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Sample records for rectal cancer resection

  1. [Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for resectable lower rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takase, Shiro; Kamigaki, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishimura, Hideki; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2009-11-01

    To suppress local recurrence and preserve sphincter function, we performed preoperative chemoradiotherapy( CRT) of rectal cancer. Sixteen patients with lower advanced rectal cancer received tegafur/uracil/calcium folinate+RT followed by curative resection with lateral lymph node dissection 2-8 weeks later. The male/female ratio was found to be 11:5 (41-75 years old) and the CRT was feasible for all patients. There were 11-PR and 5-SD according to RECIST criteria, and lower isotope accumulation was observed for all primary tumors in FDG-PET study. After CRT, all patients received R0 curative resection (11 APR, 2 LAR, 1 Hartmann and 1 ISR). On pathological study, 3 patients showed complete response. Surgical complications including pelvic infection, delayed a wound healing and deep venous thrombosis, etc. In conclusion, preoperative CRT of advanced rectal cancer could potentially be useful for local control and sphincter saving, however, it is necessary to manage specific surgical complications due to radiation. PMID:20037306

  2. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Resection for Mid and Low Rectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Bulent; Yuksel, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The current study was conducted to determine whether robotic low anterior resection (RLAR) has real benefit over laparoscopic low anterior resection (LLAR) in terms of surgical and early oncologic outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 35 RLARs and 28 LLARs, performed for mid and low rectal cancers, from January 2013 through June 2015. Results: A total of 63 patients were included in the study. All surgeries were performed successfully. The clinicopathologic characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Compared with the laparoscopic group, the robotic group had less intraoperative blood loss (165 vs. 120 mL; P < .05) and higher mean operative time (252 vs. 208 min; P < .05). No significant differences were observed in the time to flatus passage, length of hospital stay, and postoperative morbidity. Pathological examination of total mesorectal excision (TME) specimens showed that both circumferential resection margin and transverse (proximal and distal) margins were negative in the RLAR group. However, 1 patient each had positive circumferential resection margin and positive distal transverse margin in the LLAR group. The mean number of harvested lymph nodes was 27 in the RLAR group and 23 in the LLAR group. Conclusions: In our study, short-term outcomes of robotic surgery for mid and low rectal cancers were similar to those of laparoscopic surgery. The quality of TME specimens was better in the patients who underwent robotic surgery. However, the longer operative time was a limitation of robotic surgery. PMID:27081292

  3. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status. PMID:27097629

  4. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  5. Treatment of rectal cancer by low anterior resection with coloanal anastomosis.

    PubMed Central

    Paty, P B; Enker, W E; Cohen, A M; Lauwers, G Y

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our institution's experience with low anterior resection in combination with coloanal anastomosis (LAR/CAA) for primary rectal cancer was reviewed (1) to determine cancer treatment results, 2) to identify risk factors for pelvic recurrence, and 3) to assess the long-term success of sphincter preservation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Use of sphincter-preserving resection for mid-rectal and selected distal-rectal cancers continues to increase. As surgical techniques and adjuvant therapy evolve, treatment results must be carefully assessed. METHODS: One hundred thirty-four patients treated for primary rectal cancer by LAR/CAA between 1977 and 1990 were studied retrospectively. All pathologic slides were reviewed. Median follow-up was 4 years. RESULTS: Actuarial 5-year survival for all patients was 73%. Among 36 patients who relapsed, distant metastatic disease had developed at the time of first clinical relapse in most (86%). Pelvic recurrence was detected in 13 patients, an actuarial rate of 11% at 5 years. Mesenteric implants, positive microscopic resection margin, T3 tumor, perineural invasion, blood vessel invasion, and high tumor grade were associated with increased risk for pelvic recurrence. Eleven patients ultimately required permanent colostomy, and in eight instances the cause was pelvic recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Low anterior resection combined with coloanal anastomosis provides good treatment for mid-rectal cancers and for some distal rectal cancers. Pelvic recurrence is not associated with short distal resection margins but is correlated with the presence of histopathologic markers of aggressive disease in the primary tumor. Long-term preservation of anal sphincter function depends primarily on control of pelvic tumor and can be achieved in more than 90% of patients. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:8161262

  6. [Two Cases of Curative Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Noboru; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Kuboki, Satoshi; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Kato, Atsushi; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Reports of conversion in cases of locally advanced colorectal cancer have been increasing. Here, we present 2 cases in which curative resection of locally advanced rectal cancer accompanied by intestinal obstruction was achieved after establishing a stoma and administering chemotherapy. The first case was of a 46-year-old male patient diagnosed with upper rectal cancer and intestinal obstruction. Because of a high level of retroperitoneal invasion, after establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 13 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Around 6 months after the initial surgery, low anterior resection for rectal cancer and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Fourteen days after curative resection, the patient was discharged from the hospital. The second case was of a 66-year-old male patient with a circumferential tumor extending from Rs to R, accompanied by right ureter infiltration and sub-intestinal obstruction. After establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 11 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Five months after the initial surgery, anterior resection of the rectum and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Twenty days after curative resection, the patient was released from the hospital. No recurrences have been detected in either case. PMID:26805302

  7. Anterior-only Partial Sacrectomy for en bloc Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Hector; Perez-Orribo, Luis F.; Plata-Bello, Julio M.; Martin-Malagon, Antonio I.; Garcia-Marin, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The usual procedure for partial sacrectomies in locally advanced rectal cancer combines a transabdominal and a posterior sacral route. The posterior approach is flawed with a high rate of complications, especially infections and wound-healing problems. Anterior-only approaches have indirectly been mentioned within long series of rectal cancer surgery. We describe a case of partial sacrectomy for en bloc resection of a locally advanced rectal cancer with invasion of the low sacrum through a combined transabdominal and perineal approach without any posterior incision. Methods Through a midline laparotomy, the tumor was dissected and the sacral osteotomy was performed. Once the sacrum was mobile, the muscular attachments to its posterior wall were cut through the perineal approach. This latter route was also used to remove the whole specimen. Results The postoperative period was uneventful in terms of infection and wound healing, but the patient developed right foot dorsiflexion paresis that completely disappeared in 1 month. Resection margins were negative. After a follow-up of 18 months, the patient has no local recurrence but presented lung and liver metastases. Conclusion In cases of rectal cancer involving the low sacrum, the combination of a transabdominal and a perineal route to carry out the partial sacrectomy is a feasible approach that avoids changes of surgical positioning and the morbidity related to posterior incisions. This strategy should be considered when deciding on undertaking partial sacrectomy in locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:25396109

  8. Sparing Sphincters and Laparoscopic Resection Improve Survival by Optimizing the Circumferential Resection Margin in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Metin; Bayraktar, Adem; Sivirikoz, Emre; Yegen, Gülcin; Karip, Bora; Saglam, Esra; Bulut, Mehmet Türker; Balik, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of rectal cancer treatment is to minimize the local recurrence rate and extend the disease-free survival period and survival. For this aim, obtainment of negative circumferential radial margin (CRM) plays an important role. This study evaluated predictive factors for positive CRM status and its effect on patient survival in mid- and distal rectal tumors. Patients who underwent curative resection for rectal cancer were included. The main factors were demographic data, tumor location, surgical technique, neoadjuvant therapy, tumor diameter, tumor depth, lymph node metastasis, mesorectal integrity, CRM, the rate of local recurrence, distant metastasis, and overall and disease-free survival. Statistical analyses were performed by using the Chi-squared test, Fisher exact test, Student t test, Mann–Whitney U test and the Mantel–Cox log-rank sum test. A total of 420 patients were included, 232 (55%) of whom were male. We observed no significant differences in patient characteristics or surgical treatment between the patients who had positive CRM and who had negative CRM, but a higher positive CRM rate was observed in patients undergone abdominoperineal resection (APR) (P < 0.001). Advanced T-stage (P < 0.001), lymph node invasion (P = 0.001) and incomplete mesorectum (P = 0.007) were encountered significantly more often in patients with positive CRM status. Logistic regression analysis revealed that APR (P < 0.001) and open resection (P = 0.046) were independent predictors of positive CRM status. Moreover, positive CRM was associated with decreased 5-year overall and disease-free survival (P = 0.002 and P = 0.004, respectively). This large single-institution series demonstrated that APR and open resection were independent predictive factors for positive CRM status in rectal cancer. Positive CRM independently decreased the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates. PMID:26844498

  9. Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer with mesorectal excision: incidence, risk factors, and management.

    PubMed

    Tortorelli, Antonio Pio; Alfieri, Sergio; Sanchez, Alejandro Martin; Rosa, Fausto; Papa, Valerio; Di Miceli, Dario; Bellantone, Chiara; Doglietto, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-01

    We investigated risk factors and prognostic implications of symptomatic anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer, and the influence of a diverting stoma. Our retrospective review of prospective collected data analyzed 475 patients who underwent anterior resection for rectal cancer. Uni- and multivariate analysis was made between anastomotic leakage and patient, tumor, and treatment variables, either for the overall group (n = 475) and in the midlow rectal cancer subgroup (n = 291). Overall rate of symptomatic leakage was 9 per cent (43 of 475) with no related postoperative mortality. At univariate analysis, significant factors for leak were a tumor less than 6 cm from the anal verge (13.7 vs 6.6%; P = 0.011) and intraoperative transfusions (16.9 vs 4.3%; P = 0.001). Similar results were observed in the midlow rectal cancer subgroup. At multivariate analysis, no parameter resulted in being an independent prognostic factor for risk of leakage. In patients with a leakage, a temporary enterostomy considerably reduced the need for reoperation (12.5 vs 77.8%; P < 0.0001) and the risk of a permanent stoma (18.7 vs 28.5%; P = 0.49). The incidence of anastomotic failure increases for lower tumors, whereas it is not influenced by radiotherapy. Defunctioning enterostomy does not influence the leak rate, but it mitigates clinical consequences. PMID:25569064

  10. Factors affecting sphincter-preserving resection treatment for patients with low rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, ZHENQIANG; YU, XIANBO; WANG, HAIJIANG; MA, MING; ZHAO, ZELIANG; WANG, QISAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the factors associated with the use of sphincter-preserving resection (SPR) surgery for the treatment of low rectal cancer. A total of 330 patients with histopathologically confirmed low rectal cancer were divided into two groups, namely the abdominoperineal resection (APR) and sphincter-preserving (SP) groups. For SPR factor analysis, the χ2 test was performed as the univariate analysis, while a logistic regression test was conducted as the multivariate analysis. Of the 330 patients, 192 cases (58.18%) received SPR surgery and 138 cases (41.82%) underwent an APR. Univariate analysis results revealed that the sphincter-preserving factor was significantly associated with age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), total infiltrated circumference, distance of the tumor from the anal verge (DTAV), depth of invasion and tumor grade (P<0.05). However, there were no statistically significant associations with family medical history, diabetes history, venous tumor embolism, growth type, tumor length, lymphatic metastasis and level of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that the sphincter-preserving factor was strongly associated with DTAV and the depth of invasion, with significant statistical difference (P<0.05). Therefore, selecting SPR surgery for patients with low rectal cancer is dependent on age, gender, ethnicity, BMI, the total infiltrated circumference, DTAV, depth of invasion and tumor grade. In addition, DTAV and the depth of invasion are independent risk factors for the selection of SPR surgery. PMID:26622341

  11. Use of Valtrac™-Secured Intracolonic Bypass in Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Danyang; Lin, Jianjiang; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of anastomotic leakage (AL) remains a major concern in the early postoperative stage. Because of the relatively high morbidity and mortality of AL in patients with laparoscopic low rectal cancer who receive an anterior resection, a fecal diverting method is usually introduced. The Valtrac™-secured intracolonic bypass (VIB) was used in open rectal resection, and played a role of protecting the anastomotic site. This study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the VIB in protecting laparoscopic low rectal anastomosis and to compare the efficacy and complications of VIB with those of loop ileostomy (LI). Medical records of the 43 patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective laparoscopic low anterior resection and received VIB procedure or LI between May 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including the patients’ demographics, clinical features, and operative data. Twenty-four patients received a VIB and 19 patients a LI procedure. Most of the demographics and clinical features of the groups, including Dukes stages, were similar. However, the median distance of the tumor edge from the anus verge in the VIB group was significantly longer (7.5 cm; inter-quartile range [IQR] 7.0–9.5 cm) than that of the L1 group (6.0 cm; IQR 6.0–7.0 cm). None of the patients developed clinical AL. The comparisons between the LI and the VIB groups were adjusted for the significant differences in the tumor level of the groups. After adjustment, the LI group experienced longer overall postoperative hospital stay (14.0 days, IQR: 12.0, 16.0 days; P < 0.001) and incurred higher costs ($6300 (IQR: $5900, $6600)) than the VIB group (7.0 days, $4800; P < 0.05). Stoma-related complications in the ileostomy group included dermatitis (n = 2), stoma bleeding (n = 1), and wound infection after closure (n = 2). No BAR-related complications occurred. The mean time to Valtrac™ ring loosening was 14.1 ± 3

  12. [A Case of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Curatively Resected Following Chemoradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yohei; Terada, Itsuro; Terai, Shiro; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kaji, Masahide; Maeda, Kiichi; Shimizu, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 70s was referred to our hospital with anorexia, weight loss, and constipation. After examination by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and colonoscopy, he was diagnosed as having a locally advanced rectal cancer with abscess formation. Because CT and MRI indicated that the tumor had invaded the seminal vesicle, prostate, and sacrum, we diagnosed it as an unresectable tumor. We treated the abscesses around the tumor by sigmoid colostomy with administration of antibiotics. After control of the infection, the patient received systemic chemotherapy with capecitabine/oxaliplatin (XELOX) plus bevacizumab (BV). After the 5th courses of XELOX plus BV, the primary tumor showed a tendency to shrink, but invasion to the neighboring organs was still seen. Therefore, we treated him with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using S-1. After completion of CRT with no significant adverse effects, the tumor invasion to the neighboring organs disappeared, and we performed a low anterior resection 9 weeks later. Pathological findings revealed that the tumor had shrunk remarkably and it was resected curatively, although a few tumor cells remained in the subserosal layer of the ulcerative scar caused by the CRT. His postoperative course was uneventful, and he underwent adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 for 3 months after discharge. To date, no disease recurrence has been detected. We report a case of locally advanced rectal cancer, which was curatively resected following chemoradiotherapy, along with a short literature review. PMID:26805354

  13. Pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring during robotic-assisted low anterior resection for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Grade, Marian; Beham, Alexander W; Schüler, P; Kneist, Werner; Ghadimi, B Michael

    2016-06-01

    While the oncological outcome of patients with rectal cancer has been considerably improved within the last decades, anorectal, urinary and sexual functions remained impaired at high levels, regardless of whether radical surgery was performed open or laparoscopically. Consequently, intraoperative monitoring of the autonomic pelvic nerves with simultaneous electromyography of the internal anal sphincter and manometry of the urinary bladder has been introduced to advance nerve-sparing surgery and to improve functional outcome. Initial results suggested that pelvic neuromonitoring may result in better functional outcomes. Very recently, it has also been demonstrated that minimally invasive neuromonitoring is technically feasible. Because, to the best of our knowledge, pelvic neuromonitoring has not been performed during robotic surgery, we report the first case of robotic-assisted low anterior rectal resection combined with intraoperative monitoring of the autonomic pelvic nerves. PMID:26705113

  14. Laparoscopic resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis without abdominal incisions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Yong; Chen, Gang; Du, Jun-Feng; Chen, Guang; Wei, Xiao-Jun; Cui, Wei; Zuo, Fu-Yi; Yu, Bo; Dong, Xing; Ji, Xi-Qing; Yuan, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess laparoscopic radical resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. METHODS: From March 2010 to June 2014, 30 patients (14 men and 16 women, aged 36-78 years, mean age 59.8 years) underwent laparoscopic radical resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis through anus-preserving transanal resection. The tumors were 5-7 cm away from the anal margin in 24 cases, and 4 cm in six cases. In preoperative assessment, there were 21 cases of T1N0M0 and nine of T2N0M0. Through the middle approach, the sigmoid mesentery was freed at the root with an ultrasonic scalpel and the roots of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein were dissected, clamped and cut. Following the total mesorectal excision principle, the rectum was separated until the anorectal ring reached 3-5 cm from the distal end of the tumor. For perineal surgery, a ring incision was made 2 cm above the dentate line, and sharp dissection was performed submucosally towards the superior direction, until the plane of the levator ani muscle, to transect the rectum. The rectum and distal sigmoid colon were removed together from the anus, followed by a telescopic anastomosis between the full thickness of the proximal colon and the mucosa and submucosal tissue of the rectum. RESULTS: For the present cohort of 30 cases, the mean operative time was 178 min, with an average of 13 positive lymph nodes detected. One case of postoperative anastomotic leak was observed, requiring temporary colostomy, which was closed and recovered 3 mo later. The postoperative pathology showed T1-T2N0M0 in 19 cases and T2N1M0 in 11 cases. Twelve months after surgery, 94.4% patients achieved anal function Kirwan grade 1, indicating that their anal function returned to normal. The patients were followed up for 1-36 mo, with an average of 23 mo. There was no local recurrence, and 17 patients survived for > 3 years (with a survival rate of 100

  15. Quality of Life After a Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Walma, Marieke S.; de Roos, Marnix A.J.; Boerma, Djamila; van Westreenen, Henderik L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fecal incontinence is a major concern, and its incidence increases with age. Quality of life may decrease due to fecal incontinence after both sphincter-saving surgery and a rectal resection with a permanent stoma. This study investigated quality of life, with regard to fecal incontinency, in elderly patients after rectal-cancer surgery. Methods All patients who underwent elective rectal surgery with anastomosis for rectal cancer between December 2008 and June 2012 at two Dutch hospitals were eligible for inclusion. The Wexner and the fecal incontinence quality of life (FIQoL) scores were collected. Young (<70 years of age) and elderly (≥70 years of age) patients were compared. Results Seventy-nine patients were included, of whom 19 were elderly patients (24.1%). All diverting stomas that had been placed (n = 60, 75.9%) had been closed at the time of the study. There were no differences in Wexner or FIQoL scores between the young and the elderly patients. Also, there were no differences between patients without a diverting stoma and patients in whom bowel continuity had been restored. Elderly females had significantly worse scores on the FIQoL subscales of coping/behavior (P = 0.043) and depression/self-perception (P = 0.004) than young females. Elderly females scored worse on coping/behavior (P = 0.010) and depression/self-perception (P = 0.036) than elderly males. Young and elderly males had comparable scores. Conclusion Quality of life with regard to fecal incontinency is worse in elderly females after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. Patients should be informed of this impact, and a definite stoma may be considered in this patient group. PMID:26962533

  16. Role of protective stoma in low anterior resection for rectal cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Wen; Ma, Cong-Chao; Yang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To provide a comprehensive evaluation of the role of a protective stoma in low anterior resection (LAR) for rectal cancer. METHODS: The PubMed, EMBASE, and MEDLINE databases were searched for studies and relevant literature published between 2007 and 2014 regarding the construction of a protective stoma during LAR. A pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was used to assess the outcomes of the studies, including the rate of postoperative anastomotic leakage and reoperations related to leakage. Funnel plots and Egger’s tests were used to evaluate the publication biases of the studies. P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 11 studies were included in the meta-analysis. In total, 5612 patients were examined, 2868 of whom had a protective stoma and 2744 of whom did not. The sample size of the studies varied from 34 to 1912 patients. All studies reported the number of patients who developed an anastomotic leakage and required a reoperation related to leakage. A random effects model was used to calculate the pooled RR with the corresponding 95%CI because obvious heterogeneity was observed among the 11 studies (I2 = 77%). The results indicated that the creation of a protective stoma during LAR significantly reduces the rate of anastomotic leakage and the number of reoperations related to leakage, with pooled RRs of 0.38 (95%CI: 0.30-0.48, P < 0.00001) and 0.37 (95%CI: 0.29-0.48, P < 0.00001), respectively. The shape of the funnel plot did not reveal any evidence of obvious asymmetry. CONCLUSION: The presence of a protective stoma effectively decreased the incidences of anastomotic leakage and reoperation and is recommended in patients undergoing low rectal anterior resections for rectal cancer. PMID:25548503

  17. Laparoscopic vs open abdominoperineal resection in the multimodality management of low rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Huang, Li-Yong; Song, Cheng-Li; Zhuo, Chang-Hua; Shi, De-Bing; Cai, Guo-Xiang; Xu, Ye; Cai, San-Jun; Li, Xin-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection compared with the open procedure in multimodality management of rectal cancer. METHODS: A total of 106 rectal cancer patients who underwent open abdominoperineal resection (OAPR) were matched with 106 patients who underwent laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (LAPR) in a 1 to 1 fashion, between 2009 and 2013 at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Propensity score matching was carried out based on age, gender, pathological staging of the disease and administration of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Data regarding preoperative staging, surgical technique, pathological results, postoperative recovery and complications were reviewed and compared between the LAPR and OAPR groups. Perineal closure around the stoma and pelvic floor reconstruction were performed only in OAPR, not in LAPR. Therefore, abdominoperineal resection procedure-specific surgical complications including parastomal hernia and perineal wound complications were compared between the open and laparoscopic procedure. Regular surveillance of the two cohorts was carried out to gather prognostic data. Disease-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier estimate and log-rank test. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with locally advanced disease treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between the LAPR group and the OAPR group in terms of clinicopathological features. The operation time (180.8 ± 47.8 min vs 172.1 ± 49.2 min, P = 0.190), operative blood loss (93.9 ± 60.0 mL vs 88.4 ± 55.2 mL, P = 0.494), total number of retrieved lymph nodes (12.9 ± 6.9 vs 12.9 ± 5.4, P = 0.974), surgical complications (12.3% vs 15.1%, P = 0.549) and pathological characteristics were comparable between the LAPR and OAPR group, respectively. Compared with OAPR patients, LAPR patients showed significantly shorter postoperative analgesia (2.4 ± 0

  18. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  19. Risk Factors of Permanent Stomas in Patients with Rectal Cancer after Low Anterior Resection with Temporary Stomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul Min; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to identify risk factors influencing permanent stomas after low anterior resection with temporary stomas for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 2528 consecutive rectal cancer patients who had undergone low anterior resection were retrospectively reviewed. Risk factors for permanent stomas were evaluated among these patients. Results Among 2528 cases of rectal cancer, a total of 231 patients had a temporary diverting stoma. Among these cases, 217 (93.9%) received a stoma reversal. The median period between primary surgery and stoma reversal was 7.5 months. The temporary and permanent stoma groups consisted of 203 and 28 patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that independent risk factors for permanent stomas were anastomotic-related complications (p=0.001) and local recurrence (p=0.001). The 5-year overall survival for the temporary and permanent stoma groups were 87.0% and 70.5%, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusion Rectal cancer patients who have temporary stomas after low anterior resection with local recurrence and anastomotic-related complications may be at increased risk for permanent stoma. PMID:25683994

  20. [A Case of Advanced Rectal Cancer Resected Successfully after Induction Chemotherapy with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Panitumumab].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshimi; Uchima, Yasutake; Kawamura, Minori; Takeda, Osami; Hanno, Hajime; Takayanagi, Shigenori; Hirooka, Tomoomi; Dozaiku, Toshio; Hirooka, Takashi; Aomatsu, Naoki; Hirakawa, Toshiki; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Nishii, Takafumi; Morimoto, Junya; Nakazawa, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of advanced colon cancer that was effectively treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab combination chemotherapy. The patient was a 54-year-old man who had type 2 colon cancer of the rectum. An abdominal CT scan demonstrated rectal cancer with bulky lymph node metastasis and 1 hepatic node(rectal cancer SI[bladder retroperitoneum], N2M0H1P0, cStage IV). He was treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, CT revealed that the primary lesion and regional metastatic lymph nodes had reduced in size(rectal cancer A, N1H1P0M0, cStage IV). Anterior rectal resection with D3 nodal dissection and left lateral segmentectomy of the liver was performed. The histological diagnosis was tubular adenocarcinoma(tub2-1), int, INF a, pMP, ly0, v0, pDM0, pPM0, R0. He was treated with 4 courses of mFOLFOX6 after surgery. The patient has been in good health without a recurrence for 2 years and 5 months after surgery. This case suggests that induction chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab is a potentially effective regimen for advanced colon cancer. PMID:27210100

