Science.gov

Sample records for rectal administration

  1. Effect of Rectal Levodopa Administration: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vogelzang, Jolanda M.J.; Luinstra, Marianne; Rutgers, A. Wijnand F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this report is to discuss whether or not rectal levodopa administration is useful in some situations. Background In situations where oral intake of levodopa formulations is not possible, the treatment options of Parkinson's disease patients are limited. The literature describes no or low rectal absorption of levodopa. Case Description A patient with an ileus was unable to take oral medication. After consulting the neurologist and pharmacist, the surgeon decided to describe a rectal formulation of levodopa/carbidopa (100/25 mg) once daily. On day 3 of the therapy, 1 h after administration of the rectal formulation of levodopa/carbidopa, a blood sample was drawn. The patient was unable to take his other Parkinson medication; therefore the dose of the rectal levodopa/carbidopa was increased to 5 times a day. Results Full control of the symptoms was not achieved, but alleviation of the most severe tremor and rigidity was seen, which was confirmed by the neurologist, nurses and patient. The levodopa concentration detected was 17 nmol/l. Compared to levodopa concentrations described in the literature (1,400-12,000 nmol/l), the concentration is very low. There are some possible explanations for the low concentration detected. The presence of a specific amino acid transport system in the rectum is not known, which could lead to no or reduced absorption. The poor rectal absorption of carbidopa leads to a higher conversion of levodopa to dopamine peripherally. Conclusions In situations where patients are unable to take oral medication, rectal administration of levodopa/carbidopa is worth considering. PMID:26600784

  2. Rectal and sublingual administration of tacrolimus: a single-dose pharmacokinetic study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Stifft, Frank; Vanmolkot, Floris; Scheffers, Ingrid; van Bortel, Luc; Neef, Cees; Christiaans, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Aims The immunosuppressant tacrolimus is usually administered orally. When this is not feasible, other routes of administration may be useful. Previous research suggested that tacrolimus may be applied sublingually or rectally. Pharmacokinetic data are sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the pharmacokinetics of these alternative formulations with orally administered tacrolimus. Methods Three single, fixed-dose formulations of tacrolimus were administered in a random sequence in 18 healthy subjects, using a cross-over study design. For sublingual administration, 3?mg of powder obtained from oral capsules was applied under the tongue for a period of 15?min without swallowing, with mouth rinsing afterwards. For rectal administration, a suppository containing 15?mg of the oral powder was used. Oral administration consisted of 7?mg of instant-release tacrolimus capsules (Prograf). Main pharmacokinetic outcome parameters were compared by anova. Results Sublingual administration showed no clinically significant exposure, contrary to rectal administration, where all subjects had clinically relevant exposure, with a lower relative bioavailability (78%), a lower maximal blood concentration and a later time of maximal blood concentration compared with oral administration. Conclusions Sublingual administration of a single dose of tacrolimus does not result in systemic exposure if care is taken not to swallow saliva and to rinse the oral cavity afterwards. Rectal administration of tacrolimus results in clinically relevant systemic exposure and might represent an alternative formulation in case oral administration is not feasible. When used as a topical agent, systemic side-effects should be considered. PMID:24809233

  3. School Nurses' Experience with Administration of Rectal Diazepam Gel for Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Christine; O'Hara, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine school nurses' knowledge of state and school district policies, their experience regarding the administration of rectal diazepam gel in the school, and the perceived benefits and barriers of providing this treatment. Four hundred nineteen nurses responded to a survey conducted during the National…

  4. Posttherapeutic change in portal-systemic circulation investigated by T1-201 per-rectal administration

    SciTech Connect

    Tonami, N.; Nakajima, K.; Watanabe, N.; Yokoyama, K.; Seto, M.; Seki, H.; Koizumi, K.; Hisada, K.; Kanai, M.; Hinoue, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A noninvasive method of T1-201 per-rectal administration was performed in patients with esophageal varices to investigate the changes of portal-systemic circulation after treatment. One mCi of T1-201 chloride was given rectally and scintigram and heart/liver uptake ratio at 60 min. after administration (H/L) were investigated before and after sclerosing therapy of esophageal varices by direct injection of ethanolamine oleate under endoscopic guidance (9 patients, 13 cases) and splenic artery emobilization therapy with gelatin sponge block (6 patients). The mean value of H/L was decreased from 1.22 +- 0.21 to 0.96 +- 0.34 in 9 cases who underwent successful varices sclerosing therapy (p<0.05) and marked decrease of H/L and scintigraphic change were observed in 2 cases, but there were 7 cases showing no or a little change, while in 4 cases of unsuccessful sclerosing therapy, H/L was not significantly changed. The mean value of H/L was decreased from 1.15 +- 0.26 to 0.84 +- 0.27 in 6 patients who underwent splenic artery embolization therapy (p<0.005) but there was no significant correlation between H/L change rate and embolization volume of spleen. From these results, the authors understand that portal-systematic shunting greatly depends on esophageal varices in cases showing highly decreased H/L after sclerosing therapy and does not much depend on esophageal varices in cases showing no or a little change in H/L. This method seems to be useful in evaluating pathophysiological changes in portal-systemic shunting by treatments of portal circulation.

  5. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePLUS

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  6. Diazepam Rectal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a gel to instill rectally using a prefilled syringe with a special plastic tip. Follow the directions ... cannot fall. Remove the protective cover from the syringe by pushing it up with your thumb and ...

  7. Clearance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection in calves by rectal administration of bovine lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Kieckens, E; Rybarczyk, J; De Zutter, L; Duchateau, L; Vanrompay, D; Cox, E

    2015-03-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains, of which E. coli O157:H7 is the best-studied serotype, are an important group of foodborne pathogens causing severe illness in humans worldwide. The main reservoirs for EHEC are ruminants, mostly cattle, which harbor the bacteria in their intestinal tracts without showing clinical symptoms. In this study, we used bovine lactoferrin, a natural occurring bactericidal and immunomodulating protein, as an antibacterial agent against EHEC infection in cattle. Nine 3-month-old Holstein-Friesian calves were experimentally infected with EHEC (strain NCTC12900). Three animals received a daily rectal spray treatment with bovine lactoferrin, three animals received an oral treatment, and three animals served as a control group. Blood samples were collected weekly and fecal samples twice weekly to monitor antibody responses and fecal excretion, respectively. Animals in the rectal group ceased shedding within 26 days of the experimental treatment and remained negative. This beneficial effect of bovine lactoferrin was not observed in the oral group, where animals were still shedding at the time of euthanasia (day 61). All groups developed serum responses, but no clear differences could be observed between the groups. However, the results indicate that the use of bovine lactoferrin as a rectal treatment can be a useful strategy to preclude further transmission of EHEC infections from cattle to humans. PMID:25527551

  8. Rectal lymphoscintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, L.; Salfi, R.; Meraviglia, F.; Mazzeo, F.

    1984-06-01

    Regional lymph nodes of the rectum are not demonstrable by pedal lymphoscintigraphy. The authors have evaluated the technique of rectal lymphoscintigraphy, using a technique similar to that which has been used in the assessment of lymph nodes in breast and prostatic cancer. Thirty-five patients were studied: ten normal subjects and 25 patients with rectal cancer. In normal subjects, the lymph nodes accompanying the superior hemorrhoidal artery and the inferior mesenteric artery are demonstrable in succession; after three hours the aortic lymph nodes are demonstrable. The 25 patients with rectal cancer underwent resection of their primary tumor and the stage was defined according to Dukes (1932). In five patients (stage A) no alteration was demonstrable. In 11 patients (stage B) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed vs. the control group. In nine cases (stage C) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed and defective versus the control group.

  9. Changes of portal systemic shunting after sclerotherapy and/or partial splenic embolization observed by thallium-201 per rectal administration

    SciTech Connect

    Tonami, N.; Nakajima, K.; Kawabata, S.; Watanabe, N.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Tanaka, N.; Kobayashi, K.

    1988-01-01

    Tl-201 per-rectal scintigraphy was performed before and after injection sclerotherapy of esophageal varices and/or partial splenic embolization in patients with esophageal varices to observe the changes of portal systemic shunting by these treatments. The changes in the heart-to-liver uptake ratio of Tl-201 after injection sclerotherapy ranged widely from a decrease to an increase with a mean change rate (mean of the absolute value of change rate) and one standard deviation of 19.0 +/- 19.9%. By partial splenic embolization the heart-to-liver uptake ratio was decreased significantly with the mean change rate and one standard deviation of 26.2 +/- 17.4% (P less than .05). This noninvasive and simple method seems to be useful in evaluating pathophysiological changes of portal systemic shunting observed from inferior mesenteric vein blood flow after treatments of portal circulation system.

  10. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  11. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePLUS

    A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower rectum. The doctor uses a gloved, lubricated finger to ... or other changes of the prostate gland. A digital rectal exam may be done to collect stool ...

  12. Changes of portal systemic shunting after sclerotherapy and/or partial splenic embolization observed by Tl-201 per-rectal administration

    SciTech Connect

    Tonami, N.; Nakajima, K.; Kawabata, S.; Watanabe, N.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Tanaka, N.; Kobayashi, K.

    1988-01-01

    Tl-201 per-rectal scintigraphy was performed before and after injection sclerotherapy of esophageal varices and/or partial splenic embolization in patients with esophageal varices to observe the changes of portal systemic shunting by these treatments. The changes in the heart-to-liver uptake ratio of Tl-201 after injection sclerotherapy ranged widely from a decrease to an increase with the mean change rate (mean of the absolute value of change rate) +/- 1 SD of 19.0% +/- 19.9%. By partial splenic embolization the heart-to-live uptake ratio was decreased significantly with the mean change rate +/- 1 SD of 26.2% +/- 17.4% (P less than 0.05). This noninvasive and simple method seems to be useful in evaluating pathophysiological changes of portal systemic shunting observed from inferior mesenteric vein blood flow after treatments of portal circulation system.

  13. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  14. Pentobarbital Oral and Rectal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as a capsule and liquid to take by mouth and as a suppository to be used rectally. ... Grisactin), medications for depression or seizures, metronidazole (Flagyl), oral contraceptives, propranolol (Inderal), quinidine, rifampin, sedatives, sleeping pills, ...

  15. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  16. Rectal motility and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tukker, J J; de Blaey, C J; Charbon, G A

    1984-07-01

    The contractile activity of the canine rectal wall exhibits a positive influence on the behaviour of fatty suppositories in vivo with respect to both spreading abilities and rate and extent of release of the readily water-soluble compound phenazone. This influence on bio-availability was marked when the drug was suspended in a large particle size (100-125 µm). When used in small particles (< 35µm), far less influence of contractile activity was found. Small particles were equivalent to coarse particles with respect to the bioavailability. The addition of colloidal silicium oxide has a marked influence on spreading and bioavailability. Enhanced rectal motility exhibits an influence on the absorption only when a coarse fraction of the drug is suspended. It was concluded that rectal motility might be a cause of variation in bioavailability of drugs from rectal suppositories. For this reason only well-trained animals should be used when bioavailability of drugs from suppositories is tested in an animal model. PMID:24277287

  17. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; ?uczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; G?ówka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg?1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg?1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL?1 and 235.7 ng·mL?1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was slower after rectal than after intrathecal administration (t½= 5.50 versus 2.02 hours, respectively). Limitations This study reports two cases only, and there could be inter-patient variation. Conclusion Bupivacaine in boluses administered intrathecally (0.25%, 2 mL) provided effective, safe analgesia in advanced cancer patients. Bupivacaine enema (100 mg·100 mL?1) was shown to be a valuable option for control of end-of-life tenesmoid cancer pain. PMID:25336967

  18. [Traumatic rectal injuries].

    PubMed

    Steinman, E; Cunha, J C; Branco, P D; Bevilacqua, R G; Birolini, D

    1990-01-01

    The authors review the cases of traumatic rectal injuries admitted to the Emergency Service of the "Hospital das Clínicas", University of São Paulo Medical School, during the period of July 1981 to July 1988. Forty-five patients (62.5%) had their injuries due to gunshot, 14 (19.4%) due to foreign bodies on the rectum, 10 (13.8%) due to blunt trauma and 3 (4.1%) due to stab wounds. The intraperitoneal rectum was injured in 32 patients (44.4%) and extraperitoneal portion of the rectum in 40 patients (55.5%). On the intraperitoneal injuries the management adopted were simple suture (14 patients), associated with a colostomy (17 patients) and in one patient the Hartmann procedure was adopted. On the extraperitoneal wounds the management adopted were rectal repair (when feasible), colostomy, distal washout and drainage. The complications rate was 27.8%, and from them, the majority (70%) were related to infectious nature. Seven patients died (9.7%), four of them as a consequence of sepsis. The morbidity and mortality of the rectal injuries were closed related to infectious complications as a consequence of late diagnosis. For this reason, the authors consider that all efforts should be employed to establish the prompt diagnosis. PMID:2099139

  19. Anorectal conditions: rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Fox, Audralan; Tietze, Pamela H; Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan

    2014-04-01

    Rectal prolapse, the protrusion of the layers of the rectal wall through the anal canal, may be partial (mucosal) or complete (full thickness). Although prolapse is most common among older women, it affects individuals of all ages, including children. Associated fecal incontinence and constipation are typical. Urinary incontinence and uterovaginal/bladder prolapse also may coexist. Some patients may have rectal ulcers. Diagnosis is predominantly clinical; visualization of the prolapse may require the patient to strain while sitting or squatting. Imaging studies, including fluoroscopic or dynamic magnetic resonance defecography, can confirm the prolapse if the diagnosis is uncertain, and endoscopy can aid in detecting other colonic/extracolonic pathology. Nonsurgical management (eg, increased fiber intake, fiber supplements, biofeedback) often is therapeutic in minor (first- or second-degree) mucosal prolapse and can help alleviate constipation and incontinence before and after surgery for patients with full-thickness prolapse. However, for full-thickness prolapse, transabdominal procedures are the most effective management and are favored for healthy patients, irrespective of age. Perineal procedures (eg, rubber band ligation, mucosal excision) can be used for patients with full-thickness prolapse who are not candidates for transabdominal surgery and for those with second- and third-degree mucosal prolapse. PMID:24742085

  20. Rectal fluconazole for tinea capitis

    PubMed Central

    Pernica, Jeffrey M; Dayneka, Natalie; Hui, Charles PS

    2009-01-01

    The present report describes a case of tinea capitis in a boy with autistic spectrum disorder and an aversion to oral medications. He refused weekly oral fluconazole and there was a poor response to daily rectal griseofulvin. He tolerated once-weekly rectal fluconazole (10 mg/kg) well and there was an excellent clinical outcome. PMID:21037831

  1. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rectal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the rectum. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the rectum or to other ...

  2. Presentations of Localized Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Rectal Cancer: Advanced Technologies Chris Willett, M.D. Department of Radiation Oncology Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC Gastric Intergroup 0116: RT Considerations 35% of initially submitted RT plans: Major deviations (2/3 undertreatment) 2

  3. Proctoclysis: emergency rectal fluid infusion.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Vincent

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of proctoclysis (rectal fluid infusion) in providing fluid resuscitation in the absence of intravenous access in rural and remote environments. PMID:19856644

  4. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental. PMID:23584263

  5. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A rectal dilator is a device designed to dilate the anal sphincter and canal when the size of the anal opening may interfere with its function or the passage of an examining instrument. (b)...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A rectal dilator is a device designed to dilate the anal sphincter and canal when the size of the anal opening may interfere with its function or the passage of an examining instrument. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A rectal dilator is a device designed to dilate the anal sphincter and canal when the size of the anal opening may interfere with its function or the passage of an examining instrument. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A rectal dilator is a device designed to dilate the anal sphincter and canal when the size of the anal opening may interfere with its function or the passage of an examining instrument. (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A rectal dilator is a device designed to dilate the anal sphincter and canal when the size of the anal opening may interfere with its function or the passage of an examining instrument. (b)...

  10. [Anterior rectal duplication. Value of ultrasonic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Tréguier, C; Montagne, C; Gandon, Y; Langanay, T; Frémond, B; Babut, J M; Carsin, M

    1990-01-01

    A case of neonatal anterior rectal duplication is reported. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a prerectal cystic mass. The different types of rectal duplications and the main differential diagnosis are described. Mechanical obstruction and neoplastic risk make early surgery necessary. PMID:2181959

  11. Administration

    Cancer.gov

    Overview The Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR) Administrative team is responsible for the support of all staff and operational requirements for the laboratory.  With approximately 50 staff members to support this team covers a wide breadth of

  12. Rectal duplication with sciatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Nosek, Marzena; Golonka, Anna; Kali?ska-Lipert, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Rectal duplications represent 5% of all duplications in the alimentary tract, and they are very rarely diagnosed during the neonatal period. The authors present the method of investigation and the results of surgical treatment of a full-term neonate with a sciatic hernia containing a rectal duplication. The procedure started with three-port laparoscopy, but excision of the tubular duplication of the rectum was possible only by a transanal endorectal pull-through approach. The sciatic hernia was closed, and plastic sutures on the buttock finished the procedure. The coincidence of sciatic hernia with rectal duplication is extremely rare, and the method of treatment depends exclusively on the anatomical conditions. PMID:26240629

  13. Neural control of shark rectal gland.

    PubMed

    Stoff, J S; Silva, P; Lechan, R; Solomon, R; Epstein, F H

    1988-08-01

    Veratrum alkaloids stimulated salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of Squalus acanthias. Stimulation by veratrine was prevented by the nerve channel blockers tetrodotoxin and procaine and was not evident in a preparation of dispersed rectal gland cells. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-like immunoreactivity was detected by histological techniques in neuronal tissue within the rectal gland. Veratrine stimulation caused the release of immunoreactive VIP into the venous effluent of perfused glands. The stimulatory action of veratrine was inhibited by somatostatin, another neuropeptide known to be present in nerves of Squalus rectal gland. These findings suggest the likelihood of neural modulation of rectal gland function. PMID:2900607

  14. Overview of Radiation Therapy for Treating Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    A major outcome of importance for rectal cancer is local control. Parallel to improvements in surgical technique, adjuvant therapy regimens have been tested in clinical trials in an effort to reduce the local recurrence rate. Nowadays, the local recurrence rate has been reduced because of both good surgical techniques and the addition of radiotherapy. Based on recent reports in the literature, preoperative chemoradiotherapy is now considered the standard of care for patients with stages II and III rectal cancer. Also, short-course radiotherapy appears to provide effective local control and the same overall survival as more long-course chemoradiotherapy schedules and, therefore, may be an appropriate choice in some situations. Capecitabine is an acceptable alternative to infusion fluorouracil in those patients who are able to manage the responsibilities inherent in self-administered, oral chemotherapy. However, concurrent administration of oxaliplatin and radiotherapy is not recommended at this time. Radiation therapy has long been considered an important adjunct in the treatment of rectal cancer. Although no prospective data exist for several issues, we hope that in the near future, patients with rectal cancer can be treated by using the best combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy in near future. PMID:25210685

  15. Rectal microbicides: clinically relevant approach to the design of rectal specific placebo formulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to identify the critical formulation parameters controlling distribution and function for the rectal administration of microbicides in humans. Four placebo formulations were designed with a wide range of hydrophilic characteristics (aqueous to lipid) and rheological properties (Newtonian, shear thinning, thermal sensitive and thixotropic). Aqueous formulations using typical polymers to control viscosity were iso-osmotic and buffered to pH 7. Lipid formulations were developed from lipid solvent/lipid gelling agent binary mixtures. Testing included pharmaceutical function and stability as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity. Results The aqueous fluid placebo, based on poloxamer, was fluid at room temperature, thickened and became shear thinning at 37°C. The aqueous gel placebo used carbopol as the gelling agent, was shear thinning at room temperature and showed a typical decrease in viscosity with an increase in temperature. The lipid fluid placebo, myristyl myristate in isopropyl myristate, was relatively thin and temperature independent. The lipid gel placebo, glyceryl stearate and PEG-75 stearate in caprylic/capric triglycerides, was also shear thinning at both room temperature and 37°C but with significant time dependency or thixotropy. All formulations showed no rectal irritation in rabbits and were non-toxic using an ex vivo rectal explant model. Conclusions Four placebo formulations ranging from fluid to gel in aqueous and lipid formats with a range of rheological properties were developed, tested, scaled-up, manufactured under cGMP conditions and enrolled in a formal stability program. Clinical testing of these formulations as placebos will serve as the basis for further microbicide formulation development with drug-containing products. PMID:21385339

  16. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  17. Seminal Vesicle-Rectal Fistula Secondary to Anastomotic Leakage After Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer: A Case Report and Brief Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Masato; Hiraguri, Manabu; Maeda, Chika; Yoshiki, Mizukami; Horigome, Naoto; Kaneko, Gengo

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with seminal vesicle-rectal fistula, an extremely rare complication of low anterior resection of the rectum. A 53-year-old man with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent low anterior resection in our hospital. The patient experienced diarrhea, pneumaturia, and low-grade fever on postoperative day 13. A computed tomography scan showed emphysema in the right seminal vesicle. We concluded that anastomotic leakage induced a seminal vesicle-rectal fistula. The patient underwent conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and oral intake of metronidazole. Diarrhea and pneumaturia rapidly improved after metronidazole administration and the patient was successfully cured without invasive therapy such as colostomy or surgical drainage. A seminal vesicle-rectal fistula is a rare complication of low anterior resection, and therapeutic strategies for this condition remain elusive. Our report provides valuable information on the successful conservative treatment of a secondary seminal vesicle-rectal fistula that developed after low anterior resection of the rectum in a patient. PMID:24444264

  18. Müllerian Adenosarcoma Arising From Rectal Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunseok; Oh, Hoon Kyu

    2014-01-01

    A Müllerian adenosarcoma is an extremely rare tumor characterized by a stromal component of usually low-grade malignancy and by a benign glandular epithelial component. A Müllerian adenosarcoma occurs mainly in the uterus, but also in extrauterine locations. Extrauterine Müllerian adenosarcomas are thought to arise from endometriotic deposits. A 36-year-old female presented to Daegu Catholic University Medical Center with a symptom of loose stool for several months. The imaging studies revealed a rectal mass, so she underwent a laparoscopic low anterior resection. Although extemporary pathology revealed an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, the final histologic diagnosis was a Müllerian adenosarcoma arising from rectal endometriosis. To our knowledge, except a concomitant rectal villotubular adenoma, cases of Müllerian adenosarcomas arising the rectal wall are rare. An adenosarcoma arising from endometriosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pelvic mass, even one appearing in rectal wall, because ectopic endometrial tissue exists everywhere. PMID:25360431

  19. The emerging role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fakih, Marwan

    2014-01-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer remains a substantial public health problem. Historically, the disease has been plagued by high rates of both distant and local recurrences. The standardization of pre-operative chemoradiation and transmesorectal excision (TME) have greatly lowered the rates of local recurrence. Efforts to improve treatment through use of more effective radiosensitizing therapies have proven unsuccessful in rectal cancer. Presently, due to improved local therapies, distal recurrences represent the dominant problem in this disease. Adjuvant chemotherapy is currently of established benefit in colorectal cancer. As such, adjuvant chemotherapy, consisting of fluoropyrimidine and oxaliplatin, represent the standard of care for many patients. However, after pre-operative chemoradiotherapy and rectal surgery, the administration of highly effective chemotherapy regimens has proven difficult. For this reason, novel neoadjuvant approaches represent appealing avenues for investigation. Strategies of neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation and neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by chemotherapy are under investigation. Initial encouraging results have been noted, though definitive phase III data is lacking. PMID:25276409

  20. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5?cm. PMID:26290512

  1. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  2. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. Transanal endoscopic surgery in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Mora-Lopez, Laura; Alcantara-Moral, Manel; Caro-Tarrago, Aleidis; Gomez-Diaz, Carlos Javier; Navarro-Soto, Salvador

    2014-09-01

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for rectal cancer, but complications are frequent and rates of morbidity, mortality and genitourinary alterations are high. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) allows preservation of the anal sphincters and, via its vision system through a rectoscope, allows access to rectal tumors located as far as 20 cm from the anal verge. The capacity of local surgery to cure rectal cancer depends on the risk of lymph node invasion. This means that correct preoperative staging of the rectal tumor is necessary. Currently, local surgery is indicated for rectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas invading the submucosa, but not beyond (T1). Here we describe the standard technique for TEM, the different types of equipment used, and the technical limitations of this approach. TEM to remove rectal adenoma should be performed in the same way as if the lesion were an adenocarcinoma, due to the high percentage of infiltrating adenocarcinomas in these lesions. In spite of the generally good results with T1, some authors have published surprisingly high recurrence rates; this is due to the existence of two types of lesions, tumors with good and poor prognosis, divided according to histological and surgical factors. The standard treatment for rectal adenocarcinoma T2N0M0 is TME without adjuvant therapy. In this type of adenocarcinoma, local surgery obtains the best results when complete pathological response has been achieved with previous chemoradiotherapy. The results with chemoradiotherapy and TEM are encouraging, but the scientific evidence remains limited at present. PMID:25206260

  4. Screening paediatric rectal forms of azithromycin as an alternative to oral or injectable treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Gaudin, Karen; Gaubert, Alexandra; Ba, Boubakar; Tagliaferri, Serena; Fawaz, Fawaz; Fabre, Jean-Louis; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Lafarge, Xavier; White, Nicholas J.; Olliaro, Piero L.; Millet, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a candidate formulation for further development of a home or near-home administrable paediatric rectal form of a broad-spectrum antibiotic – specially intended for (emergency) use in tropical rural settings, in particular for children who cannot take medications orally and far from health facilities where injectable treatments can be given. Azithromycin, a broad-spectrum macrolide used orally or intravenously for the treatment of respiratory tract, skin and soft tissue infections, was selected because of its pharmacokinetic and therapeutic properties. Azithromycin in vitro solubility and stability in physiologically relevant conditions were studied. Various pharmaceutical forms, i.e. rectal suspension, two different rectal gels, polyethylene glycol (PEG) suppository and hard gelatin capsule (HGC) were assessed for in vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability in the rabbit. Azithromycin PEG suppository appears to be a promising candidate. PMID:22868232

  5. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-04

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  6. Comparison between Preoperative Rectal Diclofenac Plus Paracetamol and Diclofenac Alone for PostoperativePain of Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Samimi Sede, Saghar; Davari Tanha, Fateme; Valadan, Mehrnaz; Modaressi, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect whether the preoperative combined administration of rectal diclofenac and paracetamol is superior to placebo or rectal diclofenac alone for pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and methods: Ninety female patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I-II), scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy were recruited to this double blind trial and were randomized to receive one of three modalities before surgery: rectal combination of diclofenac and paracetamol, rectal diclofenac alone or rectal placebo alone which were given as a suppository one hour prior to surgery. The primary outcomes were visual analogue pain scores measured at 0, 0.5, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours after surgery and the time of first administration and also total amount of morphine used in the first 24 hour after surgery. A 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS ) was used to assess pain intensity at rest. Results: In patients receiving the combination of diclofenac and paracetamol total dose of morphine used in the first 24 hour after surgery was significantly lower (13.9 ± 2.7 mg) compared to diclofenac group (16.8± 2.8 mg) and placebo group (20.1 ± 3.6 mg) (p<0.05). VAS pain score was significantly lower in combination group compared to other groups all time during first 24 hours (p<0.05). There had been a significant difference between combination group and the two other groups in terms of the first request of morphine (p<0.05). Conclusion: According to our study Patients who receive the rectal diclofenac-paracetamol combination experience significantly a lower pain scale in the first 24 hour after surgery compared with patients receiving diclofenac or placebo alone. Their need to supplementary analgesic is significantly later and lower compared to placebo and diclofenac alone. PMID:25628716

  7. Increased rectal cell proliferation following alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Simanowski, U; Homann, N; Knuhl, M; Arce, L; Waldherr, R; Conradt, C; Bosch, F; Seitz, H

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Epidemiological data indicate an increased risk for rectal cancer following chronic alcohol consumption. As chronic ethanol ingestion leads to rectal hyperregeneration in experimental animals, indicating a state of increased susceptibility to carcinogens, we studied cell proliferation in alcohol abusers.?METHODS—Rectal biopsies were taken from 44 heavy drinkers and 26 controls. Cell proliferation, including proliferative compartment size, was measured by immunohistological staining for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki67, and by in situ hybridisation for histone H3. Quantification of cell proliferation using PCNA staining was evaluated in 27 alcohol abusers and 12 controls. In addition, immunohistology was performed for cytokeratins and gene products of Rb1, bcl-2, and p53.?RESULTS—Heavy drinking resulted in increased cell proliferation of the rectal mucosa, as shown by increased detection of different proliferation markers. However, cell differentiation regarding cytokeratin expression patterns was unchanged as well as regulatory factors involved in carcinogenesis and/or apoptosis.?CONCLUSION—Chronic alcohol abuse leads to rectal mucosal hyperproliferation in humans, a condition associated with an increased cancer risk.???Keywords: colorectal cancer; alcohol; rectal mucosa PMID:11511565

  8. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed.

  9. Benign rectal ulceration of unknown origin. An unusual cause of rectal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, E R; Whimster, W F

    1976-01-01

    An unusual progressive form of benign rectal ulceration was found in an infant who presented with repeated episodes of rectal bleeding. The ulceration failed to respond to medical treatment but was cured by anterior resection of the rectum. The aetiology is not known. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1083214

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF CAPSAICIN-SENSITIVE RECTAL MECHANORECEPTORS ACTIVATED BY RECTAL DISTENSION IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, N. J.; Kerrin, A.; Singer, C. A.; Hennig, G. W.; Gerthoffer, W. T.; McDonnell, O.

    2015-01-01

    Rodents detect visceral pain in response to noxious levels of rectal distension. However, the mechanoreceptors that innervate the rectum and respond to noxious levels of rectal distension have not been identified. Here, we have identified the mechanoreceptors of capsaicin-sensitive rectal afferents and characterized their properties in response to circumferential stretch of the rectal wall. We have also used the lethal spotted (ls/ls) mouse to determine whether rectal mechanoreceptors that respond to capsaicin and stretch may also develop in an aganglionic rectum that is congenitally devoid of enteric ganglia. In wild type (C57BL/6) mice, graded increases in circumferential stretch applied to isolated rectal segments activated a graded increase in firing of slowly-adapting rectal mechanoreceptors. Identical stimuli applied to the aganglionic rectum of ls/ls mice also activated similar graded increases in firing of stretch-sensitive rectal afferents. In both wild type and aganglionic rectal preparations, focal compression of the serosal surface using von Frey hairs identified mechanosensitive “hot spots,” that were associated with brief bursts of action potentials. Spritzing capsaicin (10 µM) selectively onto each identified mechanosensitive hot spot activated an all or none discharge of action potentials in 32 of 56 identified hot spots in wild type mice and 24 of 62 mechanosensitive hot spots in the aganglionic rectum of ls/ls mice. Each single unit activated by both capsaicin and circumferential stretch responded to low mechanical thresholds (1–2 g stretch). No high threshold rectal afferents were ever recorded in response to circumferential stretch. Anterograde labeling from recorded rectal afferents revealed two populations of capsaicin-sensitive mechanoreceptor that responded to stretch: one population terminated within myenteric ganglia, the other within the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers. In the aganglionic rectum of ls/ls mice, only the i.m. mechanoreceptors were identified. Both myenteric and i.m. mechanoreceptors could be identified by their immunoreactivity to the anti-TRPV1 antibody and the vesicular glutamate transporter, Vglut2. Myenteric mechanoreceptors had a unique morphology, consisting of smooth bulbous nodules that ramified within myenteric ganglia. In summary, the rectum of wild type mice is innervated by at least two populations of capsaicin-sensitive rectal mechanoreceptor, both of which respond to low mechanical thresholds within the innocuous range. These findings suggest that the visceral pain pathway activated by rectal distension is likely to involve low threshold rectal mechanoreceptors that are activated within the normal physiological range. PMID:18395992

  11. The Great Pretender: Rectal Syphilis Mimic a Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisani Ceretti, Andrea; Virdis, Matteo; Maroni, Nirvana; Arena, Monica; Masci, Enzo; Magenta, Alberto; Opocher, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Rectal syphilis is a rare expression of the widely recognised sexual transmitted disease, also known as the great imitator for its peculiarity of being confused with mild anorectal diseases because of its vague symptoms or believed rectal malignancy, with the concrete risk of overtreatment. We present the case of a male patient with primary rectal syphilis, firstly diagnosed as rectal cancer; the medical, radiological, and endoscopic features are discussed below. PMID:26451271

  12. Intestinal obstruction due to rectal endometriosis: a surgical enigma.

    PubMed

    Jarmin, Razman; Idris, Mohd Azim; Shaharuddin, Shaharin; Nadeson, Sukumar; Rashid, Lukman Mohd; Mustaffa, Wan Muhaizan Wan

    2006-07-01

    Obstructed rectal endometriosis is an uncommon presentation. The clinical and intraoperative presentation may present as malignant obstruction. The difficulty in making the diagnosis may delay the definitive management of the patient. We report a unique case of rectal endometriosis mimicking malignant rectal mass causing intestinal obstruction and discuss the management of the case. PMID:16877213

  13. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials. PMID:17957502

  14. Traumatic rectal hematoma following anal rape.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y M; Davis, M; Ott, D J

    1986-07-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year-old male prisoner with a traumatic rectal hematoma caused by anal rape. Barium enema showed a large rectal mass confirmed to be a hematoma by proctoscopic examination. Surgery was performed due to a falling hemoglobin level, and an 800-mL hematoma was evacuated. The patient became febrile following surgery, and computed tomography revealed a pelvic mass consistent with recurrent hematoma or abscess. Repeat surgery showed recurrent hematoma. The patient recovered uneventfully. PMID:3487997

  15. [Treatment Strategy for Stage ? Rectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yoshiyuki; Morohashi, Hajime; Yoshida, Eri; Kimura, Toshirou; Koyama, Motoi; Murata, Akihiko; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2015-10-01

    Eighteen consecutive patients who underwent rectal resection following preoperative chemotherapy for cStage ? rectal cancer at our institute, between 2009 and 2014, were retrospectively assessed. Preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6, SOX, XELOX, and other anticancer agents was administered to 8, 5, 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Combined moleculartargeted therapy was administered to 12 patients. The response evaluation showed that an antitumor effect was observed in 10 and 8 patients with local tumors who achieved a partial response(PR)and stable disease(SD), respectively, and in 9 and 9 patients with distant metastases who achieved a PR and SD, respectively. The operative procedures included high/low anterior resection(n=12), intersphincteric resection(n=2), and abdominoperineal resection/Hartmann's operation(n=4). An ileostomy was performed in 6 patients before chemotherapy. Postoperative complications occurred in 6 patients. Two patients with an ileostomy had anastomotic insufficiency, but recovered without reoperation. There was no significant difference in overall survival(p=0.382)when these patients were compared with 45 cStage ?rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery without preoperative chemotherapy. However, the rate of curability B was higher in patients who received preoperative chemotherapy(44.4%)compared to those who did not(26.7%). The results of this study are inconclusive and have not determined whether preoperative chemotherapy results in better long-term survival for cStage ? rectal cancer patients. However, preoperative chemotherapy might contribute to higher operative curability. PMID:26489583

  16. [Rectal cancer and adjuvant chemotherapy: which conclusions?].

    PubMed

    Bachet, J-B; Rougier, P; de Gramont, A; André, T

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rectum represents about a third of cases of colorectal cancer, with an annual incidence of 12,000 cases in France. On the contrary of colon cancer, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer has not been definitively proved, more because this question was assessed in few recent studies than because negative results. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is now the reference treatment for mid and lower rectal cancers, and allow to increase the local control without improvement of progression free survival and overall survival. The data of the "historical studies" of adjuvant treatment in rectal cancer published before 1990, of the meta-analysis of adjuvant trials in rectal cancer and of the QUASAR study suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (intravenous or oral), in absence of pre-operative treatment, decrease the risk of metastatic relapse after curative surgery for a rectal cancer of stage II or III. This benefice seems similar to the one observed in colon cancer. In the EORTC radiotherapy group trial 22921, an adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low dose of leucovorin was not associated with a significantly improvement of overall survival but, despite the fact that only 42.9% of patients received all planed cycles, the progression free survival was increased (not significantly) in groups receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The French recommendations are to discuss the indication of adjuvant chemotherapy by fluoropyrimidines in cases of stage III rectal cancer on histopathologic reports and no chemotherapy in case of stade II. Despite the fact that none study have assessed a combination of fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin in adjuvant setting in rectal cancer, like in colon cancer, the Folfox4, modified Folfox6 or Xelox regimens are valid options in stage III (experts opinion). In cases of pathologic complete remission or in absence of involved nodes, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy is not assessed. In all cases, the decision of adjuvant chemotherapy has to be taken during a multidisciplinary meeting. The interest of a combination of fluoropyrimidine and oxaliplatin is assessed in currently adjuvant trials (PETTAC-6 and CAO/ARO/AIO-04), and future trials will assess the interest of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:19965305

  17. RECTAL-SPECIFIC MICROBICIDE APPLICATOR: EVALUATION AND COMPARISON WITH A VAGINAL APPLICATOR USED RECTALLY

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Giguere, Rebecca; Dolezal, Curtis; Bauermeister, José; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Valladares, Juan; Rohan, Lisa C.; Anton, Peter A.; Cranston, Ross D.; Febo, Irma; Mayer, Kenneth; McGowan, Ian

    2014-01-01

    An applicator designed for rectal delivery of microbicides was tested for acceptability by 95 young men who have sex with men, who self-administered 4mL of placebo gel prior to receptive anal intercourse over 90 days. Subsequently, 24 of the participants self-administered rectally 4mL of tenofovir or placebo gel over 7 days using a vaginal applicator, and compared both applicators on a Likert scale of 1–10, with 10 the highest rating. Participants reported high likelihood to use either applicator in the future (mean scores 9.3 and 8.8 respectively, p= ns). Those who tested both liked the vaginal applicator significantly more than the rectal applicator (7.8 vs. 5.2, p=0.003). Improvements in portability, conspicuousness, aesthetics, tip comfort, product assembly and packaging were suggested for both. This rectal-specific applicator was not superior to a vaginal applicator. While likelihood of future use is reportedly high, factors that decrease acceptability may erode product use over time in clinical trials. Further attention is needed to develop user-friendly, quick-acting rectal microbicide delivery systems. PMID:24858481

  18. Failed stapled rectal resection in a constipated patient with rectal aganglionosis.

    PubMed

    Pescatori, Lorenzo C; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Pescatori, Mario

    2014-04-21

    A rare case of a severely constipated patient with rectal aganglionosis is herein reported. The patient, who had no megacolon/megarectum, underwent a STARR, i.e., stapled transanal rectal resection, for obstructed defecation, but her symptoms were not relieved. She started suffering from severe chronic proctalgia possibly due to peri-retained staples fibrosis. Intestinal transit times were normal and no megarectum/megacolon was found at barium enema. A diverting sigmoidostomy was then carried out, which was complicated by an early parastomal hernia, which affected stoma emptying. She also had a severe diverting proctitis, causing rectal bleeding, and still complained of both proctalgia and tenesmus. A deep rectal biopsy under anesthesia showed no ganglia in the rectum, whereas ganglia were present and normal in the sigmoid at the stoma site. As she refused a Duhamel procedure, an intersphincteric rectal resection and a refashioning of the stoma was scheduled. This case report shows that a complete assessment of the potential causes of constipation should be carried out prior to any surgical procedure. PMID:24764689

  19. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  20. Current status of laparoscopy for the treatment of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shussman, Noam; Wexner, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Surgery for rectal cancer in complex and entails many challenges. While the laparoscopic approach in general and specific to colon cancer has been long proven to have short term benefits and to be oncologically safe, it is still a debatable topic for rectal cancer. The attempt to benefit rectal cancer patients with the known advantages of the laparoscopic approach while not compromising their oncologic outcome has led to the conduction of many studies during the past decade. Herein we describe our technique for laparoscopic proctectomy and assess the current literature dealing with short term outcomes, immediate oncologic measures (such as lymph node yield and specimen quality) and long term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. We also briefly evaluate the evolving issues of robotic assisted rectal cancer surgery and the current innovations and trends in the minimally invasive approach to rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25386061

  1. Current status of laparoscopy for the treatment of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shussman, Noam; Wexner, Steven D

    2014-11-01

    Surgery for rectal cancer in complex and entails many challenges. While the laparoscopic approach in general and specific to colon cancer has been long proven to have short term benefits and to be oncologically safe, it is still a debatable topic for rectal cancer. The attempt to benefit rectal cancer patients with the known advantages of the laparoscopic approach while not compromising their oncologic outcome has led to the conduction of many studies during the past decade. Herein we describe our technique for laparoscopic proctectomy and assess the current literature dealing with short term outcomes, immediate oncologic measures (such as lymph node yield and specimen quality) and long term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. We also briefly evaluate the evolving issues of robotic assisted rectal cancer surgery and the current innovations and trends in the minimally invasive approach to rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25386061

  2. Intramedullary Spinal Cord Metastasis From Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kyung Ho; Yi, Seong Yoon; Jung, Joo Hyuk; Kang, Seung Hee; Choi, Pyong Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis (ISCM) is an uncommon condition of the central nervous system (CNS) cause by systemic malignant tumors. Most ISCM cases are known to occur in patients with lung cancer and breast cancer; however, ISCM also very rarely occurs in patients with colorectal cancer. For the first time in Korea, we experienced a case of ISCM arising from rectal cancer, where a 75-year-old man presented with an abruptly-developed left-foot drop and numbness in both legs. The patient had lung metastases from rectal cancer that had been treated with chemotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intramedullary nodular lesion at the T12 level. ISCM was diagnosed and treated with steroids and radiotherapy. The patient's neurological symptoms were relieved for a while after treatment, but his condition deteriorated progressively. He died 4 months after ISCM had been diagnosed. PMID:25360432

  3. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Slater, A; Betts, M; Anderson, E M; Cunningham, C

    2016-02-01

    Since its introduction in the 1980s, total mesorectal excision (TME) has been the standard surgical technique for treating rectal cancer. This procedure involves removing the rectum and the surrounding envelope of fat along the plane of the mesorectal fascia. Resecting this embryological unit reduces the local recurrence rate by removing all local lymph nodes, including those with occult metastatic disease; however, this surgery is associated with mortality and morbidity. Complications include incontinence for patients given an anastomosis, long-term stoma formation, and sexual and bladder dysfunction. Local excision of rectal cancer using the transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) technique is associated with fewer complications, and therefore, is used as an alternative in specific circumstances. We outline the technique, its indications, imaging appearances and complications. PMID:26654131

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mai-Lan; Liu, Judy; Narra, Vamsidhar

    2008-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)is a useful modality for the evaluation of rectal cancer, providing superior anatomic/pathologic visualization when compared with endorectal ultrasound (EUS) and computed tomography (CT). Preoperative MRI is useful for tissue characterization and tumor staging, which determines the surgical approach and need for neoadjuvant/adjuvant therapy. Important prognostic factors include the circumferential resection margin (CRM), T and N stages, and extent of local invasion. Postoperative MRI to assess the extent of tumor recurrence enables early resection, which can greatly prolong survival. MRI criteria for local recurrence include T2 hyperintensity, early dynamic rim enhancement, and nodular morphology. Future research in MRI of rectal cancer is geared toward developing optimal imaging techniques including high-resolution MRI, whole-body scans, and parallel imaging; imaging of lymph nodes by MR lymphography; and response to therapy using diffusion/perfusion-weighted MR and functional imaging. PMID:20011416

  5. Transanal Evisceration Caused by Rectal Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Torres Sánchez, María Teresa; Richart Aznar, Jose Manuel; Martí Martínez, Eva María; Martínez-Abad, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Transrectal evisceration caused by colorectal injury is an unusual entity. This pathology is more frequent in elderly patients and it is usually produced spontaneously. Rectal prolapse is the principal predisposing factor. An 81-year-old woman was taken to the hospital presenting exit of intestinal loops through the anus. After first reanimation measures, an urgent surgery was indicated. We observed the absence of almost every small intestine loop in the abdominal cavity; these had been moved to the pelvis. After doing the reduction, a 3 to 4 cm linear craniocaudal perforation in upper rectum was objectified, and Hartmann's procedure was performed. We investigated and knew that she frequently manipulate herself to extract her faeces. The fast preoperative management avoided a fatal conclusion or an extensive intestinal resection. Reasons that make us consider rectal self-injury as the etiologic factor are explained. PMID:24639971

  6. Preinduction of anesthesia in children with rectally administered midazolam.

    PubMed

    Spear, R M; Yaster, M; Berkowitz, I D; Maxwell, L G; Bender, K S; Naclerio, R; Manolio, T A; Nichols, D G

    1991-04-01

    The authors evaluated the efficacy of rectally administered midazolam for preinduction (i.e., premedication/induction) of anesthesia in 67 pediatric patients, ASA physical status 1 or 2, undergoing a variety of elective surgical procedures. In phase 1, 41 children weighing 12 +/- 3 kg (range 7-20 kg) and 31 +/- 16 months (range 8-67 months) of age (mean +/- SD) received midazolam, 0.4-5.0 mg.kg-1, in an attempt to produce unconsciousness. Only one child lost consciousness (4.5 mg.kg-1). However, at all doses, inhalational induction of anesthesia was facilitated because children were tranquil and calmly separated from their parent(s). There were no clinically significant changes in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration, 10 min after drug administration. In phase 2, 26 children weighing 17 +/- 4 kg (range 10-26 kg) and 44 +/- 19 months (range 17-84 months) months of age undergoing tonsil and/or adenoid surgery were studied to determine the optimal sedative dose of rectally administered midazolam. Patients received 0.3, 1.0, 2.0, or 3.0 mg.kg-1 of midazolam in a randomized, double-blind fashion. One third (3 of 9) of patients receiving 0.3 mg.kg-1 struggled during mask induction. All patients receiving greater than or equal to 1.0 mg.kg-1 were adequately sedated (P less than 0.008). Discharge from the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), however, was delayed (greater than 60 min) in children receiving greater than or equal to 2.0 mg.kg-1 (P less than 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2008948

  7. Case report: Sigmoid strangulation from evisceration through a perforated rectal prolapse ulcer – An unusual complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer Z.; Kittmer, Tiffaney; Forbes, Shawn; Ruo, Leyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rectal prolapse occurs particularly in elder females and presentation can sometimes lead to complications such as strangulation and evisceration of other organs through the necrotic mucosa. Presentation of case This is a case of a 61 year-old female with rectal prolapse complicated by rectal perforation through which a segment of sigmoid colon eviscerated and became strangulated. This patient initially presented with sepsis requiring ICU admission, but fully recovered following a Hartmann’s procedure with a sacral rectopexy. Discussion Complications of rectal prolapse include incarceration, strangulation, and rarely, perforation with evisceration of other viscera requiring urgent operation. This report provides a brief overview of complications associated with rectal prolapse, reviews similar cases of transrectal evisceration, and discusses the management of chronic rectal prolapse. Conclusion Prompt surgical consult is warranted if any signs or symptoms suggestive of complications from prolapse are present. PMID:25680532

  8. Morphine modifies the cingulate-operculum network underlying painful rectal evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Lelic, D; Olesen, A E; Gregersen, H; Dahan, A; Kolesnikov, Y; Drewes, A M

    2014-02-01

    The effect of opioids on brain networks underlying rectal evoked potentials (EPs) has never been investigated. This study utilized brain source connectivity to explore whether morphine induced changes in brain networks underlying painful rectal EPs would reflect changes in pain scores due to morphine. Twenty healthy volunteers were included in this placebo-controlled cross-over study. Sensory and pain thresholds to electrically induced rectal stimulation were taken before (baseline) and 70 min after placebo/morphine (30 mg) administration. The stimulation intensity required to evoke moderate pain at baseline was employed for EPs. The pain score of this stimulation intensity was recorded again 70 min after placebo/morphine administration. 62-channel EPs were recorded for both arms. Amplitudes and latencies were analysed and brain source connectivity analysis was done. Changes in any of the parameters describing EPs were correlated to changes in subjective pain ratings. Morphine increased sensory and pain thresholds by 28.8% and 27.5% (P ? 0.02). The pain score corresponding to moderate pain at baseline was attenuated in both placebo and morphine arms by 14.5% and 37.5% (P < 0.05). There was a 33.9% reduction in EP amplitudes due to placebo (P < 0.05), whereas EP amplitudes remained stable due to morphine. A dominating cingulate-operculum network to rectal pain was seen. Cingulate source shifted anteriorly in the morphine arm (P < 0.001) and this shift was positively correlated to the change in the pain score (r = 0.6, P < 0.05). These findings indicate that visceral pain relief due to morphine is associated with reorganization within cingulate cortex, which may be used as a biomarker of opioid effects. PMID:24184388

  9. [Rare complications in surgically treated rectal and anal atresia with submucous pull-through of the rectal mucosa].

    PubMed

    von Bodmann, J; Hecker, W C

    1988-02-01

    Two rare complications after Rehbein's pull-through operation are reported. The first case is a four-year-old child producing at two times a urethral-rectal-muscle cuff fistula, the rectal muscle cuff being filled with urine. The second case deals with a now fourteen-year-old boy in whom a mucosa-regenerated rectal muscle cuff led to an enterogenous cyst of double fist size. PMID:3376596

  10. The pharmacokinetics of a single oral or rectal dose of concurrently administered isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    P Brock, A; Isaza, R; Egelund, E F; Hunter, R P; Peloquin, C A

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a disease of concern in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Treatment for tuberculosis in elephants utilizes multidrug protocols combining isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and/or ethambutol. In this study, a single, coformulated dose of isoniazid 5 mg/kg, rifampin 10 mg/kg, pyrazinamide 30 mg/kg, and ethambutol 30 mg/kg was administered orally to six Asian elephants, and rectally to five elephants using a cross-over design. Blood samples were collected serially over 24 h. Pyrazinamide and ethambutol concentrations were determined using validated gas chromatography assays. Isoniazid and rifampin concentrations were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography assays. Rectal isoniazid produced an earlier Tmax compared with oral administration. Oral isoniazid resulted in a comparatively lower Cmax , but higher AUC values compared with rectal isoniazid. Oral rifampin and oral ethambutol were well absorbed while rectal rifampin was not. Oral pyrazinamide produced comparatively higher Cmax and AUC values compared with rectal pyrazinamide. Results of this study indicate that currently recommended therapeutic monitoring sample collection times for rectal isoniazid and oral rifampin do not provide an accurate assessment of exposure for these drugs. This study demonstrates notable individual variability, indicating that dosing of these medications requires individual monitoring and provides additional information to guide the clinician when treating elephants. PMID:24684601

  11. Laparoscopic rectopexy in solitary rectal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Saeed; Salmanroughani, Hassan; Binesh, Fariba; Taghipoor, Shokoh; Kargar, Shady

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome (SRUS) come to a physician with passage of mucus and bloody liquid within defecation. The treatment for SRUS is depended to the severity of symptoms and the existance of rectal prolapse. This study is a report of the assessing of rectopexy as surgical modalities for 62 medical treatment resistant SRUS patients who were referred to the gastrointestinal department of Shahid Sadoughi Medical University and Mojibian hospital. The present non-randomized clinical trial was carried out in 62 SRUS patients from 1991 till 2005. In these patients SRUS was confirmed by histology. They were symptomatic after conservative therapy and referred for surgical intervention. All of them had been undergone abdominal rectopexy by two laparoscopic surgeons. In our study, rectal bleeding and history of digitalization had the highest and lowest frequency of symptoms and signs in our cases respectively. Abdominal rectopexy was done in 39 cases and complete recovery in our cases was 69.23%. Complete recovery rate in cases with dysplasia (63.8%) was significantly higher than cases without that (P=0.04). Complete recovery rate in cases that had finger defecation (85%) was significantly higher than cases without that (50%) (P=0.03). Laparoscopic rectopexy is one of the main surgical techniques for treatment of SRUS. This technique can present complete recovery for SRUS patients. Some of them include topical medications, behavior modification supplemented by fiber and biofeedback and surgery were more available and studied. But it seems that education of SRUS patient conservative treatment remain cornerstone in the SRUS management. PMID:22174170

  12. Current trends in staging rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Samee, Abdus; Selvasekar, Chelliah Ramachandran

    2011-02-21

    Management of rectal cancer has evolved over the years. In this condition preoperative investigations assist in deciding the optimal treatment. The relation of the tumor edge to the circumferential margin (CRM) is an important factor in deciding the need for neoadjuvant treatment and determines the prognosis. Those with threatened or involved margins are offered long course chemoradiation to enable R? surgical resection. Endoanal ultrasound (EUS) is useful for tumor (T) staging; hence EUS is a useful imaging modality for early rectal cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful for assessing the mesorectum and the mesorectal fascia which has useful prognostic significance and for early identification of local recurrence. Computerized tomography (CT) of the chest, abdomen and pelvis is used to rule out distant metastasis. Identification of the malignant nodes using EUS, CT and MRI is based on the size, morphology and internal characteristics but has drawbacks. Most of the common imaging techniques are suboptimal for imaging following chemoradiation as they struggle to differentiate fibrotic changes and tumor. In this situation, EUS and MRI may provide complementary information to decide further treatment. Functional imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) is useful, particularly PET/CT fusion scans to identify areas of the functionally hot spots. In the current state, imaging has enabled the multidisciplinary team of surgeons, oncologists, radiologists and pathologists to decide on the patient centered management of rectal cancer. In future, functional imaging may play an active role in identifying patients with lymph node metastasis and those with residual and recurrent disease following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. PMID:21412492

  13. [Robotic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gustavo; Alvarez, Fernando A; Mentz, Ricardo; Vaccaro, Carlos A; Im, Víctor; Quintana, Guillermo Ojea

    2013-06-01

    Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) has proven to be feasible and safe. However, it represents a major technical challenge, since it involves the dissection of the rectum in a confined space such as the bony pelvis using un-ergonomic surgical devices. This difficulty is accentuated in patients with distal tumors and high body mass index (BMI), in which the surgical margins and the hypogastric nerves may be affected. Therefore, robotic surgery aims to overcome these limitations that conspire against the mininvasive surgical approach of rectal cancer. We present an obese (BMI = 32 kg/m2) 82-year-old man with a history of smoking and prostate cancer that was recently diagnosed with a middle rectal adenocarcinoma at 9 cm from the anal verge. Rectal examination evidenced a mobile lesion. Computed tomography scan ruled out metastases and at the local staging by MRI, the tumor was considered as T3-N0 with free circumferential margins. Surgical treatment was decided and a hybrid technique was used combining an initial laparoscopic approach followed by the robotic TME. The patient had a full recovery and was discharged three days after surgery without complications. Pathological examination revealed a low-grade adenocarcinoma with mesorectal invasion, free circumferential and distal margins, and 24 negative lymph nodes (pT3-pN0-pM0/Stage II). Robotic TME was performed safely in an obese patient. It facilitated dissection maneuvers in a confined space with proper identification and preservation of the hypogastric nerves, allowing retrieving an intact mesorectum. Prospective randomized trials will define the role of this new technology. PMID:23940915

  14. Why Rectal Douches May Be Acceptable Rectal-Microbicide Delivery Vehicles for MSM

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Bauermeister, José; Ventuneac, Ana; Dolezal, Curtis; Mayer, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Rationale To explore age of onset of rectal douching among men who have sex with men (MSM) and reasons leading to and maintaining douching behavior; and to consider whether rectal douches containing microbicidal agents might be acceptable for men at HIV risk. Methods In Stage 1, we used qualitative methods to explore douching behavior in a sample of 20 MSM. Subsequently, we developed a structured questionnaire that was administered in Stage 2 to 105 MSM. Results More than half of participants who completed Stage 1 douched during the trial despite having been advised not to do so. Of the 105 HIV uninfected participants in Stage 2, 51% reported using rectal douches in the prior six months; 47% douched before and 25% after anal intercourse. Most participants reported douching frequently or always. On average, men reported douching about two hours prior to or one hour following intercourse. Average age of onset was late 20s. Most men who douched wanted to be clean or were encouraged to douche by their partners. Some men thought douching after sex could prevent STIs. Conclusion Rectal douching appears to be a popular behavior among men who have RAI. It is necessary to identify harmless douches. If HIV/STI preventive douches can be developed, rectal douching prior to or following sexual intercourse could become an important additional prevention tool. To reshape an existing behavior to which some men strongly adhere, like douching, by suggesting use of one type of douche over another may be more successful than trying to convince MSM to engage in behaviors they never practiced before or those they resist (e.g., condom use). PMID:19959973

  15. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatl?, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  16. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  17. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yuka; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Tadanobu; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer. PMID:26668568

  18. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Yuka; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Tadanobu; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer. PMID:26668568

  19. [Surgical correction of prostato-rectal fistulas].

    PubMed

    Bauer, H W; Sturm, W; Feifel, G

    1983-03-01

    A recto-prostatic fistula is a rare complication of prostatic operations and the literature on the subject is scanty. Three men were treated for recto-prostatic fistulas representing complications of prostatic surgery. York Masons trans-sphincteric trans-rectal operation resulted in prompt, primary healing of the fistula. Subsequent colostomy closure left all three patients with normal urinary and fecal control. A systematic 3-step sequence of operation is advocated for the treatment of recto-prostatic fistulas. The York Mason operation provides excellent exposure and reliable closure of recto-urinary fistulas. PMID:6190292

  20. Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer after Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boustani, J; Caubet, M; Bosset, J-F

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this overview was to investigate whether adjuvant chemotherapy has a favourable effect on the outcome of patients with rectal cancer who had preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. A review of randomised clinical trials that allocated patients between fluorouracil-based and observation or between fluorouracil-based and oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy was carried out, including their corresponding meta-analyses. None of the five randomised trials has shown a significant benefit of fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for overall survival or disease-free survival. Also, the three corresponding meta-analyses failed to show a benefit of adjuvant treatment. Of three randomised trials - two phase III and one phase II with a 3-year disease-free survival end point - two showed a small benefit of adding oxaliplatin to fluorouracil, one failed. The corresponding meta-analyses showed that the pooled difference was not significant. In conclusion, the use of postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy is not scientifically proven. PMID:26698026

  1. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  2. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  3. Approach of trans-rectal NIR optical tomography probing for the imaging of prostate with trans-rectal ultrasound correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Jiang, Zhen; Xu, Guan; Musgrove, Cameron; Bunting, Charles F.

    2008-02-01

    The trans-rectal implementation of NIR optical tomography makes it possible to assess functional status like hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in prostate non-invasively. Trans-rectal NIR tomography may provide tissue-specific functional contrast that is potentially valuable for differentiation of cancerous lesions from normal tissues. Such information will help to determine if a prostate biopsy is needed or can be excluded for an otherwise ambiguous lesion. The relatively low spatial resolution due to the diffuse light detection in trans-rectal NIR tomography, however, limits the accuracy of localizing a suspicious tissue volume. Trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) is the clinical standard for guiding the positioning of biopsy needle owing to its resolution and convenience; nevertheless, TRUS lacks the pathognomic specificity to guide biopsy to only the suspicious lesions. The combination of trans-rectal NIR tomography with TRUS could potentially give better differentiation of cancerous tissue from normal background and to accurately localize the cancer-suspicious contrast obtained from NIR tomography. This paper will demonstrate the design and initial evaluation of a trans-rectal NIR tomography probe that can conveniently integrate with a commercial TRUS transducer. The transrectal NIR tomography obtained from this probe is concurrent with TRUS at matching sagittal imaging plane. This design provides the flexibility of simple correlation of trans-rectal NIR with TRUS, and using TRUS anatomic information as spatial prior for NIR image reconstruction.

  4. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gene-hyuk; Kim, Kyung Ah; Hwang, Seong Su; Park, Soo Youn; Kim, Hyun A.; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Ji Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI. Methods We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2) of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI) and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Results All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471), while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI) was marginally significant (p = 0.0534). Conclusion The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis. PMID:26348217

  5. Rectal Douching and Implications for Rectal Microbicides among Populations Vulnerable to HIV in South America: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Jerome T.; Kinsler, Janni J.; Imrie, John; Nureña, César R.; Sánchez, Jorge; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While gel-formulated Rectal Microbicides (RM) are the first to enter clinical trials, rectal douching in preparation for anal intercourse is a common practise, thus RMs formulated as douches may be a convenient alternative to gels. Nonetheless, little is known about potential users’ thoughts regarding douche-formulated RMs or rectal douching practises, data needed to inform the advancement of douche-based RMs. This qualitative study examined thoughts regarding douches, their use as a RM and current douching practises among men who have sex with men and transgender women. Methods Ten focus groups and 36 in-depth interviews were conducted (N=140) to examine the overall acceptability of RM, of which one component focused on rectal douching. Focus groups and interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded; text relating to rectal douching was extracted and analysed. Sociodemographic information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results Support for a douche-formulated RM centred on the possibility of combined pre-coital hygiene and HIV protection, and it was believed that a deeply-penetrating liquid douche would confer greater HIV protection than a gel. Drawbacks included rectal dryness; impracticality and portability issues; and, potential side effects. Non-commercial douching apparatus use was common and liquids used included detergents, vinegar, bleach, lemon juice and alcohol. Conclusions A douche-formulated RM while desirable and perceived as more effective than a gel-formulated RM also generated questions regarding practicality and side-effects. Of immediate concern were the non-commercial liquids already being used which likely damage rectal epithelia, potentially increasing HIV infection risk. Pre-coital rectal douching is common and a RM formulated as such is desirable, but education on rectal douching practices is needed now. PMID:23966338

  6. Proforma-based reporting in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, F; Mangat, N; Swift, I R; Brown, G

    2010-01-01

    The improvements in outcomes associate with the use of preoperative therapy rather than postoperative treatment means that clinical teams are increasingly reliant on imaging to identify high-risk features of disease to determine treatment plans. For many solid tumours, including rectal cancer, validated techniques have emerged in identifying prognostic factors pre-operatively. In the MERCURY study, a standardised scanning technique and the use of reporting proformas enabled consistently accurate assessment and documentation of the prognostic factors. This is now an essential tool to enable our clinical colleagues to make treatment decisions. In this review, we describe the proforma-based reporting tool that enables a systematic approach to the interpretation of the magnetic resonance images, thereby enabling all the clinically relevant features to be adequately assessed. PMID:20880773

  7. Optimal time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon . E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr; Choi, Won Sik; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chang, Heung Moon; Ryu, Min Hee; Jang, Se Jin; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided into Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy.

