to be higher than that of a concentrated one under the same recharge volume and time. The relationship between recharge frequency and efficiency, expressed as H = 0.29498 f0.40163 and R2 = 0.97264, respectively, was obtained through the FDM numerical simulation. In the recharge intervals, the optimal recharge efficiency was achieved when the water level rose to 40% of the peak.

  7. Enhanced oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A. B.; Jackson, E. J.

    1985-10-15

    An improved portable, versatile, modular, above-ground system and process for generating combustion gases, principally nitrogen and carbon dioxide, and steam, for removing particulate matter and corrosive components from the combustion gases, and for injecting the purified nitrogen and CO/sub 2/, and steam, individually or in selected mixtures, at controlled temperatures and pressures into a subterranean formation bearing hydrocarbons to enhance the recovery thereof. The system includes a high-pressure combustion reactor for efficient generation of combustion gases at the required rates and at pressures up to about 8000 psi and temperatures up to about 4500/sup 0/ F. The reactor is water-jacketed but lined with refractory material to minimize soot formation. Combustion chamber temperature is reduced to a safe level by water injection with the fuel.

  8. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

    1959-07-01

    The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

  9. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, J.W.; Werkema, R.G.

    1959-07-28

    The recovery of uranium from magnesium fluoride slag obtained as a by- product in the production of uranium metal by the bomb reduction prccess is presented. Generally the recovery is accomplished by finely grinding the slag, roasting ihe ground slag air, and leaching the roasted slag with a hot, aqueous solution containing an excess of the sodium bicarbonate stoichiometrically required to form soluble uranium carbonate complex. The roasting is preferably carried out at between 425 and 485 deg C for about three hours. The leaching is preferably done at 70 to 90 deg C and under pressure. After leaching and filtration the uranium may be recovered from the clear leach liquor by any desired method.

  10. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

  11. Hydrogen recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

  12. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Yeager, J.H.

    1958-08-12

    In the prior art processing of uranium ores, the ore is flrst digested with nitric acid and filtered, and the uranium values are then extracted tom the filtrate by contacting with an organic solvent. The insoluble residue has been processed separately in order to recover any uranium which it might contain. The improvement consists in contacting a slurry, composed of both solution and residue, with the organic solvent prior to filtration. Tbe result is that uranium values contained in the residue are extracted along with the uranium values contained th the solution in one step.

  13. Actinide recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Navratil, James D.; Saba, Mark T.

    1987-07-28

    Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrenedivinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like.

  14. Actinide recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.; Saba, M.T.

    1985-06-13

    Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrene-divinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like. 2 tabs.

  15. Stillage processing for nutrient recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeten, J.M.; Coble, C.G.; Egg, R.P.; Lawhon, J.T.; McBee, G.G.; Schelling, G.T.

    1983-06-01

    Stillage from fermentation of grain sorghum and sweet potatoes was processed for dry matter and nutrient recovery by combinations of screw press, vibrating screen, centrifugation, ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis, yielding up to 98% dry matter removal. For most processes, protein removal equaled or exceeded dry matter removal.

  16. METAL RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Werner, L.B.; Hill, O.F.

    1957-12-01

    A process is presented for the separation of plutonium from the niobium oxide which is frequently used as a carrier precipitate to separate the plutonium from solutions of dissolved fuel elements. The niobium oxide, plutonium bearing precipitate is treated with hydrogen fluoride converting the niobium to the volatile pentafluoride, while the plutonium is changed into the substantially non- volatile plutonium tetrafluoride. After the niobium has been removed, the plutonium tetrafluoride is reacted with elemental fluorine, converting it to a higher plutonium fluoride and this may in turn be volitilized away from any residual impurities.

  17. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, D.

    1958-04-15

    A process of recovering uranium from very low-grade ore residues is described. These low-grade uraniumcontaining hydroxide precipitates, which also contain hydrated silica and iron and aluminum hydroxides, are subjected to multiple leachings with aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate at a pH of at least 9. This leaching serves to selectively extract the uranium from the precipitate, but to leave the greater part of the silica, iron, and aluminum with the residue. The uranium is then separated from the leach liquor by the addition of an acid in sufficient amount to destroy the carbonate followed by the addition of ammonia to precipitate uranium as ammonium diuranate.

  18. Shale oil recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Zerga, Daniel P.

    1980-01-01

    A process of producing within a subterranean oil shale deposit a retort chamber containing permeable fragmented material wherein a series of explosive charges are emplaced in the deposit in a particular configuration comprising an initiating round which functions to produce an upward flexure of the overburden and to initiate fragmentation of the oil shale within the area of the retort chamber to be formed, the initiating round being followed in a predetermined time sequence by retreating lines of emplaced charges developing further fragmentation within the retort zone and continued lateral upward flexure of the overburden. The initiating round is characterized by a plurality of 5-spot patterns and the retreating lines of charges are positioned and fired along zigzag lines generally forming retreating rows of W's. Particular time delays in the firing of successive charges are disclosed.

  19. Gravity Field Recovery with Simulated GOCE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, J.; Bruinsma, S.; Balmino, G.; Abrikosov, O.; Foerste, C.; Rothacher, M.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical simulations of the gravity field parameter recovery using the direct method, with satellite positions as pseudo observations instead of simulated GPS Satellite-to-Satellite (SST) tracking data, and with gravity gradients (SGG data), were done and are ongoing in the framework of the European GOCE Gravity Consortium test and validation plan for GOCE mission data processing. This work shows the latest results from the CNES and GFZ software packages, GINS and EPOS, respectively. After the iterative least-squares orbit adjustment procedure has converged to the highest attainable precision level, the gravity field normal equations are computed in a subsequent step. These SST normal equations, representing the long wavelength gravity field signal, are then reduced for arc-dependent parameters (i.e. state vector at epoch, empirical parameters) and cumulated over the entire observation period. Secondly, the gravity gradient measurements (SGG) are processed, taking into account the coloured noise in these data, and yield (high resolution) normal equations. They are combined with the SST normal equations and the gravity field and gradiometer common mode calibration parameters are simultaneously estimated. The coloured noise in the SGG data is based on the latest and realistic gradiometer specifications. The precision in the measurement bandwidth is approximately 3-5 milliEotvos, but rapidly decreasing for lower frequencies. Due to this behaviour, the observation equations have to be filtered in order to obtain the most accurate recovery. The filter algorithm, design and results are presented to considerable detail since this particular step is the key element that will enable the achievement of the GOCE mission objectives from the ground segment point of view.

  20. Heat recovery reduces process energy losses

    SciTech Connect

    Anon

    1981-09-01

    After evaluation of process and plant operation losses, a pharmaceutical plant found heat recovery a viable means of reducing energy losses. One of the first applications of air-to-air heat recovery was in a recirculation/dehumidification process. Heat exchangers were used to recover heat from the air used to generate or dry the dehumidification material.

  1. A field laboratory for improved oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, A.F.; McDonald, J.; Claridge, E.; Killough, J.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of Annex III of the Memorandum of Understanding, undertaken by the Houston Petroleum Research Center at the University of Houston, was to develop a field laboratory for research in improved oil recovery using a Gulf Coast reservoir in Texas. The participants: (1) make a field site selection and conducted a high resolution seismic survey in the demonstration field, (2) obtained characteristics of the reservoir (3) developed an evaluation of local flood efficiency in different parts of the demonstration reservoir, (4) used diverse methodology to evaluate the potential recovery of the remaining oil in the test reservoir, (5) developed cross-well seismic tomography, and (6) will transfer the learned technologies to oil operators through publication and workshops. This abstract is an overview of these tasks.

  2. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1985-03-12

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with a polynuclear aromatic compound having a molecular weight of at least 155. A novel surfactant system useful in enhanced oil recovery containing the above surfactant is also provided. In addition, an improved process for the enhanced recovery of oil is provided utilizing the novel surfactant system.

  3. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1984-12-11

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with either a petroleum sulfonate or an alkaryl sulfonate. A surfactant system containing the above surfactant useful in enhanced oil recovery processes is also provided.

  4. Global Lunar Gravity Field Recovery from SELENE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Heki, Kosuke; Hanada, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    Results of numerical simulation are presented to examine the global gravity field recovery capability of the Japanese lunar exploration project SELENE (Selenological and Engineering Explorer) which will be launched in 2005. New characteristics of the SELENE lunar gravimetry include four-way satellite-to-satellite Doppler tracking of main orbiter and differential VLBI tracking of two small free-flier satellites. It is shown that planned satellites configuration will improve lunar gravity field in wide range of wavelength as well as far-side selenoid.

  5. REDUCTION IN Pu RECOVERY PROCESSES

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, D.M.; Black, R.P.S.

    1959-09-29

    A method is described for reducing plutonium from the hexavalent to the tetravalent state in a carrier precipitation process for separating plutonium and nuclear fission products. In accordance with the invention oxalate ions are incorporated in the hexavalent plutoniumcontaining solution prior to a step of precipitating lanthanum fluoride in the solution.

  6. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF CONSTITUENTS OF ORES

    DOEpatents

    McCullough, R.F.

    1959-05-01

    A process for U recovery from leached zone material is described. Calcination with alkali metal carbonate at 600 to 2000 deg F followed by digestion with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and filtration forms the basis of the process. (T.R.H.)

  7. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  8. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  9. Metallic Recovery and Ferrous Melting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Luis Trueba

    2004-05-30

    The effects of melting atmosphere and charge material type on the metallic and alloy recovery of ferrous charge materials were investigated in two sets of experiments (Tasks 1 and 2). In addition, thermodynamic studies were performed (Task 3) to determine the suitability of ladle treatment for the production of ductile iron using scrap charge materials high in manganese and sulfur. Task 1--In the first set of experiments, the charge materials investigated were thin steel scrap, thick steel scrap, cast iron scrap, and pig iron in the rusty and clean states. Melting atmospheres in this set of experiments were varied by melting with and without a furnace cover. In this study, it was found that neither covered melting nor melting clean (non-rusty) ferrous charge materials improved the metallic recovery over the recovery experienced with uncovered melting or rusty charge materials. However, the silicon and manganese recoveries were greater with covered melting and clean materials. Silicon and manganese in the molten iron react with oxygen dissolved in the iron from uncovered melting and oxidized iron (surface rust). Silica and manganese silicates are formed which float to the slag decreasing recoveries of silicon and manganese. Cast iron and pig iron had higher metallic recoveries than steel scrap. Carbon recovery was affected by the carbon content of the charge materials, and not by the melting conditions. Irons with higher silicon contents had higher silicon recovery than irons with lower silicon contents. Task 2--In the second set of experiments, briquetted turnings and borings were used to evaluate the effects of briquette cleanliness, carbon additions, and melting atmosphere on metallic and alloy recovery. The melting atmosphere in this set of experiments was varied by melting in air and with an argon atmosphere using the SPAL process. In this set of experiments, carbon additions to the briquettes were found to have the greatest effect on metallic and alloy

  10. Recovery of transuranics from process residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.; Gray, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Process residues are generated at both the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and the Savannah River Plant (SRP) during aqueous chemical and pyrochemical operations. Frequently, process operations will result in either impure products or produce residues sufficiently contaminated with transuranics to be nondiscardable as waste. Purification and recovery flowsheets for process residues have been developed to generate solutions compatible with subsequent Purex operations and either solid or liquid waste suitable for disposal. The ''scrub alloy'' and the ''anode heel alloy'' are examples of materials generated at RFP which have been processed at SRP using the developed recovery flowsheets. Examples of process residues being generated at SRP for which flowsheets are under development include LECO crucibles and alpha-contaminated hydraulic oil.

  11. PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Morris, G.O.

    1955-06-21

    This patent relates to a process for the recovery of uranium from impure uranium tetrafluoride. The process consists essentially of the steps of dissolving the impure uranium tetrafluoride in excess dilute sulfuric acid in the presence of excess hydrogen peroxide, precipitating ammonium uranate from the solution so formed by adding an excess of aqueous ammonia, dissolving the precipitate in sulfuric acid and adding hydrogen peroxide to precipitate uranium peroxdde.

  12. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  13. Oil recovery process using polymer microemulsion complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Canter, N.H.; Robbins, M.L.

    1982-11-23

    A process for the enhanced recovery of oil from a subterranean formation using a polymer-microemulsion complex is disclosed. The polymer is polyethylene oxide or polyvinyl pyrrolidone which interacts with the surfactant of the microemulsion to form a physical association. The resulting complex is characterized by a complexation energy of at least 2 kcal/mole. Slugs containing the present polymer-microemulsion complexes are stable at high salinity, show reduced destabilization due to surfactant adsorption and retention by the formation, have low interfacial tensions and achieve an early banking, as well as increased displacement of crude oil.

  14. Pyrolysis processing for solid waste resource recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serio, Michael A. (Inventor); Kroo, Erik (Inventor); Wojtowicz, Marek A. (Inventor); Suuberg, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Solid waste resource recovery in space is effected by pyrolysis processing, to produce light gases as the main products (CH.sub.4, H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2O, NH.sub.3) and a reactive carbon-rich char as the main byproduct. Significant amounts of liquid products are formed under less severe pyrolysis conditions, and are cracked almost completely to gases as the temperature is raised. A primary pyrolysis model for the composite mixture is based on an existing model for whole biomass materials, and an artificial neural network models the changes in gas composition with the severity of pyrolysis conditions.

  15. PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, D.M.

    1959-01-13

    An improvement is presented in the process for recovery and decontamination of plutonium. The carrier precipitate containing plutonium is dissolved and treated with an oxidizing agent to place the plutonium in a hexavalent oxidation state. A lanthanum fluoride precipitate is then formed in and removed from the solution to carry undesired fission products. The fluoride ions in the reniaining solution are complexed by addition of a borate sueh as boric acid, sodium metaborate or the like. The plutonium is then reduced and carried from the solution by the formation of a bismuth phosphate precipitate. This process effects a better separation from unwanted flssion products along with conccntration of the plutonium by using a smaller amount of carrier.

  16. Zinc Recovery via the Flame Reactor Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, J. F.; Bounds, C. O.; Lherbier, L. W.

    1988-08-01

    A major objective of the zinc industry for the 1990s will be to maintain high zinc recovery while eliminating the disposal of copious quantities of hazardous iron residues. The flame reactor process has demonstrated the potential of meeting this objective by either treating the residues or smelting zinc directly. The process has been proven commercially viable for treating flue dusts generated during electric arc furnace steelmaking. Zinc, lead and cadmium are recovered from the dust as a crude oxide for recycle while a nonhazardous slag is produced for sale. Similar products are efficiently produced from electrolytic zinc plant neutral leach and iron precipitation residues. In addition, the reactor shows promise of fulfilling its original objective of being a low-energy primary zinc smelter by fuming and condensing zinc from roasted concentrates.

  17. Field Geology/Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Jakes, Petr; Jaumann, Ralf; Marshall, John; Moses, Stewart; Ryder, Graham; Saunders, Stephen; Singer, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The field geology/process group examined the basic operations of a terrestrial field geologist and the manner in which these operations could be transferred to a planetary lander. Four basic requirements for robotic field geology were determined: geologic content; surface vision; mobility; and manipulation. Geologic content requires a combination of orbital and descent imaging. Surface vision requirements include range, resolution, stereo, and multispectral imaging. The minimum mobility for useful field geology depends on the scale of orbital imagery. Manipulation requirements include exposing unweathered surfaces, screening samples, and bringing samples in contact with analytical instruments. To support these requirements, several advanced capabilities for future development are recommended. Capabilities include near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, multispectral microscopy, artificial intelligence in support of imaging, x ray diffraction, x ray fluorescence, and rock chipping.

  18. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  19. [Recovery of consciousness: process-oriented approach].

    PubMed

    Gusarova, S B

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally psychological neurorehabilitation of neurosurgical patients is provided subject to availability of clear consciousness and minimal potential to communicate verbally. Cognitive and emotional disorders, problems in social adaptation, neurotic syndromes are normally targets in such cases. We work with patients having survived severe brain damage being in different states of consciousness: vegetative state, minimal state of consciousness, mutism, confusion, posttraumatic Korsaroff syndrom. Psychologist considers recovery of consciousness as the target besides traditional tasks. Construction of communication with patient is central part of such job, where the patient remains unable to contact verbally, yet it is impossible to consider potential aphasia. This is a non-verbal "dialogue" with patient created by psychologist with gradual development and involving other people and objects of environment. Inline with modern neuroscientific achievements demonstrating ability to recognize by patients with severe brain injury (A. Owen, S. Laureys, M. Monti, M. Coleman, A. Soddu, M. Boly and others) we base upon psychological science, on psychotherapeutic approaches containing instruments inevitable to work with patients in altered states of consciousness and creation of non-verbal communication with patient (Jung, Reich, Alexander, Lowen, Keleman, Arnold and Amy Mindell, S. Tomandl, D. Boadella, A. Längle, P. Levin etc). This article will include 15 years of experience to apply Process-oriented approach by A. Mindell to recovery of consciousness of neurosurgical patients based on work with "minimal signals" (micro moves, breath, mimic reactions etc.), principle of feedback, psychosomatic resonance, empathy. PMID:24761599

  20. Enhanced oil recovery process and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A. B.; Jackson, E. V.

    1985-02-19

    An improved portable, versatile, modular, aboveground system and process for generating combustion gases, principally nitrogen and carbon dioxide, and steam, for removing particulate matter and corrosive components from the combustion gases, and for injecting the purified nitrogen and CO/sub 2/, and steam, individually or in selected mixtures, at controlled temperatures and pressures into a subterranean formation bearing hydrocarbons to enhance the recovery thereof. The system includes a high-pressure combustion reactor for efficient generation of combustion gases at the required rates and at pressures up to about 8000 psi and temperatures up to about 4500/sup 0/ F. The reactor is water-jacketed but lined with refractory material to minimize soot formation. Combustion chamber temperature is reduced to a safe level by water injection with the fuel.

  1. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a process for recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide. The process consists the steps of: introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water and which is divided into a recycle portion and a tailgas portion; converting substantially all sulfur species in the recycle portion of the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide to thereby form condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; removing water from the recycle portion of the condenser; and moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried recycle condenser, as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace.

  2. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, the process comprising the steps of: (a) introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising (1) the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and (2) an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; (b) combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (c) introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; (d) subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (e) introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water; (f) converting substantially all sulfur species in the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide, to thereby form a condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; (g) removing water from the condenser effluent from step (f); and (h) moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried condenser effluent from step (g), as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace in step (a) above.

  3. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Liu, Wei

    1995-01-01

    A catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(OF.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1)n].sub.1-k M.sub.k, [(FO.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1.5).sub.n ].sub.1-k M.sub.k, or [Ln.sub.x Zr.sub.1-x O.sub.2-0.5x ].sub.1-k M.sub.k wherein FO.sub.2 is a fluorite-type oxide; RO represents an alkaline earth oxide; RO.sub.1.5 is a Group IIIB or rare earth oxide; Ln is a rare earth element having an atomic number from 57 to 65 or mixtures thereof; M is a transition metal or a mixture of transition metals; n is a number having a value from 0.0 to 0.35; k is a number having a value from 0.0 to about 0.5; and x is a number having a value from about 0.45 to about 0.55.

  4. Recycled fatty acid crude petroleum recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Herter, G. L.; Herter, C.

    1984-11-06

    A method of recovering crude oil for subsequent processing. The method contemplates the step of exposing the source of crude oil such as a subterranean petroleum reservoir or a vessel or container of tar sands, kerogen or the like to aliphatic or carboxylic acid, preferably oleic acid, to produce a solvated crude oil mixture of reduced viscosity. This mixture is saponifyed by reacting it with a nucleophilic base, preferably a hydroxide of potassium or sodium, under pressure whereby to separate the solvated mixture into petroleum crude and an acid soap which migrates to an aqueous phase. The petroleum crude is separated from the aqueous soap through conventional techniques. Afterwards, a desaponification step contemplates recovery of the aliphatic or carboxylic acid for subsequent recycling in the previously mentioned exposing step. Reuse is facilitated by desaponifying aqueous soap within a high pressure containment vessel reacted with an acid suitable for donating a hydrated proton to the aqueous phase of the soap. This reconstituted acid is recycled for injection into the inputting step. Preferably carbonic acid is generated for the desaponifying step by injecting high pressure carbon dioxide within the containment vessel. By-products of the chemical reaction are separated and/or filtered as necessary to effectuate necessary purification sub-steps.

  5. Photochemical response of the nighttime mesosphere to electric field heating—Recovery of electron density enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotovsky, D. A.; Moore, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    A photochemical model has been developed to examine the response of the nighttime mesosphere to electric field heating. Time dynamics of 29 chemical species are accounted for by a set of 156 reactions. Recovery dynamics of electron density enhancements are examined in detail, and the recovery timescales of VLF scattering resulting from the modeled conductivity changes are quantitatively estimated. Both typical recovery (up to 240 s) and long recovery (>300 s) timescales of early VLF scattering events are explainable in terms of the model results. Electron production and loss during recovery is determined by a small set of attachment, detachment, and recombination processes. Based on the model results, we conclude that long recovery VLF scattering proceeds from sufficiently large electron density enhancements that are controlled by slow recombination loss (i.e., when attachment loss is small or balanced by detachment).