  1. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  2. Anatomical basis and clinical research of pelvic autonomic nerve preservation with laparoscopic radical resection for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Lu, Xiao-ming; Tao, Kai-xiong; Ma, Jian-hua; Cai, Kai-lin; Wang, Lin-fang; Niu, Yan-feng; Wang, Guo-bin

    2016-04-01

    The clinical effect of laparoscopic rectal cancer curative excision with pelvic autonomic nerve preservation (PANP) was investigated. This study evaluated the frequency of urinary and sexual dysfunction of 149 male patients with middle and low rectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic or open total mesorectal excision with pelvic autonomic nerve preservation (PANP) from March 2011 to March 2013. Eighty-four patients were subjected to laparoscopic surgery, and 65 to open surgery respectively. The patients were followed up for 12 months, interviewed, and administered a standardized questionnaire about postoperative functional outcomes and quality of life. In the laparoscopic group, 13 patients (18.37%) presented transitory postoperative urinary dysfunction, and were medically treated. So did 12 patients (21.82%) in open group. Sexual desire was maintained by 52.86%, un-ability to engage in intercourse by 47.15%, and un-ability to achieve orgasm and ejaculation by 34.29% of the patients in the laparoscopic group. Sexual desire was maintained by 56.36%, un-ability to engage in intercourse by 43.63%, and un-ability to achieve orgasm and ejaculation by 33.73% of the patients in the open group. No significant differences in urinary and sexual dysfunction between the laparoscopic and open rectal resection groups were observed (P>0.05). It was concluded that laparoscopic rectal cancer radical excision with PANP did not aggravate or improve sexual and urinary dysfunction. PMID:27072964

  3. [A case of surgical approach to the recurrence of the para-aortic lymph nodes after resection of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Hiroki; Ota, Hirofumi; Fujie, Yujirou; Shimizu, Kaori; Ogino, Takayuki; Toyoda, Yasuhiro; Yoshioka, Akiko; Yoshioka, Setsuko; Hojou, Shigeyuki; Endo, Wakio; Kakutani, Aki; Maeura, Yoshiichi

    2009-11-01

    A 63-year-old female diagnosed as rectal cancer underwent low anterior resection and received adjuvant chemotherapy (folinate/tegafur/uracil therapy). After 6 months, lymph node metastasis was confirmed by an elevation of the tumor marker (CEA) and a FDG-PET image. After administration of 37 courses of mFOLFOX6 therapy, surgical excision was performed to the lymph node recurrence, because it was difficult to continue mFOLFOX6 therapy with grade 3 neuropathy. After 8 months from the last operation, no lymph node metastasis was appeared in the para-aortic area. PMID:20037371

  4. [Role of transanal drainage tube in the prevention of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Song; Tong, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is one of the most serious complications of anterior resection for rectal cancer with morbidity about 10%. Distance of anastomosis to anal margin, underlying disease, surgical technique and perioperative situations are associated with AL. The transanal drainage tube (TDT) after anastomosis is gradually proved to be useful in prevention of AL. Most of the literatures suggest that TDT is simple and safe, and can reduce the incidence of AL. The materials and the operating process of TDT have been universalized gradually: application of silicone or rubber material, large lumen with several side holes, placement at a distance of 3 to 5 cm above the anastomosis for 5 to 7 days. However, selection bias existed in previous studies, and the main problems were disunity of enrolling standard and exclusion of patients with high AL risk, which would not fully reflect the value of TDT. Defunctioning stoma (or diverting stoma, DS) is a common method to prevent and treat the AL. At present, efficacy comparison between TDT and DS remains controversial. Thus, randomized, double-blind, controlled trials are needed to investigate the value of TDT in prevention of AL after anterior resection, especially for middle and low rectal cancer. PMID:27353109

  5. Factors Predicting Difficulty of Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer with Total Mesorectal Excision and Double Stapling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiping; Li, Qiken; Fan, Yongtian; Li, Dechuan; Jiang, Lai; Qiu, Pengnian; Tang, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic sphincter-preserving low anterior resection for rectal cancer is a surgery demanding great skill. Immense efforts have been devoted to identifying factors that can predict operative difficulty, but the results are inconsistent. Objective Our study was conducted to screen patients’ factors to build models for predicting the operative difficulty using well controlled data. Method We retrospectively reviewed records of 199 consecutive patients who had rectal cancers 5–8 cm from the anal verge. All underwent laparoscopic sphincter-preserving low anterior resections with total mesorectal excision (TME) and double stapling technique (DST). Data of 155 patients from one surgeon were utilized to build models to predict standardized endpoints (operative time, blood loss) and postoperative morbidity. Data of 44 patients from other surgeons were used to test the predictability of the built models. Results Our results showed prior abdominal surgery, preoperative chemoradiotherapy, tumor distance to anal verge, interspinous distance, and BMI were predictors for the standardized operative times. Gender and tumor maximum diameter were related to the standardized blood loss. Temporary diversion and tumor diameter were predictors for postoperative morbidity. The model constructed for the operative time demonstrated excellent predictability for patients from different surgeons. Conclusions With a well-controlled patient population, we have built a predictable model to estimate operative difficulty. The standardized operative time will make it possible to significantly increase sample size and build more reliable models to predict operative difficulty for clinical use. PMID:26992004

  6. Adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: defining subgroups who may benefit after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and resection

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Monique; Nelemans, Patty J; Valentini, Vincenzo; Crane, Christopher H; Capirci, Carlo; Rödel, Claus; Nash, Garrett M; Kuo, Li-Jen; Glynne-Jones, Rob; García-Aguilar, Julio; Suárez, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Biondo, Sebastiano; Theodoropoulos, George; Lambregts, Doenja MJ; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Beets, Geerard L

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT) for rectal cancer patients might depend on the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Aim was to evaluate whether the effect of aCT in rectal cancer is modified by response to CRT and to identify which patients benefit from aCT after CRT, by means of a pooled analysis of individual patient data from 13 datasets. Patients were categorised into 3 groups: pCR (ypT0N0), ypT1-2 tumour and ypT3-4 tumour. Hazard ratios for the effect of aCT were derived from multivariable Cox regression analyses. Primary outcome measure was recurrence-free survival (RFS). 1723(52%) of 3313 included patients received aCT. 898 patients had a pCR, 966 had a ypT1-2 tumour and 1302 had a ypT3-4 tumour. For 122 patients response category was missing and 25 patients had ypT0N+. Median follow-up for all patients was 51 (0-219) months. Hazard ratios for RFS with 95%CI for patients treated with aCT were 1.25(0.68-2.29), 0.58(0.37-0.89) and 0.83(0.66-1.10) for patients with pCR, ypT1-2 and ypT3-4 tumours, respectively. The effect of aCT in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT differs between subgroups. Patients with a pCR after CRT may not benefit from aCT, whereas patients with residual tumour had superior outcomes when aCT was administered. The test for interaction did not reach statistical significance, but the results support further investigation of a more individualized approach to administer aCT after CRT and surgery based on pathologic staging. PMID:25418551

  7. Indication of pre-surgical radiochemotherapy enhances psychosocial morbidity among patients with resectable locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bencova, V; Krajcovicova, I; Svec, J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer experience stress-determined psychosocial comorbidities and behavioural alterations. Patients expectation to be cured by the first line surgery and their emotional status can be negatively influenced by the decision to include neoadjuvant long-course radiotherapy prior to surgical intervention. From the patient's perspective such treatment algorithmindicates incurability of the disease. The aim of this study was to analyse the extent and dynamics of stress and related psychosocial disturbances among patients with resectable rectal cancer to whom the neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy before surgery has been indicated.Three standardised assessment tools evaluating psychosocial morbidity of rectal cancer patients have been implemented: The EORTC QLQ C30-3, the EORTC QLQ CR29 module and the HADS questionnaires previously tested for internal consistency were answered by patients before and after long-course radiotherapy and after surgery and the scores of clinical and psychosocial values were evaluated by means of the EORTC and HADS manuals. The most profound psychosocial distress was experienced by patients after the decision to apply neoadjuvant radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy before surgical intervention. The involvement of pre-surgical radiotherapy into the treatment algorithm increased emotional disturbances (anxiety, feelings of hopelessness) and negatively influenced patient's treatment adherence and positive expectations from the healing process. The negative psychosocial consequences appeared to be more enhanced in female patients. Despite provided information about advances of neoadjuvant radiotherapy onto success of surgical intervention, the emotional and cognitive disorders improved only slightly. The results clearly indicate that addressed communication and targeted psychosocial support has to find place before pre-surgical radiochemotherapy and as a standard part through the trajectory of the entire multimodal rectal cancer

  8. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Meerten, Esther van; Rothbarth, Joost; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de; Burger, Jacobus W.A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  9. Multivisceral resections for rectal cancers: short-term oncological and clinical outcomes from a tertiary-care center in India

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vishwas D.; Jatal, Sudhir; Ostwal, Vikas; Engineer, Reena; Arya, Supreeta; Patil, Prachi; Bal, Munita

    2016-01-01

    Background Locally advanced rectal cancers (LARCs) involve one or more of the adjacent organs in upto 10-20% patients. The cause of the adhesions may be inflammatory or neoplastic, and the exact causes cannot be determined pre- or intra-operatively. To achieve complete resection, partial or total mesorectal excision (TME) en bloc with the involved organs is essential. The primary objective of this study is to determine short-term oncological and clinical outcomes in these patients undergoing multivisceral resections (MVRs). Methods This is a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database. Between 1 July 2013 and 31 May 2015, all patients undergoing MVRs for adenocarcinoma of the rectum were identified from this database. All patients who had en bloc resection of an adjacent organ or part of an adjacent organ were included. Those with unresectable metastatic disease after neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. Results Fifty-four patients were included in the study. Median age of the patients was 43 years. Mucinous histology was detected in 29.6% patients, and signet ring cell adenocarcinoma was found in 24.1% patients. Neoadjuvant therapy was given in 83.4% patients. R0 resection was achieved in 87% patients. Five-year overall survival (OS) was 70% for the entire cohort of population. Conclusions In Indian subcontinent, MVRs in young patients with high proportion of signet ring cell adenocarcinomas based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of response assessment (MRI 2) is associated with similar circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement and similar adjacent organ involvement as the western patients who are older and surgery is being planned on MRI 1 (baseline pelvis). However, longer follow-up is needed to confirm noninferiority of oncological outcomes. PMID:27284465

  10. [Two Cases of Rectal Cancer Resected Curatively after Chemotherapy with CapeOX plus Bmab].

    PubMed

    Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Wataru; Hashiba, Takahiro; Togawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-01

    We report 2 cases of locally far-advanced rectosigmoid cancer that were initially unresectable, but were successfully excised after treatment with CapeOX plus Bmab chemotherapy(capecitabine, L-OHP, and bevacizumab). Case 1: A 72-year-old man who complained of severe constipation initially received sigmoid colostomy because of far-advanced rectosigmoid cancer. After 4 courses of CapeOX plus Bmab chemotherapy administration, the size of the primary tumor remarkably decreased and curative resection could be performed. There has been no signs of recurrence for 27 months. Case 2: A 73-year-old man who complained of tenesmus initially received ileostomy because of far-advanced rectosigmoid cancer that directly invaded the appendix, ileum, and urinary bladder. After he received 3 courses of CapeOX plus Bmab chemotherapy, the primary tumor was found to have shrunk remarkably. Therefore, surgery was performed and the tumor was resected curatively. From these experiences, we conclude that some patients with locally far-advanced colorectal cancer can be treated effectively with CapeOX plus Bmab chemotherapy in a neoadjuvant setting. PMID:26805125

  11. Seminal vesicle-rectal fistula secondary to anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection for rectal cancer: a case report and brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masato; Hiraguri, Manabu; Maeda, Chika; Yoshiki, Mizukami; Horigome, Naoto; Kaneko, Gengo

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with seminal vesicle-rectal fistula, an extremely rare complication of low anterior resection of the rectum. A 53-year-old man with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent low anterior resection in our hospital. The patient experienced diarrhea, pneumaturia, and low-grade fever on postoperative day 13. A computed tomography scan showed emphysema in the right seminal vesicle. We concluded that anastomotic leakage induced a seminal vesicle-rectal fistula. The patient underwent conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and oral intake of metronidazole. Diarrhea and pneumaturia rapidly improved after metronidazole administration and the patient was successfully cured without invasive therapy such as colostomy or surgical drainage. A seminal vesicle-rectal fistula is a rare complication of low anterior resection, and therapeutic strategies for this condition remain elusive. Our report provides valuable information on the successful conservative treatment of a secondary seminal vesicle-rectal fistula that developed after low anterior resection of the rectum in a patient. PMID:24444264

  12. An individual patient data meta-analysis of adjuvant therapy with uracil–tegafur (UFT) in patients with curatively resected rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, J; Hamada, C; Yoshida, S; Kodaira, S; Yasutomi, M; Kato, T; Oba, K; Nakazato, H; Saji, S; Ohashi, Y

    2007-01-01

    Uracil–Tegafur (UFT), an oral fluorinated pyrimidine chemotherapeutic agent, has been used for adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively resected colorectal cancer patients. Past trials and meta-analyses indicate that it is somewhat effective in extending survival of patients with rectal cancer. The objective of this study was to perform a reappraisal of randomised clinical trials conducted in this field. We designed an individual patient-based meta-analysis of relevant clinical trials to examine the benefit of UFT for curatively resected rectal cancer in terms of overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and local relapse-free survival (LRFS). We analysed individual patient data of five adjuvant therapy randomised clinical trials for rectal cancer, which met the predetermined inclusion criteria. These five trials had a combined total of 2091 patients, UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy compared to surgery-alone, 5-year follow-up, intention-to-treat-based analytic strategy, and similar endpoints (OS and DFS). In a pooled analysis, UFT had significant advantage over surgery-alone in terms of both OS (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.70–0.97; P=0.02) and DFS (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95%CI, 0.63–0.84; P<0.0001). This individual patient-based meta-analysis demonstrated that oral UFT significantly improves both OS and DFS in patients with curatively resected rectal cancer. PMID:17375049

  13. [A Case of an Unresectable Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with Surrounding Organ Invasion Successfully Resected after Chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus Cetuximab].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hironori; Ariake, Kyohei; Takemura, Shinichi; Doi, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    A 63-year-old man visited our hospital with pain on micturition and was found to have a large rectal tumor with urinary bladder invasion on enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT). The tumor appeared to be unresectable at presentation; thus, sigmoid colostomy was performed and chemotherapy was initiated. The tumor was found to be EGFR-positive and contained a wild-type KRAS. The mFOLFOX6 plus cetuximab (c-mab) regimen was initiated. The follow-up CT scan showed good tumor shrinkage after 4 courses of chemotherapy; 4 additional courses were administered. The tumor eventually regressed by more than 60% and was judged to be resectable. High anterior resection of the rectum with partial resection of the bladder was performed. Abdominal wall metastasis was detected 8 months after surgery, and additional resection was performed. The patient remained well with no other recurrence 8 months after the high anterior resection. Although chemoradiotherapy is the standard preoperative treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer, systemic therapy is effective in certain cases such as substantial tumor invasion of adjacent organs or metastasis. Here, we present a case of rectal cancer that became curatively resectable after preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus c-mab. PMID:27067860

  14. MRI Risk Stratification for Tumor Relapse in Rectal Cancer Achieving Pathological Complete Remission after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Honsoul; Myoung, Sungmin; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Ahn, Joong Bae; Hur, Hyuk; Lim, Joon Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rectal cancer patients achieving pCR are known to have an excellent prognosis, yet no widely accepted consensus on risk stratification and post-operative management (e.g., adjuvant therapy) has been established. This study aimed to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) high-risk factors for tumor relapse in pathological complete remission (pCR) achieved by rectal cancer patients who have undergone neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and curative resection. Materials and Methods We analyzed 88 (male/female = 55/33, median age, 59.5 years [range 34–78]) pCR-proven rectal cancer patients who had undergone pre-CRT MRI, CRT, post-CRT MRI and curative surgery between July 2005 and December 2012. Patients were observed for post-operative tumor relapse. We analyzed the pre/post-CRT MRIs for parameters including mrT stage, mesorectal fascia (mrMRF) status, tumor volume, tumor regression grade (mrTRG), nodal status (mrN), and extramural vessel invasion (mrEMVI). We performed univariate analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results Post-operative tumor relapse occurred in seven patients (8.0%, n = 7/88) between 5.7 and 50.7 (median 16.8) months. No significant relevance was observed between tumor volume, volume reduction rate, mrTRG, mrT, or mrN status. Meanwhile, positive mrMRF (Ppre-CRT = 0.018, Ppre/post-CRT = 0.006) and mrEMVI (Ppre-CRT = 0.026, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.008) were associated with higher incidence of post-operative tumor relapse. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a higher risk of tumor relapse in patients with positive mrMRF (Ppre-CRT = 0.029, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.009) or mrEMVI (Ppre-CRT = 0.024, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.003). Conclusion Positive mrMRF and mrEMVI status was associated with a higher risk of post-operative tumor relapse of pCR achieved by rectal cancer patients, and therefore, can be applied for risk stratification and to individualize treatment plans. PMID:26730717

  15. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m{sup 2}/week, irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  16. Abdominoperineal resection without an abdominal incision for rectal cancer has the advantage of no abdominal wound complication and easier stoma care.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Chi

    2012-02-01

    Abdominoperineal resection has been used for years for the management of low rectal cancer. However, the abdominal incision is associated with many complications and causes interference of the stoma care. If the abdominal incision can be avoided, it would be beneficial to the patient. The aim of the study is to evaluate the possibility and safety of performing abdominoperineal resection and the oncology result without an abdominal incision. From September 2001 to May 2010, 40 patients with rectal malignancies received excision of the rectum, anus, and perineum through a perineal incision and a skin hole created for stomy. No harmonic scalpel or laser was used during surgery. No laparoscope or hand port was used in the procedure. There were 19 males and 21 females. Age ranged from 31 to 87 years old (average, 62.9 years). There were 39 adenocarcinomas and one malignant gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor. There was no operative mortality. Six patients had postoperative complications; three patients had intestinal obstructions; and one patient each had bleeding, urinary tract infection, and colostomy separation from the skin. The lymph nodes in the specimens ranged from 9 to 33 cm (average, 16.8 cm). The survival is similar to the traditional abdominoperineal resection. This limited experience suggests that an abdominal incision is not necessary for radical resection of the rectum, anus, and perineum in patients with low-lying rectal cancer. It also offers the patient easier care of stoma without interference of the abdominal incision. PMID:22369824

  17. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 {+-} 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 {+-} 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  18. Diverting stoma with anterior resection for rectal cancer: does it reduce overall anastomotic leakage and leaks requiring laparotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Liang-Hao; Zhong, Ming; Chen, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) after resection for rectal carcinoma accelerates morbidity and mortality rates, extends hospital stay, and increases treatment costs, particularly when requiring laparotomy. The role of a protective diverting stoma (DS) in avoiding leakage has repeatedly been discussed, but prospective randomized studies on this subject are rare and their results contradictory. The MEDLINE database was searched for studies of AL requiring laparotomy and of the associated rate of protective DSs in initial anterior resection (AR) to review these studies systematically. The collected data were used to determine the average rate of AL requiring laparotomy after rectal cancer surgery in the DS group compared with that in the non-DS group. A total of 930 abstracts were retrieved from MEDLINE; 15 articles on AR and 22 on low/ultralow AR (LAR) were included in the review and analysis. The overall rate of AL requiring laparotomy was 6.57% (813/12, 376) in the AR studies and 4.13% (157/3, 802) in the LAR studies. In the AR studies, the pooled AL rate in the DS group was higher than that in the non-DS group (12.30% vs. 9.16%, P < 0.001). However, the pooled rate of AL requiring laparotomy in the DS group was lower than that in the non-DS group (3.69% vs. 7.42%, P < 0.001). In the LAR studies, the pooled AL rate in the DS group was lower than that in the non-DS group (7.74% vs. 9.64%, P = 0.045). The pooled rate of AL requiring laparotomy in the DS group was also lower than that in the non-DS group (2.67% vs. 5.21%, P < 0.001). By contrast, the pooled rate of definitive stomas and mortality caused by AL did not have any statistical difference between the DS and non-DS groups in both AR studies (definitive stomas: 0% vs. 0.65%; mortality: 0.95% vs. 1.19%) and LAR studies (definitive stomas: 1.03% vs. 1.01%; mortality: 0.35% vs. 0.36%). Protective DSs significantly decrease the rate of AL in LAR. AL requiring surgical correction was significantly reduced in the DS group

  19. A Phase II study of preoperative radiotherapy and concomitant weekly irinotecan in combination with protracted venous infusion 5-fluorouracil, for resectable locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Matilde . E-mail: mnavarrogarcia@ico.scs.es; Dotor, Emma; Rivera, Fernando; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Vega-Villegas, Maria Eugenia; Cervantes, Andres; Garcia, Jose Luis; Gallen, Manel; Aranda, Enrique

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with irinotecan (CPT-11) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable T3-T4 rectal cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 were included. CPT-11 (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) and 5-FU (225 mg/m{sup 2}/day continuous infusion, 5 days/week) were concurrently administered with radiation therapy (RT) (45 Gy, 1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week), during 5 weeks. Results: A total of 74 patients were enrolled: mean age, 59 years (20-74 years; SD, 11.7). Planned treatment was delivered to most patients (median relative dose intensity for both drugs was 100%). Grade 3/4 lymphocytopenia occurred in 35 patients (47%), neutropenia in 5 (7%), and anemia in 2 (3%). Main Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities were diarrhea (14%), asthenia (9%), rectal mucositis (8%), and abdominal pain (8%). Of the 73 resected specimens, 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.8-23.7) had a pathologic complete response and 49.3% (95% CI, 37.4-61.3) were downstaged. Additionally, 66.7% (95% CI, 51.1-80.0) of patients with ultrasound staged N1/N2 disease had no pathologic evidence of nodal involvement after CRT. Conclusions: This preoperative CRT schedule has been shown to be effective and feasible in a large population of patients with resectable rectal cancer.