  8. Role of laparoscopy in rectal cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahi, Ido; Mazeh, Haggi

    2014-01-01

    Despite established evidence on the advantages of laparoscopy in colon cancer resection, the use of laparoscopy for rectal cancer resection is still controversial. The initial concern was mainly regarding the feasibility of laparoscopy to achieve an adequate total mesorectal excision specimen. These concerns have been raised following early studies demonstrating higher rates of circumferential margins positivity following laparoscopic resection, as compared to open surgery. Similar to colon resection, patients undergoing laparoscopic rectal cancer resection are expected to benefit from a shorter length of hospital stay, less analgesic requirements, and a faster recovery of bowel function. In the past decade there have been an increasing number of large scale clinical trials investigating the oncological and perioperative outcomes of laparoscopic rectal cancer resection. In this review we summarize the current literature available on laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. PMID:24803801

  9. Simultaneous Laparoscopy-Assisted Resection for Rectal and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jiafeng; Chen, Tufeng; Zheng, Zongheng; Wei, Bo; Huang, Yong; Huang, Jianglong; Xu, Haozhong

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted surgery for either rectal or gastric cancer has been increasingly performed. However, simultaneous laparoscopy-assisted resection for synchronous rectal and gastric cancer is rarely reported in the literature. In our study, 3 cases of patients who received simultaneous laparoscopy-assisted resection for synchronous rectal and gastric cancer were recorded. The results showed that all 3 patients recovered well, with only 253 minutes of mean operation time, 57 mL of intraoperative blood loss, 5 cm of assisted operation incision, 4 days to resume oral intake, 12 days' postoperative hospital stay, and no complication or mortality. No recurrence or metastasis was found within the follow-up period of 22 months. When performed by surgeons with plentiful experience in laparoscopic technology, simultaneous laparoscopy-assisted resection for synchronous rectal and gastric cancer is safe and feasible, with the benefits of minimal trauma, fast recovery, and better cosmetic results, compared with open surgery. PMID:24960501

  10. Rectal Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haitao; Wang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Rectal pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) will be a critical component of HIV prevention products due to the prevalence of unprotected receptive anal intercourse among men who have sex with men and heterosexual couples. Given the biological considerations of this compartment and the complexity of HIV infection, design of a successful rectal microbicide product faces a number of challenges. Important information is being compiled to begin to address deficits in knowledge toward design of rectal PrEP products for men and women. Aspects of formulation development and preclinical and clinical evaluation of rectal products studied to date are summarized in this review. This article is based on a presentation at the "Product Development Workshop 2013: HIV and Multipurpose Prevention Technologies," held in Arlington, Virginia on February 21–22, 2013. It forms part of a special supplement to Antiviral Research. PMID:24188705

  11. Adult rectosigmoid junction intussusception presenting with rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing Zeng; Teo, Li Tserng; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of intussusception in adults present with chronic and nonspecifi c symptoms, and can sometimes be challenging to diagnose. We herein report on a patient w ith the rare symptom of colonic intussusceptions presenting with rectal prolapse and review the existing literature of similar case reports to discuss how to reach an accurate diagnosis. A 75-year-old woman with dementia presented with per rectal bleeding, rectal prolapse and lower abdominal pain. An operation was scheduled and a large sigmoid intussusception with a polyp as a leading point was found intraoperatively. She subsequently recovered well and was discharged. As large sigmoid intussusceptions may present as rectal prolapse, intussusception should be considered as a differential diagnosis for immobile patients, especially when the leading point is a lesion. PMID:26034324

  12. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  13. High Rate of Sexual Dysfunction Following Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Caglar; Tinay, Ilker; Yegen, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although rectal cancer is a very common malignancy and has an improved cure rate in response to oncological treatment, research on rectal-cancer survivors' sexual function remains limited. Sexual dysfunction (SD) after rectal cancer treatment was measured, and possible predisposing factors that may have an impact on the development of this disorder were identified. Methods Patients undergoing curative rectal cancer surgery from January 2012 to September 2013 were surveyed using questionnaires. The female sexual function index or the International Index of Erectile Function was recorded. A multiple logistic regression was used to test associations of clinical factors with outcomes. Results Fifty-six men (56%) and 28 women (44%) who completed the questionnaire were included in the study. A total of 76 patients of the 86 patients (90.5%) with the diagnosis of rectal cancer who were included in this study reported different levels of SD after radical surgery. A total of 64 patients (76%) from the whole cohort reported moderate to severe SD after treatment of rectal cancer. Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD. Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients. Patients were rarely treated for dysfunction. Conclusion Sexual problems after surgery for rectal cancer are common, but patients are rarely treated for SD. Female patients reported higher rates of SD than males. These results point out the importance of sexual (dys)function in survivors of rectal cancer. More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes. PMID:25360427

  14. Geometric modeling, functional parameter calculation, and visualization of the in-vivo distended rectal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Manduca, Armando; Camp, Jon J.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Robb, Richard A.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2006-03-01

    The rectum can distend to accommodate stool, and contracts in response to distention during defecation. Rectal motor dysfunctions are implicated in the pathophysiology of functional defecation disorders and fecal incontinence. These rectal motor functions can be studied by intra-luminal measurements of pressure by manometry, or combined with volume during rectal balloon distention. Pressure-volume (p-v) relationships provide a global index of rectal mechanical properties. However, balloon distention alone does not measure luminal radius or wall thickness, which are necessary to compute wall tension and stress respectively. It has been suggested that the elastic modulus, which is the linear slope of the stress-strain relationship, is a more accurate measure of wall stiffness. Also, measurements of compliance may not reflect differences in rectal diameter between subjects prior to inflation, and imaging is necessary to determine if, as has been suggested, rectal pressure-volume relationships are affected by extra-rectal structures. We have developed a technique to measure rectal stress:strain relationships in humans, by simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during rectal balloon distention. After a conditioning distention, a rectal balloon was distended with water from 0 to 400 ml in 50 ml steps, and imaged at each step with MRI. The fluid filled balloon was segmented from each volume, the phase-ordered binary volumes were transformed into a geometric characterization of the inflated rectal surface. Taken together with measurements of balloon pressure and of rectal wall thickness, this model of the rectal surface was used to calculate regional values of curvature, tension, strain, and stress for the rectum. In summary, this technique has the unique ability to non-invasively measure the rectal stress:strain relationship and also determine if rectal expansion is limited by extra-rectal structures. This functional information allows the direct clinical analysis of rectal motor function and offers the potential for characterizing abnormal mechanical properties of the rectal wall in disease.

  15. Evaluation of snail mucin motifs as rectal absorption enhancer for insulin in non-diabetic rat models.

    PubMed

    Adikwu, Michael Umale

    2005-09-01

    The use of snail mucin motifs as rectal absorption enhancer for insulin has been evaluated. The mucin motifs were extracted from the giant African snail Archachatina marginata by differential precipitation with acetone. The mucin motifs were found to have a molecular weight of 5780 Da and an isoelectric point of 3.4. At the concentrations evaluated, the mucin exhibited rectal absorption enhancing property for the administration of insulin in rats. The % basal blood glucose level of the rats that received the batch of suppositories containing no mucin were consistently above 100% except at the ninetieth minute when it came down slightly to 97.2%. Rats dosed with the batch containing 7%w/w suppositories showed the greatest blood glucose reduction with mean % basal blood glucose concentration of 61.2%. Batches of the suppository containing 5% and 7% mucin showed more marked and consistent lowering in blood glucose concentration than the other batches containing lower amounts of the rectal absorption enhancer. The batch with 7% mucin reduced the basal glucose level to 44% within 2 h of administration of the glycero-gelatin suppository loaded mucin. PMID:16141566

  16. Toward a selection of the most appropriate procedure in the treatment of complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, J H; de Morree, H

    1988-05-01

    Defecographic evaluation was performed in 30 patients with rectal prolapse to assess the effect of posterior rectopexy on rectal function and to arrive at a selection of the best procedure. Preoperative defecography revealed rectal intussusception in all patients. Postoperative control studies showed adequate rectal fixation to the anterior sacral surface. Intussusception no longer occurred. Rectal stenosis due to the surgical procedure was absent. The described technique of posterior rectopexy eliminates the prolapse mechanism without creating new disorders and is therefore a rational procedure. Advocation of new procedures should also be based on results of colorectal tests that assess the effect of the procedures on rectal function. PMID:3366034

  17. [A Case of Rectal Cancer with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis Successfully Treated with First-Line Panitumumab Monotherapy].

    PubMed

    Takahara, Bunji; Mima, Atsushi; Sasaki, Kiyomi; Mima, Kazumasa

    2015-07-01

    The patient was a 66-year-old man with progressive rectal cancer and portal vein tumor thrombosis near the porta hepatis. A subileus further complicated the situation. Therefore, an abdominoperineal resection was performed. As the KRAS gene was the wild-type gene, we administered panitumumab monotherapy every 2 weeks after the operation. Two months after the operation, the tumor marker levels were normal and the tumor size was reduced. Hence, oral capecitabine, with 1-week administration followed by 1-week of rest, was added to the therapy. In the 12 months after the operation, panitumumab was stopped once, and treatment with capecitabine alone was continued in the same schedule. As of 26 months, the disease showed a partial response using capecitabine alone. We report our experience of a case of rectal cancer with portal vein tumor thrombosis that was successfully treated with panitumumab. PMID:26197754

  18. The accuracy of endorectal ultrasonography in rectal cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    COTE, ADRIAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; LEBOVICI, ANDREI; MOIS, EMIL; AL HAJJAR, NADIM; MARE, CODRUTA; BADEA, RADU; IANCU, CORNEL

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The incidence of rectal cancer in the European Union is about 35% of the total colorectal cancer incidence. Staging rectal cancer is important for planning treatment. It is essential for the management of rectal cancer to have adequate preoperative imaging, because accurate staging can influence the therapeutic strategy, type of resection, and candidacy for neoadjuvant therapy. The aim of this work is to evaluate the accuracy of endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) in rectal cancer staging. Methods A retrospective study was performed to assess the accuracy of ERUS by analyzing patients discharged from Regional Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (IRGH) Cluj-Napoca, Romania, diagnosed with rectal cancer between 01 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. Patients who were preoperatively staged by other imaging methods and those who had ERUS performed in another service were excluded from the analysis. As inclusion criteria remained ERUS performed for patients with rectal cancer in IRGH Cluj-Napoca where they were also operated. We analyzed preoperative T stage obtained by ERUS and it was compared with the histopathology findings. Results The number of patients discharged with a diagnosis of rectal cancer were 200 (operated – 157) in 2011, 193 (operated – 151) in 2012, and 198 (operated – 142) in 2013. We analyzed a total of 51 cases diagnosed with rectal cancer who performed ERUS in IRGH Cluj-Napoca. The results according to the T stage obtained by ERUS and histopathology test were: Under-stage T2= 25.0%, T3=7.9% of cases; Over-stage T2=25.0%, T3=31.6% and T4=60.0% of cases. Less than 20% of patients underwent preoperative radio-chemotherapy. Conclusions ERUS is a method of staging rectal cancer which is human dependent. ERUS is less accurate for T staging of stenotic tumours, but the accuracy may still be within acceptable limits. Surgeons use ERUS to adopt a treatment protocol, knowing the risk of under-staging and over-staging of this method. The accuracy of ERUS is higher in diagnosing rectal cancer in stages T1, T2 and even in stage T3 with malignant tumor which is not occlusive. ERUS is less accurate for T staging of locally advanced and stenotic tumours. PMID:26609269

  19. Symposium on rectal cancer: 3. The case for adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Bernard J.

    1997-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer is intended to eradicate subclinical deposits of cancer cells not removed at surgery. These residual cells are found most commonly at the resection margin of the primary tumour and in transected cancer-bearing lymphatics or vessels. Refinements in surgical technique have been associated with a reduction in the risk of pelvic recurrence in some nonrandomized series. However, clinical trials have shown that the combinations of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and in some instances radiotherapy alone, reduce the risk of recurrence and may improve survival rates compared with those of surgery alone. It is premature to consider that adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy is unnecessary. PMID:9336525

  20. Reverse-Hybrid Robotic Mesorectal Excision for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ja; You, Y. Nancy; Schlette, Erika; Nguyen, Sa; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The robotic system offers potential technical advantages over laparoscopy for total mesorectal excision with radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer. However, the requirement for fixed docking limits its utility when the working volume is large or patient repositioning is required. The purpose of this study was to evaluate short-term outcomes associated with a novel setup to perform total mesorectal excision and radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer by the use of a “reverse” hybrid robotic-laparoscopic approach. Methods This is a prospective consecutive cohort observational study of patients who underwent robotic rectal cancer resection from January 2009 to March 2011. During the study period a technique of reverse-hybrid robotic-laparoscopic rectal resection with radical lymphadenectomy was developed. This technique involves reversal of the operative sequence with lymphovascular and rectal dissection to precede proximal colonic mobilization. This technique evolved from a conventional hybrid resection with laparoscopic vascular control, colonic mobilization, and robotic pelvic dissection. Perioperative, and short-term oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Results Thirty patients underwent reverse-hybrid resection. Median tumor location was 5 cm (interquartile range 3-9) from the anal verge. Median BMI was 27.6 (interquartile range 25.0-32.1 kg/m2). Twenty (66.7%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. There were no conversions. Median blood loss was 100 mL (interquartile range 75-200). Total operation time was a median 369 (interquartile range 306-410) minutes. Median docking time was 6 (interquartile range 5-8) minutes and console time was 98 (interquartile range 88-140) minutes. Resection was R0 in all patients with no patients had an incomplete mesorectal resection. Six patients (20%) underwent extended lymph node dissection or en bloc resection. Conclusions Reverse-hybrid robotic surgery for rectal cancer maximizes the therapeutic applicability of the robotic and conventional laparoscopic techniques for optimized application in minimally invasive rectal surgery. PMID:22228169

  1. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards. PMID:1681170

  2. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  3. Less-Invasive Surgery May Not Be Best Option for Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Invasive Surgery May Not Be Best Option for Rectal Cancer Two studies found standard surgery was slightly more ... not match standard surgery for the treatment of rectal cancer, new research indicates. The finding is based on ...

  4. Endorectal ultrasound for control of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, F; Kuntz, C; Schlag, P; Herfarth, C

    1993-01-01

    Endorectal ultrasound (EUS) is known to be a reliable method for preoperative staging of rectal tumors. In this study, EUS was used to select patients with rectal cancer suitable for preoperative radiation therapy. By performing EUS before and after radiation, the aim of the study was to evaluate the role of EUS in monitoring the effects of preoperative radiation therapy. In 17 patients with large T3 or T4 rectal tumors, a complete staging by EUS was done before and after radiation therapy. Beside a shrinkage of the tumor, there was a change of echopattern to more hyperechoic gray levels to be observed in the irradiated tumor. The rectal wall lost its normal architecture, and lymph nodes disappeared or changed their echopattern from echopoor to echorich. There was no down-staging of a tumor seen by EUS. Complete preoperative staging was correct in 13 of 17 patients because of endosonographic examination before and after preoperative radiation therapy. New interpretation criteria are given for evaluation of patients with rectal cancer treated by radiation therapy. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8424703

  5. Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has in recent years progressively established itself as one of the most valuable modalities for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment of rectal cancer and its use has largely focused on accurate morphological assessment. The potential of MRI, however, extends beyond detailed anatomical depiction: aspects of tissue physiology, such as perfusion, oxygenation and water molecule diffusivity, can be assessed indirectly. Functional MRI is rapidly evolving as a promising non-invasive assessment tool for tumour phenotyping and assessment of response to new therapeutic agents. In spite of promising experimental data, the evidence base for the application of functional MRI techniques in rectal cancer remains modest, reflecting the relatively poor agreement on technical protocols, image processing techniques and quantitative methodology to date, hampering routine integration into clinical management. This overview outlines the established strengths and the critical limitations of anatomical MRI in rectal cancer; it then introduces some of the functional MRI techniques and quantitative analysis methods that are currently available, describing their applicability in rectal cancer and reviewing the relevant literature; finally, it introduces the concept of a multi-parametric quantitative approach to rectal cancer. PMID:26586163

  6. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  7. Quantification of Organ Motion During Chemoradiotherapy of Rectal Cancer Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Irene; Hawkins, Maria; Hansen, Vibeke; Thomas, Karen; McNair, Helen; O'Neill, Brian; Aitken, Alexandra; Tait, Diana

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: There has been no previously published data related to the quantification of rectal motion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during standard conformal long-course chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the interfractional changes in rectal movement and dimensions and rectal and bladder volume using CBCT and to quantify the bony anatomy displacements to calculate the margins required to account for systematic ({Sigma}) and random ({sigma}) setup errors. Methods and Materials: CBCT images were acquired from 16 patients on the first 3 days of treatment and weekly thereafter. The rectum and bladder were outlined on all CBCT images. The interfraction movement was measured using fixed bony landmarks as references to define the rectal location (upper, mid, and low), The maximal rectal diameter at the three rectal locations was also measured. The bony anatomy displacements were quantified, allowing the calculation of systematic ({Sigma}) and random ({sigma}) setup errors. Results: A total of 123 CBCT data sets were analyzed. Analysis of variance for standard deviation from planning scans showed that rectal anterior and lateral wall movement differed significantly by rectal location. Anterior and lateral rectal wall movements were larger in the mid and upper rectum compared with the low rectum. The posterior rectal wall movement did not change significantly with the rectal location. The rectal diameter changed more in the mid and upper than in the low rectum. No consistent relationship was found between the rectal and bladder volume and time, nor was a significant relationship found between the rectal volume and bladder volume. Conclusions: In the present study, the anterior and lateral rectal movement and rectal diameter were found to change most in the upper rectum, followed by the mid rectum, with the smallest changes seen in the low rectum. Asymmetric margins are warranted to ensure phase 2 coverage.

  8. Assessment of pharmacokinetics and tolerability of intranasal diazepam relative to rectal gel in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Henney, Herbert R; Sperling, Michael R; Rabinowicz, Adrian L; Bream, Gary; Carrazana, Enrique J

    2014-09-01

    Diazepam rectal gel (RG) is currently the only approved rescue therapy for outpatient management of seizure clusters in the United States. There is an unmet medical need for an alternative rescue therapy for seizure clusters that is effective, and more convenient to administer with a socially acceptable method of delivery. An intranasal diazepam formulation has been developed, and this study evaluates the tolerability and bioavailability of diazepam nasal spray (NS) relative to an equivalent dose of diazepam-RG in healthy adults. Twenty-four healthy adults were enrolled in a phase 1, open-label, 3-period crossover study. Plasma diazepam and metabolite concentrations were measured by serial sampling. Dose proportionality for 5- and 20-mg intranasal doses and the bioavailability of 20mg diazepam-NS relative to 20mg diazepam-RG were assessed by maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and systemic exposure parameters (AUC0-? and AUC0-24). The mean Cmax values for 20mg diazepam-NS and 20mg diazepam-RG were 378 ± 106 and 328 ± 152 ng/mL, achieved at 1.0 and 1.5h, respectively. Subjects administered intranasal and rectal gel formulations experienced nasal and rectal leakage, respectively. Diazepam absorption following intranasal administration was consistent but 3 subjects with diazepam-RG had low plasma drug levels at the earliest assessment of 5 min, due to poor retention, and were excluded from analysis. Excluding them, the treatment ratios (20mg diazepam-NS:20mg diazepam-RG) and 90% confidence intervals for diazepam Cmax and AUC0-24 were 0.98 (0.85-1.14) and 0.89 (0.80-0.98), respectively, suggesting that the bioavailability was comparable between the two formulations. Dose proportionality was observed between the lowest and highest dose-strengths of intranasal formulation. Both intranasal and rectal treatments were well tolerated with mild to moderate adverse events. Results suggest that a single-dose of 20mg diazepam-NS is tolerable and comparable in bioavailability to that of diazepam-RG. The intranasal formulation may provide caregivers and patients with a more socially acceptable and convenient alternative rescue therapy in the acute treatment of seizure clusters. PMID:24934774

  9. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  10. Neo-adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    In rectal cancer treatment, attention has focused on the local primary tumour and the regional tumour cell deposits to diminish the risk of a loco-regional recurrence. Several large randomized trials have also shown that combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have markedly reduced the risk of a loco-regional recurrence, but this has not yet had any major influence on overall survival. The best results have been achieved when the radiotherapy has been given preoperatively. Preoperative radiotherapy improves loco-regional control even when surgery has been optimized to improve lateral clearance, i.e., when a total mesorectal excision has been performed. The relative reduction is then 50%-70%. The value of radiotherapy has not been tested in combination with more extensive surgery including lateral lymph node clearance, as practised in some Asian countries. Many details about how the radiotherapy is performed are still open for discussion, and practice varies between countries. A highly fractionated radiation schedule (5 Gy × 5), proven efficacious in many trials, has gained much popularity in some countries, whereas a conventionally fractionated regimen (1.8-2.0 Gy × 25-28), often combined with chemotherapy, is used in other countries. The additional therapy adds morbidity to the morbidity that surgery causes, and should therefore be administered only when the risk of loco-regional recurrence is sufficiently high. The best integration of the weakest modality, to date the drugs (conventional cytotoxics and biologicals) is not known. A new generation of trials exploring the best sequence of treatments is required. Furthermore, there is a great need to develop predictors of response, so that treatment can be further individualized and not solely based upon clinical factors and anatomic imaging. PMID:24379566

  11. Emerging and Evolving Technology in Colon and Rectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bosio, Raul M; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has changed the way we manage many colon and rectal pathologies. Multiple techniques, from straight laparoscopic procedures, to hand-assisted and single-port techniques are available, requiring surgeons to go through various learning curves. Robotic surgery is a relatively novel technique in general surgery which appears to hold most promise for rectal resection. Laparoscopic rectal procedures are difficult, and even in experienced hands, conversion rates are around 17%. Robotic surgery may be a point of difference in these cases, despite a long learning curve and higher costs. This article will describe the role of robotics in colorectal surgery. Room set up, port placement, and docking strategies will be described for common procedures, with emphasis on a hybrid robotic low anterior resection. PMID:26491407

  12. Rectal Perforation Caused by Anal Stricture After Hemorrhoid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yong Joon; Ha, Heon-Kyun; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Shin, Rumi; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate therapies for hemorrhoids can lead to various complications including anorectal stricture. We report a patient presenting with catastrophic rectal perforation due to severe anal stricture after inappropriate hemorrhoid treatment. A 67-years old man with perianal pain visited the emergency room. The hemorrhoids accompanied by constipation, had tortured him since his youth. Thus he had undergone injection sclerotherapy several times by an unlicensed therapist and hemorrhoidectomy twice at the clinics of private practitioners. His body temperature was as high as 38.5?. The computed tomographic scan showed a focal perforation of posterior rectal wall. The emergency operation was performed. The fibrotic tissues of the anal canal were excised. And then a sigmoid loop colostomy was constructed. The patient was discharged four days following the operation. This report calls attention to the enormous risk of unlicensed injection sclerotherapy and overzealous hemorrhoidectomy resulting in scarring, progressive stricture, and eventual rectal perforation. PMID:23586012

  13. Concurrent Occurrence of Uterovaginal and Rectal Prolapse: An Uncommon Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Umeh, UA; Ugwu, EO; Obi, SN; Nnagbo, JE

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant uterovaginal and rectal prolapse is an uncommon occurrence. Where laparoscopic equipment and skills are lacking, sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy can be accomplished by laparotomy, especially in women who desire to retain their uterus for either biological or psychological reasons. A 40-year-old primipara with a history of concomitant mass protruding from both her vagina and anus following a spontaneous unsupervised delivery at home. Following pelvic examination, a diagnosis of uterovaginal and rectal prolapse was made. In view of her parity and desire to retain her reproductive function, she was offered abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy with satisfactory postoperative recovery. In resource-limited settings with concomitant uterine and rectal prolapse, open abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy is an effective and safe alternative to Manchester operation in the absence of laparoscopic equipment and skills. PMID:26500795

  14. Human Collagen Injections to Reduce Rectal Dose During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, William R.; Hosford, Charles C.; Schultz, Steven E.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. Methods: This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. Conclusions: The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Tan; Xu, Guo-Qiang; Teng, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Yi-Peng; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, You-Ming

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and the differential diagnosis of rectal NENs from other subepithelial lesions (SELs). METHODS: The study group consisted of 36 consecutive patients with rectal NENs histopathologically diagnosed using biopsy and/or resected specimens. The control group consisted of 31 patients with homochronous rectal non-NEN SELs confirmed by pathology. Epithelial lesions such as cancer and adenoma were excluded from this study. One EUS expert blinded to the histological results reviewed the ultrasonic images. The size, original layer, echoic intensity and homogeneity of the lesions and the perifocal structures were investigated. The single EUS diagnosis recorded by the EUS expert was compared with the histological results. RESULTS: All NENs were located at the rectum 2-10 cm from the anus and appeared as nodular (n = 12), round (n = 19) or egg-shaped (n = 5) lesions with a hypoechoic (n = 7) or intermediate (n = 29) echo pattern and a distinct border. Tumors ranged in size from 2.3 to 13.7 mm, with an average size of 6.8 mm. Homogeneous echogenicity was seen in all tumors except three. Apart from three patients (stage T2 in two and stage T3 in one), the tumors were located in the second and/or third wall layer without involvement of the fourth and fifth layers. In the patients with stage T1 disease, the tumors were located in the second wall layer only in seven cases, the third wall layer only in two cases, and both the second and third wall layers in 27 cases. Approximately 94.4% (34/36) of rectal NENs were diagnosed correctly by EUS, and 74.2% (23/31) of other rectal SELs were classified correctly as non-NENs. Eight cases of other SELs were misdiagnosed as NENs, including two cases of inflammatory lesions and one case each of gastrointestinal tumor, endometriosis, metastatic tumor, lymphoma, neurilemmoma, and hemangioma. The positive predictive value of EUS for rectal NENs was 80.9% (34/42), the negative predictive value was 92.0% (23/25), and the diagnostic accuracy was 85.1%. CONCLUSION: EUS has satisfactory diagnostic accuracy for rectal NENs with good sensitivity, but unfavorable specificity, making the differential diagnosis of NENs from other SELs challenging. PMID:25132764

  16. [SIDE-TO-END ANASTOMOSIS IN LOW ANTERIOR RECTAL RESECTION].

    PubMed

    Shelygin, Iu A; Budtuev, A S; Pikunov, D Iu; Rybakov, E G; Fomenko, O Iu; Sevost'ianov, S I

    2015-01-01

    The authors have launched a prospective randomized study aimed to make a comparison of functional results of formation of straight coloanal (control group) and side-to end (main group) anastomosis in case of low anterior rectal resection since 2012. Each group consisted of 40 patients undergoing operation concerning uncomplicated rectal cancer of medium-ampullar section of rectum. It was noted that patients of the main group had lower stool frequency in postoperative period. A function of the interior sphincter was less damaged and the rate of compliance of rectum was high. PMID:26234063

  17. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  18. Pre-referral rectal artesunate for severe malaria

    PubMed Central

    Okebe, Joseph; Eisenhut, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe or complicated malaria is a medical emergency and people die as a result of delays in starting treatment. Most patients need parenteral treatment, and in primary healthcare facilities, where intravenous therapy is not available but intramuscular injections can be given, intramuscular quinine, artesunate, and artemether have been used before transporting patients to hospital. However, in rural settings with limited access to health care, intramuscular injections may also be unavailable. In these situations, rectal artesunate given prior to transfer to hospital by volunteers with little medical training, may be a feasible option. Objectives To evaluate the effects of pre-referral treatment with rectal artesunate on mortality and morbidity in people with severe malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE and LILACS up to 21 May 2014. We also searched the WHO clinical trial registry platform and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Individual or cluster-randomized controlled trials comparing pre-referral rectal artesunate with placebo or injectable antimalarials in children and children with severe malaria. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts for potentially eligible trials, and extracted data from the included trials. Dichotomous outcomes were summarized using risk ratios (RR) and presented with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Where data allowed, we conducted subgroup analyses by age, trial region and whether participants were included in the trial analysis. We assessed the quality of evidence for the most important outcomes using the GRADE approach. Main results One trial met the inclusion criteria; a placebo-controlled trial of 17,826 children and adults living in rural villages in Ghana and Tanzania (Africa) and Bangladesh (Asia). Villagers with no previous medical training were trained to recognize the symptoms of severe malaria, administer rectal artesunate and refer patients to hospital. The trained villagers were supervised during the trial period. In the African sites only children aged 6 to 72 months were enrolled, whereas in Bangladesh, older children and adults were also enrolled. In young children (aged 6 to 72 months) there were fewer deaths following rectal artesunate than with placebo (RR 0.74; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.93; one trial; 8050 participants; moderate quality evidence), while in older children and adults there were more deaths in those given rectal artesunate (RR 2.21; 95% CI 1.18 to 4.15; one trial; 4018 participants; low quality evidence). In Africa, only 56% of participants reached a secondary healthcare facility within six hours compared to over 90% in Asia. There were no differences between the intervention and control groups in the proportion of participants reaching a healthcare facility within six hours (RR 0.99; 95% CI 0.98 to 1.01; 12,068 participants), or in the proportion with parasitaemia (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.98 to 1.02; 17,826 participants), or with coma or convulsions on arrival (RR 1.01; 95% CI 0.90 to 1.14; 12,068 participants). There are no existing trials that compare rectal versus intramuscular artesunate. Authors' conclusions In rural areas without access to injectable antimalarials rectal artesunate provided before transfer to a referral facility probably reduces mortality in severely ill young children compared to referral without treatment. However, the unexpected finding of possible higher mortality in older children and adults has to be taken into account in forming any national or local policies about pre-referral rectal artesunate. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Rectal artesunate for treating people with suspected severe malaria before transfer to hospital Cochrane Collaboration researchers conducted a review of the effects of pre-referral rectal artesunate for people with suspected severe malaria, living in rural areas without healthcare services. After searching for all

  19. Treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer: Controversies and questions

    PubMed Central

    Trakarnsanga, Atthaphorn; Ithimakin, Suthinee; Weiser, Martin R

    2012-01-01

    Rectal cancers extending through the rectal wall, or involving locoregional lymph nodes (T3/4 or N1/2), have been more difficult to cure. The confines of the bony pelvis and the necessity of preserving the autonomic nerves makes surgical extirpation challenging, which accounts for the high rates of local and distant relapse in this setting. Combined multimodality treatment for rectal cancer stage II and III was recommended from National Institute of Health consensus. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation using fluoropyrimidine-based regimen prior to surgical resection has emerged as the standard of care in the United States. Optimal time of surgery after neoadjuvant treatment remained unclear and prospective randomized controlled trial is ongoing. Traditionally, 6-8 wk waiting period was commonly used. The accuracy of studies attempting to determine tumor complete response remains problematic. Currently, surgery remains the standard of care for rectal cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemoradiation, whereas observational management is still investigational. In this article, we outline trends and controversies associated with optimal pre-treatment staging, neoadjuvant therapies, surgery, and adjuvant therapy. PMID:23112544

  20. Isolated rectal gland cells: oxygen consumption and hormonal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Silva, P; Lear, S; Segal, F; Rosen, S; Spokes, K; Stevens, A; Lichtstein, D; Epstein, F H

    1986-01-01

    Cells isolated from rectal glands of Squalus acanthias, using collagenase and hyaluronidase digestion, retained normal morphological characteristics as judged by light microscopy of 1-micron plastic sections. Their oxygen consumption per unit weight was comparable to that of intact rectal gland studied either in situ, or by isolated perfusion, as well as that of rectal gland slices. Cellular respiration was stimulated by dibutyryl cyclic AMP and theophylline or by vasoactive intestinal peptide which stimulate secretion of chloride by the intact gland. Stimulated oxygen consumption was inhibited by ouabain and bumetanide and was proportional to the concentration of sodium or chloride in the incubation solution. The oxygen consumption of these cells parallels the secretory and metabolic behavior of the intact rectal gland, suggesting that it reflects energy demands for ion transport. The relative ease with which a homogeneous preparation of viable and active cells can be obtained and the apparent preservation of many of their key functional characteristics make this preparation a useful tool for the study of hormone-stimulated ion transport. PMID:3027517

  1. Surgical Correction of Rectal Prolapse in Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Mayu; Wilding, Laura A; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is a common clinical problem in laboratory mice. This condition may occur spontaneously, develop after genetic manipulations, result from infections with pathogens such as Citrobacter species, or arise secondary to experimental design such as colitis models. The current standard of care at our institution is limited to monitoring mice until tissue becomes ulcerated or necrotic; this strategy often leads to premature euthanasia of valuable animals prior to the study endpoint. Surgical correction of rectal prolapse is performed routinely and with minimal complications in larger species by using manual reduction with placement of a pursestring suture. In this report, we investigated whether the use of a pursestring suture was an effective treatment for mice with rectal prolapse. The procedure includes anesthetizing mice with isoflurane, manually reducing prolapsed tissue, and placing a pursestring suture of 4-0 polydioxanone. We have performed this procedure successfully in 12 mice. Complications included self-trauma, fecal impaction due to lack of defecation, and mutilation of the surgical site by cage mates. Singly housing mice for 7 d postoperatively, applying multimodal analgesia, and releasing the pursestring when indicated eliminated these complications. The surgical repair of rectal prolapses in mice is a minimally invasive procedure that resolves the clinical symptoms of affected animals and reduces the number of mice that are euthanized prematurely prior to the study endpoint. PMID:26442289

  2. Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Hancock, S.; Coe, F.L.; Sugarbaker, P.H.

    1986-09-01

    An unsolved problem in colon and rectal surgery involves the treatment of locally invasive primary and recurrent rectal cancer. An approach is described that uses intracavitary iridium-192 sources in combination with a pelvic displacement prosthesis to augment external beam radiation doses to sites of residual disease identified at surgery. This approach should permit administration of tumoricidal doses of radiation to positive surgical margins minimizing radiation toxicity to the small bowel. The radiation source and all prosthetic materials are removed at the bedside within 2 weeks of surgery, ensuring accurate radiation dosimetry, minimizing infectious complications, and sparing the patient the need for full high-dose pelvic irradiation.

  3. Rectal Dose and Source Strength of the High-Dose-Rate Iridium-192 Both Affect Late Rectal Bleeding After Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to reconfirm our previous findings that the rectal dose and source strength both affect late rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT), by using a rectal dose calculated in accordance with the definitions of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 (ICRU{sub RP}) or of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients who underwent HDR-ICBT and were followed up for 1 year or more were studied. The rectal dose for ICBT was calculated by using the ICRP{sub RP} based on orthogonal radiographs or the DVH parameters based on computed tomography (CT). The total dose was calculated as the biologically equivalent dose expressed in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). The relationship between averaged source strength or the EQD{sub 2} and late rectal bleeding was then analyzed. Results: When patients were divided into four groups according to rectal EQD{sub 2} ({>=} or =} or <2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}), the group with both a high EQD{sub 2} and a high source strength showed a significantly greater probability of rectal bleeding for ICRU{sub RP}, D{sub 2cc}, and D{sub 1cc}. The patients with a median rectal dose above the threshold level did not show a greater frequency of rectal bleeding unless the source strength exceeded 2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}. Conclusions: Our results obtained with data based on ICRU{sub RP} and CT-based DVH parameters indicate that rectal dose and source strength both affect rectal bleeding after HDR-ICBT.

  4. Does raising morning rectal temperature to evening levels offset the diurnal variation in muscle force production?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ben J; Pullinger, Samuel A; Kerry, Jonathan W; Robinson, William R; Reilly, Tom P; Robertson, Colin M; Waterhouse, James M

    2013-05-01

    Muscle force production and power output in active males, regardless of the site of measurement (hand, leg, or back), are higher in the evening than in the morning. This diurnal variation is attributed to motivational, peripheral and central factors, and higher core and, possibly, muscle temperatures in the evening. This study investigated whether increasing morning rectal temperatures to evening resting values, by active or passive warm-ups, leads to muscle force production and power output becoming equal to evening values in motivated subjects. Ten healthy active males (mean ± SD: age, 21.2 ± 1.9 yrs; body mass, 75.4 ± 8 kg; height, 1.76 ± .06 m) completed the study, which was approved by the University Ethics Committee. The subjects were familiarized with the techniques and protocol and then completed four sessions (separated by at least 48 h): control morning (07:30 h) and evening (17:30 h) sessions (with an active 5-min warm-up) and then two further sessions at 07:30 h but proceeded by an extended active or passive warm-up to raise rectal temperature to evening values. These last two sessions were counterbalanced in order of administration. During each trial, three measures of handgrip strength, isokinetic leg strength measurements (of knee flexion and extension at 1.05 and 4.19 rad.s(-1) through a 90° range of motion), and four measures of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) on an isometric ergometer (utilizing the twitch-interpolation technique) were performed. Rectal and intra-aural temperatures, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and thermal comfort (TC) were measured. Measurements were made after the subjects had reclined for 30 min and after the warm-ups and prior to the measurement of handgrip and isokinetic and isometric ergometry. Muscle temperature was taken after the warm-up and immediately before the isokinetic and MVC measurements. Warm-ups were either active (cycle ergometer at 150 W) or passive (resting in a room at 35 °C, relative humidity 45%). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance models with repeated measures. Rectal and intra-aural temperatures were higher at rest in the evening (.56 °C and .74 °C; p < .05) than in the morning, but there were no differences after the active or passive warm-ups, the subjects' ratings of thermal comfort reflecting this. Muscle temperatures also displayed significant diurnal variation, with higher values in the evening (~.31 °C; p < .05). Grip strength, isokinetic knee flexion for peak torque and peak power at 1.05 rad.s(-1), and knee extension for peak torque at 4.19 rad.s(-1) all showed higher values in the evening. All other measures of strength or power showed a trend to be higher in the evening ( .10 > p > .05). There was no significant effect of active or passive warm-ups on any strength or power variable, and subjects reported maximal values for effort for each strength measure. In summary, effects of time of day were seen in some measures of muscle performance but, in this population of motivated subjects, there was no evidence that increasing morning rectal temperature to evening values by active or passive warm-up increased muscle strength to evening values. PMID:23281719

  5. DEER RECTAL TEMPERATURES * Demarais et al. 705DEER RECTAL TEMPERATURES * Demarais et al. 705 SAS INSTITUTEINC. 1982. SAS user's guide: statis-

    E-print Network

    Beier, Paul

    DEER RECTAL TEMPERATURES * Demarais et al. 705DEER RECTAL TEMPERATURES * Demarais et al. 705 SAS. Fastingmetabolismof white- tailed deer. J. Wildl. Manage.33:490-498. WEISFELD, G. E. 1982. An extensionof the stress. Fastingmetabolismof white- tailed deer. J. Wildl. Manage.33:490-498. WEISFELD, G. E. 1982. An extensionof the stress

  6. Dose Constraint for Minimizing Grade 2 Rectal Bleeding Following Brachytherapy Combined With External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Rectal Dose-Volume Histogram Analysis of 457 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Yorozu, Atsunori; Ohashi, Toshio; Toya, Kazuhito; Seki, Satoshi; Yoshida, Kayo; Kaneda, Tomoya; Saito, Shiro; Nishiyama, Toru; Hanada, Takashi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the rectal tolerance to Grade 2 rectal bleeding after I-125 seed brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), based on the rectal dose-volume histogram. Methods and Materials: A total of 458 consecutive patients with stages T1 to T3 prostate cancer received combined modality treatment consisting of I-125 seed implantation followed by EBRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles. The prescribed doses of brachytherapy and EBRT were 100 Gy and 45 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively. The rectal dosimetric factors were analyzed for rectal volumes receiving >100 Gy and >150 Gy (R100 and R150) during brachytherapy and for rectal volumes receiving >30 Gy to 40 Gy (V30-V40) during EBRT therapy in 373 patients for whom datasets were available. The patients were followed from 21 to 72 months (median, 45 months) after the I-125 seed implantation. Results: Forty-four patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 rectal bleeding. On multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.014), R100 (p = 0.002), and V30 (p = 0.001) were identified as risk factors for Grade 2 rectal bleeding. The rectal bleeding rate increased as the R100 increased: 5.0% (2/40 patients) for 0 ml; 7.5% (20/267 patients) for >0 to 0.5 ml; 11.0% (11/100 patients) for >0.5 to 1 ml; 17.9% (5/28 patients) for >1 to 1.5 ml; and 27.3% (6/22 patients) for >1.5 ml (p = 0.014). Grade 2 rectal bleeding developed in 6.4% (12/188) of patients with a V30 {<=}35% and in 14.1% (26/185) of patients with a V30 >35% (p = 0.02). When these dose-volume parameters were considered in combination, the Grade 2 rectal bleeding rate was 4.2% (5/120 patients) for a R100 {<=}0.5 ml and a V30 {<=}35%, whereas it was 22.4% (13/58 patients) for R100 of >0.5 ml and V30 of >35%. Conclusion: The risk of rectal bleeding was found to be significantly volume-dependent in patients with prostate cancer who received combined modality treatment. Rectal dose-volume analysis is a practical method for predicting the risk of development of Grade 2 rectal bleeding.

  7. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yasuyuki; Kariya, Shuji; Nakatani, Miyuki; Yoshida, Rie; Kono, Yumiko; Kan, Naoki; Ueno, Yutaka; Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru

    2015-10-01

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization. PMID:26163363

  8. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer were performance status, AJCC stage, chemotherapy, surgery, extent of resection, histologic grading, and hemoglobin levels both before and during radiotherapy.

  9. [The treatment of rectal cancer--the optimizing possibilities].

    PubMed

    Chifan, M; D?nil?, N; Niculescu, D; Târcoveanu, E; Georgescu, S; Epure, O; Andronic, D; G?le?anu, M R; Carasevici, E

    1996-01-01

    The authors studies 280 rectal cancers treated in the first surgical clinic of Ia?i in the period 1981-1994. Although surgery is the main treatment of these tumors, it cannot be and it must be not used alone. Surgery must be associated with radio- and chemotherapy, because is the only way possible to increase the number of resections for rectal tumors and the survival rate. For the 263 tumors operated the resectability was 73, 5%: Milles's operation 101 (36, 7%), Dixon's operation 81 (30, 79%), other operation 91 (33, 11%). We consider that Dixon's operation is the best choice for the tumors in the stages A and B of Dukes classifications. Preoperative radiotherapy can influence the tumor volume (downstaging) and decrease local recurrences to about 10-15%. Surgery alone must be practiced only in emergencies. Postoperative chemotherapy is mandatory and it reduces local recurrences and delays metastasis evolution. PMID:9455405

  10. Clinical and manometric evaluation of rectal prolapse and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Keighley, M R; Makuria, T; Alexander-Williams, J; Arabi, Y

    1980-01-01

    The clinical presentation and manometric findings in 46 patients with rectal prolapse and/or incontinence are reported. Basal and maximal squeeze pressures in the anal canal of patients with prolapse alone did not differ from the pressures in age and sex-matched controls whereas anal pressures in both groups of patients with incontinence were significantly lower than in controls. Physiotherapy and faradism had no therapeutic value in rectal prolapse but gave improvement in 30 per cent of patients with incontinence. Rectopexy gave satisfactory results in all the patients with prolapse and improved incontinence in 70 per cent. Post-anal repair cured 87 per cent of patients with idiopathic anorectal incontinence or with persistent incontinence after rectopexy. No form of treatment was associated with any significant elevation of anal pressures. PMID:7357245

  11. Therapeutic approaches in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Combined-modality therapy, using radiotherapy and chemotherapy with surgery, has been the traditional therapeutic algorithm for locally advanced rectal cancer. Standard of care in the United States has evolved to include neoadjuvant concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by surgical excision and adjuvant chemotherapy. This approach has led to a significant improvement in local recurrences (LR), to the point where distant sites are the more common site of failure. Further improvements in local control have failed to improve overall survival. This article reviews historical trials that shifted the treatment paradigm to the current standard of care, as well as recent research trials, which have sought to incorporate new treatment methodologies, and treatment agents to improve outcomes. Finally this article describes ongoing studies and their potential impact on the future of therapeutic management of locally-advanced rectal cancer. PMID:25276408

  12. Robotic technology: Optimizing the outcomes in rectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Buchs, Nicolas C

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive rectal resection remains a challenging procedure, even in experienced hands. Technical limitations explain at least in part the reasons of a relatively poor adoption of laparoscopy for rectal resection, in particular for low tumors in a deep and narrow pelvis. Robotics is intended to overcome these limitations. Potentially better short-term outcomes have been published: reduced conversion rates, better functional outcomes, shorter learning curve, reduction of positive margins, better specimen… However, robotic surgery has not yet taken over as the gold standard approach for low anterior resection. Several drawbacks might indeed discourage the most fervent surgeon: the size of the robot, the lack of tactile feedback, the risk and difficulties during multiquadrant surgery, and, of course, costs. Whilst new systems might overcome most of these drawbacks, it seems obvious that the development of robotic surgery is underway. Robotics is not just another interesting technical tool, but more a new concept, which should play a role in the future. PMID:26078918

  13. Hyperthermia in the multimodal therapy of advanced rectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wust, P; Gellermann, J; Rau, B; Löffel, J; Speidel, A; Stahl, H; Riess, H; Vogl, T J; Felix, R; Schlag, P M

    1996-01-01

    The synergistic effects of hyperthermia (raising temperatures to 40 degrees C and above) when combined with radiotherapy and cytotoxic drugs and a modulation of immunological phenomena have been demonstrated in the laboratory. Pre-clinical data relating to hyperthermia are summed up, along with their implications for clinical application. Controlled studies of local and regional hyperthermia have been performed during recent years, and these show us that the adjunction of hyperthermia provides at least an improvement of local control compared with radiotherapy alone. Current clinical results are summarized. Therapy systems based on radiowave irradiation have been commercially available for regional hyperthermia of the pelvis since the mid 1980s. This technology allows us to perform sufficiently tolerable and effective regional hyperthermia on rectal carcinomas. Used as part of curative preoperative and postoperative multimodal therapeutic strategies, hyperthermia can lead to improvement in local control (resectability, down-staging, progression-free time, recurrence rate), at least for certain risk groups. The preoperative radio-chemo-thermotherapy of advanced primary and recurring rectal carcinoma, uT3/4, was tested in a phase-I/II study of 20 patients. Therapy procedure, acute toxicity, thermal parameters, and response are described and discussed for this patient group. The regimen proved to be sufficiently tolerable, and complications did not occur. Tumor resection was performed on 14 of the 20 patients; 13 of the procedures were R0-resections and one was an R2 resection. In 64% of the resected rectal carcinomas, histopathological down-staging of the pretherapeutic endosonographical stadium was achieved; in three of the patients, despite continued non-resectability, local control has now been maintained for more than 12 months. In two patients with nonresectable rectal carcinomas, local progress was seen during the neoadjuvant combination therapy. PMID:8893348

  14. Intensified neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for rectal cancer enhances surgical complications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy has proven superior to adjuvant treatment in reducing the rate of local recurrence without impairing cancer related survival or the incidence of distant metastases. The present study aimed at addressing the effects of an intensified protocol of neoadjuvant treatment on the development of postoperative complications. Methods A total of 387 patients underwent oncological resection for rectal cancer in our institution between January 2000 and December 2009. 106 patients received an intensified radiochemotherapy. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were analyzed retrospectively with special attention on complication rates after intensified radio-chemotherapy. Therefore, for each patient subjected to neoadjuvant treatment a patient without neoadjuvant treatment was matched in the following order for tumor height, discontinuous resection/exstirpation, T-category of the TNM-system, dividing stoma and UICC stage. Results Of all patients operated for rectal cancer, 27.4% received an intensified neoadjuvant treatment. Tumor location in the matched patients were in the lower third (55.2%), middle third (41.0%) and upper third (3.8%) of the rectum. Postoperatively, surgical morbidity was higher after intensified neoadjuvant treatment. In the subgroup with low anterior resection (LAR) the anastomosis leakage rate was higher (26.6% vs. 9.7%) and in the subgroup of patients with rectal exstirpations the perineal wound infection rate was increased (42.2% vs. 18.8%) after intensified radiochemotherapy. Conclusions In rectal cancer the decision for an intensified neoadjuvant treatment comes along with an increase of anastomotic leakage and perineal wound infection. Quality of life is often reduced considerably and has to be balanced against the potential benefit of intensifying neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. PMID:24073705

  15. Laparoscopic Resection for Rectal Cancer: What Is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Dedrick Kok-Hong; Chong, Choon-Seng; Lieske, Bettina; Tan, Ker-Kan

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic colectomy for colon cancer is a well-established procedure supported by several well-conducted large-scale randomised controlled trials. Patients could now be conferred the benefits of the minimally invasive approach while retaining comparable oncologic outcomes to the open approach. However, the benefits of laparoscopic proctectomy for rectal cancer remained controversial. While the laparoscopic approach is more technically demanding, results from randomised controlled trials regarding long term oncologic outcomes are only beginning to be reported. The impacts of bladder and sexual functions following proctectomy are considerable and are important contributing factors to the patients' quality of life in the long-term. These issues present a delicate dilemma to the surgeon in his choice of operative approach in tackling rectal cancer. This is compounded further by the rapid proliferation of various laparoscopic techniques including the hand assisted, robotic assisted, and single port laparoscopy. This review article aims to draw on the significant studies which have been conducted to highlight the short- and long-term outcomes and evidence for laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer. PMID:24822196

  16. Which endoscopic treatment is the best for small rectal carcinoid tumors?

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Kim, Jin Su; Cheung, Dae Young; Cho, Young-Seok

    2013-10-16

    The incidence of rectal carcinoids is rising because of the widespread use of screening colonoscopy. Rectal carcinoids detected incidentally are usually in earlier stages at diagnosis. Rectal carcinoids estimated endoscopically as < 10 mm in diameter without atypical features and confined to the submucosal layer can be removed endoscopically. Here, we review the efficacy and safety of various endoscopic treatments for small rectal carcinoid tumors, including conventional polypectomy, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), cap-assisted EMR (or aspiration lumpectomy), endoscopic submucosal resection with ligating device, endoscopic submucosal dissection, and transanal endoscopic microsurgery. It is necessary to carefully choose an effective and safe primary resection method for complete histological resection. PMID:24147192

  17. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with solitary rectal ulcer in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Bes, C; Da?l?, Ü; Y?lmaz, F; Soy, M

    2015-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare benign disorder that has a wide range of clinical presentations and variable endoscopic fi ndings which makes it diffi cult to diagnose and treat. The clinical and endoscopic picture in this condition can also mimic malign ulceration, malignancy or Crohn's disease. Behçet's disease can affect the gastrointestinal tract. However to the best of our knowledge, no case with solitary rectal ulceration has been reported so far in literature. We herein present a patient diagnosed with Behçet's disease admitted to our clinic with rectal bleeding due to solitary rectal ulceration. PMID:26492967

  18. Correlation of Chromosomal Instability, Telomere Length and Telomere Maintenance in Microsatellite Stable Rectal Cancer: A Molecular Subclass of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Lisa A.; Johnson, Ruth A.; Viker, Kimberly B.; Hafner, Kari A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Litzelman, Kristin; Seo, Songwon; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Engelman, Corinne D.; Rider, David N.; Vanderboom, Russell J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Skinner, Halcyon G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer (CRC) tumor DNA is characterized by chromosomal damage termed chromosomal instability (CIN) and excessively shortened telomeres. Up to 80% of CRC is microsatellite stable (MSS) and is historically considered to be chromosomally unstable (CIN+). However, tumor phenotyping depicts some MSS CRC with little or no genetic changes, thus being chromosomally stable (CIN-). MSS CIN- tumors have not been assessed for telomere attrition. Experimental Design MSS rectal cancers from patients ?50 years old with Stage II (B2 or higher) or Stage III disease were assessed for CIN, telomere length and telomere maintenance mechanism (telomerase activation [TA]; alternative lengthening of telomeres [ALT]). Relative telomere length was measured by qPCR in somatic epithelial and cancer DNA. TA was measured with the TRAPeze assay, and tumors were evaluated for the presence of C-circles indicative of ALT. p53 mutation status was assessed in all available samples. DNA copy number changes were evaluated with Spectral Genomics aCGH. Results Tumors were classified as chromosomally stable (CIN-) and chromosomally instable (CIN+) by degree of DNA copy number changes. CIN- tumors (35%; n=6) had fewer copy number changes (<17% of their clones with DNA copy number changes) than CIN+ tumors (65%; n=13) which had high levels of copy number changes in 20% to 49% of clones. Telomere lengths were longer in CIN- compared to CIN+ tumors (p=0.0066) and in those in which telomerase was not activated (p=0.004). Tumors exhibiting activation of telomerase had shorter tumor telomeres (p=0.0040); and tended to be CIN+ (p=0.0949). Conclusions MSS rectal cancer appears to represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that may be categorized both on the basis of CIN status and telomere maintenance mechanism. MSS CIN- rectal cancers appear to have longer telomeres than those of MSS CIN+ rectal cancers and to utilize ALT rather than activation of telomerase. PMID:24278232

  19. In vivo trans-rectal ultrasound coupled trans-rectal near-infrared optical tomography of canine prostate bearing transmissible venereal tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Holyoak, G. Reed; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Xu, Guan; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Piao, Daqing

    2009-02-01

    In vivo trans-rectal near-infrared (NIR) optical tomography is conducted on a tumor-bearing canine prostate with the assistance of trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS). The canine prostate tumor model is made possible by a unique round cell neoplasm of dogs, transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) that can be transferred from dog to dog regardless of histocompatibility. A characterized TVT cell line was homogenized and passed twice in subcutaneous tissue of NOD/SCID mice. Following the second passage, the tumor was recovered, homogenized and then inoculated by ultrasound guidance into the prostate gland of a healthy dog. The dog was then imaged with a combined trans-rectal NIR and TRUS imager using an integrated trans-rectal NIR/US applicator. The image was taken by NIR and US modalities concurrently, both in sagittal view. The trans-rectal NIR imager is a continuous-wave system that illuminates 7 source channels sequentially by a fiber switch to deliver sufficient light power to the relatively more absorbing prostate tissue and samples 7 detection channels simultaneously by a gated intensified high-resolution CCD camera. This work tests the feasibility of detecting prostate tumor by trans-rectal NIR optical tomography and the benefit of augmenting TRUS with trans-rectal NIR imaging.

  20. Rectal sensorimotor dysfunction in patients with urge faecal incontinence: evidence from prolonged manometric studies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C L H; Lunniss, P J; Wang, D; Williams, N S; Scott, S M

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Although external anal sphincter dysfunction is the major cause of urge faecal incontinence, approximately 50% of such patients have evidence of rectal hypersensitivity and report exaggerated stool frequency and urgency. The contribution of rectosigmoid contractile activity to the pathophysiology of this condition is unclear, and thus the relations between symptoms, rectal sensation, and rectosigmoid motor function were investigated. Methods: Fifty two consecutive patients with urge faecal incontinence, referred to a tertiary surgical centre, and 24 volunteers, underwent comprehensive anorectal physiological investigation, including prolonged rectosigmoid manometry. Patients were classified on the basis of balloon distension thresholds into those with rectal hypersensitivity (n?=?27) and those with normal rectal sensation (n?=?25). Automated quantitative analysis of overall rectosigmoid contractile activities and, specifically, high amplitude contractions and rectal motor complex activity was performed. Results: External anal sphincter dysfunction was similar in both patient groups. Overall, phasic activity and high amplitude contraction frequency were greater, and rectal motor complex variables significantly altered, in those with rectal hypersensitivity. Symptoms, more prevalent in the rectal hypersensitivity group, were also more often associated with rectosigmoid contractile events. For individuals, reduced compliance and increased rectal motor complex frequency were only observed in patients with rectal hypersensitivity. Conclusions: We have identified a subset of patients with urge faecal incontinence—namely, those with rectal hypersensitivity—who demonstrated increased symptoms, enhanced perception, reduced compliance, and exaggerated rectosigmoid motor activity. Comprehensive assessment of rectosigmoid sensorimotor function, in addition to evaluation of anal function, should be considered in the investigation of patients with urge faecal incontinence. PMID:15914573

  1. ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling of human rectal cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal cancer is one of the most prevalent tumor types. Understanding the metabolic profile of rectal cancer is important for developing therapeutic approaches and molecular diagnosis. Methods Here, we report a metabonomics profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human rectal cancer subjects (n?=?127) and normal controls (n?=?43) using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomics assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for the biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the 1H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of rectal cancer. Results Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed among the different stages of rectal cancer tissues (stage I?=?35; stage II?=?37; stage III?=?37 and stage IV?=?18) and normal controls. A total of 38 differential metabolites were identified, 16 of which were closely correlated with the stage of rectal cancer. The up-regulation of 10 metabolites, including lactate, threonine, acetate, glutathione, uracil, succinate, serine, formate, lysine and tyrosine, were detected in the cancer tissues. On the other hand, 6 metabolites, including myo-inositol, taurine, phosphocreatine, creatine, betaine and dimethylglycine were decreased in cancer tissues. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of energy, amino acids, ketone body and choline metabolism, which may be correlated with the progression of human rectal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of rectal cancer tissues, indicating possibility of the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of rectal cancer. The altered metabolites may be as potential biomarkers, which would provide a promising molecular diagnostic approach for clinical diagnosis of human rectal cancer. The role and underlying mechanism of metabolites in rectal cancer progression are worth being further investigated. PMID:24138801

  2. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Park, H; Lee, J; Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T; Lee, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (MSIP) (Grant No. 200900420)

  3. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  4. 75 FR 51080 - Determination That DIASTAT (Diazepam Rectal Gel), 5 Milligrams/Milliliter, 10 Milligrams/2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ...Rectal Gel), 5 Milligrams/ Milliliter, 10 Milligrams/2 Milliliter, 15 Milligrams...milligrams (mg)/milliliter (mL), 10 mg/2 mL, 15 mg/3 mL, and 20 mg/4...for diazepam rectal gel, 5 mg/mL, 10 mg/2 mL, 15 mg/3 mL, and 20...

  5. Development of a Self-contained, Indwelling Rectal Temperature Probe for Cattle Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A device was developed to automatically monitor rectal temperature (RT) of cattle for application in research settings. Compared with manual measurement of rectal temperature, this device decreases labor and time requirements, and allows data collection without the influence of animal handling or re...

  6. Photodynamic Therapy with Motexafin Lutetium for Rectal Cancer: A Preclinical Model in the Dog

    E-print Network

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    Photodynamic Therapy with Motexafin Lutetium for Rectal Cancer: A Preclinical Model in the Dog H of rectal resection after motexafin lutetium-mediated photodynamic therapy. Methods. Ten mixed breed dogs received the photosensitizing agent motexafin lutetium (MLu, Pharmacyclics, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) of 2 mg

  7. Successful resection of metachronous para-aortic, Virchow lymph node and liver metastatic recurrence of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Fukunaga, Toru; Kimura, Masayuki; Sugamoto, Yuji; Tasaki, Kentaro; Hoshino, Isamu; Ota, Takumi; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Tamachi, Tomohide; Hosokawa, Takashi; Asai, Yo; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-11-28

    A 66-year-old female presented with the main complaint of defecation trouble and abdominal distention. With diagnosis of rectal cancer, cSS, cN0, cH0, cP0, cM0 cStage II, Hartmann's operation with D3 lymph node dissection was performed and a para-aortic lymph node and a disseminated node near the primary tumor were resected. Histological examination showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, pSS, pN3, pH0, pP1, pM1 (para-aortic lymph node, dissemination) fStage IV. After the operation, the patient received chemotherapy with FOLFIRI regimen. After 12 cycles of FOLFIRI regimen, computed tomography (CT) detected an 11 mm of liver metastasis in the postero-inferior segment of right hepatic lobe. With diagnosis of liver metastatic recurrence, we performed partial hepatectomy. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as a metastatic rectal cancer with cut end microscopically positive. After the second operation, the patient received chemotherapy with TS1 alone for 2 years. Ten months after the break, CT detected a 20 mm of para-aortic lymph node metastasis and a 10 mm of lymph node metastasis at the hepato-duodenal ligament. With diagnosis of lymph node metastatic recurrences, we performed lymph node dissection. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as metastatic rectal cancer in para-aortic and hepato-duodenal ligament areas. After the third operation, we started chemotherapy with modified FOLFOX6 regimen. After 2 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 regimen, due to the onset of neutropenia and liver dysfunction, we switched to capecitabine alone and continued it for 6 mo and then stopped. Eleven months after the break, CT detected two swelling 12 mm of lymph nodes at the left supraclavicular region. With diagnosis of Virchow lymph node metastatic recurrence, we started chemotherapy with capecitabine plus bevacizumab regimen. Due to the onset of neutropenia and hand foot syndrome (Grade 3), we managed to continue capecitabine administration with extension of interval period and dose reduction. After 2 years and 2 mo from starting capecitabine plus bevacizumab regimen, Virchow lymph nodes had slowly grown up to 17 mm. Because no recurrence had been detected besides Virchow lymph nodes for this follow up period, considering the side effects and quality of life, surgical resection was selected. We performed left supraclavicular lymph node dissection. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as a metastatic rectal cancer. After the fourth operation, the patient selected follow up without chemotherapy. Now we follow up her without recurrence and keep her quality of life high. PMID:26640350

  8. Successful resection of metachronous para-aortic, Virchow lymph node and liver metastatic recurrence of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Fukunaga, Toru; Kimura, Masayuki; Sugamoto, Yuji; Tasaki, Kentaro; Hoshino, Isamu; Ota, Takumi; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Tamachi, Tomohide; Hosokawa, Takashi; Asai, Yo; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old female presented with the main complaint of defecation trouble and abdominal distention. With diagnosis of rectal cancer, cSS, cN0, cH0, cP0, cM0 cStage II, Hartmann’s operation with D3 lymph node dissection was performed and a para-aortic lymph node and a disseminated node near the primary tumor were resected. Histological examination showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, pSS, pN3, pH0, pP1, pM1 (para-aortic lymph node, dissemination) fStage IV. After the operation, the patient received chemotherapy with FOLFIRI regimen. After 12 cycles of FOLFIRI regimen, computed tomography (CT) detected an 11 mm of liver metastasis in the postero-inferior segment of right hepatic lobe. With diagnosis of liver metastatic recurrence, we performed partial hepatectomy. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as a metastatic rectal cancer with cut end microscopically positive. After the second operation, the patient received chemotherapy with TS1 alone for 2 years. Ten months after the break, CT detected a 20 mm of para-aortic lymph node metastasis and a 10 mm of lymph node metastasis at the hepato-duodenal ligament. With diagnosis of lymph node metastatic recurrences, we performed lymph node dissection. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as metastatic rectal cancer in para-aortic and hepato-duodenal ligament areas. After the third operation, we started chemotherapy with modified FOLFOX6 regimen. After 2 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 regimen, due to the onset of neutropenia and liver dysfunction, we switched to capecitabine alone and continued it for 6 mo and then stopped. Eleven months after the break, CT detected two swelling 12 mm of lymph nodes at the left supraclavicular region. With diagnosis of Virchow lymph node metastatic recurrence, we started chemotherapy with capecitabine plus bevacizumab regimen. Due to the onset of neutropenia and hand foot syndrome (Grade 3), we managed to continue capecitabine administration with extension of interval period and dose reduction. After 2 years and 2 mo from starting capecitabine plus bevacizumab regimen, Virchow lymph nodes had slowly grown up to 17 mm. Because no recurrence had been detected besides Virchow lymph nodes for this follow up period, considering the side effects and quality of life, surgical resection was selected. We performed left supraclavicular lymph node dissection. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as a metastatic rectal cancer. After the fourth operation, the patient selected follow up without chemotherapy. Now we follow up her without recurrence and keep her quality of life high. PMID:26640350

  9. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Metformin use and improved response to therapy in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Heath D; Crane, Christopher H; Garrett, Christopher R; Eng, Cathy; Chang, George J; Skibber, John M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Kelly, Patrick; Sandulache, Vlad C; Delclos, Marc E; Krishnan, Sunil; Das, Prajnan

    2013-02-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer is commonly treated with chemoradiation prior to total mesorectal excision (TME). Studies suggest that metformin may be an effective chemopreventive agent in this disease as well as a possible adjunct to current therapy. In this study, we examined the effect of metformin use on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and outcomes in rectal cancer. The charts of 482 patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated from 1996 to 2009 with chemoradiation and TME were reviewed. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range 19.8-63). Nearly, all patients were treated with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (98%) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (81.3%). Patients were categorized as nondiabetic (422), diabetic not taking metformin (40), or diabetic taking metformin (20). No significant differences between groups were found in clinical tumor classification, nodal classification, tumor distance from the anal verge or circumferential extent, pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level, or pathologic differentiation. pCR rates were 16.6% for nondiabetics, 7.5% for diabetics not using metformin, and 35% for diabetics taking metformin, with metformin users having significantly higher pCR rates than either nondiabetics (P = 0.03) or diabetics not using metformin (P = 0.007). Metformin use was significantly associated with pCR rate on univariate (P = 0.05) and multivariate (P = 0.01) analyses. Furthermore, patients taking metformin had significantly increased disease-free (P = 0.013) and overall survival (P = 0.008) compared with other diabetic patients. Metformin use is associated with significantly higher pCR rates as well as improved survival. These promising data warrant further prospective study. PMID:24133632

  11. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  12. Generic Planning Target Margin for Rectal Cancer Treatment Setup Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M. Campbell, Jonathon P.; Yan Di

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To calculate the generic planning target margin (GPTM) for patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for rectal cancer placed in a prone position with a customized cradle for small-bowel exclusion. Methods and Materials: A total of 25 consecutive rectal cancer patients were treated for 25 or 28 fractions in a prone position using a cradle to maximize small bowel exclusion. Treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans were used to create orthogonally digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for portal image registration, which were compared with daily portal images from an electronic portal-imaging device (EPID). Translation values needed to align the DRRs and EPIDs were recorded for the superior to inferior (SI), right to left (RL), and anterior to posterior (AP) directions, and used to calculate the GPTM using the four-parameter model. Age, weight, and body mass index were tested compared with the setup variation using a Pearson correlation and a t test for significance. Gender versus setup variation was compared with a t test. Results: A total of 1,723 EPID images were reviewed. The GPTM was 10 mm superior, 8 mm inferior, 7 mm RL and 10 mm AP. Age and gender were unrelated to setup variation. Weight was significantly associated with systematic AP variation (p < 0.05). BMI was significantly associated with systematic SI (p < 0.05) and AP (p < 0.01) variation and random RL variation (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The GPTM for rectal cancer is asymmetric with a maximum of 10 mm in the superior, anterior and posterior dimensions. Body mass index may effect setup variation. Research using advanced treatment planning should include these margins in the planning target volume definition.