  6. Economic feasibility study for phosphorus recovery processes.

    PubMed

    Molinos-Senante, María; Hernández-Sancho, Francesc; Sala-Garrido, Ramón; Garrido-Baserba, Manel

    2011-06-01

    Phosphorus recovery from wastewater has become a necessity for sustainable development because phosphorus is a non-renewable essential resource, and its discharge into the environment causes serious negative impacts. There are no economic incentives for the implementation of phosphorus recovery technologies because the selling price of rock phosphate is lower than phosphorus recovered from sewage. The methodologies used to determine the feasibility of such projects are usually focused on internal costs without considering environmental externalities. This article shows a methodology to assess the economic feasibility of wastewater phosphorus recovery projects that takes into account internal and external impacts. The shadow price of phosphorus is estimated using the directional distance function to measure the environmental benefits obtained by preventing the discharge of phosphorus into the environment. The economic feasibility analysis taking into account the environmental benefits shows that the phosphorus recovery is viable not only from sustainable development but also from an economic point of view. PMID:21809783

  7. Estimation of oil recovery by in-situ combustion in the Jobo Field of Eastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Luengo-C, J.R.; Sanyal, S.K.

    1981-03-01

    A laboratory combustion experiment using samples from Jobo Field was completed. The data obtained by this experiment could be used for an approximate estimation of recovery for a pilot project in this field. An isolated pilot test would give enough information to determine the behavior of the combustion process for field applications. Aplication of recovery correlations indicate that a pilot test in an inverted 5-spot pattern (10 to 20 acres spacing) appears adequate for these field conditions. Air injection rates should be calculated and compared with injectivity tests, the ability of the producing wells to handle the oil, and the maximum pressure the reservoir can handle without fracturing.

  8. Low cost process heat recovery. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, P.; McCray, J.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to analyze waste heat recovery potential, economic analysis, heat exchanger and system design, and computer analysis programs. The heating demand and heat recovery potential at a Madison neighborhood bakery was conducted. The building has steam heat and natural gas is used in the hot water heater, the cooking stoves, and in the baking oven. Heat recovery potential was analyzed based upon fuel consumption in the baking oven, flue gas temperature, mass flow rate, and hours of oven operation. The feasibility of waste heat recovery systems is analyzed using life cycle cost and life cycle savings. For a first approximation, hand calculations were performed for air-to-air flat plate, fin-plate, and liquid-to-air tube type heat exchangers using the temperature and mass flow data from a pizza restaurant in Madison. Then a heat exchanger analysis program was written in interactive BASIC. The analysis indicates that heat recovery using the flat-plate and fin-plate exchanger designs is technically feasible and yields high effectiveness. (MCW)

  9. Helium recovery at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M.; Kynoch, J.

    2015-12-01

    Helium conservation is becoming increasingly important as helium availability is on the decline and prices are on the rise. The Florida State University National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has taken several steps over the past five years to increase the percentage of helium recovered. These include the installation of a standalone purifier, recovery flow meters, contamination meters, and a new piping system. The improvements to the recovery system have reduced the amount of helium purchased by the Mag Lab by 60% while helium usage has increased by roughly 40%. This article will provide details about the recovery system as a whole and describe some of the main components. There will also be some examples of the problems we've had to overcome, and some that we are still working on. Finally, there will be an update on the current status of the recovery system and a description of our plans for the future.

  10. Thought field therapy and trauma recovery.

    PubMed

    Folkes, Crystal E

    2002-01-01

    People who have been repeatedly exposed to traumatic events are at high risk for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Refugees and immigrants can certainly be in this category, but seldom seek professional therapy due to cultural, linguistic, financial, and historical reasons. A rapid and culturally sensitive treatment is highly desirable with communities new to Western-style healing. In this study of 31 clients, a pre-test was given, all participants received Thought Field Therapy (TFT), and were then post-tested after 30 days. Pre-test and post-test total scores showed a significant drop in all symptom sub-groupings of the DSM criteria for PTSD. The findings of this study contrast with the outcomes of other methods of treatment, and are a significant addition to the growing body of data on refugee mental health. PMID:12166020

  11. Analysis of backward error recovery for concurrent processes with recovery blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.; Lee, Y. H.

    1982-01-01

    Three different methods of implementing recovery blocks (RB's). These are the asynchronous, synchronous, and the pseudo recovery point implementations. Pseudo recovery points so that unbounded rollback may be avoided while maintaining process autonomy are proposed. Probabilistic models for analyzing these three methods under standard assumptions in computer performance analysis, i.e., exponential distributions for related random variables were developed. The interval between two successive recovery lines for asynchronous RB's mean loss in computation power for the synchronized method, and additional overhead and rollback distance in case PRP's are used were estimated.

  12. Diamond recovery from natural gas fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.S.H.; Wentzek, S.E.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a process for separating diamondoid compounds from a solvent. It comprises providing a hydrocarbon solvent containing at least about 70 weight percent paraffins having at least 30 carbon atoms and less than about 5 weight percent aliphatics having less than about 30 carbon atoms; charging the diamondoid-containing hydrocarbon solvent to a separation stage under subatmospheric pressure and temperature within the range of from about 0 to about 150{degrees} C; and withdrawing a vapor stream enriched in diamondoids from the separation stage and condensing the vapor stream at a temperature from about {minus}80{degrees} C to about ambient in the absence of reflux to the separation stage.

  13. Bangkit: The Processes of Recovery from First Episode Psychosis in Java.

    PubMed

    Subandi, M A

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing literature on recovery from schizophrenia. Most studies, however, focused on outcome, with insufficient attention paid to the process of recovery. The aim of this study was to explore the process of recovery from first episode psychotic illness in a Javanese cultural setting. An ethnographic method was applied where researcher conducted a field work and followed seven participants in their natural setting. This study identified three phases of recovery process in the context of Javanese culture: Bangkit, gaining insight; Usaha, struggling to achieve recovery; and Rukun, harmonious integration with family and community integration. Recovery entails regaining insight, followed by simultaneous inward and outward efforts that reconstitute one's inner and outer world, respectively. Participants also expressed their recovery in terms of a movement through physical space, from confinement in their own home to the wider spaces shared with family and community. Movements in physical space parallel movements in social space, where participants accomplish a social recovery. The Javanese phase of recovery found in this study is comparable to the phase of recovery identified by previous literatures in the Western context. PMID:25600832

  14. A field laboratory for improved oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, A.F.; McDonald, J.; Claridge, E.; Killough, J.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of Annex III of the Memorandum of Understanding, undertaken by the Houston Petroleum Research Center at the University of Houston, was to develop a field laboratory for research in improved oil recovery using a Gulf Coast reservoir in Texas. The participants: (1) make a field site selection and conducted a high resolution seismic survey in the demonstration field, (2) obtained characteristics of the reservoir (3) developed an evaluation of local flood efficiency in different parts of the demonstration reservoir, (4) used diverse methodology to evaluate the potential recovery of the remaining oil in the test reservoir, (5) developed cross-well seismic tomography, and (6) will transfer the learned technologies to oil operators through publication and workshops. This abstract is an overview of these tasks.

  15. Monitoring of thermal enhanced oil recovery processes with electromagnetic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.

    1992-09-01

    Research in applying electromagnetic methods for imaging thermal enhanced oil recovery has progressed significantly during the past eighteen months. Working together with researchers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and supported by a group of industrial sponsors we have focused our effort on field system development and doing field surveys connected with EOR operations. Field surveys were recently completed at the Lost Hills No.3 oil field and at UC Richmond Field station. At Lost Hills, crosshole EM data sets were collected before a new phase of steam injection for EOR and again four months after the onset of steaming. The two data sets were nearly identical suggesting that very little steam had been injected into this borehole. This is in accord with the operators records which indicate injectivity problems with this particular well. At Richmond we conducted a salt water injection monitoring experiment where 50,000 gallons of salt water were injected in a shallow aquifer and crosshole EM data were collected using the injection well and several observation wells. We applied the imaging code to some of the collected data and produced an image showing that the salt water slug has propagated 8--10 m from the injector into the aquifer. This result is partially confirmed by prior calculations and well logging data. Applying the EM methods to the problem of oil field characterization essentially means extending the borehole resistivity log into the region between wells. Since the resistivity of a sedimentary environment is often directly dependent on the fluids in the rock the knowledge of the resistivity distribution within an oil field can be invaluable for finding missed or bypassed oil or for mapping the overall structure. With small modification the same methods used for mapping EOR process can be readily applied to determining the insitu resistivity structure.

  16. DOE tallies Class III oil recovery field projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-25

    Here are details from midterm proposals submitted as part of the US Department of Energy's Class 3 oil recovery field demonstration candidate projects. All of the proposals emphasize dissemination of project details so that the results, if successful, can be applied widely in similar reservoirs. Project results will also be fed into a national petroleum technology transfer network. The proposals include: Gulf of Mexico, Gulf coast, offshore California, a California thermal, immiscible CO[sub 2], produced/potable water, microbial EOR, California diatomite, West Texas Spraberry field, and other Permian Basin fields.

  17. Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1982-01-26

    The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

  18. Surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process

    SciTech Connect

    Sethl, V.K.; Satchwell, R.M.; Johnson, L.A. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Geological studies have shown that there are many surface or near-surface deposits in the United States that contain large quantities of petroleum. In the State of Wyoming, a high concentration of such deposits exists in the Wind River, Big Horn, and Powder River Basins. These shallow deposits typically occur as unconsolidated or friable formations that contain millions of barrels of oil. Conventional petroleum production techniques have been attempted in many of these deposits with little or no economic success. In an attempt to improve the production economics, the Western Research Institute was solicited to develop a technique for the recovery of oil from these deposits. WRI, with support from the Economic and Community Development Division of the State of Wyoming, and as a part of the WRI/US Department of Energy, Jointly Sponsored Research program, proposed to develop, test, and demonstrate a viable and economical technology for the recovery of oil using mining and surface recovery processes. Reneau Energy, Inc. of La Quinta, California, agreed to participate in the project in providing a test site and mined materials. The goal of the proposed project to be completed in two phases, was to develop existing energy resources which are not presently being utilized. Phase 1 of the project, consisting of six specific tasks, was conducted to evaluate the suitability of various surface processing schemes. Phase 1 also included gravity drainage tests to determine if recovery techniques such as horizontal drilling could be applied. Phase 1 work was completed, and a final report was prepared and submitted to the funding agencies. Based on the results obtained in Phase 1 of the project, fluidized-bed based thermal recovery appeared to be a viable option. A 100 tons per day pilot plant was designed, constructed, and operated in the field. This report describes the results and experiences of the Phase 2 testing.

  19. Cultural points of resistance to the 12-Step recovery process.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Buxton, M E; Bilal, R; Seymour, R B

    1993-01-01

    This article addresses some of the key issues in developing culturally relevant approaches to drug abuse treatment and recovery, using the HAFC/Glide African-American Extended Family Program as a positive example of effective cultural adaptability within recovery. Cultural points of resistance to the recovery process are also addressed, including the perception that 12-Step fellowships are exclusive and confused with religion, confusion over surrender versus powerlessness, and concerns about low self-esteem, dysfunctional family structure, communication difficulties, and institutionalized and internalized racism. The authors also focus on professional resistance in other countries, where different treatment approaches and philosophies block the acceptance of a recovery concept in general and the 12-Step process in particular. In explicating these issues, addiction is presented as a multicultural problem in need of multicultural solutions. The challenge is to adapt the process of recovery to all cultures and races, to counter stereotypes on all sides, and to eliminate the perception that recovery only works for addicts from the White mainstream. PMID:8483054

  20. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR URANIUM RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

    1958-06-17

    A process is described for extracting uranium from uranium ore, wherein the uranium is substantially free from molybdenum contamination. In a solvent extraction process for recovering uranium, uranium and molybdenum ions are extracted from the ore with ether under high acidity conditions. The ether phase is then stripped with water at a lower controiled acidity, resaturated with salting materials such as sodium nitrate, and reextracted with the separation of the molybdenum from the uranium without interference from other metals that have been previously extracted.

  1. PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Potratz, H.A.

    1958-12-16

    A process for the separation of plutonium from uranlum and other associated radioactlve fission products ls descrlbed conslstlng of contacting an acid solution containing plutonium in the tetravalent state and uranium in the hexavalent state with enough ammonium carbonate to form an alkaline solution, adding cupferron to selectlvely form plutonlum cupferrlde, then recoverlng the plutonium cupferride by extraction with a water lmmiscible organic solvent such as chloroform.

  2. Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch

    DOEpatents

    Radke, C.J.

    1983-07-25

    A process and compositions for enhancing the recovery of acid crudes are disclosed. The process involves injecting caustic solutions into the reservoir to maintain a pH of 11 to 13. The fluid contains an effective amount of multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. A tall oil pitch soap is added as a polymeric mobility control agent. (DMC)

  3. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.W.; Neff, W.A.

    1992-05-12

    A process is described for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO[sub 3]. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths. 18 figs.

  4. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger W.; Neff, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO.sub.3. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths.

  5. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  6. BISMUTH PHOSPHATE CARRIER PROCESS FOR Pu RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Finzel, T.G.

    1959-02-01

    An improvement in the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation process for recovering plutonium is described. It has been found that a more granular and more easily filterable carrier precipitiite is formed if the addition of the bismuth and phosphate ions is effected by first adding 9/10 of the bismuth ions necessary, then slowly adding all of the source of the phosphate ions to be incorporated in the precipitate, while digesting at 75 C and afterwards incorporating the remainder of the total bismuth ions necessary

  7. Process for recovery of hydrogen and

    DOEpatents

    James, Brian R.; Li-Lee, Chung; Lilga, Michael A.; Nelson, David A.

    1987-01-01

    on of sulfur Abstract A process of abstracting sulfur from H.sub.2 S and generating hydrogen is disclosed comprising dissolving Pd.sub.2 X.sub.2 (.mu.-dppm).sub.2 in a solvent and then introducing H.sub.2 S. The palladium complex abstracts sulfur, forming hydrogen and a (.mu.-S) complex. The (.mu.-S) complex is readily oxidizable to a (.mu.-SO.sub.2) adduct which spontaneously loses SO.sub.2 and regenerates the palladium complex.

  8. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials discussed in this report is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy.

  9. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yorstos, Yanis C.

    2002-03-11

    The emphasis of this work was on investigating the mechanisms and factors that control the recovery of heavy oil with the objective to improve recovery efficiencies. For this purpose the interaction of flow transport and reaction at various scales from the pore network to the field scales were studied. Particular mechanisms to be investigated included the onset of gas flow in foamy oil production and in in-situ steam drive, gravity drainage in steam processes, the development of sustained combustion fronts and the propagation of foams in porous media. Analytical, computational and experimental methods were utilized to advance the state of the art in heavy oil recovery. Successful completion of this research was expected to lead to improvements in the Recovery efficiency of various heavy oil processes.

  10. Process Control for Precipitation Prevention in Space Water Recovery Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam; Callahan, Michael R.; Muirhead, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, rotary distillation systems have been actively pursued by NASA as one of the technologies for water recovery from wastewater primarily comprised of human urine. A specific area of interest is the prevention of the formation of solids that could clog fluid lines and damage rotating equipment. To mitigate the formation of solids, operational constraints are in place that limits such that the concentration of key precipitating ions in the wastewater brine are below the theoretical threshold. This control in effected by limiting the amount of water recovered such that the risk of reaching the precipitation threshold is within acceptable limits. The water recovery limit is based on an empirically derived worst case wastewater composition. During the batch process, water recovery is estimated by monitoring the throughput of the system. NASA Johnson Space Center is working on means of enhancing the process controls to increase water recovery. Options include more precise prediction of the precipitation threshold. To this end, JSC is developing a means of more accurately measuring the constituent of the brine and/or wastewater. Another means would be to more accurately monitor the throughput of the system. In spring of 2015, testing will be performed to test strategies for optimizing water recovery without increasing the risk of solids formation in the brine.

  11. Data warehousing methods and processing infrastructure for brain recovery research.

    PubMed

    Gee, T; Kenny, S; Price, C J; Seghier, M L; Small, S L; Leff, A P; Pacurar, A; Strother, S C

    2010-09-01

    In order to accelerate translational neuroscience with the goal of improving clinical care it has become important to support rapid accumulation and analysis of large, heterogeneous neuroimaging samples and their metadata from both normal control and patient groups. We propose a multi-centre, multinational approach to accelerate the data mining of large samples and facilitate data-led clinical translation of neuroimaging results in stroke. Such data-driven approaches are likely to have an early impact on clinically relevant brain recovery while we simultaneously pursue the much more challenging model-based approaches that depend on a deep understanding of the complex neural circuitry and physiological processes that support brain function and recovery. We present a brief overview of three (potentially converging) approaches to neuroimaging data warehousing and processing that aim to support these diverse methods for facilitating prediction of cognitive and behavioral recovery after stroke, or other types of brain injury or disease. PMID:21175009

  12. Two-reactor, high-recovery sulfur plant and process

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.L.; Palm, J.W.

    1989-04-18

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur wherein an acid gas feedstream comprising hydrogen sulfide is processed for the recovery of sulfur in a Claus process sulfur recovery plant. The process consists of: (a) passing the acid gas feedstream successively through the thermal reaction zone, the first position Claus catalytic reaction zone, and the second position Claus catalytic reaction zone for the recovery of sulfur; (b) preconditioning the first position Claus catalytic reaction zone by introducing thereinto a cold stream having an inlet temperature effective for condensing sulfur on at least a portion of the catalyst and passing the resulting stream through a remaining substantial portion of the catalyst, the cold stream thus used for preconditioning being produced by cooling acid gas feedstream effluent from the thermal reaction zone to the first position catalytic reaction zone to the temperature; and (c) switching the thus preconditioned Claus catalytic reaction zone in the first position into the second position and continuing cooling the thus preconditioned freshly regenerated reactor in the second position concurrently with forming and depositing sulfur on catalyst therein, and switching the Claus catalytic reaction zone in the second position into the first position and continuing the process according to (a), (b), and (c).

  13. Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: Sixth amendment and extension to Annex IV enhanced oil recovery thermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, T.B. ); Rivas, O. )

    1991-10-01

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Sixth Amendment and Extension of Annex 4, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 44 through 49. Tasks are: DOE-SUPRI-laboratory research on steam foam, CAT-SCAN, and in-situ combustion; INTEVEP-laboratory research and field projects on steam foam; DOE-NIPER-laboratory research and field projects light oil steam flooding; INTEVEP-laboratory research and field studies on wellbore heat losses; DOE-LLNL-laboratory research and field projects on electromagnetic induction tomography; INTEVEP-laoboratory research on mechanistic studies.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT FOR AMMONIA RECOVERY PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technology Verification report describes the nature and scope of an environmental evaluation of ThermoEnergy Corporation’s Ammonia Recovery Process (ARP) system. The information contained in this report represents data that were collected over a 3-month pilot study. The ti...

  15. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Murtha, M.J.

    1983-08-09

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  16. Surfactant compositions useful in enhanced oil recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckels nee Byth, N. J.; Thompson, J. L.

    1985-07-30

    Surfactant compositions comprising: (1) an alkylated, diaromatic sulfonate, (2) a petroleum sulfonate, (3) a condensation product of an alkanol and an alkylene oxide, or a sulfate of such a condensation product, and (4) a glycol ether are useful in enhanced oil recovery processes.

  17. Oil recovery process involving the injection of thickened water

    SciTech Connect

    Byham, D.E.; Chen, C.S.; Sheppard, E.W.

    1980-09-16

    Waterflood oil recovery process involving the use of an amphoteric polyelectrolyte as a thickening agent for mobility control. The amphoteric polyelectrolyte is a copolymer of a quaternary vinyl pyridinium sulfonate and a water-insoluble alpha olefin or hydrogenated diene. Specifically disclosed are vinyl pyridinium sulfonate-styrene block copolymers. The amphoteric polyelectrolytes are stable in high temperature and high brine environments.

  18. Use of geostatistic techniques to describe a reservoir to be submitted into a secondary recovery process field case: {open_quotes}Eocene B-Inferior/VLG-3659, Ceuta, Venezuela{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, T.; Poquioma, W.

    1997-08-01

    This study presents the results of an integrated reservoir study of the Eocene B-Inferior/VLG-3659, Area 7, Ceuta filed. This field located in the Maracaibo Lake in the western side of Venezuela. The objective was to evaluating the feasibility to implement a secondary recovery project by means of water flooding. Core information was used for this study (194 ft), PVT analysis, RFI, build-up and statistic`s pressure analysis, modem logs and production history data. Using geostatistical techniques (Kriging) it was defined a low uncertainty geological model that was validated by means of a black oil simulator (Eclipse). The results showed a good comparison of historical pressure of the reservoir against those obtained from the model, without the need of {open_quotes}history matching{close_quotes}. It means without modifying neither the initial rock properties nor reservoir fluids. The results of this study recommended drilling in two new locations, also the reactivation of four producing wells and water flooding under peripherical array by means of four injection wells, with the recovery of an additional 30.2 MMSTB. The economical evaluation shows an internal return rate of 31.4%.