  20. Transanal Pull-Through Procedure with Delayed versus Immediate Coloanal Anastomosis for Anus-Preserving Curative Resection of Lower Rectal Cancer: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yong; Huang, Ping; Ren, Qing-Gui

    2016-06-01

    This case-control study compared the effectiveness and safety of transanal pull-through procedure (TPP) with delayed or immediate coloanal anastomosis (CAA) for anus-preserving curative resection of lower rectal cancer. Lower rectal cancer patients (n = 128) were hospitalized between January 2003 and December 2013 for elective anus-preserving curative resection through a TPP with delayed (n = 72) or immediate (n = 56) CAA. Main outcome measures including surgical safety, resection radicality, and defecation function were assessed. The two groups were comparable in age, sex, gross pathology, histology, and tumor-node-metastasis staging. Both the delayed and immediate CAA TPPs had similar resection radicality and safety profiles. The immediate CAA was associated with a significantly higher risk of anastomotic leakage and defecation impairment. None of patients in the delayed CAA group experienced anastomotic leakage. In conclusion, TPP with delayed CAA may be superior to immediate CAA in minimizing the risk of anastomotic leakage and relevant surgical morbidities, and does not require a temporary ileostomy and second-look restoration of ostomy. PMID:27305886

  1. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  2. Adjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy After Simultaneous Surgical Resection of Rectal Cancer With Liver Metastases: Analysis of Prognosis and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho Jung; Yu, Chang Sik; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Kang, Byung Woog; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the outcomes of adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after simultaneous surgical resection in rectal cancer patients with liver metastases (LM). Materials and Methods: One hundred and eight patients receiving total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer and surgical resection for LM were reviewed. Forty-eight patients received adjuvant CRT, and 60 were administered CT alone. Recurrence patterns and prognosis were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were compared between the CRT and CT groups. The inverse probability of the treatment-weighted (IPTW) method based on the propensity score was used to adjust for selection bias between the two groups. Results: At a median follow-up period of 47.7 months, 77 (71.3%) patients had developed recurrences. The majority of recurrences (68.8%) occurred in distant organs. By contrast, the local recurrence rate was only 4.7%. Median DFS and OS were not significantly different between the CRT and CT groups. After applying the IPTW method, we observed no significant differences in terms of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.347; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.759-2.392; p = 0.309) and OS (HR, 1.413; CI, 0.752-2.653; p = 0.282). Multivariate analyses showed that unilobar distribution of LM and normal preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level (<6 mg/mL) were significantly associated with longer DFS and OS. Conclusions: The local recurrence rate after simultaneous resection of rectal cancer with LM was relatively low. DFS and OS rates were not different between the adjuvant CRT and CT groups. Adjuvant CRT may have a limited role in this setting. Further prospective randomized studies are required to evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment in these patients.

  3. Local recurrence after curative resection for rectal carcinoma: The role of surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jung-A; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Local recurrence of rectal cancer is difficult to treat, may cause severe and disabling symptoms, and usually has a fatal outcome. The aim of this study was to document the clinical nature of locally recurrent rectal cancer and to determine the effect of surgical resection on long-term survival.A retrospective review was conducted of the prospectively collected medical records of 2485 patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent radical resection between September 1994 and December 2008.In total, 147 (5.9%) patients exhibited local recurrence. The most common type of local recurrence was lateral recurrence, whereas anastomotic recurrence was the most common type in patients without preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Tumor location with respect to the anal verge significantly affected the local recurrence rate (P < 0.001), whereas preoperative CCRT did not affect the local recurrence rate (P = 0.433). Predictive factors for surgical resection of recurrent rectal cancer included less advanced tumor stage (P = 0.017, RR = 3.840, 95% CI = 1.271-11.597), axial recurrence (P < 0.001, RR = 5.772, 95% CI = 2.281-14.609), and isolated local recurrence (P = 0.006, RR = 8.679, 95% CI = 1.846-40.815). Overall survival after diagnosis of local recurrence was negatively influenced by advanced pathologic tumor stage (P = 0.040, RR = 1.867, 95% CI = 1.028-3.389), positive CRM (P = 0.001, RR = 12.939, 95% CI = 2.906-57.604), combined distant metastases (P = 0.001, RR = 2.086, 95% CI = 1.352-3.218), and nonsurgical resection of recurrent tumor (P < 0.001, RR = 4.865, 95% CI = 2.586-9.153).In conclusion, the clinical outcomes of local recurrence after curative resection of rectal cancer are diverse. Surgical resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer should be considered as an initial treatment, especially in patients with less advanced tumors and axial recurrence. PMID:27399067

  4. Importance of surgical margins in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukkai Krishnamurty, Devi; Wise, Paul E

    2016-03-01

    Distal resection margin (DRM) and circumferential resection margin (CRM) are two important considerations in rectal cancer management. Although guidelines recommend a 2 cm DRM, studies have shown that a shorter DRM is adequate, especially in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Standardization of total mesorectal excision has greatly improved quality of CRM. Although more patients are undergoing sphincter-saving procedures, abdominoperineal resection is indicated for very distal tumors, and pelvic exenteration is often necessary for tumors involving pelvic organs. PMID:27094456

  5. [The current place of abdomino-anal pull-through resection of the rectum in the modern rectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Nechaĭ, I A

    2014-01-01

    It was discussed abdomino-anal resection of rectum with relegation of colon excess in anal canal in case of cancer. It was presented the data about state of colo-anal functions in patients after such operations. The reasons of unsatisfactory functional results are analyzed in the article. Also it was described the factors influencing on violation of tank, evacuation and obturator functions. PMID:24874224

  6. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  7. Intraoperative blood loss during surgical treatment of low-rectal cancer by abdominosacral resection is higher than during extra-levator abdominosacral amputation of the rectum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Abdominosacral resection (ASR) usually required blood transfusions, which are virtually no longer in use in the modified abdominosacral amputation of the rectum (ASAR). The aim of this study was to compare the intra-operative bleeding in low-rectal patients subjected to ASR or ASAR. Material and methods The study included low-rectal cancer patients subjected to ASR (n = 114) or ASAR (n = 46) who were retrospectively compared in terms of: 1) the frequency of blood transfusions during surgery and up to 24 h thereafter; 2) the volume of intraoperative blood loss (ml of blood transfused) during surgery and up to 24 h thereafter; 3) hemoglobin concentrations (Hb) 1, 3 and 5 days after surgery; 4) the duration of hospitalization. Results Blood transfusions were necessary in 107 ASR patients but in none of those subjected to ASAR (p < 0.001). Median blood loss in the ASR group was 800 ml (range: 100–4500 ml). The differences between the groups in median Hb determined 1, 3 and 5 days following surgery were insignificant. The proportions of patients with abnormal values of Hb, however, were significantly higher in the ASR group on postoperative days 1 and 3 (day 1: 71.9% vs. 19.6% in the ASAR group, p = 0.025; day 3: 57.% vs. 13.0%, p = 0.009). Average postoperative hospitalization in ASR patients was 13 days compared to 9 days in the ASAR group (p = 0.031). Conclusions Abdominosacral amputation of the rectum predominates over ASR in terms of the prevention of intra- and postoperative bleeding due to the properly defined surgical plane in low-rectal cancer patients. PMID:24904664

  8. [Evaluation of safe resection margins in rectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Hovorková, E; Hadži-Nikolov, D; Ferko, A; Örhalmi, J; Chobola, M; Ryška, A

    2014-02-01

    The fact that surgically well performed total mesorectal excision with negative circumferential resection margin represents one of the most important prognostic factors in colorectal carcinoma is already well known. These parameters significantly affect the incidence of local tumour recurrence as well as distant metastasis, and are thus related to the duration of patient survival. The surgeons task is to perform mesorectal excision as completely as possible, i.e., to remove the rectum with an intact cylinder of mesorectal fat. The approach of the pathologist to evaluation of total mesorectal excision specimens differs greatly from that of resection specimens from other parts of the large bowel. Besides evaluation of the usual parameters for colon cancer staging, it is essential to assess certain additional factors specific to rectal carcinomas, namely tumour distance from circumferential (radial) resection margins and the quality of the mesorectal excision. In order to accurately evaluate these parameters, knowledge of a wide range of clinical data is indispensable (results of preoperative imaging, intraoperative findings). For objective evaluation of these parameters it is necessary to introduce standardized procedures for resection specimen processing and macro and microscopic examination. This approach is based mainly on standardized macroscopic photo-documentation of the integrity of the mesorectal surface. Parallel transverse sections of the resection specimens are made with targeted tissue sampling for histological examination. It is essential to have close cooperation between surgeons and pathologists within a multidisciplinary team enabling mutual feedback. PMID:24702293

  9. Pathologic Nodal Classification Is the Most Discriminating Prognostic Factor for Disease-Free Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Curative Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Dae Yong

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the effects of clinical and pathologic factors on disease-free survival (DFS) with the aim of identifying the most discriminating factor predicting DFS in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 420 patients who underwent preoperative CRT and curative resection between August 2001 and October 2006. Gender, age, distance from the anal verge, histologic type, histologic grade, pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, cT, cN, cStage, circumferential resection margin, type of surgery, preoperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, ypT, ypN, ypStage, and tumor regression grade (TRG) were analyzed to identify prognostic factors associated with DFS. To compare the discriminatory prognostic ability of four tumor response-related pathologic factors (ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG), the Akaike information criteria were calculated. Results: The 5-year DFS rate was 75.4%. On univariate analysis, distance from the anal verge, histologic type, histologic grade, pretreatment CEA level, cT, circumferential resection margin, type of surgery, preoperative chemotherapeutic regimen, ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG were significantly associated with DFS. Multivariate analysis showed that the four parameters ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG were, consistently, significant prognostic factors for DFS. The ypN showed the lowest Akaike information criteria value for DFS, followed by ypStage, ypT, and TRG, in that order. Conclusion: In our study, ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG were important prognostic factors for DFS, and ypN was the most discriminating factor.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy with uracil–tegafur for curatively resected stage III rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hisashige, A; Yoshida, S; Kodaira, S

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the National Surgical Adjuvant Study of Colorectal Cancer in Japan, a randomised controlled trial of oral uracil–tegafur (UFT) adjuvant therapy for stage III rectal cancer, showed remarkable survival gains, compared with surgery alone. To evaluate value for money of adjuvant UFT therapy, cost-effective analysis was carried out. Cost-effectiveness analysis of adjuvant UFT therapy was carried out from a payer's perspective, compared with surgery alone. Overall survival and relapse-free survival were estimated by Kaplan–Meier method, up to 5.6 years from randomisation. Costs were estimated from trial data during observation. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were calculated using utility score from literature. Beyond observation period, they were simulated by the Boag model combined with the competing risk model. For 5.6-year observation, 10-year follow-up and over lifetime, adjuvant UFT therapy gained 0.50, 0.96 and 2.28 QALYs, and reduced costs by $2457, $1771 and $1843 per person compared with surgery alone, respectively (3% discount rate for both effect and costs). Cost-effectiveness acceptability and net monetary benefit analyses showed the robustness of these results. Economic evaluation of adjuvant UFT therapy showed that this therapy is cost saving and can be considered as a cost-effective treatment universally accepted for wide use in Japan. PMID:18797469

  11. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. [Rectal resection with colo-anal anastomosis for ergotamine-induced rectal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Panis, Y; Valleur, P; Kleinmann, P; Willems, G; Hautefeuille, P

    1990-01-01

    Anorectal ulcers due to ergotamine suppositories are extremely rare. We report the first case of rectal stenosis following regular abuse of ergotamine suppositories which required rectal resection and coloanal anastomosis, despite stopping the intoxication 1 year previously. The rectal eversion during the perineal procedure allowed a low anastomosis to be performed, on the dentate line. One year later, the functional result was considered to be good, demonstrating the place of coloanal anastomosis in benign rectal pathology. PMID:2100123

  13. Short-term Outcomes of an Extralevator Abdominoperineal Resection in the Prone Position Compared With a Conventional Abdominoperineal Resection for Advanced Low Rectal Cancer: The Early Experience at a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seungwan; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the perioperative and pathologic outcomes between an extralevator abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the prone position and a conventional APR. Methods Between September 2011 and March 2014, an extralevator APR in the prone position was performed on 13 patients with rectal cancer and a conventional APR on 26 such patients. Patients' demographics and perioperative and pathologic outcomes were obtained from the colorectal cancer database and electronic medical charts. Results Age and preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level were significantly different between the conventional and the extralevator APR in the prone position (median age, 65 years vs. 55 years [P = 0.001]; median preoperative CEA level, 4.94 ng/mL vs. 1.81 ng/mL [P = 0.011]). For perioperative outcomes, 1 (3.8%) intraoperative bowel perforation occurred in the conventional APR group and 2 (15.3%) in the extralevator APR group. In the conventional and extralevator APR groups, 12 (46.2%) and 6 patients (46.2%) had postoperative complications, and 8 (66.7%) and 2 patients (33.4%) had major complications (Clavien-Dindo III/IV), respectively. The circumferential resection margin involvement rate was higher in the extralevator APR group compared with the conventional APR group (3 of 13 [23.1%] vs. 3 of 26 [11.5%]). Conclusion The extralevator APR in the prone position for patients with advanced low rectal cancer has no advantages in perioperative and pathologic outcomes over a conventional APR for such patients. However, through early experience with a new surgical technique, we identified various reasons for the lack of favorable outcomes and expect sufficient experience to produce better peri- or postoperative outcomes. PMID:26962531

  14. Rectal arteriovenous fistula resected laparoscopically after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ushigome, Hajime; Hayakawa, Tetsushi; Morimoto, Mamoru; Kitagami, Hidehiko; Tanaka, Moritsugu

    2014-01-01

    We report a very rare case of rectal arteriovenous fistula following sigmoidectomy and discuss this case in the context of the existing literature. In April 2011, the patient, a man in his 60s, underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with lymph node dissection for sigmoid colon cancer. Beginning in February 2012, he experienced frequent diarrhea. Abdominal contrast-enhanced CT revealed local thickening of the rectal wall and rectal arteriovenous fistula near the anastomosis site. Rectitis from the rectal arteriovenous fistula was diagnosed. No improvement was seen with conservative treatment. Therefore, surgical resection was performed laparoscopically and the site of the lesion was confirmed by intraoperative angiography. The arteriovenous fistula was identified and resected. Postoperatively, diarrhea symptoms resolved, and improvement in rectal wall thickening was seen on abdominal CT. No recurrence has been seen as of 1 year postoperatively. PMID:24450345

  15. Effect of preservation of Denonvilliers' fascia during laparoscopic resection for mid-low rectal cancer on protection of male urinary and sexual functions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong-Bo; Fang, Jia-Feng; Zheng, Zong-Heng; Wei, Bo; Huang, Jiang-Long; Chen, Tu-Feng; Huang, Yong; Lei, Pu-Run

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preservation of Denonvilliers' fascia (DF) during laparoscopic resection for mid-low rectal cancer on protection of male urogenital function. Whether preservation of DF during TME is effective for protection of urogenital function is largely elusive.Seventy-four cases of male mid-low rectal cancer were included. Radical laparoscopic proctectomy was performed, containing 38 cases of preservation of DF (P-group) and 36 cases of resection of DF (R-group) intraoperatively. Intraoperative electrical nerve stimulation (INS) on pelvic autonomic nerve was performed and intravesical pressure was measured manometrically. Urinary function was evaluated by residual urine volume (RUV), International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS), and quality of life (QoL). Sexual function was evaluated using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scale and ejaculation function classification.Compared with performing INS on the surfaces of prostate and seminal vesicles in the R-group, INS on DF in the P-group exhibited higher increasing intravesical pressure (7.3 ± 1.5 vs 5.9 ± 2.4 cmH2O, P = 0.008). In addtion, the P-group exhibited lower RUV (34.3 ± 27.2 vs 57.1 ± 50.7 mL, P = 0.020), lower IPSS and QoL scores (7 days: 6.1 ± 2.4 vs 9.5 ± 5.9, P = 0.002 and 2.2 ± 1.1 vs 2.9 ± 1.1, P = 0.005; 1 month: 5.1 ± 2.4 vs 6.6 ± 2.2, P = 0.006 and 1.6 ± 0.7 vs 2.1 ± 0.6, P = 0.003, respectively), higher IIEF score (3 months: 10.7 ± 2.1 vs 8.9 ± 2.0, P = 0.000; 6 months: 14.8 ± 2.2 vs 12.9 ± 2.2, P = 0.001) and lower incidence of ejaculation dysfunction (3 months: 28.9% vs 52.8%, P = 0.037; 6 months: 18.4% vs 44.4%, P = 0.016) postoperatively.Preservation of DF during laparoscopic resection for selective male mid-low rectal cancer is effective for protection of urogenital function. PMID:27311004

  16. Phase I Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation With S-1 and Oxaliplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Mi-Jung; Jang, Se-Jin; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a Phase I study of preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) with S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine, plus oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the recommended dose. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy was delivered to a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions and followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of a fixed dose of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29 and escalated doses of S-1 on Days 1-14 and 22-35. The initial dose of S-1 was 50 mg/m{sup 2}/day, gradually increasing to 60, 70, and 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Surgery was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled and tolerated up to Dose Level 4 (3 patients at each dose level) without dose-limiting toxicity. An additional 3 patients were enrolled at Dose Level 4, with 1 experiencing a dose-limiting toxicity of Grade 3 diarrhea. Although maximum tolerated dose was not attained, Dose Level 4 (S-1 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was chosen as the recommended dose for further Phase II studies. No Grade 4 toxicity was observed, and Grade 3 toxicities of leukopenia and diarrhea occurred in the same patient (1 of 15, 6.7%). Pathologic complete responses were observed in 2 of 15 patients (13.3%). Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day when combined with oxaliplatin in preoperative CRT, and a Phase II trial is now ongoing.

  17. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  18. Transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Suguru; Takahashi, Ryo; Hida, Koya; Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-06-01

    Although laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer has been gaining acceptance with the gradual accumulation of evidence, it remains a technically demanding procedure in patients with a narrow pelvis, bulky tumors, or obesity. To overcome the technical difficulties associated with laparoscopic rectal dissection and transection, transanal endoscopic rectal dissection, which is also referred to as transanal (reverse, bottom-up) total mesorectal excision (TME), has recently been introduced. Its potential advantages include the facilitation of the dissection of the anorectum, regardless of the patient body habitus, and a clearly defined safe distal margin and transanal extraction of the specimen. This literature review shows that this approach seems to be feasible with regard to the operative and short-term postoperative outcomes. In experienced hands, transanal TME is a promising method for the resection of mid- and low-rectal cancers. Further investigations are required to clarify the long-term oncological and functional outcomes. PMID:26055500

  19. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  20. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic [correction of laparoscopis] anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Ignjatovic, D; Bergamaschi, R

    2002-01-01

    Anterior resection for the treatment of full thickness rectal prolapse has been around for over four decades. 1 However, its use has been limited due to fear of anastomotic leakage and related morbidity. It has been shown that high anterior resection is preferable to its low counterpart as the latter increases complication rates. 2 Although sparing the inferior mesenteric artery in sigmoid resection for diverticular disease has been shown to decrease leak rates in a randomized setting, 3 vascular division is current practice. We shall challenged this current practice of dividing the mesorectum in anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse developing a technique that allows the preservation of the superior rectal artery. PMID:12587465

  1. Evidence-based treatment of patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIANG; YANG, JIE; QIAN, QUN

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a worldwide disease whose incidence has increased significantly. Evidence-based medicine is a category of medicine that optimizes decision making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. Evidence-based medicine can be used to formulate a reasonable treatment plan for newly diagnosed rectal cancer patients. The current review focuses on the application of evidence-based treatment on patients with rectal cancer. The relationship between perioperative blood transfusion and recurrence of rectal cancer after surgery, the selection between minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and traditional laparotomy, choice of chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer prior to surgery, selection between stapled and hand-sewn methods for colorectal anastomosis during rectal cancer resection, and selection between temporary ileostomy and colostomy during the surgery were addressed. Laparoscopy is considered to have more advantages but is time-consuming and has high medical costs. In addition, laparoscopic rectal cancer radical resection is preferred to open surgery. In radical resection surgery, use of a stapling device for anastomosis can reduce postoperative anastomotic fistula, although patients should be informed of possible anastomotic stenosis. PMID:26998054

  2. Comparative study between transanal tube and loop ileostomy in low anterior resection for mid rectal cancer: a retrospective single center trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ki; Won, Dae-Youn; Lee, Jin-Kwon; Kang, Won-Kyung; Kim, Jun-Gi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy and safety of the transanal tube (TAT) in preventing anastomotic leak (AL) in rectal cancer surgery. Methods Clinical data of the patients who underwent curative surgery for mid rectal cancer from February 2010 to February 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Rectal cancers arising 5 to 10 cm above the anal verge were selected. Patients were divided into the ileostomy, TAT, or no-protection groups. Postoperative complications including AL and postoperative course were compared. Results We included 137 patients: 67, 35, and 35 patients were included in the ileostomy, TAT, and no-protection groups, respectively. Operation time was longer in the ileostomy group (P = 0.029), and more estimated blood loss was observed (P = 0.018). AL occurred in 5 patients (7.5%) in the ileostomy group, 1 patients (2.9%) in the TAT group, and 6 patients (17.1%) in the no-protection group (P = 0.125). Patients in the ileostomy group resumed diet more than 1 day earlier than those in the other groups (P = 0.000). Patients in the no-protection group had about 1 or 2 days longer postoperative hospital stay (P = 0.048). The ileostomy group showed higher late complication rates than the other groups as complications associated with the stoma itself or repair operation developed (P = 0.019). Conclusion For mid rectal cancer surgery, the TAT supports anastomotic site protection and diverts ileostomy-related complications. Further large scale randomized controlled studies are needed to gain more evidence and expand the range of TAT usage. PMID:25960989

  3. [Laparoscopic Resection Rectopexy for the Treatment of External Rectal Prolapse].

    PubMed

    Axt, S; Falch, C; Müller, S; Kirschniak, A; Glatzle, J

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic resection rectopexy is one of the surgical options for the treatment of external rectal prolapse. A standardised and reproducible procedure for this operation is a decisive advantage for such cases. The operation can be divided in 11 substeps, so-called nodal points, which must be reached before further progress can be made and simplify the operation by dividing the procedure into substeps. This manuscript and the accompanying film demonstrate the standardised laparoscopic resection rectopexy as taught in the "Surgical Training Center Tübingen," and performed at the University Hospital of Tübingen. PMID:26114633

  4. MicroRNA in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Gruber, Jens; Ghadimi, B Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide, the proper staging of the disease determines the subsequent therapy. For those with locally advanced rectal cancer, a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is recommended before any surgery. However, response to CRT ranges from complete response (responders) to complete resistance (non-responders). To date we are not able to separate in advance the first group from the second, due to the absence of a valid biomarker. Therefore all patients receive the same therapy regardless of whether they reap benefits. On the other hand almost all patients receive a surgical resection after the CRT, although a watch-and-wait procedure or an endoscopic resection might be sufficient for those who responded well to the CRT. Being highly conserved regulators of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) seem to be promising candidates for biomarkers. Many studies have been analyzing the miRNAs expressed in rectal cancer tissue to determine a specific miRNA profile for the ailment. Unfortunately, there is only a small overlap of identified miRNAs between different studies, posing the question as to whether different methods or differences in tissue storage may contribute to that fact or if the results simply are not reproducible, due to unknown factors with undetected influences on miRNA expression. Other studies sought to find miRNAs which correlate to clinical parameters (tumor grade, nodal stage, metastasis, survival) and therapy response. Although several miRNAs seem to have an impact on the response to CRT or might predict nodal stage, there is still only little overlap between different studies. We here aimed to summarize the current literature on rectal cancer and miRNA expression with respect to the different relevant clinical parameters. PMID:27190581

  5. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental. PMID:23584263

  6. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  7. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Irinotecan and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Jeong, Jun Yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Jae-Gahb; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer has shown benefit over postoperative CRT; however, a standard CRT regimen has yet to be defined. We performed a prospective concurrent CRT Phase II study with irinotecan and capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid-to-lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions for a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 40 mg/m{sup 2} of irinotecan per week for 5 consecutive weeks and 1,650 mg/m{sup 2} of capecitabine per day for 5 days per week (weekdays only) from the first day of radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were included for the study endpoints. Results: In total, 48 patients were enrolled; 33 (68.7%) were men and 15 (31.3%) were women, and the median age was 59 years (range, 32-72 years). The pathologic complete response rate was 25.0% (11 of 44; 95% confidence interval, 12.2-37.8) and 8 patients (18.2% [8 of 44]) showed near-total tumor regression. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 75.0% and 93.6%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicities included leukopenia (3 [6.3%]), neutropenia (1 [2.1%]), infection (1 [2.1%]), alanine aminotransferase elevation (1 [2.1%]), and diarrhea (1 [2.1%]). There was no Grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with irinotecan and capecitabine with treatment-free weekends showed very mild toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of survival.

  8. Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  9. Rectovaginal fistula: a new approach by stapled transanal rectal resection.