  13. Clinical impact of atypical endoscopic features in rectal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jong Hee; Lee, Seong Dae; Youk, Eui Gon; Lee, Jae Bum; Lee, Enu-Jung; Chang, Hee Jin; Sohn, Dae Kyung

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To validate the association between atypical endoscopic features and lymph node metastasis (LNM). METHODS: A total of 247 patients with rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) were analyzed. Endoscopic images were reviewed independently by two endoscopists, each of whom classified tumors by sized and endoscopic features, such as shape, color, and surface change (kappa coefficient 0.76 for inter-observer agreement). All of patients underwent computed tomography scans of abdomen and pelvis for evaluation of LNM. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the factors associated with LNM. Additionally, the association between endoscopic atypical features and immunohistochemical staining of tumors was analyzed. RESULTS: Of 247 patients, 156 (63.2%) were male and 15 (6.1%) were showed positive for LNM. On univariate analysis, tumor size (P < 0.001), shape (P < 0.001), color (P < 0.001) and surface changes (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with LNM. On multivariate analysis, tumor size (OR = 11.53, 95%CI: 2.51-52.93, P = 0.002) and atypical surface (OR = 27.44, 95%CI: 5.96-126.34, P < 0.001) changes were independent risk factors for LNM. The likelihood of atypical endoscopic features increased as tumor size increased. Atypical endoscopic features were associated with LNM in rectal NETs < 10 mm (P = 0.005) and 10-19 mm (P = 0.041) in diameter. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the rate of atypical endoscopic features was higher in non L-cell tumors. CONCLUSION: Atypical endoscopic features as well as tumor size are predictive factors of LNM in patients with rectal NETs. PMID:26715813

  14. Umbilical metastasis derived from early stage rectal cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Umbilical metastasis, also called Sister Mary Joseph’s nodule (SMJN), is defined as the umbilical nodule associated with advanced metastatic intra-abdominal and pelvic malignancies. A patient with umbilical metastasis has been deemed to have a poor prognosis. Rectal cancer presenting with a SMJN is a rare phenomenon, especially in the early stage and in middle-low rectal cancer. Case presentation We report a case of a 70-year-old male presenting with umbilical metastasis derived from rectal cancer (10 cm from the anal verge, T2N0). Discussion and conclusion For rectal cancer with umbilical metastasis, the exact metastatic routes as well as the criterion of diagnosis and treatments are not very clear. Here we review the literature on rectal cancer and SMJN to deepen the understanding of this disease. PMID:24708697

  15. Effects of a single rectal dose of Misoprostol prior to abdominal hysterectomy in women with symptomatic leiomyoma: a randomized double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Afsarosadat; Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Meibodi, Bahare; Vaghefi, Marzie; Yazdian, Pouria; Zeidabadi, Mahbube; Dehghani, Atefe; Teimoori, Soraya; Jamali, Azadeh; Akhondi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibroma, the most common benign pelvic tumor in women, affects 25 to 30% of women of reproductive age. Primary treatment for patients with symptomatic or large fibroma is surgery. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a single rectal dose of Misoprostol on bleeding during abdominal hysterectomy. Methods This double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted with 80 candidates for abdominal hysterectomy, due to uterine myoma, in the Shahid Sadoughi hospital of Yazd in 2012. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of single rectal dose of Misoprostol on peri-operational abdominal hysterectomy bleeding. Following administration of 400 micrograms of Misoprostol in the case group (n=40), predetermined criteria were compared with control group (n=40). Results Volume of bleeding during the operation was significantly lower in cases where Misoprostol was used. (268.71 ± 156.85 vs. 350.38 ± 152.61 cc in the case and control groups, respectively). Our findings also showed that Hemoglobin (Hb) levels before, 8, and 30 hours following the operation differed significantly (p=0.001), but these changes were similar in both groups. Pre-operative Hb levels were 11.90 ± 1.7 and 11.90 ± 2.0 in the case and control groups, respectively. Conclusion A single rectal dose of Misoprostol has positive effect on reducing peri-operational bleeding in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy due to symptomatic leiomyoma. PMID:26516444

  16. Combination of Novel Agents with Radiotherapy to Treat Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, T A; Dearman, C; Sharma, R A

    2016-02-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines is an established treatment in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. There has been a great deal of research into improving patient outcomes by modifying this regimen by the addition of further radiosensitising agents. One of the difficulties in advancing new combination therapies has been lack of consensus on which surrogate measures best reflect clinically important outcomes. Here we review combinations of the cytotoxic, biological and other agents currently under scrutiny to improve clinical outcomes for patients with colorectal cancer. We also discuss advances in biomarkers that may ultimately result in an ability to tailor neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens to the somatic gene profile of individual patients. PMID:26719097

  17. 25 mg versus 50?mg dose of rectal diclofenac for prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis in Japanese patients: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Takeo; Horimoto, Masayoshi; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Osugi, Naoto; Ikezoe, Tatsuro; Kotani, Kaori; Sanada, Toru; Higashi, Churi; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Ota, Makiyo; Mizuno, Tatsunori; Gotoh, Yasukazu; Okuda, Yorihide; Suzuki, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to assess the appropriate administration dose of non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs to prevent pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Importantly, the 100?mg dose of diclofenac recommended in Western countries has not been permitted in Japan. Design A retrospective study. Settings A single centre in Japan. Participants This study enrolled patients who underwent ERCP at the Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Saiseikai Senri Hospital, from April 2011 through June 2013, and who received either a 25 or a 50?mg dose of rectal diclofenac after ERCP. Primary outcome measure The occurrence of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). A multivariate regression model was used to assess the effect of the 50?mg dose (the 50?mg group) of rectal diclofenac and to compare it to the occurrence of PEP referring to the 25?mg group. Results A total of 155 eligible patients received either 25?mg (84 patients) or 50?mg (71 patients) doses of rectal diclofenac after ERCP to prevent PEP. The proportion of PEP was significantly lower in the 50?mg group than in the 25?mg group (15.5% (11/71) vs 33.3% (28/84), p=0.018). In a multivariate analysis, the occurrence of PEP was significantly lower in the 50?mg group than in the 25?mg group even after adjusting potential confounding factors (adjusted OR=0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.70). Conclusions From this observation, the occurrence of PEP was significantly lower among ERCP patients with the 50?mg dose of rectal diclofenac than among those with the 25?mg dose. PMID:25795692

  18. Watch and wait approach to rectal cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Marcos E; Fang, Sandy H

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, there were an estimated 136800 new cases of colorectal cancer, making it the most common gastrointestinal malignancy. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and over one-third of newly diagnosed patients have stage III (node-positive) disease. For stage II and III colorectal cancer patients, the mainstay of curative therapy is neoadjuvant therapy, followed by radical surgical resection of the rectum. However, the consequences of a proctectomy, either by low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection, can lead to very extensive comorbidities, such as the need for a permanent colostomy, fecal incontinence, sexual and urinary dysfunction, and even mortality. Recently, trends of complete regression of the rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy have been confirmed by clinical and radiographic evaluation-this is known as complete clinical response (cCR). The “watch and wait” approach was first proposed by Dr. Angelita Habr-Gama in Brazil in 2009. Those patients with cCR are followed with close surveillance physical examinations, endoscopy, and imaging. Here, we review management of rectal cancer, the development of the “watch and wait” approach and its outcomes. PMID:26649153

  19. Differences in telomerase activity between colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ayiomamitis, Georgios D.; Notas, George; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Zizi-Sermpetzoglou, Adamantia; Georgiadou, Maria; Sfakianaki, Ourania; Kouroumallis, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers and the third leading cause of cancer death in both sexes. The disease progresses as a multistep process and is associated with genetic alterations. One of the characteristic features of cancer is telomerase activation. We sought to evaluate the differences in telomerase activity between colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue and to correlate the differences in telomerase activity between different locations with clinicopathological factors and survival. Methods Matched colon tumour samples and adjacent normal mucosa samples 10 cm away from the tumour were collected during colectomy. We assessed telomerase activity using real time polymerase chain reaction. Several pathological characteristics of tumours, including p53, Ki-67, p21, bcl2 and MLH1 expression were also studied. Results We collected samples from 49 patients. There was a significantly higher telomerase activity in colon cancer tissue than normal tissue. Adenocarcinomas of the right colon express significantly higher telomerase than left-side cancers. Colon cancers and their adjacent normal tissue had significantly more telomerase and were more positive to MLH1 than rectal cancers. The expression of p53 negatively correlated to telomerase activity and was linked to better patient survival. Conclusion Colon and rectal cancers seem to have different telomerase and MLH1 profiles, and this could be another factor for their different biologic and clinical behaviour and progression. These results support the idea that the large bowel cannot be considered a uniform organ, at least in the biology of cancer. PMID:24869613

  20. Current treatment of rectal cancer adapted to the individual patient

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, Laura; Ciria, Juan Pablo; Arbea, Leire; Liñán, Olga; Cafiero, Sergio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative radiochemotherapy and total mesorectal excision surgery is a recommended standard therapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. However, some subgroups of patients benefit more than others from this approach. In order to avoid long-term complications of radiation and chemotherapy, efforts are being made to subdivide T3N0 stage using advanced imaging techniques, and to analyze prognostic factors that help to define subgroup risk patients. Long-course radiochemotherapy has the potential of downsizing the tumor before surgery and may increase the chance of sphincter preservation in some patients. Short-course radiotherapy (SCRT), on the other hand, is a practical schedule that better suits patients with intermediated risk tumors, located far from the anal margin. SCRT is also increasingly being used among patients with disseminated disease, before resection of the rectal tumor. Improvements in radiation technique, such as keeping the irradiation target below S2/S3 junction, and the use of IMRT, can reduce the toxicity associated with radiation, specially long-term small bowel toxicity. PMID:24416579

  1. [Pelvic exenteration in advanced and or recurrent rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Y; Moriya, Y; Hojo, K

    1987-01-01

    Operative procedures of pelvic exenteration which were performed on a 54 yrs male patient with irradiated rectal cancer involving the prostatic gland, perineal skin and gluteal muscles were demonstrated by cinema. Perianal fistula formation and hard fibrotic adhesion between the distal rectum and the sacrum were also seen. As a result, combined resection of the perianal skin, gluteal muscles and distal sacral bone (fourth and fifth sacral and coccygeal vertebrae) was carried out. Fifty four total pelvic exenteration were performed at National Cancer Center Hospital from 1962 to 1985. The procedures were performed as a definitive treatment for the primary tumors in 35 cases (31 males and 4 females) which corresponds to 2.7% of operated primary rectal cancer at the same period and for the locally recurrent cancer in 19 cases (13 males and 6 females). By post operative histopathological examination 35 operations, 28 of 35 primary and 7 of 19 recurrent cases, were assessed as potentially curative. Hospital death rate was 13%; i.e. 7 cases (1 of 35 primary and 6 of 19 recurrent cases). Postoperative survival rates of the 54 patients were calculated by Kaplan-Meier's method. There were 17 survivors among 35 curatively operated patients and 5 yr survival rate was 34%. On the other hand, though 6 patients are surviving, there is no long term survivor (more than 35 months) among 21 patients who were treated by palliative resection. PMID:2434830

  2. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ?2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ?2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ? 0.041) and of grade ? 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  3. Positional Reproducibility and Effects of a Rectal Balloon in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae Ho; Lee, Chang-Geol; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Jooho; Lee, Sangkyu; Suh, Chang-Ok; Seong, Jinsil; Suh, Yang Gun; Lee, Ikjae

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of the rectal balloon in prostate cancer radiotherapy, many issues still remain to be verified objectively including its positional reproducibility and relevance to treatment morbidity. We have developed a custom rectal balloon that has a scale indicating the depth of insertion and dilates symmetrically ensuring positional reproducibility. Fifty patients with prostate cancer treated by definitive 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with rectal balloon were analyzed. Each of first five patients undergone computed tomography (CT) three times with a rectal balloon. The positional reproducibility was tested by Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) from the CT-to-CT fusion images. Planning variables and clinical acute toxicities were compared between when or not applying balloon. An ICC of greater than 0.9 in all directions revealed an excellent reproducibility of the balloon. Rectal balloon improved considerably the mean dose and V45Gy-V65Gy in plan comparison, and especially in 3D-CRT the rectal volume exposed to more than 60 Gy dropped from 41.3% to 19.5%. Clinically, the balloon lowered acute toxicity, which was lowest when both the balloon and IMRT were applied simultaneously. The rectal balloon carries excellent reproducibility and reduces acute toxicity in 3D-CRT and IMRT for prostate cancer. PMID:19794990

  4. Penetrating Bladder Trauma: A High Risk Factor for Associated Rectal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, B. M.; Reis, L. O.; Calderan, T. R.; de Campos, C. C.; Fraga, G. P.

    2014-01-01

    Demographics and mechanisms were analyzed in prospectively maintained level one trauma center database 1990–2012. Among 2,693 trauma laparotomies, 113 (4.1%) presented bladder lesions; 51.3% with penetrating injuries (n = 58); 41.3% (n = 24) with rectal injuries, males corresponding to 95.8%, mean age 29.8 years; 79.1% with gunshot wounds and 20.9% with impalement; 91.6% arriving the emergence room awake (Glasgow 14-15), hemodynamically stable (average systolic blood pressure 119.5?mmHg); 95.8% with macroscopic hematuria; and 100% with penetrating stigmata. Physical exam was not sensitive for rectal injuries, showing only 25% positivity in patients. While 60% of intraperitoneal bladder injuries were surgically repaired, extraperitoneal ones were mainly repaired using Foley catheter alone (87.6%). Rectal injuries, intraperitoneal in 66.6% of the cases and AAST-OIS grade II in 45.8%, were treated with primary suture plus protective colostomy; 8.3% were sigmoid injuries, and 70.8% of all injuries had a minimum stool spillage. Mean injury severity score was 19; mean length of stay 10 days; 20% of complications with no death. Concomitant rectal injuries were not a determinant prognosis factor. Penetrating bladder injuries are highly associated with rectal injuries (41.3%). Heme-negative rectal examination should not preclude proctoscopy and eventually rectal surgical exploration (only 25% sensitivity). PMID:24527030

  5. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  6. Dynamic study of rectally absorbed ammonia in liver cirrhosis using (13N)ammonia and a positron camera

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, H.; Okuda, K.; Musha, H.; Tateno, Y.; Fukuda, N.; Matsumoto, T.; Shisido, F.; Rikitake, T,; Iinuma, T.; Kurisu, A.; Arimizu, N.

    1980-11-01

    (13N)Ammonia produced by the cyclotron was instilled intrarectally in patients with cirrhosis and other liver diseases to study the turnover of rectally absorbed (12N)ammonia. In the control, (13N)ammonia was absorbed quickly and visualized the liver, whereas in patients with cirrhosis, the lungs and heart were first visualized, and 13N activity over the head was also higher. It was suggested that a large proportion of absorbed (13N)ammonia bypassed hepatocytes and reached peripheral tissues in cirrhosis. The heart/liver ratio of 13N and 13N over the head were correlated with various indices of portal hypertension. The relative proportion of nonammonia 13N metabolites in blood was lower at 5 and 15 min after administration in cirrhosis, suggesting a reduced capacity of the liver to remove and metabolize ammonia.

  7. Rectal-wall dose dependence on postplan timing after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel; Yeung, Ivan; Williams, Theresa; Pearson, Shannon; McLean, Michael; Pond, Gregory; Crook, Juanita . E-mail: Juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: Dose to rectal wall after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy is dependent on distance between posterior prostatic seeds and anterior rectal wall and is influenced by postimplant periprostatic edema. We analyzed the effect of postplan timing on anterior rectal-wall dose. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received permanent seed {sup 125}I brachytherapy as monotherapy (145 Gy). Implants were preplanned by use of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and carried out by use of preloaded needles. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated by use of magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion on Days 1, 8, and 30. The anterior rectal-wall dose is reported as the isodose enclosing 1.0 or 2.0 cc of rectal wall and as the RV100 in cc. Results: The dose to rectal wall increased progressively over time. The median increase in dose to 1.0 cc of rectal wall (RD [1 cc]) from Day 1 to 30 was 39.2 Gy (p < 0.001). RV100 increased from a median of 0.07 cc on Day 1 to 0.67 cc on Day 30. The most significant predictor of rectal-wall dose (RD [1 cc], RD [2 cc], or RV100) was the time of evaluation (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Although periprostatic edema cannot be quantified by postimplant imaging, the dose to the anterior rectal wall increases significantly over time as prostatic and periprostatic edema resolve. Critical-organ dose reporting and guidelines for minimizing toxicity must take into account the time of the assessment.

  8. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Jeremy G.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ?grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ?grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ?2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following BT.

  9. Proteomic analysis of colon and rectal carcinoma using standard and customized databases

    PubMed Central

    Slebos, Robbert J.C.; Wang, Xia; Wang, Xaojing; Zhang, Bing; Tabb, David L.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding proteomic differences underlying the different phenotypic classes of colon and rectal carcinoma is important and may eventually lead to a better assessment of clinical behavior of these cancers. We here present a comprehensive description of the proteomic data obtained from 90 colon and rectal carcinomas previously subjected to genomic analysis by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Here, the primary instrument files and derived secondary data files are compiled and presented in forms that will allow further analyses of the biology of colon and rectal carcinoma. We also discuss new challenges in processing these large proteomic datasets for relevant proteins and protein variants. PMID:26110064

  10. Laparoscopic vs open abdominoperineal resection in the multimodality management of low rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Huang, Li-Yong; Song, Cheng-Li; Zhuo, Chang-Hua; Shi, De-Bing; Cai, Guo-Xiang; Xu, Ye; Cai, San-Jun; Li, Xin-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection compared with the open procedure in multimodality management of rectal cancer. METHODS: A total of 106 rectal cancer patients who underwent open abdominoperineal resection (OAPR) were matched with 106 patients who underwent laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (LAPR) in a 1 to 1 fashion, between 2009 and 2013 at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Propensity score matching was carried out based on age, gender, pathological staging of the disease and administration of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Data regarding preoperative staging, surgical technique, pathological results, postoperative recovery and complications were reviewed and compared between the LAPR and OAPR groups. Perineal closure around the stoma and pelvic floor reconstruction were performed only in OAPR, not in LAPR. Therefore, abdominoperineal resection procedure-specific surgical complications including parastomal hernia and perineal wound complications were compared between the open and laparoscopic procedure. Regular surveillance of the two cohorts was carried out to gather prognostic data. Disease-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier estimate and log-rank test. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with locally advanced disease treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between the LAPR group and the OAPR group in terms of clinicopathological features. The operation time (180.8 ± 47.8 min vs 172.1 ± 49.2 min, P = 0.190), operative blood loss (93.9 ± 60.0 mL vs 88.4 ± 55.2 mL, P = 0.494), total number of retrieved lymph nodes (12.9 ± 6.9 vs 12.9 ± 5.4, P = 0.974), surgical complications (12.3% vs 15.1%, P = 0.549) and pathological characteristics were comparable between the LAPR and OAPR group, respectively. Compared with OAPR patients, LAPR patients showed significantly shorter postoperative analgesia (2.4 ± 0.7 d vs 2.7 ± 0.6 d, P < 0.001), earlier first flatus (57.3 ± 7.9 h vs 63.5 ± 9.2 h, P < 0.001), shorter urinary drainage time (6.5 ± 3.4 d vs 7.8 ± 1.3 d, P < 0.001), and shorter postoperative admission (11.2 ± 4.7 d vs 12.6 ± 4.0 d, P = 0.014). With regard to APR-specific complications (perineal wound complications and parastomal hernia), there were no significant differences between the two groups. Similar results were found in the 26 pairs of patients administered neoadjuvant chemoradiation in subgroup analysis. During the follow-up period, no port site recurrences were observed. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection for multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer is safe, and is associated with earlier recovery and shorter admission time in combination with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. PMID:26401082

  11. Clinical Decision Support for Colon and Rectal Surgery: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B.; Melton, Genevieve B.; Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) has been shown to improve clinical processes, promote patient safety, and reduce costs in healthcare settings, and it is now a requirement for clinicians as part of the Meaningful Use Regulation. However, most evidence for CDS has been evaluated primarily in internal medicine care settings, and colon and rectal surgery (CRS) has unique needs with CDS that are not frequently described in the literature. The authors reviewed published literature in informatics and medical journals, combined with expert opinion to define CDS, describe the evidence for CDS, outline the implementation process for CDS, and present applications of CDS in CRS.CDS functionalities such as order sets, documentation templates, and order facilitation aids are most often described in the literature and most likely to be beneficial in CRS. Further research is necessary to identify and better evaluate additional CDS systems in the setting of CRS. PMID:24436644

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    PubMed Central

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  13. Use of Robotics in Colon and Rectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.; Beekley, Alec C.

    2013-01-01

    The pace of innovation in the field of surgery continues to accelerate. As new technologies are developed in combination with industry and clinicians, specialized patient care improves. In the field of colon and rectal surgery, robotic systems offer clinicians many alternative ways to care for patients. From having the ability to round remotely to improved visualization and dissection in the operating room, robotic assistance can greatly benefit clinical outcomes. Although the field of robotics in surgery is still in its infancy, many groups are actively investigating technologies that will assist clinicians in caring for their patients. As these technologies evolve, surgeons will continue to find new and innovative ways to utilize the systems for improved patient care and comfort. PMID:24436647

  14. Rectal metastasis from Breast cancer: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Cho Ee; Wright, Lucie; Pieri, Andrew; Belhasan, Anas; Fasih, Tarannum

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer metastases occurs in around 50% of all presentation. It is the second most common type of cancer to metastasise to the GI tract but this only occurs in less than 1% of cases. Presentation of case We report a case that underwent treatment for invasive lobular cancer (ILC) of the breast and 5 years later was found to have rectal and peritoneal metastasis. She is currently receiving palliative management including chemotherapy in the form of weekly Paclitaxel (Taxol®) and stenting to relieve obstruction. Conclusion There should be high clinical suspicion of bowel metastasis in patients presenting with positive faecal occult blood with or without bowel symptoms even if the incidence is less <1% of metastases, particularly in cases where the initial breast tumour was large, with positive axillary nodes. PMID:26188979

  15. Is total pelvic exenteration reasonable primary treatment for rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, L F; Huddleston, C B; Sawyers, J L; Potts, J R; Sharp, K W; McDougal, S W

    1988-01-01

    Total pelvic exeneration (TPE) is reasonable primary surgical therapy in select patients with large bulky locally invasive rectal cancers that can be removed en bloc. Many do not have either nodal or distant metastasis. Furthermore, TPE can be curative and often is palliative for similar lesions that are recurrent or nonresponsive to radiation therapy. Operative mortality rates should be under 10% and can be under 5% for primary cases. Although improvement in preoperative management and operative technique, especially with urinary conduits and postoperative care is clear, both early and late complications are significant. Unfortunately, preoperative identification of those patients requiring TPE rather than abdominoperineal or low anterior resection remains poor. Furthermore, recent improvements in techniques for pelvic slings to prevent small bowel entrapment and protection from irradiation or myocutaneous flaps to obliterate the massive dead space are not yet clearly established as preventors of either early or later complications. PMID:3291792

  16. Is total pelvic exenteration reasonable primary treatment for rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Williams, L F; Huddleston, C B; Sawyers, J L; Potts, J R; Sharp, K W; McDougal, S W

    1988-06-01

    Total pelvic exeneration (TPE) is reasonable primary surgical therapy in select patients with large bulky locally invasive rectal cancers that can be removed en bloc. Many do not have either nodal or distant metastasis. Furthermore, TPE can be curative and often is palliative for similar lesions that are recurrent or nonresponsive to radiation therapy. Operative mortality rates should be under 10% and can be under 5% for primary cases. Although improvement in preoperative management and operative technique, especially with urinary conduits and postoperative care is clear, both early and late complications are significant. Unfortunately, preoperative identification of those patients requiring TPE rather than abdominoperineal or low anterior resection remains poor. Furthermore, recent improvements in techniques for pelvic slings to prevent small bowel entrapment and protection from irradiation or myocutaneous flaps to obliterate the massive dead space are not yet clearly established as preventors of either early or later complications. PMID:3291792

  17. Rectal bleeding in a 4-month-old boy

    SciTech Connect

    Dutro, J.A.; Santanello, S.A.; Unger, F.; Goodwin, C.D.

    1986-10-24

    A case of bleeding Meckel's diverticulum is described in an infant. A 4-month-old boy was seen initially with a 24-hour history of painless hematochezia. His parents had noted two episodes of maroon-colored stool that did not appear to be associated with any abdominal distress. His medical history was unremarkable, with normal growth and development. Physical examination revealed a well-nourished, well-hydrated infant in no apparent distress. Vital signs were normal. Rectal examination revealed no masses, but bright-red blood was noted on the examining finger. Findings from the remainder of the examination were normal. An upright roentgenogram of the abdomen was obtained and demonstrated no abnormalities. The abdominal technetium scan was abnormal. An exploratory laparotomy was performed later on the day of admission.

  18. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    PubMed

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-12-10

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  19. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  20. Rectal Radiotherapy - Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Delivery, Delineation and Doses.

    PubMed

    Teoh, S; Muirhead, R

    2016-02-01

    The use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in rectal cancer is attractive in that it may reduce acute and late toxicities and potentially facilitate dose escalation. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy probably has a role in selected patients, but further investigation is required to identify the parameters for selection. Delineation of specific nodal groups allows maximal sparing of bladder and small bowel. In locally advanced tumours a simultaneous integrated boost allows dose escalation incorporating hypofractionation and a shorter overall treatment time. However, due to a sparsity of data on late toxicity in doses ?60 Gy, doses at this level should be used with caution, ideally within prospective trials. Future studies investigating dose escalation must ascertain late toxicity as well as local control, as both can significantly affect quality of life and without both, the risk-benefit ratio cannot be calculated. PMID:26643092

  1. Position Verification for the Prostate: Effect on Rectal Wall Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Haverkort, Marie A.D.; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Pieters, Bradley R.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Assendelft, Esther; Lensing, Andrea L.; Herk, Marcel van; Reijke, Theo M. de; Stoker, Jaap; Koning, Caro C.E.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of gold marker (GM)-based position correction on the cumulative dose in the anorectal wall compared with traditional bony anatomy (BA)-based correction, taking into account changes in anorectal shape and position. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 consecutive prostate cancer patients, treated with curative external beam radiotherapy, were included. Four fiducial GMs were implanted in the prostate. Positioning was verified according to the shift in BA and GMs on daily electronic portal images. Position corrections were determined using on- and off-line position verification protocols according to the position of the GMs (GM-on and GM-off) and BA (BA-off). For all patients, intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were made for the GM (8-mm planning target volume margin) and BA (10-mm planning target volume margin) protocols. The dose distribution was recomputed on 11 repeat computed tomography scans to estimate the accumulated dose to the prostate and anorectal wall while considering internal organ motion. Results: The dose that is at least received by 99% of the prostate was, on average, acceptable for all protocols. The individual patient data showed the best coverage for both GM protocols, with >95% of the prescribed dose for all patients. The anorectal wall dose was significantly lower for the GM protocols. The dose that is at least received by 30% of the rectal wall was, on average, 54.6 Gy for GM-on, 54.1 Gy for GM-off, and 58.9 Gy for BA-off (p <.001). Conclusion: Position verification with GM and reduced planning target volume margins yielded adequate treatment of the prostate and a lower rectal wall dose, even when accounting for independent movement of the prostate and anorectal wall.

  2. Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gollins, S; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2016-02-01

    Improved surgical technique plus selective preoperative radiotherapy have decreased rectal cancer pelvic local recurrence from, historically, 25% down to about 5-10%. However, this improvement has not reduced distant metastatic relapse, which is the main cause of death and a key issue in rectal cancer management. The current standard is local pelvic treatment (surgery ± preoperative radiotherapy) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, depending on resection histology. For circumferential resection margin (CRM)-threatened cancer on baseline magnetic resonance imaging, downstaging long-course preoperative chemoradiation (LCPCRT) is generally used. However, for non-CRM-threatened disease, varying approaches are currently adopted in the UK, including straight to surgery, short-course preoperative radiotherapy and LCPCRT. Clinical trials are investigating intensification of concurrent chemoradiation. There is also increasing interest in investigating preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as a way of exposing micro-metastatic disease to full-dose systemic chemotherapy as early as possible and potentially reducing metastatic relapse. Phase II trials suggest that this strategy is feasible, with promising histological response and low rates of tumour progression during NAC. Phase III trials are needed to determine the benefit of NAC when added to standard therapy and also to determine if it can be used instead of neoadjuvant radiotherapy-based schedules. Although several measures of neoadjuvant treatment response assessment based on imaging or pathology are promising predictive biomarkers for long-term survival, none has been validated in prospective phase III studies. The phase III setting will enable this, also providing translational opportunities to examine molecular predictors of response and survival. PMID:26645661

  3. A Pilot Study of the Effect of Daikenchuto on Rectal Sensation in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael; Linker-Nord, Sara; Busciglio, Irene; Iturrino, Johanna; Szarka, Lawrence A; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Daikenchuto (TU 100), a botanical agent that modulates gastrointestinal nerves, is used in the treatment of motility and functional disorders. Our aim was to study the effects of TU-100 on rectal compliance and sensation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods In 20 patients per treatment arm, we conducted a single-center, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose pharmacodynamics study evaluating the effects of TU-100, 15 g (5 g t.i.d. [means 3 times a day]), for 14–16 consecutive days on rectal compliance and rectal sensation (thresholds and sensation ratings), all measured at baseline and on the last day of medication treatment. The primary endpoint was rectal sensation thresholds and sensation ratings in response to balloon distension at 32 mmHg. Secondary endpoints were rectal compliance, sensation thresholds, ratings and tone (fasting and postprandial), bowel pattern, abdominal pain (average and worst severity) and bloating scores, IBS quality of life and safety profile. Results Rectal sensation ratings post-treatment were significantly associated with baseline (pre-treatment) ratings and with level of anxiety or stress recorded at the time of the sensation testing. There were no effects of TU-100 treatment on rectal sensation ratings, sensation thresholds, rectal fasting or postprandial tone, rectal compliance, bowel function, abdominal pain or bloating scores, or IBS quality of life. Conclusions TU-100 did not significantly affect rectal compliance and sensation in patients with IBS in this study. PMID:26486374

  4. The role of the robotic technique in minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Luca, Fabrizio; Petz, Wanda; Valvo, Manuela; Cenciarelli, Sabine; Zuccaro, Massimiliano; Biffi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery is feasible, oncologically safe, and offers better short-term outcomes than traditional open procedures in terms of pain control, recovery of bowel function, length of hospital stay, and time until return to working activity. Nevertheless, laparoscopic techniques are not widely used in rectal surgery, mainly because they require a prolonged and demanding learning curve that is available only in high-volume and rectal cancer surgery centres experienced in minimally invasive surgery. Robotic surgery is a new technology that enables the surgeon to perform minimally invasive operations with better vision and more intuitive and precise control of the operating instruments, promising to overcome some of the technical difficulties associated with standard laparoscopy. The aim of this review is to summarise the current data on clinical and oncological outcomes of minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer, focusing on robotic surgery, and providing original data from the authors’ centre. PMID:24101946

  5. Evolution of imaging in rectal cancer: multimodality imaging with MDCT, MRI, and PET

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yifei; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), and positron emission tomography (PET) are complementary imaging modalities in the preoperative staging of patients with rectal cancer, and each offers their own individual strengths and weaknesses. MRI is the best available radiologic modality for the local staging of rectal cancers, and can play an important role in accurately distinguishing which patients should receive preoperative chemoradiation prior to total mesorectal excision. Alternatively, both MDCT and PET are considered primary modalities when performing preoperative distant staging, but are limited in their ability to locally stage rectal malignancies. This review details the role of each of these three modalities in rectal cancer staging, and how the three imaging modalities can be used in conjunction. PMID:25830037

  6. Laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer and cholecystectomy for patient with situs inversus totalis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia-Feng; Zheng, Zong-Heng; Wei, Bo; Chen, Tu-Feng; Lei, Pu-Run; Huang, Jiang-Long; Huang, Li-Jun; Wei, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis (SIT) is a rare congenital anomaly presenting with complete transposition of thoracic and abdominal viscera. Laparoscopic surgery for either rectal cancer or gallbladder diseases with SIT is rarely reported in the literature. A 39-year-old woman was admitted to hospital owing to rectal cancer. She was diagnosed with SIT by performing radiography and abdominal computed tomography scan as a routine preoperative investigation. We performed laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer successfully in spite of technical difficulties caused by abnormal anatomy. One year later, she was diagnosed with cholecysticpolyp, and we performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy for her uneventfully. With this case, we believe that performance by an experienced laparoscopic surgeon, either laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer or cholecystectomy with SIT is safe and feasible. PMID:26195883

  7. 78 FR 46965 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Recommendations for Mesalamine Rectal Suppositories...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ...FDA-2007-D-0369] Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Recommendations for Mesalamine Rectal...guidance, FDA recommends in vivo and in vitro studies to demonstrate BE of generic...pharmacokinetic endpoints and comparative in vitro studies (melting point,...

  8. Total Mesorectal Excision, an erroneous anatomical term for the gold standard in rectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Luna, María Rita; Guarneros-Zárate, Joaquín E; Tueme-Izaguirre, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    In 1986 Professor R J Heald published in The Lancet his new technique which he called Total Mesorectal Excision; today this is the gold standard for the surgical management of rectal cancer. In Total Mesorectal Excision (TME), the mesorectum is the term used to describe all the peri-rectal connective tissue including the posterior sheath of the endopelvic fascia containing the peri-rectal neurovascular structures. However, the mesenterium is a defined structure composed of a double layer of peritoneum which does not include the endopelvic fascia and the lateral rectal stalks, so these should not be included in the term 'mesorectum'. In our globalized medical culture it is important to use anatomic terms approved by the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists, as contained in the Terminologia Anatomica produced by the Federative International Programme for Anatomical Terminology (FIPAT). The term mesorectum is not listed in the Terminologia Anatomica. PMID:26409653

  9. EFFECTS OF PROSTATE-RECTUM SEPARATION ON RECTAL DOSE FROM EXTERNAL BEAM RADIOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Susil, Robert C.; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Song, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is the major dose-limiting structure. Physically separating the rectum from the prostate (e.g., by injecting a spacer) can reduce the rectal radiation dose. Despite pilot clinical studies, no careful analysis has been done of the risks, benefits, and dosimetric effects of this practice. Methods and Materials Using cadaveric specimens, 20 mL of a hydrogel was injected between the prostate and rectum using a transperineal approach. Imaging was performed before and after spacer placement, and the cadavers were subsequently dissected. Ten intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated (five before and five after separation), allowing for characterization of the rectal dose reduction. To quantify the amount of prostate-rectum separation needed for effective rectal dose reduction, simulations were performed using nine clinically generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. Results In the cadaveric studies, an average of 12.5 mm of prostate-rectum separation was generated with the 20-mL hydrogel injections (the seminal vesicles were also separated from the rectum). The average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy decreased from 19.9% to 4.5% (p < .05). In the simulation studies, a prostate-rectum separation of 10 mm was sufficient to reduce the mean rectal volume receiving 70 Gy by 83.1% (p < .05). No additional reduction in the average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy was noted after 15 mm of separation. In addition, spacer placement allowed for increased planning target volume margins without exceeding the rectal dose tolerance. Conclusion Prostate-rectum spacers can allow for reduced rectal toxicity rates, treatment intensification, and/or reduced dependence on complex planning and treatment delivery techniques. PMID:19939577

  10. Rectal tone and compliance affected in patients with fecal incontinence after fistulotomy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Richard Alexander; Camacho, Santiago; Flores, Francisco; Altamirano, Evelyn; García, Mario Antonio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anal sphincter and rectal factors that may be involved in fecal incontinence that develops following fistulotomy (FIAF). METHODS: Eleven patients with FIAF were compared with 11 patients with idiopathic fecal incontinence and with 11 asymptomatic healthy subjects (HS). All of the study participants underwent anorectal manometry and a barostat study (rectal sensitivity, tone, compliance and capacity). The mean time since surgery was 28 ± 26 mo. The postoperative continence score was 14 ± 2.5 (95%CI: 12.4-15.5, St Mark’s fecal incontinence grading system). RESULTS: Compared with the HS, the FIAF patients showed increased rectal tone (42.63 ± 27.69 vs 103.5 ± 51.13, P = 0.002) and less rectal compliance (4.95 ± 3.43 vs 11.77 ± 6.9, P = 0.009). No significant differences were found between the FIAF patients and the HS with respect to the rectal capacity; thresholds for the non-noxious stimuli of first sensation, gas sensation and urge-to-defecate sensation or the noxious stimulus of pain; anal resting pressure or squeeze pressure; or the frequency or percentage of relaxation of the rectoanal inhibitory reflex. No significant differences were found between the FIAF patients and the patients with idiopathic fecal incontinence. CONCLUSION: In patients with FIAF, normal motor anal sphincter function and rectal sensitivity are preserved, but rectal tone and compliance are impaired. The results suggest that FIAF is not due to alterations in rectal sensitivity and that the rectum is more involved than the anal sphincters in the genesis of FIAF. PMID:25852287

  11. Dilemmas in Endoscopic Management of Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Case-Based Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Rajca, Brian P.; Wagh, Mihir S.

    2015-01-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumors are uncommon neoplasms that historically were regarded as having an indolent course. Due to the widespread use of screening colonoscopy neuroendocrine tumors of the rectum are identified with increasing frequency. More recent literature has suggested that rectal neuroendocrine tumors may progress in a more malignant fashion than previously believed. In this case-based discussion we present management dilemmas, analyze current guidelines, and highlight the role of endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic resection, and surgery. PMID:26346026

  12. Balloon dilatation of post-surgical ano-rectal strictures in two infants.

    PubMed

    Wilder, W M; Melhem, R E

    1989-01-01

    Balloon dilatation of ano-rectal strictures offers an alternative to surgical repair of such lesions. This procedure has been described in higher colonic strictures secondary to necrotizing enterocolitis in infants but not in post-surgical ano-rectal strictures. Two cases of successful balloon dilatation are reported. Anal sphincter injury resulting in fecal incontinence, as previously reported [1], did not occur. PMID:2797937

  13. Late Rectal Toxicity on RTOG 94-06: Analysis Using a Mixture Lyman Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei; Bosch, Walter R.; Michalski, Jeff; Winter, Kathryn; Mohan, Radhe; Purdy, James A.; Kuban, Deborah; Lee, Andrew K.; Cheung, M. Rex; Thames, Howard D.; Cox, James D.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To estimate the parameters of the Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model using censored time-to-event data for Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06, a dose-escalation trial designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model was fitted to data from 1,010 of the 1,084 patients accrued on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06 using an approach that accounts for censored observations. Separate fits were obtained using dose-volume histograms for whole rectum and dose-wall histograms for rectal wall. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.2 years, the crude incidence of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity was 15% (n = 148). The parameters of the Lyman model fitted to dose-volume histograms data, with 95% profile-likelihood confidence intervals, were TD{sub 50} = 79.1 Gy (75.3 Gy, 84.3 Gy), m = 0.146 (0.107, 0.225), and n = 0.077 (0.041, 0.156). The fit based on dose-wall histogram data was not significantly different. Patients with cardiovascular disease had a significantly higher incidence of late rectal toxicity (p = 0.015), corresponding to a dose-modifying factor of 5.3%. No significant association with late rectal toxicity was found for diabetes, hypertension, rectal volume, rectal length, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, or prescribed dose per fraction (1.8 Gy vs. 2 Gy). Conclusions: These results, based on a large cohort of patients from a multi-institutional trial, are expected to be widely representative of the ability of the Lyman model to describe the long-term risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

  14. [Treatment of a postoperative rectal stenosis with a self-expanding biodegradable polydioxanone stent].

    PubMed

    Dederichs, F; Knüdeler, S; Nolte, W; Iesalnieks, I

    2013-05-01

    Rectal stricture is a serious although infrequent complication of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). In some cases, these strictures may be refractory to treatment by endoscopic balloon dilatation. Biodegradable stents might improve the outcome by providing an extended period of dilatation. Moreover, these stents can remain in place without the need to remove them. In the presented case, a biodegradable polidioxanone stent originally developed to treat benign oesophageal stenoses was used to treat a patient suffering from rectal stricture following a TEM. PMID:23681896

  15. Administrative Synergy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  16. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Clavo, Bernardino; Santana-Rodriguez, Norberto; Llontop, Pedro; Gutierrez, Dominga; Ceballos, Daniel; Méndez, Charlin; Rovira, Gloria; Suarez, Gerardo; Rey-Baltar, Dolores; Garcia-Cabrera, Laura; Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Fiuza, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52-119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p < 0.001) and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p = 0.032). Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7-14)?g/dL to 13 (10-15)?g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p = 0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation. PMID:26357522

  17. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella; Pirozzi, Giuseppe Antonio; Cilla, Savino; Cuscuna, Daniele; Di Lallo, Alessandra; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Mantini, Giovanna; Pacelli, Fabio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Ingrosso, Marcello; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant radiotherapy underwent proctoscopy a year after the course of radiotherapy. Mucosal changes were classified by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis. Results: After a median follow-up time of 45 months (range, 18-99), the 3-year incidence of grade {>=}2 rectal late toxicity according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 24%, with all patients (24/24; 100%) experiencing rectal bleeding. The occurrence of grade {>=}2 clinical rectal late toxicity was higher in patients with grade {>=}2 (32% vs. 15 %, p = 0.02) or grade {>=}3 VRS telangiectasia (47% vs. 17%, p {<=} 0.01) and an overall VRS score of {>=}2 (31% vs. 16 %, p = 0.04) or {>=}3 (48% vs. 17%, p = 0.01) at the 1-year proctoscopy. Conclusions: Early proctoscopy (1 year) predicts late rectal bleeding and therefore can be used as a surrogate endpoint for late rectal toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this frequent complication.

  18. Potential Pitfalls in Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Placement for Bleeding Rectal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Sakib, S M Nazmus; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Jawed, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    In patients with portal hypertension, bleeding from rectal varices is rare. However, it can be life-threatening. We report a case of massive bleeding from large rectal varices in a 59-year-old man with alcoholic cirrhosis. Emergent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement was performed following failed local endoscopic therapy. Despite normalization of the portosystemic pressure gradient, the patient had another episode of massive bleeding on the following day. Embolization of the rectal varices via TIPS successfully stopped the bleeding. After the procedure, rapid decompensation of the cirrhosis led to severe encephalopathy, and death was observed. Although TIPSs have been reported to be useful in controlling bleeding from rectal varices, our case illustrates the potential pitfalls in using this technique in the treatment of rectal variceal bleeding. TIPSs may not be always successful in controlling massive bleeding from large rectal varices, even after normalization of portal hypertension. TIPSs can also be associated with life-threatening complications that may lead to early mortality. PMID:26464566

  19. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Clavo, Bernardino; Santana-Rodriguez, Norberto; Llontop, Pedro; Gutierrez, Dominga; Ceballos, Daniel; Méndez, Charlin; Rovira, Gloria; Suarez, Gerardo; Rey-Baltar, Dolores; Garcia-Cabrera, Laura; Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Fiuza, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p < 0.001) and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p = 0.032). Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14)?g/dL to 13 (10–15)?g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p = 0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation. PMID:26357522

  20. Comparison of hydrocolonic sonograpy accuracy in preoperative staging between colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hye Won; Chung, Jae Bock; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kang, Jin Kyung; Park, Chan Il

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the accuracy of hydrocolonic sonography (HUS) in determining the depth of invasion (T stage) in colon and rectal cancer. METHODS: A total of 1 000-2 000 mL of saline was instilled per rectum using a system for barium enemas, and then ultrasonography was conducted by a SSA-270A (Toshiba Co, Japan) sonolayer unit with a 3.75 MHz for 17 patients with colon cancer and 13 patients with rectal cancer before operation. After operation, T stage in HUS was compared with postoperative histological findings. RESULTS: Overall, the accuracy of T stage was 70%. It was 88% in colon cancer and 46% in rectal cancer. In evaluating nodal state, the accuracy of HUS was low in both colon (71%) and rectal cancers (46%) compared with conventional CT or MRI. The overall accuracy of N staging was 60%. CONCLUSION: HUS is valuable to evaluate the depth of invasion in colon cancer, but is less valuable in rectal cancer. Because HUS is low-cost, noninvasive, and readily available at any place, this technique seems to be useful to determine the preoperative staging in colon cancer, but not in rectal cancer. PMID:15069717

  1. Semi-automatic staging system for rectal cancer using spatially oriented unwrapped endorectal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmath, John R.; Cao, Zhujiang; Bao, Philip; Herline, Alan J.; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    Endorectal ultrasound is currently the gold standard for the staging of rectal cancer; however, the accurate staging of the disease requires extensive training and is difficult, especially for those clinicians who do not see a large number of patients per year. Therefore, there is a need for a semi-automatic staging system to assist the clinicians in the accurate staging of rectal cancer. We believe that the unwrapping of the circular ERUS images captured by a spatially tracked ERUS system is a step in this direction. The steps by which a 2D image can be unwrapped are described thereby allowing the circular layers of the rectal wall to be displayed as flat layers stacked on top of each other. We test the unwrapping process using images from a cylindrical rectal phantom and a human rectum. The process of unwrapping endorectal ultrasound images qualitatively provides good visualization of the layers of the rectal wall and rectal tumors and supports the continual study of this novel staging system.

  2. Rectal gland of Bactrocera papayae: ultrastructure, anatomy, and sequestration of autofluorescent compounds upon methyl eugenol consumption by the male fruit fly.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Cynthia C H; Tan, Keng Hong

    2005-08-01

    Sexually mature males of Bactrocera papayae are strongly attracted to and consume methyl eugenol (ME). Upon consumption, ME is biotransformed to two phenylpropanoids, 2-allyl-4,5-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) and (E)-coniferyl alcohol (CF), that are transported in the hemolymph, sequestered and stored in the rectal glands, and subsequently released as sex and aggregation pheromones during courtship. To date, very little work on the ultrastructure and anatomy of the rectal gland has been done, and the accumulation of phenylpropanoids in the rectal glands of males has not been observed visually. Our objectives are to describe the anatomy and fine structures of the rectal glands of males and females and to observe the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds in the rectal glands of males. The rectal glands of males and females have four rectal papillae with each papilla attached to a rectal pad. The rectal pads protrude from the rectal gland as the only surfaces of the gland that are not surrounded by muscles. The rectal papillae of ME-fed males had oil droplets and autofluorescent compounds that were absent from those of ME-deprived males. The autofluorescent compounds accumulated in the rectal sac, which is an evagination that is not found in rectal glands of females. The accumulation of these compounds increased with time and reached maximum at a day post-ME feeding and decreased thereafter. This trend is similar to the accumulation pattern of phenylpropanoids, CF and DMP in the rectal gland. PMID:16170821

  3. Hand-assisted laparoscopic suture rectopexy for complete rectal prolapse complicated by a solitary ulcer and obstructed defecation: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a condition in which an ulcer occurs in the rectum. There is evidence that solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is associated with rectal prolapse either overt or occult and that stopping complete rectal prolapse may lead to rapid healing of the solitary rectal ulcer. A huge variety of operative techniques have been described in the literature to correct this condition. We present the case of a patient who underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic suture rectopexy for complete rectal prolapse complicated by a solitary ulcer and obstructed defecation. Case presentation A 32-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our institute complaining of having had difficulty with her bowel movements, a rectal prolapse and pain in the anal area for one and a half years. She was checked in hospital for suspected rectal carcinoma, however, the examination revealed rectal ulceration. A diagnosis of complete rectal prolapse complicated by a solitary ulcer and obstructed defecation was established. The symptoms persisted so a hand-assisted laparoscopic suture rectopexy was performed. After six months of follow-up, her bowel movements had improved, she was experiencing no pain and the rectal ulcer had healed. Conclusion A hand-assisted laparoscopic suture rectopexy is a feasible and safe surgical treatment of rectal prolapse with solitary rectal ulcer syndrome, providing complete recovery for patients with solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. PMID:23718282

  4. Iatrogenic Rectal Diverticulum With Pelvic-Floor Dysfunction in Patients After a Procedure for a Prolapsed Hemorrhoid

    PubMed Central

    Na, Sun Kyung; Shim, Ki-Nam; Jung, Sung-Ae; Chung, Soon Sup

    2014-01-01

    Diverticula are frequently seen in the sigmoid, descending, ascending and transverse colons whereas rectal diverticula are extremely rare. The stapled rectal mucosectomy for the treatment of a prolapsed hemorrhoid is less painful and has lower morbidity; therefore, it has been commonly used despite possible complications. This paper reports a case of a rectal diverticulum that developed after a procedure for prolapsed hemorrhoids (PPH). A 42-year-old man with a history of hemorrhoidectomies came to the hospital because of constipation. On sigmoidoscopy, a 2-cm-sized, feces-filled pocket was located just above the anorectal junction. After removal of the fecal material, a huge rectal diverticulum (-4 cm in diameter) was seen. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of rectal diverticulum outpouching through the muscular layer of the intestine in a left posterolateral direction. The patient was discharged without complication after a transanal diverticulectomy had been performed, and the direct rectal wall had been repaired. PMID:24639972

  5. Automatically-generated rectal dose constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Yong Nam; Kim, Soo Kon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-06-01

    The dose constraint during prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization should be patient-specific for better rectum sparing. The aims of this study are to suggest a novel method for automatically generating a patient-specific dose constraint by using an experience-based dose volume histogram (DVH) of the rectum and to evaluate the potential of such a dose constraint qualitatively. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) of the rectum with respect to V %ratio in our study were divided into three groups, where V %ratio was defined as the percent ratio of the rectal volume overlapping the planning target volume (PTV) to the rectal volume: (1) the rectal NTCPs in the previous study (clinical data), (2) those statistically generated by using the standard normal distribution (calculated data), and (3) those generated by combining the calculated data and the clinical data (mixed data). In the calculated data, a random number whose mean value was on the fitted curve described in the clinical data and whose standard deviation was 1% was generated by using the `randn' function in the MATLAB program and was used. For each group, we validated whether the probability density function (PDF) of the rectal NTCP could be automatically generated with the density estimation method by using a Gaussian kernel. The results revealed that the rectal NTCP probability increased in proportion to V %ratio , that the predictive rectal NTCP was patient-specific, and that the starting point of IMRT optimization for the given patient might be different. The PDF of the rectal NTCP was obtained automatically for each group except that the smoothness of the probability distribution increased with increasing number of data and with increasing window width. We showed that during the prostate IMRT optimization, the patient-specific dose constraints could be automatically generated and that our method could reduce the IMRT optimization time as well as maintain the IMRT plan quality.

  6. Development of HIV-1 Rectal-Specific Microbicides and Colonic Tissue Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Russo, Julie; Wang, Lin; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Li, Jie; Friend, David R.; McGowan, Ian M.; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is structurally and functionally different from the vagina. Thus, the paradigm of topical microbicide development and evaluation has evolved to include rectal microbicides (RMs). Our interest was to create unique RM formulations to safely and effectively deliver antiretroviral drugs to mucosal tissue. RMs were designed to include those that spread and coat all surfaces of the rectum and distal colon rapidly (liquid) and those that create a deformable, erodible barrier and remain localized at the administration site (gel). Tenofovir (TFV) (1%) was formulated as an aqueous thermoreversible fluid and a carbopol-based aqueous hydrogel. Lipid-based liquid and gel formulations were prepared for UC781 (0.1%) using isopropyl myristate and GTCC (Caprylic/Capric Triglycerides), respectively. Formulations were characterized for pH, viscosity, osmolality, and drug content. Pre-clinical testing incorporated ex vivo colonic tissue obtained through surgical resections and flexible sigmoidoscopy (flex sig). As this was the first time using tissue from both sources side-by-side, the ability to replicate HIV-1 was compared. Efficacy of the RM formulations was tested by applying the products with HIV-1 directly to polarized colonic tissue and following viral replication. Safety of the formulations was determined by MTT assay and histology. All products had a neutral pH and were isoosmolar. While HIV-1BaL and HIV-1JR-CSF alone and in the presence of semen had similar replication trends between surgically resected and flex sig tissues, the magnitude of viral replication was significantly better in flex sig tissues. Both TFV and UC781 formulations protected the colonic tissue, regardless of tissue source, from HIV-1 and retained tissue viability and architecture. Our in vitro and ex vivo results show successful formulation of unique RMs. Moreover, the results of flex sig and surgically resected tissues were comparable suggesting the incorporation of both in pre-clinical testing algorithms. PMID:25025306

  7. Electrical neuromodulation at acupoint ST36 normalizes impaired colonic motility induced by rectal distension in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jin, Haifeng; Liu, Jiemin; Foreman, Robert D; Chen, Jiande D Z; Yin, Jieyun

    2015-09-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been shown to improve impaired gastric motility and slow waves in both humans and animals. However, its effects on colonic motility have rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of EA on impaired colonic motility induced by rectal distension (RD)in dogs. Colon contractions and transit were measured in various sessions with and without EA in hound dogs chronically placed with a colonic cannula. Colonic contractile activity was assessed by motility index (MI). Autonomic functions were determined by the spectral analysis of the heart rate variability derived from the electrocardiogram. It was found 1) RD suppressed colonic motility by 40.5% (10.8 ± 0.9 with RD vs. 6.4 ± 0.8 at baseline, P < 0.002). EA at ST36 normalized colonic contractions suppressed by RD (12.9 ± 2.8, P < 0.002 vs. RD and P = 0.1 vs. control). 2) Administration of atropine blocked the ameliorating effect of EA on colon motility. 3) RD also delayed colonic transit (65.0 ± 2.0% with RD vs. 86.0 ± 1.9% without RD, P < 0.001) that was restored with EA (84.0 ± 1.9%, P = 0.178 vs. control). 4) EA increased vagal activity suppressed by RD (0.37 ± 0.07 with RD + EA vs. 0.09 ± 0.03 with RD without EA, P < 0.001). In conclusion, RD inhibits colonic contractions and delays colonic transit in dogs; EA at ST36 restores the RD-induced impairment in both colonic contraction and transit by enhancing vagal activity and mediated via the cholinergic pathway. PMID:26113299

  8. Pharmacological characteristics of endothelin receptors on sheep rectal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Lohsiriwat, Varut; Scholefield, John H; Dashwood, Michael R; Wilson, Vincent G

    2011-06-01

    Haemorrhoids is associated with high blood flow of the anorectal region. The question of whether pharmacological manipulation of vascular supply can relieve the symptoms of haemorrhoids has been raised. In order to undertake this type of clinical investigation, it is first essential to gain a better understanding of the properties of vascular receptors that may regulate blood flow into anal cushions and haemorrhoids. Due to the limited availability of human anorectal specimens and the good reliability of sheep tissue as an experimental model of human anorectal diseases, we studied the properties of endothelin receptors in sheep rectal artery (SRA) and vein (SRV), the vessels contributing to the blood flow of haemorrhoidal plexus, using isometric tension recordings. We found that endothelin-1 and sarafotoxin 6a were very potent constrictor agents in both SRA and SRV. The selective ET(A) receptor antagonist PD156707 (100 nM) produced a parallel rightward displacement of ET-1-induced contractions in both vessels and abolished sarafotoxin 6a-induced contractions in the SRA. PD156707 (3 ?M) practically abolished contractions to ET-1 in the SRA, suggesting that the response is entirely mediated by ET(A) receptors. While, the selective ET(B) receptor antagonist BQ788 (100 nM) caused no significant change in ET-1-induced contractions in both vessels, a minor role for ET(B) receptor subtype to responses to sarafotoxin 6a in the artery was suggested. PMID:21382493

  9. Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuremsky, Jeffrey G.; Tepper, Joel E.; McLeod, Howard L. Phar

    2009-07-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is currently treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Although approximately 45% of patients respond to neoadjuvant therapy with T-level downstaging, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond. Molecular biomarkers have been investigated for their ability to predict outcome in LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. A literature search using PubMed resulted in the initial assessment of 1,204 articles. Articles addressing the ability of a biomarker to predict outcome for LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation were included. Six biomarkers met the criteria for review: p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thymidylate synthase, Ki-67, p21, and bcl-2/bax. On the basis of composite data, p53 is unlikely to have utility as a predictor of response. Epidermal growth factor receptor has shown promise as a predictor when quantitatively evaluated in pretreatment biopsies or when EGFR polymorphisms are evaluated in germline DNA. Thymidylate synthase, when evaluated for polymorphisms in germline DNA, is promising as a predictive biomarker. Ki-67 and bcl-2 are not useful in predicting outcome. p21 needs to be further evaluated to determine its usefulness in predicting outcome. Bax requires more investigation to determine its usefulness. Epidermal growth factor receptor, thymidylate synthase, and p21 should be evaluated in larger prospective clinical trials for their ability to guide preoperative therapy choices in LARC.