  19. On the optimal design of the disassembly and recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Xanthopoulos, A.; Iakovou, E.

    2009-05-15

    This paper tackles the problem of the optimal design of the recovery processes of the end-of-life (EOL) electric and electronic products, with a special focus on the disassembly issues. The objective is to recover as much ecological and economic value as possible, and to reduce the overall produced quantities of waste. In this context, a medium-range tactical problem is defined and a novel two-phased algorithm is presented for a remanufacturing-driven reverse supply chain. In the first phase, we propose a multicriteria/goal-programming analysis for the identification and the optimal selection of the most 'desirable' subassemblies and components to be disassembled for recovery, from a set of different types of EOL products. In the second phase, a multi-product, multi-period mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model is presented, which addresses the optimization of the recovery processes, while taking into account explicitly the lead times of the disassembly and recovery processes. Moreover, a simulation-based solution approach is proposed for capturing the uncertainties in reverse logistics. The overall approach leads to an easy-to-use methodology that could support effectively middle level management decisions. Finally, the applicability of the developed methodology is illustrated by its application on a specific case study.

  20. On the optimal design of the disassembly and recovery processes.

    PubMed

    Xanthopoulos, A; Iakovou, E

    2009-05-01

    This paper tackles the problem of the optimal design of the recovery processes of the end-of-life (EOL) electric and electronic products, with a special focus on the disassembly issues. The objective is to recover as much ecological and economic value as possible, and to reduce the overall produced quantities of waste. In this context, a medium-range tactical problem is defined and a novel two-phased algorithm is presented for a remanufacturing-driven reverse supply chain. In the first phase, we propose a multicriteria/goal-programming analysis for the identification and the optimal selection of the most 'desirable' subassemblies and components to be disassembled for recovery, from a set of different types of EOL products. In the second phase, a multi-product, multi-period mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model is presented, which addresses the optimization of the recovery processes, while taking into account explicitly the lead times of the disassembly and recovery processes. Moreover, a simulation-based solution approach is proposed for capturing the uncertainties in reverse logistics. The overall approach leads to an easy-to-use methodology that could support effectively middle level management decisions. Finally, the applicability of the developed methodology is illustrated by its application on a specific case study. PMID:19138507

  1. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-05-01

    This first quarter report of 2001 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf{trademark} (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. During this reporting periods new catalyst formulations were tested. The experiments showed that the newest catalyst has slightly better performance, but catalyst TDA No.2 is still superior overall for use with the hybrid CrystaSulf process due to lower costs. Plans for catalyst pelletization and continued testing are described.

  2. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-10-01

    This third quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas.

  3. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-04-01

    This first quarter report of 2004 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane while avoiding methane oxidation and fouling due to coking from other hydrocarbon contaminants. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas.

  4. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, Jr., Fred J.

    1985-01-01

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  5. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, F.J. Jr.

    1983-06-16

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  6. A Mineral Processing Field Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a field course in Cornwall looking at mineral processing with the focus on the chemistry involved. The course was split into two parts. The first looked at tin mining based around Penzance. This involved visiting mines, hunting for mineral samples, carrying out a stream survey and visiting the Camborne School of Mines…

  7. Test of TDA's Direct Oxidation Process for Sulfur Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; Eugene Peeples; Sandra Huzyk; Randy Welch

    2005-01-01

    This project was a Phase III pilot plant test of TDA's gas sweetening process done under realistic conditions. TDA Research Inc successfully completed the test at Whiting Petroleum's Sable San Andreas Gas Plant. The feed was approximately 228,000 standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of gas that contained approximately 60 vol% CO{sub 2}, 20 vol% CH{sub 4} and 10 vol% C{sub 3}+ and higher hydrocarbons. The feed was associated gas from CO{sub 2} flooding operations carried out on Whiting's oil wells. The gas is collected and piped to the Sable gas plant where it is normally flared. We sited our pilot plant in line with the flare so that we could remove the hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) prior to flaring. The average H{sub 2}S concentration in the gas during the field test was 7341 ppm. The selectivity of our process for converting H{sub 2}S into elemental sulfur was essentially 100% and the catalyst converted 90% of the H{sub 2}S into sulfur and water (the remaining 10% of the H{sub 2}S passed through unconverted). Importantly, no catalyst deactivation was observed for over the course of the 1000+ hour test. Minimal (ca. 10-15 ppm) of SO{sub 2} was formed during the test. Approximately 3.6 tons of elemental sulfur was recovered from a total inlet of 3.9 tons of sulfur (as H{sub 2}S). The total amount of SO{sub 2} released from the plant (taking into account flaring of the unconverted 10% H2S) was 0.86 tons. This amount of SO{sub 2} is much lower than the normal 8 tons that would have been emitted if all of the H{sub 2}S were flared over the time of the pilot plant test. The pilot plant was simple to operate and required much less operator intervention than is typical for a new unit being commissioned. Our operator (Mr. Eugene Peeples) has more than 30 years of experience operating commercial scale liquid redox sulfur recovery processes and in his opinion, TDA's Direct Oxidation pilot plant is easier to operate than liquid systems. The ease of use and low capital and

  8. Automobile shredder residue: Process developments for recovery of recyclable constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E.J.; Jody, B.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Shoemaker, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are threefold: (1) to briefly outline the structure of the automobile shredder industry as a supplier of ferrous scrap, (2) to review the previous research that has been conducted for recycling automobile shredder residue (ASR), and (3) to present the results and implications of the research being conducted at ANL on the development of a process for the selective recovery and recycling of the thermoplastics content of ASR. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch

    DOEpatents

    Radke, Clayton J.

    1985-01-01

    Compositions and process employing same for enhancing the recovery of residual acid crudes, particularly heavy crudes, by injecting a composition comprising caustic in an amount sufficient to maintain a pH of at least about 11, preferably at least about 13, and a small but effective amount of a multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. Preferably a tall oil pitch soap is included and particularly for the heavy crudes a polymeric mobility control agent.

  10. Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery - EOR thermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Eighth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section.

  11. Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Radke, C. J.

    1985-07-02

    Compositions and process employing same for enhancing the recovery of residual acid crudes, particularly heavy crudes, by injecting a composition comprising caustic in an amount sufficient to maintain a pH of at least about 11, preferably at least about 13, and a small but effective amount of a multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. Preferably a tall oil pitch soap is included and particularly for the heavy crudes a polymeric mobility control agent.

  12. Latest developments in lunar gravity field recovery within the project GRAZIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Sandro; Wirnsberger, Harald; Klinger, Beate; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Baur, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The project GRAZIL addresses the highly accurate recovery of the lunar gravity field using intersatellite Ka-band ranging (KBR) measurements collected by the Lunar Gravity Ranging System (LGRS) of the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission. Dynamic precise orbit determination is an indispensable task in order to recover the lunar gravity field based on LGRS measurements. The concept of variational equations is adopted to determine the orbit of the two GRAIL satellites based on radio science data. In this contribution we focus on the S-band two-way Doppler data collected by the Deep Space Network. As far as lunar gravity field recovery is concerned, we apply an integral equation approach using short orbital arcs in the order of one hour. In this contribution special attention is given to the refinement of our processing strategy in conjunction with an increase of the spectral resolution. Based on these considerations we present the latest version of a lunar gravity field model developed in Graz which is based on KBR observations during the primary mission phase (March 1 to May 29, 2012). Our results are validated against GRAIL models computed at NASA-GSFC and NASA-JPL.

  13. A Fractional Order Recovery SIR Model from a Stochastic Process.

    PubMed

    Angstmann, C N; Henry, B I; McGann, A V

    2016-03-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been a proliferation of epidemiological models with ordinary derivatives replaced by fractional derivatives in an ad hoc manner. These models may be mathematically interesting, but their relevance is uncertain. Here we develop an SIR model for an epidemic, including vital dynamics, from an underlying stochastic process. We show how fractional differential operators arise naturally in these models whenever the recovery time from the disease is power-law distributed. This can provide a model for a chronic disease process where individuals who are infected for a long time are unlikely to recover. The fractional order recovery model is shown to be consistent with the Kermack-McKendrick age-structured SIR model, and it reduces to the Hethcote-Tudor integral equation SIR model. The derivation from a stochastic process is extended to discrete time, providing a stable numerical method for solving the model equations. We have carried out simulations of the fractional order recovery model showing convergence to equilibrium states. The number of infecteds in the endemic equilibrium state increases as the fractional order of the derivative tends to zero. PMID:26940822

  14. Electric field dependent decay and recovery of DO11 doped into PMMA thin films: beyond 100% recovery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Hung, Sheng Ting; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2012-11-01

    Anthraquinones are a class of organic dyes with a wide range of uses in optical devices that require intensities above the damage threshold for operation. It has been demonstrated that some anthraquinones doped into (poly)methyl methacrylate(PMMA) demonstrate the novel effect of self healing. One theory of decay and self healing is photocharge ejection and recombination. Using digital imaging we probe the electric field dependent decay and recovery of the anthraquinone disperse orange 11(DO11) doped into PMMA. We find that the electric field works to mitigate decay and improves recovery, as well as find that for large fields the sample appears to recover beyond 100%.

  15. Recovery and purification process development for monoclonal antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junfen; Winter, Charles; Bayer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Hundreds of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently in development, and many companies have multiple antibodies in their pipelines. Current methodology used in recovery processes for these molecules are reviewed here. Basic unit operations such as harvest, Protein A affinity chromatography and additional polishing steps are surveyed. Alternative processes such as flocculation, precipitation and membrane chromatography are discussed. We also cover platform approaches to purification methods development, use of high throughput screening methods, and offer a view on future developments in purification methodology as applied to mAbs. PMID:20647768

  16. Process for the recovery of coke oven waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Flockenhaus, C.; Meckel, J.F.; Wagener, D.

    1981-01-20

    This invention is directed to a process for making coke and recovering the heat therefrom for preheating the firing gas to the coke oven. The process involves the use of the coke oven firing gas to extract the sensible heat from the hot coke from the coking oven to both preheat the firing gas for the coke oven and cool the hot coke. Significant economies are achieved in the two-fold function of coke production and heat recovery in accordance with the method disclosed.

  17. Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge ash through an electrodialytic process.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Paula; Couto, Nazaré; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2014-05-01

    The electrodialytic separation process (ED) was applied to sewage sludge ash (SSA) aiming at phosphorus (P) recovery. As the SSA may have high heavy metals contents, their removal was also assessed. Two SSA were sampled, one immediately after incineration (SA) and the other from an open deposit (SB). Both samples were ED treated as stirred suspensions in sulphuric acid for 3, 7 and 14 days. After 14 days, phosphorus was mainly mobilized towards the anode end (approx. 60% in the SA and 70% in the SB), whereas heavy metals mainly electromigrated towards the cathode end. The anolyte presented a composition of 98% of P, mainly as orthophosphate, and 2% of heavy metals. The highest heavy metal removal was achieved for Cu (ca. 80%) and the lowest for Pb and Fe (between 4% and 6%). The ED showed to be a viable method for phosphorus recovery from SSA, as it promotes the separation of P from the heavy metals. PMID:24656469

  18. Thermal acidization and recovery process for recovering viscous petroleum

    DOEpatents

    Poston, Robert S.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal acidization and recovery process for increasing production of heavy viscous petroleum crude oil and synthetic fuels from subterranean hydrocarbon formations containing clay particles creating adverse permeability effects is described. The method comprises injecting a thermal vapor stream through a well bore penetrating such formations to clean the formation face of hydrocarbonaceous materials which restrict the flow of fluids into the petroleum-bearing formation. Vaporized hydrogen chloride is then injected simultaneously to react with calcium and magnesium salts in the formation surrounding the bore hole to form water soluble chloride salts. Vaporized hydrogen fluoride is then injected simultaneously with its thermal vapor to dissolve water-sensitive clay particles thus increasing permeability. Thereafter, the thermal vapors are injected until the formation is sufficiently heated to permit increased recovery rates of the petroleum.

  19. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-07-01

    This second quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. This report describes testing using the laboratory apparatus but operated at the pilot plant using the actual pilot plant

  20. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-07-01

    This second quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. Bench-scale catalyst testing at the CrystaSulf pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas was successful, and

  1. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Lundeen; Girish Srinivas; David W. DeBerry

    2003-01-01

    This fourth quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. Bench-scale catalyst testing at the CrystaSulf pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas was successful and a skid

  2. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-04-01

    This first quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf{sup SM} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. In a previous reporting period tests were done to determine the effect of hydrocarbons such as n-hexane on catalyst performance with and without H{sub 2}S present. The experiments showed that hexane oxidation is suppressed when H{sub 2}S is present. Hexane represents the most reactive of the C1 to C6 series of alkanes. Since hexane exhibits low reactivity under H{sub 2}S oxidation conditions, and more importantly, does not change

  3. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-04-01

    This first quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. Bench-scale catalyst testing at the CrystaSulf pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas was successful, and

  4. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-08-01

    This first quarter report of 2001 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. During this reporting period tests were done to determine the effect of hydrocarbons such as n-hexane on catalyst performance with and without H{sub 2}S present. The experiments showed that hexane oxidation is suppressed when H{sub 2}S is present. Hexane represents the most reactive of the C1 to C6 series of alkanes. Since hexane exhibits low reactivity under H{sub 2}S oxidation conditions, and more importantly, does not change the

  5. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

  6. Bidentate organophosphorus solvent extraction process for actinide recovery and partition

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1976-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery and partitioning of actinide values from acidic nuclear waste aqueous solutions, the actinide values including trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent oxidation states is provided and includes the steps of contacting the aqueous solution with a bidentate organophosphorous extractant to extract essentially all of the actinide values into the organic phase. Thereafter the respective actinide fractions are selectively partitioned into separate aqueous solutions by contact with dilute nitric or nitric-hydrofluoric acid solutions. The hexavalent uranium is finally removed from the organic phase by contact with a dilute sodium carbonate solution.

  7. A process for treatment and recovery of spent potliner (SPL)

    SciTech Connect

    Adrien, R.J.; Besida, J.; Pong, T.K.; O`Donnell, T.A.; Wood, D.G.; Covey, G.H.; Giansiracusa, J.J.; Price, D.E.

    1996-10-01

    Spent potliner (SPL) is classified as a hazardous waste as it contains cyanides and high levels of fluorides. This paper describes a novel process for the conversion of SPL at near ambient temperatures for the recovery of useful products and a benign residue. The initial treatment of crushed SPL removes over 90% of the cyanide and a large percentage of the fluoride. By appropriate selection of the chemical species and wash conditions aluminum fluoride and other fluorides are effectively recovered in subsequent stages. After this treatment by a series of chemical washes the residue produced is a carbonaceous material containing only carbon and brick fragments, i.e. refractory aluminum compounds.

  8. UF.sub.6 -Recovery process utilizing desublimation

    DOEpatents

    Eby, Robert S.; Stephenson, Michael J.; Andrews, Deborah H.; Hamilton, Thomas H.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a UF.sub.6 -recovery process of the kind in which a stream of substantially pure gaseous UF.sub.6 is directed through an externally chilled desublimer to convert the UF.sub.6 directly to an annular solid ring adhering to the interior wall of the desublimer. After accumulation of a desired amount of solid UF.sub.6, the desublimer is heated to liquefy the solid. Subsequently, the liquid is recovered from the desublimer. It has been found that during the heating operation the desublimer is subjected to excessive mechanical stresses. In addition, it has been found that the incorporation of a very small percentage of relatively noncondensable, nonreactive gas (e.g., nitrogen) in the UF.sub.6 input to the desublimer effects significant decreases in the stresses generated during the subsequent melting operation. This modification to the process provides valuable advantages in terms of reduced hazard, lower operating costs for the desublimer, and increased service life for the desublimer and its auxiliaries. The new process is especially suitable for the recovery of enriched UF.sub.6 from high-speed UF.sub.6 gas-centrifuge cascades.

  9. UF/sub 6/-recovery process utilizing desublimation

    DOEpatents

    Eby, R.S.; Stephenson, M.J.; Andrews, D.H.; Hamilton, T.H.

    1983-12-21

    The invention is a UF/sub 6/-recovery process of the kind in which a stream of substantially pure gaseous UF/sub 6/ is directed through an externally chilled desublimer to convert the UF/sub 6/ directly to an annular solid ring adhering to the interior wall of the desublimer. After accumulation of a desired amount of solid UF/sub 6/, the desublimer is heated to liquefy the solid. Subsequently, the liquid is recovered from the desublimer. It has been found that during the heating operation the desublimer is subjected to excessive mechanical stresses. In addition, it has been found that the incorporation of a very small percentage of relatively noncondensable, nonreactive gas (e.g., nitrogen) in the UF/sub 6/ input to the desublimer effects significant decreases in the stresses generated during the subsequent melting operation. This modification to the process provides valuable advantages in terms of reduced hazard, lower operating costs for the desublimer, and increased service life for the desublimer and its auxiliaries. The new process is especially suitable for the recovery of enriched UF/sub 6/ from high-speed UF/sub 6/ gas-centrifuge cascades.

  10. Process for the recovery of curium-244 from nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Posey, J.C.

    1980-10-01

    A process has been designed for the recovery of curium from purex waste. Curium and americium are separated from the lanthanides by a TALSPEAK extraction process using differential extraction. Equations were derived for the estimation of the economically optimum conditions for the extraction using laboratory batch extraction data. The preparation of feed for the extraction involves the removal of nitric acid from the Purex waste by vaporization under reduced pressure, the leaching of soluble nitrates from the resulting cake, and the oxalate precipitation of a pure lanthanide-actinide fraction. Final separation of the curium from americium is done by ion-exchange. The steps of the process, except ion-exchange, were tested on a laboratory scale and workable conditions were determined.

  11. Low Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal and Recovery CNG Claus Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Klint, V.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-10-01

    Increased use of natural gas (methane) in the domestic energy market will force the development of large non-producing gas reserves now considered to be low quality. Large reserves of low quality natural gas (LQNG) contaminated with hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N) are available but not suitable for treatment using current conventional gas treating methods due to economic and environmental constraints. A group of three technologies have been integrated to allow for processing of these LQNG reserves; the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFZ) process for hydrocarbon / acid gas separation; the Triple Point Crystallizer (TPC) process for H{sub 2}S / C0{sub 2} separation and the CNG Claus process for recovery of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S. The combined CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus group of processes is one program aimed at developing an alternative gas treating technology which is both economically and environmentally suitable for developing these low quality natural gas reserves. The CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus process is capable of treating low quality natural gas containing >10% C0{sub 2} and measurable levels of H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} to pipeline specifications. The integrated CFZ / CNG Claus Process or the stand-alone CNG Claus Process has a number of attractive features for treating LQNG. The processes are capable of treating raw gas with a variety of trace contaminant components. The processes can also accommodate large changes in raw gas composition and flow rates. The combined processes are capable of achieving virtually undetectable levels of H{sub 2}S and significantly less than 2% CO in the product methane. The separation processes operate at pressure and deliver a high pressure (ca. 100 psia) acid gas (H{sub 2}S) stream for processing in the CNG Claus unit. This allows for substantial reductions in plant vessel size as compared to conventional Claus / Tail gas treating technologies. A close integration of the components of the CNG Claus

  12. Recovery processes and dynamics in single and interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdandzic, Antonio

    Systems composed of dynamical networks --- such as the human body with its biological networks or the global economic network consisting of regional clusters --- often exhibit complicated collective dynamics. Three fundamental processes that are typically present are failure, damage spread, and recovery. Here we develop a model for such systems and find phase diagrams for single and interacting networks. By investigating networks with a small number of nodes, where finite-size effects are pronounced, we describe the spontaneous recovery phenomenon present in these systems. In the case of interacting networks the phase diagram is very rich and becomes increasingly more complex as the number of interacting networks increases. In the simplest example of two interacting networks we find two critical points, four triple points, ten allowed transitions, and two forbidden transitions, as well as complex hysteresis loops. Remarkably, we find that triple points play the dominant role in constructing the optimal repairing strategy in damaged interacting systems. To test our model, we analyze an example of real interacting financial networks and find evidence of rapid dynamical transitions between well-defined states, in agreement with the predictions of our model.

  13. ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Long, R.S.; Bailes, R.H.

    1958-04-15

    A process for the recovery of certain metallic ions from aqueous solutions by ion exchange techniques is described. It is applicable to elements such as vanadium, chromium, nnanganese, and the like, which are capable of forming lower valent cations soluble in aqueous solutions and which also form ldgher valent anions soluble in aqueous acidic solutions. For example, small amounts of vanadium occurring in phosphoric acid prepared from phosphate rock may be recovered by reducing the vanadium to a trivalent cation adsorbing; the vanadium in a cationic exchange resin, then treating the resin with a suitable oxidizing agent to convert the adsorbed vanadium to a higher valent state, and finally eluting; the vanadium as an anion from the resin by means of an aqueous acidic solution.

  14. Durability Testing of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Portzer, Jeffrey W.; Turk, Brian S.; Gangwal, Santosh K.