    PubMed

    Li Destri, Giovanni; Scilletta, Beniamino; Tomaselli, Tiziana Grazia; Zarbo, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Many surgical procedures have been developed to repair rectovaginal fistulas even if no "procedure of choice" is reported. The authors report a case of relatively uncommon, complex, medium-high post-obstetric rectovaginal fistula without sphincteral lesions and treated with a novel tailored technique. Our innovative surgical management consisted of preparing the neck of the fistula inside the vagina and folding it into the rectum so as to enclose the fistula within two semicontinuous sutures (stapled transanal rectal resection); no fecal diversion was performed. Postoperative follow-up at 9 months showed no recurrence of the fistula. PMID:17899300

  10. Voiding Dysfunction after Total Mesorectal Excision in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Noh, Tae Il; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Gu; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the voiding dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods This was part of a prospective study done in the rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with TME between November 2006 and June 2008. Consecutive uroflowmetry, post-voided residual volume, and a voiding questionnaire were performed at preoperatively and postoperatively. Results A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study, including 28 male and 22 female. In the comparison of the preoperative data with the postoperative 3-month data, a significant decrease in mean maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume were found. In the comparison with the postoperative 6-month data, however only the maximal flow rate was decreased with statistical significance (P=0.02). In the comparison between surgical methods, abdominoperineal resection patients showed delayed recovery of maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume. There was no significant difference in uroflowmetry parameters with advances in rectal cancer stage. Conclusions Voiding dysfunction is common after rectal cancer surgery but can be recovered in 6 months after surgery or earlier. Abdominoperineal resection was shown to be an unfavorable factor for postoperative voiding. Larger prospective study is needed to determine the long-term effect of rectal cancer surgery in relation to male and female baseline voiding condition. PMID:22087426

  11. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic sigmoid resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, R; Lovvik, K; Marvik, R

    2004-01-01

    Sigmoid resection is indicated in the treatment of complete rectal prolapse (CRP) in patients with prolonged colorectal transit time (CTT). Its use however has been limited due to fear of anastomotic leakage. This study challenges the current practice of dividing the mesorectum by prospectively evaluating the impact of sparing the superior rectal artery (SRA) on leak rates after laparoscopic sigmoid resection (LSR) for CRP. During 30 months data on 33 selected patients with CRP were prospectively collected. Three patients were withdrawn from the analysis, as they had neither resection nor anastomosis. Twenty-nine women and one man (median age 55 range 21-83 years) underwent LSR with preservation of SRA for a median CRP of 8 (3-15) cm. There were 20 ASA I and 10 ASA II patients. Ten patients had undergone previous surgery. Four patients complained of dyschezia, whereas incontinence was present in 26 patients. Anal ultrasound showed isolated internal sphincter defects in two patients. Four young adults (21-32 years) had normal CTT, whereas 26 older patients had a median CTT of 5 (4-6) days. Defecography demonstrated 10 enteroceles, two sigmoidoceles, and one rectal hernia through the levator ani muscle. Mortality was nil. Median operating room time was 180 (120-330) min, suprapubic incision length 5 (3-7) cm, estimated blood loss 150 (50-500) ml, specimen length 20 (12-45) cm, solid food resumption 3 (1-6) days, and length of stay 4.5 (2-7) days. Thirty-day complications were not related to anastomosing and occurred in 20% of the patients. Although the evidence provided by the present study suggests that sparing SRA has a favorable impact on anastomotic leak rates, these nonrandomized results need further evaluation. The division of the mesorectum at the rectosigmoid junction seems not necessary, and its sparing should therefore be considered as it may contain anastomotic leak rates. PMID:15771289

  12. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  13. Surgery for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Satish K; Heriot, Alexander G; Lynch, Andrew Craig

    2016-06-01

    Rectal cancer can recur locally in up to 10% of the patients who undergo definitive resection for their primary cancer. Surgical salvage is considered appropriate in the curative setting as well as select cases with palliative intent. Disease-free survival following salvage resection is dependent upon achieving an R0 resection margin. A clear understanding of applied surgical anatomy, appropriate preoperative planning, and a multidisciplinary approach to aggressive soft tissue, bony, and vascular resection with appropriate reconstruction is necessary. Technical tips, tricks, and pitfalls that may assist in managing these cancers are discussed and the roles of additional boost radiation and intraoperative radiation therapy in the management of such cancers are also discussed. PMID:27247536

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of Sphincter-Sparing Surgery versus Abdominoperineal Resection in Rectal Cancer: Patient-Reported Outcomes in National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Randomized Trial R-04

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Marcia M.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Lopa, Samia; Yothers, Greg; Ko, Clifford Y.; Arora, Amit; Atkins, James N.; Bahary, Nathan; Soori, Gamini; Robertson, John M.; Eakle, Janice; Marchello, Benjamin T.; Wozniak, Timothy F.; Beart, Robert W.; Wolmark, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Objective NSABP R-04 was a randomized controlled trial of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with resectable stage II–III rectal cancer. We hypothesized that patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR) would have a poorer quality of life than those who underwent sphincter-sparing surgery (SSS). Methods To obtain patient-reported outcomes (PROs) we administered two symptom scales at baseline and 1 year postoperatively: the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal (FACT-C) and the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer module for patients with Colorectal Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-CR38). Scoring was stratified by non-randomly assigned definitive surgery (APR vs SSS). Analyses controlled for baseline scores and stratification factors: age, gender, stage, intended surgery, and randomly assigned chemoradiotherapy. Results Of 1,608 randomly assigned patients, 987 had data for planned analyses; 62% underwent SSS; 38% underwent APR. FACT-C total and subscale scores were not statistically different by surgery at one year. For the EORTC-QLQ-CR38 functional scales, APR patients reported worse body image (70.3 vs 77.0, P=0.0005) at one year than did SSS patients. Males undergoing APR reported worse sexual enjoyment (43.7 vs 54.7, P=0.02) at one year than did those undergoing SSS. For the EORTC-QLQ-CR38 symptom scale scores, APR patients reported worse micturition symptoms than the SSS group at one year (26.9 vs 21.5, P=0.03). SSS patients reported worse GI tract symptoms than did the APR patients (18.9 vs 15.2, P<0.0001), as well as weight loss (10.1 vs 6.0, P=0.002). Conclusions Symptoms and functional problems were detected at one year by EORTC-QLQ-CR38, reflecting different symptom profiles in patients who underwent APR than those who underwent SSS. Information from these PROs may be useful in counseling patients anticipating surgery for rectal cancer. PMID:24670844

  15. Minimally invasive surgery for rectal cancer: Are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Bradley J; Makhija, Rohit

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic colon surgery for select cancers is slowly evolving as the standard of care but minimally invasive approaches for rectal cancer have been viewed with significant skepticism. This procedure has been performed by select surgeons at specialized centers and concerns over local recurrence, sexual dysfunction and appropriate training measures have further hindered widespread acceptance. Data for laparoscopic rectal resection now supports its continued implementation and widespread usage by expeienced surgeons for select patients. The current controversies regarding technical approaches have created ambiguity amongst opinion leaders and are also addressed in this review. PMID:21412496

  16. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  17. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic vs open rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Winson Jianhong; Chew, Min Hoe; Dharmawan, Angela Renayanti; Singh, Manraj; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Loi, Carol Tien Tau; Tang, Choong Leong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term clinical and oncological outcomes of laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR) and the impact of conversion in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: An analysis was performed on a prospective database of 633 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection. Patients were compared in three groups: Open surgery (OP), laparoscopic surgery, and converted laparoscopic surgery. Short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and survival analysis were compared. RESULTS: Among 633 patients studied, 200 patients had successful laparoscopic resections with a conversion rate of 11.1% (25 out of 225). Factors predictive of survival on univariate analysis include the laparoscopic approach (P = 0.016), together with factors such as age, ASA status, stage of disease, tumor grade, presence of perineural invasion and vascular emboli, circumferential resection margin < 2 mm, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. The survival benefit of laparoscopic surgery was no longer significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.148). Neither 5-year overall survival (70.5% vs 61.8%, P = 0.217) nor 5-year cancer free survival (64.3% vs 66.6%, P = 0.854) were significantly different between the laparoscopic group and the converted group. CONCLUSION: LRR has equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes when compared to OP. Laparoscopic conversion does not confer a worse prognosis. PMID:27358678

  18. [Three Cases of Stage Ⅳ Low Rectal Cancer with Lateral Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis].

    PubMed

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Yagi, Ryoma; Tajima, Yosuke; Okamura, Takuma; Nakano, Masato; Ishikawa, Takashi; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi; Nogami, Hitoshi; Maruyama, Satoshi; Takii, Yasumasa

    2015-11-01

    Case 1: A 61-year-old man who had a diagnosis of low rectal cancer with lateral pelvic lymph node (LPLN) metastasis and multiple liver metastases underwent low anterior resection with LPLN dissection. The initial surgery was followed by chemotherapy, and then an extended right hepatectomy with partial resection of the liver was performed. Subsequently, a lung metastasis was detected, and the lung was partially resected. The patient was alive 9 years and 6 months after the initial operation. Case 2: A 53-year-old man had a diagnosis of low rectal cancer. After 5 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab, he underwent low anterior resection with LPLN dissection and resection of the peritoneal metastasis. The patient was alive 6 years and 3 months after the surgery without any signs of recurrence. Case 3: A 48-year-old man had a diagnosis of low rectal cancer and multiple liver metastases. He underwent low anterior resection with LPLN dissection and right hepatic lobectomy. He subsequently showed liver and lung metastases. The patient received systemic chemotherapy, and is alive with recurrent disease. We report 3 cases of Stage Ⅳ low rectal cancer with LPLN metastasis, and propose that LPLN dissection is important as a part of R0 resection for Stage Ⅳ low rectal cancer. PMID:26805345

  19. Toward Restored Bowel Health in Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Steineck, Gunnar; Schmidt, Heike; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Sjöberg, Fei; Bull, Cecilia Magdalena; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    As technology gets better and better, and as clinical research provides more and more knowledge, we can extend our ambition to cure patients from cancer with restored physical health among the survivors. This increased ambition requires attention to grade 1 toxicity that decreases quality of life. It forces us to document the details of grade 1 toxicity and improve our understanding of the mechanisms. Long-term toxicity scores, or adverse events as documented during clinical trials, may be regarded as symptoms or signs of underlying survivorship diseases. However, we lack a survivorship nosology for rectal cancer survivors. Primarily focusing on radiation-induced side effects, we highlight some important observations concerning late toxicity among rectal cancer survivors. With that and other data, we searched for a preliminary survivorship-disease nosology for rectal cancer survivors. We disentangled the following survivorship diseases among rectal cancer survivors: low anterior resection syndrome, radiation-induced anal sphincter dysfunction, gut wall inflammation and fibrosis, blood discharge, excessive gas discharge, excessive mucus discharge, constipation, bacterial overgrowth, and aberrant anatomical structures. The suggested survivorship nosology may form the basis for new instruments capturing long-term symptoms (patient-reported outcomes) and professional-reported signs. For some of the diseases, we can search for animal models. As an end result, the suggested survivorship nosology may accelerate our understanding on how to prevent, ameliorate, or eliminate manifestations of treatment-induced diseases among rectal cancer survivors. PMID:27238476

  20. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  1. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic sigmoid resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, Roberto; Lovvik, Kari; Marvik, Ronald

    2003-12-01

    Sigmoid resection is indicated in the treatment of complete rectal prolapse (CRP) in patients with prolonged colorectal transit time (CTT). Its use, however, has been limited because of fear of anastomotic leakage. This study challenges the current practice of dividing the mesorectum by prospectively evaluating the impact of sparing the superior rectal artery (SRA) on leak rates after laparoscopic sigmoid resection (LSR) for CRP. During a 30-month period, data on 33 selected patients with CRP were prospectively collected. Three patients were withdrawn from the analysis, as they had neither resection nor anastomosis. Twenty-nine women and 1 man (median age 55 range 21-83 years) underwent LSR with preservation of SRA for a median CRP of 8 (3-15) cm. There were 20 ASA I and 10 ASA II patients. Ten patients had undergone previous surgery. Four patients complained of dyschezia, whereas incontinence was present in 26 patients. Anal ultrasound showed isolated internal sphincter defects in 2 patients. Four young adults (21-32 years) had normal CTT, whereas 26 older patients had a median CTT of 5(4-6) days. Defecography demonstrated 10 enteroceles, two sigmoidoceles, and one rectal hernia through the levator ani muscle. Mortality was nil. Median operating room time was 180 (120-330) min, suprapubic incision length 5(3-7) cm, estimated blood loss 150 (50-500) mL, specimen length 20 (12-45) cm, solid food resumption 3(1-6) days, and length of stay 4.5(2-7) days. Thirty-day complications were not related to anastomosing and occurred in 20% of the patients. Median follow-up was 34.1 (18-48) months. One patient had a recurrence. Although the evidence provided by the present study suggests that sparing SRA has a favorable impact on anastomotic leak rates, these nonrandomized results need further evaluation. The division of the mesorectum at the rectosigmoid junction seems not necessary, and its sparing should therefore be considered as it may contain anastomotic leak rates. PMID

  2. Recent advances in robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Soichiro; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Robotic technology, which has recently been introduced to the field of surgery, is expected to be useful, particularly in treating rectal cancer where precise manipulation is necessary in the confined pelvic cavity. Robotic surgery overcomes the technical drawbacks inherent to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer through the use of multi-articulated flexible tools, three-dimensional stable camera platforms, tremor filtering and motion scaling functions, and greater ergonomic and intuitive device manipulation. Assessments of the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have reported similar operation times, blood loss during surgery, rates of postoperative morbidity, and circumferential resection margin involvement when compared with laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, rates of conversion to open surgery are reportedly lower with increased urinary and male sexual functions in the early postoperative period compared with laparoscopic surgery, demonstrating the technical advantages of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. However, long-term outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have not been fully evaluated yet; therefore, large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology. PMID:26059248

  3. Usefulness of endoscopic resection using the band ligation method for rectal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Seung; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Kwon, Kwang An; Park, Dong Kyun; An, Jung Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are among the most common of gastrointestinal NETs. Due to recent advances in endoscopy, various methods of complete endoscopic resection have been introduced for small (≤10 mm) rectal NETs. However, there is a debate about the optimal treatment for rectal NETs. In our study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of endoscopic resection using pneumoband and elastic band (ER-BL) for rectal NETs smaller than 10 mm in diameter. Methods A total of 55 patients who were diagnosed with rectal NET from January 2004 to December 2011 at Gil Medical Center were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen patients underwent ER-BL. For comparison, 39 patients underwent conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Results There was a markedly lower deep margin positive rate for ER-BL than for conventional EMR (6% [1/16] vs. 46% [18/39], P=0.029). Four patients who underwent conventional EMR experienced perforation or bleeding. However, they recovered within a few days. On the other hand, patients whounderwent endoscopic resection using a pneumoband did not experience any complications. In multivariate analysis, ER-BL (P=0.021) was independently associated with complete resection. Conclusions ER-BL is an effective endoscopic treatment with regards to deep margin resection for rectal NET smaller than 10 mm. PMID:27175117

  4. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  5. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  6. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Majdoub, Karim Ibn; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100 000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:26161211

  7. Treatment delay in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Law, C W; Roslani, A C; Ng, L L C

    2009-06-01

    Early diagnosis of rectal cancer is important for prompt treatment and better outcome. Little data exists for comparison or to set standards. The primary objective of this study is to identify factors resulting in delays in treatment of rectal cancer, the correlation between the disease stage and diagnosis waiting time, treatment waiting time and duration of symptoms. A five year retrospective audit was undertaken in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). There were 137 patients recruited and the median time to diagnosis was nine days after the first UMMC Surgical Unit consultation with a mean of 18.7 days. Some 11% had to wait more than four weeks for diagnosis. The median time from confirmation of diagnosis to surgery was 11 days with a mean of 18.6 days. Sixty-two percent of patients were operated upon within two weeks of diagnosis and more than 88% by four weeks. However, 10% of them had delayed surgery done four weeks after diagnosis. Long colonoscopy waiting time was the main cause for delay in diagnosis while delay in staging CTs were the main reason for treatment delays. PMID:20058579

  8. Surgical strategy for low rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Dumont, F; Mariani, A; Elias, D; Goéré, D

    2015-02-01

    The two goals of surgery for lower rectal cancer surgery are to obtain clear "curative" margins and to limit post-surgical functional disorders. The question of whether or not to preserve the anal sphincter lies at the center of the therapeutic choice. Histologically, tumor-free distal and circumferential margins of>1mm allow a favorable oncologic outcome. Whether such margins can be obtained depends of TNM staging, tumor location, response to chemoradiotherapy and type of surgical procedure. The technique of intersphincteric resection relies on these narrow margins to spare the sphincter. This procedure provides satisfactory oncologic outcome with a rate of circumferential margin involvement ranging from 5% to 11%, while good continence is maintained in half of the patients. The extralevator abdominoperineal resection provides good oncologic results, however this procedure requires a permanent colostomy. A permanent colostomy alters several domains of quality of life when located at the classical abdominal site but not when brought out at the perineal site as a perineal colostomy. PMID:25455959

  9. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  10. Endoluminal loco-regional resection by TEM after R1 endoscopic removal or recurrence of rectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Quaresima, Silvia; Balla, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo; Bruzzone, Paolo; Ursi, Pietro; Lezoche, Emanuele; Paganini, Alessandro M

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endoluminal loco-regional resection (ELRR) by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) after R1 endoscopic resection or local recurrence of early rectal cancer after operative endoscopy. Material and methods Twenty patients with early rectal cancer were enrolled, including patients with incomplete endoscopic resection, or complete endoscopic resection of a tumor with unfavorable prognostic factors (group A, ten patients), and local recurrence after endoscopic removal (group B, ten patients). At admission, histology after endoscopic polypectomy was: TisR1(4), T1R0G3(1), T1R1(5) in group A, and TisR0(8), T1R0(2) in group B. All patients underwent ELRR by TEM with nucleotide-guided mesorectal excision (NGME). Results Mean operative time was 150 minutes. Complications occurred in two patients (10%). Definitive histology was: moderate dysplasia(4), pT0N0(3), pTisN0(5), pT1N0(6), pT2N0(2). Mean number of lymph-nodes was 3.1. Mean follow-up was 79.5 months. All patients are alive and disease-free. Conclusions ELRR by TEM after R1 endoscopic resection of early rectal cancer or for local recurrence after operative endoscopy is safe and effective. It may be considered as a diagnostic procedure, as well as a curative treatment option, instead of a more invasive TME. PMID:26882538

  11. Rectal Cancer, Version 2.2015.

    PubMed

    Benson, Al B; Venook, Alan P; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chan, Emily; Chen, Yi-Jen; Cooper, Harry S; Engstrom, Paul F; Enzinger, Peter C; Fenton, Moon J; Fuchs, Charles S; Grem, Jean L; Grothey, Axel; Hochster, Howard S; Hunt, Steven; Kamel, Ahmed; Kirilcuk, Natalie; Leong, Lucille A; Lin, Edward; Messersmith, Wells A; Mulcahy, Mary F; Murphy, James D; Nurkin, Steven; Rohren, Eric; Ryan, David P; Saltz, Leonard; Sharma, Sunil; Shibata, David; Skibber, John M; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Stoffel, Elena M; Stotsky-Himelfarb, Eden; Willett, Christopher G; Gregory, Kristina M; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Rectal Cancer begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, posttreatment surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and survivorship. The NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant new data from publications and abstracts, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points from the 2015 NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were perioperative therapy options and surveillance for patients with stage I through III disease. PMID:26085388

  12. Watch and wait approach to rectal cancer: A review.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Marcos E; Fang, Sandy H

    2015-11-27

    In 2014, there were an estimated 136800 new cases of colorectal cancer, making it the most common gastrointestinal malignancy. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and over one-third of newly diagnosed patients have stage III (node-positive) disease. For stage II and III colorectal cancer patients, the mainstay of curative therapy is neoadjuvant therapy, followed by radical surgical resection of the rectum. However, the consequences of a proctectomy, either by low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection, can lead to very extensive comorbidities, such as the need for a permanent colostomy, fecal incontinence, sexual and urinary dysfunction, and even mortality. Recently, trends of complete regression of the rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy have been confirmed by clinical and radiographic evaluation-this is known as complete clinical response (cCR). The "watch and wait" approach was first proposed by Dr. Angelita Habr-Gama in Brazil in 2009. Those patients with cCR are followed with close surveillance physical examinations, endoscopy, and imaging. Here, we review management of rectal cancer, the development of the "watch and wait" approach and its outcomes. PMID:26649153

  13. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  14. [Secondary retroperitoneal fibrosis in a 39-year-old man after rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Jarosch, A; Tiller, M; Rohrbach, H; Leimbach, T; Schepp, W

    2016-05-01

    A 39-year-old man had been treated for rectal cancer 6 years ago by lower anterior resection of the rectum and perioperative radiochemotherapy. Since then follow-up had been unremarkable but now the patient presented with unspecific lower abdominal pain. The cause of the pain was identified as paraneoplastic retroperitoneal fibrosis secondary to metachronous pulmonary metastases of the rectal cancer. PMID:26895316

  15. Endoscopic Resection for Small Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors: Comparison of Endoscopic Submucosal Resection with Band Ligation and Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Seok; Shin, Yong Woon; Kwon, Kye Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. There is no consensus so far regarding the optimal endoscopic method for treatment of small rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET). The aim of this study was to compare treatment efficacy, safety, and procedure time between endoscopic submucosal resection with band ligation (ESMR-L) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Methods. We conducted a prospective study of patients who visited Inha University Hospital for endoscopic resection of rectal NET (≦10 mm). Pathological complete resection rate, procedure time, and complications were evaluated. Results. A total of 77 patients were treated by ESMR-L (n = 53) or ESD (n = 24). En bloc resection was achieved in all patients. A significantly higher pathological complete resection rate was observed in the ESMR-L group (53/53, 100%) than in the ESD group (13/24, 54.2%) (P = 0.000). The procedure time of ESD (17.9 ± 9.1 min) was significantly longer compared to that of ESMR-L (5.3 ± 2.8 min) (P = 0.000). Conclusions. Considering the clinical efficacy, technical difficulty, and procedure time, the ESMR-L method should be considered as the first-line therapy for the small rectal NET (≤10 mm). ESD should be left as a second-line treatment for the fibrotic lesion which could not be removed using the ESMR-L method. PMID:27525004

  16. Successful treatment of rectal cancer with perineal invasion: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    KITAHARA, TOMOHIRO; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; SHINGAI, TATSUSHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer occasionally invades adjacent organs. However, rectal cancer with perineal invasion is uncommon and difficult to treat. Locally advanced colorectal cancer may be clinically treated with neoadjuvant therapy, followed by en bloc resection. Skin invasion may lead to tumor dissemination via cutaneous blood flow and lymphatic routes. There is currently no firm evidence regarding the treatment of these significantly advanced rectal cancers. In this study, we report 3 cases of rectal cancer with perineal invasion, successfully managed by multimodality treatment. Case 1 is a 52-year-old man with rectal cancer that had invaded the perineum; case 2 is a 38-year-old man with rectal cancer infiltrating the perineal skin and liver metastasis; and case 3 is a 50-year-old woman with rectal cancer and perineal invasion. All the cases were treated with radical excision. No severe complications were observed in the perioperative period. Case 2, in particular, was confirmed to remain alive 5 years after the surgery. Our experience suggests that multimodality treatment, including extended radical surgery, may be a feasible approach to the treatment of rectal cancer with perineal skin invasion. PMID:24940483

  17. Neoadjuvant Treatment Does Not Influence Perioperative Outcome in Rectal Cancer Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Alexis; Weitz, Juergen Slodczyk, Matthias; Koch, Moritz; Jaeger, Dirk; Muenter, Marc; Buechler, Markus W.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for perioperative morbidity in patients undergoing resection of primary rectal cancer, with a specific focus on the effect of neoadjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: This exploratory analysis of prospectively collected data included all patients who underwent anterior resection/low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary rectal cancer between October 2001 and October 2006. The study endpoints were perioperative surgical and medical morbidity. Univariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors were performed. Results: A total of 485 patients were included in this study; 425 patients (88%) underwent a sphincter-saving anterior resection/low anterior resection, 47 (10%) abdominoperineal resection, and 13 (2%) multivisceral resection. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was performed in 100 patients (21%), and 168 (35%) underwent neoadjuvant short-term radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy). Patient age and operative time were independently associated with perioperative morbidity, and operative time, body mass index >27 kg/m{sup 2} (overweight), and resection type were associated with surgical morbidity. Age and a history of smoking were confirmed as independent prognostic risk factors for medical complications. Neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with a worse outcome. Conclusion: The results of this prospective study have identified several risk factors associated with an adverse perioperative outcome after rectal cancer surgery. In addition, neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with increased perioperative complications.