  10. TEM in the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer in elderly

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Transanal microscopic surgery is an important application of minimally invasive surgery of rectum, allowing realization of complex transanal intervention. Patients and Methods During the period between January 2002 and December 2010, seven patients, five men and two women, average age 75 years, with early rectal cancer recurrence were selected for this type of surgical palliative procedure. The selection of the patients is made by: transrectal ultrasonografy, colonoscopy and abdominal ultrasonografy, to rule out liver metastases, CT with and without enema, PET CT. Follow-up is approximately 12-30 months. Results The pathologic staging confirms the complete excision of recurrences. Then patients are referred for more complementary therapies. Discussion The significance of conservative treatment for local recurrence of rectum adenocarcinoma is still controversial because the recurrence is an expression of tumor spread not controlled by oncological surgical and radio/chemo therapy. Conclusion In selected subjects such as the elderly, based on equal oncological treatment, the reduction of surgical trauma, preservation of anatomical integrity and resolution of symptoms are important results. PMID:24267977

  11. Five years with a rectal foreign body: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ozbilgin, Mücahit; Arslan, Baha; Yakut, Mehmet Can; Aksoy, Süleyman Ozkan; Terzi, Mustafa Cem

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Rectal foreign bodies are rare colorectal emergencies. They are important for the complications that may occur. Delayed response causes a wide range of complications or may even result in death. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 22 years old male patient was seen at our hospital with anal pain, discharge, and complaining of incontinence. The patient stated that a bottle of beverage was placed into his anal canal in an inverted manner for sexual satisfaction 5 years previously. DISCUSSION After clinical and radiological assessment under general anaesthesia in the lithotomy position the object was removed by a laparotomy. He was advised to seek legal help and he received psychiatric treatment in the postoperative period prior to his discharge. CONCLUSION Complications such as abscess, perianal fistula complicated by severe pelvic sepsis and osteomyelitis were expected complications in this case. As in this case, a surgical approach may eliminate dissection planes, increasing morbidity and mortality related to the injuring of surrounding bodies during object extraction. PMID:25553525

  12. Rectal and intranasal immunizations with recombinant urease induce distinct local and serum immune responses in mice and protect against Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Kleanthous, H; Myers, G A; Georgakopoulos, K M; Tibbitts, T J; Ingrassia, J W; Gray, H L; Ding, R; Zhang, Z Z; Lei, W; Nichols, R; Lee, C K; Ermak, T H; Monath, T P

    1998-06-01

    To determine the optimal inductive sites for immunization against Helicobacter pylori infection, the protective efficacy of recombinant urease (rUre) was assessed for mice given the vaccine by either the oral (p.o.), intranasal (i.n.), or rectal route. When mice were immunized with rUre (25 microg p.o. or rectally or 10 microg i.n.) plus heat-labile toxin from Escherichia coli as the mucosal adjuvant, all routes afforded protection against challenge with H. pylori, as indicated by a significant reduction in gastric urease activity (P < 0.0005) compared to that of sham-immunized controls. Quantitative H. pylori culture of stomach tissue demonstrated a >97% reduction in bacterial burden in mice immunized by all routes (P < 0.05). Induction of antiurease immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels in gastric luminal secretions after p.o. immunization was greater than after i.n. administration (means, 6.0 and 1.02 ng/ml, respectively) and was dependent upon challenge with H. pylori. However, immunization by the rectal route resulted in the generation of the highest levels of gastric antiurease IgA (mean, 40. 89 ng/ml), which was detectable prior to challenge with H. pylori. Immunohistochemical staining of stomach tissue for cells secreting urease-specific antibody and CD4(+) T cells showed levels of recruitment to be dependent upon challenge with H. pylori and equivalent for all routes. These results identify both the rectum and nasal passages as suitable inductive sites for urease immunization. PMID:9596763

  13. Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Predictor of Pathologic Response and a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a predictor of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and prognostic factor for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 352 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery. Serum CEA levels were determined before CRT administration (pre-CRT CEA) and before surgery (post-CRT CEA). Correlations between pre-CRT CEA levels and rates of good response (Tumor regression grade 3/4) were explored. Patients were categorized into three CEA groups according to their pre-/post-CRT CEA levels (ng/mL) (Group A: pre-CRT CEA {<=} 3; B: pre-CRT CEA >3, post-CRT CEA {<=}3; C: pre- and post-CRT CEA >3 ng/mL), and their oncologic outcomes were compared. Results: Of 352 patients, good responses were achieved in 94 patients (26.7%). The rates of good response decreased significantly as the pre-CRT CEA levels became more elevated (CEA [ng/mL]: {<=}3, 36.4%; 3-6, 23.6%; 6-9, 15.6%; >9, 7.8%; p < 0.001). The rates of good response were significantly higher in Group A than in Groups B and C (36.4% vs. 17.3% and 14.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The 3-year disease-free survival rate was significantly better in Groups A and B than in Group C (82% and 79% vs. 57%, respectively; p = 0.005); the CEA grouping was identified as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.025). Conclusions: In locally advanced rectal cancer patients, CEA levels could be of clinical value as a predictor of response to preoperative CRT and as an independent prognostic factor after preoperative CRT and curative surgery.

  14. Administrative Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarity, Augustus C., III; Maulding, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how all four facets of administrative ecology help dispel the claims about the "impossibility" of the superintendency. These are personal ecology, professional ecology, organizational ecology, and community ecology. Using today's superintendency as an administrative platform, current literature describes a preponderance of…

  15. Fournier gangrene presenting in a patient with undiagnosed rectal adenocarcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Fournier gangrene is a rare necrotising fascitis of the perineum and genitals caused by a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. The first case was described by Baurienne in 1764 but the condition was named by Fournier in 1883 who reported the cases of five men with the condition with no apparent etiology. Infection most commonly arises from the skin, urethra, or rectal regions. Despite appropriate therapy, mortality in this disease is still high. We report a case of a low rectal malignancy presenting as Fournier gangrene. This case report serves to highlight an extremely unusual presentation of rectal cancer, a common surgical pathology. Case presentation The patient is a 48 years old Afghanian male that admitted with Fournier gangrene. In the course of medical and surgical treatment the presence of extensive rectal adenocarcinoma was discovered. After partial recovery, standard loop colostomy was inserted. Skin grafting of necrotic areas was performed and systemic rectal cancer chemotherapy initiated after full stabilization. Conclusion Fournier gangrene is an uncommon but life threatening condition with high associated mortality and morbidity. Usually there is an underlying cause for the development of Fournier gangrene, that if addressed correctly, can lead to a good outcome. Early diagnosis and treatment decrease the morbidity and mortality of this life threatening condition. Good management is based on aggressive debridement, broad spectrum antibiotics and intensive supportive care. PMID:20062653

  16. Rectal cancer: future directions and priorities for treatment, research and policy in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christopher; Ehrenberg, Nieves; Frizelle, Frank; Sarfati, Diana; Balasingam, Adrian; Pearse, Maria; Parry, Susan; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Bissett, Ian

    2014-06-01

    New Zealand has one of the highest incidences of rectal cancer in the world, and its optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach. A National Rectal Cancer Summit was convened in August 2013 to discuss management of rectal cancer in the New Zealand context, to highlight controversies and discuss domestic priorities for the future. This paper summarises the priorities for treatment, research and policy for rectal cancer services in New Zealand identified as part of the Summit in August. The following priorities were identified: - Access to high-quality information for service planning, review of outcomes, identification of inequities and gaps in provision, and quality improvement; - Engagement with the entire sector, including private providers; - Focus on equity; - Emerging technologies; - Harmonisation of best practice; - Importance of multidisciplinary team meetings. In conclusion, improvements in outcomes for patients with rectal cancer in New Zealand will require significant engagement between policy makers, providers, researchers, and patients in order to ensure equitable access to high quality treatment, and strategic incorporation of emerging technologies into clinical practice. A robust clinical information framework is required in order to facilitate monitoring of quality improvements and to ensure that equitable care is delivered. PMID:24929694

  17. Chloride secretagogues stimulate inositol phosphate formation in shark rectal gland tubules cultured in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Ecay, T.W.; Valentich, J.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Neuroendocrine activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland cells is associated with increases in cellular cAMP, cGMP, and free calcium concentrations. We report here on the effects of several chloride secretagogues on inositol phosphate formation in cultured rectal gland tubules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), atriopeptin (AP), and ionomycin increase the total inositol phosphate levels of cultured tubules, as measured by ion exchange chromatography. Forskolin, a potent chloride secretagogue, has no effect on inositol phosphate formation. The uptake of {sup 3}H-myo-inositol into phospholipids is very slow, preventing the detection of increased levels of inositol trisphosphate. However, significant increases in inositol monophosphate (IP1) and inositol biphosphate (IP2) were measured. The time course of VIP- and AP-stimulated IP1 and IP2 formation is similar to the effects of these agents on the short-circuit current responses of rectal gland monolayer cultures. In addition, aluminum fluoride, an artificial activator of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, stimulates IP1 and IP2 formation. We conclude that rectal gland cells contain VIP and AP receptors coupled to the activation of phospholipase C. Coupling may be mediated by G-proteins. Receptor-stimulated increases in inositol phospholipid metabolism is one mechanism leading to increased intracellular free calcium concentrations, an important regulatory event in the activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland epithelial cells.

  18. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y.; Tezcaner, Tugan; Moray, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 10 patients treated with TAMIS for benign and malignant rectal tumors, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function was evaluated with anorectal manometry and Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. RESULTS: The mean distance of the tumors from the anal verge was 5.6 cm, and mean tumor diameter was 2.6 cm. All resection margins were tumor free. There was no difference in preoperative and 3-week postoperative anorectalmanometry findings; only mean minimum rectal sensory volume was lower at 3 weeks after surgery. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all patients except one which resolved by 6 weeks after surgery.The mean postoperative follow-up was 28 weeks without any recurrences. CONCLUSION: Transanal minimally invasive surgery is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of rectal tumors and can be performed without impairing anorectal functions.

  19. Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. Methods This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. Results The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P?=?0.051) or distant (P?=?0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P?=?0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio?=?5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P?=?0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. Conclusions The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients. PMID:24295240

  20. Quantitative analysis of rectal cancer by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. Q.; Wu, X. J.; Tang, T.; Zhu, S. W.; Yao, Q.; Gao, Bruce Z.; Yuan, X. C.

    2012-08-01

    To quantify OCT images of rectal tissue for clinic diagnosis, the scattering coefficient of the tissue is extracted by curve fitting the OCT signals to a confocal single model. A total of 1000 measurements (half and half of normal and malignant tissues) were obtained from 16 recta. The normal rectal tissue has a larger scattering coefficient ranging from 1.09 to 5.41 mm-1 with a mean value of 2.29 mm-1 (std:±0.32), while the malignant group shows lower scattering property and the values ranging from 0.25 to 2.69 mm-1 with a mean value of 1.41 mm-1 (std:±0.18). The peri-cancer of recta has also been investigated to distinguish the difference between normal and malignant rectal tissue. The results demonstrate that the quantitative analysis of the rectal tissue can be used as a promising diagnostic criterion of early rectal cancer, which has great value for clinical medical applications.

  1. Rectal prolapse: an overview of clinical features, diagnosis, and patient-specific management strategies.

    PubMed

    Bordeianou, Liliana; Hicks, Caitlin W; Kaiser, Andreas M; Alavi, Karim; Sudan, Ranjan; Wise, Paul E

    2014-05-01

    Rectal prolapse can present in a variety of forms and is associated with a range of symptoms including pain, incomplete evacuation, bloody and/or mucous rectal discharge, and fecal incontinence or constipation. Complete external rectal prolapse is characterized by a circumferential, full-thickness protrusion of the rectum through the anus, which may be intermittent or may be incarcerated and poses a risk of strangulation. There are multiple surgical options to treat rectal prolapse, and thus care should be taken to understand each patient's symptoms, bowel habits, anatomy, and pre-operative expectations. Preoperative workup includes physical exam, colonoscopy, anoscopy, and, in some patients, anal manometry and defecography. With this information, a tailored surgical approach (abdominal versus perineal, minimally invasive versus open) and technique (posterior versus ventral rectopexy +/- sigmoidectomy, for example) can then be chosen. We propose an algorithm based on available outcomes data in the literature, an understanding of anorectal physiology, and expert opinion that can serve as a guide to determining the rectal prolapse operation that will achieve the best possible postoperative outcomes for individual patients. PMID:24352613

  2. Novel association of rectal evacuation disorder and rumination syndrome: Diagnosis, comorbidities, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Iturrino, Johanna; Shin, Andrea; Vazquez-Roque, Maria; Katzka, David A; Snuggerud, Jill R; Seime, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with disorders of gastrointestinal function may undergo unnecessary treatment if misdiagnosed as motility disorders. Objective To report on clinical features, medical, surgical, and psychiatric comorbidities, and prior treatments of a patient cohort diagnosed concurrently with nonpsychogenic rumination syndrome and pelvic floor dysfunction (also termed rectal evacuation disorder). Methods From a consecutive series (1994–2013) of 438 outpatients with rectal evacuation disorders in the practice of a single gastroenterologist at a tertiary care centre, 57 adolescents or adults were diagnosed with concomitant rumination syndrome. All underwent formal psychological assessment or completed validated questionnaires. Results All 57 patients (95% female) fulfilled Rome III criteria for rumination syndrome; rectal evacuation disorder was confirmed by testing of anal sphincter pressures and rectal balloon evacuation. Prior to diagnosis, most patients underwent multiple medical and surgical treatments (gastrostomy, gastric fundoplication, other gastric surgery, ileostomy, colectomy) for their symptoms. Psychological comorbidity was identified in 93% of patients. Patients were managed predominantly with psychological and behavioural approaches: diaphragmatic breathing for rumination and biofeedback retraining for pelvic floor dysfunction. Conclusions Awareness of concomitant rectal evacuation disorder and rumination syndrome and prompt identification of psychological comorbidity are keys to instituting behavioural and psychological methods to avoid unnecessary treatment. PMID:24724013

  3. Endoscopic mucosal resection for rectal carcinoids under micro-probe ultrasound guidance

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fu-Run; Huang, Liu-Ye; Wu, Cheng-Rong

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the therapeutic value of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) under micro-probe ultrasound guidance for rectal carcinoids less than 1 cm in diameter. METHODS: Twenty-one patients pathologically diagnosed with rectal carcinoids following colonoscopy in our hospital from January 2007 to November 2012 were included in this study. The patients consisted of 14 men and 7 women, with a mean age of 52.3 ± 12.2 years (range: 36-72 years). The patients with submucosal tumors less than 1 cm in diameter arising from the rectal and muscularis mucosa detected by micro-probe ultrasound were treated with EMR and followed up with conventional endoscopy and micro-probe ultrasound. RESULTS: All of the 21 tumors were confirmed by micro-probe ultrasound as uniform hypoechoic masses originating from the rectal and muscularis mucosa, without invasion of muscularis propria and vessels, and less than 1 cm in diameter. EMR was successfully completed without bleeding, perforation or other complications. The resected specimens were immunohistochemically confirmed to be carcinoids. Patients were followed up for one to two years, and no tumor recurrence was reported. CONCLUSION: EMR is a safe and effective treatment for rectal carcinoids less than 1 cm in diameter. PMID:23674859

  4. High-dose rate intracavitary therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. II. Risk factors for rectal complication

    SciTech Connect

    Teshima, T.; Chatani, M.; Hata, K.; Inoue, T.

    1988-02-01

    From August 1978 through December 1982, a total of 267 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated using remote afterloading high-dose rate intracavitary therapy (RALS) with non-rigid applicator at our department. The data from 199 previously untreated patients with standard application out of 267 were available for this analysis of rectal complication. The incidence of moderate to severe rectal complication (Kottmeier's grade 2 and 3) was 7% (13/199). Cox's regression model was used for the analysis of risk factors for rectal complication in which even minor injuries (grade 1) were included. By using this method, it was clear that the first significant risk factor was z-coordinates of weighted geometric center (WGC-z) (p = 0.0007) and the second corresponding factor was rectal TDF (p = 0.0082), the sum of the rectal dose measured by semiconductor dosimeter (ICD-5) and the dose of external whole pelvic irradiation. From the analysis of application pattern of intracavitary sources, WGC-z indicated the approximation of intracavitary sources to the anterior wall of rectum quantitatively and three-dimensionally. The significance of rectal TDF also implied that the monitoring of rectal dose by ICD-5 had an important role for the prediction and prevention of rectal complication after RALS.

  5. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Local Excision in Early Stage Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Suzanne; Blackstock, A William; Herman, Joseph M; Abdel-Wahab, May; Azad, Nilofer; Das, Prajnan; Goodman, Karyn A; Hong, Theodore S; Jabbour, Salma K; Jones, William E; Konski, Andre A; Koong, Albert C; Kumar, Rachit; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Small, William; Thomas, Charles R; Suh, W Warren

    2015-10-01

    Low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection are considered standard treatments for early rectal cancer but may be associated with morbidity in selected patients who are candidates for early distal lesions amenable to local excision (LE). The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. The panel recognizes the importance of accurate staging to identify patients who may be candidates for a LE approach. Patients who may be candidates for LE alone include those with small, low-lying T1 tumors, without adverse pathologic features. Several surgical approaches can be utilized for LE however none include lymph node evaluation. Adjuvant radiation±chemotherapy may be warranted depending on the risk of nodal metastases. Patients with high-risk T1 tumors, T2 tumors not amenable to radical surgery may also benefit from adjuvant treatment; however, patients with positive margins or T3 lesions should be offered abdominoperineal resection or low anterior resection. Neoadjuvant radiation±chemotherapy followed by LE in higher risk patients results in excellent local control, but it is not clear if this approach reduces recurrence rates over surgery alone. PMID:26371522

  6. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed; Safran, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  7. Trans-rectal interventional MRI: initial prostate biopsy experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Bernadette M.; Behluli, Meliha R.; Feller, John F.; May, Stuart T.; Princenthal, Robert; Winkel, Alex; Kaminsky, David B.

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland when evaluated along with T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and their corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps can yield valuable information in patients with rising or elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels1. In some cases, patients present with multiple negative trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies, often placing the patient into a cycle of active surveillance. Recently, more patients are undergoing TRIM for targeted biopsy of suspicious findings with a cancer yield of ~59% compared to 15% for second TRUS biopsy2 to solve this diagnostic dilemma and plan treatment. Patients were imaged in two separate sessions on a 1.5T magnet using a cardiac phased array parallel imaging coil. Automated CAD software was used to identify areas of wash-out. If a suspicious finding was identified on all sequences it was followed by a second imaging session. Under MRI-guidance, cores were acquired from each target region3. In one case the microscopic diagnosis was prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), in the other it was invasive adenocarcinoma. Patient 1 had two negative TRUS biopsies and a PSA level of 9ng/mL. Patient 2 had a PSA of 7.2ng/mL. He underwent TRUS biopsy which was negative for malignancy. He was able to go on to treatment for his prostate carcinoma (PCa)4. MRI may have an important role in a subset of patients with multiple negative TRUS biopsies and elevated or rising PSA.

  8. Changes in rectal sensitivity after hypnotherapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Prior, A; Colgan, S M; Whorwell, P J

    1990-01-01

    Fifteen patients with the irritable bowel syndrome were studied to assess the effect of hypnotherapy on anorectal physiology. In comparison with a control group of 15 patients who received no hypnotherapy significant changes in rectal sensitivity were found in patients with diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome both after a course of hypnotherapy and during a session of hypnosis (p less than 0.05). Although patient numbers were small, a trend towards normalisation of rectal sensitivity was also observed in patients with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. No changes in rectal compliance or distension-induced motor activity occurred in either subgroup nor were any changes in somatic pain thresholds observed. The results suggest that symptomatic improvement in irritable bowel syndrome after hypnotherapy may in part be due to changes in visceral sensitivity. PMID:2387513

  9. Update on Transanal NOTES for Rectal Cancer: Transitioning to Human Trials

    PubMed Central

    Telem, Dana A.; Berger, David L.; Bordeianou, Liliana G.; Rattner, David W.; Sylla, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) resection for rectal cancer has been demonstrated in both survival swine and fresh human cadaveric models. In preparation for transitioning to human application, our group has performed transanal NOTES rectal resection in a large series of human cadavers. This experience both solidified the feasibility of resection and allowed optimization of technique prior to clinical application. Improvement in specimen length and operative time was demonstrated with increased experience and newer platforms. This extensive laboratory experience has paved the way for successful clinical translation resulting in an ongoing clinical trial. To date, based on published reports, 4 human subjects have undergone successful hybrid transanal NOTES resection of rectal cancer. While promising, instrument limitations continue to hinder a pure transanal approach. Careful patient selection and continued development of new endoscopic and flexible-tip instruments are imperative prior to pure NOTES clinical application. PMID:22685646

  10. Discrimination of rectal cancer through human serum using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Li, Siqi; Zhang, Su; Jin, Lili

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to detect the changes in blood serum components that accompany rectal cancer. The differences in serum SERS data between rectal cancer patients and healthy controls were examined. Postoperative rectal cancer patients also participated in the comparison to monitor the effects of cancer treatments. The results show that there are significant variations at certain wavenumbers which indicates alteration of corresponding biological substances. Principal component analysis (PCA) and parameters of intensity ratios were used on the original SERS spectra for the extraction of featured variables. These featured variables then underwent linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and classification and regression tree (CART) for the discrimination analysis. Accuracies of 93.5 and 92.4 % were obtained for PCA-LDA and parameter-CART, respectively.

  11. [Current status and novel approach of robotic surgery for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaohui

    2015-08-01

    With the development of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic technique is now widely used in rectal surgery because of its advantages in terms of pain control, recovery of bowel function, length of hospital stay, short- and long-term outcomes. Total mesorectal excision(TME) is recommended as the standard procedure for rectal cancer. Laparoscopic TME, however, can be challenging due to its two-dimensional vision, restricted instrument movements, and a prolonged learning curve. Robotic surgery overcomes these intrinsic limitations by superior three-dimensional magnified optics, stable retraction platform, and 7 degrees of freedom of instrument movements, and offers an easier operation and shorter learning curve. This review summarizes the advantages as well as the current status of robotic rectal surgery, and explores the novel approach and new techniques with the related literature and the author's own experience. PMID:26303685

  12. Administration Certificate

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Business Administration Certificate Studious IIIIIIIIIIIIInnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnggggggggggggggggggggeeeeeeeeeeeeeennnnnnnnnnnniiiiiiiiiiiiiioooooooooooooooouuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuusssssssssssss EDWARDS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN #12;Aneducationthatfits yourschedule, University of Saskatchewan 3 #12; BAC 11 Introduction to Business Focuses on integrated organizational

  13. Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Gel Reduces the Acute Rectal Toxicity of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Barme, Greg A.; Gilbert, Ronald F.; Holevas, Richard E.; Kobashi, Luis I.; Reed, Richard R.; Solomon, Ronald S.; Walter, Nancy L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Macedo, Jorge; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze whether cross-linked hyaluronan gel reduces the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2008 and March 2009, we transperitoneally injected 9mL of cross-linked hyaluronan gel (Hylaform; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) into the anterior perirectal fat of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients to increase the separation between the prostate and rectum by 8 to 18mm at the start of radiotherapy. Patients then underwent high-dose rate brachytherapy to 2,200cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 5,040cGy. We assessed acute rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grading scheme. Results: Median follow-up was 3 months. The anteroposterior dimensions of Hylaform at the start and end of radiotherapy were 13 {+-} 3mm (mean {+-} SD) and 10 {+-} 4mm, respectively. At the start of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, daily mean rectal doses were 73 {+-} 13cGy with Hylaform vs. 106 {+-} 20cGy without Hylaform (p = 0.005). There was a 0% incidence of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 Grade 1, 2, or 3 acute diarrhea in 10 patients who received Hylaform vs. a 29.7% incidence (n = 71) in 239 historical controls who did not receive Hylaform (p = 0.04). Conclusions: By increasing the separation between the prostate and rectum, Hylaform decreased the mean rectal dose. This led to a significant reduction in the acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  14. Relationships between defecographic findings, rectal emptying, and colonic transit time in constipated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Karlbom, U; Påhlman, L; Nilsson, S; Graf, W

    1995-01-01

    The relations between defecographic findings, rectal emptying, and colonic transit time were analysed in 80 constipated patients (median age 49 years, range 22-87). Patients were classified into three clinically defined groups (slow transit, outlet obstruction, and a mixed group). Rectal evacuation was evaluation was evaluated by computer-based area calculation. There were no differences in defecographic findings except that evacuation was less efficient in the slow transit group compared with the mixed group (p < 0.01) and with the outlet obstruction group (P < 0.05). Transit time was prolonged in the slow transit and mixed groups compared with the outlet group (p < 0.001). Prominent impression of the puborectalis muscle during straining and the size of a rectocoele correlated with rectal emptying (p < 0.01). Perineal descent, anorectal angles, enterocoele, or intussusception were not significantly related to emptying. Prominent impression of the puborectalis muscle (p < 0.05) and impaired rectal emptying (p < 0.05) were more frequent in patients with prolonged transit time (six or more days). There was no significant correlation between transit time and rectal evacuation in the total study population. There was, however, an inverse relation between these variables (r = 0.40, p < 0.02) when all patients who claimed infrequent defecation (two or fewer/week) were analysed separately. These results did not confirm a direct relation between rectal evacuation and colonic transit time in constipated patients overall. The results are consistent with the suggestion that impaired colonic function may develop secondary to outlet obstruction in some patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7615282

  15. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: Current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be associated to reduced conversion rates. Other short-term outcomes are comparable to conventional laparoscopy techniques, if not better. Ultimately, pathological data evaluation suggests that oncologic safety may be preserved after robotic total mesorectal excision. However, further studies are required to evaluate oncologic safety and functional results. PMID:25339823

  16. Depletion of neuroendocrine cells in rectal biopsy specimens from HIV positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, J. B.; Batman, P. A.; Miller, A. R.; Sedgwick, P. M.; Griffin, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To compare the density of neuroendocrine cells in rectal biopsy specimens from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals with that of a control group. METHODS: Neuroendocrine cells in rectal biopsies were identified using an immunohistochemical stain for chromogranin and subsequently quantified using a method of linear intercept. RESULTS: Neuroendocrine cells were found to be significantly decreased in the HIV positive group. CONCLUSIONS: Loss of neuroendocrine cells may contribute to apoptotic bodies seen in this condition. This could be related to infection of these cells with HIV and could contribute to diarrhoeal disease in HIV infection. Images PMID:1624601

  17. Estimation of Rectal Dose Using Daily Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Fukuda, Shoichi; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The actual dose delivered to critical organs will differ from the simulated dose because of interfractional organ motion and deformation. Here, we developed a method to estimate the rectal dose in prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy with consideration to interfractional organ motion using daily megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT). Methods and Materials: Under exemption status from our institutional review board, we retrospectively reviewed 231 series of MVCBCT of 8 patients with prostate cancer. On both planning CT (pCT) and MVCBCT images, the rectal contours were delineated and the CT value within the contours was replaced by the mean CT value within the pelvis, with the addition of 100 Hounsfield units. MVCBCT images were rigidly registered to pCT and then nonrigidly registered using B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) with Velocity AI software. The concordance between the rectal contours on MVCBCT and pCT was evaluated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The dose distributions normalized for 1 fraction were also deformed and summed to estimate the actual total dose. Results: The DSC of all treatment fractions of 8 patients was improved from 0.75±0.04 (mean ±SD) to 0.90 ±0.02 by DIR. Six patients showed a decrease of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) from total dose compared with treatment plans. Although the rectal volume of each treatment fraction did not show any correlation with the change in gEUD (R{sup 2}=0.18±0.13), the displacement of the center of gravity of rectal contours in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction showed an intermediate relationship (R{sup 2}=0.61±0.16). Conclusion: We developed a method for evaluation of rectal dose using DIR and MVCBCT images and showed the necessity of DIR for the evaluation of total dose. Displacement of the rectum in the AP direction showed a greater effect on the change in rectal dose compared with the rectal volume.

  18. [Local imaging of rectal cancer - update 2015 : MRI as imaging biomarker].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, A-O

    2015-11-01

    The significance of state of the art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for rectal cancer goes far beyond the detection and diagnostics of local dispersion and is increasingly focusing on patient prognosis. The identification of prognostic factors, such as tumor (T) and nodal (N) status, involvement of the circumferential resection margin, presence of extramural vascular invasion, tumor response prediction following neoadjuvant therapy, therapy-related changes in microcirculation, permeability and tissue cellularity and structured reporting are important elements of advanced rectal cancer imaging. In this context, multiparametric MRI is progressively evolving into a powerful imaging biomarker. PMID:26538136

  19. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  20. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ?2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (?18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (?0.8 and ?4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ?1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness variations within this range. Presented in part at the European Society for Therapeutic Radiotherapy and Oncology Annual Meeting, April 5-8, 2014, Vienna, Austria.

  1. Comparison of the Occurrence of Transportation-associated Fever in 2 Years Old Thoroughbreds before and after Introduction of Prophylactic Marbofloxacin Administration

    PubMed Central

    ENDO, Yoshiro; TSUCHIYA, Takeru; AKIYAMA, Kentaro; TAKEBE, Naoya; NAKAI, Kenji; KOROSUE, Kenji; ISHIMARU, Mutsuki; TSUZUKI, Nao; HOBO, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to reveal the preventive effect of marbofloxacin (MRFX) administration just before transportation, we compared the occurrence of transportation-associated fever before and after introduction of MRFX administration. After the introduction of prophylactic MRFX administration, the rectal temperatures of horses after transportation were significantly lower than before the introduction of MRFX administration (P<0.01) and the number of febrile horses was significantly lower than before the introduction of MRFX administration (P<0.01). In conclusion, these results show that prophylactic MRFX administration just before transportation is clinically effective at preventing transportation-associated fever. PMID:25558181

  2. Locally advanced rectal cancer: a comparison of management strategies.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Robert; Kronfli, Miranda

    2011-06-18

    Traditionally, there has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer and 10-40% of patients require a permanent stoma. Both short-course preoperative radiotherapy (SCPRT) and long-course preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) are used to reduce the risk of local recurrence and enable a curative resection. Total mesorectal excision has reduced the rate of local recurrence (even without radiotherapy) to below 10%, but has highlighted a high risk of metastatic disease in 30-40% of patients. Current trials suggest that in resectable cancers, where the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggests the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is not potentially involved, then SCPRT and CRT are equivalent in terms of outcomes such as local recurrence, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). For patients with more advanced disease, where the CRM is breached or threatened according to the MRI, the integration of more active chemotherapy and biological agents into chemoradiation is an attractive strategy because of the high risk of metastases. However, in none of the trials published in the last decade has chemoradiation impacted on DFS or OS. We examine the strategies of neoadjuvant, concurrent, consolidation (after chemoradiation and before surgery) and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with cytotoxic agents, and the integration of biological agents for future potential strategies of treatment. We also compare the trials and compare the different strategies of long-course preoperative radiotherapy and SCPRT; the intensification of preoperative radiation and chemoradiation with dose escalation of external beam radiotherapy, using brachytherapy, intra-operative radiotherapy, hyperfractionation, and various available techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy. We recommend examining dose escalation of radiotherapy to the primary tumour where MRI predicts a threatened CRM. Of the potential treatment strategies involving cytotoxic agents, such as neoadjuvant, concurrent, consolidation and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, the most promising would appear to be consolidation chemotherapy following chemoradiation in locally advanced disease, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy in MRI-selected patients who do not require radiation. Improvement in the quality of surgery is also an important future goal. PMID:21711061

  3. Comparative Analysis of Radiosensitizers for K-RAS Mutant Rectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Stephen Y.; Hong, Theodore S.; Haigis, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 40% of rectal cancers harbor activating K-RAS mutations, and these mutations are associated with poor clinical response to chemoradiotherapy. We aimed to identify small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) that synergize with ionizing radiation (IR) (“radiosensitizers”) that could be incorporated into current treatment strategies for locally advanced rectal cancers (LARCs) expressing mutant K-RAS. We first optimized a high-throughput assay for measuring individual and combined effects of SMIs and IR that produces similar results to the gold standard colony formation assay. Using this screening platform and K-RAS mutant rectal cancer cell lines, we tested SMIs targeting diverse signaling pathways for radiosensitizing activity and then evaluated our top hits in follow-up experiments. The two most potent radiosensitizers were the Chk1/2 inhibitor AZD7762 and the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235. The chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which is used to treat LARC, synergized with AZD7762 and enhanced radiosensitization by AZD7762. This study is the first to compare different SMIs in combination with IR for the treatment of K-RAS mutant rectal cancer, and our findings suggest that Chk1/2 inhibitors should be evaluated in new clinical trials for LARC. PMID:24349411

  4. Use of transanal minimally invasive surgery for endoscopic resection of rectal tumour: a technical note

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Muhammad Shafique; Bhatti, Muhammad I.; Baig, MK; Miles, William F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this article is to report and discuss a case of lower rectal cancer undergoing endoscopic transanal resection of tumour (ETART) using a transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) approach. Methods: A technical note on a case report. An innovative approach for ETART using TAMIS. Results: This is the first-ever case report of lower rectal cancer treated by ETART using a TAMIS approach. The procedure was completed successfully without any operative or peri-operative complication. Peri-operative flexible sigmoidoscopy confirmed a wide and patent rectal lumen. Conclusion: Use of a TAMIS approach for ETART to remove lower rectal cancer for palliation can be technically very effective compared with conventional ETART, due to the potential advantages of avoiding contaminant fluid spillage, easy access, better visualization compared with conventional ETART, and being user-friendly. The results from larger cohorts of patients undergoing TAMIS ETART are required before recommending the routine use of this technique. However, until then, this approach may be considered as an alternative to conventional ETART. PMID:24994833

  5. Molecular Response to Cetuximab and Efficacy of Preoperative Cetuximab-Based Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer

    E-print Network

    -14, 2007, Wolfsberg, Switzerland; and at the 44th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical.jco.org. It is not included in the PDF version (via Adobe® Reader®). © 2009 by American Society of Clinical Oncology 0732-183X in Rectal Cancer Annelies Debucquoy, Karin Haustermans, Anneleen Daemen, Selda Aydin, Louis Libbrecht

  6. Heritability of rectal temperature and genetic correlations with production and reproduction traits in dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic selection for body temperature regulation during heat stress might be a useful approach to reduce the magnitude of heat stress effects on production and reproduction. Present objectives were to estimate the genetic parameters of rectal temperature in dairy cows reared in free stall barns und...

  7. Ionic composition of the rectal contents and excreta of the reduviid bug Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Kollien, A H.; Grospietsch, T; Kleffmann, T; Zerbst-Boroffka, I; Schaub, G A.

    2001-07-01

    We have investigated the chemical composition of the rectal contents, faeces and urine of the blood-sucking bug Triatoma infestans. This is the environment in which the important disease-causing organism, Trypanosoma cruzi, lives. Directly after feeding of Triatoma infestans, the pH of the excreta switched from an acidic to an alkaline pH and, 1 day later, back to a slightly acidic pH. The osmolality varied in the initial excreta and in the rectal contents on the day following the meal between 300 and 460 mosmol/kg H(2)O, but after an additional day it increased to 350-970 mosmol/kg H(2)O. Determinations by ion capillary electrophoresis showed that sulphate and phosphate dominated the rectal contents in unfed bugs. After feeding, the first four drops of fluid excreta were mainly a sodium chloride solution (>150 mM for each). One to 10 days after feeding strong individual variations in the concentrations of individual ions were evident, especially for potassium and sodium. Mean concentrations of chloride remained at about 70 mM; sulphate and phosphate showed an increase within the first 1 or 2 days and then reached a level of about 160 and 210 mM, respectively. The rectal contents of long-term starved bugs contained high concentrations of phosphate and potassium; sulphate and sodium were slightly lower. PMID:11356421

  8. Factors affecting sexual function: A comparison between women with gynecological or rectal cancer and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Chun; Rew, Lynn; Chen, Lynn

    2014-11-23

    This study had two purposes: (i) to explore differences in sexual function between women with gynecological or rectal cancer after related pelvic-area treatments and women without cancer; and (ii) to investigate the relationships among body image, anxiety and depression, sexual relationship power, sexual self-schema, and female sexual function. The participants (n?=?139) were recruited through Internet cancer support groups and women's health organizations in the USA. Six structured questionnaires were mailed, and the data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results showed that women with gynecological or rectal cancer had significantly worse sexual function than women without cancer. Having gynecological/rectal cancer and a negative sexual self-schema were significantly related to poor sexual function. Furthermore, sexual self-schema moderated the relationship between sexual relationship power and female sexual function. Healthcare providers could give more attention to sexual issues in women who have undergone treatment for gynecological or rectal cancer, especially for those with a negative sexual self-schema and high sexual relationship power, which might improve these women's quality of life. PMID:25417724

  9. Successful treatment of recurrent rectal prolapse using three Thiersch sutures in children.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kashif; Gan, Richard Wei Chern; Singh, Shailinder

    2015-01-01

    Many techniques are described to manage recurrent rectal prolapse in children, including repeated Thiersch stitch, phenol injections, Delorme and Altemeier procedures, and rectopexy. We describe a case of successful treatment of rectal prolapse by placing three Thiersch sutures circumferentially along the anal canal-a simple and novel modification of a well-known procedure. An 8-year-old boy with full-thickness rectal prolapse was treated with laxatives to no avail. He was subsequently treated with phenol-in-almond-oil injection and insertion of a 1/0PDS Thiersch suture. The effects were temporary with recurrence 3?months later. A further phenol-in-almond-oil injection was given and a 1/0PDS Thiersch suture placed, and the patient was discharged on laxatives. Recurrence occurred again at 3?months. This was treated with three circumferential Thiersch sutures along the anal canal-one Prolene 2/0 and two 1/0PDS. There has been no recurrence at follow-up. Placement of three sequential Thiersch sutures along the rectum is effective in treating recurrent rectal prolapse and a good alternative to major rectopexy. PMID:26607187

  10. Glucose Infusion into Exercising Dogs after Confinement: Rectal and Active Muscle Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kruk, B.; Nazar, K.; Falecka-Wieczorek, I.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous glucose infusion into ambulatory dogs results in attenuation of exercise-induced increase of both rectal and thigh muscle temperatures. That glucose (Glu) infusion attenuates excessive increase in body temperature from restricted activity during confinement deconditioning. Intravenous glucose infusion attenuates the rise in exercise core temperature in deconditioned dogs by a yet undefined mechanism.

  11. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy: Injection of Hyaluronic Acid to Better Preserve The Rectal Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier; Udrescu, Corina; Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite ; Devonec, Marian; Tanguy, Ronan; Sotton, Marie-Pierre; Enachescu, Ciprian; Colombel, Marc; Azria, David; Jalade, Patrice; Ruffion, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) between the rectum and the prostate for reducing the dose to the rectal wall in a hypofractionated irradiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a phase 2 study, 10 cc of HA was injected between the rectum and prostate. For 16 patients, the same intensity modulated radiation therapy plan (62 Gy in 20 fractions) was optimized on 2 computed tomography scans: CT1 (before injection) and CT2 (after injection). Rectal parameters were compared: dose to 2.5 cc (D2.5), 5 cc (D5), 10 cc (D10), 15 cc (D15), and 20 cc (D20) of rectal wall and volume of rectum covered by the 90% isodose line (V90), 80% (V80), 70% (V70), 60% (V60), and 50% (V50). Results: The mean V90, V80, V70, V60, and V50 values were reduced by 73.8% (P<.0001), 55.7% (P=.0003), 43.0% (P=.007), 34% (P=.002), and 25% (P=.036), respectively. The average values of D2.5, D5, D10, D15, and D20 were reduced by 8.5 Gy (P<.0001), 12.3 Gy (P<.0001), 8.4 Gy (P=.005), 3.7 Gy (P=.026), and 1.2 Gy (P=.25), respectively. Conclusions: The injection of HA significantly limited radiation doses to the rectal wall.

  12. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  13. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: A systematic review of current practice

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tony Wing Chung; Lee, Janet Fung Yee; Futaba, Kaori; Hon, Sophie Sok Fei; Ngo, Dennis Kwok Yu; Ng, Simon Siu Man

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To give a comprehensive review of current literature on robotic rectal cancer surgery. METHODS: A systematic review of current literature via PubMed and Embase search engines was performed to identify relevant articles from january 2007 to november 2013. The keywords used were: “robotic surgery”, “surgical robotics”, “laparoscopic computer-assisted surgery”, “colectomy” and “rectal resection”. RESULTS: After the initial screen of 380 articles, 20 papers were selected for review. A total of 1062 patients (male 64.0%) with a mean age of 61.1 years and body mass index of 24.9 kg/m2 were included in the review. Out of 1062 robotic-assisted operations, 831 (78.2%) anterior and low anterior resections, 132 (12.4%) intersphincteric resection with coloanal anastomosis, 98 (9.3%) abdominoperineal resections and 1 (0.1%) Hartmann’s operation were included in the review. Robotic rectal surgery was associated with longer operative time but with comparable oncological results and anastomotic leak rate when compared with laparoscopic rectal surgery. CONCLUSION: Robotic colorectal surgery has continued to evolve to its current state with promising results; feasible surgical option with low conversion rate and comparable short-term oncological results. The challenges faced with robotic surgery are for more high quality studies to justify its cost. PMID:24936229

  14. Characterization of the endogenous intestinal peptide that stimulates the rectal gland of Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Anderson, W G; Conlon, J M; Hazon, N

    1995-06-01

    It has been postulated that gut peptides play a major role in the regulation of rectal gland secretion in elasmobranchs. An isolated perfused rectal gland secretion in elasmobranchs. An isolated perfused rectal gland preparation was developed for Scyliorhinus canicula that responded to dibutyryl 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate plus 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, increasing chloride clearance rates threefold over basal levels. Activity was stimulated by an endogenous peptide, isolated in pur form by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography from the intestine of S. canicula. The primary structure was established as Ser-Pro-Ser-Asn-Ser-Lys-Cys-Pro-Asp-Gly-Pro-Asp-Cys-Phe-Val-Gly-Leu-Met- NH2. This is a sequence identical to that of the tachykinin scyliorhinin II. Perfusion of synthetic scyliorhinin II increased secretion rate in the rectal gland of S. canicula in a dose-dependent manner with a maximal response at 10(-6) M, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide, a stimulator in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, had no effect. We propose that scyliorhinin II is the uncharacterized peptide rectin, previously identified from the intestine of S. canicula. PMID:7541963

  15. Acromegaly due to a Macroinvasive Plurihormonal Pituitary Adenoma and a Rectal Carcinoid Tumor.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sang Ouk; Hwang, Jin Kyung; Rhee, Sang Youl; Chon, Suk; Oh, Seungjoon; Lee, Misu; Pellegata, Natalia S; Kim, Sung Woon

    2015-09-01

    A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with plurihormonality usually causes acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia, and also accompanies with neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbances. However, its concurrent presentation with a rectal carcinoid tumor is rarely observed. This study reports the history, biochemical, colonoscopic and immunohistochemical results of a 48-year-old female with acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia. Despite the large size and invasive nature of the pituitary adenoma to adjacent anatomical structures, she did not complain of any neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbance or headache. Immunohistochemical staining of the surgical specimen from the pituitary adenoma revealed that the tumor cells were positive for growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Staining for pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) was shown to be strongly positive, which could have been possibly contributing to the plurihormonality of this adenoma. Colonoscopy found a rectal polyp that was identified to be a carcinoid tumor using immunohistochemical staining. A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with concomitant rectal carcinoid tumor was secreting GH, PRL, and TSH, which were believed to be in association with over-expression of Pit-1. This is the first case report of double primary tumors comprising a plurihormonal pituitary macroadenoma and rectal carcinoid tumor. PMID:25559714

  16. Acromegaly due to a Macroinvasive Plurihormonal Pituitary Adenoma and a Rectal Carcinoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Sang Ouk; Hwang, Jin-Kyung; Rhee, Sang Youl; Chon, Suk; Oh, Seungjoon; Lee, Misu; Pellegata, Natalia S.

    2015-01-01

    A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with plurihormonality usually causes acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia, and also accompanies with neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbances. However, its concurrent presentation with a rectal carcinoid tumor is rarely observed. This study reports the history, biochemical, colonoscopic and immunohistochemical results of a 48-year-old female with acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia. Despite the large size and invasive nature of the pituitary adenoma to adjacent anatomical structures, she did not complain of any neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbance or headache. Immunohistochemical staining of the surgical specimen from the pituitary adenoma revealed that the tumor cells were positive for growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Staining for pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) was shown to be strongly positive, which could have been possibly contributing to the plurihormonality of this adenoma. Colonoscopy found a rectal polyp that was identified to be a carcinoid tumor using immunohistochemical staining. A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with concomitant rectal carcinoid tumor was secreting GH, PRL, and TSH, which were believed to be in association with over-expression of Pit-1. This is the first case report of double primary tumors comprising a plurihormonal pituitary macroadenoma and rectal carcinoid tumor. PMID:25559714

  17. Cost comparison between endoscopic submucosal dissection and transanal endoscopic microsurgery for the treatment of rectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Myung Jin; Hong, Chang Won; Han, Kyung Su; Kim, Byung Chang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Sung Chan; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare medical costs of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) for the treatment of rectal tumors. Methods The records of 80 patients who underwent ESD and 32 who underwent TEM for the treatment of rectal tumors were collected. Factors compared in the two groups included patient age, sex and clinical characteristics, as well as hospital stay, procedure time, instrument use, medications, postoperative complications, and imaging and laboratory findings. Costs were analyzed based on medical insurance fees, as set publicly by the Ministry of Health & Welfare, Korea. Medical costs were also divided into patient copayments and National Health Insurance (NHI) Corporation charges. Results Patient characteristics, including age, sex, and comorbidities, were similar in the two groups, as were procedure time, histologic diagnosis, tumor size and distance from the anal verge, hospital stay, and complication rates. Median total hospital costs were significantly lower in the ESD than in the TEM group (1,214 United State dollars [USD] vs. 1,686 USD, P < 0.001). The costs for consumables, drugs and laboratory as well as operation fee were also significantly lower in the ESD than in the TEM group. However, patient copayments in the ESD group were significantly higher than in the TEM group (928 USD vs. 496 USD, P < 0.001), because ESD procedure for rectal tumors is not yet covered by the Korean NHI. Conclusion Overall direct medical costs were significantly lower for ESD than for TEM in the treatment of rectal tumors. PMID:26448919

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.; Lear, S.; Kniaz, D.; Greger, R.; Epstein, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallel with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.

  19. Relationship between temperament and transportation with rectal temperature and secretion of cortisol and epinephrine in bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated whether temperament influences rectal temperature and the secretion of cortisol and epinephrine in response to transportation. Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score (average of exit velocity, EV, and pen score, PS) measured 28 days prior to weaning with the 8...

  20. Laparoscopic versus conventional open resection of rectal carcinoma: A clinical comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Xi; Sun, Yao-Min; Hua, Yi-Bin; Shen, Li-Zong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of laparoscopic resection of rectal carcinoma and to compare the short-term outcome of laparoscopic procedure with conventional open surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients with rectal cancer were included in a prospective non-randomized study. The patients were assigned to laparoscopic (n = 18) or open (n = 18) colorectal resection. Case selection, surgical technique, and clinical and pathological results were reviewed. RESULTS: The operative time was longer in laparoscopic resection group (LAP) than in open resection group (189 ± 18 min vs 146 ± 22 min, P < 0.05). Intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications were less in LAP resection group than in open resection group. An earlier return of bowel motility was observed after laparoscopic surgery. The overall postoperative morbidity was 5.6% in the LAP resection group and 27.8% in open resection group (P < 0.05). No anastomotic leakage was found in both groups. The pathologic examination showed that the length of the resected specimen, the mean number of harvested lymph nodes in laparoscopic resection group were comparable to those in open resection group. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal cancer is a feasible but technically demanding procedure. The present study demonstrates the safety of the procedure, while oncologic results are comparable to the open surgery, with a favorable short-term outcome. PMID:15069719

  1. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer: accuracy of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Kim, Seung Hoon; Chun, Ho Kyung; Lee, Woo-Yong; Yun, Seong-Hyeon; Song, Sang-Yong; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo Keun; Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jongmee; Lee, Soon Jin

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the preoperative staging of rectal cancer. Thirty-five patients with a primary rectal cancer who underwent preoperative 3-T MRI using a phased-array coil and had a surgical resection were enrolled in the study group. Preoperatively, three experienced radiologists independently assessed the T and N staging. A confidence level scoring system was used to determine if there was any perirectal invasion, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. The interobserver agreement was estimated using kappa statistics. The overall accuracy rate of T staging for rectal cancer was 92%. The diagnostic accuracy was 97% for T1, 89% for T2 and 91% for T3, respectively. The predictive accuracy for perirectal invasion by the three observers was high (Az>0.92). The interobserver agreement for T staging was moderate to substantial. The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of mesorectal nodal metastases were 80%, 98%, and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, preoperative 3-T MRI using a phase-array coil accurately indicates the depth of tumor invasion for rectal cancer with a low variability. PMID:16416276

  2. The influence of bovine temperament on rectal temperature and stress hormones in response to transportation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the influence of bovine temperament on rectal temperature (RT), cortisol (CS), and epinephrine (EPI) secretion in response to transportation. Brahman bulls (10 months of age) were selected from the spring 2007 calf crop based on temperament score which was an ave...

  3. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@ibk.liu.se

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p {<=} 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors.

  4. ADMINISTRATIVE CLIMATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRUCE, ROBERT L.; CARTER, G.L., JR.

    IN THE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, STYLES OF LEADERSHIP PROFOUNDLY AFFECT THE QUALITY OF THE SERVICE RENDERED. ACCORDINGLY, MAJOR INFLUENCES ON ADMINISTRATIVE CLIMATE AND EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY ARE EXAMINED IN ESSAYS ON (1) SOURCES OF JOB SATISFACTION AND DISSATISFACTION, (2) MOTIVATIONAL THEORIES BASED ON JOB-RELATED SATISFACTIONS AND NEEDS,…

  5. Engineering Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    This book is intended to acquaint naval engineering officers with their duties in the engineering department. Standard shipboard organizations are analyzed in connection with personnel assignments, division operations, and watch systems. Detailed descriptions are included for the administration of directives, ship's bills, damage control, training…

  6. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  7. EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

    E-print Network

    Wenderholm, Elaine

    Supervision: Improvement of Instruction (3sh) EAD 695 Internship (3sh) Spring 2016 EAD 610 School at the left and a 9-hour internship. The program leads to full certification in school administration. About-teachers, or instructors in nearly all courses. The department works with school districts to help identify high quality

  8. Dose-distance metric that predicts late rectal bleeding in patients receiving radical prostate external-beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Chan, Elisa K.; Kosztyla, Robert; Liu, Mitchell; Moiseenko, Vitali

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between rectal dose distribution and the incidence of late rectal complications following external-beam radiotherapy has been previously studied using dose-volume histograms or dose-surface histograms. However, they do not account for the spatial dose distribution. This study proposes a metric based on both surface dose and distance that can predict the incidence of rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy. One hundred and forty-four patients treated with radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer were prospectively followed to record the incidence of grade ?2 rectal bleeding. Radiotherapy plans were used to evaluate a dose-distance metric that accounts for the dose and its spatial distribution on the rectal surface, characterized by a logistic weighting function with slope a and inflection point d0. This was compared to the effective dose obtained from dose-surface histograms, characterized by the parameter n which describes sensitivity to hot spots. The log-rank test was used to determine statistically significant (p < 0.05) cut-off values for the dose-distance metric and effective dose that predict for the occurrence of rectal bleeding. For the dose-distance metric, only d0 = 25 and 30 mm combined with a > 5 led to statistical significant cut-offs. For the effective dose metric, only values of n in the range 0.07-0.35 led to statistically significant cut-offs. The proposed dose-distance metric is a predictor of rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Both the dose-distance metric and the effective dose metric indicate that the incidence of grade ?2 rectal bleeding is sensitive to localized damage to the rectal surface.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging based rectal cancer classification: landmarks and technical standardization.

    PubMed

    Alasari, Sami; Lim, Daero; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-14

    Rectal cancer classification is important to determine the preoperative chemoradiation therapy and to select appropriate surgical technique. We reviewed the Western and Japanese rectal cancer classification and we propose our new classification based of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We determine the relation of the tumor to fixed parameters in MRI, which are peritoneal reflection and levator ani muscle. Then, we classify the rectal cancer into four levels based on tumor distal margin and invasion to MRI parameters. We applied all three classifications to 60 retrospectively collected patients of different rectal cancer distance and we compared our classifications to the others. Based on each level we standardize our surgical approach. For stages?I-III, We found that level?I?where tumor distal margin is located above the peritoneal reflection and all of them were received low anterior resection (LAR) without chemoradiation. Level II where tumor distal margin is located from the peritoneal reflection and above the levator ani insertion on the rectum. 90% of them were received LAR ± chemoradiation. Level III where tumor distal margin is located at the level of levator ani insertion or invading any part of the levator ani. 60% of them had ULAR + coloanal anastomosis ± chemoradiation. Level IV where the tumor distal margin is located below the levator ani insertion; 77% were received APR ± chemoradiation. The overall kappa for all levels between surgeons and radiologist was 0.93 (95%CI: 0.87-0.99), which is indicating almost perfect agreement. We concluded that the management of rectal tumors differed among each tumor level and our new MRI based classification might facilitate the prediction of surgical and chemoradiation management with better communication among a multidisciplinary team comparing to other classifications. PMID:25593457

  10. Role of Peroxiredoxin I in Rectal Cancer and Related to p53 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Lee, Kuan-Der; Yeh, Chung-Hung; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Shih; Chin, Chih-Chien; Lin, Paul- Yang; Wang, Jeng-Yi

    2010-11-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is widely accepted for the treatment of localized rectal cancer. Although peroxiredoxin I (PrxI) and p53 have been implicated in carcinogenesis and cancer treatment, the role of PrxI and its interaction with p53 in the prognosis and treatment response of rectal cancer remain relatively unstudied. Methods and Materials: In the present study, we examined the levels of PrxI and p53 in rectal cancer patients using membrane arrays and compared them with normal population samples. To demonstrate the biologic changes after manipulation of PrxI expression, we established stable transfectants of HCT-116 (wild-type p53) and HT-29 (mutant p53) cells with a PrxI silencing vector. The predictive capacities of PrxI and p53 were also assessed by relating the immunohistochemical staining of a retrospective series of rectal cancer cases to the clinical outcome. Results: The membrane array and immunochemical staining data showed that PrxI, but not p53, was significantly associated with the tumor burden. Our immunochemistry findings further indicated that PrxI positivity was linked to a poor response to neoadjuvant therapy and worse survival. In cellular and animal experiments, the inhibition of PrxI significantly decreased tumor growth and sensitized the tumor to irradiation, as indicated by a lower capacity to scavenge reactive oxygen species and more extensive DNA damage. The p53 status might have contributed to the difference between HCT-116 and HT-29 after knockdown of PrxI. Conclusion: According to our data, the level of PrxI combined with the p53 status is relevant to the prognosis and the treatment response. We suggested that PrxI might be a new biomarker for rectal cancer.

  11. Rectal Motion in Patients Receiving Preoperative Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, James D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sampson, Elliott; Bayley, Andrew; Scott, Sandra; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Timothy; Cummings, Bernard; Dinniwell, Robert; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the movement of rectum, mesorectum, and rectal primary during a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer had a planning CT scan with rectal contrast before commencement of preoperative chemoradiation. The scan was repeated during Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of chemoradiation. The rectal primary (gross tumor volume), rectum, mesorectum, and bladder were contoured on all four scans. An in-house biomechanical model-based deformable image registration technique, Morfeus, was used to measure the three-dimensional spatial change in these structures after bony alignment. The required planning target volume margin for this spatial change, after bone alignment, was also calculated. Results: Rectal contrast was found to introduce a systematic error in the position of all organs compared with the noncontrast state. The largest change in structures during radiotherapy was in the anterior and posterior directions for the mesorectum and rectum and in the superior and inferior directions for the gross tumor volume. The planning target volume margins required for internal movement for the mesorectum based on the three scans acquired during treatment are 4 mm right, 5 mm left, 7 mm anterior, and 6 mm posterior. For the rectum, values were 8 mm right, 8 mm left, 8 mm anterior, and 9 mm posterior. The greatest movement of the rectum occurred in the upper third. Conclusions: Contrast is no longer used in CT simulation. Assuming bony alignment, a nonuniform margin of 8 mm anteriorly, 9 mm posteriorly, and 8 mm left and right is recommended.

  12. Meta-analysis of robotic and laparoscopic surgery for treatment of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuang; Jiang, Hong-Gang; Chen, Zhi-Heng; Zhou, Shu-Yang; Liu, Xiao-Sun; Yu, Ji-Ren

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To conduct a meta-analysis to determine the relative merits of robotic surgery (RS) and laparoscopic surgery (LS) for rectal cancer. METHODS: A literature search was performed to identify comparative studies reporting perioperative outcomes for RS and LS for rectal cancer. Pooled odds ratios and weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using either the fixed effects model or random effects model. RESULTS: Eight studies matched the selection criteria and reported on 661 subjects, of whom 268 underwent RS and 393 underwent LS for rectal cancer. Compared the perioperative outcomes of RS with LS, reports of RS indicated favorable outcomes considering conversion (WMD: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.11-0.58; P = 0.001). Meanwhile, operative time (WMD: 27.92, 95% CI: -13.43 to 69.27; P = 0.19); blood loss (WMD: -32.35, 95% CI: -86.19 to 21.50; P = 0.24); days to passing flatus (WMD: -0.18, 95% CI: -0.96 to 0.60; P = 0.65); length of stay (WMD: -0.04; 95% CI: -2.28 to 2.20; P = 0.97); complications (WMD: 1.05; 95% CI: 0.71-1.55; P = 0.82) and pathological details, including lymph nodes harvested (WMD: 0.41, 95% CI: -0.67 to 1.50; P = 0.46), distal resection margin (WMD: -0.35, 95% CI: -1.27 to 0.58; P = 0.46), and positive circumferential resection margin (WMD: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.12-2.39; P = 0.42) were similar between RS and LS. CONCLUSION: RS for rectal cancer is superior to LS in terms of conversion. RS may be an alternative treatment for rectal cancer. Further studies are required. PMID:22215947

  13. Expression of FXYD-3 is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Rectal Cancer Patients With Preoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Loftas, Per; Onnesjoe, Sofia; Widegren, Emma; Adell, Gunnar; Kayed, Hany; Kleeff, Joerg; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Sun Xiaofeng

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: FXYD-3 (MAT-8) is overexpressed in several types of cancers; however, its clinical relevance in rectal cancers has not been studied. Therefore, we examined FXYD-3 expression in rectal cancers from the patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to determine whether FXYD-3 was overexpressed in rectal cancers and correlated with RT, survival, and other clinicopathologic variables. Methods and Materials: The study included 140 rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT, 65 with and 75 without RT before surgery. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 70) and adjacent (n = 101) normal mucosa, primary tumors (n = 140), and lymph node metastasis (n = 36). Results: In the whole cohort, strong FXYD-3 expression was correlated with infiltrative tumor growth (p = 0.02). In the RT group, strong FXYD-3 expression alone (p = 0 .02) or combined with phosphatase of regenerating liver was associated with an unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.02), independent of both TNM stage and tumor differentiation. In tumors with strong FXYD-3 expression, there was less tumor necrosis (p = 0.02) and a trend toward increased incidence of distant metastasis (p = 0.08) after RT. None of these effects was seen in the non-RT group. FXYD-3 expression in the primary tumors tended to be increased compared with normal mucosa regardless of RT. Conclusion: FXYD-3 expression was a prognostic factor independent of tumor stage and differentiation in patients receiving preoperative RT for rectal cancer.

  14. COMPARISON OF RECTAL BALLOON EXPULSION TEST IN SEATED AND LEFT LATERAL POSITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Ratuapli, Shiva; Bharucha, Adil E.; Harvey, Doris; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Defecatory disorders can be diagnosed by rectal balloon expulsion (BE) and anorectal manometry, which are traditionally evaluated in the seated and left lateral (LL) positions respectively. The aims of this study were to compare BE in the LL and seated positions and to compare anorectal manometric parameters to BE performed in the seated and left lateral positions. Methods 220 women (healthy [62], chronic constipation [158]) had anorectal high resolution manometry and BE, summarized by time required (seated position, normal ?60s) or external traction to facilitate expulsion (LL position, normal ?100g). Results BE results in both positions were either concordant (normal [141], or abnormal [32]), or discordant (only LL abnormal [30], only seated abnormal [17]). There was modest agreement (? =0.44 [95%CI 0.30–0.57]) between seated and LL BE. Compared to subjects with normal BE in both positions, anal pressure during simulated evacuation (SE) was higher, and the rectoanal gradient (rectal-anal pressure) during simulated evacuation was more negative in the other 3 categories (i.e., abnormal LL only, abnormal seated only, and both abnormal). High anal pressure during SE (OR=1.02, 95%CI 1.00–1.04) and high rectal sensory threshold for desire to defecate (OR=1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02) were associated with increased risk of abnormal BE in both positions, whereas high rectal pressure during SE (OR=0.96, 95% CI 0.93- 0.98) was associated with lower risk. Conclusions There is modest agreement between rectal BE in left lateral and seated positions. In addition to abnormal seated BE, which is considered indicative of pelvic floor dysfunction, HRM findings suggest that even some patients with abnormal BE in the left lateral position have pelvic floor dysfunction. PMID:23952111

  15. [Is there a relationship between rectal colonization and nosocomial infection of patients in intensive care unit?].

    PubMed

    Ye?ilba?, Zuhal; Ça?atay, Arif Atahan; Karadeniz, Asl?; Ba?aran, Seniha; Orhun, Günseli; Ergin Özcan, Perihan; Özsüt, Halit; Eraksoy, Haluk

    2015-07-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) microorganisms are a major problem in intensive care units (ICUs) with high mortality and morbidity rates and the prior colonization is an important risk factor for these infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of rectal colonization of MDR microorganisms and the association between the microorganisms that caused colonization and infection in the patients with nosocomial infections in ICUs. Rectal swabs were obtained on the day of 0, 3, 7, 14, 21 and weekly thereafter from 80 patients over 18 years of age hospitalized in ICU for more than 48 hours, and cultured for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL)- producing gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and carbapenem-resistant enteric and nonenteric bacilli. Patients whose rectal swabs were not obtained on admission (on the day of 0), were excluded even they were hospitalized more than 48 hours. Bile esculin agar containing 64 ?g/mL ceftazidime and 6 ?g/mL vancomycin, chromogenic MRSA agar and blood agar media, MacConkey agar containing 1 mg/L ceftazidime and ceftriaxone, and 5 mL tryptic soy broth media containing 10 µg imipenem and meropenem discs were used for identification. Identification of GNB was determined by conventional methods and ESBL production was determined by double-disc synergy test. Patients have been followed up for nosocomial infections. Bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed with standard microbiological methods. In 37 (46%) of the 80 patients, at least one MDR microorganism was isolated in rectal swab cultures on the day of 0. The most common microorganisms were ESBL-positive E.coli (19%), followed by ESBL-positive K.pneumoniae (13%), carbapenem-resistant P.aeruginosa (10%), ESBL-positive K.oxytoca (3%), MRSA (1%), VRE (1%), carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter sp. (1%) and carbapenem-resistant K.pneumoniae (1%), respectively. The number of microorganisms isolated from rectal swab cultures on the following days have increased, and on the 7th day, the rate of the patients with rectal colonization ascended to 72%. Out of 80 patients, 52 (65%) had nosocomial infections in the follow-up and the mean duration of infection development was 11.8±9.9 days in these patients. Patients with and without rectal colonization were compared in terms of subsequent nosocomial infection rates. While no statistically significant difference has been detected between two groups on the day of 0, patients with rectal colonization detected on the day of 3 and 7, had a significantly higher incidence of nosocomial infections (p=0.02, p=0.01). Among the patients with ESBL-positive GNB, carbapenem-resistant K.pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant P.aeruginosa and VRE infections, the same microorganisms have been isolated in the rectal swab cultures taken before the development of infection. This result was statistically significant for each of these microorganisms (p=0.00-0.03). However, such a correlation was not observed for Acinetobacter infections. Since MRSA infections developed in only two patients, no istatistical analysis has been done for this microorganism. In conclusion, our data suggest that MDR microorganisms that cause nosocomial infections, initially colonize the gastrointestinal tract, and early detection of colonized patients in ICUs may help an effective infection control by preventing the spread of these resistant microorganisms. PMID:26313275

  16. Rectal Swabs Are Suitable for Quantifying the Carriage Load of KPC-Producing Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, A.; Romano, J.; Chmelnitsky, I.; Navon-Venezia, S.; Edgar, R.