    1996-12-31

    Designs for advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems call for desulfurization of coal gasifier gas at high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) conditions using highly efficient, regenerable metal oxides such as zinc titanate. Regeneration of the sulfided sorbent using an oxygen-containing gas stream results in a sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2})-containing off-gas at HTHP conditions. The patented Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) developed by the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) with Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) support is an attractive option for treatment of this regeneration off-gas. Using a slipstream of coal gas as a reducing agent, it efficiently converts the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur, an essential industrial commodity that is easily stored and transported.

  15. Combined effect of ohmic heating and enzyme assisted aqueous extraction process on soy oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Pare, Akash; Nema, Anurag; Singh, V K; Mandhyan, B L

    2014-08-01

    This research describes a new technological process for soybean oil extraction. The process deals with the combined effect of ohmic heating and enzyme assisted aqueous oil extraction process (EAEP) on enhancement of oil recovery from soybean seed. The experimental process consisted of following basic steps, namely, dehulling, wet grinding, enzymatic treatment, ohmic heating, aqueous extraction and centrifugation. The effect of ohmic heating parameters namely electric field strength (EFS), end point temperature (EPT) and holding time (HT) on aqueous oil extraction process were investigated. Three levels of electric field strength (i.e. OH600V, OH750V and OH900V), 3 levels of end point temperature (i.e. 70, 80 and 90 °C) and 3 levels of holding time (i.e. 0, 5 and 10 min.) were taken as independent variables using full factorial design. Percentage oil recovery from soybean by EAEP alone and EAEP coupled with ohmic heating were 53.12 % and 56.86 % to 73 % respectively. The maximum oil recovery (73 %) was obtained when the sample was heated and maintained at 90 °C using electric field strength of OH600V for a holding time of 10 min. The free fatty acid (FFA) of the extracted oil (i.e. in range of 0.97 to 1.29 %) was within the acceptable limit of 3 % (oleic acid) and 0.5-3 % prescribed respectively by PFA and BIS. PMID:25114355

  16. Evaluation of enhanced recovery operations in Smackover fields of southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains detailed geologic and engineering information on enhanced-recovery techniques used in unitized Smackover fields in Alabama. The report also makes recommendations on the applicability of these enhanced-recovery techniques to fields that are not now undergoing enhanced recovery. Eleven Smackover fields in Alabama have been unitized. Three fields were unitized specifically to allow the drilling of a strategically placed well to recover uncontacted oil. Two fields in Alabama are undergoing waterflood projects. Five fields are undergoing gas-injection programs to increase the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. Silas and Choctaw Ridge fields were unitized but no enhanced-recovery operations have been implemented.

  17. Recovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video discusses the recovery events that occur in high-power rocketry and the various devices used in safely recovering the rocket. The video includes a discussion of black powder and ejection...

  18. Impact of Processing Method on Recovery of Bacteria from Wipes Used in Biological Surface Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nathan D.; Filliben, James J.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental sampling for microbiological contaminants is a key component of hygiene monitoring and risk characterization practices utilized across diverse fields of application. However, confidence in surface sampling results, both in the field and in controlled laboratory studies, has been undermined by large variation in sampling performance results. Sources of variation include controlled parameters, such as sampling materials and processing methods, which often differ among studies, as well as random and systematic errors; however, the relative contributions of these factors remain unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the relative impacts of sample processing methods, including extraction solution and physical dissociation method (vortexing and sonication), on recovery of Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Burkholderia thailandensis and Escherichia coli) bacteria from directly inoculated wipes. This work showed that target organism had the largest impact on extraction efficiency and recovery precision, as measured by traditional colony counts. The physical dissociation method (PDM) had negligible impact, while the effect of the extraction solution was organism dependent. Overall, however, extraction of organisms from wipes using phosphate-buffered saline with 0.04% Tween 80 (PBST) resulted in the highest mean recovery across all three organisms. The results from this study contribute to a better understanding of the factors that influence sampling performance, which is critical to the development of efficient and reliable sampling methodologies relevant to public health and biodefense. PMID:22706055

  19. [Recovery].

    PubMed

    Estingoy, Pierrette; Gilliot, Élodie; Parisot, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The historical fatalism of the impossibility of recovering from psychosis eased from the 1970s with the shaping of the idea of a possible recovery. Recovery is today the objective for the patient and caregivers. The key to achieving this lies in the encounter with Others. A collective approach, on the level of the institution, must be established. The aim is to create opportunities for the patient to express their doubts and feelings. PMID:26363659

  20. Visualizing the blind brain: brain imaging of visual field defects from early recovery to rehabilitation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Urbanski, Marika; Coubard, Olivier A.; Bourlon, Clémence

    2014-01-01

    Visual field defects (VFDs) are one of the most common consequences observed after brain injury, especially after a stroke in the posterior cerebral artery territory. Less frequently, tumors, traumatic brain injury, brain surgery or demyelination can also determine various visual disabilities, from a decrease in visual acuity to cerebral blindness. Visual field defects is a factor of bad functional prognosis as it compromises many daily life activities (e.g., obstacle avoidance, driving, and reading) and therefore the patient’s quality of life. Spontaneous recovery seems to be limited and restricted to the first 6 months, with the best chance of improvement at 1 month. The possible mechanisms at work could be partly due to cortical reorganization in the visual areas (plasticity) and/or partly to the use of intact alternative visual routes, first identified in animal studies and possibly underlying the phenomenon of blindsight. Despite processes of early recovery, which is rarely complete, and learning of compensatory strategies, the patient’s autonomy may still be compromised at more chronic stages. Therefore, various rehabilitation therapies based on neuroanatomical knowledge have been developed to improve VFDs. These use eye-movement training techniques (e.g., visual search, saccadic eye movements), reading training, visual field restitution (the Vision Restoration Therapy, VRT), or perceptual learning. In this review, we will focus on studies of human adults with acquired VFDs, which have used different imaging techniques (Positron Emission Tomography, PET; Diffusion Tensor Imaging, DTI; functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, fMRI; Magneto Encephalography, MEG) or neurostimulation techniques (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, TMS; transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, tDCS) to show brain activations in the course of spontaneous recovery or after specific rehabilitation techniques. PMID:25324739

  1. A New Screening Methodology for Improved Oil Recovery Processes Using Soft-Computing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parada, Claudia; Ertekin, Turgay

    2010-05-01

    The first stage of production of any oil reservoir involves oil displacement by natural drive mechanisms such as solution gas drive, gas cap drive and gravity drainage. Typically, improved oil recovery (IOR) methods are applied to oil reservoirs that have been depleted naturally. In more recent years, IOR techniques are applied to reservoirs even before their natural energy drive is exhausted by primary depletion. Descriptive screening criteria for IOR methods are used to select the appropriate recovery technique according to the fluid and rock properties. This methodology helps in assessing the most suitable recovery process for field deployment of a candidate reservoir. However, the already published screening guidelines neither provide information about the expected reservoir performance nor suggest a set of project design parameters, which can be used towards the optimization of the process. In this study, artificial neural networks (ANN) are used to build a high-performance neuro-simulation tool for screening different improved oil recovery techniques: miscible injection (CO2 and N2), waterflooding and steam injection processes. The simulation tool consists of proxy models that implement a multilayer cascade feedforward back propagation network algorithm. The tool is intended to narrow the ranges of possible scenarios to be modeled using conventional simulation, reducing the extensive time and energy spent in dynamic reservoir modeling. A commercial reservoir simulator is used to generate the data to train and validate the artificial neural networks. The proxy models are built considering four different well patterns with different well operating conditions as the field design parameters. Different expert systems are developed for each well pattern. The screening networks predict oil production rate and cumulative oil production profiles for a given set of rock and fluid properties, and design parameters. The results of this study show that the networks are

  2. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-06-01

    This final report describes the objectives, technical approach, results and conclusions for a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept is a configuration of CrystaTech, Inc.'s CrystaSulf{reg_sign} process which utilizes a direct oxidation catalyst upstream of the absorber tower to oxidize a portion of the inlet hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and elemental sulfur. This hybrid configuration of CrystaSulf has been named CrystaSulf-DO and represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day and more. This hybrid process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both onshore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf is a nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes H{sub 2}S from gas streams and converts it to elemental sulfur. In CrystaSulf, H{sub 2}S in the inlet gas is reacted with SO{sub 2} to make elemental sulfur according to the liquid phase Claus reaction: 2H{sub 2}S + SO{sub 2} {yields} 2H{sub 2}O + 3S. The SO{sub 2} for the reaction can be supplied from external sources by purchasing liquid SO{sub 2} and injecting it into the CrystaSulf solution, or produced internally by converting a portion of the inlet gas H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} or by burning a portion of the sulfur produced to make SO{sub 2}. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, the needed SO{sub 2} is produced by placing a bed of direct oxidation catalyst in the inlet gas stream to oxidize a

  3. A nitriding process for the recovery of niobium from ferroniobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, A. K.; Singh, Kulwant; Gupta, C. K.

    1992-08-01

    A three-step process based on nitriding-leaching-pyrovacuum decomposition has been developed for the recovery of niobium metal relatively free of iron from ferroniobium. The process essentially involves nitriding of ferroniobium powder with ammonia at 950 °C to 1000 °C. Nitrided ferroalloy was then treated with a 9:1 mixture of 30 pct HNO3 and HC1 to leach out iron nitrides. The residue was then pyrovacuum treated at 1825 °C under a dynamic vacuum of 0.02 m torr to finally yield metal containing about 0.2 pct iron starting from ferroniobium containing about 35 pct iron. The treated material has been further purified by electron-beam melt refining. The refined metal showed a hardness in the range of 80 to 84 VHN under a load of 100 g. The metal on analysis was found to contain 200 ppm of oxygen, less than 100 ppm of nitrogen, and about 100 ppm of carbon. The process appears to be quite attractive because it does not involve the treatment of ferroniobium with halogens or halides at elevated temperatures.

  4. Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

    2006-09-30

    This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible

  5. Yttrium recovery from primary and secondary sources: A review of main hydrometallurgical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, Valentina; De Michelis, Ida; Kopacek, Bernd

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Review of the main hydrometallurgical processes to recover yttrium. • Recovery of yttrium from primary sources. • Recovery of yttrium from e-waste and other types of waste. - Abstract: Yttrium is important rare earths (REs) used in numerous fields, mainly in the phosphor powders for low-energy lighting. The uses of these elements, especially for high-tech products are increased in recent years and combined with the scarcity of the resources and the environmental impact of the technologies to extract them from ores make the recycling waste, that contain Y and other RE, a priority. The present review summarized the main hydrometallurgical technologies to extract Y from ores, contaminated solutions, WEEE and generic wastes. Before to discuss the works about the treatment of wastes, the processes to retrieval Y from ores are discussed, since the processes are similar and derived from those already developed for the extraction from primary sources. Particular attention was given to the recovery of Y from WEEE because the recycle of them is important not only for economical point of view, considering its value, but also for environmental impact that this could be generated if not properly disposal.

  6. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM IMPURE SOLUTIONS THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-11-01

    A process is presented for the recovery of uraninm values from impure solutions which are obtained, for example, by washing residual uranium salt or uranium metal deposits from stainless steel surfaces using an aqueous or certain acidic aqueous solutions. The solutions include uranyl and oxidized iron, chromium, nickel, and copper ions and may contain manganese, zinc, and silver ions. In accordance with one procedure. the uranyl ions are reduced to the uranous state, and the impurity ions are complexed with cyanide under acidic conditions. The solution is then treated with ammonium hydroxide or alkali metal hydroxide to precipitate uranous hydroxide away from the complexed impurity ions in the solution. Alternatively, an excess of alkali metal cyanide is added to the reduced solution until the solution becomes sufficiently alkaline for the uranons hydroxide to precipitate. An essential feature in operating the process is in maintaining the pH of the solution sufficiently acid during the complexing operation to prevent the precipitation of the impurity metal hydroxides.

  7. Electric Field Containerless Processing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this task is to develop the science and technology base required to design and construct a high temperature electric field positioning module that could be used by materials scientists to conduct containerless science experiments in a low gravity environment. Containerless science modules that employ electric fields to position and manipulate samples offer several advantages over acoustic or electromagnetic systems. The electric field system will operate not only at atmospheric pressures but also in a vacuum, in contrast to the acoustic modules which can only operate in atmosphere where the acoustic forces are sufficient. The electric field technique puts minimum energy into the sample, whereas the electromagnetic system can deposit energy into the sample through eddy current heat as well as physical mixing in the sample. Two types of electric field modules have been constructed and tested to date. One employs a charged sample and uses electrostatic forces to position and control the sample. The second type of module induces electrical polarization of the sample and electric field gradients to position and control the sample.

  8. Neurofunctional Reward Processing Changes in Cocaine Dependence During Recovery.

    PubMed

    Balodis, Iris M; Kober, Hedy; Worhunsky, Patrick D; Stevens, Michael C; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Carroll, Kathleen M; Potenza, Marc N

    2016-07-01

    Although reward processing appears altered in addiction, few studies track neurofunctional changes following treatment or relate these to measures of reduced drug use. The current study examined neurofunctional alterations in reward processing in cocaine dependence (CD) pretreatment and posttreatment to determine whether these changes relate to clinically meaningful outcome indicators. Treatment-seeking CD outpatients (N=29) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a monetary incentive delay task (MIDT) pretreatment and posttreatment. The MIDT parses anticipatory from outcome phases of reward/loss processing. Abstinence indicators (negative urines, days abstinent from cocaine during follow-up) were collected throughout treatment and up to 1 year later. Healthy control (HC) participants (N=28) were also scanned twice with the MIDT. Relative to pretreatment, at posttreatment CD participants demonstrated increased anticipatory reward activity in the midbrain, thalamus, and precuneus (pFWE<0.05). Increased midbrain activity correlated with cocaine abstinence during the 1-year follow-up. Ventral striatal (VS) activity during loss anticipation correlated negatively with negative urine screens. HC group test-retest results showed decreased ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity during winning outcomes. CD-HC group-by-time differences revealed increased left inferior frontal gyrus activity in the CD group during anticipatory phases at posttreatment. In CD participants, increased posttreatment activity in dopamine-innervated regions suggests lowered thresholds in anticipatory signaling for non-drug rewards. Midbrain and VS responses may represent biomarkers associated with CD abstinence. Abstinence-related neurobiological changes occur in similar regions implicated during active use and may possibly be used to track progress during short- and long-term recovery. PMID:26792441

  9. 60-Hz electric-field effects on pineal melatonin rhythms: time course for onset and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.; Anderson, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Rats exposed for 3 weeks to uniform 60-Hz electric fields of 39 kV/m (effective field strength) failed to show normal pineal gland circadian rhythms in serotonin N-acetyl transferase activity and melatonin concentrations. The time required for recovery of the melatonin rhythm after cessation of field exposure was determined to be less than 3 days. The rapid recovery suggests that the overall metabolic competence of the pineal is not permanently compromised by electric-field exposure, and that the circadian rhythm effect may be neuronally mediated.

  10. Hydrometallurgical process for zinc recovery from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD). Part II: Downstream processing and zinc recovery by electrowinning.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, P E; Oustadakis, P; Katsiapi, A; Agatzini-Leonardou, S

    2010-07-15

    The characterization and the agitation leaching of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) by diluted sulphuric acid have been studied in Part I, as a separate article. The aim of the present research work (Part II) is the development of a purification process of the leach liquor for the recovery of high-purity zinc by electrowinning. The proposed hydrometallurgical process consists of the following four (4) unit operations: (1) Removal of iron as easily filterable crystalline basic sulphate salt of the jarosite type, at atmospheric pressure, by chemical precipitation at pH: 3.5 and 95 degrees C. (2) Zinc solvent extraction by Cyanex 272 at pH: 3.5, T: 40 degrees C, with 25% extractant concentration. (3) Stripping of the loaded organic phase by zinc spent electrolyte (62.5 g/L Zn(2+)) at T: 40 degrees C with diluted H(2)SO(4) (3 mol/L). (4) Zinc electrowinning from sulphate solutions (at 38 degrees C) using Al as cathode and Pb as anode. The acidity of the electrolyte was fixed at 180 g/L H(2)SO(4), while the current density was kept constant at 500 A/m(2). PMID:20434263

  11. Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery for thermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, T.B.; Bolivar, J.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Ninth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 62 through 67. The first, second, third, fourth fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth reports on Annex IV, [Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, and IV-8 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP) (DOE/BC-92/1/SP, DOE/BC-93/3/SP, and DOE/BC-95/3/SP)] contain the results from the first 61 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, October 1991, February 1993, and March 1995 respectively.

  12. In-situ steam drive oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Vanmeurs, P.; Waxman, M.H.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1987-02-03

    A process is described for heating a subterranean oil and water-containing reservoir formation, comprising: completing at least one each of heat-injecting and fluid-producing wells into a treatment interval of the formation which is at least about 100 feet thick, contains both oil and water, and is both undesirably impermeable and non-productive in response to injections of oil recovery fluids; arranging the wells to have boreholes which, substantially throughout the treatment interval, are substantially parallel and are separated by substantially equal distances of at least about 20 feet; in each heat-injecting well, substantially throughout the treatment interval, sealing the face of the reservoir formation with a solid material which is relatively heat-conductive and substantially fluid impermeable; in each fluid-producing well, substantially throughout the treatment interval, establishing fluid communication between the wellbore and the reservoir formation and arranging the well for producing fluid from the reservoir formation; and heating the interior of each heat-injecting well, at least substantially throughout the treatment interval, at a rate or rates capable of (a) increasing the temperature within the borehole interior to at least about 600/sup 0/C. and (b) maintaining a borehole interior temperature of at least about 600/sup 0/C. without causing it to become high enough to thermally damage equipment within the borehole while heat is being transmitted away from the borehole at a rate not significantly faster than that permitted by the thermal conductivity of the reservoir formation.

  13. EFFICIENT RECOVERY OF BIOETHANOL USING NOVEL PERVAPORATION-DEPHLEGMATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioethanol is the most important liquid fuel made in the U.S. from domestically produced renewable resources. Traditional production of bioethanol involves batch fermation of biomass followed by ethanol recovery from the fermentation broths using distillation. The distillation st...

  14. Membrane-based processes for wastewater nutrient recovery: Technology, challenges, and future direction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Shon, Ho Kyong; Gray, Stephen R; Elimelech, Menachem

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater nutrient recovery holds promise for more sustainable water and agricultural industries. We critically review three emerging membrane processes - forward osmosis (FO), membrane distillation (MD) and electrodialysis (ED) - that can advance wastewater nutrient recovery. Challenges associated with wastewater nutrient recovery were identified. The advantages and challenges of applying FO, MD, and ED technologies to wastewater nutrient recovery are discussed, and directions for future research and development are identified. Emphasis is given to exploration of the unique mass transfer properties of these membrane processes in the context of wastewater nutrient recovery. We highlight that hybridising these membrane processes with existing nutrient precipitation process will lead to better management of and more diverse pathways for near complete nutrient recovery in wastewater treatment facilities. PMID:26674549

  15. Identification of existing waste heat recovery and process improvement technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.L.; Dodge, R.E.; Smith, S.A.; Ames, K.R.

    1984-03-01

    General information is provided on waste heat recovery opportunities. The currently available equipment for high- and low-temperature applications are described. Other equipment related to wasteheat recovery equipment such as components, instruments and controls, and cleaning equipment is discussed briefly. A description of the microcomputer data base is included. Suppliers of waste heat equipment are mentioned throughout the report, with specific contacts, addresses, and telephone numbers provided in an Appendix.

  16. Kinematic space-baselines and their use for gravity field recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, Adrian; Bock, Heike; Meyer, Ulrich; Arnold, Daniel; Dahle, Christoph

    Kinematic positions of individual low Earth orbiting satellites equipped with spaceborne GPS receivers have been widely used to determine the long wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. GPS-derived relative kinematic positions (space-baselines) of formation flying satellites may be used as additional pseudo-observations to support long wavelength gravity field recovery. In preparation for the Swarm data analysis we review the principles of gravity field determination from kinematic baseline data (Jäggi et al. 2009, doi:10.1007/978-3-540-85426-5_14) and extend them towards a more flexible combination with the contribution from the absolute kinematic positions. Kinematic baselines will be treated in close analogy to GRACE inter-satellite K-Band measurements, but instead of the inter-satellite biased range observations the (unbiased) components of the inter-satellite distance vector will be used as additional pseudo-observations. Covariance information from the kinematic baseline determination will be used to properly weight the baseline contribution in the combination with the normal equations stemming from the absolute kinematic positions. GPS data from the GRACE mission will be used to study different baseline processing options and to assess the benefit for long wavelength gravity field determination.