  18. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  19. Ileorectal fistula due to a rectal cancer-A case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Minoru; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    A 51-year-old man was seen at our hospital because of diarrhea. Barium enema and colonoscopy revealed a cancer in the lower rectum and fistula formation from the site to ileum. Resection of the rectal cancer and ileorectal fistula was performed. Histologically, the resected lesion was mucinous adenocarcinoma with contiguous invasion from the rectum to the ileum. The patient is alive with no sign of recurrence 120 months after operation. Fistula formation between the colon and other gastrointestinal tract organs is very rare, especially for rectal cancer. Fistula-forming colorectal cancers are rarely found to have metastatic lesions in the liver, peritoneum and lymph nodes despite their invasive behavior; accordingly, curative resection involving partial resection of the intestine with fistula is expected. PMID:22096678

  20. New technique of transanal proctectomy with completely robotic total mesorrectal excision for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Ruiz, Marcos; Palazuelos, Carlos Manuel; Martín Parra, José Ignacio; Alonso Martín, Joaquín; Cagigas Fernández, Carmen; del Castillo Diego, Julio; Gómez Fleitas, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Anterior resection with total mesorectal excision is the standard method of rectal cancer resection. However, this procedure remains technically difficult in mid and low rectal cancer. A robotic transanal proctectomy with total mesorectal excision and laparoscopic assistance is reported in a 57 year old male with BMI 32 kg/m2 and rectal adenocarcinoma T2N1M0 at 5 cm from the dentate line. Operating time was 420 min. Postoperative hospital stay was 6 days and no complications were observed. Pathological report showed a 33 cm specimen with ypT2N0 adenocarcinoma at 2 cm from the distal margin, complete TME and non affected circumferential resection margin. Robotic technology might reduce some technical difficulties associated with TEM/TEO or SILS platforms in transanal total mesorectal excision. Further clinical trials will be necessary to assess this technique. PMID:24589418

  1. [Conversion Therapy of Initially Unresectable Rectal Cancer with Perforation via FOLFOX4 Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Chizu; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Nitta, Hiroshi; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Omoto, Hideyuki; Kamata, Shigeyuki; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of perforated rectal cancer that became curatively resectable after FOLFOX4 chemotherapy. An 81- year-old woman was transferred to our hospital with a diagnosis of bowel perforation. She underwent emergency transverse colostomy, peritoneal lavage, and the insertion of indwelling drainage tubes, because the perforated rectal cancer was considered unresectable. After recuperation, she received chemotherapy consisting of FOLFOX4 and bevacizumab. Owing to a good response to the treatment after 4 months, rectal resection was achieved curatively. Wound dehiscence occurred as a postoperative complication. The patient chose not to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Currently, she has been alive for more than 1 year 3 months after resection without recurrence. PMID:26805353

  2. Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158339.html Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment: ... therapy for rectal cancer in the United States, only slightly more than half of patients receive it, ...

  3. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A.

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Perineal herniation of an ileal neobladder following radical cystectomy and consecutive rectal resection for recurrent bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neumann, P A; Mehdorn, A S; Puehse, G; Senninger, N; Rijcken, E

    2016-04-01

    Secondary perineal herniation of intraperitoneal contents represents a rare complication following procedures such as abdominoperineal rectal resection or cystectomy. We present a case of a perineal hernia formation with prolapse of an ileum neobladder following radical cystectomy and rectal resection for recurrent bladder cancer. Following consecutive resections in the anterior and posterior compartment of the lesser pelvis, the patient developed problems emptying his neobladder. Clinical examination and computed tomography revealed perineal herniation of his neobladder through the pelvic floor. Through a perineal approach, the hernial sac could be repositioned, and via a combination of absorbable and non-absorbable synthetic mesh grafts, the pelvic floor was stabilised. Follow-up review at one year after hernia fixation showed no signs of recurrence and no symptoms. In cases of extensive surgery in the lesser pelvis with associated weakness of the pelvic compartments, meshes should be considered for closure of the pelvic floor. Development of biological meshes with reduced risk of infection might be an interesting treatment option in these cases. PMID:26985818

  5. Surgery for Locally Advanced T4 Rectal Cancer: Strategies and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Helewa, Ramzi M; Park, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Locally advanced T4 rectal cancer represents a complex clinical condition that requires a well thought-out treatment plan and expertise from multiple specialists. Paramount in the management of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are accurate preoperative staging, appropriate application of neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments, and, above all, the provision of high-quality, complete surgical resection in potentially curable cases. Despite the advanced nature of this disease, extended and multivisceral resections with clear margins have been shown to result in good oncological outcomes and offer patients a real chance of cure. In this article, we describe the assessment, classification, and multimodality treatment of primary locally advanced T4 rectal cancer, with a focus on surgical planning, approaches, and outcomes. PMID:27247535

  6. [Rectal cancer and adjuvant chemotherapy: which conclusions?].

    PubMed

    Bachet, J-B; Rougier, P; de Gramont, A; André, T

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rectum represents about a third of cases of colorectal cancer, with an annual incidence of 12,000 cases in France. On the contrary of colon cancer, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer has not been definitively proved, more because this question was assessed in few recent studies than because negative results. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is now the reference treatment for mid and lower rectal cancers, and allow to increase the local control without improvement of progression free survival and overall survival. The data of the "historical studies" of adjuvant treatment in rectal cancer published before 1990, of the meta-analysis of adjuvant trials in rectal cancer and of the QUASAR study suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (intravenous or oral), in absence of pre-operative treatment, decrease the risk of metastatic relapse after curative surgery for a rectal cancer of stage II or III. This benefice seems similar to the one observed in colon cancer. In the EORTC radiotherapy group trial 22921, an adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low dose of leucovorin was not associated with a significantly improvement of overall survival but, despite the fact that only 42.9% of patients received all planed cycles, the progression free survival was increased (not significantly) in groups receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The French recommendations are to discuss the indication of adjuvant chemotherapy by fluoropyrimidines in cases of stage III rectal cancer on histopathologic reports and no chemotherapy in case of stade II. Despite the fact that none study have assessed a combination of fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin in adjuvant setting in rectal cancer, like in colon cancer, the Folfox4, modified Folfox6 or Xelox regimens are valid options in stage III (experts opinion). In cases of pathologic complete remission or in absence of involved nodes, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy is not assessed. In

  7. Drug Combinations in Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Carvalho, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy has an accepted role in reducing the risk of local recurrence in locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, particularly when the circumferential resection margin is breached or threatened, according to magnetic resonance imaging. Fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation can obtain a significant down-sizing response and a curative resection can then be achieved. Approximately, 20% of the patients can also obtain a pathological complete response, which is associated with less local recurrences and increased survival. Patients who achieve a sustained complete clinical response may also avoid radical surgery. In unresectable or borderline resectable tumors, around 20% of the patients still fail to achieve a sufficient down-staging response with the current chemoradiation schedules. Hence, investigators have aspired to increase pathological complete response rates, aiming to improve curative resection rates, enhance survival, and potentially avoid mutilating surgery. However, adding additional cytotoxic or biological agents have not produced dramatic improvements in outcome and often led to excess surgical morbidity and higher levels of acute toxicity, which effects on compliance and in the global efficacy of chemoradiation. PMID:27238473

  8. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  9. Obesity: is there an increase in perioperative complications in those undergoing elective colon and rectal resection for carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Blee, Thomas H; Belzer, G Eric; Lambert, Pamela J

    2002-02-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that obese and overweight patients undergoing elective resection for colon and rectal cancer have longer operative times, increased intraoperative blood loss, and more postoperative complications compared with normal-weight individuals. Our study cohorts included all patients undergoing elective first-time colon resection for proven colorectal carcinoma. Patients undergoing resection for recurrent disease or for emergent indications such as obstruction, perforation, or hemorrhage and those who underwent an additional surgical procedure at the time of colon resection were excluded from analysis. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing resection for colorectal carcinoma during a 30-month period. One hundred fifty-three consecutive patients were identified. Body Mass Index was calculated for each patient. Each patient was labeled as normal, overweight, or obese on the basis of World Health Organization criteria. Estimated intraoperative blood loss, duration of surgery, and postoperative complications were recorded for each patient. Comparisons of continuous variables were made using one- or two-way analysis of variance testing. Comparisons of discrete variables were made with chi-square testing. Level of confidence was defined as P < 0.05. Forty-eight normal, 54 overweight, and 51 obese patients were identified. The type of colon resection, age range, and premorbid conditions were well matched between groups. There was no statistical difference in intraoperative blood loss between groups. The operative times were statistically longer in obese and overweight groups compared with the normal group. No statistical differences existed in postoperative complications between groups. We conclude that obese and overweight patients undergoing resection for colorectal carcinoma when compared with normal-weight patients have similar intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications but longer operative times

  10. Quality of care indicators in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Demetter, P; Ceelen, W; Danse, E; Haustermans, K; Jouret-Mourin, A; Kartheuser, A; Laurent, S; Mollet, G; Nagy, N; Scalliet, P; Van Cutsem, E; Van Den Eynde, M; Van de Stadt, J; Van Eycken, E; Van Laethem, J L; Vindevoghel, K; Penninckx, F

    2011-09-01

    Quality of health care is a hot topic, especially with regard to cancer. Although rectal cancer is, in many aspects, a model oncologic entity, there seem to be substantial differences in quality of care between countries, hospitals and physicians. PROCARE, a Belgian multidisciplinary national project to improve outcome in all patients with rectum cancer, identified a set of quality of care indicators covering all aspects of the management of rectal cancer. This set should permit national and international benchmarking, i.e. comparing results from individual hospitals or teams with national and international performances with feedback to participating teams. Such comparison could indicate whether further improvement is possible and/or warranted. PMID:22103052

  11. Incidence and mortality of anastomotic dehiscence requiring reoperation after rectal carcinoma resection.

    PubMed

    Cong, Zhi-jie; Hu, Liang-hao; Xing, Jun-jie; Bian, Zheng-qian; Fu, Chuan-gang; Yu, En-da; Li, Zhao-shen; Zhong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Anastomotic dehiscence (AD) requiring reoperation is the most severe complication following anterior rectal resection. We performed a systematic review on studies that describe AD requiring reoperation and its subsequent mortality after anterior resection for rectal carcinoma. A systematic search was performed on published literature. Data on the definition and rate of AD, the number of ADs requiring reoperation, the mortality caused by AD, and the overall postoperative mortality were pooled and analyzed. A total of 39 studies with 24,232 patients were analyzed. The studies varied in incidence and definition of AD. Systematic review of the data showed that the overall rate of AD was 8.6%, and the rate of AD requiring reoperation was 5.4%. The postoperative mortality caused by AD was 0.4%, and the overall postoperative mortality was 1.3%. We found considerable risk and mortality for AD requiring reoperation, which largely contributed to the overall postoperative mortality. PMID:24670019

  12. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27198037

  13. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  14. Severe rectal injury following radiation for prostatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.; Goldberg, H.; Goldman, H.; Lombardo, L.; Skaist, L.

    1984-04-01

    Between 1970 and 1981, 348 patients underwent definitive irradiation. Of these patients 6 (1.7 per cent) sustained severe rectal injury as manifest by major rectal bleeding, rectal stricture, rectal mucosal slough and rectal ulceration. Severe rectal injury was observed in 0 of 13 patients (0 per cent) treated with 125iodine, 3 of 329 (1 per cent) treated with 6,400 to 6,800 rad external irradiation, 2 of 39 (5 per cent) treated with 7,000 to 7,300 rad external irradiation, and 1 of 7 (14 per cent) treated with 198gold and external irradiation. The impact of radiation dose, radiation therapy technique and surgical trauma was assessed. Rectal injury was managed by supportive measures in 2 patients and by diverting colostomy in 3 with benefit. One patient underwent abdominoperineal resection. A small bowel fistula and an intra-abdominal abscess developed, and the patient died.

  15. Current status of laparoscopy for the treatment of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shussman, Noam; Wexner, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Surgery for rectal cancer in complex and entails many challenges. While the laparoscopic approach in general and specific to colon cancer has been long proven to have short term benefits and to be oncologically safe, it is still a debatable topic for rectal cancer. The attempt to benefit rectal cancer patients with the known advantages of the laparoscopic approach while not compromising their oncologic outcome has led to the conduction of many studies during the past decade. Herein we describe our technique for laparoscopic proctectomy and assess the current literature dealing with short term outcomes, immediate oncologic measures (such as lymph node yield and specimen quality) and long term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. We also briefly evaluate the evolving issues of robotic assisted rectal cancer surgery and the current innovations and trends in the minimally invasive approach to rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25386061

  16. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for the Complete Resection of the Rectal Remnant Mucosa in a Patient With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Koyu; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman underwent prophylactic subtotal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) 18 years ago. She underwent 5 transanal endoscopic microsurgeries for rectal remnant polyps, and was referred for the treatment of rectal remnant polyp recurrence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed to remove multiple polypoid lesions that circumferentially extended throughout the rectal remnant with lesions spreading onto the anastomotic site. The rectal remnant mucosa was resected in 2 pieces without complication. Specimens showed high-grade adenoma but no malignancy. Follow-up colonoscopy showed no recurrence. PMID:27144195

  17. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for the Complete Resection of the Rectal Remnant Mucosa in a Patient With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Naoki; Akiyama, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Koyu; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    A 47-year-old woman underwent prophylactic subtotal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) 18 years ago. She underwent 5 transanal endoscopic microsurgeries for rectal remnant polyps, and was referred for the treatment of rectal remnant polyp recurrence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed to remove multiple polypoid lesions that circumferentially extended throughout the rectal remnant with lesions spreading onto the anastomotic site. The rectal remnant mucosa was resected in 2 pieces without complication. Specimens showed high-grade adenoma but no malignancy. Follow-up colonoscopy showed no recurrence. PMID:27144195

  18. The Great Pretender: Rectal Syphilis Mimic a Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisani Ceretti, Andrea; Virdis, Matteo; Maroni, Nirvana; Arena, Monica; Masci, Enzo; Magenta, Alberto; Opocher, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Rectal syphilis is a rare expression of the widely recognised sexual transmitted disease, also known as the great imitator for its peculiarity of being confused with mild anorectal diseases because of its vague symptoms or believed rectal malignancy, with the concrete risk of overtreatment. We present the case of a male patient with primary rectal syphilis, firstly diagnosed as rectal cancer; the medical, radiological, and endoscopic features are discussed below. PMID:26451271

  19. Irinotecan and radiosensitization in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Illum, Henrik

    2011-04-01

    Neoadjuvant radiation therapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is currently considered the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. Pathologically complete response is a desirable outcome and has been associated with increased disease-free survival. There is a need to improve on this approach given that only approximately 10% achieve a pathologically complete response. Irinotecan has an established role in the treatment of metastatic rectal cancer. Both in-vitro and in-vivo data have shown promising radiosensitization properties. This study provides an overview of the published clinical trials evaluating the role of irinotecan as a radiosensitizer in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Although early-phase clinical trials initially showed promising results, this did not translate into improved outcome in a larger randomized phase II trial. Increased topoisomerase I expression has recently been identified as a possible predictive marker for improved response to irinotecan-based radiosensitization. This finding could help identify a subset of patients more likely to benefit from the addition of irinotecan in future trials. PMID:21160419

  20. New approach to adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, M.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Kramer, S.

    1980-02-01

    A sandwich technique of adjuvant radiotherapy was used to treat twenty-three patients with rectal cancer. In this technique, low dose preoperative irradiation (500 rad in one treatment) was given to all patients followed by immediate surgery (usually an A-P resection); on the basis of histopathological findings, patients with stage B/sub 2/ and C rectal cancer were selectively given 4500 rad post-operative irradiation in 5 weeks. Nine patients had early lesions (stage A and B/sub 1/) and did not receive postoperative irradiation. Thirteen patients had stage B/sub 2/ and C disease and hence received the full course of postoperative irradiation. One patient was found to have liver metastasis at the time of surgery, and hence received only palliative therapy. Follow-up of these twenty-three patients ranges from 10 months to 24 months with a median follow-up of 15 months. Treatment was well-tolerated with few side effects. Only two of the twenty-two patients who were treated for cure have failed to date. Both patients had stage C/sub 2/ disease; one patient developed an anterior abdominal wall recurrence in the surgical scar 3 months post-treatment and the second patient developed brain and bone metastases. No patients have failed in the pelvis. We feel this technique of adjuvant therapy is a logical approach to the treatment of rectal cancer and has potential for improving survival. The rationale for this approach to adjuvant radiotherapy is discussed together with implications for survival.

  1. Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gollins, S; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2016-02-01

    Improved surgical technique plus selective preoperative radiotherapy have decreased rectal cancer pelvic local recurrence from, historically, 25% down to about 5-10%. However, this improvement has not reduced distant metastatic relapse, which is the main cause of death and a key issue in rectal cancer management. The current standard is local pelvic treatment (surgery ± preoperative radiotherapy) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, depending on resection histology. For circumferential resection margin (CRM)-threatened cancer on baseline magnetic resonance imaging, downstaging long-course preoperative chemoradiation (LCPCRT) is generally used. However, for non-CRM-threatened disease, varying approaches are currently adopted in the UK, including straight to surgery, short-course preoperative radiotherapy and LCPCRT. Clinical trials are investigating intensification of concurrent chemoradiation. There is also increasing interest in investigating preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as a way of exposing micro-metastatic disease to full-dose systemic chemotherapy as early as possible and potentially reducing metastatic relapse. Phase II trials suggest that this strategy is feasible, with promising histological response and low rates of tumour progression during NAC. Phase III trials are needed to determine the benefit of NAC when added to standard therapy and also to determine if it can be used instead of neoadjuvant radiotherapy-based schedules. Although several measures of neoadjuvant treatment response assessment based on imaging or pathology are promising predictive biomarkers for long-term survival, none has been validated in prospective phase III studies. The phase III setting will enable this, also providing translational opportunities to examine molecular predictors of response and survival. PMID:26645661

  2. Total mesorectal excision for the treatment of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zedan, Ali; Salah, Tareq

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the surgical treatment of rectal cancer, a clear circumferential resection margin and distal resection margin should be obtained. The aim of this study was to determine the morbidity, mortality, survival outcome, and local failure after total mesorectal excision (TME) in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer. Methods This retrospective study was conducted on 101 patients treated for rectal cancer using low anterior resection (LAR), abdominoperinial resection (APR), or Hartmaan’s technique. In all operative procedures, total mesorectal excisions (TMEs) were done. The patients were treated from November 2000 to April 2011 in the South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI) of Assuit University (Egypt). Neo-adjuvant therapy was given to those patients with serosalin filtration, lymph node involvement, and sexual and urinary function impairment. Data were analyzed using IBM-SPSS version 21, and survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results One hundred one patients were evaluable (61 males, 40 females). Regarding the operative procedure used, it was: (APR), LAR, Hartmaan’s technique in 15.8%, 71.3%, and 12.9% of patients, respectively. Operation-related mortality during the 30 days after surgery was 3%. The operations resulted in morbidity in 25% of the patients, anastomotic site leak in 5.9% of the patients, urinary dysfynction in 9.9% of the patients, and erectile dysfunction in 15.8% of the male patients. Regarding safety margin, the median distances were distal/radial margin, 23/12 mm, distal limit 7 cm. Median lymph nodes harvest 19 nodes. Primary tumor locations were anteriorly 23.8%, laterally 13.9%, posteriorly 38.6%, and circumferential 23.8%. Protective stoma 16.8%. Primary Tumor TNM classification (T1, T2, T3, and T4; 3, 28.7, 55.4, and 12.9%, respectively). Nodes Metastases (N0, N1, and N2; 57.4, 31.7, and 10.9%, respectively). TNM staging (I, II, III, and IV; 15.8, 29.7, 46.5, and 7.9%, respectively). Chemotherapy was

  3. [A Case of Lateral Lymph Node Recurrence Five-Years after Curative Surgery for Rectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Kiyotaka; Miyake, Masakazu; Uemura, Mamoru; Miyazaki, Michihiko; Ikeda, Masataka; Maeda, Sakae; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Hama, Naoki; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Omiya, Hideyasu; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Hirao, Motohiro; Takami, Koji; Nakamori, Shoji; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2015-11-01

    A 62-year-old woman had undergone laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer in February 2008. The pathological diagnosis was pT2, pN0, M0, pStageⅠ. At her request, she took UFT for 5 years as adjuvant chemotherapy. A CT examination revealed lateral lymph node swelling in January 2014. She was referred to our hospital after a diagnosis of lateral lymph node recurrence. She was administered 6 courses of FOLFIRI plus Cmab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy, after which the tumor size reduced by 62%. The treatment effect was rated as a PR. Laparoscopic right intrapelvic lymph node dissection was performed in July 2014, and the pathological diagnosis was recurrence of rectal cancer in the lateral lymph nodes. We report a case of dissection of lymph node recurrence 5 years after curative surgery for rectal cancer, along with a literature review. PMID:26805111

  4. Immunological Landscape and Clinical Management of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ruiz, Elísabeth; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of rectal cancer and colon cancer differs due to increased local relapses in rectal cancer. However, the current molecular classification does not differentiate rectal cancer and colon cancer as two different entities. In recent years, the impact of the specific immune microenvironment in cancer has attracted renewed interest and is currently recognized as one of the major determinants of clinical progression in a wide range of tumors. In colorectal cancer, the density of lymphocytic infiltration is associated with better overall survival. Due to the need for biomarkers of response to conventional treatment with chemoradiotherapy in rectal tumors, the immune status of rectal cancer emerges as a useful tool to improve the management of patients. PMID:26941741

  5. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery versus endoscopic mucosal resection for large rectal adenomas (TREND-study)

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Frank JC; de Graaf, Eelco JR; Dijkgraaf, Marcel GW; Reitsma, Johannes B; Haringsma, Jelle; Timmer, Robin; Weusten, Bas LAM; Gerhards, Michael F; Consten, Esther CJ; Schwartz, Matthijs P; Boom, Maarten J; Derksen, Erik J; Bijnen, A Bart; Davids, Paul HP; Hoff, Christiaan; van Dullemen, Hendrik M; Heine, G Dimitri N; van der Linde, Klaas; Jansen, Jeroen M; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie CH; Breumelhof, Ronald; Geldof, Han; Hardwick, James CH; Doornebosch, Pascal G; Depla, Annekatrien CTM; Ernst, Miranda F; van Munster, Ivo P; de Hingh, Ignace HJT; Schoon, Erik J; Bemelman, Willem A; Fockens, Paul; Dekker, Evelien