    2013-01-01

    It is more convenient and practical to collect rectal swabs than stool specimens to study carriage of colon pathogens. In this study, we examined the ability to use rectal swabs rather than stool specimens to quantify Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). We used a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay to determine the concentration of the blaKPC gene relative to the concentration of 16S rRNA genes and a quantitative culture-based method to quantify CRE relative to total aerobic bacteria. Our results demonstrated that rectal swabs are suitable for quantifying the concentration of KPC-producing CRE and that qPCR showed higher correlation between rectal swabs and stool specimens than the culture-based method. PMID:23295937

  17. Molecular, Pathologic and MRI Investigation of the Prognostic and Redictive Importance of Extramural Venous Invasion in Rectal Cancer (MARVEL) Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-26

    Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Diseases; Colorectal Neoplasms; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases

  18. Estimation of {alpha}/{beta} for Late Rectal Toxicity Based on RTOG 94-06

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L.; Thames, Howard D.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Bosch, Walter R.; Mohan, Radhe; Winter, Kathryn; Cox, James D.; Purdy, James A.; Dong Lei

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To estimate {alpha}/{beta}, the parameter ratio from the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, for Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 94-06; and to determine whether correcting the rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH) for differences in dose per fraction, based on the LQ model, significantly improves the fit to these data of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Methods and Materials: The generalized LKB model was fitted to the Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity data in two ways: by using DVHs representing physical dose to rectum, and by using a modified approach in which dose bins in the rectal DVH were corrected for differences in dose per fraction using the LQ model, with {alpha}/{beta} estimated as an additional unknown parameter. The analysis included only patients treated with the same treatment plan throughout radiotherapy, so that the dose per fraction to each voxel of rectum could be determined from the DVH. The likelihood ratio test was used to assess whether the fit of the LQ-corrected model was significantly better than the fit of the LKB model based on physical doses to rectum. Results: The analysis included 509 of the 1,084 patients enrolled on RTOG 94-06. The estimate of {alpha}/{beta} from the LQ-corrected LKB model was 4.8 Gy, with 68% confidence interval 0.6 Gy to 46 Gy. The fit was not significantly different from the fit of the LKB model based on physical dose to rectum (p = 0.236). Conclusions: The estimated fractionation sensitivity for Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity is consistent with values of {alpha}/{beta} for rectum found previously in human beings and in rodents. However, the confidence interval is large, and there is no evidence that LQ correction of the rectal DVH significantly changes the fit or predictions of the LKB model for this endpoint.

  19. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ?1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ?25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  20. Accumulation ofDendrobium superbum (orchidaceae) fragrance in the rectal glands by males of the melon fly,Dacus cucurbitae.

    PubMed

    Nishida, R; Iwahashi, O; Tan, K H

    1993-04-01

    4-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone was characterized from flowers of the orchidDendrobium superbum as a specific attractant factor for the male melon fly,Dacus cucurbitae. The male flies compulsively licked the flower surface and sequestered the compound in significant quantities in their rectal glands. The compound was detected within 6 hr after ingestion and was retained for more than six days in the rectal gland sacs. PMID:24249012

  1. Comparison of rectal swabs and faeces for real-time PCR detection of enteric agents in Rwandan children with gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular diagnostics have emerged as an efficient and feasible alternative for broad detection of pathogens in faeces. However, collection of stool samples is often impractical in both clinical work and in epidemiology studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of rectal swabs as compared with traditional faeces samples for detection of enteric agents by PCR. Method Three hundred twenty-six pairs of rectal swab and stool samples, obtained from Rwandan children aged 0.5-4.99 years, with or without diarrhoea, were analysed by multiple real-time PCR amplifying 3 viral, 6 bacterial and one protozoan target. Results For all agents there was a significant correlation (R2 0.31-0.85) between Ct values in faeces and rectal swabs. For most agents the Ct values, a marker for target concentration, were significantly lower (by 1–3 cycles) in faeces, indicating pathogen content up to ten times higher than in rectal swabs. Despite this, there was no significant difference in detection rate between faeces and rectal swabs for any agent, reflecting that pathogen concentration was far above the limit of detection in the majority of cases. Conclusion The similar detection rates and the Ct value correlations as compared with traditional faeces samples indicate that rectal swabs are accurate for real-time PCR-based identification of enteric agents and may be used also for quantitative estimation of pathogen load. PMID:24073740

  2. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung; Yeo, Hyun Yang; Baek, Ji Yeon; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang ; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seock-Ah; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly and 1650 mg/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with irinotecan plus capecitabine regimen was not associated with improved clinical outcome compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab.

  3. [Organization of colon-rectal cancer screening in the Provincial Health Agency of Ragusa].

    PubMed

    Blangiardi, F; Ferrera, G; Cilia, S; Aprile, E

    2012-01-01

    Cancer screening is a secondary prevention program that permits early diagnosis of neoplasias and precancerous lesions are in order to diminish mortality and morbidity for certain types of tumors (breast, colon-rectal, and cervical). In 2010, the Ragusa Provincial Health Agency began screening for colon-rectal cancer in an experimental phase that initially involved only the municipality of Ragusa but that was then extended to other municipalities of the province. Although the organizing model suffered from many managerial problems including lack of human resources and tools, there was good collaboration and involvement of the public health/hygiene offices and the general practitioners and volunteer associations. This type of networking was useful in that adhesion to screening was well above that expected. Another winning aspect of the project resulted in clear and pertinent communication to the population. PMID:22880386

  4. Multidisciplinary Management of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer-An Evolving Landscape?

    PubMed

    Lee, Margaret; Gibbs, Peter; Wong, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    For many years, the multidisciplinary approach of neoadjuvant radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision and adjuvant fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy has remained the accepted standard management for locally advanced rectal cancers. Over this time period, many new systemic treatment options have become available, including: additional chemotherapeutic agents (oxaliplatin) and targeted therapies (vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors), which can be added to neoadjuvant and adjuvant regimens or given in combination with radiotherapy as radio-sensitizing agents. Here we review the current literature, examining emerging data related to the impact of multiple modifications to the standard approach, including the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the addition of new agents to standard chemoradiation, and postoperative fluoropyrimidine-based treatment, the optimal timing of surgery, and nonoperative approaches to the management of locally advanced rectal cancers. PMID:26210575

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound: current role and future perspectives in managing rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Câr?ân?, Elena Tatiana; Pârvu, Daniel; S?ftoiu, Adrian

    2011-12-01

    As therapeutic regimens for rectal cancer have seen considerable changes, an accurate staging is mandatory for choosing the adequate strategy. Locoregional staging is the decisive factor in selecting patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and for determining the extent of surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound (endorectal ultrasound--ERUS) is a very effective method for assessing the local extent of rectal cancer, especially regarding the depth of tumor infiltration. Although a significant limitation is represented by its lower accuracy for diagnosis of lymph node metastases, this is still a point of concern for other imaging tests as well. In this review we report the current data on ERUS, presenting both its advantages and limitations, and making a comparison to other staging methods. Recent developments of the technology that might enhance staging accuracy are also discussed. PMID:22187707

  6. [Case of rectal migratin of mesh after TVM (tension-free vaginal mesh) operation].

    PubMed

    Taoka, Rikiya; Mizuno, Kei; Matsuoka, Takashi; Kita, Yuki; Nakanishi, Shotaro; Asai, Seiji; Soda, Takeshi; Inoue, Koji; Terai, Akito

    2011-11-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with recto-cutaneous fistula after tension-free vaginal mesh reconstruction using polypropylene mesh for pelvic organ prolapse. Eleven months after the operation, an ulcerative lesion with stools smell secretion developed in the left hip. Magnetic resonance imaging and colonoscopy revealed a migration of the left arm of the mesh and a recto-cutaneous fistula. The patient underwent excision of the infected mesh and rectal wall closure together with transient colostomy. After 8 months, colonoscopy revealed a new migration of the mesh in the rectum, which was also removed. The colostomy was closed one year later and rectal erosion has not reccurred since then. The possibility of developing a rare but severe mesh-related complication as presented here should always be kept in mind. PMID:22390087

  7. 17-Week Delay Surgery after Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer with Complete Pathological Response

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marisa D.; Gomes, Manuel T.; Moreno, Filipa; Rocha, Anabela; Lopes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) followed by curative surgery still remains the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The main purpose of this multimodal treatment is to achieve a complete pathological tumor response (ypCR), with better survival. The surgery delay after CRT completion seems to increase tumor response and ypCR rate. Usually, time intervals range from 8 to 12 weeks, but the maximum tumor regression may not be seen in rectal adenocarcinomas until several months after CRT. About this issue, we report a case of a 52-year-old man with LARC treated with neoadjuvant CRT who developed, one month after RT completion, an acute myocardial infarction. The need to increase the interval between CRT and surgery for 17 weeks allowed a curative surgery without morbidity and an unexpected complete tumor response in the resected specimen (given the parameters presented in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 11 weeks after radiotherapy completion). PMID:26579325

  8. Rectal cancer. Treatment advances that reduce recurrence rates and lengthen survival.

    PubMed

    Sexe, R; Miedema, B W

    1993-07-01

    The risk of malignant disease arising in rectal mucosa is high. Surgery is the most effective form of treatment but results in cure in only 50% of patients. Adjuvant preoperative radiation therapy reduces the likelihood of local recurrence but does not improve survival rates. Fluorouracil is the most effective agent for adjuvant chemotherapy and slightly improves survival when given after surgery. Combining radiation therapy with chemotherapy appears to have a synergistic effect, and recent studies show that providing this combination after surgery improves survival. Future trends in the treatment of rectal cancer are expected to include expanded use of local excision to preserve anal sphincter function, preoperative use of a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy, perioperative use of chemotherapy combined with immunostimulating therapy, and use of tumor antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:8321771

  9. Pathologic Assessment of Rectal Carcinoma after Neoadjuvant Radio(chemo)therapy: Prognostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hav, Monirath; Libbrecht, Louis; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Geboes, Karen; Pattyn, Piet; Cuvelier, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radio(chemo)therapy is increasingly used in rectal cancer and induces a number of morphologic changes that affect prognostication after curative surgery, thereby creating new challenges for surgical pathologists, particularly in evaluating morphologic changes and tumour response to preoperative treatment. Surgical pathologists play an important role in determining the many facets of rectal carcinoma patient care after neoadjuvant treatment. These range from proper handling of macroscopic specimens to accurate microscopic evaluation of pathological features associated with patients' prognosis. This review presents the well-established pathological prognostic indicators and discusses challenging features in order to provide both surgical pathologists and treating physicians with a checklist that is useful in a neoadjuvant setting. PMID:26509160

  10. [Value of CT following surgery for rectal cancer (a prospective study)].

    PubMed

    Fezoulidis, I; Imhof, H; Karner-Hanusch, J; Teleky, B; Wunderlich, M; Schiessel, R

    1987-12-01

    The results of computed tomography of 48 patients after operation on rectal carcinoma who underwent close-meshed computer tomographic examinations are given in a prospective study. (First examination 6 weeks after operation, further examinations at intervals of 3 months, mean observation time: 12 months). The results of follow-up by means of computer tomographic examination are compared with clinical examinations and control of CEA levels. The use of computer tomographic examination resulted in 43 confirmed negative, 3 confirmed positive and 2 false negative findings (including cases with CT-aided fine needle biopsy). These results give an accuracy of 96% and thus exceed clinical examination and controls of CEA-level. How far early diagnosis of local recurrence of rectal cancer influences survival time, can be answered after completion of this study in the next few years. PMID:2830075

  11. Design of a rectal probe for diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging for chemotherapy and radiotherapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giessen, Martijn; Santoro, Ylenia; Mirzaei Zarandi, Soroush; Pigazzi, Alessio; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2014-03-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) has shown great potential for the early detection of non-responding tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer, already one day after therapy starts. Patients with rectal cancer receive similar chemotherapy treatment. The rectum geometry and tissue properties of healthy and tumor tissue in the rectum and the requirement of surface contact impose constraints on the probe design. In this work we present the design of a DOSI probe with the aim of early chemotherapy/radiotherapy effectiveness detection in rectal tumors. We show using Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements that the colon tissue can be characterized reliably using a source-detector separation in the order of 10 mm. We present a design and rapid prototype of a probe for DOSI measurements that can be mounted on a standard laparoscope and that fits through a standard rectoscope. Using predominantly clinically approved components we aim at fast clinical translation.

  12. Hypothalamic, rectal, and muscle temperatures in exercising dogs - Effect of cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, B.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the mechanisms of performance prolongation during exercise is presented. Measurements were obtained of the rectal, muscle, and hypothalamic temperature of dogs during treadmill exercise at an ambient temperature of 22 + or - 1 C, with and without cooling by use of ice packs. In comparison with exercise without cooling, exercise with cooling was found to: (1) increase exercise duration from 90 + or - 14 to 145 + or - 15 min; (2) attenuate increases in hypothalamic, rectal and muscle temperature; (3) decrease respiratory and heart rates; and (4) lower blood lactic acid content. It is shown that although significant differences were found between the brain, core, and muscle temperatures during exercise with and without cooling, an inverse relation was observed between muscle temperature and the total duration of exercise. It is suggested that sustained muscle hyperthermia may have contributed to the limitation of working ability in exercise with and without cooling.

  13. Rectally administered prednisolone--evidence for a predominantly local action.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, D A; Taylor, M; James, V H; Walker, G

    1980-01-01

    Plasma prednisolone levels have been compared in healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from idiopathic proctocolitis after the administration of standard retention enemata containing either prednisolone-21-phosphate or prednisolone metasulphobenzoate sodium. The levels were significantly lower after the latter, irrespective of the presence or degree of activity of the disease. Prednisolone metasulphobenzoate appeared to be as effective as the 21-phosphate ester for the treatment of proctocolitis in the few patients where the two drugs were compared. It seems possible that the beneficial effect of the form of therapy is exerted predominantly locally, rather than by systemic action. PMID:7399322

  14. Fatal herpes simplex virus hepatitis following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and anterior resection for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Toomey, D P; Dhadda, A S; Sanni, L A; Cooke, J P; Hartley, J E

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a young patient who contracted fatal herpes simplex virus hepatitis following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and anterior resection for rectal cancer. The rarity and non-specific presentation of this treatable disease, which masqueraded as the sequelae of postoperative sepsis, resulted in a diagnosis following death. Features that should prompt inclusion of herpes simplex virus hepatitis in the differential diagnoses are suggested and the case is a reminder of how neoadjuvant therapy may subtly alter a patient's immunocompetency. PMID:25350168

  15. Mesh–free Ventral Rectopexy for Women with Complete Rectal and Uterovaginal Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Tade, Adedayo O.; Olatunji, Adetola O.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mesh rectopexy may be associated with infective complications, erosion into the vagina or rectum, and disintegration or dislodgement. A mesh-free rectopexy will avoid these complications. Objective of the study was to perform mesh-free ventral rectopexy and assess its safety and effectiveness. Materials and Methods: Nine women with complete rectal and uterovaginal prolapse were treated with total abdominal hysterectomy, closure of the vaginal vault, extirpation of the pouch of Douglas and suture of anterior rectal wall to the posterior vaginal wall (ventral suture rectopexy). The ventral suture rectopexy was achieved by three pairs of interrupted silk sutures, 2.5 cm above each other, and the first pair very close to the pelvic floor. This composite structure (anterior rectal wall and posterior vaginal wall), sits astride the perineal body. Intussusception and subsequent prolapse of the sutured rectum and vaginal wall is prevented. Vaginal vault prolapse was prevented by the suture of each round ligament of the uterus to the corresponding lateral vaginal fornix. No mesh was used. Results: Nine multiparous women aged between 52 and 70 years had the procedure. The mean operative time was 135 minutes (range 110-220). The follow-up period was between 29 months and 7 years. Full continence was restored in all patients within eight weeks of the operation. Bowel habit returned to once daily in four patients and once every other day in the remaining five patients, within thirteen weeks of surgery. One patient had intermittent mucus discharge per rectum for six months. This stopped without a specific treatment. There has been no known recurrence in these nine patients. One patient developed wound infection as a complication. There was no mortality. All the patients are now asymptomatic. Conclusion: Ventral suture rectopexy is a safe and effective treatment for complete rectal prolapse in a selected group of patients. PMID:23741582

  16. Advantage of endoscopic mucosal resection with a cap for rectal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Bum; Kim, Hyung Wook; Kang, Dae Hwan; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kim, Su Jin; Nam, Hyeong Seok

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the outcomes of endoscopic mucosal resection with a cap (EMR-C) with those of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the resection of rectal neuroendocrine tumors. METHODS: One hundred and sixteen lesions in 114 patients with rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) resected with EMR-C or ESD were included in the study. This study was performed at Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital between July 2009 and August 2014. We analyzed endoscopic complete resection rate, pathologic complete resection rate, procedure time, and adverse events in the EMR-C (n = 65) and ESD (n = 51) groups. We also performed a subgroup analysis by tumor size. RESULTS: Mean tumor size was 4.62 ± 1.66 mm in the EMR-C group and 7.73 ± 3.14 mm in the ESD group (P < 0.001). Endoscopic complete resection rate was 100% in both groups. Histologic complete resection rate was significantly greater in the EMR-C group (92.3%) than in the ESD group (78.4%) (P = 0.042). Mean procedure time was significantly longer in the ESD group (14.43 ± 7.26 min) than in the EMR-C group (3.83 ± 1.17 min) (P < 0.001). Rates of histologic complete resection without complication were similar for tumor diameter ? 5 mm (EMR-C, 96%; ESD, 100%, P = 0.472) as well as in cases of 5 mm < tumor diameter ? 10 mm (EMR-C, 80%; ESD, 71.0%, P = 0.524). CONCLUSION: EMR-C may be simple, faster, and more effective than ESD in removing rectal NETs and may be preferable for resection of small rectal NETs. PMID:26309365

  17. Imaging in rectal cancer with emphasis on local staging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Supreeta; Das, Deepak; Engineer, Reena; Saklani, Avanish

    2015-01-01

    Imaging in rectal cancer has a vital role in staging disease, and in selecting and optimizing treatment planning. High-resolution MRI (HR-MRI) is the recommended method of first choice for local staging of rectal cancer for both primary staging and for restaging after preoperative chemoradiation (CT-RT). HR-MRI helps decide between upfront surgery and preoperative CT-RT. It provides high accuracy for prediction of circumferential resection margin at surgery, T category, and nodal status in that order. MRI also helps assess resectability after preoperative CT-RT and decide between sphincter saving or more radical surgery. Accurate technique is crucial for obtaining high-resolution images in the appropriate planes for correct staging. The phased array external coil has replaced the endorectal coil that is no longer recommended. Non-fat suppressed 2D T2-weighted (T2W) sequences in orthogonal planes to the tumor are sufficient for primary staging. Contrast-enhanced MRI is considered inappropriate for both primary staging and restaging. Diffusion-weighted sequence may be of value in restaging. Multidetector CT cannot replace MRI in local staging, but has an important role for evaluating distant metastases. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) has a limited role in the initial staging of rectal cancer and is reserved for cases with resectable metastatic disease before contemplating surgery. This article briefly reviews the comprehensive role of imaging in rectal cancer, describes the role of MRI in local staging in detail, discusses the optimal MRI technique, and provides a synoptic report for both primary staging and restaging after CT-RT in routine practice. PMID:25969638

  18. Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer Is Associated With Reduced Serum Testosterone and Increased FSH and LH

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti Svartberg, Johan; Carlsen, Erik; Dueland, Svein; Haug, Egil; Skovlund, Eva; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Marianne G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: It is known that scattered radiation to the testes during pelvic radiotherapy can affect fertility, but there is little knowledge on its effects on male sex hormones. The aim of this study was to determine whether radiotherapy for rectal cancer affects testosterone production. Methods and Materials: All male patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Patients treated with surgery alone were randomly selected from the same registry as control subjects. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were analyzed, and free testosterone was calculated (N = 290). Information about the radiotherapy treatment was collected from the patient hospital charts. Results: Serum FSH was 3 times higher in the radiotherapy group than in the control group (median, 18.8 vs. 6.3 IU/L, p <0.001), and serum LH was 1.7 times higher (median, 7.5 vs. 4.5 IU/l, p <0.001). In the radiotherapy group, 27% of patients had testosterone levels below the reference range (8-35 nmol/L), compared with 10% of the nonirradiated patients (p <0.001). Irradiated patients had lower serum testosterone (mean, 11.1 vs. 13.4 nmol/L, p <0.001) and lower calculated free testosterone (mean, 214 vs. 235 pmol/L, p <0.05) than control subjects. Total testosterone, calculated free testosterone, and gonadotropins were related to the distance from the bony pelvic structures to the caudal field edge. Conclusions: Increased serum levels of gonadotropins and subnormal serum levels of testosterone indicate that curative radiotherapy for rectal cancer can result in permanent testicular dysfunction.

  19. Quality of life in rectal cancer surgery: What do the patient ask?

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Luglio, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer surgery has dramatically changed with the introduction of the total mesorectal excision (TME), which has demonstrated to significantly reduce the risk of local recurrence. The combination of TME with radiochemotherapy has led to a reduction of local failure to less than 5%. On the other hand, surgery for rectal cancer is also impaired by the potential for a significant loss in quality of life. This is a new challenge surgeons should think about nowadays: If patients live more, they also want to live better. The fight against cancer cannot only be based on survival, recurrence rate and other oncological endpoints. Patients are also asking for a decent quality of life. Rectal cancer is probably a paradigmatic example: Its treatment is often associated with the loss or severe impairment of faecal function, alteration of body anatomy, urogenital problems and, sometimes, intractable pain. The evolution of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in the last decades is an important example, which emphasizes the importance that themes like scar, recovery, pain and quality of life might play for patients. The attention to quality of life from both patients and surgeons led to several surgical innovations in the treatment of rectal cancer: Sphincter saving procedures, reservoir techniques (pouch and coloplasty) to mitigate postoperative faecal disorders, nerve-sparing techniques to reduce the risk for sexual dysfunction. Even more conservative procedures have been proposed alternatively to the abdominal-perineal resection, like the local excisions or transanal endoscopic microsurgery, till the possibility of a wait and see approach in selected cases after radiation therapy.

  20. Metaplastic Ossification in a Juvenile Rectal Polyp: A Rare Histological Finding

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Monika; Kaur, Jasveen; Bindroo, Samridhi; Sharma, Anuradha; Mahajan, Nanak Chand

    2013-01-01

    An osseous metaplasia is a phenomenon which has been described in a wide variety of tissue types with respect to both neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions. However, an osseous metaplasia is exceedingly rare in colonic polyps. We are herein representing a case of osseous metaplasia in a juvenile rectal polyp in a six year old boy, with review of the literature on the suggested mechanisms of its aetiology. PMID:23814740

  1. Surgical and oncology trials for rectal cancer: who will participate? | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Patients, surgeons, and oncologists were asked whether they would be willing to enter one of five randomized controlled trials for rectal cancer. Patients’ willingness to participate was consistently low (19%-32%). Colorectal surgeons and medical and radiation oncologists also reported low levels of potential participation. The overwhelming reason for refusing to enter each trial was a dislike of the randomization process, followed by the effect of treatment on quality of life.

  2. [APPLICATION OF FISTULA PLUG WITH THE FIBRIN ADHESIVE IN TREATMENT OF RECTAL FISTULAS].

    PubMed

    Aydinova, P R; Aliyev, E A

    2015-05-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 21 patients, suffering high transsphincteric and extrasphincteric rectal fistulas, were studied. In patients of Group I the fistula passage was closed, using fistula plug obturator; and in patients of Group II--by the same, but preprocessed by fibrin adhesive. The fistula aperture germeticity, prophylaxis of rude cicatrices development in operative wound zone, promotion of better fixation of bioplastic material were guaranteed, using fistula plug obturator with preprocessing, using fibrin adhesive. PMID:26419026

  3. Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Choi, Jun Jeong; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients.

  4. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a clinically significant reduction in lower GI toxicity compared with CRT. Further study is needed to evaluate differences in late toxicity and long-term efficacy.

  5. CXCL10 mRNA expression predicts response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Zhimin; Liu, Fangqi; Zhu, Ji; Yang, Li; Cai, Guoxiang; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Wei; Cai, Sanjun; Xu, Ye

    2014-10-01

    Chemoradiotherapy has been commonly used as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer to allow for less aggressive surgical approaches and to improve quality of life. In cancer, it has been reported that CXCL10 has an anti-tumor function. However, the association between CXCL10 and chemoradiosensitivity has not been fully investigated. We performed this study to investigate the relationship between CXCL10 expression and chemoradiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients. Ninety-five patients with rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) were included. Clinical parameters were compared with the outcome of NCRT and CXCL10 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression between the pathological complete response (pCR) group and non-pathological complete response (npCR) group. CXCL10 mRNA and protein expressions between groups were analyzed using the Student's t test and chi-square test. The mean mRNA level of CXCL10 in the pCR group was significantly higher than that in the npCR group (p?=?0.010). In the pCR group, 73.7 % of the patients had high CXCL10 mRNA expression, and 61.4 % of the patients in the npCR group had low CXCL10 mRNA expression. Subjects with high CXCL10 mRNA expression demonstrated a higher sensitivity to NCRT (p?=?0.011). The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the diagnostic performance of CXCL10 mRNA expression had an area under the curve of 0.720 (95 % confidence interval, 0.573-0.867). There were no differences between the pCR and npCR groups in CXCL10 protein expression (p?>?0.05). High CXCL10 mRNA expression is associated with a better tumor response to NCRT in rectal cancer patients and may predict the outcome of NCRT in this malignancy. PMID:24969558

  6. Techniques and Outcome of Surgery for Locally Advanced and Local Recurrent Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Renehan, A G

    2016-02-01

    Locally advanced primary rectal cancer is variably defined, but generally refers to T3 and T4 tumours. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment for these tumours but there is a high-risk for local recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2011) guidelines recommend that patients with these tumours be considered for preoperative chemoradiotherapy and this is the starting point for any discussion, as it is standard care. However, there are many refinements of this pathway and these are the subject of this overview. In surgical terms, there are two broad settings: (i) patients with tumours contained within the mesorectal envelope, or in the lower rectum, limited to invading the sphincter muscles (namely some T2 and most T3 tumours); and (ii) patients with tumours directly invading or adherent to pelvic organs or structures, mainly T4 tumours - here referred to as primary rectal cancer beyond total mesorectal excision (PRC-bTME). Major surgical resection using the principles of TME is the mainstay of treatment for the former. Where anal sphincter sacrifice is indicated for low rectal cancers, variations of abdominoperineal resection - referred to as tailored excision - including the extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE), are required. There is debate whether or not plastic reconstruction or mesh repair is required after these surgical procedures. To achieve cure in PRC-bTME tumours, most patients require extended multivisceral exenterative surgery, carried out within specialist multidisciplinary centres. The surgical principles governing the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer (RRC) parallel those for PRC-bTME, but typically only half of these patients are suitable for this type of major surgery. Peri-operative morbidity and mortality are considerable after surgery for PRC-bTME and RRC, but unacceptable levels of variation in clinical practice and outcome exist globally. To address this, there are now major efforts to standardise terminology and classifications, to allow appropriate comparisons in future studies. PMID:26683258

  7. Consolidating Risk Estimates for Radiation-Induced Complications in Individual Patient: Late Rectal Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, Phillip; Devisetty, Kiran; Tarima, Sergey S.; Lawton, Colleen A.F.; Semenenko, Vladimir A.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new approach to synthesize published normal tissue complication data using late rectal toxicity in prostate cancer as an example. Methods and Materials: A data survey was performed to identify the published reports on the dose-response relationships for late rectal toxicity. The risk estimates for Grade 1 or greater, Grade 2 or greater, and Grade 3 or greater toxicity were obtained for a test cohort of patients treated at our institution. The influence of the potential factors that might have affected the reported toxicity levels was investigated. The studies that did not conform to the general data trends were excluded, and single, combined risk estimates were derived for each patient and toxicity level. Results: A total of 21 studies of nonoverlapping patient populations were identified. Three studies provided dose-response models for more than one level of toxicity. Of these 21 studies, 6, 14, and 5 were used to derive the initial risk estimates for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. A comparison of risk estimates between the studies reporting rectal bleeding and rectal toxicity (bleeding plus other symptoms) or between studies with follow-up <36 months and {>=}36 months did not reveal significant differences (p {>=} .29 for all comparisons). After excluding three reports that did not conform to the general data trends, the combined risk estimates were derived from 5 reports (647 patients), 11 reports (3,369 patients), and 5 reports (1,330 patients) for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed approach is feasible and allows for more systematic use of published dose-response data to estimate the complication risks for the individual patient.

  8. Quality of life in rectal cancer surgery: What do the patient ask?

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Luglio, Gaetano

    2015-12-27

    Rectal cancer surgery has dramatically changed with the introduction of the total mesorectal excision (TME), which has demonstrated to significantly reduce the risk of local recurrence. The combination of TME with radiochemotherapy has led to a reduction of local failure to less than 5%. On the other hand, surgery for rectal cancer is also impaired by the potential for a significant loss in quality of life. This is a new challenge surgeons should think about nowadays: If patients live more, they also want to live better. The fight against cancer cannot only be based on survival, recurrence rate and other oncological endpoints. Patients are also asking for a decent quality of life. Rectal cancer is probably a paradigmatic example: Its treatment is often associated with the loss or severe impairment of faecal function, alteration of body anatomy, urogenital problems and, sometimes, intractable pain. The evolution of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in the last decades is an important example, which emphasizes the importance that themes like scar, recovery, pain and quality of life might play for patients. The attention to quality of life from both patients and surgeons led to several surgical innovations in the treatment of rectal cancer: Sphincter saving procedures, reservoir techniques (pouch and coloplasty) to mitigate postoperative faecal disorders, nerve-sparing techniques to reduce the risk for sexual dysfunction. Even more conservative procedures have been proposed alternatively to the abdominal-perineal resection, like the local excisions or transanal endoscopic microsurgery, till the possibility of a wait and see approach in selected cases after radiation therapy. PMID:26730279

  9. Sigmoid volvulus: is it a possible complication after stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR)?

    PubMed Central

    RESTA, G.; SCAGLIARINI, L.; BANDI, M.; VEDANA, L.; MARZETTI, A.; FERROCCI, G.; SANTINI, M.; ANANIA, G.; CAVALLESCO, G.; BACCARINI, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We report a case of sigmoid volvulus post-stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) for obstructed defecation. The patient, a 68-year-old woman with chronic constipation and dolichosigma, two days post-STARR presented severe abdominal pain. CT revealed sigmoid ischemia. The patient underwent resection of the sigmoid colon with end colostomy (Hartmann’s procedure). Can STARR procedure produce a serious complication as sigmoid volvulus in patient with dolichosigma and obstructed defecation syndrome? PMID:24091179

  10. Long-Term Oncologic Outcomes of Laparoscopic versus Open Surgery for Middle and Lower Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaotang; Jiang, Feizhao; Tu, Jingfu; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic surgery for middle and lower rectal cancer remain controversial because anatomical and complex surgical procedures specifically influence oncologic outcomes. This study analyzes the long-term outcomes of laparoscopic versus open surgery for middle and lower rectal cancer. Methods Patients (laparoscopic: n = 129, open: n = 152) who underwent curative resection for middle and lower rectal cancer from 2003 to 2008 participated in the study. The same surgical team performed all operations. The mean follow up time of all patients was 74.3 months. Results No statistical difference in local recurrence rate (7.8% vs. 7.2%; log-rank = 0.024; P = 0.876) and distant recurrence rate (20.9% vs.16.4%; log-rank = 0.699; P = 0.403) between laparoscopic and open groups were observed within 5 years. The 5-year overall survival rates of the laparoscopic and open groups were 72.9% and 75.7%, respectively; no significant statistical difference was observed between them (log-rank = 0.163; P = 0.686). The 5-year survival rates between groups were not different between stages: Stage I (92.6% vs. 86.7%; log-rank = 0.533; P = 0.465); stage II (75.8% vs. 80.5%; log-rank = 0.212; P = 0.645); and Stage III (63.8% vs. 69.1%, log-rank = 0272;P = 0.602). However, significant statistical difference amongst different stages were observed (log-rank = 1.802; P = 0.003). Conclusion Laparoscopic and open surgery for middle and lower rectal cancer offer equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes. Laparoscopic surgery is feasible in these patients. PMID:26335944

  11. Vaginal Motion and Bladder and Rectal Volumes During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy After Hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. Results: The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Conclusion: Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation.

  12. Effect of Lymph Node Count on Pathological Stage III Rectal Cancer with Preoperative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingguo; Liang, Lei; Gan, Lu; Cai, Guoxiang; Li, Xinxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    Lymph node (LN) status after surgery for rectal cancer is affected by preoperative radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to perform a population-based evaluation of the impact of pathologic LN status after neoadjuvant radiotherapy on survival. A total of 1,650 patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)-registered ypIII stage rectal cancer was analyzed. We identified the optimal cutoff for retrieved LNs as 10 (?2?=?14.006, P?rectal patients was a prognosis factor only with the numbers from 8 to 16(except for 13). Using the total mesorectal excision technique with an adequate pathologic examination, a large number of LNs retrieved (?17) might indicate worse tumor response grade and poorer survival. PMID:26582242

  13. Analysis of 116 cases of rectal cancer treated by transanal local excision

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this research was to evaluate the therapeutic effects and prognostic factors of transanal local excision (TAE) for rectal cancer. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 116 cases that underwent TAE for rectal cancer from 1995 to 2008. A Cox regression analysis was used to analyze prognostic factors. Results The survival times for the patients were from 14 to 160.5 months (median time, 58.5 months). The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 72% and 53%, respectively. In all 16 cases experienced local recurrence (13.8%). Pathological type, recurrence or metastasis, and depth of infiltration (T stage) were the prognostic factors according to the univariate analysis, and the latter two were independent factors affecting patient prognosis. For patients with T1 stage who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, there was no local recurrence; for those in T2 stage, the local recurrence rate was 14.6%. In addition, there was no difference between the patients who received radiotherapy and those who did not (T1: P?=?0.260, T2: P?=?0.262 for survival rate and T1: P?=?0.480, T2: P?=?0.560 for recurrence). Conclusions The result of TAE for rectal cancer is satisfactory for T1 stage tumors, but it is not suitable for T2 stage tumors. PMID:25008129

  14. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging to localize tumors and sentinel lymph nodes in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Handgraaf, Henricus J M; Boogerd, Leonora S F; Verbeek, Floris P R; Tummers, Quirijn R J G; Hardwick, James C H; Baeten, Coen I M; Frangioni, John V; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L

    2016-02-01

    Tumor involvement at the resection margin remains the most important predictor for local recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. A careful description of tumor localization is therefore essential. Currently, endoscopic tattooing with ink is customary, but visibility during laparoscopic resections is limited. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green (ICG) could be an improvement. In addition to localize tumors, ICG can also be used to identify sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). The feasibility of this new technique was explored in five patients undergoing laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Intraoperative tumor visualization was possible in four out of five patients. Fluorescence signal could be detected 32±18 minutes after incision, while ink could be detected 42 ± 21 minutes after incision (p = 0.53). No recurrence was diagnosed within three months after surgery. Ex vivo imaging identified a mean of 4.2 ± 2.7 fluorescent lymph nodes, which were appointed SLNs. One out of a total of 83 resected lymph nodes contained a micrometastasis. This node was not fluorescent. This technical note describes the feasibility of endoscopic tattooing of rectal cancer using ICG:nanocolloid and NIR fluorescence imaging during laparoscopic resection. Simultaneous SLN mapping was also feasible, but may be less reliable due to neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:25950124

  15. Molecular details of a starch utilization pathway in the human gut symbiont Eubacterium rectale

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Darrell W.; Orlovsky, Nicole I.; Foley, Matthew H.; Kwiatkowski, Kurt J.; Bahr, Constance M.; Maynard, Mallory; Demeler, Borries; Koropatkin, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Eubacterium rectale is a prominent human gut symbiont yet little is known about the molecular strategies this bacterium has developed to acquire nutrients within the competitive gut ecosystem. Starch is one of the most abundant glycans in the human diet, and E. rectale increases in vivo when the host consumes a diet rich in resistant starch, although it is not a primary degrader of this glycan. Here we present the results of a quantitative proteomics study in which we identify two glycoside hydrolase 13 family enzymes, and three ABC transporter solute-binding proteins that are abundant during growth on starch and, we hypothesize, work together at the cell surface to degrade starch and capture the released maltooligosaccharides. EUR_21100 is a multidomain cell wall anchored amylase that preferentially targets starch polysaccharides, liberating maltotetraose, while the membrane associated maltogenic amylase EUR_01860 breaks down maltooligosaccharides longer than maltotriose. The three solute-binding proteins display a range of glycan-binding specificities that ensure the capture of glucose through maltoheptaose and some ?1,6-branched glycans. Taken together, we describe a pathway for starch utilization by E. rectale DSM 17629 that may be conserved among other starch-degrading Clostridium cluster XIVa organisms in the human gut. PMID:25388295

  16. Hyperthermia for treatment of rectal cancer: evaluation for induction of multidrug resistance gene (mdr1) expression.

    PubMed

    Stein, U; Rau, B; Wust, P; Walther, W; Schlag, P M

    1999-01-01

    Environmental stress factors, such as heat, may induce multidrug resistance gene (mdr1) expression, which could result in the disadvantageous multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. To evaluate this possibility in a clinical situation, we investigated mdr1 gene expression in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative radio-chemo-thermo-therapy (RCTT). Patients were classified into groups according to the treatment schedule of RCTT vs. radio-chemo-therapy (RCT) without hyperthermia (control group). Expression of the mdr1 gene was analyzed in tumors and normal rectal tissues prior to and post-treatment (RCTT or RCT, respectively) by means of semi-quantitative and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The data were correlated with therapeutic response and survival parameters. Based on our evaluation criteria, in 2 of 19 tumors of the RCTT group, mdr1 gene expression was increased more than 2-fold; in 3 of 19 tumors of this group, however, mdr1 expression was decreased more than 2-fold. In the patient control group, levels of mdr1 gene expression were reduced in 2 of 8 tumors. Thus, hyperthermia combined with RCT (RCTT) in comparison with RCT alone does not lead to an increase in mdr1 gene expression in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer within the preoperative treatment schedule. The risk of inducing the classical multidrug resistance phenotype by hyperthermia was thus minimal in this clinical setting. Subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy should thus not be hindered. PMID:9935221

  17. Analysis of the factors affecting lymph node metastasis and the prognosis of rectal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Wu, Fan; Zhao, Hong; Dou, Lizhou; Wang, Yang; Guo, Chunguang; Wang, Guiqi; Zhao, Dongbing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the factors affecting lymph node metastasis and the prognosis of rectal neuroendocrine tumors after surgical treatment. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted using the clinical data from 156 cases of rectal neuroendocrine tumors during the period of January 1999 to December 2013. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the survival time, Cox regression analysis was performed for statistical analysis of clinicopathological factors that may be associated with lymph node metastasis and prognosis, and correlation analysis was carried out using binary logistic regression. Results: The overall 5-year survival rate of the entire group was 95.7%. Multivariate analysis showed that the depth of invasion was an independent prognostic factor (P < 0.001). The incidence of lymph node metastasis was 7.7% (12/156), and logistic regression analysis showed that lymph node metastasis was related to the depth of invasion (P = 0.003) and tumor diameter (P = 0.006). Conclusion: The surgical approach of rectal neuroendocrine tumors should be selected based on a comprehensive consideration of factors such as tumor size, depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis. PMID:26722537

  18. Factors affecting sphincter-preserving resection treatment for patients with low rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, ZHENQIANG; YU, XIANBO; WANG, HAIJIANG; MA, MING; ZHAO, ZELIANG; WANG, QISAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the factors associated with the use of sphincter-preserving resection (SPR) surgery for the treatment of low rectal cancer. A total of 330 patients with histopathologically confirmed low rectal cancer were divided into two groups, namely the abdominoperineal resection (APR) and sphincter-preserving (SP) groups. For SPR factor analysis, the ?2 test was performed as the univariate analysis, while a logistic regression test was conducted as the multivariate analysis. Of the 330 patients, 192 cases (58.18%) received SPR surgery and 138 cases (41.82%) underwent an APR. Univariate analysis results revealed that the sphincter-preserving factor was significantly associated with age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), total infiltrated circumference, distance of the tumor from the anal verge (DTAV), depth of invasion and tumor grade (P<0.05). However, there were no statistically significant associations with family medical history, diabetes history, venous tumor embolism, growth type, tumor length, lymphatic metastasis and level of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that the sphincter-preserving factor was strongly associated with DTAV and the depth of invasion, with significant statistical difference (P<0.05). Therefore, selecting SPR surgery for patients with low rectal cancer is dependent on age, gender, ethnicity, BMI, the total infiltrated circumference, DTAV, depth of invasion and tumor grade. In addition, DTAV and the depth of invasion are independent risk factors for the selection of SPR surgery.

  19. The Utility of Digital Rectal Examination in Estimating Prostate Volume in a Rural Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Udeh, EI; Dakum, NK; Aderibigbe, SA; Edeh, JA

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the correlation between prostate volume estimated by digital rectal examination (DRE) and that estimated by abdominal ultrasound in the same patients. Patients and Methods: Men who presented to our urology outpatient clinic with lower urinary tract symptoms were recruited in this study. We estimated the prostate size by digital rectal examination using the sliding scale as a guide and subsequently measured the prostate volume by transabdominal ultrasound. Results: A total of 100 patients completed this study. The mean age was 65.6 ± 9.84 years. The Kappa's reliability test comparing the prostate size estimated by DRE and the prostate size measured by transabdominal ultrasound was 0.579832, the Kappa's standard error was 0.097768 and Kappa's t value was 5.93. The Kappa's reliability test fell into good agreement range (0.4–0.75). This is further validated by the Pearson's correlation test ascertaining correlation between Ultrasound and DRE and generated a correlation coefficient® of 0.59 (P = 0.00). This implies a high positive correlation between ultrasound estimated prostate volume and that estimated by DRE that is statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Estimation of prostate volume by digital rectal examination is reliable. This is very important in an environment where esoteric laboratory facilities are not readily available, and the clinician has to depend mainly on his clinical acumen. PMID:26425063

  20. Treatment of lateral pelvic nodes metastases from rectal cancer: the future prospective.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Y

    2013-01-01

    One feature of rectal cancer that remains controversial is the significance of lateral lymph node, because TME does not remove these nodes. We discussed the brief history of lateral nodes dissection and some problems in performing the extended surgery.In Japan, an ongoing prospective multicenter randomized trial comparing TME alone and TME with clearance of lateral node is progress. In the West, MERCURY study showed 11.7% of patients with rectal cancer had MRI-identified suspicious pelvic side wall nodes. Judging from incidence and prognosis, pelvic side wall nodes in the west are almost similar meaning as lateral nodes in Japan. There is long-standing controversy as to whether lateral lymph nodes metastasis represent systemic or localized disease. Though there has been reports suggesting effect of RT on lateral nodes metastases, the question remains whether preoperative CRT can fully sterilize lateral nodes deposits. Is it appropriate inspection assuming that positive CRM and bowel perforation is major cause of local recurrence after abdominoperineal resection? Some reports say that lateral node metastasis is major cause of local recurrence.We must share following views that the east and the west should join forces to improve selection criteria for lateral node dissection and neoadjuvant treatment to prevent overtreatment, and ultimately aim to improve quality of life and oncological outcome for patients with low rectal cancer. PMID:24629807

  1. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in Radiation-Induced Rectal Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram; Jackson, Andrew; Tucker, Susan L.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2010-03-01

    The available dose/volume/outcome data for rectal injury were reviewed. The volume of rectum receiving >=60Gy is consistently associated with the risk of Grade >=2 rectal toxicity or rectal bleeding. Parameters for the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model from four clinical series are remarkably consistent, suggesting that high doses are predominant in determining the risk of toxicity. The best overall estimates (95% confidence interval) of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model parameters are n = 0.09 (0.04-0.14); m = 0.13 (0.10-0.17); and TD{sub 50} = 76.9 (73.7-80.1) Gy. Most of the models of late radiation toxicity come from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy dose-escalation studies of early-stage prostate cancer. It is possible that intensity-modulated radiotherapy or proton beam dose distributions require modification of these models because of the inherent differences in low and intermediate dose distributions.

  2. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  3. Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, Asa R.; Svanvik, Joar; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT.

  4. Mucosal HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through oral compared to vaginal and rectal routes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingke; Vajdy, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field There are currently over thirty million people infected with HIV and there are no vaccines available to prevent HIV infections or disease. The genitourinary, rectal and oral mucosa are the mucosal HIV transmission routes. An effective vaccine that can induce both systemic and local mucosal immunity is generally accepted as a major means of protection against mucosal HIV transmission and AIDS. What the reader will gain Structure and cells that comprise the oral, vaginal and rectal mucosa pertaining to HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through each mucosal route to prevent mucosal and systemic infection will be discussed. Areas covered in this review Covering publications from 1980’s through 2010, mucosal transmission of HIV and current and previous approaches to vaccinations are discussed. Take home message Although oral transmission of HIV is far less common than vaginal and rectal transmissions, infections through this route do occur through oral sex as well as vertically from mother to child. Mucosal vaccination strategies against oral and other mucosal HIV transmissions are under intense research but the lack of consensus on immune correlates of protection and lack of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants and delivery systems hamper progress towards a licensed vaccine. PMID:20624114

  5. A Randomized Trial of Rectal Indomethacin to Prevent Post-ERCP Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Scheiman, James M.; Lehman, Glen A.; Chak, Amitabh; Mosler, Patrick; Higgins, Peter D.R.; Hayward, Rodney A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Elta, Grace H.; Sherman, Stuart; Waljee, Akbar K.; Repaka, Aparna; Atkinson, Matthew R.; Cote, Gregory A.; Kwon, Richard S.; McHenry, Lee; Piraka, Cyrus R.; Wamsteker, Erik J.; Watkins, James L.; Korsnes, Sheryl J.; Schmidt, Suzette E.; Turner, Sarah M.; Nicholson, Sylvia; Fogel, Evan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Preliminary research suggests that rectally administered nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may reduce the incidence of pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Methods In this multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial, we assigned patients at elevated risk for post-ERCP pancreatitis to receive a single dose of rectal indomethacin or placebo immediately after ERCP. Patients were determined to be at high risk on the basis of validated patient- and procedure-related risk factors. The primary outcome was post-ERCP pancreatitis, which was defined as new upper abdominal pain, an elevation in pancreatic enzymes to at least three times the upper limit of the normal range 24 hours after the procedure, and hospitalization for at least 2 nights. Results A total of 602 patients were enrolled and completed follow-up. The majority of patients (82%) had a clinical suspicion of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. Post-ERCP pancreatitis developed in 27 of 295 patients (9.2%) in the indomethacin group and in 52 of 307 patients (16.9%) in the placebo group (P = 0.005). Moderate-to-severe pancreatitis developed in 13 patients (4.4%) in the indomethacin group and in 27 patients (8.8%) in the placebo group (P = 0.03). Conclusions Among patients at high risk for post-ERCP pancreatitis, rectal indomethacin significantly reduced the incidence of the condition. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00820612.) PMID:22494121

  6. Removal of Rectal Foreign Bodies Using Tenaculum Forceps Under Endoscopic Assistance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Keun Joon; Kim, Joon Sung; Kim, Boo Gyoung; Park, Sung Min; Ji, Jeong-Seon; Kim, Byung-Wook; Choi, Hwang

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of rectal foreign bodies is increasing by the day, though not as common as that of upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies. Various methods for removal of foreign bodies have been reported. Removal during endoscopy using endoscopic devices is simple and safe, but if the foreign body is too large to be removed by this method, other methods are required. We report two cases of rectal foreign body removal by a relatively simple and inexpensive technique. A 42-year-old man with a vibrator in the rectum was admitted due to inability to remove it by himself and various endoscopic methods failed. Finally, the vibrator was removed successfully by using tenaculum forceps under endoscopic assistance. Similarly, a 59-year-old man with a carrot in the rectum was admitted. The carrot was removed easily by using the same method as that in the previous case. The use of tenaculum forceps under endoscopic guidance may be a useful method for removal of rectal foreign bodies. PMID:26576143

  7. Management of sub-5?mm rectal carcinoids with lymph node metastases

    PubMed Central

    Toh, James Wei Tatt; Henderson, Christopher; Yabe, Takako Eva; Ong, Evonne; Chapuis, Pierre; Bokey, Les

    2015-01-01

    Minute (<5?mm) and small (5–10?mm) rectal carcinoids discovered during colonoscopy are generally considered to be non-aggressive, and the management and surveillance of patients with this entity are usually limited. We present the case of a 61-year-old Chinese female with multiple sub-5?mm carcinoid tumours in the rectum without any computed tomography (CT) evidence of lymph node or distant metastases. She underwent an ultra-low anterior resection for a sessile rectal polyp with the histological appearance of a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Seven foci of minute carcinoids in the rectum and perirectal lymph node metastastic spread from the carcinoid tumours were also discovered on histopathology. There were no lymph node metastases originating from adenocarcinoma. This case report and review of the literature suggests that minute rectal carcinoids are at risk of metastasizing and that these patients should be investigated for lymph node and distant metastatic spread with CT and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy or its equivalent, as this would influence prognosis and surgical management of these patients. Findings relating to lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, high Ki-67, mitotic rate, depth of tumour invasion, central ulceration, multifocal tumours and size are useful in predicting metastases and may be used in scoring tools. Size alone is not a good predictor of metastastic spread. PMID:25342710

  8. Rectal cell proliferation and colon cancer risk in patients with hypergastrinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Renga, M; Brandi, G; Paganelli, G; Calabrese, C; Papa, S; Tosti, A; Tomassetti, P; Miglioli, M; Biasco, G

    1997-01-01

    Background—The influence of gastrin on the colonic mucosa is still uncertain. Some authors have suggested a stimulating effect on the growth of normal and malignant colonic epithelium, while others have shown no association between gastrin and neoplastic development. ?Aims—To evaluate the effect of gastrin on colorectal cell proliferation, patients with chronic endogenous hypergastrinaemia underwent proctoscopy. Biopsy specimens were taken in order to study rectal cell kinetics. ?Patients and controls—Ten patients with chronic autoimmune gastritis (CAG), six patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES), and 16 hospital controls took part in this study. Patients with CAG and ZES had basal serum gastrin concentrations significantly higher than controls (p<0.001). ?Methods—Immunohistochemistry was performed on 3 µm sections of rectal biopsy specimens incubated with 5'-bromodeoxyuridine. ?Results—The percentage of proliferating cells in the entire crypts (overall labelling index) was similar in all the groups. However, the labelling frequency in the upper two fifths of the glands (?h value) was significantly higher in patients with CAG or ZES compared with controls (p<0.01 in both patient groups versus controls). ?Conclusions—Endogenous hypergastrinaemia is associated with rectal cell proliferation defects, similar to those observed in conditions at high risk for colon cancer. The effect of the increased serum concentrations of gastrin on the colorectal mucosa after treatment with drugs inhibiting gastric acid secretion should be investigated. ?? Keywords: gastrin; cell kinetics; colon cancer; chronic autoimmune gastritis; Zollinger-Ellison syndrome PMID:9378387

  9. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: Clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing-Chao; Shen, Rong-Rong; Qin, Huan-Long; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is an uncommon benign disease, characterized by a combination of symptoms, clinical findings and histological abnormalities. Ulcers are only found in 40% of the patients; 20% of the patients have a solitary ulcer, and the rest of the lesions vary in shape and size, from hyperemic mucosa to broad-based polypoid. Men and women are affected equally, with a small predominance in women. SRUS has also been described in children and in the geriatric population. Clinical features include rectal bleeding, copious mucus discharge, prolonged excessive straining, perineal and abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation, constipation, and rarely, rectal prolapse. This disease has well-described histopathological features such as obliteration of the lamina propria by fibrosis and smooth muscle fibers extending from a thickened muscularis mucosa to the lumen. Diffuse collage deposition in the lamina propria and abnormal smooth muscle fiber extensions are sensitive markers for differentiating SRUS from other conditions. However, the etiology remains obscure, and the condition is frequently associated with pelvic floor disorders. SRUS is difficult to treat, and various treatment strategies have been advocated, ranging from conservative management to a variety of surgical procedures. The aim of the present review is to summarize the clinical features, pathophysiology, diagnostic methods and treatment strategies associated with SRUS. PMID:24574747

  10. Removal of Rectal Foreign Bodies Using Tenaculum Forceps Under Endoscopic Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Keun Joon; Kim, Boo Gyoung; Park, Sung Min; Ji, Jeong-Seon; Kim, Byung-Wook; Choi, Hwang

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of rectal foreign bodies is increasing by the day, though not as common as that of upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies. Various methods for removal of foreign bodies have been reported. Removal during endoscopy using endoscopic devices is simple and safe, but if the foreign body is too large to be removed by this method, other methods are required. We report two cases of rectal foreign body removal by a relatively simple and inexpensive technique. A 42-year-old man with a vibrator in the rectum was admitted due to inability to remove it by himself and various endoscopic methods failed. Finally, the vibrator was removed successfully by using tenaculum forceps under endoscopic assistance. Similarly, a 59-year-old man with a carrot in the rectum was admitted. The carrot was removed easily by using the same method as that in the previous case. The use of tenaculum forceps under endoscopic guidance may be a useful method for removal of rectal foreign bodies. PMID:26576143

  11. Neoadjuvant Treatment Does Not Influence Perioperative Outcome in Rectal Cancer Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Alexis; Weitz, Juergen Slodczyk, Matthias; Koch, Moritz; Jaeger, Dirk; Muenter, Marc; Buechler, Markus W.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for perioperative morbidity in patients undergoing resection of primary rectal cancer, with a specific focus on the effect of neoadjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: This exploratory analysis of prospectively collected data included all patients who underwent anterior resection/low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary rectal cancer between October 2001 and October 2006. The study endpoints were perioperative surgical and medical morbidity. Univariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors were performed. Results: A total of 485 patients were included in this study; 425 patients (88%) underwent a sphincter-saving anterior resection/low anterior resection, 47 (10%) abdominoperineal resection, and 13 (2%) multivisceral resection. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was performed in 100 patients (21%), and 168 (35%) underwent neoadjuvant short-term radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy). Patient age and operative time were independently associated with perioperative morbidity, and operative time, body mass index >27 kg/m{sup 2} (overweight), and resection type were associated with surgical morbidity. Age and a history of smoking were confirmed as independent prognostic risk factors for medical complications. Neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with a worse outcome. Conclusion: The results of this prospective study have identified several risk factors associated with an adverse perioperative outcome after rectal cancer surgery. In addition, neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with increased perioperative complications.

  12. RECTAL IMPACTION DUE TO PRICKLY PEAR SEEDS BEZOAR: A CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Marchese, S; Bertucci, B; Manti, F; Berritto, D; Roperto, A G; Tamburrini, S

    2015-01-01

    Fecal impaction is the third cause of lower gastrointestinal tract obstruction after strictures for colon cancer and postoperative adhesions. A rapid diagnosis is necessary to avoid complications due to intestinal obstruction. Rectal phytobezoar due to prickly pear fruit seeds are an extremely rare entity, in the literature about twenty similar cases are described. Prickly pears are common in many countries, even in the Mediterranean area. When the ingestion of their fruit is excessive, this can be harmful, leading to the formation of phytobezoar causing fecal impaction. We describe the first case of phytobezoar due to prickly pear fruit seeds in continental Europe: a 76-year-old Italian female who ingested almost 40 prickly pear fruit leading to the composition of a large rectal phytobezoar. The patient presented clinically with fecal impaction, diagnosed by imaging and successfully treated by rectal irrigation and manual disimpaction. Our aim is to remind the physicians of these risks in evaluating patients with intestinal obstruction, when there is positive anamnesis for provenience from some areas in which these fruits are eaten. We also want to underline the role of Imaging Multi Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis of these very uncommon entities. PMID:26403411

  13. Age and Comorbid Illness Are Associated With Late Rectal Toxicity Following Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Stenmark, Matt H.; Ritter, Tim; Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan ; Litzenberg, Dale; Jackson, William; Johnson, Skyler; Albrecht-Unger, Liesel; Donaghy, Alex; Phelps, Laura; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Marsh, Robin; Olson, Karin; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts of patient age and comorbid illness on rectal toxicity following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to assess the Qualitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model in this context. Methods and Materials: Rectal toxicity was analyzed in 718 men previously treated for prostate cancer with EBRT (?75 Gy). Comorbid illness was scored using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCMI), and the NTCP was evaluated with the QUANTEC model. The influence of clinical and treatment-related parameters on rectal toxicity was assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The cumulative incidence of rectal toxicity grade ?2 was 9.5% and 11.6% at 3 and 5 years and 3.3% and 3.9% at 3 and 5 years for grade ?3 toxicity, respectively. Each year of age predicted an increasing relative risk of grade ?2 (P<.03; hazard ratio [HR], 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.06]) and ?3 rectal toxicity (P<.0001; HR, 1.14 [95% CI,1.07-1.22]). Increasing CCMI predicted rectal toxicity where a history of either myocardial infarction (MI) (P<.0001; HR, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.9-13.7]) or congestive heart failure (CHF) (P<.0006; HR, 5.4 [95% CI, 0.6-47.5]) predicted grade ?3 rectal toxicity, with lesser correlation with grade ?2 toxicity (P<.02 for MI, and P<.09 for CHF). An age comorbidity model to predict rectal toxicity was developed and confirmed in a validation cohort. The use of anticoagulants increased toxicity independent of age and comorbidity. NTCP was prognostic for grade ?3 (P=.015) but not grade ?2 (P=.49) toxicity. On multivariate analysis, age, MI, CHF, and an NTCP >20% all correlated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: Patient age and a history of MI or CHF significantly impact rectal toxicity following EBRT for the treatment of prostate cancer, even after controlling for NTCP.

  14. Rectal gonorrhoea as an independent risk factor for HIV infection in a cohort of homosexual men.

    PubMed Central

    Craib, K J; Meddings, D R; Strathdee, S A; Hogg, R S; Montaner, J S; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Schechter, M T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether certain sexually transmitted diseases are independent risk factors for HIV transmission in a cohort of homosexual men. METHODS--Eligible cases were identified as those who had seroconverted between November 1982 and November 1990. Two persistently HIV-seronegative control participants were randomly selected for each case from all participants who remained seronegative in November 1990. For cases, risk factor data were taken from an index visit which was defined as the first seropositive visit, while for controls these data were obtained from a matched visit which occurred within two months of the index visit for the corresponding case. Mantel-Haenszel methods and logistic regression were used to compare differences in risk factors for seroconversion between cases and controls. RESULTS--A total of 125 cases and 250 controls were eligible for this study. Cases were significantly more likely to have had reported any gonorrhoea (17% versus 6%; OR = 2.94; 95% CI: 1.51-5.73) or syphilis (7% versus 2%; OR = 3.78; 95% CI: 1.33-10.79) than controls during the seroconversion period. Multivariate logistic regression revealed rectal gonorrhoea to be independently associated with risk of seroconversion (odds ratio = 3.18; p = 0.044), whereas urethral gonorrhoea (p = 0.479) and pharyngeal gonorrhoea (p = 0.434) were not after inclusion of rectal gonorrhoea. In addition, the following variables were also shown to exert an independent effect on seroconversion: frequency of anal intercourse, use of illicit drugs, number of male sexual partners, and lack of a post-secondary education. CONCLUSIONS--In this observational study, rectal gonorrhoea was found to be associated with HIV seroconversion after adjustment for a number of HIV risk factors. We cannot rule out that rectal gonorrhoea was not directly associated with HIV infection but rather with other residual lifestyle factors not fully adjusted for in the analysis. However, the relationship with gonococcal involvement of a specific anatomic site lends support to a biological association between gonorrhoea and HIV infection, rather than to alternative non-biologic explanations. Our findings are consistent with previous studies reporting an association between HIV infection and non-ulcerative sexually transmitted diseases. Such a direct association might be explained by postulating that gonorrhoea results in inflamed rectal mucosa and compromised epithelial integrity, thereby predisposing an individual to subsequent HIV infection. PMID:7635489

  15. Influence of body mass index and periprostatic fat on rectal dosimetry in permanent seed prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We examined the influence of body mass index (BMI) and body fat distribution on rectal dose in patients treated with permanent seed brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials We analyzed 213 patients treated with I125 seed brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. BMI and rectal dosimetry data for all patients were available. Data on visceral and subcutaneous fat distribution at the level of the iliac crest (n?=?140) as well as the distribution of periprostatic and subcutaneous fat at the symphysis pubis level were obtained (n?=?117). Fat distribution was manually contoured on CT on day 30 after brachytherapy. The correlation between BMI, fat distribution and rectal dose (R100 (in cc), R150 (cc), D2 (Gy)) was analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient. Differences in rectal dose between tertiles of body fat distribution were calculated using nonparametric tests. Results Periprostatic adipose was only weakly correlated with BMI (r?=?0.0.245, p?=?0.008) and only weakly correlated with the other fat measurements (r?=?0.31-0.37, p?1.3 cc (23% of patients) had less visceral fat (p?=?0.004), less subcutaneous fat at the level of the iliac crest (p?=?0.046) and a lower BMI (26.8 kg/m2 vs. 28.5 kg/m2, p?=?0.02) than patients with an R100 of <1.3 cc. Results were very similar when comparing an R100 of >1.0 cc (34% of patients) across the tertiles. None of the tested linear regression models were predictive (max 12%) of dose to the rectum. Conclusion Dose to the rectum is dependent on BMI and body fat distribution. Periprostatic fat does not influence rectal dose. Dose to the rectum remains difficult to predict and depends on many factors, one of which is body fat distribution. PMID:24731303

  16. The location of surgical care for rural patients with rectal cancer: patterns of treatment and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nostedt, Michelle C.; McKay, Andrew M.; Hochman, David J.; Wirtzfeld, Debrah A.; Yaffe, Clifford S.; Yip, Benson; Silverman, Richard; Park, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Background Where cancer patients receive surgical care has implications on policy and planning and on patients’ satisfaction and outcomes. We conducted a population-based analysis of where rectal cancer patients undergo surgery and a qualitative analysis of rectal cancer patients’ perspectives on location of surgical care. Methods We reviewed Manitoba Cancer Registry data on patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosed between 2004 and 2006. We interviewed rural patients with rectal cancer regarding their preferences and the factors they considered when deciding on treatment location. Interview data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results From 2004 to 2006, 2086 patients received diagnoses of CRC in Manitoba (colon: 1578, rectal: 508). Among rural patients (n = 907), those with rectal cancer were more likely to undergo surgery at an urban centre than those with colon cancer (46.5% v. 28.8%, p < 0.001). Twenty rural patients with rectal cancer participated in interviews. We identified 3 major themes from the interview data: the decision-maker, treatment factors and personal factors. Participants described varying input into referral decisions, and often they did not perceive a choice regarding treatment location. Treatment factors, including surgeon factors and hospital factors, were important when considering treatment location. Personal factors, including travel, support, accommodation, finances and employment, also affected participants’ treatment experiences. Conclusion A substantial proportion of rural patients with rectal cancer undergo surgery at urban centres. The reasons are complex and only partly related to patient choice. Further studies are required to better understand cancer system access in geographically dispersed populations and to support cancer patients through the decision-making and treatment processes. PMID:25421082

  17. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer: the MERCURY research project.