  17. Low-Salinity Waterflooding to Improve Oil Recovery - Historical Field Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson

    2007-11-01

    Waterflooding is by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of wa-terfloods. Laboratory water-flood tests and single-well tracer tests have shown that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery, but work designed to test the method on a field scale has not yet been undertaken. Historical waterflood records could unintentionally provide some evidence of improved recovery from waterflooding with lower salinity brine. Nu-merous fields in the Powder River basin of Wyoming have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) obtained from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Three Minnelusa formation fields in the basin were identified as potential candidates for waterflood comparisons based on the salinity of the connate and injection water. Historical pro-duction and injection data for these fields were obtained from the public record. Field waterflood data were manipulated to be displayed in the same format as laboratory coreflood re-sults. Recovery from fields using lower salinity injection wa-ter was greater than that using higher salinity injection wa-ter—matching recovery trends for laboratory and single-well tests.

  18. Visualizing underwater acoustic matched-field processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Lawrence; Kamgar-Parsi, Behzad; Karahalios, Margarida; Heitmeyer, Richard

    1991-06-01

    Matched-field processing is a new technique for processing ocean acoustic data measured by an array of hydrophones. It produces estimates of the location of sources of acoustic energy. This method differs from source localization techniques in other disciplines in that it uses the complex underwater acoustic environment to improve the accuracy of the source localization. An unexplored problem in matched-field processing has been to separate multiple sources within a matched-field ambiguity function. Underwater acoustic processing is one of many disciplines where a synthesis of computer graphics and image processing is producing new insight. The benefits of different volume visualization algorithms for matched-field display are discussed. The authors show how this led to a template matching scheme for identifying a source within the matched-field ambiguity function that can help move toward an automated source localization process.

  19. Reductive stripping process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, Fred J.; Crouse, David J.

    1984-01-01

    A reductive stripping flow sheet for recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is described. Uranium is stripped from a uranium-loaded organic phase by a redox reaction converting the uranyl to uranous ion. The uranous ion is reoxidized to the uranyl oxidation state to form an aqueous feed solution highly concentrated in uranium. Processing of this feed through a second solvent extraction cycle requires far less stripping reagent as compared to a flow sheet which does not include the reductive stripping reaction.

  20. 27 CFR 19.4 - Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes. 19.4 Section 19.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... General Provisions § 19.4 Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes....

  1. 27 CFR 19.4 - Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes. 19.4 Section 19.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... General Provisions § 19.4 Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes....

  2. 27 CFR 19.4 - Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes. 19.4 Section 19.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... General Provisions § 19.4 Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes....

  3. 27 CFR 19.4 - Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes. 19.4 Section 19.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... General Provisions § 19.4 Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes....

  4. GRACE Time-Variable Gravity Field Recovery Using an Improved Energy Balance Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Kun

    Earth's gravity is continuously varying with respect to time due primarily to mass transports within the Earth system and external gravitational forcing. A new formalism based on energy conservation principle for time-variable gravity field recovery using satellite gravimetry has been developed and yields more accurate estimation of in-situ geopotential difference observables using K-Band Ranging (KBR) measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) twin-satellite mission. The new approach can preserve more time-variable gravity information sensed by KBR range-rate measurements and reduce orbit error as compared to previous energy balance studies. Results based on analysis of more than 10 years of GRACE data indicate that the estimated geopotential differences agree well with the predicted values from official Level 2 solutions: with much higher correlation of 0.9, as compared to 0.5-0.8 reported by previous energy balance studies. This study demonstrates that the new approach is more flexible for both global and regional temporal gravity recovery, leading to the first independent GRACE monthly solution series based on energy conservation principle, which is comparable to the results from different approach. The developed formalism is applicable to the general case of low-low satellite-to-satellite radiometric or laser interferometric tracking measurements, such as GRACE Follow-on or other Next Generation Gravity Field missions, for efficient retrieval and studies of Earth's mass transport evolutions. The regional gravity analysis over Greenland reveals that a substantially higher temporal resolution is achievable at 10 or 11-day interval from GRACE data, as compared to the official monthly solutions, but without the compromise of spatial resolution, nor the need to use regularization or post-processing. Studies of the terrestrial and ground water storage change over North China Plain show high correlation in sub-monthly scale, among the 11

  5. Lunar gravity field recovery: sensitivity studies from simulated tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, A.; Baur, O.

    2012-04-01

    The lunar gravity field is essential for understanding the structure and the thermal evolution of the Moon. Typically, the gravity field is inferred from tracking data to satellites orbiting the Moon. Due to the fact that the Moon is in the state of synchronous rotation with the Earth, direct tracking to the farside is impossible. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), launched in 2009, is equipped with various instruments whose purpose is to prepare for save robotic returns to the Moon. To geolocate LRO, the spacecraft is tracked by means of radiometric techniques (ranges, range rates, angles) and optical laser (laser ranges). We analyzed tracking data to LRO with respect to various aspects, such as the number of observations, their spatial distribution on the lunar surface, and the present noise level. We used these real-data characteristics to simulate tracking data to LRO. We generated three different simulation scenarios: observations were simulated (1) during the exact time spans when LRO was tracked from a specific ground station, (2) whenever the spacecraft was in view from a station, and (3) for the nearside as well as for the farside of the Moon. Based on the resulting trajectories, we estimated three sets of spherical harmonic coefficients representing the lunar gravity field. Moreover, we varied the maximum degree of estimated coefficients and investigated the effect of noise on the estimated parameters. Observation simulation and parameter estimation was accomplished with the software packages GEODYN and SOLVE.

  6. BENCH-SCALE RECOVERY OF LEAD USING AND ELECTRO- MEMBRANE/CHELATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of a bench-scale treatability test to investigate key process parameters influencing an innovative chelation electrodeposition process for recovery of lead from contaminated sons. thylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta...

  7. Biodiesel production process from microalgae oil by waste heat recovery and process integration.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunfeng; Chen, Guanyi; Ji, Na; Liu, Qingling; Kansha, Yasuki; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the optimization of microalgae oil (MO) based biodiesel production process is carried out by waste heat recovery and process integration. The exergy analysis of each heat exchanger presented an efficient heat coupling between hot and cold streams, thus minimizing the total exergy destruction. Simulation results showed that the unit production cost of optimized process is 0.592$/L biodiesel, and approximately 0.172$/L biodiesel can be avoided by heat integration. Although the capital cost of the optimized biodiesel production process increased 32.5% and 23.5% compared to the reference cases, the operational cost can be reduced by approximately 22.5% and 41.6%. PMID:26133477

  8. Field pilot tests for tertiary recovery using butane and propane injection

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, E.F.; Garcia, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    This work describes a pilot project for tertiary recovery of liquid hydrocarbons through LPG injection in water-out sections of the Bolivar reservoir in La Pena Field, Santa Cruz, Boliva. The promising results obtained in the initial field miscibility tests, as well as the results from a mathematical model built to stimulate and evaluate the tertiary recovery project, directed subsequent work into a cyclic scheme for enhanced recovery. This scheme is explained and injection production data is presented. Field facilities built to handle both the injected LPG and the produced oil-LPG mixture are described. The oil/LPG ratio and the LPG recovered/injected fraction are the main factors measured in this to make further considerations for a full scale project.

  9. INNOVATIVE RINSE-AND-RECOVERY SYSTEM FOR METAL FINISHING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the feasibility of a rinse-and-recovery system that can be installed in almost any metal finishing line and does not harm the environment because no plating solution exits to the sewer. Most toxic pollutants from metal finishing operations are associated wit...

  10. Souls in Extremis: Enacting Processes of Recovery from Homelessness Among Older African American Women.

    PubMed

    Moxley, David P; Washington, Olivia G M

    2016-06-01

    In a midwestern city of the USA, the authors implemented the Leaving Homelessness Intervention Research Project-and its eight subprojects-to further understand homelessness as experienced by older minority women, develop intervention strategies to facilitate the movement of the participants out of homelessness, and illuminate the women's recovery process. After reviewing the social issue of homelessness among older African American women in the USA, and offering a framework on recovery and qualitative themes of recovery among participants involved in the Telling My Story subproject, the authors present a four-factor model of recovery-focused practice. The model reflects two recovery paradigms: one that is responsive to the negative consequences people experience as a result of their exposure to extreme situations, such as homelessness, and a proactive one in which assistance is designed to help people in recovery advance their own self-development and move forward their process of individuation. PMID:26781673

  11. High-Resolution Gravity and Time-Varying Gravity Field Recovery using GRACE and CHAMP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shum, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research work conducted under NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards Program 1998 (SENH98) entitled High Resolution Gravity and Time Varying Gravity Field Recovery Using GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) and CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Package for Geophysical Research and Applications), which included a no-cost extension time period. The investigation has conducted pilot studies to use the simulated GRACE and CHAMP data and other in situ and space geodetic observable, satellite altimeter data, and ocean mass variation data to study the dynamic processes of the Earth which affect climate change. Results from this investigation include: (1) a new method to use the energy approach for expressing gravity mission data as in situ measurements with the possibility to enhance the spatial resolution of the gravity signal; (2) the method was tested using CHAMP and validated with the development of a mean gravity field model using CHAMP data, (3) elaborate simulation to quantify errors of tides and atmosphere and to recover hydrological and oceanic signals using GRACE, results show that there are significant aliasing effect and errors being amplified in the GRACE resonant geopotential and it is not trivial to remove these errors, and (4) quantification of oceanic and ice sheet mass changes in a geophysical constraint study to assess their contributions to global sea level change, while the results improved significant over the use of previous studies using only the SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging)-determined zonal gravity change data, the constraint could be further improved with additional information on mantle rheology, PGR (Post-Glacial Rebound) and ice loading history. A list of relevant presentations and publications is attached, along with a summary of the SENH investigation generated in 2000.

  12. Simulation of EOR (enhanced oil recovery) processes in stochastically generated permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, J.R.; Castillo, J.L.; Lake, L.W. . Dept. of Petroleum Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Many enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes involve injecting an agent, such as steam or CO{sub 2}, that is much more mobile than the resident oil. Other EOR processes attempt to improve sweep efficiency by adding polymer or surfactant to the injected water to create a favorable mobility ratio. This study examines the effect of statistically generated heterogeneity on miscible displacements at unfavorable and favorable mobility ratios. The principal goal is to delineate the effects of fingering, dispersion and channeling on volumetric sweep efficiency. Two-dimensional heterogeneous permeability fields are generated with variability (heterogeneity) and spatial correlation as characterizing parameters. Four levels of correlation and three of variability make up a 12 element matrix. At each element of the matrix, a miscible displacement simulation at unit mobility ratio shows the effect of the heterogeneity, and simulations at mobility ratios of 10 and 0.5 show the effect of viscous force differences combined with heterogeneity. 20 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Recovery of Magnesium from Seawaters and Development of Analytical Techniques for Eco-Friendly Materials Processing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Yoon, C.; Chung, K.

    2008-12-01

    Nevertheless other resources such as fossil fuel, oils, mineral resources, drive continued interest in developing fundamental techniques for recovering valuable metals like seawater origin. A process for recovery of magnesium from brine and bittern have been described in achieving low-level detection limits as well as reliability of analytical technique. The choice of analytical technique to meet the most stringent analytical needs of our fields is ICP-OES and XRF for commercial purposes in high solid waters like bittern. This study contains the results of a study of processes for seawater reverse osmosis with enhanced precipitation yield such as NaCl, Mg(OH)2, and Br2. The original bittern composition supplied from Hanjoo Co. Ltd. was pretreated for microbial matter and additional NaOH, NH4OH, or Na2CO3. Adding NaOH at pH 9.0 to pH 9.9 yield precipitation of Na2CO3.

  14. GOCE Precise Science Orbits for the Entire Mission and their Use for Gravity Field Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, Adrian; Bock, Heike; Meyer, Ulrich; Weigelt, Matthias

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), ESA's first Earth Explorer Core Mission, was launched on March 17, 2009 into a sun-synchronous dusk-dawn orbit and re-entered into the Earth's atmosphere on November 11, 2013. It was equipped with a three-axis gravity gradiometer for high-resolution recovery of the Earth's gravity field, as well as with a 12-channel, dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver for precise orbit determination (POD), instrument time-tagging, and the determination of the long wavelength part of the Earth’s gravity field. A precise science orbit (PSO) product was provided during the entire mission by the GOCE High-level Processing Facility (HPF) from the GPS high-low Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (hl-SST) data. We present the reduced-dynamic and kinematic PSO results for the entire mission period. Orbit comparisons and validations with independent Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements demonstrate the high quality of both orbit products being close to 2 cm 1-D RMS, but also reveal a correlation between solar activity, GPS data availability, and the quality of the orbits. We use the 1-sec kinematic positions of the GOCE PSO product for gravity field determination and present GPS-only solutions covering the entire mission period. The generated gravity field solutions reveal severe systematic errors centered along the geomagnetic equator, which may be traced back to the GPS carrier phase observations used for the kinematic orbit determination. The nature of the systematic errors is further investigated and reprocessed orbits free of systematic errors along the geomagnetic equator are derived. Eventually, the potential of recovering time variable signals from GOCE kinematic positions is assessed.

  15. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  16. The process of recovery of people with mental illness: The perspectives of patients, family members and care providers: Part 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is a qualitative design study that examines points of divergence and convergence in the perspectives on recovery of 36 participants or 12 triads. Each triad comprising a patient, a family member/friend, a care provider and documents the procedural, analytic of triangulating perspectives as a means of understanding the recovery process which is illustrated by four case studies. Variations are considered as they relate to individual characteristics, type of participant (patient, family, member/friend and care provider), and mental illness. This paper which is part of a larger study and is based on a qualitative research design documents the process of recovery of people with mental illness: Developing a Model of Recovery in Mental Health: A middle range theory. Methods Data were collected in field notes through semi-structured interviews based on three interview guides (one for patients, one for family members/friends, and one for caregivers). Cross analysis and triangulation methods were used to analyse the areas of convergence and divergence on the recovery process of all triads. Results In general, with the 36 participants united in 12 triads, two themes emerge from the cross-analysis process or triangulation of data sources (12 triads analysis in 12 cases studies). Two themes emerge from the analysis process of the content of 36 interviews with participants: (1) Revealing dynamic context, situating patients in their dynamic context; and (2) Relationship issues in a recovery process, furthering our understanding of such issues. We provide four case studies examples (among 12 cases studies) to illustrate the variations in the way recovery is perceived, interpreted and expressed in relation to the different contexts of interaction. Conclusion The perspectives of the three participants (patients, family members/friends and care providers) suggest that recovery depends on constructing meaning around mental illness experiences and that the process is

  17. PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM PHOSPHATIC ORE

    DOEpatents

    Long, R.L.

    1959-04-14

    A proccss is described for the recovery of uranium from phosphatic products derived from phosphatic ores. It has been discovered that certain alkyl phosphatic, derivatives can be employed in a direct solvent extraction operation to recover uranium from solid products, such as superphosphates, without first dissolving such solids. The organic extractants found suitable include alkyl derivatives of phosphoric, pyrophosphoric, phosof the derivative contains from 4 to 7 carbon atoms. A diluent such as kerosene is also used.

  18. Effects of chemical additives on microbial enhanced oil recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, R.S.; Chase, K.L.; Bertus, K.M.; Stepp, A.K.

    1989-12-01

    An extensive laboratory study has been conducted to determine (1) the role of the microbial cells and products in oil displacement, (2) the relative rates of transport of microbial cells and chemical products from the metabolism of nutrient in porous media, and (3) the effects of chemical additives on the oil recovery efficiency of microbial formulations. This report describes experiments relating to the effects of additives on oil recovery efficiency of microbial formulations. The effects of additives on the oil recovery efficiency of microbial formulations were determined by conducting oil displacement experiments in 1-foot-long Berea sandstone cores. Sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), a low-molecular-weight polyacrylamide polymer, a lignosulfonate surfactant, and sodium bicarbonate were added to a microbial formulation at a concentration of 1%. The effects of using these additives in a preflush prior to injection of the microbial formulation were also evaluated. Oil-displacement experiments with and without a sodium bicarbonate preflush were conducted in 4-foot-long Berea sandstone cores, and samples of in situ fluids were collected at various times at four intermediate points along the core. The concentrations of metabolic products and microbes in the fluid samples were determined. 9 refs., 22 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Field recovery of layered tektites in northeast Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, J.T.; Pitakpaivan, K.; Putthapiban, P.

    1995-07-25

    The authors recovered Australasian tektites in place throughout a 40 X 130 km region in northeast Thailand extending from the Laotian border westward to a line connecting Na Pho Klang in the northeast through Det Udom to Nam Yun in the south. With two exceptions, in sites near the western edge of this region, all fragments are layered (muong-Nong-type) tektites. It appears that large layered tektites are mainly found by rice farmers in fields that were forested until the recent past. The presence of layered tektites in this 40 X 130 km area implies that impact melt that fell in these areas was hot enough to flow if it was deposited on a sloping surface. The absence of splash-form tektites from the region indicates that the layer was still molten when masses having shapes (teardrops, dumbbells, etc.) produced by spinning reached the ground. To account for this and to allow time for the melt to flow a few tens of centimeters requires that the atmosphere remained hot (>2300 K) for a few minutes. Tektites that are in place are almost always associated with a widespread 10-cm to meter-thick layer of laterite. In two cases (one involving layered, one involving splash-form tektites), where accurate stratigraphic control demonstrated that the tektites were still in section, they were sited on top of the laterite layer just below a layer of aeolian sand. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Field recovery of layered tektites in northeast Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.; Pitakpaivan, Kaset; Putthapiban, Prinya; Salyapongse, Sirot; Thapthimthong, Boonlom; McHone, John F.

    1995-07-01

    We recovered Australasian tektites in place throughout a 40×130 km region in northeast Thailand extending from the Laotian border westward to a line connecting Na Pho Klang in the northeast through Det Udom to Nam Yun in the south. With two exceptions, in sites near the western edge of this region, all fragments are layered (muong-Nong-type) tektites. It appears that large layered tektites are mainly found by rice farmers in fields that were forested until the recent past. The presence of layered tektites in this 40×130 km area implies that impact melt that fell in these areas was not enough to flow if it was deposited on a sloping surface. The absence of splash-form tektites from the region indicates that the layer was still molten when masses having shapes (teardrops, dumbbells, etc.) produced by spinning reached the ground. To account for this and to allow time for the melt to flow a few tens of centimeters requires that the atmosphere remained hot (>2300 K) for a few minutes. Tektites that are in place are almost always associated with a wide-spread 10-cm to meter-thick layer of laterite. In two cases (one involving layered, one involving splash-form tektites), where accurate stratigraphic control demonstrated that the tektites were still in section, they were sited on top of the laterite layer just below a layer of aeolian sand.

  1. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-02-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity.

  2. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-02-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity. PMID:25591118

  3. The recovery of VOC from vapours and condensates by membrane processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chmiel, H.; Mavrov, V.; Faehnrich, A.

    1995-12-31

    Membrane separation processes, applied individually or combined with other separation processes, have proven to be particularly suitable for integration into production processes. This paper provides examples which focus on the recovery of volatile organic components from exhaust air, vapours and condensates by membrane processes. The processes described are vapour permeation combined with adsorption, nanofiltration, and reverse osmosis.

  4. 27 CFR 19.57 - Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes. 19.57 Section 19.57 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Activities Not Subject to This Part § 19.57 Recovery and reuse...

  5. Magnetic Field Observations of Partial Ring Current during Storm Recovery Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Lucek, E. A.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of an extensive survey of the magnetic field observations in the inner magnetosphere using 30 years of magnetospheric magnetic field data from Polar, Cluster, ISEE, and AMPTE/CCE missions. The purpose of this study is to understand the magnetic field evolution during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms, and its implication to the ring current recovery and loss mechanisms of ring current particles. It is now commonly believed that a strong partial ring current is formed during the storm main phase due to the enhanced earthward convection of energetic ions from nightside plasma sheet. But the presence of a strong partial ring current throughout the recovery phase remains controversial. The magnetic field generated by the ring current inflates the inner magnetosphere and causes magnetic field depressions in the equatorial magnetosphere. During the storm recovery phase, we find that the distribution of the equatorial magnetic field depression exhibits similar local time dependence as the ring current distribution obtained from the combined dataset in the earlier study. It shows that a strong partial ring current is a permanent feature throughout the recovery phase. In the early recovery phase, the partial ring current peaks near the dusk terminator as indicated by the peak of the magnetic field depression. As the recovery phase progresses, the partial ring current decays most quickly near the dusk and results in a dusk-to-midnight moving of the peak of the partial ring current. Thus the loss mechanisms work most effectively near the dusk. The magnetic field depression increases the gyroradius of ring current protons to a scale greater or comparable to the thickness of the magnetopause, which increases the chance of ion drift loss near the dusk magnetopause at larger L-shell (L greater than 5). But the drift loss mechanism alone cannot explain the loss of ring current ions especially in the smaller L-shell (L less than 5). The precipitation loss

  6. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 89

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Summaries are presented for the DOE contracts related to supported research for thermal recovery of petroleum, geoscience technology, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Data included for each project are: title, contract number, principal investigator, research organization, beginning date, expected completion date, amount of award, objectives of the research, and summary of technical progress.

  7. Nonthermal processing by radio frequency electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) processing is relatively new and has been shown to inactivate bacteria in apple juice, orange juice and apple cider at moderately low temperatures. Key equipment components of the process include a radio frequency power supply and a treatment chamber that is ca...