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent non-randomized studies suggest that extended endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is equally effective in removing large rectal adenomas as transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). If equally effective, EMR might be a more cost-effective approach as this strategy does not require expensive equipment, general anesthesia and hospital admission. Furthermore, EMR appears to be associated with fewer complications. The aim of this study is to compare the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of TEM and EMR for the resection of large rectal adenomas. Methods/design Multicenter randomized trial among 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients with a rectal adenoma ≥ 3 cm, located between 1–15 cm ab ano, will be randomized to a TEM- or EMR-treatment strategy. For TEM, patients will be treated under general anesthesia, adenomas will be dissected en-bloc by a full-thickness excision, and patients will be admitted to the hospital. For EMR, no or conscious sedation is used, lesions will be resected through the submucosal plane in a piecemeal fashion, and patients will be discharged from the hospital. Residual adenoma that is visible during the first surveillance endoscopy at 3 months will be removed endoscopically in both treatment strategies and is considered as part of the primary treatment. Primary outcome measure is the proportion of patients with recurrence after 3 months. Secondary outcome measures are: 2) number of days not spent in hospital from initial treatment until 2 years afterwards; 3) major and minor morbidity; 4) disease specific and general quality of life; 5) anorectal function; 6) health care utilization and costs. A cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of EMR against TEM for large rectal adenomas will be performed from a societal perspective with respectively the costs per recurrence free patient and the cost per quality adjusted life year as outcome measures. Based on comparable recurrence rates for TEM and EMR of 3.3% and

  6. Heterogeneity of KRAS Mutation Status in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Peter; König, Alexander; Schirmer, Markus; Kitz, Julia; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Azizian, Azadeh; Bernhardt, Markus; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Grade, Marian; Ghadimi, Michael; Ströbel, Philipp; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anti-EGFR targeted therapy is of increasing importance in advanced colorectal cancer and prior KRAS mutation testing is mandatory for therapy. However, at which occasions this should be performed is still under debate. We aimed to assess in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer whether there is intra-specimen KRAS heterogeneity prior to and upon preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and if there are any changes in KRAS mutation status due to this intervention. Materials and Methods KRAS mutation status analyses were performed in 199 tumor samples from 47 patients with rectal cancer. To evaluate the heterogeneity between different tumor areas within the same tumor prior to preoperative CRT, 114 biopsies from 34 patients (mean 3 biopsies per patient) were analyzed (pre-therapeutic intratumoral heterogeneity). For the assessment of heterogeneity after CRT residual tumor tissue (85 samples) from 12 patients (mean 4.2 tissue samples per patient) were analyzed (post-therapeutic intratumoral heterogeneity) and assessment of heterogeneity before and after CRT was evaluated in corresponding patient samples (interventional heterogeneity). Primer extension method (SNaPshot™) was used for initial KRAS mutation status testing for Codon 12, 13, 61, and 146. Discordant results by this method were reevaluated by using the FDA-approved KRAS Pyro Kit 24, V1 and the RAS Extension Pyro Kit 24, V1 Kit (therascreen® KRAS test). Results For 20 (43%) out of the 47 patients, a KRAS mutation was detected. With 12 out of 20, the majority of these mutations affected codon 35. We did not obtained evidence that CRT results in changes of the KRAS mutation pattern. In addition, no intratumoral heterogeneity in the KRAS mutational status could be proven. This was true for both the biopsies prior to CRT and the resection specimens thereafter. The discrepancy observed in some samples when using the SNaPshot™ assay was due to insufficient sensitivity of this technique upon

  7. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  8. Current treatment of rectal cancer adapted to the individual patient

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, Laura; Ciria, Juan Pablo; Arbea, Leire; Liñán, Olga; Cafiero, Sergio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative radiochemotherapy and total mesorectal excision surgery is a recommended standard therapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. However, some subgroups of patients benefit more than others from this approach. In order to avoid long-term complications of radiation and chemotherapy, efforts are being made to subdivide T3N0 stage using advanced imaging techniques, and to analyze prognostic factors that help to define subgroup risk patients. Long-course radiochemotherapy has the potential of downsizing the tumor before surgery and may increase the chance of sphincter preservation in some patients. Short-course radiotherapy (SCRT), on the other hand, is a practical schedule that better suits patients with intermediated risk tumors, located far from the anal margin. SCRT is also increasingly being used among patients with disseminated disease, before resection of the rectal tumor. Improvements in radiation technique, such as keeping the irradiation target below S2/S3 junction, and the use of IMRT, can reduce the toxicity associated with radiation, specially long-term small bowel toxicity. PMID:24416579

  9. Structured pathology reporting improves the macroscopic assessment of rectal tumour resection specimens.

    PubMed

    King, Simon; Dimech, Margaret; Johnstone, Susan

    2016-06-01

    We examined whether introduction of a structured macroscopic reporting template for rectal tumour resection specimens improved the completeness and efficiency in collecting key macroscopic data elements. Fifty free text (narrative) macroscopic reports retrieved from 2012 to 2014 were compared with 50 structured macroscopic reports from 2013 to 2015, all of which were generated at John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW. The six standard macroscopic data elements examined in this study were reported in all 50 anatomical pathology reports using a structured macroscopic reporting dictation template. Free text reports demonstrated significantly impaired data collection when recording intactness of mesorectum (p<0.001), relationship to anterior peritoneal reflection (p=0.028) and distance of tumour to the non-peritonealised circumferential margin (p<0.001). The number of words used was also significantly (p<0.001) reduced using pre-formatted structured reports compared to free text reports. The introduction of a structured reporting dictation template improves data collection and may reduce the subsequent administrative burden when macroscopically evaluating rectal resections. PMID:27114373

  10. Prospective Evaluation of Genito-Urinary Function after Laparoscopic Rectal Resection in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Mari, Giulio; Costanzi, Andrea; Galfrascoli, Elisa; Rosato, Andrea; Crippa, Jacopo; Maggioni, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic anterior rectal resection with total mesorectal excision is related to sexual and urinary disorders. Anastomotic leak and neo-adjuvant radiation therapy are effective factors in worsening pelvic function. We report a series of 50 elderly (age 70) patients who underwent laparoscopic total mesorectal excision inquired about pre and post-operative genito-urinary function. Patients were interviewed preoperatively, 1 and 9 months post-operatively with validated questionnaires about sexual and urinary function and quality of life. They also underwent urofluximetric test with ultrasound measurement of the bladder remnant volume. The geriatric assessment was performed with the BARTHEL index. Urinary and sexual function slightly worsened after surgery although not significantly. Mean Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Indicator score decreased significantly from pre operative levels at 1 month from surgery. BARTHEL index did not change significantly across surgery. Maximum urinary flow, mean urinary flow, bladder residual volume worsened after surgery although not significantly. Laparoscopic anterior rectal resection with total mesorectal excision affects the genito-urinary status of elderly patients. Incidence of severe dysfunctions is similar to normal aged population. PMID:27604669

  11. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  12. Total sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer – A case report featuring technical details and potential pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Melich, George; Weber, Michael; Stein, Barry; Minutolo, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo O.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Total sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer is controversial. However, recent publications suggest encouraging outcomes with high sacral resections. We present the first case report describing technical aspects, potential pitfalls and treatment of complications associated with total sacrectomy performed as a treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. PRESENTATION OF CASE A fifty-three year old man was previously treated at another institution with a low anterior resection (LAR) followed by chemo-radiation and left liver tri-segmentectomy for metastatic rectal cancer. Three years following the LAR, the patient developed a recurrence at the site of colorectal anastomosis, manifesting clinically as a contained perforation, forming a recto-cutaneous fistula through the sacrum. Abdomino-perineal resection (APR) and complete sacrectomy were performed using an anterior–posterior approach with posterior spinal instrumented fusion and pelvic fixation using iliac crest bone graft. Left sided vertical rectus abdominis muscle flap and right sided gracilis muscle flap were used for hardware coverage and to fill the pelvic defect. One year after the resection, the patient remains disease free and has regained the ability to move his lower limbs against gravity. DISCUSSION The case described in this report features some formidable challenges due to the previous surgeries for metastatic disease, and the presence of a recto-sacral cutaneous fistula. An approach with careful surgical planning including considerationof peri-operative embolization is vital for a successful outcome of the operation. A high degree of suspicion for pseudo-aneurysms formation due infection or dislodgement of metallic coils is necessary in the postoperative phase. CONCLUSION Total sacrectomy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer with acceptable short-term outcomes is possible.A detailed explanation to the patient of the possible complications and expectations including the concept of a

  13. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  14. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  15. Follow-up of patients after resection for colorectal cancer: a position paper of the Canadian Society of Surgical Oncology and the Canadian Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Carole S.; McLeod, Robin S.

    1997-01-01

    Objective To provide recommendations for postoperative follow-up of patients with colorectal carcinoma. Options Postoperative follow-up surveillance versus no surveillance. Evidence A MEDLINE search for articles published between 1966 and February 1996 with the terms “colorectal neoplasm” and “follow-up studies.” Pertinent citations from references of reviewed articles were also retrieved. Methodology With the evidence-based methodology of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination, a thorough review of the value of postoperative follow-up for colorectal cancer patients was performed. Studies were categorized according to their study design and submitted to critical appraisal. Randomized trials, cohort studies and descriptive studies were assessed. A benefit of follow-up was defined as an overall increase in survival. Recommendation To date, there is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation on the benefit of postoperative surveillance in colorectal cancer patients. Further clinical trials are needed to clarify the role of postoperative follow-up for patients after resection for colorectal cancer. PMID:9126121

  16. [Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with vertical rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal resection for cancer].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Novák, András; István, Gábor; Lóderer, Zoltán; Ledniczky, György; Ondrejka, Pál

    2012-10-01

    Perineal wound healing problems following extended abdomino-perineal resection of ano-rectal cancer represent a great challenge to the surgeon. Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with a myocutan flap was thought to reduce surgical wound healing complications. A review of the relevant literature was carried out on perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal rectal resection for cancer. The more commonly used neoadjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy as well as extended surgical radicality resulted in increased perioperative risks, therefore combined procedures between the colorectal and plastic surgical teams are inevitable. This case report illustrates the above trend. PMID:23086826

  17. Posterior high sacral segmental disconnection prior to anterior en bloc exenteration for recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, K G M; Solomon, M J; Austin, K K S; Lee, P J; Stalley, P

    2016-06-01

    This article describes a novel technique for en bloc resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer that invades the high sacral bone (above S3). The involved segment of the sacrum is mobilised with osteotomes during an initial posterior approach before an anterior abdominal phase where the segment of sacral bone is delivered with the specimen. This allows en bloc resection of the involved sacrum while preserving uninvolved distal and contralateral sacral bone and nerve roots. The goal is to obtain a clear bony margin and offer a chance of cure while improving functional outcomes by maintaining pelvic stability and minimising neurological deficit. PMID:27000857

  18. Review of systemic therapies for locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Arsen; Tan, Carlyn; Tuli, Richard; Hendifar, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer, along with colon cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. Up to a quarter of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis and 40% will develop metastatic disease. The past 10 years have been extremely exciting in the treatment of both locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer (mRC). With the advent of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, increased numbers of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are surviving longer and some are seeing their tumors shrink to sizes that allow for resection. The advent of biologics and monoclonal antibodies has propelled the treatment of mRC further than many could have hoped. Combined with regimens such as FOLFOX or FOLFIRI, median survival rates have been increased to an average of 23 months. However, the combinations of chemotherapy regimens seem endless for rectal cancer. We will review the major chemotherapies available for locally advanced and mRC as well as regimens currently under investigation such as FOLFOXIRI. We will also review vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors as single agents and in combination with traditional chemotherapy regimens. PMID:25830038

  19. Postoperative Irradiation for Rectal Cancer Increases the Risk of Small Bowel Obstruction After Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Nancy N.; Hartman, Lacey K.; Tepper, Joel E.; Ricciardi, Rocco; Durham, Sara B.; Virnig, Beth A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk of small bowel obstruction (SBO) after irradiation (RT) for rectal cancer Background: SBO is a frequent complication after standard resection of rectal cancer. Although the use of RT is increasing, the effect of RT on risk of SBO is unknown. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry data linked to Medicare claims data to determine the effect of RT on risk of SBO. Patients 65 years of age and older diagnosed with nonmetastatic invasive rectal cancer treated with standard resection from 1986 through 1999 were included. We determined whether patients had undergone RT and evaluated the effect of RT and timing of RT on the incidence of admission to hospital for SBO, adjusting for potential confounders using a proportional hazards model. Results: We identified a total of 5606 patients who met our selection criteria: 1994 (36%) underwent RT, 74% postoperatively. Patients were followed for a mean of 3.8 years. A total of 614 patients were admitted for SBO over the study period; 15% of patients in the RT group and 9% of patients in the nonirradiated group (P < 0.001). After controlling for age, sex, race, diagnosis year, type of surgery, and stage, we found that patients who underwent postoperative RT were at higher risk of SBO, hazard ratio 1.69 (95% CI, 1.3–2.1). However, the long-term risk associated with preoperative irradiation was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.55–1.46). Conclusions: Postoperative but not preoperative RT after standard resection of rectal cancer results in an increased risk of SBO over time. PMID:17414603

  20. Management of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lal, Alysandra; Christians, Kathleen; Evans, Douglas B

    2010-04-01

    Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is an emerging stage of disease defined by computed tomogrpahy criteria, patient (Katz type B), or disease characteristics (Katz type C). These patients are particularly well suited to a surgery-last strategy with induction therapy consisting of chemotherapy (gemcitabine alone or in combination) followed by chemoradiation. With appropriate selection and preoperative planning, many patients with borderline resectable disease derive clinical benefit from multimodality therapy. The use of a standardized system for the staging of localized pancreatic cancer avoids indecision and allows for the optimal treatment of all patients guided by the extent of their disease. In this article, 2 case reports are presented, and the term borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is discussed. The advantages of neoadjuvant therapy and surgery are also discussed. PMID:20159519

  1. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett’s, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  2. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  3. Radiofrequency thermal treatment with chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHOJI, HISANORI; MOTEGI, MASAHIKO; OSAWA, KIYOTAKA; OKONOGI, NORIYUKI; OKAZAKI, ATSUSHI; ANDOU, YOSHITAKA; ASAO, TAKAYUKI; KUWANO, HIROYUKI; TAKAHASHI, TAKEO; OGOSHI, KYOJI

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that patients with a clinical complete response (CR) following radiofrequency thermal treatment exhibit significantly increased body temperature compared with other groups, whereas patients with a clinical partial response or stable disease depended on the absence or presence of output limiting symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation among treatment response, Hidaka radiofrequency (RF) output classification (HROC: termed by us) and changes in body temperature. From December 2011 to January 2014, 51 consecutive rectal cancer cases were included in this study. All patients underwent 5 RF thermal treatments with concurrent chemoradiation. Patients were classified into three groups based on HROC: with ≤9, 10–16, and ≥17 points, calculated as the sum total points of five treatments. Thirty-three patients received surgery 8 weeks after treatment, and among them, 32 resected specimens were evaluated for histological response. Eighteen patients did not undergo surgery, five because of progressive disease (PD) and 13 refused because of permanent colostomy. We demonstrated that good local control (ypCR + CR + CRPD) was observed in 32.7% of cases in this study. Pathological complete response (ypCR) was observed in 15.7% of the total 51 patients and in 24.2% of the 33 patients who underwent surgery. All ypCR cases had ≥10 points in the HROC, but there were no patients with ypCR among those with ≤9 points in the HROC. Standardization of RF thermal treatment was performed safely, and two types of patients were identified: those without or with increased temperatures, who consequently showed no or some benefit, respectively, for similar RF output thermal treatment. We propose that the HROC is beneficial for evaluating the efficacy of RF thermal treatment with chemoradiation for rectal cancer, and the thermoregulation control mechanism in individual patients may be pivotal in predicting the response to RF thermal treatment

  4. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  5. [A patient with recurrent rectal cancer in whom pulmonary metastasis disappeared by FOLFOX 4 therapy].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Minoru; Ono, Seigo; Nakayama, Yoshimi; Nitta, Shingo; Ishiyama, Shun; Shinjou, Kunihiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Ishibiki, Yoshirou; Urao, Masahiko; Kojima, Kuniaki

    2007-11-01

    We performed FOLFOX 4 therapy in a patient with lung metastasis (a 62-year-old woman) after surgery for rectal cancer and observed both normalization of tumor markers and disappearance of the metastasis. Low anterior resection was performed for progressive rectal cancer, and treatment with UFT and folinate was started one month after surgery. However, tumor markers increased after 2 months of treatment and CT scans showed metastases to both lungs. FOLFOX 4 therapy was started, and tumor markers became normal after four courses, while the lung metastases disappeared after 10 courses. The dosage of FOLFOX 4 was reduced after three courses due to neutropenia and diarrhea. This treatment appeared to be effective for the inhibition of lung metastasis associated with colorectal cancer. PMID:18030029

  6. The effect of preoperative chemoradiotherapy on lymph nodes harvested in TME for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adequate lymph nodes resection in rectal cancer is important for staging and local control. This retrospective analysis single center study evaluated the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation on the number of lymph nodes in rectal carcinoma, considering some clinicopathological parameters. Methods A total of 111 patients undergone total mesorectal excision for rectal adenocarcinoma from July 2005 to May 2012 in our center were included. No patient underwent any prior pelvic surgery or radiotherapy. Chemoradiotherapy was indicated in patients with rectal cancer stage II or III before chemoradiation. Results One-hundred and eleven patients were considered. The mean age was 67.6 yrs (range 36 – 84, SD 10.8). Fifty (45.0%) received neoadjuvant therapy before resection. The mean number of removed lymph nodes was 13.6 (range 0–39, SD 7.3). In the patients who received neoadjuvant therapy the number of nodes detected was lower (11.5, SD 6.5 vs. 15.3, SD 7.5, p = 0.006). 37.4% of patients with preoperative chemoradiotherapy had 12 or more lymph nodes in the specimen compared to the 63.6% of those who had surgery at the first step (p: 0.006). Other factors associated in univariate analysis with lower lymph nodes yield included stage (p 0.005) and grade (p 0.0003) of the tumour. Age, sex, tumor site, type of operation, surgeons and pathologists did not weight upon the number of the removed lymph nodes. Conclusion In TME surgery for rectal cancer, preoperative CRT results into a reduction of lymph nodes yield in univariate analisys and linear regression. PMID:24246069

  7. Liver resection for colorectal cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gallinger, S.; Biagi, J.J.; Fletcher, G.G.; Nhan, C.; Ruo, L.; McLeod, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    Questions Should surgery be considered for colorectal cancer (crc) patients who have liver metastases plus (a) pulmonary metastases, (b) portal nodal disease, or (c) other extrahepatic metastases (ehms)? What is the role of chemotherapy in the surgical management of crc with liver metastases in (a) patients with resectable disease in the liver, or (b) patients with initially unresectable disease in the liver that is downsized with chemotherapy (“conversion”)? What is the role of liver resection when one or more crc liver metastases have radiographic complete response (rcr) after chemotherapy? Perspectives Advances in chemotherapy have improved survival in crc patients with liver metastases. The 5-year survival with chemotherapy alone is typically less than 1%, although two recent studies with folfox or folfoxiri (or both) reported rates of 5%–10%. However, liver resection is the treatment that is most effective in achieving long-term survival and offering the possibility of a cure in stage iv crc patients with liver metastases. This guideline deals with the role of chemotherapy with surgery, and the role of surgery when there are liver metastases plus ehms. Because only a proportion of patients with crc metastatic disease are considered for liver resection, and because management of this patient population is complex, multidisciplinary management is required. Methodology Recommendations in the present guideline were formulated based on a prepublication version of a recent systematic review on this topic. The draft methodology experts, and external review by clinical practitioners. Feedback was incorporated into the final version of the guideline. Practice Guideline These recommendations apply to patients with liver metastases from crc who have had or will have a complete (R0) resection of the primary cancer and who are being considered for resection of the liver, or liver plus specific and limited ehms, with curative intent. 1(a). Patients with liver and lung

  8. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  9. Orbital metastasis as the inaugural presentation of occult rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cherif, Eya; Ben Hassine, Lamia; Azzabi, Samira; Khalfallah, Narjess

    2014-01-01

    Orbital metastasis is uncommon and occurs in 2–3% of patients with cancer. It is rarely the initial manifestation of a systemic malignancy. It usually indicates extensive haematogenous dissemination of a primary cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. Breast, lungs and prostate cancers are the most common primary cancers leading to orbital metastasis. However, orbital tumour revealing a rectal adenocarcinoma is exceptional. We describe a case of orbital tumour in a 67-year-old man with no history of systemic cancer while presenting with ophthalmic symptoms. Investigations revealed rectal adenocarcinoma as the primary malignant tumour. PMID:24481014

  10. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  11. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  12. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Yuka; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Tadanobu; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer. PMID:26668568

  13. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yuka; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Tadanobu; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer. PMID:26668568

  14. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed; Safran, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  15. Techniques and Outcome of Surgery for Locally Advanced and Local Recurrent Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Renehan, A G

    2016-02-01

    Locally advanced primary rectal cancer is variably defined, but generally refers to T3 and T4 tumours. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment for these tumours but there is a high-risk for local recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2011) guidelines recommend that patients with these tumours be considered for preoperative chemoradiotherapy and this is the starting point for any discussion, as it is standard care. However, there are many refinements of this pathway and these are the subject of this overview. In surgical terms, there are two broad settings: (i) patients with tumours contained within the mesorectal envelope, or in the lower rectum, limited to invading the sphincter muscles (namely some T2 and most T3 tumours); and (ii) patients with tumours directly invading or adherent to pelvic organs or structures, mainly T4 tumours - here referred to as primary rectal cancer beyond total mesorectal excision (PRC-bTME). Major surgical resection using the principles of TME is the mainstay of treatment for the former. Where anal sphincter sacrifice is indicated for low rectal cancers, variations of abdominoperineal resection - referred to as tailored excision - including the extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE), are required. There is debate whether or not plastic reconstruction or mesh repair is required after these surgical procedures. To achieve cure in PRC-bTME tumours, most patients require extended multivisceral exenterative surgery, carried out within specialist multidisciplinary centres. The surgical principles governing the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer (RRC) parallel those for PRC-bTME, but typically only half of these patients are suitable for this type of major surgery. Peri-operative morbidity and mortality are considerable after surgery for PRC-bTME and RRC, but unacceptable levels of variation in clinical practice and outcome exist globally. To address this, there are now major efforts to standardise

  16. Secondary Cancers After Radiation Therapy for Primary Prostate or Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yen-Chien; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Li, Chung-Yi; Chuang, Jen-Pin; Lee, Jenq-Chang

    2016-04-01

    Literature about the risk of secondary cancer after radiation therapy (RT) of prostate and rectal cancer reveals contradictory results. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine whether the RT induces secondary rectal or prostate cancer in patients, respectively, with prostate or rectal cancer. All studies published in Medline or Pubmed up to March 3, 2015, containing RT of primary rectal or prostate cancer, and providing risk estimates of secondary prostate or rectal cancer were considered as eligible. Relative risk (RR) and standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated using the random-effects model. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. 12 of them were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. For prostate cancer patients, pooled adjusted RRs or SIRs did not show an effect on the risk of secondary rectal cancer. However, notwithstanding the limitations of SEER-based studies, the subgroup of prostate cancer patients receiving external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) showed an increased risk of rectal cancer. For rectal cancer patients, pooled adjusted RR of prostate cancer was 1.12 (95 % CI, 0.44-2.8) and SIR was 0.40 (95 % CI, 0.29-0.55). All studies included in the SIR analysis of rectal cancer were derived from the SEER data source. Based on current evidence, RT for prostate cancer patients had no effect on rectal cancer incidence, except for patients who received EBRT therapy. However, compared with the general population, RT for rectal cancer is associated with a decreased prostate cancer risk as found in SEER-based studies. PMID:26711638

  17. Advances in the Surgical Management of Resectable and Borderline Resectable Pancreas Cancer.

    PubMed

    Helmink, Beth A; Snyder, Rebecca A; Idrees, Kamran; Merchant, Nipun B; Parikh, Alexander A

    2016-04-01

    Successful surgical resection offers the only chance for cure in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, pancreatic resection is feasible in less than 20% of the patients. In this review, the current state of surgical management of pancreatic cancer is discussed. The definition of resectability based on cross-sectional imaging and the technical aspects of surgery, including vascular resection and/or reconstruction, management of aberrant vascular anatomy and extent of lymphadenectomy, are appraised. Furthermore, common pancreatic resection-specific postoperative complications and their management are reviewed. PMID:27013365

  18. The diagnosis and management of rectal cancer: expert discussion and recommendations derived from the 9th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, Barcelona, 2007.