    PubMed

    Brown, G; Daniels, I R

    2005-01-01

    The development of a surgical technique that removes the tumour and all local draining nodes in an intact package, namely total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery, has provided the impetus for a more selective approach to the administration of preoperative therapy. One of the most important factors that governs the success of TME surgery is the relationship of tumour to the circumferential resection margin (CRM). Tumour involves the CRM in up to 20% of patients undergoing TME surgery, and results in both poor survival and local recurrence. It is therefore clear that the importance of the decision regarding the use of pre-operative therapy lies with the relationship of the tumour to the mesorectal fascia. In addition, a high-spatial-resolution MRI technique will identify tumours exhibiting other poor prognostic features, namely, extramural spread >5 mm, extramural venous invasion by tumour, nodal involvement, and peritoneal infiltration. The potential benefits of a selective approach using MRI-based selection criteria are evident. That is, over 50% of patients can be treated successfully with primary surgery alone without significant risk of local recurrence or systemic failure. Of the remainder, potentially dramatic improvements may be achieved through the use of intensive and targeted preoperative therapy aimed not only at reducing the size of the primary tumour and rendering potentially irresectable tumour resectable with tumour-free circumferential margins, but also at enabling patients at high risk of systemic failure to benefit from intensive combined modality therapy aimed at eliminating micrometastatic disease. PMID:15865021

  18. Functional disorders of the ano-rectal compartment of the pelvic floor: clinical and diagnostic value of dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Francesca

    2013-10-01

    The obstructed defecation syndrome is the main functional disorder of the posterior or ano-rectal pelvic floor compartment. Different mechanical and functional rectal disorders may cause this syndrome, including rectocele, rectal invagination, rectal prolapse, and pubo-rectalis muscle dyskinesia. Since pelvic floor muscles and fasciae act as a unique functional entity, dysfunctions of the posterior compartment are usually associated to variable dysfunctions of the anterior and middle urogenital compartments as well. Over 50% of postmenopause women are affected by severe symptoms due to pelvic floor disorders, with frequent need of surgical invasive treatments. Both diagnosis of the specific ano-rectal dysfunction and identification of all possible associated disorders are mandatory for an effective surgical or conservative treatment. Currently, dynamic MRI provides an excellent morphological and functional display of the pelvic floor like no other imaging modality. Pros and cons of posterior pelvic floor MRI, different evaluation techniques, reference lines and grading systems together with the main imaging findings will be discussed and illustrated. PMID:23090206

  19. Diffusion-weighted imaging in rectal carcinoma patients without and after chemoradiotherapy: a comparative study with histology.

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, T; Seyler, L; Münter, M; Jensen, A; Brand, K; Fritzsche, K H; Kopp-Schneider, A; Schüssler, M; Schlemmer, H P; Stieltjes, B; Ganten, M

    2013-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can be used to quantitatively assess functional parameters in rectal carcinoma that are relevant for prognosis and treatment response assessment. However, there is no consensus on the histopathological background underlying the findings derived from DWI. The aim of this study was to perform a comparison of DWI and histologic parameters in two groups of rectal carcinoma patients without (n=12) and after (n=9) neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient D and the perfusion fraction f in rectal carcinoma, the adjacent rectum and fat in the two patient groups. Immunohistological analysis was performed to assess the cellularity, vascular area fraction and vessel diameter for comparison and correlation. Out of 36 correlations between parameters from DWI and histology, four were found to be significant. In rectal carcinoma of patients without CRT, the diffusion D and the perfusion f correlated with the vascular area fraction, respectively, which could not be found in the group of patients who received CRT. Further correlations were found for the rectum and fat. Histological evaluation revealed significant differences between the tissues on the microscopic level concerning the cellular and vascular environment that influence diffusion and perfusion. In conclusion, DWI produces valuable biomarkers for diffusion and perfusion in rectal carcinoma and adjacent tissues that are highly dependent of the underlying cellular microenvironment influenced by structural and functional changes as well as the administered treatment, and consequently can be beyond histological ascertainability. PMID:23219191

  20. Can only chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment be applied to patients with rectal cancer who could not be operated?

    PubMed Central

    Oztop, Ilhan; Yilmaz, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study is aimed to evaluate patients with non-metastatic rectal cancer who could not be operated due to any reason and were treated with chemoradiotherapy alone or chemotherapy following chemoradiotherapy. Methods Patients with locally advanced non-metastatic rectal cancer, who were treated and followed-up were evaluated. Results Totally 263 patients with stage II and III rectal cancer were evaluated. It was determined that 14 (5.2%) of the patients with locally advanced stages received chemoradiotherapy alone or chemotherapy following chemoradiotherapy, and they were followed-up instead of undergoing operation. The baseline assessments revealed that 8 (57.1%) patients had clinical stage II, and 6 (42.9%) patients had clinical stage III diseases. Recurrence was detected in 3 (21.4%) patients. 6 (42.9%) patients died, and death due to rectal cancer progression was detected in 2 (14.3%) patients. Median progression-free survival was 25 months (8 to 68 months), median overall survival was 35 months (12 to 68 months), overall survival rates in 1, 3 and 5 years were 92.9%, 69.8% and 52.4%, respectively. Conclusions Chemoradiotherapy alone or subsequent chemotherapy after chemoradiotherapy may be suitable for patients with non-metastatic locally advanced rectal cancer who could not be operated due to any reason. PMID:23730515

  1. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  2. Effects of oral meloxicam administration to beef cattle receiving lipopolysaccharide administration or vaccination against respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M C; Cooke, R F; Marques, R S; Arispe, S A; Keisler, D H; Bohnert, D W

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the effects of oral meloxicam administration on metabolic, inflammatory, and acute-phase responses of beef cattle receiving a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge (Exp. 1; d -1 to 6) or vaccinated against respiratory pathogens (Exp. 2; d 7 to 21). Twenty-one Angus steers ( = 11) and heifers ( = 10) were housed in individual pens on d -15 and were offered free-choice water, mineral-vitamin mix, and hay until d 21. In Exp. 1, cattle were ranked on d -1 by sex and BW and assigned to 1) oral meloxicam administration (1 mg/kg BW daily) from day -1 to 6 (MEL8), 2) oral meloxicam administration (1 mg/kg BW) on d 0 and oral lactose monohydrate administration (1 mg/kg BW) on d -1 and from d 1 to 6 (MEL1), or 3) oral lactose monohydrate administration (1 mg/kg BW daily) from d -1 to 6 (CON). On d 0, cattle received an intravenous LPS bolus (0.5 ?g/kg BW) concurrently with treatment administration. Rectal temperature (RTEMP) was assessed, and blood samples were collected at -2, 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h relative to LPS administration. No treatment effects were detected ( ? 0.36) for RTEMP, concentrations of serum tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?), plasma haptoglobin, cortisol, insulin, and leptin, as well as blood mRNA expression of ? and cyclooxygenase-2, although all variables increased ( < 0.01) across treatments after LPS administration. In Exp. 2, cattle received the same treatments that they were assigned to in Exp. 1 from d 7 to d 13 and were vaccinated against respiratory pathogens concurrently with treatment administration on d 8. Blood samples were collected, and RTEMP was assessed as in Exp. 1 in addition to 168, 240, and 336 h relative to vaccination. No treatment effects were detected ( ? 0.26) for RTEMP, the same plasma and serum variables evaluated in Exp. 1, and serum concentrations of antibodies against or serum titers against bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus-1, and parainfluenza-3 virus. All variables increased ( < 0.01) across treatments after vaccination, except for serum TNF? and titers against bovine viral diarrhea virus-1 ( ? 0.40). Collectively, this study found no evidence that oral meloxicam administration, at the doses and intervals utilized herein, mitigated the metabolic, inflammatory, and acute-phase reactions elicited by LPS administration or vaccination against respiratory pathogens. PMID:26523594

  3. Does perineural invasion of the myenteric plexus have a key role in annular rectal invasion and digestive system symptoms of prostate carcinoma patients?

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hirotsugu; Kurata, Atsushi; Nashiro, Tamaki; Kuroda, Masahiko; Horiuchi, Hajime

    2015-12-01

    Prostate carcinoma is one of the most common cancers globally. It relatively rarely invades the rectum, accounting for only about 4% of resected cases. About half of these cases of rectal invasion show an annular rectal stricture pattern. It has been hypothesized that anatomical structures, namely Denonvilliers fascia, may play an important role in annular rectal involvement of prostate carcinoma. Here, we propose another hypothesis: the reason for annular rectal invasion by prostate carcinoma is its extension along the myenteric plexus (Auerbach's plexus). We illustrate this using a case presentation and description of the symptoms of such cases. From a review of the literature, autonomic digestive system symptoms of rectal invasion of prostatic carcinoma, such as diarrhea, tenesmus, or fecal incontinence is seen in about half of cases, coinciding with the frequency of annular rectal invasion. Thus, by modifying the long-established hypothesis, our suggestion that prostate carcinoma spreads along the myenteric plexus when cancer cells invade beyond the Denonvilliers fascia to the rectum could explain the cause and frequency not only of the annular rectal invasion but also the digestive system symptoms related to this disease. The prognosis of prostate carcinoma invading the rectum is very poor; however, this new hypothesis might shed light on the digestive system symptoms associated with prostate carcinoma and might lead to recognition and treatment of these cases at a relatively early stage of rectal invasion. PMID:26433688

  4. Laparoscopic and Robotic Total Mesorectal Excision in the Treatment of Rectal Cancer. Brief Review and Personal Remarks

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Petz, Wanda; Luca, Fabrizio; Biffi, Roberto; Spinoglio, Giuseppe; Montorsi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The current standard treatment for rectal cancer is based on a multimodality approach with preoperative radiochemotherapy in advanced cases and complete surgical removal through total mesorectal excision (TME). The most frequent surgical approach is traditional open surgery, as laparoscopic TME requires high technical skill, a long learning curve, and is not widespread, still being confined to centers with great experience in minimally invasive techniques. Nevertheless, in several studies, the laparoscopic approach, when compared to open surgery, has shown some better short-term clinical outcomes and at least comparable oncologic results. Robotic surgery for the treatment of rectal cancer is an emerging technique, which could overcome some of the technical difficulties posed by standard laparoscopy, but evidence from the literature regarding its oncologic safety and clinical outcomes is still lacking. This brief review analyses the current status of minimally invasive surgery for rectal cancer therapy, focusing on oncologic safety and the new robotic approach. PMID:24834429

  5. Comparison of noncontact infrared thermometry and 3 commercial subcutaneous temperature transponding microchips with rectal thermometry in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Brunell, Marla K

    2012-07-01

    This study compared a noncontact infrared laser thermometer and 3 different brands of subcutaneous temperature transponding microchips with rectal thermometry in 50 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). The data were analyzed by using intraclass correlation coefficients and limits of agreement. In addition, the technical capabilities and practicality of the thermometers in the clinical setting were reviewed. None of the alternative techniques investigated was equivalent to rectal thermometry in rhesus macaques. Temperatures obtained by using microchips had higher correlation and agreed more closely with rectal temperatures than did those obtained by the noncontact infrared method. However, transponding microchips did not yield consistent results. Due to difficulty in positioning nonsedated macaques in their homecage, subcutaneous microchips were not practical in the clinical setting. Furthermore, pair-housed macaques may be able to break or remove microchips from their cagemates. PMID:23043815

  6. Laparoscopic-assisted one-stage resection of rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastasis utilizing a pfannenstiel incision

    PubMed Central

    Aljiffry, Murad; Alrajraji, Mawaddah; Al-Sabah, Salman; Hassanain, Mazen

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic approaches have been increasingly used in selected patients with either colorectal or liver cancer. However, simultaneous resection of colorectal carcinoma with synchronous liver metastases is still a subject of debate. The present case describes combined laparoscopic rectal and liver resections for a patient with primary rectal cancer and a synchronous liver metastasis utilizing a Pfannenstiel incision for specimen extraction. The operative time was 370 min and estimated blood loss was 400 mL. Postoperatively, the patient required parenteral analgesia for 48 h, resumed normal diet on day 3 and was discharged on day 7 after the operation. A laparoscopic approach utilizing a Pfannenstiel extraction incision may present an advantageous and attractive option for simultaneous laparoscopic rectal and liver resection in selected patients with the aim of improving short-term outcomes. PMID:25253368

  7. Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence After Surgery and Radiotherapy or Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T.-K.; Bhosale, Priya R.; Crane, Christopher H.; Iyer, Revathy B.; Skibber, John M. M.D.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Eng, Cathy; Wolff, Robert A.; Janjan, Nora A.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Das, Prajnan

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To identify patterns of locoregional recurrence in patients treated with surgery and preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy or chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1989 and October 2001, 554 patients with rectal cancer were treated with surgery and preoperative (85%) or postoperative (15%) radiotherapy, with 95% receiving concurrent chemotherapy. Among these patients, 46 had locoregional recurrence as the first site of failure. Computed tomography images showing the site of recurrence and radiotherapy simulation films were available for 36 of the 46 patients. Computed tomography images were used to identify the sites of recurrence and correlate the sites to radiotherapy fields in these 36 patients. Results: The estimated 5-year locoregional control rate was 91%. The 36 patients in the study had locoregional recurrences at 43 sites. There were 28 (65%) in-field, 7 (16%) marginal, and 8 (19%) out-of-field recurrences. Among the in-field recurrences, 15 (56%) occurred in the low pelvis, 6 (22%) in the presacral region, 4 (15%) in the mid-pelvis, and 2 (7%) in the high pelvis. Clinical T stage, pathologic T stage, and pathologic N stage were significantly associated with the risk of in-field locoregional recurrence. The median survival after locoregional recurrence was 24.6 months. Conclusions: Patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy or chemoradiation for rectal cancer had a low risk of locoregional recurrence, with the majority of recurrences occurring within the radiation field. Because 78% of in-field recurrences occur in the low pelvic and presacral regions, consideration should be given to including the low pelvic and presacral regions in the radiotherapy boost field, especially in patients at high risk of recurrence.

  8. Interfraction Prostate Movement in Bone Alignment After Rectal Enema for Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Eun; Kim, Tae Hyo; Lee, Ki Soo; Cho, Won Yeol; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Hur, Won-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of a rectal enema on interfraction prostate movement in bone alignment (BA) for prostate radiotherapy (RT), we analyzed the spatial difference in prostates in a bone-matched setup. Materials and Methods We performed BA retrospectively with data from prostate cancer patients who underwent image-guided RT (IGRT). The prostate was identified with implanted fiducial markers. The setup for the IGRT was conducted with the matching of three fiducial markers on RT planning computed tomography images and those on two oblique kV x-ray images. Offline BA was performed at the same position. The coordinates of a virtual prostate in BA and a real prostate were obtained by use of the ExaxTrac/NovalisBody system, and the distance between them was calculated as the spatial difference. Interfraction prostate displacement was drawn from the comparison of the spatial differences. Results A total of 15 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with curative hypofractionated IGRT were enrolled. A total of 420 fractions were analyzed. The mean of the interfraction prostate displacements after BA was 3.12±2.00 mm (range, 0.20-10.53 mm). The directional difference was profound in the anterior-posterior and supero-inferior directions (2.14±1.73 mm and 1.97±1.44 mm, respectively) compared with the right-left direction (0.26±0.22 mm, p<0.05). The required margin around the clinical target volume was 4.97 mm with the formula of van Herk et al. Conclusions The interfraction prostate displacement was less frequent when a rectal enema was performed before the procedure. A rectal enema can be used to reduce interfraction prostate displacement and resulting clinical target volume-to-planning target volume margin. PMID:24466393

  9. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer in Patients With Prior Pelvic Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Eng, Cathy; Bedi, Manpreet; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine rates of toxicity, freedom from local progression, and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with reirradiation. Methods and Materials: Between February 2001 and February 2005, 50 patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy were treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for primary (n = 2 patients) or recurrent (n = 48 patients) rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients were treated with 150-cGy fractions twice daily, with a total dose of 39 Gy (n = 47 patients) if the retreatment interval was >=1 year or 30 Gy (n = 3) if the retreatment interval was <1 year. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 48 (96%) patients. Eighteen (36%) patients underwent surgical resection following radiotherapy. Results: Two patients had grade 3 acute toxicity and 13 patients had grade 3 to 4 late toxicity. The 3-year rate of grade 3 to 4 late toxicity was 35%. The 3-year rate of freedom from local progression was 33%. The 3-year freedom from local progression rate was 47% in patients undergoing surgery and 21% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.057). The 3-year overall survival rate was 39%. The 3-year overall survival rate was 66% in patients undergoing surgery and 27% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.003). The 3-year overall survival rate was 53% in patients with a retreatment interval of >2 years and 21% in those with a retreatment interval of <=2 years (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated, accelerated reirradiation was well tolerated, with low rates of acute toxicity and moderate rates of late toxicity. Reirradiation may help improve pelvic control in rectal cancer patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy.

  10. En bloc pelvic lymphadenectomy and sphincter preservation in the surgical management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Enker, W E; Pilipshen, S J; Heilweil, M L; Stearns, M W; Janov, A J; Hertz, R E; Sternberg, S S

    1986-01-01

    From 1968-1976, 412 patients were operated on for rectal cancers. One hundred fifty-six underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR) and 256 underwent low anterior resection (LAR). One hundred ninety-two underwent en bloc pelvic lymphadenectomy in conjunction with their resection, while 220 patients underwent more conservative or conventional resection. Thirty-day hospital mortality was 1.7%. The cancer-related 5-year survival was 58.8% for all patients. The proportion of patients surviving 5 years after LAR (62.8%) was significantly better than those surviving after APR (52.4%), p = 0.008. Statistically significantly superior survival was observed after extended dissection when compared to conventional resections in Dukes' A, B, and C patients as a whole (63.8 and 54.3%) and in Dukes' C patients in particular. Superiority of en bloc pelvic lymphadenectomy versus conventional resection was observed in all cases of Dukes' Stage C, Astler-Coller Stage C1, Level II (adjacent) lymph nodes, and Level I (proximal) lymph nodes and was most effective in combination with sphincter-preserving operations. Patient groups were compared for bias and/or case selection, using both contingency tables and Cox-based multiple covariant linear regression analysis, and none was found. In the face of current adjuvant therapy, which is of questionable benefit and which carries its own treatment morbidity, en bloc pelvic lymphadenectomy is advocated as an adjunct to the curative operations for rectal cancer. To improve the overall benefit, patients can be selected for pelvic lymphadenectomy as an adjuvant to resection when preoperative examination suggests that the rectal cancer penetrates the bowel wall. Accurate preoperative staging may help to define a more restricted group of patients warranting (pelvic lymphadenectomy) (PLND). A control randomized trial of the effectiveness of PLND is appropriate to further test its value. PMID:3963898

  11. Robotic versus conventional laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon Heui; Lim, Sungwon; Kim, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Robotic surgery (RS) overcomes the limitations of previous conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS). Although meta-analyses have been published recently, our study evaluated the latest comparative surgical, urologic, and sexual results for rectal cancer and compares RS with CLS in patients with rectal cancer only. Methods We searched three foreign databases (Ovid-MEDLINE, Ovid-Embase, and Cochrane Library) and five Korean databases (KoreaMed, KMbase, KISS, RISS, and KisTi) during July 2013. The Cochrane Risk of Bias and the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized were utilized to evaluate quality of study. Dichotomous variables were pooled using the risk ratio (RR), and continuous variables were pooled using the mean difference (MD). All meta-analyses were conducted with Review Manager, V. 5.3. Results Seventeen studies involving 2,224 patients were included. RS was associated with a lower rate of intraoperative conversion than that of CLS (RR, 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.54). Time to first flatus was short (MD, -0.13; 95% CI, -0.25 to -0.01). Operating time was longer for RS than that for CLS (MD, 49.97; 95% CI, 20.43-79.52, I2 = 97%). International Prostate Symptom Score scores at 3 months better RS than CLS (MD, -2.90; 95% CI, -5.31 to -0.48, I2 = 0%). International Index of Erectile Function scores showed better improvement at 3 months (MD, -2.82; 95% CI, -4.78 to -0.87, I2 = 37%) and 6 months (MD, -2.15; 95% CI, -4.08 to -0.22, I2 = 0%). Conclusion RS appears to be an effective alternative to CLS with a lower conversion rate to open surgery, a shorter time to first flatus and better recovery in voiding and sexual function. RS could enhance postoperative recovery in patients with rectal cancer. PMID:26448918

  12. Full-thickness excision using transanal endoscopic microsurgery for treatment of rectal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Jie; Wu, Nan; Zhou, Jiao-Lin; Lin, Guo-Le; Qiu, Hui-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy of full-thickness excision using transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) in the treatment of rectal neuroendocrine tumors. METHODS: We analyzed the data of all rectal neuroendocrine tumor patients who underwent local full-thickness excision using TEM between December 2006 and December 2014 at our department. Data collected included patient demographics, tumor characteristics, operative details, postoperative outcomes, pathologic findings, and follow-ups. RESULTS: Full-thickness excision using TEM was performed as a primary excision (n = 38) or as complete surgery after incomplete resection by endoscopic polypectomy (n = 21). The mean size of a primary tumor was 0.96 ± 0.21 cm, and the mean distance of the tumor from the anal verge was 8.4 ± 1.4 cm. The mean duration of the operation was 57.6 ± 13.7 min, and the mean blood loss was 13.5 ± 6.6 mL. No minor morbidities, transient fecal incontinence, or wound dehiscence was found. Histopathologically, all tumors showed typical histology without lymphatic or vessel infiltration, and both deep and lateral surgical margins were completely free of tumors. Among 21 cases of complete surgery after endoscopic polypectomy, 9 were histologically shown to have a residual tumor in the specimens obtained by TEM. No additional radical surgery was performed. No recurrence was noted during the median of 3 years’ follow-up. CONCLUSION: Full-thickness excision using TEM could be a first surgical option for complete removal of upper small rectal neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:26290641

  13. Ileal lesions in patients with ulcerative colitis after ileo-rectal anastomosis: Relationship with colonic metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Livia; Calabrese, Emma; Palmieri, Giampiero; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Onali, Sara; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo; Cossignani, Marta; Condino, Giovanna; Das, Kiron Moy; Pallone, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis (IRA), ileal lesions may develop in the neo-terminal-ileum and their possible relation with phenotypic changes towards colonic epithelium. METHODS: A total of 19 patients with IRA under regular follow up were enrolled, including 11 UC and 8 controls (6 Crohn’s disease, CD; 1 familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP; 1 colon cancer, colon K). Ileal lesions were identified by ileoscopy with biopsies taken from the ileum (involved and uninvolved) and from the rectal stump. Staining included HE and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against colonic epithelial protein CEP (Das-1) and human tropomyosin isoform 5, hTM5 (CG3). Possible relation between development of colonic metaplasia and ileal lesions was investigated. RESULTS: Stenosing adenocarcinoma of the rectal stump was detected in 1 UC patient. The neo-terminal ileum was therefore investigated in 10/11 UC patients. Ileal ulcers were detected in 7/10 UC, associated with colonic metaplasia in 4/7 (57.1%) and Das-1 and CG3 reactivity in 3/4 UC. In controls, recurrence occurred in 4/6 CD, associated with colonic metaplasia in 3/4 and reactivity with Das-1 and CG3 in 2/3. CONCLUSION: Present findings suggest that in UC, ileal lesions associated with changes towards colonic epithelium may develop also after IRA. Changes of the ileal content after colectomy may contribute to the development of colonic metaplasia, leading to ileal lesions both in the pouch and in the neo-terminal ileum after IRA. PMID:18785281

  14. Prognostic value of tumor shrinkage versus fragmentation following radiochemotherapy and surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hav, Monirath; Libbrecht, Louis; Geboes, Karen; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Boterberg, Tom; Ceelen, Wim; Pattyn, Piet; Cuvelier, Claude

    2015-05-01

    Most patients with rectal cancer receive neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT), causing a variable decrease in tumor mass. We evaluated the prognostic impact of pathologic parameters reflecting tumor response to RCT, either directly or indirectly. Seventy-six rectal cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant RCT between 2006 and 2009 were included. We studied the association between disease-free survival (DFS) and the "classical" clinicopathologic features as well as tumor deposits, circumferential resection margin (CRM), Dworak regression grade, and tumor and nodal downstaging. Patients with tumor downstaging had a longer DFS (p?=?0.05), indicating a more favorable prognosis when regression was accompanied by a decrease in tumor infiltrative depth, referred to as tumor shrinkage. Moreover, tumor downstaging was significantly associated with larger CRM and nodal downstaging (p?=?0.02), suggesting that shrinkage of the primary tumor was associated with a decreased nodal tumor load. Higher Dworak grade did not correlate with tumor downstaging, nor with higher CRM or prolonged DFS. This implies that tumor mass decrease was sometimes due to fragmentation rather than shrinkage of the primary tumor. Lastly, the presence of tumor deposits was clearly associated with reduced DFS (p?=?0.01). Assessment of tumor shrinkage after RCT via tumor downstaging and CRM is a good way of predicting DFS in rectal cancer, and shrinkage of the primary tumor is associated with a decreased nodal tumor load. Assessing regression based on the amount of tumor in relation to stromal fibrosis does not accurately discern tumor fragmentation from tumor shrinkage, which is most likely the reason why Dworak grade had less prognostic relevance. PMID:25693669

  15. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures After Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Course

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael P.; Kopetz, Scott; Bhosale, Priya R.; Eng, Cathy; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency (SI) fractures can occur as a late side effect of pelvic radiation therapy. Our goal was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of SI fractures in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 1989 and 2004, 562 patients with non-metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by mesorectal excision. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy. The hospital records and radiology reports of these patients were reviewed to identify those with pelvic fractures. Radiology images of patients with pelvic fractures were then reviewed to identify those with SI fractures. Results: Among the 562 patients, 15 had SI fractures. The 3-year actuarial rate of SI fractures was 3.1%. The median time to SI fractures was 17 months (range, 2-34 months). The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women compared to men (5.8% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.014), and in whites compared with non-whites (4% vs. 0%, p = 0.037). On multivariate analysis, gender independently predicted for the risk of SI fractures (hazard ratio, 3.25; p = 0.031). Documentation about the presence or absence of pain was available for 13 patients; of these 7 (54%) had symptoms requiring pain medications. The median duration of pain was 22 months. No patient required hospitalization or invasive intervention for pain control. Conclusions: SI fractures were uncommon in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women. Most cases of SI fractures can be managed conservatively with pain medications.

  16. Alterations in Hormone Levels After Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Male Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Frederick H.; Perera, Francisco Fisher, Barbara; Stitt, Larry

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels after postoperative chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-three men with rectal cancer had baseline and postchemoradiation FSH, LH, and testosterone measured. Adjuvant chemoradiation consisted of two 5-day cycles of bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) every 4 weeks at a dose of 500 mg/m{sup 2}/d followed by concurrent chemoradiation followed by two additional 5-day cycles of 5-FU at a dose of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/d. Continuous-infusion 5-FU at 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d was given during radiation. Pelvic radiation consisted of a three- or four-field technique with a median dose of 54.0 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 6.1 years. Mean baseline FSH levels increased from 5.3 to a peak of 23.9 IU/L (p < 0.001) 13-24 months after chemoradiation. Mean baseline LH levels increased from 4.3 to a peak of 8.5 IU/L (p < 0.001) within 6 months after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone levels decreased from 15.4 nmol/L at baseline to 8.0 nmol/L more than 4 years after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone to mean LH ratio decreased from 4.4 at baseline to 1.1 after 48 months posttreatment, suggesting a continued decrease in Leydig cell function with time. Testicular dose was measured in 5 patients. Median dose was 4 Gy (range, 1.5-8.9 Gy). Conclusions: Chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer causes persistent increases in FSH and LH levels and decreases in testosterone levels.

  17. Robotic Low Ligation of the Inferior Mesenteric Artery for Rectal Cancer Using the Firefly Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Min, Byung Soh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose By integrating intraoperative near infrared fluorescence imaging into a robotic system, surgeons can identify the vascular anatomy in real-time with the technical advantages of robotics that is useful for meticulous lymphovascular dissection. Herein, we report our initial experience of robotic low ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) with real-time identification of the vascular system for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique. Materials and Methods The study group included 11 patients who underwent a robotic total mesorectal excision with preservation of the left colic artery for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique between July 2013 and December 2013. Results The procedures included five low anterior resections and six ultra-low anterior resections with loop ileostomy. The median total operation time was 327 min (226-490). The low ligation time was 10 min (6-20), and the time interval between indocyanine green injection and division of the sigmoid artery was 5 min (2-8). The estimated blood loss was 200 mL (100-500). The median time to soft diet was 4 days (4-5), and the median length of stay was 7 days (5-9). Three patients developed postoperative complications; one patients developed anal stricture, one developed ileus, and one developed non-complicated intraabdominal fluid collection. The median total number of lymph nodes harvested was 17 (9-29). Conclusion Robotic low ligation of the IMA with real-time identification of the vascular system for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique is safe and feasible. This technique can allow for precise lymph node dissection along the IMA and facilitate the identification of the left colic branch of the IMA. PMID:26069127

  18. Intersphincteric resection with partial removal of external anal sphincter for low rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shelygin, Y A; Vorobiev, G I; Pikunov, D Yu; Markova, E V; Djhanaev, Y A; Fomenko, O Yu

    2008-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resection (APR) remains the standard procedure for rectal cancer located within 0.5 cm from dentate line (DL). In this study, we present a new type of restorative surgery: intersphincteric resection with partial removal of external anal sphincter (EAS) and anorectal reconstruction for-ultra low rectal cancer. Between March 2003 and May 2008 fifty patients (28 males, aged between 39 and 71) were operated on for ultra low rectal cancer uT2-3N0M0 with partial preservation of EAS and total anorectal reconstruction (smooth-muscle neosphincter and colonic pouch). A protective stoma was performed in all cases. Functional outcome and quality of life were recorded at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months after stoma closure using Wexner score and FIQL respectively. Anal manometry, vectrum volumetry and myography data were taken as well. Results. Postoperative complications developed in 2 patients, but no secondary surgery was required. Carcinomas were staged as pT2 (n = 14) and pT3 (n = 36). The distal clearance was 2.00.4 (range 1.5-2.8) cm, lateral clearance was 0.80.3 (range 0.2-1.4) cm. After a median follow-up of 24 (range 2-61) months, 2 local recurrences were occurred and salvaged by APR. Contractive activity of saved elements of EAS improved with a course of time and squeezing anal pressure increased as well. Perfect functional outcome was achieved in 25 of 34 patients at 12 months after stoma closure, and all the patients were satisfied with procedure. Good functional results of suggested surgery seems to be an acceptable alternative to APR with permanent stoma in selected patients. PMID:19069692

  19. Transrectal-ultrasound prostatic biopsy preparation: rectal enema vs. mechanical bowel preparation

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Riccardo; Presicce, Fabrizio; Bellangino, Mariangela; Agro, Enrico Finazzi; Gambrosier, Matteo Bonetto; Trucchi, Alberto; Petta, Stefano; Tubaro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transrectal prostate biopsy (TRUSbx) is the standard for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Different bowel preparations are used for patients undergoing TRUSbx. The aim of our study was to compare two different bowel preparations for TRUSbx. Material and methods From May 2012 and onwards, a selected group of men undergoing TRUS 12-core prostate biopsy were enrolled into a prospective database. Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive a rectal enema (Group A) the night before the procedure or polyethylene glycol 34.8 grams/4 liters of water the day before the procedure (Group B). A VAS scale to evaluate the patients’ discomfort according to the two preparations was collected. The same antibiotic prophylaxis was performed in both groups. All complications were prospectively recorded and graded according to the Clavien Classification System (CCS). Results A total of 198 patients were consecutively enrolled. Mean age was 67.5 ±7.9 years, mean body mass index (BMI) was 27.1 ±4.2 Kg/m2, mean PSA value was 9.3 ±12.6 ng/ml and the mean prostatic volume was 60.6 ±29 ml. 97 patients were enrolled in Group A and 101 in Group B. Overall post-biopsy morbidity rate was 60%. No significant differences for low-grade and high-grade complications was observed between the two groups. Patients receiving the rectal enema presented with a significantly lower VAS score (3.1 ±1.1 vs. 5.9 ±1.7; p = 0.02). Conclusions Our study confirmed that a rectal enema should be considered as the standard bowel preparation in patients undergoing a TRUS biopsy; it is as effective as PEG and associated with less discomfort. PMID:26251750

  20. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Narang, Amol K.; Griffith, Kent A.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Reese, Jennifer B.; Gearhart, Susan L.; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland ; Azad, Nolifer S.; Chan, June; Olsen, Leah; Efron, Jonathan E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient, impairment in sexual function may persist after the completion of therapy and merits further investigation.

  1. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Jo; Boland, Patrick J.; Meredith, Dennis S.; Lis, Eric; Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji; Yamada, Yoshiya J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  2. SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kotti, Angeliki Holmqvist, Annica; Albertsson, Maria; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is expressed in various normal tissues and many types of cancers. The function of SPARCL1 and its relationship to a patient's prognosis have been studied, whereas its relationship to radiation therapy (RT) is not known. Our aim was to investigate the expression of SPARCL1 in rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: The study included 136 rectal cancer patients who were randomized to undergo preoperative RT and surgery (n=63) or surgery alone (n=73). The expression levels of SPARCL1 in normal mucosa (n=29), primary tumor (n=136), and lymph node metastasis (n=35) were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Tumors with RT had stronger SPARCL1 expression than tumors without RT (P=.003). In the RT group, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival than weak expression in patients with stage III tumors, independent of sex, age, differentiation, and margin status (P=.022; RR = 18.128; 95% confidence interval, 1.512-217.413). No such relationship was found in the non-RT group (P=.224). Further analysis of interactions among SPARCL1 expression, RT, and survival showed statistical significance (P=.024). In patients with metastases who received RT, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival compared to weak expression (P=.041) but not in the non-RT group (P=.569). Conclusions: SPARCL1 expression increases with RT and is related to better prognosis in rectal cancer patients with RT but not in patients without RT. This result may help us to select the patients best suited for preoperative RT.

  3. Delorme's operation plus sphincteroplasty for complete rectal prolapse associated with traumatic fecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Mohamed M.; Abd El Maksoud, Walid M.; Gaweesh, Yosry S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rectal prolapse associated with traumatic fecal incontinence is a rare clinical combination. This study was designed to assess Delorme's operation with sphincteroplasty as a surgical management of this combination in terms of recurrence and improvement of fecal incontinence. In this prospective study, we enrolled patients suffering from short, full-thickness rectal prolapse associated with traumatic fecal incontinence who had been admitted to Alexandria Main University Hospital during the period of May 2010–January 2013. Preoperative data including cause of trauma, duration of symptoms, results of anal manometry, and degree of fecal incontinence using Wexner score were collected from all patients. Delorme's procedure with overlap sphincteroplasty was done in all patients. Recurrence of prolapse and improvement of fecal incontinence were assessed after 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. The study included 13 patients aged (32±8.7) years, 9 females and 4 males. Cause of sphincteric injury included previous anal surgery in 7 patients and normal labor in 6 patients. Duration between sphincteric injury and operation was (8.08±2.47) months. Preoperative Wexner's mean score was 16.07±3.4. Early postoperative complications included superficial wound infection (69.2%), minor wound dehiscence (61.5%), and postoperative bleeding (7.6%). Recurrence was detected in 1 patient at 6 month follow-up. Wexner's score showed significant improvement for all patients after 6 months (4.00±2.04). In conclusion, combination of Delorme's procedure and sphincteroplasty for treatment of patients with short complete rectal prolapse associated with traumatic fecal incontinence is a safe, effective surgical management with satisfactory results regarding anatomical and functional outcomes. PMID:26243520

  4. Late Side Effects and Quality of Life After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Skovlund, Eva; Hjermstad, Marianne J.; Dahl, Olav; Frykholm, Gunilla; Carlsen, Erik; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is little knowledge on long-term morbidity after radiotherapy (50 Gy) and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer. Therefore, late effects on bowel, anorectal, and urinary function, and health-related quality of life (QoL), were studied in a national cohort (n = 535). Methods and Materials: All Norwegian patients who received pre- or postoperative (chemo-)radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified. Patients treated with surgery alone served as controls. Patients were without recurrence or metastases. Bowel and urinary function was scored with the LENT SOMA scale and the St. Marks Score for fecal incontinence and QoL with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30). Results: Median time since surgery was 4.8 years. Radiation-treated (RT+) patients (n = 199) had increased bowel frequency compared with non-radiation-treated (RT-) patients (n = 336); 19% vs. 6% had more than eight daily bowel movements (p < 0.001). In patients without stoma, a higher proportion of RT+ (n = 69) compared with RT- patients (n = 240), were incontinent for liquid stools (49% vs. 15%, p < 0.001), needed a sanitary pad (52% vs. 13%, p < 0.001), and lacked the ability to defer defecation (44% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). Daily urinary incontinence occurred more frequently after radiotherapy (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.001). Radiation-treated patients had worse social function than RT- patients, and patients with fecal or urinary incontinence had impaired scores for global quality of life and social function (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with considerable long-term effects on anorectal function, especially in terms of bowel frequency and fecal incontinence. RT+ patients have worse social function, and fecal incontinence has a negative impact on QoL.

  5. Preadmission glucocorticoid use and anastomotic leakage after colon and rectal cancer resections: a Danish cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ostenfeld, Eva Bjerre; Erichsen, Rune; Baron, John A; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Riis, Anders H; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether preadmission glucocorticoid use increases the risk of anastomotic leakage after colon and rectal cancer resections. Design A population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark (2001–2011). Participants We identified patients who had undergone a primary anastomosis after a colorectal cancer resection by linking medical registries. Participants who filled their most recent glucocorticoid prescription ?90, 91–365 and >365?days before their surgery date were categorised as current, recent and former users, respectively. Main outcome measures We calculated 30-day absolute risk of anastomotic leakage and computed ORs using logistic regression models with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Of the 18?190 patients with colon cancer, anastomotic leakage occurred in 1184 (6.5%). Glucocorticoid use overall was not associated with an increased risk of leakage (6.4% vs 6.9% among never-users; OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.23). Categories of oral, inhaled or intestinal-acting glucocorticoids did not greatly affect risk of leakage. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 695 (13.2%) of 5284 patients with rectal cancer. Glucocorticoid use overall slightly increased risk of leakage (14.6% vs 12.8% among never-users; OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.72). Results did not differ significantly within glucocorticoid categories. Conclusions Preadmission glucocorticoids modestly increased the risk of anastomotic leakage mainly after rectal cancer resection. However, absolute risk differences were small and the clinical impact of glucocorticoid use may therefore be limited. PMID:26408282

  6. Short and Long-Term Outcomes of Robotic versus Laparoscopic Total Mesorectal Excision for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Soo; Baek, Se Jin; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The true benefits of robotic surgery are controversial, and whether robotic total mesorectal excision (R-TME) can be justified as a standard treatment for rectal cancer patients needs to be clarified. This case-matched study aimed to compare the postoperative complications and short- and long-term outcomes of R-TME and laparoscopic TME (L-TME) for rectal cancer. Among 1029 patients, we identified 278 rectal cancer patients who underwent R-TME. Propensity score matching was used to match this group with 278 patients who underwent L-TME. The mean follow-up period was similar between both groups (L-TME vs R-TME: 52.5?±?17.1 vs 51.0?±?13.1 months, P?=?0.253), as were patient characteristics. The operation time was significantly longer in the R-TME group than in the L-TME group (361.6?±?91.9? vs 272.4?±?83.8?min; P?

  7. The protection of insulin against proteolytic processes after rectal application to normoglycemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hacker, E; Kossowicz, J; Milde, K

    1991-02-01

    In order to improve the bioavailability of insulin after rectal application to rabbits, the influence of surface-active amino acid-fatty acid condensate on absorption and, the effects of a protease inhibitor (aprotinine), of a disinfectant (methyl-hydroxybenzoate) and of chemotherapeutics (chloramphenicol, ambazone and metronidazole) were investigated. Only the application of methylhydroxybenzoate, ambazone and of metronidazole, which inhibit the anaerobic bacterial flora, improved bioavailability significantly. The examinations show that the proteolytic activity of the anaerobic bacterial flora causes the loss of the biological activity of peptides in the rectum. PMID:1712971

  8. Feasibility study on the design of a probe for rectal cancer detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselm, V. J.; Frazer, R. E.; Lecroisset, D. H.; Roseboro, J. A.; Smokler, M. I.

    1977-01-01

    Rectal examination techniques are considered in terms of detection capability, patient acceptance, and cost reduction. A review of existing clinical techniques are considered in terms of detection capability, patient acceptance, and cost reduction. A review of existing clinical techniques and of relevant aerospace technology included evaluation of the applicability of visual, thermal, ultrasound, and radioisotope modalities of examination. The desired improvements can be obtained by redesigning the proctosigmoidoscope to have reduced size, additional visibility, and the capability of readily providing a color photograph of the entire rectosigmoid mucosa in a single composite view.

  9. [Surgical therapy of rectal prolapse. Our clinical experience of 12 years of observations].

    PubMed

    Gasbarro, V; Nigro Imperiale, F; Rubbini, M; Bignami, R; Pozza, E; Zamboni, P; Fabi, P; Mari, C; Tartari, E; De Anna, D

    1984-02-01

    AA. are reporting their experience on the subject of the surgical treatment of the rectal prolapse in all his clinical forms, during 12 years of activity that has taken place in the clinical surgery of the University of Ferrara. From their casuistry it is shown that usually this pathology is joined with other morbid forms of the small pelvis which vary according to the degree of the prolapse. They emphasize the excellent results obtained and support the surgical way of laparotomy adopted in the treatment of prolapse of II type (incomplete) and III type (complete). PMID:6525673

  10. [Research progress of cylindrical abdominoperineal resection/extralevator abdominoperineal excision for advanced low rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-jun; Han, Jia-gang

    2012-10-01

    Cylindrical abdominoperineal resection (CAPR), also known as extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE), has been described as a method for improving the outcome of APR for advanced low rectal cancer, probably because of more pelvic dissection and less positive circumferential resection margin (CRM). Recently, there have been some hot issues associated with CAPR/ELAPE, such as pelvic floor reconstruction methods, prone or lithotomy positioning during pelvic procedure, postoperative chronic perineal pain, postoperative sexual and urinary nerves damage, etc. Individual cylindrical procedure based on clinical and anatomic research may be as effective as CAPR/ELAPE while minimizing the operative trauma and the damage to the nerves of the genital and urinary organs. PMID:23099898

  11. Wound Dehiscence After APR for Low Rectal Cancer is Associated with Decreased Survival

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Alexander T.; Berger, David L.; Shellito, Paul C.; Sylla, Patrica; Bordeianou, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominoperineal Resection (APR) for low rectal adenocarcinoma is a common procedure with high morbidity including perineal wound complications. Objective To determine risk factors for perineal wound dehiscence and to investigate the effect of wound dehiscence on survival. Design Retrospective medical record review. Settings Tertiary care, university medical center (Division of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA). Patients Patients with low rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent APR from January 2001 to June 2012. Main Outcomes Measures We assessed the incidence of perineal wound dehiscence as well as survival following surgery. Results 249 patients underwent APR for rectal carcinoma. The mean age was 62.6 years (range 23–98), 159 (63.8%) were male and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 27.9 (range 16.7–58.5). 153 (61.1%) patients survived for 5 years after surgery. 69 patients (27.7%) developed wound dehiscence. Multivariable analysis revealed the following associations with dehiscence: BMI (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.03–1.15; P=0.002), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (OR 6.6; 95% CI 1.4 –32.5; P=0.02), history of other malignant neoplasm (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.5–6.6) and APR for cancer recurrence (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.2–6.3; P=0.01). In the survival analysis, wound dehiscence was associated with decreased survival (mean survival time for dehiscence vs. no dehiscence: 66.6 mo vs. 76.6 mo; P= 0.01). This relationship persisted in the multivariable analysis (HR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.8; P=0.02). Limitations This was a retrospective, observational study from a single center. Conclusions The adjusted risk of death was 1.7 times higher in patients who experienced dehiscence than in those who did not. Attention to perineal wound closure with consideration of flap creation should at least be given to patients with a history of malignant neoplasm, those with IBD, those with rectal cancer recurrence, and females undergoing posterior vaginectomy. Pre-operative weight loss should also reduce dehiscence risk. PMID:24401874

  12. Epidemiological characteristics of Candida species colonizing oral and rectal sites of Jordanian infants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that Candida colonization contributes to increasing invasion of candidiasis in hospitalized neonates. Few studies investigated the epidemiology and risk factors of Candida colonization among hospitalized and non-hospitalized infants. This prospective study investigated the major epidemiological characteristics of Candida species colonizing oral and rectal sites of Jordanian infants. Methods Infants aged one year or less who were examined at the pediatrics outpatient clinic or hospitalized at the Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan, were included in this study. Culture swabs were collected from oral and rectal sites and inoculated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. All Candida isolates were confirmed by the Remel RapID yeast plus system, and further investigated for specific virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility MIC using E-test. Genotyping of C. albicans isolates was determined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis method. Results A total of 61/492 (12.4%) infants were colonized with Candida species by either their oral/rectal sites or both. Rectal colonization was significantly more detected than oral colonization (64.6% verses 35.4%), particularly among hospitalized infants aged more than one month. The pattern and rates of colonization were as follows: C. albicans was the commonest species isolated from both sites and accounted for 67.1% of all isolates, followed by C.kefyr (11.4%), each C. tropicalis and C. glabrata (8.9%) and C. parapsilosis (3.8%). A various rates of Candida isolates proved to secrete putative virulence factors in vitro; asparatyl proteinase, phospholipase and hemolysin. C. albicans were associated significantly (P < 0.05) with these enzymes than other Candida species. All Candida isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B and caspofungin, whereas 97% of Candida species isolates were susceptible to fluconazole using E-test. The genetic similarity of 53 C. albicans isolates as demonstrated by dendrogram revealed the presence of 29 genotypes, and of these one genotype accounted for 22% of the isolates. Conclusion This study presents important epidemiological features of Candida colonization of Jordanian infants. PMID:21902841

  13. Tolerability of Combined Modality Therapy for Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients Aged 75 Years and Older

    SciTech Connect

    Margalit, Danielle N.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Clark, Jeffrey; Willett, Christopher G.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of treatment deviations during combined modality therapy for rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years and older. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of consecutively treated patients with rectal cancer aged 75 years and older treated with combined modality therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital from 2002 to 2007. The primary endpoint was the rate of treatment deviation, defined as a treatment break, dose reduction, early discontinuation of therapy, or hospitalization during combined modality therapy. Patient comorbidity was rated using the validated Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 Test (ACE-27) comorbidity index. Fisher's exact test and the Mantel-Haenszel trend test were used to identify predictors of treatment tolerability. Results: Thirty-six eligible patients had a median age of 79.0 years (range, 75-87 years); 53% (19/36) had no or mild comorbidity and 47% (17/36) had moderate or severe comorbidity. In all, 58% of patients (21/36) were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and 33% (12/36) with postoperative CRT. Although 92% patients (33/36) completed the planned radiotherapy (RT) dose, 25% (9/36) required an RT-treatment break, 11% (4/36) were hospitalized, and 33% (12/36) had a dose reduction, break, or discontinuation of concurrent chemotherapy. In all, 39% of patients (14/36) completed {>=}4 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, and 17% (6/36) completed therapy without a treatment deviation. More patients with no to mild comorbidity completed treatment than did patients with moderate to severe comorbidity (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.66). The rate of deviation did not differ between patients who had preoperative or postoperative CRT (19% vs. 17%, p = 1.0). Conclusions: The majority of elderly patients with rectal cancer in this series required early termination of treatment, treatment interruptions, or dose reductions. These data suggest that further intensification of combined modality therapy for rectal cancer should be performed with caution in elderly patients, who require aggressive supportive care to complete treatment.

  14. [Predictive factors for locally recurrent rectal cancer after primary curative surgery].

    PubMed

    Gao, Haoji; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Ren

    2015-11-25

    Local recurrence is a major clinical challenge after primary rectal cancer surgery. Although there is a possibility that R0 resection can be achieved, the outcome is still not favorable due to the low R0 resection rate and complexity of the surgery. Therefore prevention has a higher priority over treatment afterwards. As TME principle is accepted worldwide, the local recurrence rate has been reduced dramatically. And there are other factors associated with local recurrence including CRM, operation type, staging and PNI. Proper chemoradiotherapy may reduce the risk, however benefit always comes with side effect, therefore risk stratification is important. PMID:26616817

  15. Endorectal ultrasonography for the assessment of wall invasion and lymph node metastasis in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Y; Yamada, K; Ishizawa, T; Yoshinaka, H; Shimazu, H

    1992-04-01

    Endorectal ultrasonography (ERUS) with a flexible-type radial scanner (Aloka Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan; 7.5 MHz) was applied to 120 patients with rectal cancer for the assessment of wall invasion and pararectal lymph node metastasis. Normal rectal wall was described as a five- or seven-layer structure excluding the lowest part within 3 cm from the anal verge. Loss of normal layers basically indicated the existence of cancer invasion. According to UICC classification, we divided the depth of wall invasion into four ultrasonographic levels (uT1-uT4), and results were correlated with histopathologic findings. Overall accuracy of the assessment was 92.0 percent (103/112). Overestimation occurred in 5 of 60 cases with T3 cancer (8.3 percent), and underestimation occurred in 1 of 19 cases with T2 cancer (5.3 percent) and 3 of 60 cases with T3 cancer (5 percent). Inflammatory cell infiltration was found around the cancer in a considerable number of cases. However, the assessment of wall invasion was hardly affected in our hands. Because the muscularis propria of the rectal wall was often recognized as a three-layer structure, uT2 cancer was subdivided into three subgroups of uPM1, uPM2, and uPM3. The assessment of invasion of sublayers in muscularis propria was possible in 14 of 19 cases (73.7 percent), and correct assessment was achieved in 57 percent of the cases. The ultrasonographic demonstration of pararectal lymph nodes was studied on 98 patients. No swollen lymph nodes were detected ultrasonographically in 35 of 98 cases (35.7 percent), but cancer metastasis was found histopathologically in 5 of these 35 cases (14.3 percent). The metastasis was observed more frequently in lymph nodes with a diameter of more than 5 mm (53.8 percent) and in those with a well-defined boundary and with an uneven and markedly hypoechoic pattern (72.3 percent). Although unable to detect minimal cancer foci. ERUS was considered a very useful tool for the assessment of the depth of cancer invasion in the rectal wall and pararectal lymph node metastasis. PMID:1582359

  16. Principal Component Analysis-Based Pattern Analysis of Dose-Volume Histograms and Influence on Rectal Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Soehn, Matthias Alber, Markus; Yan Di

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: The variability of dose-volume histogram (DVH) shapes in a patient population can be quantified using principal component analysis (PCA). We applied this to rectal DVHs of prostate cancer patients and investigated the correlation of the PCA parameters with late bleeding. Methods and Materials: PCA was applied to the rectal wall DVHs of 262 patients, who had been treated with a four-field box, conformal adaptive radiotherapy technique. The correlated changes in the DVH pattern were revealed as 'eigenmodes,' which were ordered by their importance to represent data set variability. Each DVH is uniquely characterized by its principal components (PCs). The correlation of the first three PCs and chronic rectal bleeding of Grade 2 or greater was investigated with uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Rectal wall DVHs in four-field conformal RT can primarily be represented by the first two or three PCs, which describe {approx}94% or 96% of the DVH shape variability, respectively. The first eigenmode models the total irradiated rectal volume; thus, PC1 correlates to the mean dose. Mode 2 describes the interpatient differences of the relative rectal volume in the two- or four-field overlap region. Mode 3 reveals correlations of volumes with intermediate doses ({approx}40-45 Gy) and volumes with doses >70 Gy; thus, PC3 is associated with the maximal dose. According to univariate logistic regression analysis, only PC2 correlated significantly with toxicity. However, multivariate logistic regression analysis with the first two or three PCs revealed an increased probability of bleeding for DVHs with more than one large PC. Conclusions: PCA can reveal the correlation structure of DVHs for a patient population as imposed by the treatment technique and provide information about its relationship to toxicity. It proves useful for augmenting normal tissue complication probability modeling approaches.

  17. Grading-System-Dependent Volume Effects for Late Radiation-Induced Rectal Toxicity After Curative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Laan, Hans Paul van der

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the association between the dose distributions in the rectum and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC), Late Effects of Normal Tissue SOMA, and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 graded rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer treated with RT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 124 patients who received three-dimensional conformal RT for prostate cancer to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. All patients completed questionnaires regarding rectum complaints before RT and during long-term follow-up. Late rectum Grade 2 or worse toxicity, according to RTOG/EORTC, LENT SOMA, and CTCAE v3.0 criteria, was analyzed in relation to rectal dose and volume parameters. Results: Dose-volume thresholds (V40 {>=}65%, V50 {>=}55%, V65 {>=}45%, V70 {>=}20%, and a rectum volume {<=}140 cm{sup 3}), significantly discriminated patients with late Grade 0-1 and Grade 2 or worse rectal toxicity, particularly using the LENT SOMA and CTCAE v3.0 systems. The rectum volume receiving {>=}70 Gy (V70) was most predictive for late Grade 2 or worse rectal toxicity with each of the grading systems. The associations were strongest, however, with use of the LENT SOMA system. Conclusions: Volume effects for late radiation-induced rectal toxicity are present, but their clinical significance depends on the grading system used. This should be taken into account in the interpretation of studies reporting on radiation-induced rectal toxicity.

  18. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier; Udrescu, Corina; Tanguy, Ronan; Ruffion, Alain; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Sotton, Marie-Pierre; Devonec, Marian; Colombel, Marc; Jalade, Patrice; Azria, David

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA.

  19. Dose-Volume Constraints to Reduce Rectal Side Effects From Prostate Radiotherapy: Evidence From MRC RT01 Trial ISRCTN 47772397

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Foo, Kerwyn; Morgan, Rachel C.; Aird, Edwin G.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Critchley, Helen; Evans, Philip M. D.Phil.; Gianolini, Stefano; Mayles, W. Philip; Moore, A. Rollo; Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R. C.Stat; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is effective but dose limited because of the proximity of normal tissues. Comprehensive dose-volume analysis of the incidence of clinically relevant late rectal toxicities could indicate how the dose to the rectum should be constrained. Previous emphasis has been on constraining the mid-to-high dose range (>=50 Gy). Evidence is emerging that lower doses could also be important. Methods and Materials: Data from a large multicenter randomized trial were used to investigate the correlation between seven clinically relevant rectal toxicity endpoints (including patient- and clinician-reported outcomes) and an absolute 5% increase in the volume of rectum receiving the specified doses. The results were quantified using odds ratios. Rectal dose-volume constraints were applied retrospectively to investigate the association of constraints with the incidence of late rectal toxicity. Results: A statistically significant dose-volume response was observed for six of the seven endpoints for at least one of the dose levels tested in the range of 30-70 Gy. Statistically significant reductions in the incidence of these late rectal toxicities were observed for the group of patients whose treatment plans met specific proposed dose-volume constraints. The incidence of moderate/severe toxicity (any endpoint) decreased incrementally for patients whose treatment plans met increasing numbers of dose-volume constraints from the set of V30<=80%, V40<=65%, V50<=55%, V60<=40%, V65<=30%, V70<=15%, and V75<=3%. Conclusion: Considering the entire dose distribution to the rectum by applying dose-volume constraints such as those tested here in the present will reduce the incidence of late rectal toxicity.

  20. A Genetically Determined Dose-Volume Histogram Predicts for Rectal Bleeding among Patients Treated With Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cesaretti, Jamie A. . E-mail: jamie.cesaretti@msnyuhealth.org; Stock, Richard G.; Atencio, David P.; Peters, Sheila A.; Peters, Christopher A.; Burri, Ryan J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To examine whether possession of genetic alterations in the ATM (ataxia telangiectasia) gene is associated with rectal bleeding in a dose-dependent and volume-dependent manner. Methods and Materials: One hundred eight prostate cancer patients who underwent brachytherapy using either an {sup 125}I implant, a {sup 103}Pd implant, or the combination of external beam radiotherapy with a {sup 103}Pd implant and had a minimum of 1 year follow-up were screened for DNA sequence variations in the 62 coding exons of the ATM gene using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. Rectal dose was reported as the volume (in cubic centimeters) of rectum receiving the brachytherapy prescription dose. The two-sided Fisher exact test was used to compare differences in proportions. Results: A significant correlation between the presence of any ATM sequence alteration and Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was obtained when the radiation dose to rectal tissue was quantified. Rectal bleeding occurred in 4 of 13 patients (31%) with a variant versus 1 of 23 (4%) without a genetic alteration for patients who had <0.7 cm{sup 3} of rectal tissue receiving the implant prescription dose (p = 0.05). Of patients in whom 0.7-1.4 cm{sup 3} of the rectum received the implant prescription, 4 of 11 (36%) with an ATM alteration exhibited Grade 1 to 2 proctitis, whereas 1 of 21 (5%) without a variant (p = 0.04) developed this radiation-induced late effect. Conclusions: The possession of genetic variants in the ATM gene is associated with the development of radiation-induced proctitis after prostate cancer radiotherapy for patients who receive the full prescription dose to either a low or a moderate volume of rectal tissue.

  1. Reduction of the incidence and mortality of rectal cancer by polypectomy: a prospective cohort study in Haining County

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shu; Liu, Xi-Yong; Ding, Ke-Feng; Wang, Lin-Bo; Qiu, Pei-Lin; Ding, Xin-Feng; Shen, Yong-Zhou; Shen, Gao-Fei; Sun, Qi-Rong; Li, Wei-Dong; Dong, Qi; Zhang, Su-Zhan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To reduce the incidence and mortality of rectal cancer and address the hypothesis that colorectal cancer often arise from precursor lesion (s), either adenomas or non-adenomatous polyps, by conducting a population-based mass screening for colorectal cancer in Haining County, Zhejiang, PRC. METHODS: From 1977 to 1980, physicians screened the population of Haining County using 15 cm rigid endoscopy. Of over 240000 participants, 4076 of them were diagnosed with precursor lesions, either adenomas or non-adenomatous polyps, which were then removed surgically. All individuals with precursor lesions were followed up and reexamined by endoscopy every two to five years up to 1998. RESULTS: After the initial screening, 953 metachronous adenomas and 417 non-adenomatous polyps were detected and removed from the members of this cohort. Further, 27 cases of colorectal cancer were detected and treated. Log-rank tests showed that the survival time among those cancer patients who underwent mass screening increased significantly compared to that of other colorectal cancer patients (P < 0.0001). According to the population-based cancer registry in Haining County, age-adjusted incidence and mortality of rectal cancer decreased by 41% and 29% from 1977-1981 to 1992-1996, respectively. Observed cumulative 20-year rectal cancer incidence was 31% lower than the expected in the screened group; the mortality due to rectal cancer was 18% lower than the expected in the screened group. CONCLUSION: Mass screening for rectal cancer and precursor lesions with protocoscopy in the general population and periodical following-up with routine endoscopy for high-risk patients may decrease both the incidence and mortality of rectal cancer. PMID:12046076

  2. Senior Administrators Should Have Administrative Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Gary J.

    1987-01-01

    Recognizing that termination is viewed by the employee as the equivalent to capital punishment of a career, an administrative contract can reduce the emotional and financial entanglements that often result. Administrative contracts are described. (MLW)

  3. A Case Delayed Hemorrhage from the Stump of the Superior Rectal Artery after Abdominoperineal Resection of the Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Yuichi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Takahashi, Takao; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Osada, Shinji; Yoshida, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for advanced rectal cancer. On day 3 post surgery, a decompression tube was placed for postoperative ileus. Symptoms associated with ileus immediately disappeared. On day 7 post surgery, the patient vomited large amounts of fresh blood and became hemodynamically unstable. An emergency angiography revealed active bleeding from the stump of the superior rectal artery communicating with the third portion of the duodenum. Complete obliteration of the stump by proximal coil embolization was performed to achieve successful hemostasis. The postclinical course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 40 post surgery. PMID:20368791

  4. Phased surgical treatment of barium enema-induced rectal injury and retention of barium in the pelvic floor space

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries caused by barium enema are rarely reported. Following a phased surgical protocol for up to one year, we have successfully treated a patient with rectal injury and severe infection of the pelvic floor space complicated with retention of large amounts of barium and vaginal fistula. In this article, the phased surgery planning for the treatment of rectal injury complicated with vaginal fistula is discussed in terms of the pros and cons, and the observed effect and evolution of barium retained in the pelvic floor space are described. PMID:25405155

  5. SU-E-T-281: Reduction of Treatment Times in CyberKnife Prostate SBRT Using a Water Filled Rectal Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, P; Caroprese, B; McKellar, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To illustrate 25% reduction in CyberKnife prostate SBRT treatment times using a water filled rectal balloon. Methods: We perform prostate SBRT using a 3800cGy in 4 fraction regimen prescribed between 51% 59% iso-dose lines to 95% of PTV using a CyberKnife System. The resultant heterogeneous dosimetry is analogous to HDR dosimetry. Our patients are treated in a feet first supine position to decrease treatment couch sag and also to position the prostate anatomy closer to the robot. CT imaging is performed with a Radiadyne Immobiloc rectal balloon filled with 45-50cc water placed firmly inside the patient's rectum. A treatment plan is developed from this CT study using Multiplan. The patient is treated every other day for 4 days using the rectal balloon for each fraction. Gold fiducials previously implanted inside the prostate are used for tracking by the CyberKnife system. Results: Critical structures comprise the usual GU anatomy of bladder, rectum, urethra, femoral-heads along with emphasis on doses to anterior rectal wall and rectal mucosa. The water filled rectal balloon localizes the rectum, which enables the physician to accurately contour both anterior rectal wall, and rectal mucosa. The balloon also has a gas release valve enabling better patient comfort. Rectum localization enables the CyberKnife system to make fewer corrections resulting in fewer treatment interruptions and time lost to re-adjustment for rectal motion, bowel filling and gas creation. Effective treatment times are reduced by 25% to approximately 45 minutes. Adoption of the balloon has required minimal change to our planning strategy and plan evaluation process. Conclusion: Patient follow-up comparisons show no difference in effectiveness of treatment with and without balloons We conclude that rectal balloons enhance patient comfort and decrease effective treatment times.