  8. Behavioral recovery induced by applied electric fields after spinal cord hemisection in guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Borgens, R.B.; Blight, A.R.; McGinnis, M.E.

    1987-10-16

    Applied electric fields were used to promote axonal regeneration in spinal cords of adult guinea pigs. A propriospinal intersegmental reflex (the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex) was used to test lateral tract function after hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord. An electrical field (200 microvolts per millimeter, cathode rostral) applied across the lesion led to functional recovery of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex in 25 percent of experimental animals, whereas the functional deficit remained in control animals, which were implanted with inactive stimulators.

  9. CLASSSTRONG: Classical simulations of strong field processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Pérez-Hernández, J. A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2014-01-01

    A set of Mathematica functions is presented to model classically two of the most important processes in strong field physics, namely high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI). Our approach is based on the numerical solution of the Newton-Lorentz equation of an electron moving on an electric field and takes advantage of the symbolic languages features and graphical power of Mathematica. Like in the Strong Field Approximation (SFA), the effects of atomic potential on the motion of electron in the laser field are neglected. The SFA was proven to be an essential tool in strong field physics in the sense that it is able to predict with great precision the harmonic (in the HHG) and energy (in the ATI) limits. We have extended substantially the conventional classical simulations, where the electric field is only dependent on time, including spatial nonhomogeneous fields and spatial and temporal synthesized fields. Spatial nonhomogeneous fields appear when metal nanosystems interact with strong and short laser pulses and temporal synthesized fields are routinely generated in attosecond laboratories around the world. Temporal and spatial synthesized fields have received special attention nowadays because they would allow to exceed considerably the conventional harmonic and electron energy frontiers. Classical simulations are an invaluable tool to explore exhaustively the parameters domain at a cheap computational cost, before massive quantum mechanical calculations, absolutely indispensable for the detailed analysis, are performed.

  10. Recovery Processes of Organic Acids from Fermentation Broths in the Biomass-Based Industry.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian-Zhu; Jiang, Xing-Lin; Feng, Xin-Jun; Wang, Ji-Ming; Sun, Chao; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Xian, Mo; Liu, Hui-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The new movement towards green chemistry and renewable feedstocks makes microbial production of chemicals more competitive. Among the numerous chemicals, organic acids are more attractive targets for process development efforts in the renewable-based biorefinery industry. However, most of the production costs in microbial processes are higher than that in chemical processes, among which over 60% are generated by separation processes. Therefore, the research of separation and purification processes is important for a promising biorefinery industry. This review highlights the progress of recovery processes in the separation and purification of organic acids, including their advantages and disadvantages, current situation, and future prospects in terms of recovery yields and industrial application. PMID:26403818

  11. Efficient ethanol recovery from fermentation broths with integrated distillation-membrane process

    EPA Science Inventory

    The energy demand of distillation-molecular sieve systems for ethanol recovery/dehydration can be significant, particularly for dilute solutions. An alternative process integrating vapor stripping (like a beer still) with vapor compression and a vapor permeation membrane separati...

  12. Efficient ethanol recovery from yeast fermentation broth with integrated distillation-membrane process

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid process integrating vapor stripping with vapor compression and vapor permeation membrane separation, termed Membrane Assisted Vapor Stripping (MAVS), was evaluated for recovery and dehydration of ethanol from aqueous solution as an alternative to conventional distillatio...

  13. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yorstos, Yannis C.

    2003-03-19

    The report describes progress made in the various thrust areas of the project, which include internal drives for oil recovery, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes and the flow of fluids with yield stress.

  14. Tensiomygraphic Measurement of Atrophy Related Processes During Bed Rest and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunic, B. ostjan; Degens, Hans; Rittweger, Jorn; Narici, Marcco; Pisot, Venceslav; Mekjavic, Igor B.; Pisot, Rado

    2013-02-01

    Tensiomyographic (TMG) parameters were recently proposed for a non-invasive estimation of MHC distribution in human vastus lateralis muscle. However, TMG potential is even higher, offers additional insight into the skeletal muscle physiology, especially in the field of atrophy and hypertrophy. The purpose of this study is in developing time dynamics of TMG-measured contraction time (Tc) and maximal response amplitude (Dm), together with muscle belly thickness, measure thoroughly during 35-day bed rest and followed in 30-day recovery (N = 10 males; age 24.3 ± 2.6 years). Measurements were performed in two postural muscles (vastus medialis and lateralis) and one non-postural muscle (biceps femoris). During bed rest period we found different dynamics of muscle thickness decrease and Dm increase. Tc was unchanged in postural muscles, but in non-postural muscle increased significantly and stayed as such even at the end of recovery. We could conclude that TMG related parameters are more sensitive in measuring muscle atrophic and hypertrophic processes than biomedical imaging technique. However, a mechanism that regulates Dm still needs to be identified.

  15. FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.J.; Hyman, H.H.; Sheft, I.

    1958-04-15

    The separation and recovery of uraniunn from contaminants introduced by neutron irradiation by a halogenation and volatilization method are described. The irradiated uranium is dissolved in bromine trifluoride in the liquid phase. The uranium is converted to the BrF/sub 3/ soluble urmium hexafluoride compound whereas the fluorides of certain contaminating elements are insoluble in liquid BrF/sub 3/, and the reaction rate of the BrF/sub 3/ with certain other solid uranium contamirnnts is sufficiently slower than the reaction rate with uranium that substantial portions of these contaminating elements will remain as solids. These solids are then separated from the solution by a distillation, filtration, or centrifugation step. The uranium hexafluoride is then separated from the balance of the impurities and solvent by one or more distillations.

  16. Interfacial phenomena in foam flooding process for heavy oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.K.; Shah, D.O.

    1983-08-01

    The ability of pure and commercial foaming agents to generate in situ foams and their effects on air mobility, breakthrough time, fluid recovery and oil displacement efficiency have been studied. These parameters were correlated with the interfacial properties of foaming agents. A striking decrease in the air mobility was observed with increasing temperature as well as pressure which in turn increased the effectiveness of foams to displace additional fluid. It was observed that the chain length compatibility and molecular packing at the air-liquid interface strikingly influenced the interfacial properties of foaming agents, microscopic characteristics and behavior of foams. From the studies on mixed surfactant systems, a minimum in surface tension, a maximum in surface viscosity, a minimum in bubble size and a maximum in heavy oil displacement efficiency in a porous medium were observed when both the components of the foaming system had equal chain length.

  17. Block copolymers useful for enhanced oil recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, P.

    1989-10-03

    This patent describes a method for permeability control of a subterranean formation and for enhancing oil recovery from the subterranean formation. The method comprising injecting into the subterranean formation an aqueous solution comprised of a block copolymer having the structural form of ABA triblock or (AB){sub n} multiblock wherein A is a crosslinkable polymer, B is a non-crosslinkable polymer or a polymer having low reactivity to crosslinking agents, n is a number of at least 2 and a crosslinking agent. Wherein A is selected from the group consisting of polyacrylic acid, partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, highly hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, partially hydrolyzed polyacrylic ester, highly hydrolyzed polyacrylic ester, polyvinyl alcohol and mixtures thereof and B is selected from the group consisting of polyacrylamide, partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, polyalkylene ethers, polyvinyl alcohol and polyvinylpyridine.

  18. Local Risk-Minimization for Defaultable Claims with Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, Francesca; Cretarola, Alessandra

    2012-06-15

    We study the local risk-minimization approach for defaultable claims with random recovery at default time, seen as payment streams on the random interval [0,{tau} Logical-And T], where T denotes the fixed time-horizon. We find the pseudo-locally risk-minimizing strategy in the case when the agent information takes into account the possibility of a default event (local risk-minimization with G-strategies) and we provide an application in the case of a corporate bond. We also discuss the problem of finding a pseudo-locally risk-minimizing strategy if we suppose the agent obtains her information only by observing the non-defaultable assets.

  19. Geochemical processes during five years of aquifer storage recovery.

    PubMed

    Herczeg, Andrew L; Rattray, Karen J; Dillon, Peter J; Pavelic, Paul; Barry, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    A key factor in the long-term viability of aquifer storage recovery (ASR) is the extent of mineral solution interaction between two dissimilar water types and consequent impact on water quality and aquifer stability. We collected geochemical and isotopic data from three observation wells located 25, 65, and 325 m from an injection well at an experimental ASR site located in a karstic, confined carbonate aquifer in South Australia. The experiment involved five major injection cycles of a total of 2.5 x 10(5) m3 of storm water (total dissolved solids [TDS] approximately 150 mg/L) into the brackish (TDS approximately 2400 mg/L) aquifer. Approximately 60% of the mixture was pumped out during the fifth year of the experiment. The major effect on water quality within a 25 m radius of the injection well following injection of storm water was carbonate dissolution (35 +/- 6 g of CaCO3 dissolved/m3 of aquifer) and sulfide mineral oxidation (50 +/- 10 g as FeS2/m3 after one injection). < 0.005% of the total aquifer carbonate matrix was dissolved during each injection event, and approximately 0.2% of the total reduced sulfur. Increasing amounts of ambient ground water was entrained into the injected mixture during each of the storage periods. High 14C(DIC) activities and slightly more negative delta13C(DIC) values measured immediately after injection events show that substantial CO2(aq) is produced by oxidation of organic matter associated with injectant. There were no detectable geochemical reactions while pumping during the recovery phase in the fifth year of the experiment. PMID:15161160

  20. Effective Field Theory for Jet Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becher, Thomas; Neubert, Matthias; Rothen, Lorena; Shao, Ding Yu

    2016-05-01

    Processes involving narrow jets receive perturbative corrections enhanced by logarithms of the jet opening angle and the ratio of the energies inside and outside the jets. Analyzing cone-jet processes in effective field theory, we find that in addition to soft and collinear fields their description requires degrees of freedom that are simultaneously soft and collinear to the jets. These collinear-soft particles can resolve individual collinear partons, leading to a complicated multi-Wilson-line structure of the associated operators at higher orders. Our effective field theory provides, for the first time, a factorization formula for a cone-jet process, which fully separates the physics at different energy scales. Its renormalization-group equations control all logarithmically enhanced higher-order terms, in particular also the nonglobal logarithms.

  1. Effective Field Theory for Jet Processes.

    PubMed

    Becher, Thomas; Neubert, Matthias; Rothen, Lorena; Shao, Ding Yu

    2016-05-13

    Processes involving narrow jets receive perturbative corrections enhanced by logarithms of the jet opening angle and the ratio of the energies inside and outside the jets. Analyzing cone-jet processes in effective field theory, we find that in addition to soft and collinear fields their description requires degrees of freedom that are simultaneously soft and collinear to the jets. These collinear-soft particles can resolve individual collinear partons, leading to a complicated multi-Wilson-line structure of the associated operators at higher orders. Our effective field theory provides, for the first time, a factorization formula for a cone-jet process, which fully separates the physics at different energy scales. Its renormalization-group equations control all logarithmically enhanced higher-order terms, in particular also the nonglobal logarithms. PMID:27232017

  2. Direct filtration for recovery of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae in the field

    PubMed Central

    Sandt, Donald G.

    1973-01-01

    The recovery of schistosome cercariae from natural waters has been limited by variations in turbidity and in the accuracy of recovery with different techniques. A modification of the Rowan vacuum paper filtration method employing a battery-operated pumping system, a glass—silicone plate filter, and a specially designed filter holder is described and evaluated. Field tests on St Lucia indicate a mean filtration volume of 12.2 litres per filter at a mean turbidity of 20.3 Jackson turbidity units. Overall, 86% of the volumes filtered per filter were in excess of 6 litres. Particle size, rather than turbidity, was found to be the main factor influencing filter blockage, reading time, and accuracy. Recoveries of 0.01 cercaria (Schistosoma mansoni) per litre sampled were obtained, but the practical limit of the method is considered to be closer to 0.1 cercaria per litre sampled. PMID:4541145

  3. Acceptance and Avoidance Processes at Different Levels of Psychological Recovery from Enduring Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Vinicius R.; Oades, Lindsay G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the use of psychological acceptance and experiential avoidance, two key concepts of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), in the psychological recovery process of people with enduring mental illness. Method. Sixty-seven participants were recruited from the metropolitan, regional, and rural areas of New South Wales, Australia. They all presented some form of chronic mental illness (at least 12 months) as reflected in DSM-IV Axis I diagnostic criteria. The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ-19) was used to measure the presence of psychological acceptance and experiential avoidance; the Recovery Assessment Scale (RAS) was used to examine the levels of psychological recovery; and the Scales of Psychological Well-Being was used to observe if there are benefits in utilizing psychological acceptance and experiential avoidance in the recovery process. Results. An analysis of objectively quantifiable measures found no clear correlation between the use of psychological acceptance and recovery in mental illness as measured by the RAS. The data, however, showed a relationship between psychological acceptance and some components of recovery, thereby demonstrating its possible value in the recovery process. Conclusion. The major contribution of this research was the emerging correlation that was observed between psychological acceptance and positive levels of psychological well-being among individuals with mental illness. PMID:26576412

  4. MSO spent salt clean-up recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M G; Brummond, W A; Hipple, D L; Hsu, P C; Summers, L J; Von Holtz, E H; Wang, F T

    1997-02-01

    An effective process has been developed to separate metals, mineral residues, and radionuclides from spent salt, a secondary waste generated by Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). This process includes salt dissolution, pH adjustment, chemical reduction and/or sulfiding, filtration, ion exchange, and drying. The process uses dithionite to reduce soluble chromate and/or sulfiding agent to suppress solubilities of metal compounds in water. This process is capable of reducing the secondary waste to less than 5% of its original weight. It is a low temperature, aqueous process and has been demonstrated in the laboratory [1].

  5. Coreflood assay using extremophile microorganisms for recovery of heavy oil in Mexican oil fields.

    PubMed

    Castorena-Cortés, Gladys; Roldán-Carrillo, Teresa; Reyes-Avila, Jesús; Zapata-Peñasco, Icoquih; Mayol-Castillo, Martha; Olguín-Lora, Patricia

    2012-10-01

    A considerable portion of oil reserves in Mexico corresponds to heavy oils. This feature makes it more difficult to recover the remaining oil in the reservoir after extraction with conventional techniques. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) has been considered as a promising technique to further increase oil recovery, but its application has been developed mainly with light oils; therefore, more research is required for heavy oil. In this study, the recovery of Mexican heavy oil (11.1°API and viscosity 32,906 mPa s) in a coreflood experiment was evaluated using the extremophile mixed culture A7, which was isolated from a Mexican oil field. Culture A7 includes fermentative, thermophilic, and anaerobic microorganisms. The experiments included waterflooding and MEOR stages, and were carried out under reservoir conditions (70°C and 9.65 MPa). MEOR consisted of injections of nutrients and microorganisms followed by confinement periods. In the MEOR stages, the mixed culture A7 produced surface-active agents (surface tension reduction 27 mN m⁻¹), solvents (ethanol, 1738 mg L⁻¹), acids (693 mg L⁻¹), and gases, and also degraded heavy hydrocarbon fractions in an extreme environment. The interactions of these metabolites with the oil, as well as the bioconversion of heavy oil fractions to lighter fractions (increased alkanes in the C₈-C₃₀ range), were the mechanisms responsible for the mobility and recovery of heavy oil from the porous media. Oil recovery by MEOR was 19.48% of the residual oil in the core after waterflooding. These results show that MEOR is a potential alternative to heavy oil recovery in Mexican oil fields. PMID:22704814

  6. Magnetic field processing of inorganic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Kunerth, D.C.; Peterson, E.S.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate, understand, and demonstrate the use of magnetic field processing (MFP) to modify the properties of inorganic-based polymers and to develop the basic technical knowledge required for industrial implementation. Polyphosphazene membranes for chemical separation applications are being emphasized by this project. Previous work demonstrated that magnetic fields, appropriately applied during processing, can be used to beneficially modify membrane morphology. MFP membranes have significantly increased flux capabilities while maintaining the same chemical selectivity as the unprocessed membranes.

  7. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

    2004-10-01

    This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases

  8. Granuflow and Mulled coal: Alternative processes for fine coal recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.E.

    1999-07-01

    Granuflow and Mulled Coal were developed in parallel to enhance the ability to recover and process wet coal fines. There are some similarities in the processes; however, the end products are quite different. This paper will compare the properties of the two products prepared from the same coal and identify the unique properties of each. Criteria for selecting between the two processes, including cost, will be discussed.

  9. Bogi and Capiron fields, Oriente Basin, Ecuador: Similar reservoirs but contrasting drive mechanisms and recoveries

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, H.; Morales, M.; Young, R.; Zambrano, H.

    1996-08-01

    Bogi and Capiron fields are being developed under a unit agreement with Petroecuador. These adjoining fields straddle Block 16 in the Oriente Basin and probably share a common oil water contact. Both fields are simple four-way-dip closures which produce heavy oil from Campanian sandstones of similar quality. However, the two fields are remarkably different in terms of oil production and projected recovery as a result of differing structural closures, reservoir distributions and, hence, differing drive mechanisms. The main reservoir at Bogi field is an amalgamation of two fluvial sheet sandstones thought to be low-stand deposits associated with two falls in relative sea level. The reservoir is thick (56-78 ft) and, with an observed oil column of only 38 feet, a bottom-water drive mechanism is ubiquitous. The oil is heavy (18 API) and mobility ratios unfavorable; water production is high and oil recovery from conventional drilling is expected to be 3-5%. In contrast, only the upper fluvial sheet sandstone is present in Capiron field and a reservoir thickness of 32-48 ft combined with an oil column of 99 ft ensures an edge-water drive mechanism over most of the field with concomitant initial low water production and oil recoveries of approximately 30%. The contrast between Bogi and Capiron fields highlights the problems and challenges in the Block 16 area. Small structural closures filled with heavy oil are abundant and an accurate seismic depth map coupled with an understanding of reservoir distribution are vital to economic success.

  10. Processing (Non)Compositional Expressions: Mistakes and Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holsinger, Edward; Kaiser, Elsi

    2013-01-01

    Current models of idiom representation and processing differ with respect to the role of literal processing during the interpretation of idiomatic expressions. Word-like models (Bobrow & Bell, 1973; Swinney & Cutler, 1979) propose that idiomatic meaning can be accessed directly, whereas structural models (Cacciari & Tabossi, 1988;…

  11. Ultrasonic processing for recovery of chicken erythrocyte hemoglobin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemoglobin from chicken blood has been shown to be a good substitute for synthetic polymeric flocculants. One stage of processing the blood entails breaking open the cells and releasing the cytoplasmic contents; in the present study, we investigate the use of ultrasonic processing at this stage. Was...

  12. Chemical Processes in Astrophysical Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, P.C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1997-12-31

    The effects of stimulated photon emission on chemical processes in a radiation field are considered and their influence on the chemistry of the early universe and other astrophysical environments is investigated. Spontaneous and stimulated radiative attachment rate coefficients for H(-), Li(-) and C(-) are presented.

  13. Phonological Processing in Human Auditory Cortical Fields

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Herron, Timothy J.; Cate, Anthony D.; Kang, Xiaojian; Yund, E. W.

    2011-01-01

    We used population-based cortical-surface analysis of functional magnetic imaging data to characterize the processing of consonant–vowel–consonant syllables (CVCs) and spectrally matched amplitude-modulated noise bursts (AMNBs) in human auditory cortex as subjects attended to auditory or visual stimuli in an intermodal selective attention paradigm. Average auditory cortical field (ACF) locations were defined using tonotopic mapping in a previous study. Activations in auditory cortex were defined by two stimulus-preference gradients: (1) Medial belt ACFs preferred AMNBs and lateral belt and parabelt fields preferred CVCs. This preference extended into core ACFs with medial regions of primary auditory cortex (A1) and the rostral field preferring AMNBs and lateral regions preferring CVCs. (2) Anterior ACFs showed smaller activations but more clearly defined stimulus preferences than did posterior ACFs. Stimulus preference gradients were unaffected by auditory attention suggesting that ACF preferences reflect the automatic processing of different spectrotemporal sound features. PMID:21541252

  14. Radiative processes in external gravitational fields

    SciTech Connect

    Papini, Giorgio

    2010-07-15

    Kinematically forbidden processes may be allowed in the presence of external gravitational fields. These can be taken into account by introducing generalized particle momenta. The corresponding transition probabilities can then be calculated to all orders in the metric deviation from the field-free expressions by simply replacing the particle momenta with their generalized counterparts. The procedure applies to particles of any spin and to any gravitational fields. Transition probabilities, emission power, and spectra are, to leading order, linear in the metric deviation. It is also shown how a small dissipation term in the particle wave equations can trigger a strong backreaction that introduces resonances in the radiative process and deeply affects the resulting gravitational background.