    PubMed

    Van Cutsem, E; Dicato, M; Haustermans, K; Arber, N; Bosset, J-F; Cunningham, D; De Gramont, A; Diaz-Rubio, E; Ducreux, M; Goldberg, R; Glynne-Jones, R; Haller, D; Kang, Y-K; Kerr, D; Labianca, R; Minsky, B D; Moore, M; Nordlinger, B; Rougier, P; Scheithauer, W; Schmoll, H-J; Sobrero, A; Tabernero, J; Tempero, M; Van de Velde, C; Zalcberg, J

    2008-06-01

    Knowledge of the biology and management of rectal cancer continues to improve. A multidisciplinary approach to a patient with rectal cancer by an experienced expert team is mandatory, to assure optimal diagnosis and staging, surgery, selection of the appropriate neo-adjuvant and adjuvant strategy and chemotherapeutic management. Moreover, optimal symptom management also requires a dedicated team of health care professionals. The introduction of total mesorectal excision has been associated with a decrease in the rate of local failure after surgery. High quality surgery and the achievement of pathological measures of quality are a prerequisite to adequate locoregional control. There are now randomized data in favour of chemoradiotherapy or short course radiotherapy in the preoperative setting. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is more beneficial and has less toxicity for patients with resectable rectal cancer than postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Furthermore chemoradiotherapy leads also to downsizing of locally advanced rectal cancer. New strategies that decrease the likelihood of distant metastases after initial treatment need be developed with high priority. Those involved in the care for patients with rectal cancer should be encouraged to participate in well-designed clinical trials, to increase the evidence-based knowledge and to make further progress. Health care workers involved in the care of rectal cancer patients should be encouraged to adopt quality control processes leading to increased expertise. PMID:18539618

  19. [Endoluminal echography in rectal cancer--preoperative staging and postoperative control].

    PubMed

    Tankova, L; Kadnian, Kh; Draganov, V; Damianov, D; Damianov, N; Penchev, P; Gegova, A

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic potential of endoluminal echography and the pitfalls sources in the preoperative staging and postoperative follow-up in patients with rectal cancer. 245 patients with rectal carcinoma are evaluated during 10 years period (Jan. 1993-Jan. 2002 years). 96 patients are monitored in the early and late postoperative periods for the early detection of local recurrence as well as for the anorectal physiology assessment after low anterior rectal resection or coloanal anastomosis. Lineal transducer UST-657-5MHz (Aloka 620) and 10MHz miniprobe are applied. The accuracy for T-staging is 84% and for N-staging is 82%. The local recurrence is detected in 21 patients, on average 12.6 months after curative surgery. The local recurrence is more often in cases of lymph node involvement as well as if some specific echographic features for extramural vascular invasion are present. Endoluminal echography provides individual therapeutic management and postoperative control in patients with rectal cancer. PMID:15641546

  20. Neoadjuvant-intensified treatment for rectal cancer: Time to change?

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; De Felice, Francesca; Bulzonetti, Nadia; Guarnaccia, Roberta; Caiazzo, Rossella; Bangrazi, Caterina; Raffetto, Nicola; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    patients (3.75%). Seventy-seven patients underwent surgery; low anterior resection was performed in 52 patients, Miles’ surgery in 11 patients and total mesorectal excision in nine patients. Fifty patients showed tumor downsizing ≥ 50% pathological downstaging in 88.00% of tumors. Out of 75 patients surviving surgery, 67 patients (89.33%) had some form of downstaging after preoperative treatment. A pathological complete response was achieved in 23.75% of patients and a nearly pathologic complete response (stage ypT1ypN0) in six patients. An involvement of the radial margin was never present. During surgery, intra-abdominal metastases were found in only one patient (1.25%). Initially, 45 patients required an abdominoperineal resection due to a tumor distal margin ≤ 5 cm from the anal verge. Of these patients, only seven of them underwent Miles’ surgery and sphincter preservation was guaranteed in 84.50% of patients in this subgroup. Fourteen patients received postoperative chemotherapy. In the full analysis of enrolled cohort, eight of the 80 patients died, with seven deaths related to rectal cancer and one to unrelated causes. Local recurrences were observed in seven patients (8.75%) and distant metastases in 17 cases (21.25%). The five-year rate of overall survival rate was 90.91%. Using a median follow-up time of 28.5 mo, the cumulative incidence of local recurrences was 8.75%, and the overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 90.00% and 70.00%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest oxaliplatin chemotherapy has a beneficial effect on overall survival, likely due to an increase in local tumor control. PMID:23716984

  1. Association of statin use with a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Matthew S.; Minsky, Bruce D. . E-mail: minskyb@mskcc.org; Saltz, Leonard B.; Riedel, Elyn; Chessin, David B.; Guillem, Jose G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To assess whether 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, might enhance the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2001, 358 patients with clinically resectable, nonmetastatic rectal cancer underwent surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for either locally advanced tumors or low-lying tumors that would require abdominoperineal resection. We excluded 9 patients for radiation therapy dose <45 Gy or if statin use was unknown, leaving 349 evaluable patients. Median radiation therapy dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-55.8 Gy), and 308 patients (88%) received 5-flurouracil-based chemotherapy. Medication use, comorbid illnesses, clinical stage as assessed by digital rectal examination and ultrasound, and type of chemotherapy were analyzed for associations with pathologic complete response (pCR), defined as no microscopic evidence of tumor. Fisher's exact test was used for categoric variables, Mantel-Haenszel test for ordered categoric variables, and logistic regression for multivariate analysis. Results: Thirty-three patients (9%) used a statin, with no differences in clinical stage according to digital rectal examination or ultrasound compared with the other 324 patients. At the time of surgery, 23 nonstatin patients (7%) were found to have metastatic disease, compared with 0% for statin patients. The unadjusted pCR rates with and without statin use were 30% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.10). Variables significant univariately at the p = 0.15 level were entered into a multivariate model, as were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which were strongly associated with statin use. The odds ratio for statin use on pCR was 4.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.7-12.1; p = 0.003) after adjusting for NSAID use, clinical stage, and type of chemotherapy. Conclusion: In multivariate analysis, statin use is associated with an improved p

  2. [Complete response in a case of anastomotic recurrence of rectal cancer treated with S-1 monotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kabashima, Akira; Kitagawa, Dai; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kondo, Naoko; Teramoto, Seiichi; Saito, Genkichi; Funahashi, Tomoru; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman underwent a low anterior resection for rectal cancer in 2002.A n anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed in July 2011.S he rejected the possibility of colostomy as radical surgery.Chemotherapy consisting of capecitabine+ oxaliplatin (XELOX) or folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX6) + bevacizumab were not possible because of high costs. In view of the lower costs and the potential for ambulation, S-1 monotherapy was started. After 3 months, a reduction in the recurrent lesion was observed.After 19 months, the recurrent lesion revealed a scar, which was judged by biopsy to be Group 1.We had achieved a pathological complete response (CR).The standard treatment for recurrent colon cancer is surgical resection or multidrug chemotherapy. However, in view of a patient's quality of life (QOL), S-1 monotherapy may be considered as a potential therapy. PMID:25731306

  3. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  4. An analysis of survival and treatment failure following abdominoperineal and sphincter-saving resection in Dukes' B and C rectal carcinoma. A report of the NSABP clinical trials. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.

    PubMed Central

    Wolmark, N; Fisher, B

    1986-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resections for rectal carcinoma are being performed with decreasing frequency in favor of sphincter-saving resections. It remains, however, to be unequivocally demonstrated that sphincter preservation has not resulted in compromised local disease control, disease-free survival, and survival. Accordingly, it is the specific aim of this endeavor to compare local recurrence, disease-free survival, and survival in patients with Dukes' B and C rectal cancer undergoing curative abdominoperineal resection or sphincter-saving resection. For the purpose of this study, 232 patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and 181 subjected to sphincter-saving resections were available for analysis from an NSABP randomized prospective clinical trial designed to ascertain the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in rectal carcinoma (protocol R-01). The mean time on study was 48 months. Analyses were carried out comparing the two operations according to Dukes' class, the number of positive nodes, and tumor size. The only significant differences in disease-free survival and survival were observed for the cohort characterized by greater than 4 positive nodes and were in favor of patients treated with sphincter-saving resections. A patient undergoing sphincter-saving resection was 0.62 times as likely to sustain a treatment failure as a similar patient undergoing abdominoperineal resection (p = 0.07) and 0.49 times as likely to die (p = 0.02). The inability to demonstrate an attenuated disease-free survival and survival for patients treated with sphincter-saving resection was in spite of an increased incidence of local recurrence (anastomotic and pelvic) observed for the latter operation when compared to abdominoperineal resection (13% vs. 5%). A similar analysis evaluating the length of margins of resection in patients undergoing sphincter-preserving operations indicated that treatment failure and survival were not significantly different in patients whose distal resection

  5. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  6. Radiofrequency thermal treatment with chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Hisanori; Motegi, Masahiko; Osawa, Kiyotaka; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Atsushi; Andou, Yoshitaka; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Takeo; Ogoshi, Kyoji

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported that patients with a clinical complete response (CR) following radiofrequency thermal treatment exhibit significantly increased body temperature compared with other groups, whereas patients with a clinical partial response or stable disease depended on the absence or presence of output limiting symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation among treatment response, Hidaka radiofrequency (RF) output classification (HROC: termed by us) and changes in body temperature. From December 2011 to January 2014, 51 consecutive rectal cancer cases were included in this study. All patients underwent 5 RF thermal treatments with concurrent chemoradiation. Patients were classified into three groups based on HROC: with ≤9, 10-16, and ≥17 points, calculated as the sum total points of five treatments. Thirty-three patients received surgery 8 weeks after treatment, and among them, 32 resected specimens were evaluated for histological response. Eighteen patients did not undergo surgery, five because of progressive disease (PD) and 13 refused because of permanent colostomy. We demonstrated that good local control (ypCR + CR + CRPD) was observed in 32.7% of cases in this study. Pathological complete response (ypCR) was observed in 15.7% of the total 51 patients and in 24.2% of the 33 patients who underwent surgery. All ypCR cases had ≥10 points in the HROC, but there were no patients with ypCR among those with ≤9 points in the HROC. Standardization of RF thermal treatment was performed safely, and two types of patients were identified: those without or with increased temperatures, who consequently showed no or some benefit, respectively, for similar RF output thermal treatment. We propose that the HROC is beneficial for evaluating the efficacy of RF thermal treatment with chemoradiation for rectal cancer, and the thermoregulation control mechanism in individual patients may be pivotal in predicting the response to RF

  7. Surgical treatment for locally advanced lower third rectal cancer after neoadjuvent chemoradiation with capecitabine: prospective phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Elwanis, Mostafa Abd; Maximous, Doaa W; Elsayed, Mohamed Ibrahim; Mikhail, Nabiel NH

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach with standardized surgical, pathological and radiotherapeutic procedures. Sphincter preserving surgery for cancer of the lower rectum needs a long-course of neoadjuvant treatments to reduce tumor volume, to induce down-staging that increases circumferential resection margin, and to facilitate surgery. Aim To evaluate the rate of anal sphincter preservation in low lying, resectable, locally advanced rectal cancer and the resectability rate in unresectable cases after neoadjuvent chemoradiation by oral Capecitabine. Patients and methods This trial included 43 patients with low lying (4–7 cm from anal verge) locally advanced rectal cancer, of which 33 were resectable. All patients received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions over 5 weeks with oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiotherapy days), followed after 4–6 weeks by total mesorectal excision technique. Results Preoperative chemoradiation resulted in a complete pathologic response in 4 patients (9.3%; 95% CI 3–23.1) and an overall downstaging in 32 patients (74.4%; 95% CI 58.5–85). Sphincter sparing surgical procedures were done in 20 out of 43 patients (46.5%; 95% CI 31.5–62.2). The majority (75%) were of clinical T3 disease. Toxicity was moderate and required no treatment interruption. Grade II anemia occurred in 4 patients (9.3%, 95% CI 3–23.1), leucopenia in 2 patients (4.7%, 95% CI 0.8–17) and radiation dermatitis in 4 patients (9.3%, 95% CI 3–23.1) respectively. Conclusion In patients with low lying, locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2, twice a day on radiotherapy days, was tolerable and effective in downstaging and resulted in 46.5% anal sphincter preservation rate. PMID:19508705

  8. Prognostic Value of MicroRNAs in Preoperative Treated Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Epping, Ingo; Kramer, Frank; Jo, Peter; Bernhardt, Markus; Kitz, Julia; Salinas, Gabriela; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Grade, Marian; Beißbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection. Despite similar clinical parameters (uT2-3, uN+) and standard therapy, patients’ prognoses differ widely. A possible prediction of prognosis through microRNAs as biomarkers out of treatment-naïve biopsies would allow individualized therapy options. Methods: Microarray analysis of 45 microdissected preoperative biopsies from patients with rectal cancer was performed to identify potential microRNAs to predict overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific survival, distant-metastasis-free survival, tumor regression grade, or nodal stage. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed on an independent set of 147 rectal cancer patients to validate relevant miRNAs. Results: In the microarray screen, 14 microRNAs were significantly correlated to overall survival. Five microRNAs were included from previous work. Finally, 19 miRNAs were evaluated by qPCR. miR-515-5p, miR-573, miR-579 and miR-802 demonstrated significant correlation with overall survival and cancer-specific survival (p < 0.05). miR-573 was also significantly correlated with the tumor regression grade after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. miR-133b showed a significant correlation with distant-metastasis-free survival. miR-146b expression levels showed a significant correlation with nodal stage. Conclusion: Specific microRNAs can be used as biomarkers to predict prognosis of patients with rectal cancer and possibly stratify patients’ therapy if validated in a prospective study. PMID:27092493

  9. [Palliative Care for Rectal Cancer Complicated with Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kei; Muto, Takaaki

    2015-11-01

    Medical advancements have led to an increase in the number of elderly people. However, standard treatments may sometimes be difficult to use in elderly people. Here, we report the case of an elderly patient with rectal and gastric cancer who refused radical surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who had type-2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperuricemia, mitral valve regurgitation, and mild dementia. Furthermore, he was blind in both eyes owing to glaucoma. He first visited our hospital in 2005. In 2010, he was diagnosed with anemia, but he refused a thorough examination; however, he did consent to take iron supplements. In July 2011, he consulted our hospital for symptoms of frequent diarrhea, and agreed to an examination. After colonoscopy, he was diagnosed with rectal cancer that was becoming obstructive. There were no metastases to other organs, but he was also diagnosed with gastric cancer. As he and his family refused radical surgery, a stoma was constructed. After the operation, he received palliative care but died in September 2013. PMID:26805335

  10. Simultaneous radical cystectomy and colorectal cancer resection for synchronous muscle invasive bladder cancer and cT3 colorectal cancer: Our initial experience in five patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuo; Chen, Guiping; Zhu, Yuping; Li, Dechuan

    2014-01-01

    To review cases of simultaneous radical cystectomy and colorectal cancer (CRC) resection for synchronous carcinoma of bladder and colorectum. Between May 1997 and September 2010, five patients were diagnosed with synchronous bladder cancer and CRCs. The primary colorectal tumors included three sigmoid cancers, one ascending colon cancer and one rectal cancer. All patients underwent simultaneous radical cystectomy and CRC resection. Pathologic types were confirmed by the biopsies of cystoscopy and colonoscopy. All patients were performed synchronous radical cystectomy and CRC resection. Four of them received adjuvant chemotherapies for CRC. Two of them died of liver metastasis 32.8 months and 13 months after surgery. Although patients with synchronous carcinoma of bladder and colorectum are rare, the Urologist should be alerted to this possibility when evaluating patients for the initially presenting symptoms and/or detected tumors. The simultaneous surgery is technically feasible for the selected patients. PMID:25538788

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of rectal cancer: staging and restaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Courtney C; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kalb, Bobby T; Tipton, Russell G; Hanley, Krisztina Z; Kitajima, Hiroumi D; Dixon, W Thomas; Votaw, John R; Oshinski, John N; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is used to non-invasively stage and restage rectal adenocarcinomas. Accurate staging is important as the depth of tumor extension and the presence or absence of lymph node metastases determines if an individual will undergo preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Accurate description of tumor location is important for presurgical planning. The relationship of the tumor to the anal sphincter in addition to the depth of local invasion determines the surgical approach used for resection. High-resolution T2-weighted imaging is the primary sequence used for initial staging. The addition of diffusion-weighted imaging improves accuracy in the assessment of treatment response on restaging scans. Approximately 10%-30% of individuals will experience a complete pathologic response following chemoradiation with no residual viable tumor found in the resected specimen at histopathologic assessment. In some centers, individuals with no residual tumor visible on restaging MR who are thought to be at high operative risk are monitored with serial imaging and a "watch and wait" approach in lieu of resection. Normal rectal anatomy, MR technique utilized for staging and restaging scans, and TMN staging are reviewed. An overview of surgical techniques used for resection including newer, minimally invasive endoluminal techniques is included. PMID:25759246

  12. Malone Antegrade Continence Enema in Patients with Perineal Colostomy After Rectal Resection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Hai; Xu, Jia-He; Ye, Feng; Xu, Xiang-Ming; Lin, Jian-Jiang; Chen, Wen-Bin

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the value of antegrade continence enema (Malone operation) in abdominoperineal resection (Miles' operation). Between January 2008 and May 2009, five cancer patients (two men and three women) underwent abdominoperineal resection and digestive reconstruction by perineal colostomy and Malone antegrade continence enema in our institution. Their functional results and quality of life were recorded. None of the patients died, but two had wound infections and one experienced urinary retention. Patients performed antegrade enema every 24 h with 2,000 mL of normal saline by themselves. The duration of the enema lasted for an average of approximately 35 min, and fecal contamination was not detected at 24 h. Patient satisfaction was determined to be 88 %. Malone antegrade continence enema associated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal colostomy provided acceptable continence. It preserved the body image of the patients and resulted in a satisfactory quality of life. It is a potential alternative for patients who are not willing to have a permanent colostomy. PMID:26730081

  13. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to preoperative chemoradiation or radiation in rectal cancer: should we be more cautious?

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, R; Grainger, J; Harrison, M; Ostler, P; Makris, A

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is a term originally used to describe the administration of chemotherapy preoperatively before surgery. The original rationale for administering NACT or so-called induction chemotherapy to shrink or downstage a locally advanced tumour, and thereby facilitate more effective local treatment with surgery or radiotherapy, has been extended with the introduction of more effective combinations of chemotherapy to include reducing the risks of metastatic disease. It seems logical that survival could be lengthened, or organ preservation rates increased in resectable tumours by NACT. In rectal cancer NACT is being increasingly used in locally advanced and nonmetastatic unresectable tumours. Randomised studies in advanced colorectal cancer show high response rates to combination cytotoxic therapy. This evidence of efficacy coupled with the introduction of novel molecular targeted therapies (such as Bevacizumab and Cetuximab), and long waiting times for radiotherapy have rekindled an interest in delivering NACT in locally advanced rectal cancer. In contrast, this enthusiasm is currently waning in other sites such as head and neck and nasopharynx cancer where traditionally NACT has been used. So, is NACT in rectal cancer a real advance or just history repeating itself? In this review, we aimed to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the separate approaches of neoadjuvant, concurrent and consolidation chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer, drawing on theoretical principles, preclinical studies and clinical experience both in rectal cancer and other disease sites. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may improve outcome in terms of disease-free or overall survival in selected groups in some disease sites, but this strategy has not been shown to be associated with better outcomes than postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. In particular, there is insufficient data in rectal cancer. The evidence for benefit is strongest when NACT is administered

  14. [A Case of Brain Metastasis from Rectal Cancer with Synchronous Liver and Lung Metastases after Multimodality Treatment--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Masaru; Tominaga, Ben; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Yuuya; Watanabe, Shuuichi; Adikrisna, Rama; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yabata, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of brain metastasis from rectal cancer a long time after the initial resection. A 62-year-old woman, diagnosed with lower rectal cancer with multiple synchronous liver and lung metastases, underwent abdominoperineal resection after preoperative radiochemotherapy (40 Gy at the pelvis, using the de Gramont regimen FL therapy: 1 kur). The histological diagnosis was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Various regimens of chemotherapy for unresectable and metastatic colorectal cancer were administered, and a partial response was obtained; thereby, the metastatic lesions became resectable. The patient underwent partial resection of the liver and lung metastases. Pathological findings confirmed that both the liver and lung lesions were metastases from the rectal cancer. A disease-free period occurred for several months; however, there were recurrences of the lung metastases, so we started another round of chemotherapy. After 8 months, she complained of vertigo and dizziness. A left cerebellar tumor about 3 cm in diameter was revealed by MRI and neurosurgical excision was performed. Pathological findings confirmed a cerebellar metastasis from the rectal cancer. Twenty months after resection of the brain tumor, the patient complained of a severe headache. A brain MRI showed hydrocephalia, and carcinomatous meningitis from rectal cancer was diagnosed by a spinal fluid cytology test. A ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was inserted, but the cerebrospinal pressure did not decreased and she died 20 months after the first surgery. Although brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, the number of patients with brain metastasis is thought to increase in the near future. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is effective enough to prolong the survival period even if multiple metastases have occurred. However, after a long survival period with lung metastases such as in our case, there is a high probability of developing brain metastases. PMID:26805112

  15. Sphincter-preserving surgery after preoperative radiochemotherapy for T3 low rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    BAI, XUE; LI, SHIYONG; YU, BO; SU, HONG; JIN, WEISEN; CHEN, GANG; DU, JUNFENG; ZUO, FUYI

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of preoperative radiochemotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) and sphincter-preserving procedures for T3 low rectal cancer. Patients with rectal cancer and T3 tumors located within 1–6 cm of the dentate line received preoperative radiochemotherapy. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based radiochemotherapy was used. Radical resection with TME and sphincter-preserving procedures were performed during the six to eight weeks following radiotherapy. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The anal function was evaluated using the Wexner score. The clinical response rate was 83.5%, overall downstaging of T classification was 75.3% and pathological complete response was 15.3%. The anastomotic fistula rate was 4.7%. A median follow-up of 30 months showed the local recurrence rate to be 4.7% and the distant metastasis rate to be 5.9%. The three-year overall survival rate was 87%. The degree of anal incontinence as measured using the Wexner score decreased over time, and the anal sphincter function in the majority of patients gradually improved. Preoperative radiochemotherapy was found to improve tumor downstaging, reduces local recurrence, increase the sphincter preservation rate, and is therefore of benefit to patients with T3 low rectal cancer. PMID:22783445

  16. Quality of life in rectal cancer surgery: What do the patient ask?

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Luglio, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer surgery has dramatically changed with the introduction of the total mesorectal excision (TME), which has demonstrated to significantly reduce the risk of local recurrence. The combination of TME with radiochemotherapy has led to a reduction of local failure to less than 5%. On the other hand, surgery for rectal cancer is also impaired by the potential for a significant loss in quality of life. This is a new challenge surgeons should think about nowadays: If patients live more, they also want to live better. The fight against cancer cannot only be based on survival, recurrence rate and other oncological endpoints. Patients are also asking for a decent quality of life. Rectal cancer is probably a paradigmatic example: Its treatment is often associated with the loss or severe impairment of faecal function, alteration of body anatomy, urogenital problems and, sometimes, intractable pain. The evolution of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in the last decades is an important example, which emphasizes the importance that themes like scar, recovery, pain and quality of life might play for patients. The attention to quality of life from both patients and surgeons led to several surgical innovations in the treatment of rectal cancer: Sphincter saving procedures, reservoir techniques (pouch and coloplasty) to mitigate postoperative faecal disorders, nerve-sparing techniques to reduce the risk for sexual dysfunction. Even more conservative procedures have been proposed alternatively to the abdominal-perineal resection, like the local excisions or transanal endoscopic microsurgery, till the possibility of a wait and see approach in selected cases after radiation therapy. PMID:26730279