  6. Novice Administrators: Personality and Administrative Style Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Linda J.; Kosmoski, Georgia J.; Pollack, Dennis R.

    Since the advent of effective-schools research findings, educational administration experts have advocated a democratic and collegial leadership style for school administrators. This paper provides the findings of a study that examined 43 beginning administrators (25 females, 32 Caucasians, 9 African-Americans, 2 Hispanics) to determine what…

  7. Administrative Units M50 Administration Building

    E-print Network

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Administrative Units M50 Administration Building M41 Building No. 2 M43 2nd Administration Building S1 School of Professional and Continuing Studies M3 Gallery of NTU History Old Main Library N75 for Psychological Services Instructional Buildings M57 Common Subjects Classroom Building N11 Core Subjects

  8. Dietary influence on MAPK-signaling pathways and risk of colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Wolff, Roger K

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. Associations between genes in the DUSP, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK-signaling pathways and dietary factors associated with growth factors, inflammation, and oxidative stress and risk of colon and rectal cancer were evaluated. Data include colon cases (n = 1555) and controls (n = 1956) and rectal cases (n = 754) and controls (n = 959). Statistically significant interactions were observed for the MAPK-signaling pathways after adjustment for multiple comparisons. DUSP genes interacted with carbohydrates, mutagen index, calories, calcium, vitamin D, lycopene, dietary fats, folic acid, and selenium. MAPK1, MAPK3, MAPK1, and RAF1 within the ERK1/2 MAPK-signaling pathway interacted with dietary fats and cruciferous vegetables. Within the JNK MAPK-signaling pathway, interactions between MAP3K7 and protein, vitamin C, iron, folic acid, carbohydrates, and cruciferous vegetables; MAP3K10 and folic acid; MAP3K9 and lutein/zeaxanthin; MAPK8 and calcium; MAP3K3 and calcium and lutein; MAP3K1 and cruciferous vegetables. Interaction within the p38-signaling pathway included MAPK14 with calories, carbohydrates saturated fat, selenium, vitamin C; MAP3K2 and carbohydrates, and folic acid. These data suggest that dietary factors involved in inflammation and oxidative stress interact with MAPK-signaling genes to alter risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:23859041

  9. Impression of prognosis regarding pathologic stage after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kyungyeon; Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To ascertain pathologic stage as a prognostic indicator for rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT). METHODS: Patients with mid- and low rectal carcinoma (magnetic resonance imaging - based clinical stage II or III) between 2000 and 2009 and treated with curative radical resection were identified. Patients were divided into two groups: PCRT and No-PCRT. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was examined according to pathologic stage and addition of adjuvant treatment. RESULTS: Overall, 894 patients were identified. Of these, 500 patients received PCRT. Adjuvant chemotherapy was delivered to 81.5% of the No-PCRT and 94.8% of the PCRT patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy was given to 29.4% of the patients in the No PCRT group. The 5-year RFS for the No-PCRT group was 92.6% for Stage?I, 83.3% for Stage II, and 72.9% for Stage III. The 5-year RFS for the PCRT group was 95.2% for yp Stage 0, 91.7% for yp Stage?I, 73.9% for yp Stage II, and 50.7% for yp Stage III. CONCLUSION: Pathologic stage can predict prognosis in PCRT patients. 5-year RFS is significantly lower among PCRT patients than No-PCRT patients in pathologic stage II and III. These results should be taken into account when considering adjuvant treatment for patients treated with PCRT. PMID:25593475

  10. Prediction of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangjiao; Huang, Zhaoqin; Wang, Renben; Yu, Jinming

    2014-02-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) combined with surgery has become a standard treatment strategy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The pathological response is an important prognostic factor for LARC. The variety of tumor responses has increased the need to find a useful predictive model for the response to CRT to identify patients who will really benefit from this multimodal treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), serum carcinoembryogenic antigen (CEA), molecular biomarkers analyzed by immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling are the most used predictive models in LARC. The majority of predictors have yielded encouraging results, but there is still controversy. Diffusion-weighted MRI may be the best model to detect the dynamic changes of rectal cancer and predict the response at an early stage. Gene expression profiling and single nucleotide polymorphisms hold considerable promise to unveil the underlying complex genetics of response to CRT. Because each parameter has its own inherent shortcomings, combined models may be the future trend to predict the response. PMID:24647108

  11. Local Recurrence in Rectal Cancer: Anatomic Localization and Effect on Radiation Target

    SciTech Connect

    Syk, Erik Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nilsson, Per J.; Glimelius, Bengt

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the sites of local recurrence after total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer in an effort to optimize the radiation target. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients with recurrence after abdominal resection for rectal cancer were identified from a population-based consecutive cohort of 2,315 patients who had undergone surgery by surgeons trained in the total mesorectal excision procedure. A total of 99 cross-sectional imaging studies were retrieved and re-examined by one radiologist. The clinical records were examined for the remaining patients. Results: Evidence of residual mesorectal fat was identified in 50 of the 99 patients. In 83 patients, local recurrence was identified on the imaging studies. All recurrences were within the irradiated volume if the patients had undergone preoperative radiotherapy or within the same volume if they had not. The site of recurrence was in the lower 75% of the pelvis, anatomically below the S1-S2 interspace for all patients. Only 5 of the 44 recurrences in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge were in the lowest 20% of the pelvis. Six recurrences involved the lateral lymph nodes. Conclusion: These data suggest that a lowering of the upper limit of the clinical target volume could be introduced. The anal sphincter complex with surrounding tissue could also be excluded in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Robotic Surgery for Rectal Cancer Focusing on Short-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Woo; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Roh, Yun Ho; Kang, Jeonghyun; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the total cost of robotic surgery (RS) is known to be higher than that of laparoscopic surgery (LS), the cost-effectiveness of RS has not yet been verified. The aim of the study is to clarify the cost-effectiveness of RS compared with LS for rectal cancer. From January 2007 through December 2011, 311 and 560 patients underwent totally RS and conventional LS for rectal cancer, respectively. A propensity score-matching analysis was performed with a ratio of 1:1 to reduce the possibility of selection bias. Costs and perioperative short-term outcomes in both the groups were compared. Additional costs due to readmission were also analyzed. The characteristics of the patients were not different between the 2 groups. Most perioperative outcomes were not different between the groups except for the operation time. Complications within 30 days of surgery were not significantly different. Total hospital charges and patients’ bill were higher in RS than in LS. The total hospital charges for patients who recovered with or without complications were higher in RS than in LS, although their short-term outcomes were similar. In patients with complications, the postoperative course after RS appeared to be milder than that of LS. Total hospital charges for patients who were readmitted due to complications were similar between the groups. RS showed similar short-term outcomes with higher costs than LS. Therefore, cost-effectiveness focusing on short-term perioperative outcomes of RS was not demonstrated. PMID:26039115

  13. Probiotics for Rectal Volume Variation During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Juhye; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang; Ha, Honggu; Kim, Taenam; Kim, Dongwon

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus on the percentage volume change of the rectum (PVC{sub R}), a crucial factor of prostate movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients managed with tomotherapy as a radical treatment were enrolled in the study to take a probiotic capsule containing 1.0 × 10{sup 8} colony-forming units of L acidophilus or a placebo capsule twice daily. Radiation therapy was performed at a dose of 78 Gy in 39 fractions. The PVC{sub R}, defined as the difference in rectal volume between the planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily megavoltage CT images, was analyzed. Results: Forty patients were randomized into 2 groups. The L acidophilus group showed significantly lower median rectal volume and median PVC{sub R} values than the placebo group. L acidophilus showed a significant reduction effect on the PVC{sub R} (P<.001). However, the radiation therapy fraction number did not significantly influence the PVC{sub R}. Conclusions: L acidophilus was useful in reducing the PVC{sub R}, which is the most important determining factor of prostate position, during radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

  14. Nanocytology of rectal colonocytes to assess risk of colon cancer based on field cancerization

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Dhwanil; Roy, Hemant K.; Subramanian, Hariharan; Weinberg, David S.; Rex, Douglas K.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Muldoon, Joseph; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhu, Yuanjia; Bianchi, Laura K.; Shah, Dhiren; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Borkar, Monica; Lynch, Henry; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Developing a minimally invasive and cost effective pre-screening strategy for colon cancer is critical, because of the impossibility of performing colonoscopy on the entire at-risk population. The concept of field carcinogenesis, in which normal-appearing tissue away from a tumor has molecular and, consequently, nano-architectural abnormalities, offers one attractive approach to identify high-risk patients. In this study, we investigated whether the novel imaging technique partial-wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy could risk-stratify patients harboring precancerous lesions of the colon, using an optically measured biomarker (Ld) obtained from microscopically normal but nanoscopically altered cells. Rectal epithelial cells were examined from 146 patients, including 72 control patients, 14 patients with diminutive adenomas, 20 patients with non-advanced-non-diminutive adenomas, 15 patients with advanced adenomas/high-grade dysplasia, 12 patients with genetic mutation leading to Lynch syndrome, and 13 cancer patients. We found that the Ld obtained from rectal colonocytes was well-correlated with colon tumorigenicity in our patient cohort and in an independent validation set of 39 additional patients. Therefore, our findings suggest that PWS-measured Ld is an accurate marker of field carcinogenesis. This approach provides a potential pre-screening strategy for risk stratification before colonoscopy. PMID:22491589

  15. Nanocytology of rectal colonocytes to assess risk of colon cancer based on field cancerization.

    PubMed

    Damania, Dhwanil; Roy, Hemant K; Subramanian, Hariharan; Weinberg, David S; Rex, Douglas K; Goldberg, Michael J; Muldoon, Joseph; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhu, Yuanjia; Bianchi, Laura K; Shah, Dhiren; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Borkar, Monica; Lynch, Henry; Backman, Vadim

    2012-06-01

    Developing a minimally invasive and cost-effective prescreening strategy for colon cancer is critical because of the impossibility of conducting colonoscopy on the entire at-risk population. The concept of field carcinogenesis, in which normal-appearing tissue away from a tumor has molecular and, consequently, nano-architectural abnormalities, offers one attractive approach to identify high-risk patients. In this study, we investigated whether the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy could risk-stratify patients harboring precancerous lesions of the colon, using an optically measured biomarker (L(d)) obtained from microscopically normal but nanoscopically altered cells. Rectal epithelial cells were examined from 146 patients, including 72 control patients, 14 patients with diminutive adenomas, 20 patients with nondiminutive/nonadvanced adenomas, 15 patients with advanced adenomas/high-grade dysplasia, 12 patients with genetic mutation leading to Lynch syndrome, and 13 patients with cancer. We found that the L(d) obtained from rectal colonocytes was well correlated with colon tumorigenicity in our patient cohort and in an independent validation set of 39 additional patients. Therefore, our findings suggest that PWS-measured L(d) is an accurate marker of field carcinogenesis. This approach provides a potential prescreening strategy for risk stratification before colonoscopy. PMID:22491589

  16. N-glycomic Profiling as a Tool to Separate Rectal Adenomas from Carcinomas*

    PubMed Central

    Kaprio, Tuomas; Satomaa, Tero; Heiskanen, Annamari; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Deelder, André M.; Mustonen, Harri; Hagström, Jaana; Carpen, Olli; Saarinen, Juhani; Haglund, Caj

    2015-01-01

    All human cells are covered by glycans, the carbohydrate units of glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. Most glycans are localized to cell surfaces and participate in events essential for cell viability and function. Glycosylation evolves during carcinogenesis, and therefore carcinoma-related glycan structures are potential cancer biomarkers. Colorectal cancer is one of the world's three most common cancers, and its incidence is rising. Novel biomarkers are essential to identify patients for targeted and individualized therapy. We compared the N-glycan profiles of five rectal adenomas and 18 rectal carcinomas of different stages by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were deparaffinized, and glycans were enzymatically released and purified. We found differences in glycosylation between adenomas and carcinomas: monoantennary, sialylated, pauci-mannose, and small high-mannose N-glycan structures were more common in carcinomas than in adenomas. We also found differences between stage I–II and stage III carcinomas. Based on these findings, we selected two glycan structures: pauci-mannose and sialyl Lewis a, for immunohistochemical analysis of their tissue expression in 220 colorectal cancer patients. In colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of sialyl Lewis a, and in advanced colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of pauci-mannose. In conclusion, by mass spectrometry we found several carcinoma related glycans, and we demonstrate a method of transforming these results into immunohistochemistry, a readily applicable method to study biomarker expression in patient samples. PMID:25452313

  17. A system biology approach for understanding the miRNA regulatory network in colon rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Meeta; Nagulapalli, Kshithija; Ledford, Lakenvia; Pandit, Yogesh; Palakal, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a systems biology approach to the understanding of the miRNA-regulatory network in colon rectal cancer. An initial set of significant genes in Colon Rectal Cancer (CRC) were obtained by mining relevant literature. An initial set of cancer-related miRNAs were obtained from three databases: miRBase, miRWalk, Targetscan and GEO microarray experiment. First principle methods were then used to generate the global miRNA-gene network. Significant miRNAs and associated transcription factors in the global miRNA-gene network were identified using topological and sub-graph analyses. Eleven novel miRNAs were identified and three of the novel miRNAs, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-100 and hsa-miR-99a, were further analysed to elucidate their role in CRC. The proposed methodology effectively made use of literature data and was able to show novel, significant miRNA-transcription associations in CRC. PMID:26255374

  18. Early rectal cancer accompanied by multiple systemic abscesses: A case report

    PubMed Central

    TAJIMA, TAKAYUKI; MUKAI, MASAYA; HASEGAWA, SAYURI; YAMAMOTO, SOUICHIROU; NOMURA, EIJI; TAJIRI, TAKUMA; SADAHIRO, SOTARO; YASUDA, SEIEI; MAKUUCHI, HIROYASU

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old man undergoing treatment for diabetes presented with a cough and pyrexia that has lasted one week. Laboratory tests demonstrated evidence of inflammation. The patient was hospitalized and antibiotic treatment was initiated, but the condition of the patient did not improve. After 2 weeks, computerized tomography scanning demonstrated the presence of multiple small nodules in the lungs and a liver abscess. The patient also developed neck pain and numbness of the upper extremities and was then transferred to Tokai University Hachioji Hospital (Tokyo, Japan). Percutaneous transhepatic drainage (PTD) of the liver abscess was performed and antibiotic treatment was initiated. Detailed examination revealed there was pyogenic spondylitis of the cervical spine, therefore abscess drainage and an anterior cervical spinal fusion were performed. Culture of each lesion resulted in Klebsiella pneumoniae growth. While continuing antibiotic treatment and rehabilitation, the gastrointestinal tract was investigated and evidence of early rectal cancer was observed. The pulmonary nodules disappeared during treatment, indicating that these were multiple lung abscesses. Four weeks following abscess drainage and anterior cervical spinal fusion, lower anterior resection was performed. The present case report describes a patient who developed multiple abscesses associated with early rectal cancer and discusses the case with reference to the literature. PMID:26622822

  19. Anastomotic leakage in rectal cancer surgery: The role of blood perfusion.

    PubMed

    Rutegård, Martin; Rutegård, Jörgen

    2015-11-27

    Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer remains a common and often devastating complication. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been studied extensively and are used for patient selection, especially whether to perform a diverting stoma or not. From the current literature, data suggest that perfusion in the rectal stump rather than in the colonic limb may be more important for the integrity of the colorectal anastomosis. Moreover, available research suggests that the mid and upper rectum is considerably more vascularized than the lower part, in which the posterior compartment seems most vulnerable. These data fit neatly with the observation that anastomotic leaks are far more frequent in patients undergoing total compared to partial mesorectal excision, and also that most leaks occur dorsally. Clinical judgment has been shown to ineffectively assess anastomotic viability, while promising methods to measure blood perfusion are evolving. Much interest has recently been turned to near-infrared light technology, enhanced with fluorescent agents, which enables intraoperative perfusion assessment. Preliminary data are promising, but large-scale controlled trials are lacking. With maturation of such technology, perfusion measurements may in the future inform the surgeon whether anastomoses are at risk. In high colorectal anastomoses, anastomotic revision might be feasible, while a diverting stoma could be fashioned selectively instead of routinely for low anastomoses. PMID:26649151

  20. Multidisciplinary treatment of rectal cancer in 2014: Where are we going?

    PubMed Central

    Vignali, Andrea; De Nardi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In the present review we discuss the recent developments and future directions in the multimodal treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer, with respect to staging and re-staging modalities, to the current role of neoadjuvant chemo-radiation and to the conservative and more limited surgical approaches based on tumour response after neoadjuvant combined therapy. When initial tumor staging is considered a high accuracy has been reported for T pre-treatment staging, while preoperative lymph node mapping is still suboptimal. With respect to tumour re-staging, all the current available modalities still present a limited accuracy, in particular in defining a complete response. The role of short vs long-course radiotherapy regimens as well as the optimal time of surgery are still unclear and under investigation by means of ongoing randomized trials. Observational management or local excision following tumour complete response are promising alternatives to total mesorectal excision, but need further evaluation, and their use outside of a clinical trial is not recommended. The preoperative selection of patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant radiotherapy or not, as well as the proper identification of a clinical complete tumour response after combined treatment modalities,will influence the future directions in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:25170209

  1. Stress-induced fever after postischemic rectal temperature measurements in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darren L; DeBow, Suzanne B; Iseke, Melanie D; Colbourne, Frederick

    2003-09-01

    Postischemic temperature, which modulates brain injury, is commonly determined via a rectal temperature (Trec) probe. This procedure causes a stress-induced fever (SIF) in rodents that may aggravate injury or diminish the efficacy of a neuroprotectant. We continually measured core temperature (Tcore) via an implanted telemetry probe and made 16 Trec measurements over 4 days in sham and ischemic gerbils (5 min bilateral carotid artery occlusion). Controls did not have Trec sampled, but Tcore was measured. Rectal temperature measurements predicted Tcore in sham and ischemic gerbils. The Trec measurements caused a SIF (1 degrees C peak) in shams that did not habituate, whereas the SIF was initially absent and then increased over days in ischemic gerbils. Ischemic groups had similar CA1 injury (approximately 32% remaining), presumably because Trec measurements only resulted in a significant SIF starting on day 2 postischemia, when cell death is less sensitive to hyperthermia. Caution is warranted with Trec measurements, since the resultant SIF occurs to different extents in normal and ischemic rodents. Furthermore, the SIF could vary according to many other factors, such as the type and severity of insult, the time and frequency of measurement, and drug treatment. Accordingly, postischemic Trec measurements should be replaced with telemetry probes. PMID:14614524

  2. Preoperative chemoradiation of locally advanced T3 rectal cancer combined with an endorectal boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Anders . E-mail: andjac@vgs.vejleamt.dk; Mortensen, John P.; Bisgaard, Claus; Lindebjerg, Jan; Hansen, Johnny W.; Rafaelsen, Soren R.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect and feasibility of concurrent radiation and chemotherapy combined with endorectal brachytherapy in T3 rectal cancer with complete pathologic remission as end point. Methods and Materials: The study included 50 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. All patients had T3 tumor with a circumferential margin 0-5 mm on a magnetic resonance imaging scan. The radiotherapy was delivered by a technique including two planning target volumes. Clinical target volume 1 (CTV1) received 60 Gy/30 fractions, and CTV2 received 48.6 Gy/27 fractions. The tumor dose was raised to 65 Gy with endorectal brachytherapy 5 Gy/1 fraction to the tumor bed. On treatment days, the patients received uracil and tegafur 300 mg/m2 concurrently with radiotherapy. Results: Forty-eight patients underwent operation. Histopathologic tumor regression was assessed by the Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) system. TRG1 was recorded in 27% of the patients, and a further 27% were classified as TRG2. TRG3 was found in 40%, and 6% had TRG4. The toxicity was low. Conclusion: The results indicate that high-dose radiation with concurrent chemotherapy and endorectal brachytherapy is feasible with a high rate of complete response, but further trials are needed to define its possible role as treatment option.

  3. Anastomotic leakage in rectal cancer surgery: The role of blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rutegård, Martin; Rutegård, Jörgen

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer remains a common and often devastating complication. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been studied extensively and are used for patient selection, especially whether to perform a diverting stoma or not. From the current literature, data suggest that perfusion in the rectal stump rather than in the colonic limb may be more important for the integrity of the colorectal anastomosis. Moreover, available research suggests that the mid and upper rectum is considerably more vascularized than the lower part, in which the posterior compartment seems most vulnerable. These data fit neatly with the observation that anastomotic leaks are far more frequent in patients undergoing total compared to partial mesorectal excision, and also that most leaks occur dorsally. Clinical judgment has been shown to ineffectively assess anastomotic viability, while promising methods to measure blood perfusion are evolving. Much interest has recently been turned to near-infrared light technology, enhanced with fluorescent agents, which enables intraoperative perfusion assessment. Preliminary data are promising, but large-scale controlled trials are lacking. With maturation of such technology, perfusion measurements may in the future inform the surgeon whether anastomoses are at risk. In high colorectal anastomoses, anastomotic revision might be feasible, while a diverting stoma could be fashioned selectively instead of routinely for low anastomoses. PMID:26649151

  4. Voxel-based population analysis for correlating local dose and rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Oscar; Drean, Gael; Ospina, Juan D.; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2013-04-01

    The majority of current models utilized for predicting toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy are based on dose-volume histograms. One of their main drawbacks is the lack of spatial accuracy, since they consider the organs as a whole volume and thus ignore the heterogeneous intra-organ radio-sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a dose-image-based framework to reveal the relationships between local dose and toxicity. In this approach, the three-dimensional (3D) planned dose distributions across a population are non-rigidly registered into a common coordinate system and compared at a voxel level, therefore enabling the identification of 3D anatomical patterns, which may be responsible for toxicity, at least to some extent. Additionally, different metrics were employed in order to assess the quality of the dose mapping. The value of this approach was demonstrated by prospectively analyzing rectal bleeding (?Grade 1 at 2 years) according to the CTCAE v3.0 classification in a series of 105 patients receiving 80 Gy to the prostate by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Within the patients presenting bleeding, a significant dose excess (6 Gy on average, p < 0.01) was found in a region of the anterior rectal wall. This region, close to the prostate (1 cm), represented less than 10% of the rectum. This promising voxel-wise approach allowed subregions to be defined within the organ that may be involved in toxicity and, as such, must be considered during the inverse IMRT planning step.

  5. New tumor regression grade for rectal cancer after neoadjuvant therapy and radical surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Liu, Hao; Hu, Junjie; Liu, Sai; Yin, Jie; Du, Feng; Yuan, Jiatian; Lv, Bo

    2015-12-01

    In this retrospective study, we defined a new tumor regression grade (NTRG), which we used to evaluate the prognosis of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant therapy and then underwent radical surgery between June 2004 and October 2011. Calculated as the TRG plus a lymph node score, the NTRG was determined for 347 patients: NTRG 0, 46 patients (13.3%); NTRG 1, 63 (18.2%); NTRG 2, 183 (52.7%); NTRG 3, 30 (8.6%); NTRG 4, 25 (7.2%). Among this group, 45 (97.8%) NTRG 0, 56 (88.9%) NTRG 1, 148 (80.9%) NTRG 2, 24 (66.7%) NTRG 3, and 10 (40.0%) NTRG 4 patients experienced 5-year disease-free survival. We also found that NTRG is significantly associated with 5-year local recurrence, distant metastasis and disease-free survival (P = 0.004, 0.007 and 0.039, respectively). The NTRG may thus be an independent prognostic factor for oncologic outcomes in rectal cancer patients after neoadjuvant therapy and radical surgery, but this conclusion must be validated in randomized trials. PMID:26540466

  6. The role of autofluorescence colonoscopy in diagnosis and management of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latos, W.; Kawczyk-Krupka, A.; Ledwon, A.; Kosciarz-Grzesiok, A.; Misiak, A.; Sieron-Stoltny, K.; Sieron, A.

    2008-02-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a chronic disease of the rectum. Although SRUS is a benign condition there are studies which suggest that chronic ischaemia which occurs in the SRUS may lead to "transitional mucosa" that is similar to that adjacent to colorectal carcinomas and adenomas and may lead to colorectal dysplasia and carcinoma development. The exclusion of primary or metastatic malignancy is the most important aim in the differential diagnosis of SRUS. In our study we assess the possibilities of autofluorescence colonoscopy (AFC) in diagnosis and management of SRUS. We performed white light colonoscopy first. The tissue samples were taken for pathological examination. When SRUS was histopathologically confirmed AFC was performed by means of Xillix OncoLIFE. During AFC numerical colour value (NCV) of autofluorescence of SRUS lesions was noted. During 1946 colonoscopies eight persons were diagnosed as having solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. We did not observe autofluorescence increase in case of polipoid and flat ulcer lesions (NCV 0,39-0,67; mean 0,525) and little increase of autofluorescence in case of erythema lesion (NCV- 0,94). SRUS is a rare disorder of the rectum but it causes differential diagnosis problems. The most common reason for incorrect diagnosis are inadequate tissue specimens. AFC allows to reveal subtle areas within the lesions of more intense autofluorescence and localizes the potential cancer-transformating dysplasia. In this way the most representative area with highest risk of pre- or cancerous changes, for biopsy specimen is indicated.

  7. A common variant in MTHFR influences response to chemoradiotherapy and recurrence of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nikas, Jason B; Lee, Janet T; Maring, Elizabeth D; Washechek-Aletto, Jill; Felmlee-Devine, Donna; Johnson, Ruth A; Smyrk, Thomas C; Tawadros, Patrick S; Boardman, Lisa A; Steer, Clifford J

    2015-01-01

    An important determinant of the pathogenesis and prognosis of various diseases is inherited genetic variation. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variations at a single base position, have been identified in both protein-coding and noncoding DNA sequences, but the vast majority of millions of those variants are far from being functionally understood. Here we show that a common variant in the gene MTHFR [rs1801133 (C>T)] not only influences response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer, but it also influences recurrence of the disease itself. More specifically, patients with the homozygous ancestral (wild type) genotype (C/C) were 2.91 times more likely (291% increased benefit) to respond to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy {95% CI: [1.23, 6.89]; P=0.0150} and 3.25 times more likely (325% increased benefit) not to experience recurrence of the disease {95% CI: [1.37, 7.72]; P=0.0079} than patients with either the heterozygous (C/T) or the homozygous mutation (T/T) genotype. These results identify MTHFR as an important genetic marker and open up new, pharmacogenomic strategies in the treatment and management of rectal cancer. PMID:26693073

  8. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genetic polymorphisms and toxicity to 5-FU-based chemoradiation in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, F; Motsinger-Reif, A A; Hoskins, J M; Dvorak, A; Roy, S; Alyasiri, A; Myerson, R J; Fleshman, J W; Tan, B R; McLeod, H L

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a large degree of variation in tumour response and host toxicities associated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. We performed a complimentary pharmacogenetic study to investigate germline polymorphisms of genes involved in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and irinotecan pathways and their potential association with clinical outcomes and toxicities from neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with rectal cancer treated in a prospective genotype-directed study. Methods: The germline DNA of 131 patients was genotyped for 10 variants in TYMS, MTHFR, DPYD, UGT1A1, ABCC1 and SLCO1B1 genes. Ninety-six patients were treated with 5-FU/radiotherapy (RT) and 35 received 5-FU/RT/irinotecan. Relationships between genetic variants and adverse events, tumour response, overall and disease-free survivals were assessed. Results: MTHFR 1298A>C and MTHFR diplotypes (for 677C>T and 1298A>C) were associated with chemoradiation-related toxicity when 5-FU was used alone. MTHFR haplotypes (677C–1298C) and diplotypes (CA–TA and TA–TA) showed, respectively, a protective and a negative effect on the incidence of severe diarrhoea or mucositis. No association was observed between genetic markers and drug response. Conclusion: MTHFR polymorphisms can potentially predict toxicity in patients treated with 5-FU as a single chemotherapeutic drug. PMID:22045187

  9. Evaluation of Rectal Dose During High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, Rajib Lochan; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri; Rao, Ramakrishna; Muralidhar, Kanaparthy R.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2011-01-01

    High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix often results in high doses being delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) such as the rectum and bladder. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine and closely monitor the dose delivered to these OARs. In this study, we measured the dose delivered to the rectum by intracavitary applications and compared this measured dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectal reference point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). To measure the dose, we inserted a miniature (0.1 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber into the rectum of 86 patients undergoing radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. The response of the miniature chamber modified by 3 thin lead marker rings for identification purposes during imaging was also characterized. The difference between the TPS-calculated maximum dose and the measured dose was <5% in 52 patients, 5-10% in 26 patients, and 10-14% in 8 patients. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured dose. Our study indicates that it is possible to measure the rectal dose for cervical carcinoma patients undergoing HDR-ICBT. We also conclude that the dose delivered to the rectum can be reasonably predicted by the TPS-calculated dose.

  10. Current status of robotic surgery for rectal cancer: A bird's eye view

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Ajit; Melich, George; Marecik, Slawomir J; Park, John J; Prasad, Leela M

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for rectal cancer is now widely performed via the laparoscopic approach and has been validated in randomized controlled trials to be oncologically safe with better perioperative outcomes than open surgery including shorter length of stay, earlier return of bowel function, better cosmesis, and less analgesic requirement. Laparoscopic surgery, however, has inherent limitations due to two-dimensional vision, restricted instrument motion and a very long learning curve. Robotic surgery with its superb three-dimensional magnified optics, stable retraction platform and 7 degrees of freedom of instrument movement offers significant benefits during Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) including ease of operation, markedly lower conversion rates and better quality of the specimen in addition to shorter (steeper) learning curves. This review summarizes the current evidence for the adoption of robotic TME for rectal cancer with supporting data from the literature and from the authors’ own experience. All relevant articles from PubMed using the search terms listed below and published between 2000 and 2014 including randomized trials, meta-analyses, prospective studies, and retrospective reviews with substantial numbers were included. PMID:25598596

  11. Introduction Business Administration

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    26 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Business Administration The predecessor of the School of BusinessAdministration, Kobe University, wasfoundedin1902as. The School of Business Administration, Kobe University has developed into a leading institution of business

  12. Assessing correlations between the spatial distribution of the dose to the rectal wall and late rectal toxicity after prostate radiotherapy: an analysis of data from the MRC RT01 trial (ISRCTN 47772397)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Webb, Steve; Sydes, Matthew R.; Dearnaley, David P.; Partridge, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Many studies have been performed to assess correlations between measures derived from dose-volume histograms and late rectal toxicities for radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to quantify correlations between measures describing the shape and location of the dose distribution and different outcomes. The dose to the rectal wall was projected on a two-dimensional map. In order to characterize the dose distribution, its centre of mass, longitudinal and lateral extent, and eccentricity were calculated at different dose levels. Furthermore, the dose-surface histogram (DSH) was determined. Correlations between these measures and seven clinically relevant rectal-toxicity endpoints were quantified by maximally selected standardized Wilcoxon rank statistics. The analysis was performed using data from the RT01 prostate radiotherapy trial. For some endpoints, the shape of the dose distribution is more strongly correlated with the outcome than simple DSHs. Rectal bleeding was most strongly correlated with the lateral extent of the dose distribution. For loose stools, the strongest correlations were found for longitudinal extent; proctitis was most strongly correlated with DSH. For the other endpoints no statistically significant correlations could be found. The strengths of the correlations between the shape of the dose distribution and outcome differed considerably between the different endpoints. Due to these significant correlations, it is desirable to use shape-based tools in order to assess the quality of a dose distribution.

  13. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Updated Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Combined Modality Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Paulus, Rebecca; Mitchell, Edith; Hanna, Nader; Yuen, Albert; Nichols, Romaine; Yalavarthi, Salochna; Hayostek, Cherie; Willett, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 2 different approaches to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for distal rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: One hundred six patients with T3/T4 distal rectal cancers were randomized in a phase 2 study. Patients received either continuous venous infusion (CVI) of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week plus pelvic hyperfractionated radiation (HRT), 45.6 Gy at 1.2 Gy twice daily plus a boost of 9.6 to 14.4 Gy for T3 or T4 cancers (Arm 1), or CVI of 5-FU, 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, Monday to Friday, plus irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly × 4, plus pelvic radiation therapy (RT), 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day and a boost of 5.4 Gy for T3 and 9 Gy for T4 cancers (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4 to 10 weeks later. Results: All eligible patients (n=103) are included in this analysis; 2 ineligible patients were excluded, and 1 patient withdrew consent. Ninety-eight of 103 patients (95%) underwent resection. Four patients did not undergo surgery for either disease progression or patient refusal, and 1 patient died during induction chemotherapy. The median time of follow-up was 6.4 years in Arm 1 and 7.0 years in Arm 2. The pathological complete response (pCR) rates were 30% in Arm 1 and 26% in Arm 2. Locoregional recurrence rates were 16% in Arm 1 and 17% in Arm 2. Five-year survival rates were 61% and 75% and Disease-specific survival rates were 78% and 85% for Arm1 and Arm 2, respectively. Five second primaries occurred in patients on Arm 1, and 1 second primary occurred in Arm 2. Conclusions: High rates of disease-specific survival were seen in each arm. Overall survival appears affected by the development of unrelated second cancers. The high pCR rates with 5-FU and higher dose radiation in T4 cancers provide opportunity for increased R0 resections and improved survival.

  14. High preoperative serum globulin in rectal cancer treated with neoadjunctive chemoradiation therapy is a risk factor for poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingguo; Meng, Xianke; Liang, Lei; Xu, Ye; Cai, Guoxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    An elevated serum albumin (ALB) and albumin/globulin ratio (AGR) has been reported to be associated with a favorable prognosis for certain malignancies; however, little is known about the prognostic significance of globulin (GLB) in rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether GLB analysis could predict the prognosis of patients received NCRT. A retrospective cohort of 293 locally advanced rectal cancer patients receiving NCRT followed by radical surgery was recruited between January 2006 and December 2012 at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Levels for preoperative GLB and ALB were obtained and used to calculate the AGR. Survival analysis was used to evaluate the predictive value of GLB. X-tile program determined 28.50, 36.20 and 1.20 as optimal cut-off value for GLB, ALB and AGR in terms of survival. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that low GLB levels were significantly associated with favorable rectal cancer-specific survival (RCSS) (P < 0.05). Conversely, low ALB levels were associated with a significantly worse RCSS (P = 0.010). Collectively, high preoperative GLB level was a significantly unfavorable factor for rectal cancer patients treated with NCRT. This easily obtained variable may serve as a valuable marker to predict the outcomes of such patient population. PMID:26609491

  15. Gastric inhibitory peptide, serotonin, and glucagon are unexpected chloride secretagogues in the rectal gland of the skate (Leucoraja erinacea)

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Catherine A.; Decker, Sarah E.; Silva, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the rectal gland of the dogfish shark 50 years ago, experiments with this tissue have greatly aided our understanding of secondary active chloride secretion and the secretagogues responsible for this function. In contrast, very little is known about the rectal gland of skates. In the present experiments, we performed the first studies in the perfused rectal gland of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), an organ weighing less than one-tenth of the shark rectal gland. Our results indicate that the skate gland can be studied by modified perfusion techniques and in primary culture monolayers, and that secretion is blocked by the inhibitors of membrane proteins required for secondary active chloride secretion. Our major finding is that three G protein-coupled receptor agonists, the incretin gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), also known as glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, as well as glucagon and serotonin, are unexpected potent chloride secretagogues in the skate but not the shark. Glucagon stimulated chloride secretion to a mean value of 1,661 ± 587 ?eq·h?1·g?1 and serotonin stimulated to 2,893 ± 699 ?eq·h?1·g?1. GIP stimulated chloride secretion to 3,733 ± 679 ?eq·h?1·g?1 and significantly increased tissue cAMP content compared with basal conditions. This is the first report of GIP functioning as a chloride secretagogue in any species or tissue. PMID:24553297

  16. Prevalence of rectal colonization with multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae among international patients hospitalized at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Vasoo, Shawn; Madigan, Theresa; Cunningham, Scott A; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Porter, Stephen B; Johnston, Brian; Sampathkumar, Priya; Tosh, Pritish K; Johnson, James R; Patel, Robin; Banerjee, Ritu

    2014-02-01

    Rectal colonization with multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae was found in 23 of 94 consecutively enrolled international patients hospitalized at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. No carbapenemase producers were detected. Twenty-one isolates were extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. Colonization was associated with gastrointestinal disease and central venous catheter placement within the antecedent year. PMID:24442082

  17. The elasmobranch rectal gland secretes a plasma-hypertonic solution that is generally considered to play a major role in

    E-print Network

    Evans, David H.

    scyliorhinin II (Anderson et al., 1995). At least in S. acanthias, natriuretic peptides (NPs) enhance gland constriction. Subsequent addition of porcine C-type natriuretic peptide dilated the rings, but two prostanoids peptide (VIP) was a potent secretagogue for the isolated, perfused rectal gland of S. acanthias (Stoff et

  18. Comparing Transcervical Intrauterine Lidocaine Instillation with Rectal Diclofenac for Pain Relief During Outpatient Hysteroscopy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Sussan S.; Abdi, Mina; Movafegh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There are a number of potential advantages to performing hysteroscopy in an outpatient setting. However, the ideal approach, using local uterine anesthesia or rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, has not been determined. Our objective was to compare the efficacy of intrauterine lidocaine instillation with rectal diclofenac for pain relief during diagnostic hysteroscopy. Methods We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled trial on 70 nulliparous women with primary infertility undergoing diagnostic hysteroscopy. Subjects were assigned into one of two groups to receive either 100mg of rectal diclofenac or 5mL of 2% intrauterine lidocaine. The intensity of pain was measured by a numeric rating scale 0–10. Pain scoring was performed during insertion of the hysteroscope, during visualization of the intrauterine cavity, and during extrusion of the hysteroscope. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to the mean pain score during intrauterine visualization (p=0.500). The mean pain score was significantly lower during insertion and extrusion of the hysteroscope in the diclofenac group (p=0.001 and p=0.030, respectively). Nine patients in the lidocaine group and five patients in diclofenac group needed supplementary intravenous propofol injection for sedation (p=0.060). Conclusions Rectal diclofenac appears to be more effective than intrauterine lidocaine in reducing pain during insertion and extrusion of hysteroscope, but there are no significant statistical and clinical differences between the two methods with regard to the mean pain score during intrauterine inspection. PMID:26171120

  19. Gastric inhibitory peptide, serotonin, and glucagon are unexpected chloride secretagogues in the rectal gland of the skate (Leucoraja erinacea).

    PubMed

    Kelley, Catherine A; Decker, Sarah E; Silva, Patricio; Forrest, John N

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery of the rectal gland of the dogfish shark 50 years ago, experiments with this tissue have greatly aided our understanding of secondary active chloride secretion and the secretagogues responsible for this function. In contrast, very little is known about the rectal gland of skates. In the present experiments, we performed the first studies in the perfused rectal gland of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), an organ weighing less than one-tenth of the shark rectal gland. Our results indicate that the skate gland can be studied by modified perfusion techniques and in primary culture monolayers, and that secretion is blocked by the inhibitors of membrane proteins required for secondary active chloride secretion. Our major finding is that three G protein-coupled receptor agonists, the incretin gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), also known as glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, as well as glucagon and serotonin, are unexpected potent chloride secretagogues in the skate but not the shark. Glucagon stimulated chloride secretion to a mean value of 1,661 ± 587 ?eq·h(-1)·g(-1) and serotonin stimulated to 2,893 ± 699 ?eq·h(-1)·g(-1). GIP stimulated chloride secretion to 3,733 ± 679 ?eq·h(-1)·g(-1) and significantly increased tissue cAMP content compared with basal conditions. This is the first report of GIP functioning as a chloride secretagogue in any species or tissue. PMID:24553297

  20. Relationships Between Temperament and Transportation With Rectal Temperature and Serum Concentrations of Cortisol and Epinephrine in Bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated whether temperament influences rectal temperature and serum concentrations of cortisol and epinephrine in response to transportation. Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score (average of exit velocity, EV, and pen score, PS) measured 28 days prior to weaning wit...

  1. Near-infrared laparoscopic fluorescence for pelvic side wall delta mapping in patients with rectal cancer- 'PINPOINT' nodal assessment.

    PubMed

    Kazanowski, M; Al Furajii, H; Cahill, R A

    2015-10-01

    Low rectal cancers metastase lymphatically to the pelvic side wall in addition to cephalad spread alongside the superior rectal/inferior mesenteric arterial axis. Radical surgery in the West has focused resectional intent and effort on the midline en bloc oncological package by Total Mesorectal Excision. While neoadjuvant chemo/radiotherapy (now often administered to patients with radiologically locally advanced cancer) may contribute significant therapeutic effect to the lateral pelvic side walls, many patients with earlier preoperative stage low rectal cancer are offered surgery first (and indeed solely). Furthermore, some of those pretreated may have residual in situ lateral nodal disease and so risk understaging and undertreatment. Routine extended lymphadenectomy is on the otherhand unproven with respect to survival benefit and has likely no added role in the absence of definite (rather than possible) side-wall involvement. Near-infrared fluorescence pelvic side-wall delta mapping, as illustrated here in five patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer after neoadjuvant therapy, may give the technological capacity to identify tumor site-draining nodes on the pelvic side and the focus the operating surgeon on this potential target for surgical resection (whether by berry picking or nerve sparing clearance) and prompt individualized diagnostic and therapeutic selection. PMID:26394741

  2. SU-E-J-93: Parametrisation of Dose to the Mucosa of the Anterior Rectal Wall in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Aitkenhead, A; Hamlett, L; Wood, D; Choudhury, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of the prostate, radiation is delivered from a number of radioactive sources which are inserted via catheter into the target volume. The rectal mucosa also receives dose during the treatment, which may lead to late toxicity effects. To allow possible links between rectal dose and toxicity to be investigated, suitable methods of parametrising the rectal dose are needed. Methods: During treatment of a series of 95 patients, anatomy and catheter locations were monitored by transrectal ultrasound, and target volume positions were contoured on the ultrasound scan by the therapist. The anterior rectal mucosal wall was identified by contouring the transrectal ultrasound balloon within the ultrasound scan. Source positions and dwell times, along with the dose delivered to the patient were computed using the Oncentra Prostate treatment planning system (TPS). Data for the series of patients were exported from the TPS in Dicom format, and a series of parametrisation methods were developed in a Matlab environment to assess the rectal dose. Results: Contours of the anterior rectal mucosa were voxelised within Matlab to allow the dose to the rectal mucosa to be analysed directly from the 3D dose grid. Dose parametrisations based on dose-surface (DSH) and dose-line (DLH) histograms were obtained. Both lateral and longitudinal extents of the mucosal dose were parametrised using dose-line histograms in the relevant directions. Conclusion: We have developed a series of dose parametrisations for quantifying the dose to the rectal mucosa during HDR prostate brachytherapy which are suitable for future studies investigating potential associations between mucosal dose and late toxicity effects. The geometry of the transrectal probe standardises the rectal anatomy, making this treatment technique particularly suited to studies of this nature.

  3. Association Between the Cytogenetic Profile of Tumor Cells and Response to Preoperative Radiochemotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    González-González, María; Garcia, Jacinto; Alcazar, José A.; Gutiérrez, María L.; Gónzalez, Luis M.; Bengoechea, Oscar; Abad, María M.; Santos-Briz, Angel; Blanco, Oscar; Martín, Manuela; Rodríguez, Ana; Fuentes, Manuel; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luis; Orfao, Alberto; Sayagues, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy to locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients has proven efficient in a high percentage of cases. Despite this, some patients show nonresponse or even disease progression. Recent studies suggest that different genetic alterations may be associated with sensitivity versus resistance of rectal cancer tumor cells to neoadjuvant therapy. We investigated the relationship between intratumoral pathways of clonal evolution as assessed by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (51 different probes) and response to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, evaluated by Dworak criteria in 45 rectal cancer tumors before (n?=?45) and after (n?=?31) treatment. Losses of chromosomes 1p (44%), 8p (53%), 17p (47%), and 18q (38%) and gains of 1q (49%) and 13q (75%) as well as amplification of 8q (38%) and 20q (47%) chromosomal regions were those specific alterations found at higher frequencies. Significant association (P?rectal cancer samples. Our results point out the existence of an association between tumor cytogenetics and response to neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. Further studies in larger series of patients are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:25474426

  4. A prospective study of local recurrence after resection and low stapled anastomosis in 183 patients with rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rubbini, M; Vettorello, G F; Guerrera, C; Mari, C; De Anna, D; Mascoli, F; Pozza, E; Gasbarro, V; Donini, I

    1990-02-01

    Local recurrence is the most serious complication of anterior resection for rectal cancer, usually occurring during the first two years after surgery. Over a five-year period, from 1981 to 1986, 183 patients underwent anterior resection for rectal carcinoma at the Surgery Ward of the University of Ferrara. Patients were followed for two years postoperatively. All operations were performed with staplers and classified according to Dukes, with 43 cases of Dukes' A; 83 cases of Dukes' B; and 57 cases of Dukes' C. In the first 24 months after surgery, the tumor recurred locally in 44 of the 183 patients (24 percent). Dukes' stage, grading distal resection margin, and histopathologic differentiation of the distal rectal ring left in the stapler after anastomosis were assessed to determine a prognostic indicator for the recurrence of the tumor. The stage:recurrence ratio was as follows: A, 1 (2 percent); B, 21 (25 percent); and C, 22 (39 percent). The grading:recurrence ratio was: G1, 13:51 (25 percent); G2, 24:110 (22 percent); and G3, 7:22 (32 percent). The ratio between distal rectal resection margin and recurrence was: 0 to 2 cm, 15:27 (56 percent); 2 to 4 cm, 16:74 (22 percent); and over 4 cm, 13:82 (15 percent). Histopathologic examination of the distal rectal ring was negative for all patients. These data confirm the direct relationship between class and local recurrence and indicate histologic grade and distal resection margin as significant prognostic parameters only when interpreted in the light of staging. PMID:2298097

  5. Risk factors for rectal lymphogranuloma venereum in gay men: results of a multicentre case-control study in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, N; Sullivan, A K; French, P; White, J A; Dean, G; Smith, A; Winter, A J; Alexander, S; Ison, C; Ward, H

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for rectal lymphogranuloma venereum (rLGV) in men who have sex with men (MSM). Design A case-control study at 6 UK hospitals compared MSM with rLGV (cases) with rLGV-negative controls: MSM without potential rLGV symptoms (CGa) and separately, MSM with such symptoms (CGs). Methods Between 2008 and 2010, there were 90 rLGV cases, 74 CGa and 69 CGs recruited. Lifestyles and sexual behaviours in the previous 3?months were reported using internet-based computer-assisted self-interviews. Logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with rLGV. Results Cases were significantly more likely to be HIV-positive (89%) compared with CGa (46%) and CGs (64%). Independent behavioural risks for rLGV were: unprotected receptive anal intercourse (adjusted OR (AOR)10.7, 95% CI 3.5 to 32.8), fisting another (AOR=6.7, CI 1.8 to 25.3), sex under the influence of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (AOR=3.1, CI 1.3 to 7.4) and anonymous sexual contacts (AOR=2.7, CI 1.2 to 6.3), compared with CGa; unprotected insertive anal intercourse (AOR=4.7, CI 2.0 to 10.9) and rectal douching (AOR=2.9 CI 1.3 to 6.6), compared with CGs. An incubation period from exposure to symptoms of 30?days was indicated. Conclusions Unprotected receptive anal intercourse is a key risk factor for rectal LGV with the likelihood that rectal-to-rectal transmission is facilitated where insertive anal sex also occurs. The association between HIV and rLGV appears linked to HIV-positive men seeking unprotected sex with others with the same HIV status, sexual and drug interests. Such men should be targeted for frequent STI screening and interventions to minimise associated risks. PMID:24493859

  6. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors Associated With the Nonreversal Ileostomy Following Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Gil Jae; Park, Sung Won; Lee, Won-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A loop ileostomy is used to protect an anastomosis after anal sphincter-preserving surgery, especially in patients with low rectal cancer, but little information is available concerning risk factors associated with a nonreversal ileostomy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors of ileostomy nonreversibility after a sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. Methods Six hundred seventy-nine (679) patients with rectal cancer who underwent sphincter-preserving surgery between January 2004 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 679, 135 (19.9%) underwent a defunctioning loop ileostomy of temporary intent, and these patients were divided into two groups, that is, a reversal group (RG, 112 patients) and a nonreversal group (NRG, 23 patients) according to the reversibility of the ileostomy. Results In 23 of the 135 rectal cancer patients (17.0%) that underwent a diverting ileostomy, stoma reversal was not possible for the following reasons; stage IV rectal cancer (11, 47.8%), poor tone of the anal sphincter (4, 17.4%), local recurrence (2, 8.7%), anastomotic leakage (1, 4.3%), radiation proctitis (1, 4.3%), and patient refusal (4, 17.4%). The independent risk factors of the nonreversal group were anastomotic leakage or fistula, stage IV cancer, local recurrence, and comorbidity. Conclusion Postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage or fistula, advanced primary disease (stage IV), local recurrence and comorbidity were identified as risk factors of a nonreversal ileostomy. These factors should be considered when drafting prudential guidelines for ileostomy closure. PMID:26161377

  7. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluation of the circumferential resection margin (CRM), the depth of tumor spread beyond the muscularis propria, extramural vascular invasion and nodal status is of the utmost importance. Low rectal tumors represent a special challenge for the MDT, because decisions seek a balance between oncologic safety, in the pursuit of free resection margins, and the patient’s quality of life, in order to preserve sphincter function. At present, the exchange of information between the different specialties involved in dealing with patients with rectal cancer can rank the contribution of colleagues, auditing their work and incorporating knowledge that will lead to a better understanding of the pathology. Thus, beyond the anatomic description of the images, the radiologist’s role in the MDT makes it necessary to know the prognostic value of the findings that we describe, in terms of recurrence and survival, because these findings affect decision making and, therefore, the patients’ life. In this review, the usefulness of HR MRI in the initial staging of rectal cancer and in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment, with a focus on the prognostic value of the findings, is described as well as the contribution of HR MRI in assessing patients with suspected or confirmed recurrence of rectal cancer. PMID:23876415

  8. Laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer: Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis on clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Kang; Chen, Nan-Zheng; Zheng, Jian-Bao; He, Sai; Sun, Xue-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the main malignant tumors threatening human health. Surgery plays a pivotal role in treating colorectal cancer. The present study aimed to compare the clinical effect in patients with rectal cancer undergoing laparoscopic versus open surgery by meta-analysis of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the past 20 years. The data showed that 14 RCTs comparing laparoscopic surgery with conventional open surgery for rectal cancer matched the selection criteria and reported on 2,114 subjects, of whom 1,111 underwent laparoscopic surgery and 1,003 underwent open surgery for rectal cancer. Blood loss (P<0.00001), days to passage of flatus (P=0.0003), first bowel movement (P=0.0006), fluids intake (P<0.00001), walking independently (P<0.00001), length of hospital duration (P=0.003) and the rate of wound infection (P=0.04) were all significantly reduced following laparoscopic surgery. The incidence of complications, such as ureteric injury (P=0.33), urinary retention (P=0.43), ileus (P=0.05), anastomotic leakage (P=0.09) and incisional hernia (P=0.88), were not significantly different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in lymph nodes harvested (P=0.88), length of specimen (P=0.60), circumferential resection margin (CRM) (P=0.86), regional recurrence ((P=0.08), port site or wound metastasis (P=0.67), distant metastasis (P=0.12), 3-year overall survival (OS) (P=0.42), 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.44), 5-year OS (P=0.60) and 5-year DFS (P=0.70). Therefore, laparoscopy for the treatment of patients with rectal cancer has the advantage of recovery and the same complications and prognosis as laparotomy, which indicates that laparoscopy may provide a potential survival benefit for patients with rectal cancer. PMID:25279204

  9. Prevalence of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria on Rectal Swabs and Factors Affecting Resistance to Antibiotics in Patients Undergoing Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Beom; Hwang, Eu Chang; Kwon, Dong Deuk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria on rectal swabs in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy and the factors affecting resistance to antibiotics were evaluated. Materials and Methods Two hundred twenty-three men who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from November 2011 to December 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. Rectal swabs were cultured on MacConkey agar to identify antibiotic-resistant bacteria in rectal flora before TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. All patients were admitted and received intravenous antibiotics before prostate biopsy. Clinical variables including underlying disease, infectious complications, and antibiotics associated with resistance were evaluated. Logistic regression was used to determine the factors influencing antibiotic resistance. Results Of the 233 patients, 161 had positive rectal cultures. Escherichia coli was cultured in 130 (80.7%) and Klebsiella pneumonia in 16 (9.9%). The prevalence of quinolone resistance was 16.8% and the prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positivity was 9.3%. A previous history of prostatitis was correlated with quinolone resistance and ESBL positivity (both p=0.001). The factors affecting quinolone resistance in the univariate analysis were a previous history of prostatitis (p=0.003) and previous exposure to antibiotics (p=0.040). Only a previous history of prostatitis was statistically significant in the multivariate analysis (p=0.014). Four patients had infectious complications. Conclusions The prevalence of quinolone resistance was 16.8% in rectal swabs performed before TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. A previous history of prostatitis was influential. In patients with a history of prostatitis, selection of prophylactic antibiotics before the biopsy may be reconsidered. PMID:24648876

  10. Endoluminal Negative-Pressure Therapy for Preventing Rectal Anastomotic Leaks: A Pilot Study in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Laura H.; Mentrikoski, Mark J.; Silva, Michael A.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Kleiner, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Anastomotic leak after rectal resection carries substantial morbidity and mortality. A diverting ileostomy is beneficial for high-risk anastomoses, but its creation and reversal carry a surgical risk in addition to that of resection itself. We sought an alternative method for managing complications of rectal anastomosis. Methods: We developed an endoluminal negative-pressure technology with a diverting proximal sump, and hypothesized that it would close anastomotic disruptions in pigs. We performed rectal resections on pigs, with primary anastomoses and the creation of an anastomotic defect. In animals in the treatment group we inserted an endoluminal negative-pressure device and kept it at a low level of continuous suction for 5 d. No device was inserted in a control group of animals. After the 5-d period of treatment we evaluated the anastomoses in both the treatment and control groups of animals for leakage, using contrast enemas. Specimens of anastomosed rectum were evaluated histologically for mucosal integrity and for the location and density of inflammatory responses. Results: Fourteen pigs were assigned to either the treatment (n=10) or control (n=4) group. Of the pigs in the treatment group, 90% had complete closure of their rectal defect, as compared with 25% of the animals in the control group (?2 test, p=0.04). The animals in the treatment group had only minimal mucosal and serosal inflammation, whereas those in the control group had extensive mucosal damage with associated serositis. Conclusions: Endoluminal negative-pressure therapy was well-tolerated and led to successful closure of 90% of the anastomic rectal defects in the treatment group of animals in the present study. Additional evaluation of this therapy is warranted. PMID:24476015

  11. Evaluation of Clinical Outcomes after Abdominal Rectopexy and Delorme’s Procedure for Rectal Prolapse: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Makineni, Hemanth; Rai, B.K. Shivprasad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Complete rectal prolapse is characterized by protrusion of full thickness rectal wall through the anal orifice. Despite its rarity more than 100 surgical procedures have been described and there are no good evidence based recommendations for selection of a surgical procedure. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of commonly used procedures for rectal prolapse at our hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty seven patients presenting with complete rectal prolapse between May 2011 to May 2013 were included in this prospective study. Patients underwent either Abdominal rectopexy or Delorme’s procedure after evaluation, based on clinical judgment of experienced surgeons. Patient characteristics, complications, post-operative length of hospitalization and clinical outcomes were assessed. Patients were followed up for a mean duration of 14 months. Results: Seventeen patients underwent Abdominal rectopexy (Posterior mesh rectopexy), ten patients underwent Delorme’s procedure. No postoperative mortalities or major complications were noted. Post operative morbidity (minor) was 17% in Abdominal rectopexy group and 10% in Delormes group 0%. Incontinence improved in all six patients (100%) in rectopexy group, four patients (80%) in Delorme’s procedure group. Two patients (11%) in rectopexy group reported increase in constipation post operatively. There was one recurrence in Delorme’s procedure group with no recurrences in Abdominal rectopexy group. Conclusion: The treatment of rectal prolapse should be individualized to achieve best results. Abdominal rectopexy can be safely applied in most of patients with minimal post operative increase in constipation and recurrence by using posterior mesh rectopexy technique. Delorme’s procedure can be performed with minimal morbidity and shorter hospital stay and good functional results with acceptable recurrence rate. Delorme’s can be considered as an alternative to rectopexy not only in patients unfit for laparotomy but also in individuals with a short prolpase, avoiding a laparotomy. PMID:24995208

  12. Laparoscopic resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis without abdominal incisions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Yong; Chen, Gang; Du, Jun-Feng; Chen, Guang; Wei, Xiao-Jun; Cui, Wei; Zuo, Fu-Yi; Yu, Bo; Dong, Xing; Ji, Xi-Qing; Yuan, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess laparoscopic radical resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. METHODS: From March 2010 to June 2014, 30 patients (14 men and 16 women, aged 36-78 years, mean age 59.8 years) underwent laparoscopic radical resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis through anus-preserving transanal resection. The tumors were 5-7 cm away from the anal margin in 24 cases, and 4 cm in six cases. In preoperative assessment, there were 21 cases of T1N0M0 and nine of T2N0M0. Through the middle approach, the sigmoid mesentery was freed at the root with an ultrasonic scalpel and the roots of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein were dissected, clamped and cut. Following the total mesorectal excision principle, the rectum was separated until the anorectal ring reached 3-5 cm from the distal end of the tumor. For perineal surgery, a ring incision was made 2 cm above the dentate line, and sharp dissection was performed submucosally towards the superior direction, until the plane of the levator ani muscle, to transect the rectum. The rectum and distal sigmoid colon were removed together from the anus, followed by a telescopic anastomosis between the full thickness of the proximal colon and the mucosa and submucosal tissue of the rectum. RESULTS: For the present cohort of 30 cases, the mean operative time was 178 min, with an average of 13 positive lymph nodes detected. One case of postoperative anastomotic leak was observed, requiring temporary colostomy, which was closed and recovered 3 mo later. The postoperative pathology showed T1-T2N0M0 in 19 cases and T2N1M0 in 11 cases. Twelve months after surgery, 94.4% patients achieved anal function Kirwan grade 1, indicating that their anal function returned to normal. The patients were followed up for 1-36 mo, with an average of 23 mo. There was no local recurrence, and 17 patients survived for > 3 years (with a survival rate of 100%). CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic radical resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis through transanal resection without abdominal incisions is safe and feasible. PMID:25945011

  13. Adjuvant versus neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in distal rectal cancer: Comparison of two decades in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, Baha; Uslu, Adam; Ad?belli, Zehra; Yeti?, Halit; Cengiz, Fevzi; Aykas, Ahmet; ?im?ek, Cenk; Akp?nar, Göksever; Eliyatk?n, Nuket; Duran, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Standard surgery alone was not able to decrease local recurrence (LR) rate below 20% in rectal cancer treatment. Thus, many centers administered neoadjuvant radiotherapy (preopRTx) with or without concomitant chemotherapy for the prevention of LR. In this study, the results of 164 consecutive patients with mid- and distal rectal cancer who received surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (Group A) or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (Group NA) followed by surgery are presented. Material and Methods: The staging system used in this study is that of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), also known as the TNM system. Eligible patients were required to have radiologically assessed stage 1 (only T2N0M0) to stage 3C (T4bN1-2M0) tumor with pathologically confirmed R0 resection. The surgical method was total mesorectal excision (TME). Radiotherapy was applied with daily 180 cGy fractions for 28 consecutive days. Chemo-therapy comprised 5-fluorouracil (450 mg/m2/d) and leucovorin (20 mg/m2/d) bolus at days 1–5 and 29–33. Results: Nine patients (13%) in Group NA achieved pathologic complete response (pCR). In Group NA and Group A, locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates were 6.7% and 30.8%, (p<0.001), the mean LR-free survival was 190.0±7.3 months and 148.0±11.7 months (p=0.002) and the mean overall survival (OS) was 119.2±15.3 months and 103.0±9.4 months (p=0.23), respectively. A significant difference with regard to LR has been obtained with a statistical power of 0.92. Secondary outcome measures (DFS and OS) have not been met. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with TME is an efficient treatment protocol, particularly for the treatment of magnetic resonance imaging-staged 2A to 3C patients with two or three distal rectal adenocarcinomas. Given that a considerable proportion of patients with cT2N0M0 would develop pCR, this method of treatment can be considered for further studies. PMID:26668530

  14. Drug Allergy and the Risk of Lymph Node Metastasis in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chun; Li, Jing-Tao; Fang, Long; Xu, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Hong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous epidemiologic studies have reported that a history of allergy is associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and other malignancies. However, no information is available for the association between allergy and the risk of lymph node metastasis. Our study was designed to determine this association in rectal cancer. Methods Patients who were treated at our hospital in the period from January 2003 to June 2011, and with a pathologically hospital discharge diagnosis of rectal adencarcinoma, were included. The clinical, laboratory, and pathologic parameters were analyzed. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the association. Moreover, for type of allergic drug, sub-group analysis was performed. Results 469 patients were included, including 231 with pathological lymph node metastasis (pLNM) (49.3%) and 238 without pLNM. Univariate analysis showed, compared with patients without pLNM, patients with pLNM had a younger age (60.6±12.8 yr vs. 63.6±12.2 yr, P?=?0.012), a lower percentage of drug allergy (8.7% vs. 16.0%, P?=?0.016), an increased CEA (median/interquartile-range 5.40/2.40–13.95 vs. 3.50/2.08–8.67, P?=?0.009), and a lower serum sodium (141±3.1 mmol/L vs. 142±2.9 mmol/L, P?=?0.028). Multivariate analysis showed that drug allergy was associated with a reduced risk of pLNM (OR?=?0.553; 95% CI, 0.308–0.994; P?=?0.048). In addition, our results showed that: (1) for tumor classification, patients with drug allergy had a higher percentage of group patients with pT1/pT2; and (2) for type of allergic drug, this inverse association was found for penicillins, not for other allergic drugs. Conclusion Drug allergy is associated with a reduced risk of pLNM in rectal cancer. PMID:25162236

  15. Surgical Margins and Short-Term Results of Laparoscopic Total Mesorectal Excision for Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingqiang; Xiu, Peng; Qi, Xiaolong; Yi, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The confines of the narrow bony pelvis make laparoscopic surgery more challenging in the treatment of low rectal cancer. Macroscopic evaluation of the completeness of the mesorectum provides detailed information about the quality of surgery. This study was performed to observe the short-term outcomes and evaluate the macroscopic quality of specimens acquired from laparoscopic total mesorectal excision versus open total mesorectal excision in patients with low rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 177 patients with low rectal cancer underwent total mesorectal excision by either a laparoscopic (n = 87) or open (n = 90) approach. In all cases the surgical time, blood loss, intraoperative and postoperative complications, postoperative bowel opening, and hospital stay were assessed. Special attention was given to the macroscopic judgment concerning the cut edge of peritoneal reflection, Denonvilliers fascia, completeness of the mesorectum, and bowel wall below the mesorectum. Results: The surgical time was 160 ± 40 minutes in the laparoscopic group. It was not significantly different from that in the open group (P = .782). The operative blood loss was 28 ± 5 mL in the group undergoing laparoscopic surgery and 80 ± 20 mL in the group undergoing open surgery (P < .01). Intraoperative injuries to the pelvic autonomic nervous system were recorded in 4 cases in the laparoscopic group compared with 12 cases in the open group (P < .05). The incidences of chest infection and anastomotic leakage were similar between the 2 approaches. The postoperative bowel opening time was 2.1 ± 1.5 days in the laparoscopic group and 3.5 ± 1.6 days in the open group (P < .01), whereas the hospital stay was 5.2 ± 1.8 days and 7.0 ± 2.1 days, respectively (P < .01). Intact Denonvilliers fascia and complete total mesorectal excision were more likely to be achieved by the laparoscopic approach than the open approach (P < .01). Colorectal anastomoses were located significantly lower in the laparoscopic group than in the open group (P < .01). Conclusion: Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision has consistent advantages over open total mesorectal excision, including similar surgical time, less blood loss, reduced hospital stay, and shorter disability period. A complete macroscopic specimen is more likely to be acquired by laparoscopy because of the better pelvic view offered by the approach. PMID:23925014

  16. Rectal culture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2009:chap 180. Marrazzo JM, ... and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2009:chap 212. DuPont HL. ...