  15. Impact of materials used in lab and field experiments on the recovery of organic micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Hebig, Klaus H; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Scheytt, Traugott J

    2014-03-01

    Organic micropollutants are frequently detected in the aquatic environment. Therefore, a large number of field and laboratory studies have been conducted in order to study their fate in the environment. Due to the diversity of chemical properties among these compounds some of them may interact with materials commonly used in field and laboratory studies like tubes, filters, or sample bottles. The aim of our experiment was to study the interaction between those materials and an aqueous solution of 43 widely detected basic, neutral, and acidic organic micropollutants hereby covering a broad range of polarities. Experiments with materials were conducted as a batch study using spiked tap water and for different syringe filters by filtration with subsequent fraction collection. The best recoveries over a wide range of organic compounds were observed for batches in contact with the following materials (in descending order) acryl glass, PTFE, HDPE, and PP. The use of Pharmed©, silicone, NBR70, Tygon©, and LDPE should be avoided. Flexible tubing materials especially influence many of the investigated compounds here. Filtration with most of the tested filter types leads to no significant loss of almost all of the investigated micropollutants. Nonetheless, significant mass losses of some compounds (loratadine, fluoxetine, sertraline, and diuron) were observed during the first mL of the filtration process. No systematic correlation between compound properties, tested materials, and observed mass losses could be identified in this study. The behavior of each compound is specific and thus, not predictable. It is therefore suggested to study the interaction of compounds with filters and material prior to the actual experiment or include blank studies. PMID:24365588

  16. Impact of materials used in lab and field experiments on the recovery of organic micropollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebig, Klaus; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Scheytt, Traugott

    2015-04-01

    Organic micropollutants are frequently detected in the aquatic environment. There-fore, a large number of field and laboratory studies have been conducted in order to study their fate in the environment. Due to the diversity of chemical properties among these compounds some of them may interact with materials commonly used in field and laboratory studies like tubes, filters, or sample bottles. The aim of our experiment was to study the interaction between those materials and an aqueous solution of 43 widely detected basic, neutral, and acidic organic micropollutants hereby covering a broad range of polarities. Experiments with materials were conducted as a batch study using spiked tap water and for different syringe filters by filtration with subsequent fraction collection. The best recoveries over a wide range of organic compounds were observed for batches in contact with the following materials (in descending order) acryl glass, PTFE, HDPE, and PP. The use of Pharmed©, silicone, NBR70, Tygon©, and LDPE should be avoided. Flexible tubing materials especially influence many of the investigated compounds here. Filtration with most of the tested filter types leads to no significant loss of almost all of the investigated micropollutants. Nonetheless, significant mass losses of some compounds (loratadine, fluoxetine, sertraline, and diuron) were observed during the first mL of the filtration process. No systematic correlation between compound properties, tested materials, and ob-served mass losses could be identified in this study. The behavior of each compound is specific and thus, not predictable. It is therefore suggested to study the interaction of compounds with filters and material prior to the actual experiment or include blank studies.

  17. Electrodialysis field test for selective chloride removal from the chemical recovery cycle of a kraft pulp mill

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, H.J.; Pfromm, P.H.

    1998-12-01

    Chloride accumulation is a serious issue in the kraft pulping process. Chloride can be selectively removed from dissolved electrostatic precipitator dust (ESP dust) in the kraft chemical recovery cycle by electrodialysis with monovalent-selective anion-exchange membranes. In a pilot-scale field test, this process was investigated (total run time, 750 h). The test was performed at about 3.5% of full scale. The process showed outstanding performance and no significant membrane fouling. In feed-and-bleed operation, chloride removal levels of 94% and 61% were tested. The energy consumption for electrodialysis is low (120 kWh per metric ton of chloride removed at a 63% chloride removal level). The process performed very well even with no feed pretreatment, polarity reversal, or membrane cleaning.

  18. Effects of introducing energy recovery processes to the municipal solid waste management system in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Toshiki, Kosuke; Giang, Pham Quy; Serrona, Kevin Roy B; Sekikawa, Takahiro; Yu, Jeoung-soo; Choijil, Baasandash; Kunikane, Shoichi

    2015-02-01

    Currently, most developing countries have not set up municipal solid waste management systems with a view of recovering energy from waste or reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In this article, we have studied the possible effects of introducing three energy recovery processes either as a single or combination approach, refuse derived fuel production, incineration and waste power generation, and methane gas recovery from landfill and power generation in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, as a case study. We concluded that incineration process is the most suitable as first introduction of energy recovery. To operate it efficiently, 3Rs strategies need to be promoted. And then, RDF production which is made of waste papers and plastics in high level of sorting may be considered as the second step of energy recovery. However, safety control and marketability of RDF will be required at that moment. PMID:25662253

  19. Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. ); Vidal, J.M. ); Sippel, M.A. ); Ballard, J.R. ); Coover, D.M. Jr. ); Bloxsom, W.E. )

    1993-09-01

    An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

  20. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, Lawrence S.; Felter, Thomas E.; Talin, Alec; Ohlberg, Douglas; Fox, Ciaran; Han, Sung

    1999-01-01

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/.mu.m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 .mu.m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceeded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material.

  1. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, L.S.; Felter, T.E.; Talin, A.; Ohlberg, D.; Fox, C.; Han, S.

    1999-01-12

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/{micro}m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 {micro}m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material. 2 figs.

  2. TECHNOLOGICAL OVERVIEW REPORTS FOR EIGHT SHALE OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the document is to supply background information for evaluation of environmental impacts and pollution control technologies in connection with oil shale development. Six surface retorting processes selected for characterization were: (1) Union Oil Retort B, (2) Par...

  3. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1990-12-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  4. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  5. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  6. Process for enhancing recovery of oil from oil-bearing earth formations

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.M.; Butler, J.R.

    1984-04-03

    A process is claimed for increasing recovery of oil from oil-bearing earth formations wherein H/sub 2/S from sour wellhead gas is oxidized to SO/sub 3/ which in turn is reacted with a petroleum hydrocarbon mixture to produce a petroleum sulfonate. The petroleum sulfonate is incorporated into an oil recovery enhancing fluid and introduced through an injection well into an oil-bearing earth formation to displace oil toward a production well.

  7. Spectral analysis of creep recovery process in finemet type amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juríková, A.; Csach, K.; Ocelík, V.; Miškuf, J.; Bengus, V. Z.

    2002-01-01

    The creep recovery process in Finemet type amorphous alloy has been analyzed using the method for calculating the relaxation time spectra. The influence of structural relaxation and temperature on the spectra shape has been studied. The creep recovery spectrum of the anelastic deformation of the multicomponent Fe-Nb-Cu-Si-B amorphous alloy seems to be more complex in comparison with standard amorphous alloys.

  8. Avoiding total reduced sulfur (TRS) emissions from sodium sulfite pulping recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, J.C.; Sell, N.J. ); Ciriacks, J.C. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports that one of the current trends in paper-making with cellulose pulping is the use of high-yield processes. With yields greater than 65%, these processes include mechanical pulps (groundwood and thermomechanical pulps or TMP), and semichemical types (chemi-TMP or CTMP). Groundwood and TMP make up about 10% of North American pulp production. Semichemical pulp makes up about 7% and is mostly used for corrugating medium. High-yield pulping for linerboard, particularly using the alkaline sulfite process, is also likely to be used in the future. High-yield pulping is based primarily on the sulfite process using mostly sodium-based chemicals. A disadvantage of this process is the unavailability of a recovery system for the inorganic pulping chemicals. Generally, mills have not accepted any particular recovery system for this process. For this and other reasons, sulfite processes constitute only 3-4% of the total North American pulp production. If high-yield processes continue to increase in popularity, a sodium sulfite chemical recovery system will be needed. A number of chemical recovery systems have been developed in the past 30 years for sodium-based sulfite pulping processes, with most of the mills successfully using this process located in Scandinavia.

  9. Heat recovery/thermal energy storage for energy conservation in food processing

    SciTech Connect

    Combes, R.S.; Boykin, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    Based on energy consumption data compiled for 1974, 59% of the total energy consumed in the US food processing industry was thermal energy. The energy-consuming processes which utilize this thermal energy reject significant quantities of waste heat, usually to the atmosphere or to the wastewater discharged from the plant. Design considerations for waste heat recovery systems in the food processing industry are discussed. A systematic analysis of the waste heat source, in terms of quantity and quality is explored. Other aspects of the waste heat source, such as contamination, are addressed as potential impediments to practical heat recovery. The characteristics of the recipient process which will utilize the recovered waste heat are discussed. Thermal energy storage, which can be used as a means of allowing the waste eat recovery process to operate independent of the subsequent utilization of the recovered energy, is discussed. The project included the design, installation and monitoring of two heat recovery systems in a Gold Kist broiler processing plant. These systems recover waste heat from a poultry scalder overflow (heated wastewater) and from a refrigeration condenser utilizing ammonia as the refrigerant. The performance and economic viability of the heat recovery systems are presented.

  10. Temperature model for process impact non-uniformity in genipin recovery by high pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Ramos-de-la-Peña, Ana Mayela; Montañez, Julio C; Reyes-Vega, María de la Luz; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-15

    A model for the process impact temperature non-uniformity during high pressure processing (HPP) of genipap fruit purees was found during genipin recovery. Purees were subjected to HPP (130-530 MPa) under quasi-isobaric non-isothermal conditions (15 min; 0, 4.6 and 9.3mg pectinases/g fruit). Genipin and protein concentration was determined, and pH was measured. Polygalacturonase activity was quantified indirectly by protein content (mg/g fruit). First order kinetics described temperature changes (0-4 min). Polygalacturonase was activated at 130 MPa, inactivated reversibly at 330 MPa and activated again at 530 MPa. Enzyme reaction rate constant (k) was placed in the 0-4 min model and temperature from 2 to 15 min was described. Protein content and pH characterization in terms of decimal reduction time improved highly the 2-15 min model. Since temperature changes were modeled, more insight of its behavior in an HPP reactor was obtained, avoiding uniformity assumptions, making easier the industrial scale HPP implementation. PMID:25977049

  11. Recovery in rubble fields: long-term impacts of blast fishing.

    PubMed

    Fox, Helen E; Pet, Jos S; Dahuri, Rokhmin; Caldwell, Roy L

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents initial results from a study of factors that inhibit or enhance hard coral recovery in rubble fields created by blast fishing in Komodo National Park and Bunaken National Park, Indonesia. Within nine sites monitored since 1998, there was no significant natural recovery. Levels of potential source coral larvae were assessed with settlement tiles in the rubble fields and in nearby high coral cover sites. Rubble movement was measured and shown to be detrimental to small scleractinians, especially in high current areas. In shallow water (2-6 m deep), rubble is often overgrown by soft corals and corallimorpharians, which inhibit hard coral survival. There is increased scleractinian recruitment in quadrats cleared of soft coral, and Acropora nubbins transplanted into soft coral fields suffer greater mortality than those transplanted above the soft coral canopy. Gaining an understanding of the prognosis for coral recovery is essential not only in order to assess the long-term impacts of blast fishing, but also to improve management decisions about protection of intact reefs and potential restoration of damaged areas. PMID:12907196

  12. Marsh dieback, loss, and recovery mapped with satellite optical, airborne polarimetric radar, and field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W., III; Rangoonwala, Amina; Chi, Zhaohui; Jones, Cathleen E.; Bannister, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper and Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite based optical sensors, NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle synthetic aperture radar (UAVSAR) polarimetric SAR (PolSAR), and field data captured the occurrence and the recovery of an undetected dieback that occurred between the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in the Spartina alterniflora marshes of coastal Louisiana. Field measurements recorded the dramatic biomass decrease from 2010 to 2011 and a biomass recovery in 2012 dominated by a decrease of live biomass, and the loss of marsh as part of the dieback event. Based on an established relationship, the near-infrared/red vegetation index (VI) and site-specific measurements delineated a contiguous expanse of marsh dieback encompassing 6649.9 ha of 18,292.3 ha of S. alterniflora marshes within the study region. PolSAR data were transformed to variables used in biophysical mapping, and of this variable suite, the cross-polarization HV (horizontal send and vertical receive) backscatter was the best single indicator of marsh dieback and recovery. HV backscatter exhibited substantial and significant changes over the dieback and recovery period, tracked measured biomass changes, and significantly correlated with the live/dead biomass ratio. Within the context of regional trends, both HV and VI indicators started higher in pre-dieback marshes and exhibited substantially and statistically higher variability from year to year than that exhibited in the non-dieback marshes. That distinct difference allowed the capturing of the S. alterniflora marsh dieback and recovery; however, these changes were incorporated in a regional trend exhibiting similar but more subtle biomass composition changes.

  13. Operation of a new sewage treatment process with technologies of excess sludge reduction and phosphorus recovery.

    PubMed

    Saktaywin, W; Tsuno, H; Nagare, H; Soyama, T

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows the potential application of a new sewage treatment process with technologies of excess sludge reduction and phosphorus recovery. The process incorporated ozonation for excess sludge reduction and crystallisation process for phosphorus recovery to a conventional anaerobic/oxic (A/O) phosphorus removal process. A lab-scale continuous operation experiment was conducted with the ratio of sludge flow rate to ozonation tank of 1.1% of sewage inflow under 30 to 40 mgO3/gSS of ozone consumption and with sludge wasting ratio of 0.34% (one-fifth of a conventional A/O process). Throughout the operational experiment, a 60% reduction of excess sludge production was achieved in the new process. A biomass concentration of 2300 mg/L was maintained, and the accumulation of inactive biomass was not observed. The new process was estimated to give a phosphorus recovery degree of more than 70% as an advantage of excess sludge reduction. The slight increase in effluent COD was observed, but the process performance was maintained at a satisfactory level. These facts demonstrate an effectiveness of the new process for excess sludge reduction as well as for phosphorus recovery. PMID:16889258

  14. Recovery of Plutonium from Refractory Residues Using a Sodium Peroxide Pretreatment Process

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    2003-10-23

    The recycle of plutonium from refractory residues is a necessary activity for the nuclear weapon production complex. Traditionally, high-fired plutonium oxide (PuO2) was leached from the residue matrix using a nitric acid/fluoride dissolving flowsheet. The recovery operations were time consuming and often required multiple contacts with fresh dissolving solution to reduce the plutonium concentration to levels where residual solids could be discarded. Due to these drawbacks, the development of an efficient process for the recovery of plutonium from refractory materials is desirable. To address this need, a pretreatment process was developed. The development program utilized a series of small-scale experiments to optimize processing conditions for the fusion process and demonstrate the plutonium recovery efficiency using ceramic materials developed as potential long-term storage forms for PuO2 and an incinerator ash from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) as te st materials.

  15. Fluid diversion and sweep improvement with chemical gels in oil recovery processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.; Martin, F.D.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to identify the mechanisms by which gel treatments divert fluids in reservoirs and to establish where and how gel treatments are best applied. Several different types of gelants were examined, including polymer-based gelants, a monomer-based gelant, and a colloidal-silica gelant. This research was directed at gel applications in water injection wells, in production wells, and in high-pressure gas floods. The work examined how the flow properties of gels and gelling agents are influenced by permeability, lithology, and wettability. Other goals included determining the proper placement of gelants, the stability of in-place gels, and the types of gels required for the various oil recovery processes and for different scales of reservoir heterogeneity. During this three-year project, a number of theoretical analyses were performed to determine where gel treatments are expected to work best and where they are not expected to be effective. The most important, predictions from these analyses are presented. Undoubtedly, some of these predictions will be controversial. However, they do provide a starting point in establishing guidelines for the selection of field candidates for gel treatments. A logical next step is to seek field data that either confirm or contradict these predictions. The experimental work focused on four types of gels: (1) resorcinol-formaldehyde, (2) colloidal silica, (3) Cr{sup 3+}(chloride)-xanthan, and (4) Cr{sup 3+}(acetate)-polyacrylamide. All experiments were performed at 41{degrees}C.

  16. A combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Jensen, M.P.

    1996-03-01

    A new solvent extraction process for the simultaneous extraction of cesium and strontium from acidic nitrate media is described. This process uses a solvent formulation comprised of 0.05 M di-t-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6), 0.1 M Crown 100{prime} (a proprietary, cesium-selective derivative of dibenzo-18-crown-6), 1.2 M tributyl phosphate (TBP), and 5% (v/v) lauryl nitrile in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. Distribution ratios for cesium and strontium from 4 M nitric acid are 4.13 and 3.46, respectively. A benchtop batch countercurrent extraction experiment indicates that >98% of the cesium and strontium initially present in the feed solution can be removed in only four extraction stages. Through proper choice of extraction and strip conditions, extracted cesium and strontium can be recovered either together or individually.

  17. Use of membranes for ethylene recovery in polymerization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dembicki, D.R.; Coan, F.L.; Glassford, C.L.; Overman, D.C.

    1986-11-18

    This patent describes an improved process for manufacture of ethylene polymers wherein the improvement comprises: (a) contacting at least part of the gas mixture remaining after polymerization containing unconverted ethylene monomer with a normally solid, semi-permeable, asymmetric, water-dry, cellulose triacetate hollow fiber membrane at conditions which promote selective permeation of ethylene through the membrane; and (b) recycling the ethylene-enriched permeate as feed for the ethylene polymerization.

  18. Flotation process for sludge recovery and energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, G.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes a process for offshore sewage treatment comprising: () separating sewage into a watery effluent and a sludge; (b) placing the sludge in flexible buoyant balloon storage tanks for anaerobic digestion; (c) recovering and drying methane produced from the sludge during the digestion; (d) transferring the sludge to drying barges; (e) drying the sludge; and (f) supplying the watery effluent to surrounding seaweed farms as a nutrient.

  19. High pressure process for recovery of sulphur from gases

    SciTech Connect

    Jagodzinski, R.F.; Kerr, R.K.

    1981-07-28

    A process is provided for producing elemental sulphur from a hydrogen sulphide and sulphur dioxide containing gas stream by a claus type of catalytic reaction. The process is based on the discovery that the conventional claus catalyst, in the presence of liquid sulphur and at pressures considerably greater than one atmosphere, is significantly active toward the claus catalytic reaction. Thus, in accordance with the invention, increasing the pressure of the reaction in the presence of liquid sulphur increases both the catalytic activity and the elemental sulphur conversion. The process involves introducing a compressed hydrogen sulphide and sulphur dioxide containing gas stream into a catalytic reactor and reacting the gases in a claus catalyst bed in the reactor to produce elemental sulphur under conditions of temperature and pressure such that water in the reactor exists only as water vapor and sulphur vapor is condensed in the catalyst bed, being removed therefrom as a liquid. The pressure within the reactor is preferably between 5 and 50 atmospheres absolute.

  20. Exploring scalar field dynamics with Gaussian processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Remya; Jhingan, Sanjay; Jain, Deepak E-mail: sanjay.jhingan@gmail.com

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe remains an unsolved mystery in Cosmology. In this work we consider a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) Universe with non-relativistic matter and a single scalar field contributing to the energy density of the Universe. Properties of this scalar field, like potential, kinetic energy, equation of state etc. are reconstructed from Supernovae and BAO data using Gaussian processes. We also reconstruct energy conditions and kinematic variables of expansion, such as the jerk and the slow roll parameter. We find that the reconstructed scalar field variables and the kinematic quantities are consistent with a flat ΛCDM Universe. Further, we find that the null energy condition is satisfied for the redshift range of the Supernovae data considered in the paper, but the strong energy condition is violated.

  1. Process and apparatus for recovery of fissionable materials from spent reactor fuel by anodic dissolution

    DOEpatents

    Tomczuk, Zygmunt; Miller, William E.; Wolson, Raymond D.; Gay, Eddie C.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent metal clad fuel pins is disclosed. The process uses secondary reactions between U.sup.+4 cations and elemental uranium at the anode to increase reaction rates and improve anodic efficiency compared to prior art processes. In another embodiment of the process, secondary reactions between Cd.sup.+2 cations and elemental uranium to form uranium cations and elemental cadmium also assists in oxidizing the uranium at the anode.

  2. An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H.

    2008-07-01

    Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

  3. Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, H.C.; Williams, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

  4. Exploring the Personal Reality of Disability and Recovery: A Tool for Empowering the Rehabilitation Process

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Ashley E.; Saint-Louis, Nicole; Burke, Janice P.; Stineman, Margaret G.

    2010-01-01

    People experiencing disability and chronic disease often feel powerless, relinquishing medical control to “more knowledgeable” professionals. This article presents qualitative and quantitative results from three individual patients experiencing an emerging procedure called Recovery Preference Exploration (RPE). To inspire greater patient involvement, self-direction, and individual choice, we instructed participants to create an imagined recovery path, exposing recovery preferences while learning about clinical rehabilitation concepts. Results uncovered important values and feelings about disability, providing a richer context for patient evaluation and treatment goal modification. Applying mixed methods, RPE is presented as an explanatory process for quantifying recovery preferences in a way that stimulates rich narrative of how people see different types of disabilities. RPE shows promise for increasing depth of discussions among patients, family, and clinicians. RPE may promote greater quality of life through patient empowerment by directed learning, increased communication, and enhanced self-knowledge. PMID:18174538

  5. VOLATILE CHLORIDE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF METAL VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Hanley, W.R.

    1959-01-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium, iron, and aluminum from centain shale type ores which contain uranium in minute quantities. The ore is heated wiih a chlorinating agent. such as chlorine, to form a volatilized stream of metal chlorides. The chloride stream is then passed through granular alumina which preferentially absorbs the volatile uranium chloride and from which the uranium may later be recovered. The remaining volatilized chlorides, chiefly those of iron and aluminum, are further treated to recover chlorine gas for recycle, and to recover ferric oxide and aluminum oxide as valuable by-products.

  6. Process for recovery of palladium from nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, David O.; Buxton, Samuel R.

    1981-01-01

    Palladium is selectively removed from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing waste by adding sugar to a strong nitric acid solution of the waste to partially denitrate the solution and cause formation of an insoluble palladium compound. The process includes the steps of: (a) adjusting the nitric acid content of the starting solution to about 10 M, (b) adding 50% sucrose solution in an amount sufficient to effect the precipitation of the palladium compound, (c) heating the solution at reflux temperature until precipitation is complete, and (d) centrifuging the solution to separate the precipitated palladium compound from the supernatant liquid.

  7. Process for recovery of palladium from nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, D.O.; Buxton, S.R.

    1980-06-16

    Palladium is selectively removed from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing waste by adding sugar to a strong nitric acid solution of the waste to partially denitrate the solution and cause formation of an insoluble palladium compound. The process includes the steps of: (a) adjusting the nitric acid content of the starting solution to about 10 M; (b) adding 50% sucrose solution in an amount sufficient to effect the precipitation of the palladium compound; (c) heating the solution at reflux temperature until precipitation is complete; and (d) centrifuging the solution to separate the precipitated palladium compound from the supernatant liquid.

  8. Orbit determination and gravity field recovery from tracking data to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Andrea; Baur, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), launched in 2009, is well suited for the estimation of the long wavelengths of the lunar gravity field due to its low altitude of 50 km. Further, the orbit of LRO was polar for two years providing global coverage. The satellite has been primarily tracked via S-band (mainly two-way Doppler range-rates and two-way radiometric ranges) from the dedicated station in White Sands and from the Universal Space Network (USN). Due to the onboard altimeter the orbital precision requirement in the radial direction was rigorously defined as 1m. Because simulation studies before LRO's launch showed that this precision could not be reached with S-band observations alone, it was decided to additionally track LRO via optical laser ranges. It is worthwhile to point out that LRO is the first spacecraft in interplanetary space routinely tracked with optical one-way laser ranges. Gravity field recovery from orbit perturbations is intrinsically related to precise orbit determination. This is why considerable effort was made to find the optimum settings for orbit modeling. For a time span of three months we conducted a series of orbit overlapping tests based on Doppler observations to find the optimum arc length and the optimum set of empirical parameters. The analysis of observation residuals and orbit overlap differences showed that the estimated orbits are most precise when subdividing the time span into 2.5 days and estimating one constant empirical acceleration in along track direction. These settings were then used to analyze 13 months of Doppler data to LRO. The processing of the optical one-way laser was difficult due to the involvement of two non-synchronous clocks in one measurement (one clock at the ground station and one clock onboard LRO). The NASA software GEODYN, which was used for orbit determination and parameter estimation, models the LRO clock using a drift rate (first-order term) and an aging rate (second-order term). It seems

  9. Yttrium recovery from primary and secondary sources: a review of main hydrometallurgical processes.

    PubMed

    Innocenzi, Valentina; De Michelis, Ida; Kopacek, Bernd; Vegliò, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    Yttrium is important rare earths (REs) used in numerous fields, mainly in the phosphor powders for low-energy lighting. The uses of these elements, especially for high-tech products are increased in recent years and combined with the scarcity of the resources and the environmental impact of the technologies to extract them from ores make the recycling waste, that contain Y and other RE, a priority. The present review summarized the main hydrometallurgical technologies to extract Y from ores, contaminated solutions, WEEE and generic wastes. Before to discuss the works about the treatment of wastes, the processes to retrieval Y from ores are discussed, since the processes are similar and derived from those already developed for the extraction from primary sources. Particular attention was given to the recovery of Y from WEEE because the recycle of them is important not only for economical point of view, considering its value, but also for environmental impact that this could be generated if not properly disposal. PMID:24613592

  10. Process and apparatus for recovery of oil from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, J.C.

    1982-11-30

    A crude oil product is extracted from a tar sand by first crushing the tar sand as mined and then fine grinding the crushed material in a grinding mill in the presence of a cleansing liquid, such as an aqueous solution of a caustic. The resulting slurry is passed into suitable extractor-classifier equipment, such as that shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,814,336, in which a body of cleansing liquid is maintained. Agitation of the slurry in such maintained body of cleansing liquid substantially completes removal of the bituminous matter from the sand, and the resulting crude oil and cleansing liquid phase is discharged separately from the sand solid phase. The liquid phase is treated for the removal of residual sand particles and for the separation of residual cleansing liquid from the crude oil. The cleansing liquid so recovered is recycled and the crude oil is passed to further processing or for use as such.

  11. PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF URANIUM DEPOSITS

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J.M.; Kamen, M.D.

    1958-10-14

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from UCl/sub 4/ deposits formed on calutrons. Such deposits are removed from the calutron parts by an aqueous wash solution which then contains the uranium values in addition to the following impurities: Ni, Cu, Fe, and Cr. This impurity bearing wash solution is treated with an oxidizing agent, and the oxidized solution is then treated with ammonia in order to precipitate the uranium as ammonium diuranate. The metal impurities of iron and chromium, which form insoluble hydroxides, are precipitated along with the uranium values. The precipitate is separated from the solution, dissolved in acid, and the solution again treated with ammonia and ammonium carbonate, which results in the precipitation of the metal impurities as hydroxides while the uranium values remain in solution.

  12. A Practical Approach for Studying Fouling Process in Li-Recovery Pilot Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M.; Yoon, H.; Eom, C.; Kim, B.; Chung, K.

    2011-12-01

    The efficiency of selective ion recovery such as lithium from seawater has been major interest of previous studies. However, the characterization of adsorption behavior as well as dissolution yield as discharging environmentally problematic chemical species must carefully studied in various conditions including different seawater conditions [1]. Marine biofouling communities are complex, highly dynamic ecosystems consisting of a diverse range of organisms. The development of such communities begins with bacterial attachment followed by the colonization of higher organisms such as invertebrate larvae and algal spores [2-3]. Monitoring and field studies regarding fouling problems during operation of Li-recovery pilot plant which is designed by the Korea Institute of Geoscience & Mineral Resources (KIGAM) were major concern of this study. We examined fouling process for the duration of exposure time in real marine environment. Substrated with no-antifouling treated material and antifouling treated material were exposed and tested for different behaviors toward fouling in ocean. SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope-Energy dispersive Spectroscopy) analysis was done for surface identification of specific elements for possible dissolution during seawater exposure. To identify organic compound was used GC-MS (Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometer) analysis. Experiment results, organisms such as alga are fouled the most on 30 days and antitreated material is fouled less than non antitreated material. Operating Li-recovery pilot plant to sea, we need to consider in order to effectively and economically resolve the fouling problem. Acknowledgement : This research was supported by the national research project titled "The Development of Technology for Extraction of Resources Dissolved in Seawater" of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) funded by the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs. References [1] M. Y. Diego, K. Soren, and D. J. Kim

  13. Progress in the development of the reverse osmosis process for spacecraft wash water recovery.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecoraro, J. N.; Podall, H. E.; Spurlock, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Research work on ambient- and pasteurization-temperature reverse osmosis processes for wash water recovery in a spacecraft environment is reviewed, and the advantages and drawbacks of each are noted. A key requirement in each case is to provide a membrane of appropriate stability and semipermeability. Reverse osmosis systems intended for such use must also take into account the specific limitations and requirements imposed by the small volume of water to be processed and the high water recovery desired. The incorporation of advanced high-temperature membranes into specially designed modules is discussed.

  14. Novel Process for Removal and Recovery of Vapor Phase Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwell, Collin; Roberts, Daryl L; Albiston, Jason; Stewart, Robin; Broderick, Tom

    1998-03-09

    We demonstrated in the Phase I program all key attributes of a new technology for removing mercury from flue gases, namely, a) removal of greater than 95% of both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury, both in the laboratory and in the field b) regenerability of the sorbent c) ability to scale up, and d) favorable economics. The Phase I program consisted of four tasks other than project reporting: Task I-1 Screen Sorbent Configurations in the Laboratory Task I-2 Design and Fabricate Bench-Scale Equipment Task I-3 Test Bench-Scale Equipment on Pilot Combustor Task I-4 Evaluate Economics Based on Bench-Scale Results In Task I-1, we demonstrated that the sorbents are thermally durable and are regenerable through at least 55 cycles of mercury uptake and desorption. We also demonstrated two low-pressure- drop configurations of the sorbent, namely, a particulate form and a monolithic form. We showed that the particulate form of the sorbent would take up 100% of the mercury so long as the residence time in a bed of the sorbent exceeded 0.1 seconds. In principle, the particulate form of the sorbent could be imbedded in the back side of a higher temperature bag filter in a full-scale application. With typical bag face velocities of four feet per minute, the thickness of the particulate layer would need to be about 2000 microns to accomplish the uptake of the mercury. For heat transfer efficiency, however, we believed the monolithic form of the sorbent would be the more practical in a full scale application. Therefore, we purchased commercially-available metallic monoliths and applied the sorbent to the inside of the flow channels of the monoliths. At face velocities we tested (up to 1.5 ft/sec), these monoliths had less than 0.05 inches of water pressure drop. We tested the monolithic form of the sorbent through 21 cycles of mercury sorption and desorption in the laboratory and included a test of simultaneous uptake of both mercury and mercuric chloride. Overall, in Task

  15. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  16. Near Field Environment Process Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Wagner

    2000-11-14

    Waste emplacement and activities associated with construction of a repository system potentially will change environmental conditions within the repository system. These environmental changes principally result from heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, which elevates temperatures within the repository system. Elevated temperatures affect distribution of water, increase kinetic rates of geochemical processes, and cause stresses to change in magnitude and orientation from the stresses resulting from the overlying rock and from underground construction activities. The recognition of this evolving environment has been reflected in activities, studies and discussions generally associated with what has been termed the Near-Field Environment (NFE). The NFE interacts directly with waste packages and engineered barriers as well as potentially changing the fluid composition and flow conditions within the mountain. As such, the NFE defines the environment for assessing the performance of a potential Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The NFe evolves over time, and therefore is not amenable to direct characterization or measurement in the ambient system. Analysis or assessment of the NFE must rely upon projections based on tests and models that encompass the long-term processes of the evolution of this environment. This NFE Process Model Report (PMR) describes the analyses and modeling based on current understanding of the evolution of the near-field within the rock mass extending outward from the drift wall.

  17. Physical processes at high field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the radiation produced by the high field interaction with the rare gases have revealed the presence of both copious harmonic production and fluorescence. The highest harmonic observed was the seventeenth (14.6 rm) in Ne, the shortest wavelength ever produced by that means. Strong fluorescence was seen in Ar, Kr, and Xe with the shortest wavelengths observed being below 10 nm. Furthermore, radiation from inner-shell excited configurations in Xe, specifically the 4d/sup 9/5s5p ..-->.. 4d/sup 10/5s manifold at approx. 17.7 nm, was detected. The behaviors of the rare gases with respect to multiquantum ionization, harmonic production, and fluorescence were found to be correlated so that the materials fell into two groups, He and Ne in one and Ar, Kr, and Xe in the other. These experimental findings, in alliance with other studies on inner-shell decay processes, give evidence for a role of atomic correlations in a direct nonlinear process of inner-shell excitation. It is expected that an understanding of these high-field processes will enable the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 59 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Processing and damage recovery of intrinsic self-healing glass fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordo, Federica; Michaud, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    Glass fiber reinforced composites with a self-healing, supramolecular hybrid network matrix were produced using a modified vacuum assisted resin infusion moulding process adapted to high temperature processing. The quality and fiber volume fraction (50%) of the obtained materials were assessed through microscopy and matrix burn-off methods. The thermo-mechanical properties were quantified by means of dynamic mechanical analysis, revealing very high damping properties compared to traditional epoxy-based glass fiber reinforced composites. Self-healing properties were assessed by three-point bending tests. A high recovery of the flexural properties, around 72% for the elastic modulus and 65% of the maximum flexural stress, was achieved after a resting period of 24 h at room temperature. Recovery after low velocity impact events was also visually observed. Applications for this intrinsic and autonomic self-healing highly reinforced composite material point towards semi-structural applications where high damping and/or integrity recovery after impact are required.

  19. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 78, quarter ending March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report presents descriptions of various research projects and field projects concerned with the enhanced recovery of petroleum. Contract numbers, principal investigators, company names, and project management information is included.

  20. Selective recovery of palladium from waste printed circuit boards by a novel non-acid process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2014-08-30

    An environmental benign, non-acid process was successfully developed for selective recovery of palladium from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs). In the process, palladium was firstly enriched during copper recovery procedure and dissolved in a special solution made of CuSO4 and NaCl. The dissolved palladium was then extracted by diisoamyl sulfide (S201). It was found that 99.4% of Pd(II) could be extracted from the solution under the optimum conditions (10% S201, A/O ratio 5 and 2min extraction). In the whole extraction process, the influence of base metals was negligible due to the relatively weak nucleophilic substitution of S201 with base metal irons and the strong steric hindrance of S201 molecular. Around 99.5% of the extracted Pd(II) could be stripped from S201/dodecane with 0.1mol/L NH3 after a two-stage stripping at A/O ratio of 1. The total recovery percentage of palladium was 96.9% during the dissolution-extraction-stripping process. Therefore, this study established a benign and effective process for selective recovery of palladium from waste printed circuit boards. PMID:25037000

  1. ARISTOTELES: A European approach for an Earth gravity field recovery mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, R.; Faulks, H.; Langemann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Under contract of the European Space Agency a system study for a spaceborne gravity field recovery mission was performed, covering as a secondary mission objective geodetic point positioning in the cm range as well. It was demonstrated that under the given programmatic constraints including dual launch and a very tight development schedule, a six months gravity field mission in a 200 km near polar, dawn-dusk orbit is adequate to determine gravity anomalies to better than 5 mgal with a spatial resolution of 100 x 100 km half wavelength. This will enable scientists to determine improved spherical harmonic coefficients of the Earth gravity field equation to the order and degree of 180 or better.

  2. A study of secondary recovery possibilities of the Hogshooter field, Washington County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, I. William; Thigpen, Claude H.; Ginter, Roy L.; Alden, George P.

    1945-01-01

    The Hogshooter field, located in east central Washington County, Oklahoma, was first developed during the period 1906 to 1913. The field was extended later during the period 1918 to 1922. The principal producing horizon is the Bartlesville sand, found at an average depth of 1,150 feet. To January 1, 1944, the Bartlesville sand has produced 7,566,000 barrels of oil from 5,610 productive acres and 871 oil wells. Peak production, averaging 2,025 barrels per day for the year, was attained in the year 1910. The accumulation of oil in the Bartlesville sand is not related to structure. The total recovery from the Bartlesville sand in the Hogshooter field to January 1, 1944, is estimated to represent 10.3 per cent of the original oil in place, and the total residual oil is estimated to average 11,776 barrels per acre. Widespread application of vacuum, started in 1915, has had little beneficial effect on production. Some gas-repressuring in recent years has increased recovery to a small extent. Conservatively estimated water-flood recovery possibilities are: 3,500 barrels per acre for an area consisting of 1,393 acres (4,875,000 barrels total) with a reasonable profit at the present price of crude oil, and 2,500 barrels per acre for an area of 2,248 acres (5,620,000 barrels total), with no profit indicated under existing conditions. The latter area would show a profit equal to the first-mentioned area only with an increase in price of crude oil of forty-five cents per barrel. Subsurface waters at depths of 1,400 to 1,700 feet are indicated as a satisfactory source for use in water-flooding operations.

  3. Acoustic field positioning for containerless processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The noncontact positioning of materials in a space processing chamber is accomplished using a new type of acoustic levitator. Liquid and solid materials are positioned using a single source of sound. Fine control of position may be obtained by motion of an acoustical reflector. The electrical power required is usually less than 100 watts. The system operates satisfactorily at high and low temperatures and is adaptable as an 'add-on' feature to existing space experiments. Containerless melting and solidification can be performed and a freely suspended liquid can be shaped to the contour of the sound field. Experiments are described in which aluminum, glass and plastic materials are melted and solidified in the containerless state. The system has applications to containerless crystal growth, melting and related processes.

  4. Simple functionalization strategies for enhancing nanoparticle separation and recovery with asymmetric flow field flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mudalige, Thilak K; Qu, Haiou; Sánchez-Pomales, Germarie; Sisco, Patrick N; Linder, Sean W

    2015-02-01

    Due to the increasing use of engineered nanomaterials in consumer products, regulatory agencies and other research organizations have determined that the development of robust, reliable, and accurate methodologies to characterize nanoparticles in complex matrices is a top priority. Of particular interest are methods that can separate and determine the size of nanomaterials in samples that contain polydisperse and/or multimodal nanoparticle populations. Asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation (AF4) has shown promise for the separation of nanoparticles with wide size range distributions; however, low analyte recoveries and decreased membrane lifetimes, due to membrane fouling, have limited its application. Herein, we report straightforward strategies to minimize membrane fouling and improve nanoparticle recovery by functionalizing the surface of the nanoparticles, as well as that of the AF4 membranes. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) were stabilized through functionalization with a phosphine molecule, whereas the surface of the membranes was coated with a negatively charged polystyrenesulfonate polymer. Improved nanoparticle separation, recoveries of 99.1 (±0.5) %, and a detection limit of 6 μg/kg were demonstrated by analyzing AuNP reference materials of different sizes (e.g., 10, 30, and 60 nm), obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Furthermore, the stability of the polymer coating and its specificity toward minimizing membrane fouling were demonstrated. PMID:25556296

  5. The Application Of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery On Unconventional Oil: A Field Specific Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Sean; Millar, Andrew; Allison, Heather; McCarthy, Alan

    2014-05-01

    A substantial amount of the world's recoverable oil reserves are made from unconventional or heavy resources. However, great difficulty has been had in recovering this oil after primary and secondary recovery methods have been employed. Therefore, tertiary methods such as microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) have been employed. MEOR involves the use of bacteria and their metabolic products to alter the oil properties or rock permeability within a reservoir in order to promote the flow of oil. Although MEOR has been trialed in the past with mixed outcomes, its feasibility on heavier oils has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to show that MEOR can be successfully applied to unconventional oils. By using an indigenous strain of bacteria isolated from a reservoir of interest and applied to field specific microcosms, we will look into the effect of these bacteria compared to variant inoculums to identify which mechanisms of action the bacteria are using to improve recovery. Using this information, we will be able to identify genes of interest and groups of bacteria that may be beneficial for MEOR and look accurately identify favorable bacteria within a reservoir.

  6. Feasibility study of enhanced oil recovery for fields in decline. Export trade information (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The report, generated by Scientific Software-Intercomp, Inc. for Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos, documents the results of a feasibility study which addressed the viability of developing petroleum areas in Bolivia. The primary objective of the project was to describe the reservoirs that have been discovered and their reserves, describe which would be the best alternatives for development of these reservoirs, and to determine the best alternatives for development of all the reserves together. The report, volume 4 of 4, concerns the feasibility of enhancing the oil or condensate recovery from a chosen group of fields (Yapacani, Humberto Suarez Roca, Vibora, La Pena, San Roque, and Camiri).

  7. Fluid diversion and sweep improvement with chemical gels in oil recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, F.S.; Martin, F.D.

    1991-04-01

    The objectives of this project are to identify the mechanisms by which gel treatments divert fluids in reservoirs and to establish where and how gel treatments are best applied. Several different types of gelants are being examined. This research is directed at gel applications in water injection wells, in production wells, and in high-pressure gas floods. The work will establish how the flow properties of gels and gelling agents are influenced by permeability, lithology, and wettability. Other goals include determining the proper placement of gelants, the stability of in-place gels, and the types of gels required for the various oil recovery processes and for different scales of reservoir heterogeneity. This report describes progress made during the first year of this three-year study the following tasks: gel screening studies; impact of gelation pH, rock permeability, and lithology on the performance of a monomer-based gel; preliminary study of the permeability reduction for CO{sub 2} and water using a resorcinol-formaldehyde gel; preliminary study of permeability reduction for oil and water using a resorcinol-formaldehyde gel; rheology of Cr(III)-xanthan gel and gelants in porous media; impact of diffusion, dispersion, and viscous fingering on gel placement in injection wells; examination of flow-profile changes for field applications of gel treatments in injection wells; and placement of gels in production wells. Papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  8. Sulfur recovery process including removal of residual sulfur from Claus catalyst after regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Cabanaw, B.E.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur. It comprises: passing an acid gas feedstream having as a sulfur species essentially only hydrogen sulfide therein to a Claus plant comprising a thermal conversion zone and at least one Claus catalytic reaction zone operated under adsorption conditions including temperature for forming and depositing a preponderance of sulfur formed on catalyst therein.

  9. 78 FR 22451 - Cost Recovery for Permit Processing, Administration, and Enforcement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Parts 701, 736, 737, 738, and 750 RIN 1029-AC65 Cost Recovery for Permit Processing, Administration, and Enforcement Correction In proposed...

  10. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.