  17. Mesalamine Rectal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... firmly and tilt it slightly so that the nozzle is aimed toward your back. Squeeze the bottle ... severe or do not go away: leg or joint pain, aching, tightness or stiffness heartburn gas dizziness ...

  18. Rectal Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Things to avoid: irritating soaps and spicy foods/coffee. Sources of Dietary Fiber Sources of Fiber Serving ... powder. Eliminate irritating foods and beverages such as coffee, alcohol and spicy foods. GI Health Centers Colorectal ...

  19. Rectal Prolapse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Career Center Grants and Awards International and Travel Scholarships Suggestions on Grant Writing Members Member Resources My ... PROLAPSE Before considering surgery, a careful history and physical examination ... the science, prevention, and management of disorders and diseases of ...

  20. Hydromorphone Rectal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is in a class of medications called opiate (narcotic) analgesics. It works by changing the way the ... Aventyl, Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), and trimipramine (Surmontil); other narcotic medications for pain; medications for anxiety, seizures, mental ...

  1. Nasal, oral and rectal microbiota of Black lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysopygus)

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Vania M.; Vanstreels, Ralph E.T.; Paula, Cátia D.; Kolesnikovas, Cristiane K.M.; Ramos, Maria Christina C.; Coutinho, Selene D.; Martins, Cristiana S.; Pissinatti, Alcides; Catão-Dias, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Black lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysopygus) are endangered callithrichids. Their conservation may require future translocations or reintroductions; however these approaches involve risks of pathogen introduction in the environment and stress-related opportunistic infections in these animals. In order to screen for opportunistic and potential pathogenic bacterial and fungal microbiota, ten free-ranging and ten captive Black lion tamarins were studied and the results compared. Nasal, oral and rectal swabs were collected and cultured for aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria and fungi, and a total 203 bacterial and 84 fungal isolates were obtained. Overall, the most frequent organisms were Staphylococcus spp., Bacillus spp., Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. Microbiota of free-ranging and captive animals were similar in composition. A number of potentially pathogenic organisms were identified, emphasizing the importance of microbiological screening in future translocation or reintroduction conservation management programs. PMID:25763064

  2. Nasal, oral and rectal microbiota of Black lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysopygus).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Vania M; Vanstreels, Ralph E T; Paula, Cátia D; Kolesnikovas, Cristiane K M; Ramos, Maria Christina C; Coutinho, Selene D; Martins, Cristiana S; Pissinatti, Alcides; Catão-Dias, José L

    2014-01-01

    Black lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysopygus) are endangered callithrichids. Their conservation may require future translocations or reintroductions; however these approaches involve risks of pathogen introduction in the environment and stress-related opportunistic infections in these animals. In order to screen for opportunistic and potential pathogenic bacterial and fungal microbiota, ten free-ranging and ten captive Black lion tamarins were studied and the results compared. Nasal, oral and rectal swabs were collected and cultured for aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria and fungi, and a total 203 bacterial and 84 fungal isolates were obtained. Overall, the most frequent organisms were Staphylococcus spp., Bacillus spp., Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. Microbiota of free-ranging and captive animals were similar in composition. A number of potentially pathogenic organisms were identified, emphasizing the importance of microbiological screening in future translocation or reintroduction conservation management programs. PMID:25763064

  3. A rare clinical manifestation of rectal adenocarcinoma and synchronous scalp metastasis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Balta, Ahmet Ziya; Sücüllü, ?lker; Özdemir, Yavuz; Dandin, Özgür

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, our aim was to emphasize that cutaneous involvement can be seen at the time of diagnosis or during the clinical course of visceral organ cancers in general and in colorectal cancers particularly. We also aimed to demonstrate that cutaneous lesions occurring in patients under follow up for visceral organ cancers could be metastases. A rapid progressing scalp lesion was detected in a newly diagnosed rectal cancer patient and the tru-cut biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma metastasis. This patient died due to a myocardial infarction during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cutaneous metastatic lesions in colorectal cancers must be evaluated as a sign of advanced disease and treatment protocols should be determined accordingly. PMID:25931876

  4. A rare case of metachronous penile and urethral metastases from a rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Christodoulidou, Michelle; Sahdev, Varun; Muneer, Asif; Nigam, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic lesions in the penis are uncommon in patients with prostate or bladder cancer but penile metastatic lesions from rectal tumours are rare with only 65 cases reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 70-year-old man who developed metastatic lesions within his corpus cavernosum 2?years after being diagnosed and treated for a mucinous adenocarcinoma of the rectum and a year after a wedge resection of an isolated lung metastasis. He proceeded with total penectomy and intraoperatively two skip lesions were also found within the wall of his urethra; histological analysis proved that these were also metastatic lesions. A perineal urethrostomy was formed with the remaining macroscopically healthy urethra. He made a good recovery from his operation and continued his treatment under the oncology team. PMID:26546626

  5. Deep Endometriosis Induced Spontaneous Colon Rectal Perforation in Pregnancy: Laparoscopy Is Advanced Tool to Confirm Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Aurelio; Sartini, Annalisa; Garibaldi, Silvia; Cencini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis causes rare complications in pregnancy, such as obstetrical bleeding, preterm birth, spontaneous haemoperitoneum, and intestinal perforation. The prevalence of spontaneous perforation due to intestinal endometriosis is unknown in pregnancy. A recent review of the literature indicated 15 bowel complications caused by endometriosis during pregnancy or at the immediate postpartum period. The diagnosis of a bowel perforation can be difficult and in all of the cases reported necessitates an exploratory laparotomy. Anyway, in the majority of cases bowel perforation is not diagnosed during this laparotomy, and a repeat laparotomy is needed. Laparoscopy is being used increasingly in the diagnosis and operative management of acute abdomen. Laparoscopy can be a useful means of diagnosis and in addition a therapeutic tool in selected pregnant patients with abdominal pain. We report the first case of a pregnant woman with spontaneous double sigmoid and rectal perforation from decidualized endometriosis diagnosed by laparoscopy. PMID:25161788

  6. Effective treatment of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome using argon plasma coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Waniczek, Dariusz; Rdes, Jerzy; Piecuch, Jerzy; Rubicz, Nina; Arendt, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a chronic, multiform, non-cancerous disorder of the rectum, the final diagnosis of which is based upon histopathological criteria. This disorder is often accompanied by latent proctoptosis. We present a patient who (in 1996) was the first case in which argon plasma coagulation (APC) was used for SRUS treatment. In the years 2004–2005 the same patient underwent 15 APC sessions (at monthly intervals) obtaining full recovery from SRUS, although she had been treated unsuccessfully for 17 years prior to that. Six-year observation did not show any relapse. Local therapy with APC seems to be an important alternative in SRUS treatment without prolapse of the rectum and could become a basic method for bleeding treatment in SRUS. PMID:25276257

  7. High expression of the putative cancer stem cell marker, DCLK1, in rectal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    IKEZONO, YU; KOGA, HIRONORI; ABE, MITSUHIKO; AKIBA, JUN; KAWAHARA, AKIHIKO; YOSHIDA, TAKAFUMI; NAKAMURA, TORU; IWAMOTO, HIDEKI; YANO, HIROHISA; KAGE, MASAYOSHI; SATA, MICHIO; TSURUTA, OSAMU; TORIMURA, TAKUJI

    2015-01-01

    Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1), a microtubule-associated protein, is known to regulate neuronal differentiation, migration and neurogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that the protein is a putative marker for intestinal and pancreatic stem cells, including their cancer stem cell counterparts. The present study conducted immunohistochemical analyses for DCLK1 and the stemness marker, NANOG, in human intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), as their expression had not been previously investigated in these tumors. Eighteen patients with endoscopically resected rectal NETs were enrolled in the study. The mean age of the patients was 51 years old. The mean diameter of the resected tumors was 5.2 mm, and a histological diagnosis of NET grade G1 was formed for all tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed not only for DCLK1, but also for the known NET markers, synaptophysin, chromogranin A and cluster of differentiation (CD)56. The intensity and distribution of staining were scored on a scale of 0–3 and 0–2, respectively. The sum of the scores was calculated for each specimen. Co-expression of DCLK1 and NANOG was also examined. The mean scores for DCLK1 and synaptophysin were significantly higher than those for chromogranin A (P<0.0001) and CD56 (P<0.01). There were no significant differences in the scores between DCLK1 and synaptophysin or between chromogranin A and CD56. Notably, NANOG was expressed in high quantities in all the tumor tissues studied, showing clear co-expression with DCLK1. In conclusion, DCLK1 may be a novel marker for rectal NET, potentially indicating the presence of the stemness gene product, NANOG. PMID:26622789

  8. Apparent diffusion coefficient measurement covering complete tumor area better predicts rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Blaži?, Ivana; Maksimovi?, Ružica; Gaji?, Milan; Šaranovi?, ?or?ije

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the impact of two apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement techniques on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DW MRI) on the assessment of rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods ADC values were measured prospectively with two different techniques – the first, which measures ADCs in the most cellular tumor parts, and the second, which measures the entire tumor area, in 58 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer on pre-CRT and post-CRT image sets. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) and parameters of diagnostic accuracy were calculated for pre- and post-CRT ADC values and numeric and percent ADC change for each technique to determine their performance in tumor response evaluation using histopathological tumor-regression grade as the reference standard. Results The second technique yielded higher AUCs (0.935 vs 0.704, P?

  9. Biological Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Rectal Cancer: Challenges and Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Roels, Sarah; Slagmolen, Pieter; Lee, John A.; Loeckx, Dirk; Maes, Frederik; Stroobants, Sigrid; Ectors, Nadine; Penninckx, Freddy; Haustermans, Karin

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of integrating multiple imaging modalities for image-guided radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) were performed before, during, and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. The FDG-PET signals were segmented with an adaptive threshold-based and a gradient-based method. Magnetic resonance tumor volumes (TVs) were manually delineated. A nonrigid registration algorithm was applied to register the images, and mismatch analyses were carried out between MR and FDG-PET TVs and between TVs over time. Tumor volumes delineated on the images after CRT were compared with the pathologic TV. Results: Forty-five FDG-PET/CT and 45 MR images were analyzed from 15 patients. The mean MRI and FDG-PET TVs showed a tendency to shrink during and after CRT. In general, MRI showed larger TVs than FDG-PET. There was an approximately 50% mismatch between the FDG-PET TV and the MRI TV at baseline and during CRT. Sixty-one percent of the FDG-PET TV and 76% of the MRI TV obtained after 10 fractions of CRT remained inside the corresponding baseline TV. On MRI, residual tumor was still suspected in all 6 patients with a pathologic complete response, whereas FDG-PET showed a metabolic complete response in 3 of them. The FDG-PET TVs delineated with the gradient-based method matched closest with pathologic findings. Conclusions: Integration of MRI and FDG-PET into radiotherapy seems feasible. Gradient-based segmentation is recommended for FDG-PET. Spatial variance between MRI and FDG-PET TVs should be taken into account for target definition.

  10. Prediction of Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer by Multiplex Kinase Activity Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Folkvord, Sigurd; Flatmark, Kjersti; Dueland, Svein

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Tumor response of rectal cancer to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) varies considerably. In experimental tumor models and clinical radiotherapy, activity of particular subsets of kinase signaling pathways seems to predict radiation response. This study aimed to determine whether tumor kinase activity profiles might predict tumor response to preoperative CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Sixty-seven LARC patients were treated with a CRT regimen consisting of radiotherapy, fluorouracil, and, where possible, oxaliplatin. Pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens were analyzed using microarrays with kinase substrates, and the resulting substrate phosphorylation patterns were correlated with tumor response to preoperative treatment as assessed by histomorphologic tumor regression grade (TRG). A predictive model for TRG scores from phosphosubstrate signatures was obtained by partial-least-squares discriminant analysis. Prediction performance was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation and use of an independent test set. Results: In the patient population, 73% and 15% were scored as good responders (TRG 1-2) or intermediate responders (TRG 3), whereas 12% were assessed as poor responders (TRG 4-5). In a subset of 7 poor responders and 12 good responders, treatment outcome was correctly predicted for 95%. Application of the prediction model on the remaining patient samples resulted in correct prediction for 85%. Phosphosubstrate signatures generated by poor-responding tumors indicated high kinase activity, which was inhibited by the kinase inhibitor sunitinib, and several discriminating phosphosubstrates represented proteins derived from signaling pathways implicated in radioresistance. Conclusions: Multiplex kinase activity profiling may identify functional biomarkers predictive of tumor response to preoperative CRT in LARC.

  11. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  12. Localized volume effects for late rectal and anal toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V. . E-mail: j.lebesque@nki.nl; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Slot, Annerie; Dielwart, Michel F.H.; Koper, Peter C.M.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters derived from anorectal, rectal, and anal wall dose distributions that correlate with different late gastrointestinal (GI) complications after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 641 patients from a randomized trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. Toxicity was scored with adapted Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria and five specific complications. The variables derived from dose-volume histogram of anorectal, rectal, and anal wall were as follows: % receiving {>=}5-70 Gy (V5-V70), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}). The anus was defined as the most caudal 3 cm of the anorectum. Statistics were done with multivariate Cox regression models. Median follow-up was 44 months. Results: Anal dosimetric variables were associated with RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}2 (V5-V40, D{sub mean}) and incontinence (V5-V70, D{sub mean}). Bleeding correlated most strongly with anorectal V55-V65, and stool frequency with anorectal V40 and D{sub mean}. Use of steroids was weakly related to anal variables. No volume effect was seen for RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}3 and pain/cramps/tenesmus. Conclusion: Different volume effects were found for various late GI complications. Therefore, to evaluate the risk of late GI toxicity, not only intermediate and high doses to the anorectal wall volume should be taken into account, but also the dose to the anal wall.

  13. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  14. The slippery slope: Lubricant Use and Rectal Sexually Transmitted Infections: a newly identified risk

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Pamina M.; Weiss, Robert E.; Fuchs, Edward; Jeffries, Robin A.; Hezerah, Marjan; Brown, Stephen; Voskanian, Alen; Robbie, Edward; Anton, Peter; Cranston, Ross D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of lubricant products is extremely common during receptive anal intercourse (RAI) yet has not been assessed as a risk for acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Methods From 2006–2008 a rectal health and behavior study was conducted in Baltimore and Los Angeles as part of the UCLA Microbicide Development Program (NIAID IPCP# #0606414). Participants completed questionnaires and rectal swabs were tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis with the Aptima Combo 2 assay and blood was tested for syphilis (for RPR and TPHA with titer) and HIV. Of those reporting lubricant use and RAI, STI results were available for 380 participants. Univariate and multivariate regressions assessed associations of lubricant use in the past month during RAI with prevalent STIs. Results Consistent lubricant use during RAI in the past month was reported by 36% (137/380) of participants. Consistent past month lubricant users had a higher prevalence of STI than inconsistent users (9.5% vs. 2.9%; p=0.006). In a multivariable logistic regression model testing positive for STI was associated with consistent use of lubricant during RAI in the past month (adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 2.98 (95%CI 1.09, 8.15) after controlling for age, gender, study location, HIV status, and numbers of RAI partners in the past month. Conclusions Findings suggest some lubricant products may increase vulnerability to STIs. Because of wide use of lubricants and their potential as carrier vehicles for microbicides, further research is essential to clarify if lubricant use poses a public health risk. PMID:22183849

  15. Neoadjuvant oral vs. infusional chemoradiotherapy on locally advanced rectal cancer: Prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Sofia; Borrego, Margarida; Teixeira, Tânia; Teixeira, Rubina; Sá, Anabela; Soares, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the prognostic factors and impact on survival of neoadjuvant oral and infusional chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Background There is still no definitive consensus about the prognostic factors and the impact of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy on survival. Some studies have pointed to an improvement in overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with tumor downstaging (TD) and nodal downstaging (ND). Materials and methods A set of 159 patients with LARC were treated preoperatively. Group A – 112 patients underwent concomitant oral chemoradiotherapy: capecitabine or UFT + folinic acid. Group B – 47 patients submitted to concomitant chemoradiation with 5-FU in continuous infusion. 63.6% of patients were submitted to adjuvant chemotherapy. Results Group A: pathologic complete response (pCR) – 18.7%; TD – 55.1%; ND – 76%; loco-regional response – 74.8%. Group B: pCR – 11.4%; TD – 50%; ND – 55.8%; LRR – 54.5%. The loco-regional control was 95.6%. There was no difference in survival between both groups. Those with loco-regional response had better PFS. Conclusions Tumor and nodal downstaging, loco-regional response and a normal CEA level turned out to be important prognostic factors in locally advanced rectal cancer. Nodal downstaging and loco-regional response were higher in Group A. Those with tumor downstaging and loco-regional response from Group A had better OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy had no impact on survival except in those patients with loco-regional response who achieved a higher PFS. PMID:24416533

  16. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, Christopher H.; Eng, Cathy; Feig, Barry W.; Das, Prajnan; Skibber, John M.; Chang, George J.; Wolff, Robert A.; Krishnan, Sunil; Hamilton, Stanley; Janjan, Nora A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ellis, Lee M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We designed this Phase II trial to assess the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to concurrent neoadjuvant capecitabine-based chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Between April 2004 and December 2007, 25 patients with clinically staged T3N1 (n = 20) or T3N0 (n = 5) rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks), bevacizumab every 2 weeks (3 doses of 5 mg/kg), and capecitabine (900 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily only on days of radiation), followed by surgical resection a median of 7.3 weeks later. Results: Procedures included abdominoperineal resection (APR; 6 patients), proctectomy with coloanal anastamosis (8 patients), low anterior resection (10 patients), and local excision (1 patient). Eight (32%) of 25 patients had a pathologic complete response, and 6 (24%) of 25 had <10% viable tumor cells in the specimen. No patient had Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, gastrointestinal toxicity, or significant hematologic toxicity. Three wound complications required surgical intervention (one coloanal anastamostic dehiscence requiring completion APR and two perineal wound dehiscences after initial APR). Five minor complications occurred that resolved without operative intervention. With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (range, 4.5-32.4 months), all patients were alive; one patient has had a recurrence in the pelvis (2-year actuarial rate, 6.2%) and 3 had distant recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemoradiation resulted in encouraging pathologic complete response without an increase in acute toxicity. The impact of bevacizumab on perineal wound and anastamotic healing due to concurrent bevacizumab requires further study.

  17. Risk of Hypogonadism From Scatter Radiation During Pelvic Radiation in Male Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Ivan; Vuong, Te Garant, Aurelie; Ducruet, Thierry; Doran, Patrick; Faria, Sergio; Liberman, Sender; Richard, Carole; Letellier, Francois; Charlebois, Patrick; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have reported fluctuations in sex hormones during pelvic irradiation. The objective of this study was to observe the effects of radiation on hormonal profiles for two treatment modalities: conventional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) given neoadjuvantly for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Routine serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels were collected from 119 consecutive male patients receiving either EBRT, using 45.0-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy or HDRBT using 26 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: Thirty patients with initially abnormal profiles were excluded. Profiles included in this study were collected from 51 patients treated with EBRT and 38 patients treated with HDRBT, all of whom had normal hormonal profiles before treatment. Mean follow-up times were 17 months for the entire patient cohort-14 and 20 months, respectively-for the EBRT and HDRBT arms. Dosimetry results revealed a mean cumulative testicular dose of 1.24 Gy received in EBRT patients compared with 0.27 Gy in the HDRBT group. After treatment, FSH and LH were elevated in all patients but were more pronounced in the EBRT group. The testosterone-to-LH ratio was significantly lower (p = 0.0036) in EBRT patients for tumors in the lower third of the rectum. The 2-year hypogonadism rate observed was 2.6% for HDRBT compared with 17.6% for EBRT (p = 0.09) for tumors in the lower two thirds of the rectum. Conclusion: HDRBT allows better hormonal sparing than EBRT during neoadjuvant treatment of patients with rectal cancer.

  18. The impact of laparoscopic resection rectopexy in patients with total rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Sezai, Demirbas; Demirbas, Sezai; Akin, Levhi; Kurt, Yavuz; Ogün, Ibrahim; Celenk, Tuncay

    2005-09-01

    Total rectal prolapse is a disabling disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate pain management, hospital stays, constipation, and continence status among military personnel who underwent laparoscopic surgery. Forty patients (mostly men) underwent laparoscopic rectopexy (LR) or laparoscopic resection rectopexy (LRR). Colonic transit time, postoperative pain scores, preoperative and postoperative anal function, and changes in constipation were assessed. The median operation times for LR and LRR were 126 and 223 minutes, respectively. The median postoperative hospital stays were 3 and approximately 6 days for LR and LRR, respectively. Patients needed fewer analgesics in a short postoperative period. However, there was no difference between the two groups in analgesic requirements. Continence improved for approximately 71% of patients, but constipation was treated for 50% of affected patients. No recurrences were noted in the follow-up periods, which were 13 and 22 months for the LRR and LR groups, respectively. The quality of life for the patients who underwent LR was not as good as that for the patients who underwent LRR, at the end of 1 year. We eliminated total rectal prolapse and almost cured incontinence by using laparoscopy, although the disadvantageous aspects were long operation times and suboptimal healing with respect to constipation and related symptoms. LRR is the more feasible procedure, with the emphasis on elimination of incontinence and constipation, producing a better quality of life for patients, in addition to short hospitalizations, necessity for analgesia for a short time, and return to hard training field activities in a short time among military personnel. PMID:16261977

  19. Efficacy of High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Preoperative Local Staging of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uçar, Aysun; Obuz, Funda; Sökmen, Selman; Terzi, Cem; Sa?ol, Özgül; Sar?o?lu, Sülen; Füzün, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) for preoperative local staging in patients with rectal cancer who did not receive preoperative radiochemotherapy. Methods: In this retrospective study, 30 patients with biopsy proved primary rectal cancer were evaluated by HRMRI. Two observers independently scored the tumour and lymph node stages, and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement. The sensitivity, specificity, the negative predictive value and the positive predictive value of HRMRI findings were calculated within the 95% confidence interval. The area under the curve was measured for each result. Agreement between two observers was assessed by means of the Kappa test. Results: In T staging the accuracy rate of HRMRI was 47-67%, overstaging was 10-21%, and understaging was 13-43%. In the prediction of extramural invasion with HRMRI, the sensitivity was 79-89%, the specificity was 72-100%, the PPV was 85-100%, the NPV was 73-86%, and the area under the curve was 0.81-0.89. In the prediction of lymph node metastasis, the sensitivity was 58-58%, the specificity was 50-55%, the PPV was 43-46%, and the NPV was 64-66%. The area under the curve was 0.54-0.57. When the cut off value was selected as 1 mm, the sensitivity of HRMRI was 38-42%, the specificity was 73-82%, the PPV was 33-42%, and NPV was 79-81% in the prediction of the CRM involvement. The correlation between the two observers was moderate for tumour staging, substantial for lymph node staging and predicting of CRM involvement. Conclusion: Preoperative HRMRI provides good predictive data for extramural invasion but poor prediction of lymph node status and CRM involvement. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24003396

  20. Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine With Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: Phase I Trial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Czito, Brian G. . E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu; Bendell, Johanna C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Thomas, John; Ludwig, Kirk A.; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Ashton, Jill; Yu Daohai; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with poor outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Bevacizumab, a VEGF inhibitor, enhances the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on tumor cytotoxicity in preclinical models, including colorectal cancer. A Phase I trial was undertaken to evaluate the combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. Pretreatment staging included computerized tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical evaluation. Patients received 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the tumor in 28 fractions. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab were administered concurrently with radiation therapy. After EBRT completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included the determination of dose-limiting toxicity and a recommended Phase II dose, non dose-limiting toxicity, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled. All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Dose level 2 was associated with unacceptable toxicity (primarily diarrhea). Dose level 1 had an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended Phase II dose in our study was bevacizumab 15 mg/kg Day 1 + 10 mg/kg Days 8 and 22, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly, and capecitabine 625 mg/m{sup 2} bid during radiation days. Six patients had clinical responses. Two patients had a pathologic complete response, and 3 had microscopic disease only. One patient experienced a postoperative abscess, one a syncopal episode during adjuvant chemotherapy, and one a subclinical myocardial infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: The combination of bevacizumab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy in rectal cancer was tolerable, with encouraging response rates. Further investigation with this regimen is being pursued in a Phase II setting.

  1. Risk factors of mild rectal bleeding in very low birth weight infants: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild rectal bleeding (MRB) is a particular clinical entity different from necrotizing enterocolitis, which significantly influences neonatal care in preterm infants. We aimed to determine the risk factors and to evaluate prospectively the clinical course of MRB. Methods We consecutively included in a case–control study all infants with birth weight???1500 g or gestational age???32 weeks admitted to our unit, and presenting MRB, defined as either isolated or associated with mild clinical or radiological signs. We matched each Case with two Controls. Clinical data before, after and at time of MRB were collected, together with stool cultures at time of MRB (or at similar postnatal age in Controls). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for the development of MRB. Results During 4 years, among 823 very low birth weight (VLBW) infants admitted to our unit, 72 (8.8%) had MRB. The median duration of rectal bleeding was 1.1 [1–2] days and the fasting period lasted 2.9 [2–10] days. A relapse occurred in 24% of cases. In multivariate analysis, only hypertension during pregnancy (p?=?0.019), growth restriction at onset of bleeding (p?=?0.026), and exposure to ibuprofen (p?=?0.003) were independent risk factors for MRB. In Cases there were more infants with Clostridium Difficile in stools than in Controls (p?=?0.017). Conclusion Hypertension during pregnancy, even without intrauterine growth restriction, appeared to carry the same risk for MRB as exposure to ibuprofen and extrauterine growth restriction. PMID:24283213

  2. Caveolin-1 as a Prognostic Marker for Local Control After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz Capalbo, Gianni; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Caveolin-1 is a protein marker for caveolae organelles and has an essential impact on cellular signal transduction pathways (e.g., receptor tyrosine kinases, adhesion molecules, and G-protein-coupled receptors). In the present study, we investigated the expression of caveolin-1 in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and correlated its expression pattern with the risk for disease recurrences after preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and surgical resection. Methods and Materials: Caveolin-1 mRNA and protein expression were evaluated by Affymetrix microarray analysis (n = 20) and immunohistochemistry (n = 44) on pretreatment biopsy samples of patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum, and were correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics as well as with 5-year rates of local failure and overall survival. Results: A significantly decreased median caveolin-1 intracellular mRNA level was observed in tumor biopsy samples as compared with noncancerous mucosa. Individual mRNA levels and immunohistologic staining, however, revealed an overexpression in 7 of 20 patients (35%) and 17 of 44 patients (38.6%), respectively. Based on immunohistochemical evaluation, local control rates at 5 years for patients with tumors showing low caveolin-1 expression were significantly better than for patients with high caveolin-1-expressing carcinoma cells (p = 0.05; 92%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 82-102% vs. 72%, 95% CI = 49-84%). A low caveolin-1 protein expression was also significantly related to an increased overall survival rate (p = 0.05; 45%, 95% CI 16-60% vs. 82%, 95% CI = 67-97%). Conclusion: Caveolin-1 may provide a novel prognostic marker for local control and survival after preoperative CRT and surgical resection in rectal cancer.

  3. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  4. Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine, Bevacizumab, and Erlotinib for Rectal Cancer: A Phase 1 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan; Eng, Cathy; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; You, Y. Nancy; Maru, Dipen M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Clemons, Marilyn V.; Kopetz, Scott E.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Shureiqi, Imad; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this phase 1 trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib with preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with clinical stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma, within 12 cm from the anal verge, were treated in 4 escalating dose levels, using the continual reassessment method. Patients received preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks), erlotinib, and capecitabine. Capecitabine dose was increased from 650 mg/m{sup 2} to 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the days of radiation therapy; erlotinib dose was increased from 50 mg orally daily in weeks 1 to 3, to 50 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6, to 100 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6. Patients underwent surgery at least 9 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Results: A total of 19 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients were considered evaluable. No patient had grade 4 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had grade 3 acute toxicity (hypertension). The MTD was not reached. All 18 evaluable patients underwent surgery, with low anterior resection in 7 (39%), proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis in 4 patients (22%), posterior pelvic exenteration in 1 (6%), and abdominoperineal resection in 6 (33%). Of the 18 patients, 8 (44%) had pathologic complete response, and 1 had complete response of the primary tumor with positive nodes. Three patients (17%) had grade 3 postoperative complications (ileus, small bowel obstruction, and infection). With a median follow-up of 34 months, 1 patient developed distant metastasis, and no patient had local recurrence or died. The 3-year disease-free survival was 94%. Conclusions: The combination of preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib was well tolerated. The pathologic complete response rate appears promising and may warrant further investigation.

  5. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae . E-mail: khjung@ncc.re.kr; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% {+-} 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% {+-} 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed.

  6. Optical biopsy of the prostate: can we TRUST (trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Jiang, Zhen; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady

    2011-03-01

    Needle-based core-biopsy to locate prostate cancer relies heavily upon trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging guidance. Ultrasonographic findings of classic hypoechoic peripheral zone lesions have a low specificity of ~28%, a low positive predictive value of ~29%, and an overall accuracy of ~43%, in prostate cancer diagnosis. The prevalence of isoechoic or nearly invisible prostate cancers on ultrasonography ranges from 25 to 42%. As a result, TRUS is useful and convenient to direct the needle trajectory following a systematic biopsy sampling template rather than to target only the potentially malignant lesion for focal-biopsy. To address this deficiency in the first-line of prostate cancer imaging, a trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography (TRUST) approach is being developed to non-invasively resolve the likely optical signatures of prostate malignancy. The approach has evolved from using one NIR wavelength to two NIR bands, and recently to three bands of NIR spectrum information. The concept has been evaluated on one normal canine prostate and three dogs with implanted prostate tumor developed as a model. The initial results implementing TRUST on the canine prostate tumor model includes: (1) quantifying substantially increased total hemoglobin concentration over the time-course of imaging in a rapidly growing prostate tumor; (2) confirming hypoxia in a prostatic cystic lesion; and (3) imaging hypoxic changes of a necrotic prostate tumor. Despite these interesting results, intensive technologic development is necessary for translating the approach to benefiting clinical practice, wherein the ultimate utility is not possibly to eliminate needle-biopsy but to perform focal-biopsy that is only necessary to confirm the cancer, as well as to monitor and predict treatment responses.

  7. A Multi-institutional Clinical Trial of Rectal Dose Reduction via Injected Polyethylene-Glycol Hydrogel During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Analysis of Dosimetric Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Danny Y.; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Uhl, Matthias; Eble, Michael J.; Pinkawa, Michael; Triest, Baukelien van; Kalisvaart, Robin; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ford, Eric C.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of a prostate-rectum spacer on dose to rectum during external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess for factors correlated with rectal dose reduction. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients at 4 institutions were enrolled into a prospective pilot clinical trial. Patients underwent baseline scans and then were injected with perirectal spacing hydrogel and rescanned. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created on both scans for comparison. The objectives were to establish rates of creation of ?7.5 mm of prostate-rectal separation, and decrease in rectal V70 of ?25%. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the associations between preinjection and postinjection changes in rectal V70 and changes in plan conformity, rectal volume, bladder volume, bladder V70, planning target volume (PTV), and postinjection midgland separation, gel volume, gel thickness, length of PTV/gel contact, and gel left-to-right symmetry. Results: Hydrogel resulted in ?7.5-mm prostate-rectal separation in 95.8% of patients; 95.7% had decreased rectal V70 of ?25%, with a mean reduction of 8.0 Gy. There were no significant differences in preinjection and postinjection prostate, PTV, rectal, and bladder volumes. Plan conformities were significantly different before versus after injection (P=.02); plans with worse conformity indexes after injection compared with before injection (n=13) still had improvements in rectal V70. In multiple regression analysis, greater postinjection reduction in V70 was associated with decreased relative postinjection plan conformity (P=.01). Reductions in V70 did not significantly vary by institution, despite significant interinstitutional variations in plan conformity. There were no significant relationships between reduction in V70 and the other characteristics analyzed. Conclusions: Injection of hydrogel into the prostate-rectal interface resulted in dose reductions to rectum for >90% of patients treated. Rectal sparing was statistically significant across a range of 10 to 75 Gy and was demonstrated within the presence of significant interinstitutional variability in plan conformity, target definitions, and injection results.

  8. A social ecology of rectal microbicide acceptability among young men who have sex with men and transgender women in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Peter A; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Tepjan, Suchon

    2013-01-01

    Introduction With HIV-incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Bangkok among the highest in the world, a topical rectal microbicide would be a tremendous asset to prevention. Nevertheless, ubiquitous gaps between clinical trial efficacy and real-world effectiveness of existing HIV preventive interventions highlight the need to address multi-level factors that may impact on rectal microbicide implementation. We explored the social ecology of rectal microbicide acceptability among MSM and transgender women in Chiang Mai and Pattaya, Thailand. Methods We used a qualitative approach guided by a social ecological model. Five focus groups were conducted in Thai using a semi-structured interview guide. All interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim in Thai and translated into English. We conducted thematic analysis using line-by-line and axial coding and a constant comparative method. Transcripts and codes were uploaded into a customized database programmed in Microsoft Access. We then used content analysis to calculate theme frequencies by group, and Chi-square tests and Fisher's exact test to compare themes by sexual orientation/gender expression and age. Results Participant's (n=37) mean age was 24.8 years (SD=4.2). The majority (70.3%) self-identified as gay, 24.3% transgender women. Product-level themes (side effects, formulation, efficacy, scent, etc.) accounted for 42%, individual (increased sexual risk, packaging/portability, timing/duration of protection) 29%, interpersonal (trust/communication, power/negotiation, stealth) 8% and social–structural (cost, access, community influence, stigma) 21% of total codes, with significant differences by sexual orientation/gender identity. The intersections of multi-level influences included product formulation and timing of use preferences contingent on interpersonal communication and partner type, in the context of constraints posed by stigma, venues for access and cost. Discussion The intersecting influence of multi-level factors on rectal microbicide acceptability suggests that social–structural interventions to ensure widespread access, low cost and to mitigate stigma and discrimination against gay and other MSM and transgender women in the Thai health care system and broader society will support the effectiveness of rectal microbicides, in combination with other prevention technologies, in reducing HIV transmission. Education, outreach and small-group interventions that acknowledge differences between MSM and transgender women may support rectal microbicide implementation among most-at-risk populations in Thailand. PMID:23911116

  9. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment standard for patients with rectal cancer depends on the initial staging and includes surgical resection, radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy. For stage II and III tumors, radiochemotherapy should be performed in addition to surgery, preferentially as preoperative radiochemotherapy or as short-course hypofractionated radiation. Advances in surgical approaches, especially the establishment of the total mesorectal excision (TME) in combination with sophisticated radiation and chemotherapy have reduced local recurrence rates to only few percent. However, due to the high incidence of rectal cancer, still a high absolute number of patients present with recurrent rectal carcinomas, and effective treatment is therefore needed. Carbon ions offer physical and biological advantages. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increase relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese data on the treatment of patients with recurrent rectal cancer previously not treated with radiation therapy have shown local control rates of carbon ion treatment superior to those of surgery. Therefore, this treatment concept should also be evaluated for recurrences after radiotherapy, when dose application using conventional photons is limited. Moreover, these patients are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological efficacy of carbon ions. Methods and design In the current Phase I/II-PANDORA-01-Study the recommended dose of carbon ion radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer will be determined in the Phase I part, and feasibilty and progression-free survival will be assessed in the Phase II part of the study. Within the Phase I part, increasing doses from 12 × 3 Gy E to 18 × 3 Gy E will be applied. The primary endpoint in the Phase I part is toxicity, the primary endpoint in the Phase II part is progression-free survival. Discussion With conventional photon irradiation treatment of recurrent rectal cancer is limited, and the clinical effect is only moderate. With carbon ions, an improved outcome can be expected due to the physical and biological characteristics of the carbon ion beam. However, the optimal dose applicable in this clincial situation as re-irradiation still has to be determined. This, as well as efficacy, is to be evaluated in the present Phase I/II trial. Trial registration NCT01528683 PMID:22472035

  10. Late rectal bleeding after 3D-CRT for prostate cancer: development of a neural-network-based predictive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatis, S.; Rancati, T.; Fiorino, C.; Vavassori, V.; Fellin, G.; Cagna, E.; Mauro, F. A.; Girelli, G.; Monti, A.; Baccolini, M.; Naldi, G.; Bianchi, C.; Menegotti, L.; Pasquino, M.; Stasi, M.; Valdagni, R.

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model exploiting artificial neural networks (ANNs) to correlate dosimetric and clinical variables with late rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy and to compare the ANN results with those of a standard logistic regression (LR) analysis. 718 men included in the AIROPROS 0102 trial were analyzed. This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity, with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. Radiotherapy doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Information was recorded for comorbidity, previous abdominal surgery, use of drugs and hormonal therapy. For each patient, a rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the whole treatment was recorded and the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) evaluated as an effective descriptor of the whole DVH. Late rectal bleeding of grade ? 2 was considered to define positive events in this study (52 of 718 patients). The overall population was split into training and verification sets, both of which were involved in model instruction, and a test set, used to evaluate the predictive power of the model with independent data. Fourfold cross-validation was also used to provide realistic results for the full dataset. The LR was performed on the same data. Five variables were selected to predict late rectal bleeding: EUD, abdominal surgery, presence of hemorrhoids, use of anticoagulants and androgen deprivation. Following a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the independent test set, the areas under the curves (AUCs) were 0.704 and 0.655 for ANN and LR, respectively. When evaluated with cross-validation, the AUC was 0.714 for ANN and 0.636 for LR, which differed at a significance level of p = 0.03. When a practical discrimination threshold was selected, ANN could classify data with sensitivity and specificity both equal to 68.0%, whereas these values were 61.5% for LR. These data provide reasonable evidence that results obtained with ANNs are superior to those achieved with LR when predicting late radiotherapy-related rectal bleeding. The future introduction of patient-related personal characteristics, such as gene expression profiles, might improve the predictive power of statistical classifiers. More refined morphological aspects of the dose distribution, such as dose surface mapping, might also enhance the overall performance of ANN-based predictive models.

  11. Administrative Business Assistant

    E-print Network

    Gelfond, Michael

    Interim Managing Director (Burns) Prosperity Bank #12;AFISM Budgeting Contract Administrative Business) ATM Machines Prosperity Bank Hospitality Services Copy/Mail Barnes & Noble Student Union Fee AdvisoryAdministrative Business Assistant (Suarez) Unit Manager Marketing (Arthur) STUDENT UNION Associate

  12. Non-L-cell immunophenotype and large tumor size in rectal neuroendocrine tumors are associated with aggressive clinical behavior and worse prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Park, In Ja; Lee, Jong Lyul; Myung, Seung-Jae; Park, Yangsoon; Park, Young Soo; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon; Yu, Eunsil; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2015-05-01

    According to the 2010 World Health Organization classification, all gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are classified as malignant except for L-cell-type (glucagon-like peptide [GLP] and peptide YY [PYY]-producing) NETs. However, L-cell immunophenotype in rectal NETs has not been widely studied previously. Immunohistochemical labeling of L-cell markers with GLP1 and PYY was performed in 208 surgically or endoscopically resected rectal NET cases with tissue microarrays and was compared with clinicopathologic features and patient survival. Rectal NETs with non-L-cell immunophenotype and large tumor size (>1 cm) were associated with increased tumor grading, advanced T category, lymphovascular and perineural invasions, and lymph node and distant metastases (P<0.001, each). Rectal NET patients with non-L-cell phenotype and measuring >1 cm had significantly worse survival outcome than other groups by univariate (P<0.001) and multivariate (P<0.001) analyses. In summary, non-L-cell immunophenotype and large tumor size are associated with increased tumor grading and staging, concurrently indicating that they are independently poor prognostic indicators in rectal NET patients. Therefore, combining L-cell phenotype and tumor size can demonstrate the clinical behavior of rectal NETs more precisely than use of L-cell immunophenotype alone. PMID:25724002

  13. NASA, NOAA administrators nominated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan recently said he intended to nominate James Montgomery Beggs as NASA Administrator and John V. Byrne as NOAA Administrator. These two positions are key scientific posts that have been vacant since the start of the Reagan administration on January 20. The President also said he intends to nominate Hans Mark as NASA Deputy Administrator. At press time, Reagan had not designated his nominee for the director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  14. School Business Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, K. Forbis; And Others

    This textbook reviews the principal concerns within each of 13 major responsibility areas in school business administration. The first chapter assesses the political, social, and economic context in which schools function and school administrators work. The role and function of the school business administrator within this context is addressed in…

  15. [A Case of Radical Resection of Rectal Cancer with Multiple Liver and Lung Metastases after Preoperative Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinya; Shimizu, Yosuke; Tominaga, Harumi; Kimura, Yuri; Odagiri, Kazuki; Kurokawa, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Takahashi, Gen; Sawada, Genta; Moon, JeongHo; Inoue, Masashi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Nakahira, Shin; Hatanaka, Nobutaka

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of radical resection of rectal cancer with multiple liver and lung metastases after preoperative chemotherapy. A 54-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and loss of body weight due to rectal cancer with multiple liver and lung metastases. Therefore, the patient received 14 courses of bevacizumab+mFOLFOX6, and 7 courses of panitumumab+FOLFIRI. After the chemotherapy, the size of the distant metastases reduced by 62% on computed tomography, according to RECIST. Due to the reduction in size, a conversion surgery was attempted. First, an abdominal operation with laparoscopy was performed, and 2 months later an operation to resect the lung metastases via thoracoscopy was performed. Currently, 3 months after surgery, the patient is alive, without recurrence. PMID:26489570

  16. Successful use of pregabalin by the rectal route to treat chronic neuropathic pain in a patient with complete intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Doddrell, Charlotte; Tripathi, Shiva Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin is widely used for treatment of neuropathic pain and is only approved for oral use. This is the first reported case of using pregabalin by the rectal route for treatment in a 70-year-old patient with chronic neuropathic pain and complete intestinal failure. Therapies used in an attempt to manage his chronic pain have included a variety of doses and strengths of opioid preparations and cannabinoids, plus topical and alternative therapies. These were not effective, so it was decided to start a trial of pregabalin administered by the rectal route. Serum levels were measured to assess absorption. Within a few weeks of starting the treatment, the patient had improved pain control and appeared more comfortable and calm. PMID:26516246

  17. Real-time monitoring of tumor response to preoperative radiochemotherapy for rectal carcinoma by nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Wang, Xingfu; Jiang, Weizhong; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-03-01

    The continuing advancement of nonlinear optical imaging techniques has opened many new windows in biological exploration. In this work, the nonlinear optical microscopy, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), was extended to probe tumor response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal carcinoma. It was found that MPM has the ability of direct visualization of histopathologic changes in rectal carcinoma following preoperative RCT including stromal fibrosis, colloid response and residual tumors. Our results also showed the capability of MPM using the quantitative analyses of images to quantify these changes. This work may provide the groundwork for further exploration into the application of multiphoton-based endoscopy in a clinical setting.

  18. Increasing Disparities in Age-Related Incidence of Colon and Rectal Cancer in the United States, 1975-2010

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christina E; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y Nancy; Bednarski, Brian K; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Skibber, John M; Cantor, Scott B; Chang, George J

    2015-01-01

    Importance The overall incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been decreasing since 1998, but there has been an apparent rise in the incidence of CRC in young adults. Objective To evaluate age-related disparities in secular trends in CRC incidence in the United States. Design A retrospective cohort study using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) CRC registry. Age at diagnosis was analyzed in 15-year intervals starting at the age of 20. SEER*Stat was used to obtain the annual cancer incidence rates, annual percent change (APC), and corresponding p-values for the secular trends. Setting Data was obtained from the National Cancer Institute’s SEER registry. Patients All patients diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer from January 1, 1975 through December 31, 2010 (N = 393,241). Main Outcome Difference in CRC incidence by age. Results Overall age-adjusted CRC incidence rate decreased by 0.92% between 1975 and 2010. There has been a steady decline in the incidence of CRC in patients age 50 years or older, but the opposite trend has been observed for young adults. For patients 20 to 34 years of age, the incidence rate of localized, regional and distant colon and rectal cancer has increased. Increasing incidence rate was also observed for rectal cancer patients aged 35 to 49. Based on current trends, in 2030 the incidence rate for colon and rectal cancer will increase by 90.0% and 124.2% for patients 20 to 34 years of age and by 27.7% and 46.0% for patients 35 to 49 years of age. Conclusion and Relevance There has been a significant increase in the incidence of CRC diagnosed in young adults, with a decline in older patients. Further studies are needed to determine the cause for these trends and identify potential preventive and early detection strategies. PMID:25372703

  19. Rectal cancer profiling identifies distinct subtypes in India based on age at onset, genetic, epigenetic and clinicopathological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman

    2015-12-01

    Rectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that develops through multiple pathways characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. India has a comparatively higher proportion of rectal cancers and early-onset cases. We analyzed genetic (KRAS, TP53 and BRAF mutations, and MSI), epigenetic alterations (CpG island methylation detection of 10 tumor-related genes/loci), the associated clinicopathological features and survival trend in 80 primary rectal cancer patients from India. MSI was detected using BAT 25 and BAT 26 mononucleotide markers and mutation of KRAS, TP53, and BRAF V600E was detected by direct sequencing. Methyl specific polymerase chain reaction was used to determine promoter methylation status of the classic CIMP panel markers (P16, hMLH1, MINT1, MINT2, and MINT31) as well as other tumor specific genes (DAPK, RASSF1, BRCA1, and GSTP1). MSI and BRAF mutations were uncommon but high frequencies of overall KRAS mutations (67.5%); low KRAS codon 12 and a novel KRAS G15S mutation with concomitant RASSF1 methylation in early onset cases were remarkable. Hierarchical clustering as well as principal component analysis identified three distinct subgroups of patients having discrete age at onset, clinicopathological, molecular and survival characteristics: (i) a KRAS associated CIMP-high subgroup; (ii) a significantly younger MSS, CIMP low, TP53 mutant group having differential KRAS mutation patterns, and (iii) a CIMP-negative, TP53 mutated group. The early onset subgroup exhibited the most unfavorable disease characteristics with advanced stage, poorly differentiated tumors and had the poorest survival compared to the other subgroups. Genetic and epigenetic profiling of rectal cancer patients identified distinct subtypes in Indian population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25418895

  20. Short-course radiotherapy followed by neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer – the RAPIDO trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current standard for most of the locally advanced rectal cancers is preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and, variably per institution, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Short-course preoperative radiation with delayed surgery has been shown to induce tumour down-staging in both randomized and observational studies. The concept of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy has been proven successful in gastric cancer, hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and is currently tested in primary colon cancer. Methods and design Patients with rectal cancer with high risk features for local or systemic failure on magnetic resonance imaging are randomized to either a standard arm or an experimental arm. The standard arm consists of chemoradiation (1.8 Gy x 25 or 2 Gy x 25 with capecitabine) preoperatively, followed by selective postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy is optional and may be omitted by participating institutions. The experimental arm includes short-course radiotherapy (5 Gy x 5) followed by full-dose chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in 6 cycles before surgery. In the experimental arm, no postoperative chemotherapy is prescribed. Surgery is performed according to TME principles in both study arms. The hypothesis is that short-course radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy increases disease-free and overall survival without compromising local control. Primary end-point is disease-free survival at 3 years. Secondary endpoints include overall survival, local control, toxicity profile, and treatment completion rate, rate of pathological complete response and microscopically radical resection, and quality of life. Discussion Following the advances in rectal cancer management, increased focus on survival rather than only on local control is now justified. In an experimental arm, short-course radiotherapy is combined with full-dose chemotherapy preoperatively, an alternative that offers advantages compared to concomitant chemoradiotherapy with or without postoperative chemotherapy. In a multi-centre setting this regimen is compared to current standard with the aim of improving survival for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01558921 PMID:23742033

  1. Distribution of Residual Cancer Cells in the Bowel Wall after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients with Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duldulao, Marjun P.; Lee, Wendy; Streja, Leanne; Chu, Peiguo; Li, Wenyan; Chen, Zhenbin; Kim, Joseph; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Background The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer is pre-operative chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. After surgery, tumors are classified according to the depth of tumor invasion, nodal involvement, and tumor regression grade. However, these staging systems do not provide information about the distribution of residual cancer cells within the bowel wall. Objective To determine the distribution of residual cancer cells in each layer of the bowel wall in rectal cancer specimens. Design Prospective Phase II study. Setting Multi-institutional. Patients 153 patients with stage II or stage III rectal cancer. Interventions Patients were treated with chemoradiation and surgery. Surgical specimen tumor tissue was analyzed and the distribution of residual cancer cells in each layer of the bowel wall was determined. Main Outcome Measures Statistical analysis was used to examine the correlation of residual cancer cells in each layer of the bowel wall with the clinical/pathological stage and tumor regression grade. Results Forty-two of 153 (27%) patients had complete response in the bowel wall (ypT0). Of the remaining 111 patients who had residual cancer cells, 5 (3%) were ypTis, 12 (8%) were ypT1, 41 (27%) were ypT2, 50 (33%) were ypT3, and 3 (2%) were ypT4. Of the 94 patients with ypT2-4 tumors, 12 (13%) had cancer cells in the mucosa and 53 (56%) had cancer cells in the submucosa; 92 (98%) had cancer cells in the muscularis propria. Pretreatment cT stage correlated with distribution of residual cancer cells. Tumor regression grade was not associated with distribution of residual cancer cells after chemoradiation. Limitations Patients received different chemotherapy regimens. Conclusions Residual cancer cells in rectal cancer specimens after chemoradiation are preferentially located close to the invasive front. This should be considered when designing strategies to diagnose complete pathologic response and when investigating the mechanisms of tumor resistance to chemoradiation. PMID:23303141

  2. Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Rectum Coexistent with Giant Rectal Villous Adenoma Presenting as McKittrick-Wheelock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nakhla, Sammy G.; Murakami, Traci T.; Sundararajan, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    McKittrick-Wheelock Syndrome is a rare disorder, noted for electrolyte and fluid depletion caused by secretory colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. We report here the first reported case of a 55-year-old man with a large rectal villous adenoma coexistent with a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumor of rectum presenting with McKittrick-Wheelock Syndrome. Palliative chemotherapy resulted in complete resolution of symptoms and improved quality of life. PMID:26682079

  3. Anaesthetic management of laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer in patients of dilated cardiomyopathy with poor ejection fraction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yao-Hua; Hu, Liang; Xia, Jin; Hao, Quan-Shui; Feng, Li; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    A patient with dilated cardiomyopathy with poor ejection fraction posted for laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer which was successfully performed under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation was reported. Our observations strongly indicate that detailed preoperative assessment, watchful intraoperative monitoring, and skillful optimization of fluid status and hemodynamic play important role in the high risk patient under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. PMID:26309623

  4. Delayed diagnosis of a high-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presenting as an obstructing rectal mass.

    PubMed

    Sudworth, Oliver; Hameed, Aisha

    2015-01-01

    This case describes a 54-year-old man who presented to the surgical triage unit and was found to have a rare underlying rectal lymphoma. The patient had previously sought medical advice on multiple occasions, reporting a chronic inability to open his bowels. This case report aims to highlight the importance of thorough history taking and examination, in order to reduce delaying the diagnosis of significant pathology. PMID:26698207

  5. Rectal hyposensitivity and functional anorectal outlet obstruction are common entities in patients with functional constipation but are not significantly associated

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Su Jin; Jeon, Seong Ran; Kwon, Soon Ha; Kim, Wan Jung; Kim, Hyun Gun; Cho, Won Young; Cho, Joo Young; Kim, Jin-Oh; Lee, Ji Sung

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The causes of functional anorectal outlet obstruction (outlet obstruction) include functional defecation disorder (FDD), rectocele, and rectal intussusception (RI). It is unclear whether outlet obstruction is associated with rectal hyposensitivity (RH) in patients with functional constipation (FC). The aim of this study was to determine the association between RH and outlet obstruction in patients with FC. Methods This was a retrospective study using a prospectively collected constipation database, and the population comprised 107 patients with FC (100 females; median age, 49 years). We performed anorectal manometry, defecography, rectal barostat, and at least two tests (balloon expulsion test, electromyography, or colon transit time study). RH was defined as one or more sensory threshold pressures raised beyond the normal range on rectal barostat. We investigated the association between the presence of RH and an outlet obstruction such as large rectocele (> 2 cm in size), RI, or FDD. Results Forty patients (37.4%) had RH. No significant difference was observed in RH between patients with small and large rectoceles (22 [44.9%] vs. 18 [31%], respectively; p = 0.140). No significant difference was observed in RH between the non-RI and RI groups (36 [36.7%] vs. 4 [30.8%], respectively; p = 0.599). Furthermore, no significant difference in RH was observed between the non-FDD and FDD groups (19 [35.8%] vs. 21 [38.9%], respectively; p = 0.745). Conclusions RH and outlet obstruction are common entities but appear not to be significantly associated. PMID:23345997

  6. Development of rectal delivered thermo-reversible gelling film encapsulating a 5-fluorouracil hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Han, Yan-Xing; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-02-10

    We have developed a novel 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) formulation for rectal application to improve its therapeutic efficiency in colorectal cancer. The results indicated that 5FU formed an inclusion complex with Hydroxypropyl-?-Cyclodextrin (HP-?-CD). The stoichiometry of the complex was 1:1, with apparent stability constant of 100.4M(-1). After investigating physicochemical properties of the 5FU-HP-?-CD complex encapsulated with thermo-reversible gelling film, the optimized formulation P407/P188/HPMC/5FU-HP-?-CD (18.5/2.5/0.2/15%) was selected and evaluated. The result showed that the 5FU-HP-?-CD complex increased the solubility of 5FU, prolonged and enhanced its releasing. As compared to the raw drug, the transport efficiency of the 5FU-HP-?-CD complex itself or entrapped in thermo-reversible gelling film were respectively 7.3- and 6.8-fold increased, and the cellular uptake of 5-FU 4.9- and 5.4-fold elevated. There was no irritation or damage to rectal sites in the 10h treatment period. Therefore, this HP-?-CD based formulation might improve the therapeutic effect of 5FU on colon-rectal cancer. PMID:26686100

  7. An evaluation of four CT–MRI co-registration techniques for radiotherapy treatment planning of prone rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Dean, C J; Sykes, J R; Cooper, R A; Hatfield, P; Carey, B; Swift, S; Bacon, S E; Thwaites, D; Sebag-Montefiore, D; Morgan, A M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives MRI is the preferred staging modality for rectal carcinoma patients. This work assesses the CT–MRI co-registration accuracy of four commercial rigid-body techniques for external beam radiotherapy treatment planning for patients treated in the prone position without fiducial markers. Methods 17 patients with biopsy-proven rectal carcinoma were scanned with CT and MRI in the prone position without the use of fiducial markers. A reference co-registration was performed by consensus of a radiologist and two physicists. This was compared with two automated and two manual techniques on two separate treatment planning systems. Accuracy and reproducibility were analysed using a measure of target registration error (TRE) that was based on the average distance of the mis-registration between vertices of the clinically relevant gross tumour volume as delineated on the CT image. Results An automated technique achieved the greatest accuracy, with a TRE of 2.3 mm. Both automated techniques demonstrated perfect reproducibility and were significantly faster than their manual counterparts. There was a significant difference in TRE between registrations performed on the two planning systems, but there were no significant differences between the manual and automated techniques. Conclusion For patients with rectal cancer, MRI acquired in the prone treatment position without fiducial markers can be accurately registered with planning CT. An automated registration technique offered a fast and accurate solution with associated uncertainties within acceptable treatment planning limits. PMID:22190750

  8. The effect of intraoperative lavage with short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on rectal anastomosis of rats receiving corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Netta, S; Papadopoulos, V; Apostolidis, S; Michalopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anastomotic failure is one of the most frequent complications in rectal surgery. The present study aims to elucidate the effect of intraoperative lavage with short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on rectal anastomosis of rats receiving corticosteroids. Methods: Fifty male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. Group A (control group, without lavage and medication), group B (lavage with saline solution and no medication), group C (lavage with SCFAs and no medication), group D (lavage with saline solution and injection of 30mg/kg methylprednisolone 7 days pre-operatively and 4 days post-operatively), group E (lavage with a SCFAs and methylprednisolone). On the 4th postoperative day the animals were sacrificed and bursting pressure of the anastomosis, CRP, IL-6 and TNF-a were measured. Results: Kruskal-Wallis variance analysis showed statistically significant differences between the groups (p<0.001). The bursting pressure of the anastomosis was lower in groups B and D, while it was higher in group C. TNF-a values displayed differences between group D and groups A, C, E. Conclusions: Intraoperative lavage with SCFAs increases anastomotic strength by increasing the bursting pressure of anastomosis in rats receiving corticosteroid, while lavage with saline solution decreases it. Rectal irrigation with short-chain fatty acids may improve anastomotic healing, especially in patients receiving corticosteroids. PMID:26052203

  9. Electrical Stimulation Therapy in Chronic Functional Constipation: Five Years' Experience in Patients Refractory to Biofeedback Therapy and With Rectal Hyposensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kee Wook; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, In Ja; Seo, So Young; Koo, Hyun Sook; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Lee, Ho Su; Kim, Ji-Beom; Kim, Jong Wook; Park, Soo Kyung; Park, Sang Hyoung; Kim, Kyung Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Biofeedback therapy (BFT) can be unsuccessful in constipated patients, even those with pelvic floor dysfunction. Electrical stimulation therapy (EST) has been introduced as a novel therapeutic modality in patients with chronic constipation, especially those who have rectal hyposensitivity. We evaluated the efficacy of EST based on five years' clinical experience. Methods From January 2002 to February 2007, 159 patients underwent EST. After exclusion of 12 drop-outs, 147 (M:F = 61:86, 49 ± 17 years) finished all treatment sessions. Among them, 88 (M:F = 29:59, 49 ± 17 years) were refractory to BFT without rectal hyposensitivity (RH), and 59 (M:F = 32:27, 54 ± 17 years) were those with RH. Results The overall response to EST was 59.2% (87/147) by per-protocol analysis. In the EST-responsive group, overall satisfaction improved significantly (from 7.3 ± 3.0 to 4.3 ± 2.5, P < 0.05). Subgroup analysis showed that the response rate was 64.8% (57/88) in patients refractory to BFT without RH, and 50.8% (30/59) in those with RH. Conclusions EST may have additional therapeutic efficacy in patients who are refractory to BFT. EST may also be effective in patients with RH, including restor