  17. Robotic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: An Update in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jung Myun; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, robotic surgery for rectal cancer has rapidly gained acceptance among colorectal surgeons worldwide, with well-established safety and feasibility. The lower conversion rate and better surgical specimen quality of robotic compared with laparoscopic surgery potentially improves survival. Earlier recovery of voiding and sexual function after robotic total mesorectal excision is another favorable outcome. Long-term survival data are sparse with no evidence that robotic surgery offers major benefits in oncological outcomes. Although initial reports are promising, more rigorous scientific evaluation in multicenter, randomized clinical trials should be performed to definitely determine the advantages of robotic rectal cancer surgery. PMID:26875201

  18. Current Status of Minimally Invasive Surgery for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleshman, James

    2016-05-01

    Recent randomized controlled data have shown possible limitations to laparoscopic treatment of rectal cancer. The retrospective data, used as the basis for designing the trials, and which showed no problems with the technique, are discussed. The design of the randomized trials is discussed relative to the future meta-analysis of the recent data. The implications of the current findings on practice are discussed as surgeons try to adjust their practice to the new findings. The possible next steps for clinical and research innovations are put into perspective as new technology is considered to compensate for newly identified limitations in the laparoscopic treatment of rectal cancer. PMID:26831061

  19. Which Patients With Rectal Cancer Do Not Need Radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Joye, Ines; Haustermans, Karin

    2016-07-01

    According to current guidelines, the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer patients is preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Improvements in surgical techniques, imaging modalities, chemotherapy regimens, and radiotherapy delivery have reduced local recurrence rates to less than 10%. The current challenge in rectal cancer treatment lies in the prevention of distant metastases, which still occur in more than 25% of the patients. The decrease in local recurrence rates, the need for more effective systemic treatments, and the increased awareness of treatment-induced toxicity raise the question as to whether a more selective use of radiotherapy is advocated. PMID:27238471

  20. [A patient with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy who responded completely to S-1 therapy followed by open gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Ichiro; Arai, Isao; Tamura, Chieko; Inoue, Shigeharu; Wakasa, Kenichi

    2012-11-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, who responded completely to S-1 therapy followed by open gastrectomy. A 72-year-old man with a chief complaint of occult blood in the feces was referred to our hospital and was diagnosed with rectal cancer by colonoscopy. In addition, we found concomitant gastric cancer by gastrointestinal fiberscopy. Abdominal plain computed tomography showed no liver metastasis. In August 2010, we performed laparoscopic resection of the rectal cancer. However, at the time of discharge, abdominal enhanced computed tomography showed multiple liver metastases. Then, we administered 4 courses of S-1 therapy. In December 2010, abdominal enhanced computed tomography showed no liver metastasis. In March 2011, because no other lesion without residual gastric cancer was detected, the patient underwent gastrectomy followed by S-1 therapy. As of January 2012, the patient is alive and disease free. S-1 therapy with laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer and gastrectomy may help prolong the survival of patients with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers. PMID:23268031

  1. [Novel techniques in the treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Rautio, Tero; Kairaluoma, Matti; Sand, Juhani

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the eighth and tenth most common kind of cancer in men and women, respectively, with an increasing frequency of occurrence. Together with cancer of the large intestine it forms the third most common cancer entity. Surgical therapy is the most important form of treatment of rectal cancer; in combination with adjuvant therapy it will cure a significant proportion of the patients and provide relief for tumor-induced hemorrhagic and obstructive symptoms. The operation has usually been conducted as an open surgery with the use of simple instruments. In recent times, the operative techniques have become more versatile, and mini-invasive techniques have resulted in quicker recovery of the patients from the operation. PMID:27483632

  2. Total mesorectal excision for mid and low rectal cancer: Laparoscopic vs robotic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Feroci, Francesco; Vannucchi, Andrea; Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Cantafio, Stefano; Garzi, Alessia; Formisano, Giampaolo; Scatizzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the short- and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic and robotic surgery for middle and low rectal cancer. METHODS: This is a retrospective study on a prospectively collected database containing 111 patients who underwent minimally invasive rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) with curative intent between January 2008 and December 2014 (robot, n = 53; laparoscopy, n = 58). The patients all had a diagnosis of middle and low rectal adenocarcinoma with stage I-III disease. The median follow-up period was 37.4 mo. Perioperative results, morbidity a pathological data were evaluated and compared. The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were calculated and compared. RESULTS: Patients were comparable in terms of preoperative and demographic parameters. The median surgery time was 192 min for laparoscopic TME (L-TME) and 342 min for robotic TME (R-TME) (P < 0.001). There were no differences found in the rates of conversion to open surgery and morbidity. The patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery stayed in the hospital two days longer than the robotic group patients (8 d for L-TME and 6 d for R-TME, P < 0.001). The pathologic evaluation showed a higher number of harvested lymph nodes in the robotic group (18 for R-TME, 11 for L-TME, P < 0.001) and a shorter distal resection margin for laparoscopic patients (1.5 cm for L-TME, 2.5 cm for R-TME, P < 0.001). The three-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were similar between groups. CONCLUSION: Both L-TME and R-TME achieved acceptable clinical and oncologic outcomes. The robotic technique showed some advantages in rectal surgery that should be validated by further studies. PMID:27053852

  3. Improved accuracy of computed tomography in local staging of rectal cancer using water enema.

    PubMed

    Lupo, L; Angelelli, G; Pannarale, O; Altomare, D; Macarini, L; Memeo, V

    1996-01-01

    A new technique in the preoperative staging computed tomography of rectal cancer using a water enema to promote full distension of the rectum was compared with standard CT in a non-randomised blind study. One hundred and twenty-one patients were enrolled. There were 57 in the water enema CT group and 64 in the standard group. The stage of the disease was assessed following strict criteria and tested against the pathological examination of the resected specimen. Water enema CT was significantly more accurate than standard CT with an accuracy of 84.2% vs. 62.5% (Kappa: 0.56 vs. 0.33: Kappa Weighted: 0.93 vs. 0.84). The diagnostic gain was mainly evident in the identification of rectal wall invasion within or beyond the muscle layer (94.7 vs. 61). The increased accuracy was 33.7% (CL95: 17-49; P < 0.001). The results indicate that water enema CT should replace CT for staging rectal cancer and may offer an alternative to endorectal ultrasound. PMID:8739828

  4. Robotic Low Ligation of the Inferior Mesenteric Artery for Rectal Cancer Using the Firefly Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Min, Byung Soh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose By integrating intraoperative near infrared fluorescence imaging into a robotic system, surgeons can identify the vascular anatomy in real-time with the technical advantages of robotics that is useful for meticulous lymphovascular dissection. Herein, we report our initial experience of robotic low ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) with real-time identification of the vascular system for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique. Materials and Methods The study group included 11 patients who underwent a robotic total mesorectal excision with preservation of the left colic artery for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique between July 2013 and December 2013. Results The procedures included five low anterior resections and six ultra-low anterior resections with loop ileostomy. The median total operation time was 327 min (226-490). The low ligation time was 10 min (6-20), and the time interval between indocyanine green injection and division of the sigmoid artery was 5 min (2-8). The estimated blood loss was 200 mL (100-500). The median time to soft diet was 4 days (4-5), and the median length of stay was 7 days (5-9). Three patients developed postoperative complications; one patients developed anal stricture, one developed ileus, and one developed non-complicated intraabdominal fluid collection. The median total number of lymph nodes harvested was 17 (9-29). Conclusion Robotic low ligation of the IMA with real-time identification of the vascular system for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique is safe and feasible. This technique can allow for precise lymph node dissection along the IMA and facilitate the identification of the left colic branch of the IMA. PMID:26069127

  5. [Role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer : Is MRI-based selection a future model?].

    PubMed

    Kulu, Y; Hackert, T; Debus, J; Weber, M-A; Büchler, M W; Ulrich, A

    2016-07-01

    Following the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) in the curative treatment of rectal cancer, the role of neoadjuvant therapy has evolved. By improving the surgical technique the local recurrence rate could be reduced by TME surgery alone to below 8 %. Even if local control was further improved by additional preoperative irradiation this did not lead to a general survival benefit. Guidelines advocate that all patients in UICC stage II and III should be pretreated; however, the stage-based indications for neoadjuvant therapy have limitations. This is mainly attributable to the facts that patients with T3 tumors comprise a very heterogeneous prognostic group and preoperative lymph node diagnostics lack accuracy. In contrast, in recent years the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has become an important prognostic parameter. Patients with tumors that are very close to or infiltrate the pelvic fascia (positive CRM) have a higher rate of local recurrence and poorer survival. With high-resolution pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination in patients with rectal cancer, the preoperative CRM can be determined with a high sensitivity and specificity. Improved T staging and better prediction of the resection margins by pelvic MRI potentially facilitate the selection of patients for study-based treatment strategies omitting neoadjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:27339645

  6. The Molecular Basis of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiller, Michelle; Boostrom, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The majority of rectal carcinomas are sporadic in nature, and relevant testing for driver mutations to guide therapy is important. A thorough family history is necessary and helpful in elucidating a potential hereditary predilection for a patient's carcinoma. The adequate diagnosis of a heritable tendency toward colorectal carcinoma alters the management of a patient disease and permits the implementation of various surveillance algorithms as preventive measures. PMID:25733974

  7. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  8. The evaluation of a rectal cancer decision aid and the factors influencing its implementation in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is common in North America. Two surgical options exist for rectal cancer patients: low anterior resection with re-establishment of bowel continuity, and abdominoperineal resection with a permanent stoma. A rectal cancer decision aid was developed using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards to facilitate patients being more actively involved in making this decision with the surgeon. The overall aim of this study is to evaluate this decision aid and explore barriers and facilitators to implementing in clinical practice. Methods First, a pre- and post- study will be guided by the Ottawa Decision Support Framework. Eligible patients from a colorectal cancer center include: 1) adult patients diagnosed with rectal cancer, 2) tumour at a maximum of 10 cm from anal verge, and 3) surgeon screened candidates eligible to consider both low anterior resection and abdominoperineal resection. Patients will be given a paper-version and online link to the decision aid to review at home. Using validated tools, the primary outcomes will be decisional conflict and knowledge of surgical options. Secondary outcomes will be patient’s preference, values associated with options, readiness for decision-making, acceptability of the decision aid, and feasibility of its implementation in clinical practice. Proposed analysis includes paired t-test, Wilcoxon, and descriptive statistics. Second, a survey will be conducted to identify the barriers and facilitators of using the decision aid in clinical practice. Eligible participants include Canadian surgeons working with rectal cancer patients. Surgeons will be given a pre-notification, questionnaire, and three reminders. The survey package will include the patient decision aid and a facilitators and barriers survey previously validated among physicians and nurses. Principal component analysis will be performed to determine common themes, and logistic regression will be used to identify variables

  9. Endoscopic mucosal resection of large rectal adenomas in the era of centralization: Results of a multicenter collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Barendse, RM; Musters, GD; Fockens, P; Bemelman, WA; de Graaf, EJ; van den Broek, FJ; van der Linde, K; Schwartz, MP; Houben, MH; van Milligen de Wit, AW; Witteman, BJ; Winograd, R

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of large rectal adenomas is largely being centralized. We assessed the safety and effectiveness of EMR in the rectum in a collaboration of 15 Dutch hospitals. Methods Prospective, observational study of patients with rectal adenomas >3 cm, resected by piecemeal EMR. Endoscopic treatment of adenoma remnants at 3 months was considered part of the intervention strategy. Outcomes included recurrence after 6, 12 and 24 months and morbidity. Results Sixty-four patients (50% male, age 69 ± 11, 96% ASA 1/2) presented with 65 adenomas (diameter 46 ± 17 mm, distance ab ano 4.5 cm (IQR 1–8), 6% recurrent lesion). Sixty-two procedures (97%) were technically successful. Histopathology revealed invasive carcinoma in three patients (5%), who were excluded from effectiveness analyses. At 3 months’ follow-up, 10 patients showed adenoma remnants. Recurrence was diagnosed in 16 patients during follow-up (recurrence rate 25%). Fifteen of 64 patients (23%) experienced 17 postprocedural complications. Conclusion In a multicenter collaboration, EMR was feasible in 97% of patients. Recurrence and postprocedural morbidity rates were 25% and 23%. Our results demonstrate the outcomes of EMR in the absence of tertiary referral centers. PMID:25452845

  10. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  11. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, Christopher H.; Eng, Cathy; Feig, Barry W.; Das, Prajnan; Skibber, John M.; Chang, George J.; Wolff, Robert A.; Krishnan, Sunil; Hamilton, Stanley; Janjan, Nora A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ellis, Lee M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We designed this Phase II trial to assess the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to concurrent neoadjuvant capecitabine-based chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Between April 2004 and December 2007, 25 patients with clinically staged T3N1 (n = 20) or T3N0 (n = 5) rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks), bevacizumab every 2 weeks (3 doses of 5 mg/kg), and capecitabine (900 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily only on days of radiation), followed by surgical resection a median of 7.3 weeks later. Results: Procedures included abdominoperineal resection (APR; 6 patients), proctectomy with coloanal anastamosis (8 patients), low anterior resection (10 patients), and local excision (1 patient). Eight (32%) of 25 patients had a pathologic complete response, and 6 (24%) of 25 had <10% viable tumor cells in the specimen. No patient had Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, gastrointestinal toxicity, or significant hematologic toxicity. Three wound complications required surgical intervention (one coloanal anastamostic dehiscence requiring completion APR and two perineal wound dehiscences after initial APR). Five minor complications occurred that resolved without operative intervention. With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (range, 4.5-32.4 months), all patients were alive; one patient has had a recurrence in the pelvis (2-year actuarial rate, 6.2%) and 3 had distant recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemoradiation resulted in encouraging pathologic complete response without an increase in acute toxicity. The impact of bevacizumab on perineal wound and anastamotic healing due to concurrent bevacizumab requires further study.

  12. [A Case of Stage Ⅳ Rectal Cancer with No Evidence of Disease after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Surgery].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Watanabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Megumi; Shibasaki, Yukari; Miyazaki, Koji; Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Higuchi, Katsuyoshi; Koseki, Keita; Kitago, Kuniaki; Nishi, Naoto; Nihei, Zenro; Ito, Masashi

    2015-11-01

    A 46-year-old man presented with hematochezia in October 2012. A circumferential type 2 rectal cancer was detected with colonoscopy. Contrast-enhanced CT showed multiple liver and lung metastases. Chemotherapy was administered after the diagnosis of cStage Ⅳ rectal cancer. After 1 course of XELOX plus Bmab, the treatment was changed to XELOX plus Cmab for 21 courses. An infusion reaction occurred during the 21st course. Because a complete response of the liver metastases and a reduction in size of the primary tumor had been achieved, we performed a low anterior resection in April 2014. The final pathological diagnosis was type 2, 10×25 mm, tub1, pMP, int, INF b, pN1 (251). There was no evidence of disease (NED) after the surgery. We are closely following up this patient with no postoperative chemotherapy, and as of July 2015, there is no sign of recurrence. We describe a case of a Stage Ⅳ rectal cancer that was resected with radical surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We also include a brief review of the literature. PMID:26805126

  13. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Updated Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Combined Modality Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Paulus, Rebecca; Mitchell, Edith; Hanna, Nader; Yuen, Albert; Nichols, Romaine; Yalavarthi, Salochna; Hayostek, Cherie; Willett, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 2 different approaches to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for distal rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: One hundred six patients with T3/T4 distal rectal cancers were randomized in a phase 2 study. Patients received either continuous venous infusion (CVI) of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week plus pelvic hyperfractionated radiation (HRT), 45.6 Gy at 1.2 Gy twice daily plus a boost of 9.6 to 14.4 Gy for T3 or T4 cancers (Arm 1), or CVI of 5-FU, 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, Monday to Friday, plus irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly × 4, plus pelvic radiation therapy (RT), 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day and a boost of 5.4 Gy for T3 and 9 Gy for T4 cancers (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4 to 10 weeks later. Results: All eligible patients (n=103) are included in this analysis; 2 ineligible patients were excluded, and 1 patient withdrew consent. Ninety-eight of 103 patients (95%) underwent resection. Four patients did not undergo surgery for either disease progression or patient refusal, and 1 patient died during induction chemotherapy. The median time of follow-up was 6.4 years in Arm 1 and 7.0 years in Arm 2. The pathological complete response (pCR) rates were 30% in Arm 1 and 26% in Arm 2. Locoregional recurrence rates were 16% in Arm 1 and 17% in Arm 2. Five-year survival rates were 61% and 75% and Disease-specific survival rates were 78% and 85% for Arm1 and Arm 2, respectively. Five second primaries occurred in patients on Arm 1, and 1 second primary occurred in Arm 2. Conclusions: High rates of disease-specific survival were seen in each arm. Overall survival appears affected by the development of unrelated second cancers. The high pCR rates with 5-FU and higher dose radiation in T4 cancers provide opportunity for increased R0 resections and improved survival.

  14. Correlation of Chromosomal Instability, Telomere Length and Telomere Maintenance in Microsatellite Stable Rectal Cancer: A Molecular Subclass of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Lisa A.; Johnson, Ruth A.; Viker, Kimberly B.; Hafner, Kari A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Litzelman, Kristin; Seo, Songwon; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Engelman, Corinne D.; Rider, David N.; Vanderboom, Russell J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Skinner, Halcyon G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer (CRC) tumor DNA is characterized by chromosomal damage termed chromosomal instability (CIN) and excessively shortened telomeres. Up to 80% of CRC is microsatellite stable (MSS) and is historically considered to be chromosomally unstable (CIN+). However, tumor phenotyping depicts some MSS CRC with little or no genetic changes, thus being chromosomally stable (CIN-). MSS CIN- tumors have not been assessed for telomere attrition. Experimental Design MSS rectal cancers from patients ≤50 years old with Stage II (B2 or higher) or Stage III disease were assessed for CIN, telomere length and telomere maintenance mechanism (telomerase activation [TA]; alternative lengthening of telomeres [ALT]). Relative telomere length was measured by qPCR in somatic epithelial and cancer DNA. TA was measured with the TRAPeze assay, and tumors were evaluated for the presence of C-circles indicative of ALT. p53 mutation status was assessed in all available samples. DNA copy number changes were evaluated with Spectral Genomics aCGH. Results Tumors were classified as chromosomally stable (CIN-) and chromosomally instable (CIN+) by degree of DNA copy number changes. CIN- tumors (35%; n=6) had fewer copy number changes (<17% of their clones with DNA copy number changes) than CIN+ tumors (65%; n=13) which had high levels of copy number changes in 20% to 49% of clones. Telomere lengths were longer in CIN- compared to CIN+ tumors (p=0.0066) and in those in which telomerase was not activated (p=0.004). Tumors exhibiting activation of telomerase had shorter tumor telomeres (p=0.0040); and tended to be CIN+ (p=0.0949). Conclusions MSS rectal cancer appears to represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that may be categorized both on the basis of CIN status and telomere maintenance mechanism. MSS CIN- rectal cancers appear to have longer telomeres than those of MSS CIN+ rectal cancers and to utilize ALT rather than activation of telomerase. PMID:24278232

  15. Laparoscopic ovarian transposition prior to pelvic irradiation in a young female patient with advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Kyoichi; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Ohshiro, Taihei; Fujita, Shin

    2015-12-01

    In the report, we describe the first case of laparoscopic ovarian transposition prior to pelvic radio-chemo therapy in a young female patient with advanced rectal cancer in Japan. A 14-year-old female visited a hospital because of consistent diarrhea and melena. Colonoscopy examination showed a bulky tumor of the rectum, which was diagnosed as moderately to poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis was cT3N2aM1a (due to lymph node in pelvic side wall), cStage IVA. In an attempt to improve local control and sphincter preservation, neoadjuvant concurrent radio-chemo therapy was planned. Considering that pelvic irradiation particularly in young female might cause ovarian failure, laparoscopic ovarian transposition was carried out prior to pelvic irradiation. Sequentially the patient underwent low anterior resection of the rectum and lymphadenectomy including pelvic side wall. The menstruation was maintained with delay for 6 months after adjuvant chemotherapy. There is no evidence of cancer recurrence at 3 years after the surgery.In premenopausal patients with rectal cancer undergoing pelvic irradiation, laparoscopic ovarian transposition is one of the choices to prevent ovarian failure. PMID:26943437

  16. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors Associated With the Nonreversal Ileostomy Following Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Gil Jae; Park, Sung Won; Lee, Won-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A loop ileostomy is used to protect an anastomosis after anal sphincter-preserving surgery, especially in patients with low rectal cancer, but little information is available concerning risk factors associated with a nonreversal ileostomy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors of ileostomy nonreversibility after a sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. Methods Six hundred seventy-nine (679) patients with rectal cancer who underwent sphincter-preserving surgery between January 2004 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 679, 135 (19.9%) underwent a defunctioning loop ileostomy of temporary intent, and these patients were divided into two groups, that is, a reversal group (RG, 112 patients) and a nonreversal group (NRG, 23 patients) according to the reversibility of the ileostomy. Results In 23 of the 135 rectal cancer patients (17.0%) that underwent a diverting ileostomy, stoma reversal was not possible for the following reasons; stage IV rectal cancer (11, 47.8%), poor tone of the anal sphincter (4, 17.4%), local recurrence (2, 8.7%), anastomotic leakage (1, 4.3%), radiation proctitis (1, 4.3%), and patient refusal (4, 17.4%). The independent risk factors of the nonreversal group were anastomotic leakage or fistula, stage IV cancer, local recurrence, and comorbidity. Conclusion Postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage or fistula, advanced primary disease (stage IV), local recurrence and comorbidity were identified as risk factors of a nonreversal ileostomy. These factors should be considered when drafting prudential guidelines for ileostomy closure. PMID:26161377

  17. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer. PMID:26758900

  18. Diagnosis of a submucosal mass at the staple line after sigmoid colon cancer resection by endoscopic cutting-mucosa biopsy.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Lefor, Alan K; Horie, Hisanaga; Ito, Homare; Sata, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-04-25

    A 48-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection for cancer and surveillance colonoscopy was performed annually thereafter. Five years after the resection, a submucosal mass was found at the anastomotic staple line, 15 cm from the anal verge. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasound were not consistent with tumor recurrence. Endoscopic mucosa biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Mucosal incision over the lesion with the cutting needle knife technique revealed a creamy white material, which was completely removed. Histologic examination showed fibrotic tissue without caseous necrosis or tumor cells. No bacteria, including mycobacterium, were found on culture. The patient remains free of recurrence at five years since the resection. Endoscopic biopsy with a cutting mucosal incision is an important technique for evaluation of submucosal lesions after rectal resection. PMID:27114752

  19. Diagnosis of a submucosal mass at the staple line after sigmoid colon cancer resection by endoscopic cutting-mucosa biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Lefor, Alan K; Horie, Hisanaga; Ito, Homare; Sata, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection for cancer and surveillance colonoscopy was performed annually thereafter. Five years after the resection, a submucosal mass was found at the anastomotic staple line, 15 cm from the anal verge. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasound were not consistent with tumor recurrence. Endoscopic mucosa biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Mucosal incision over the lesion with the cutting needle knife technique revealed a creamy white material, which was completely removed. Histologic examination showed fibrotic tissue without caseous necrosis or tumor cells. No bacteria, including mycobacterium, were found on culture. The patient remains free of recurrence at five years since the resection. Endoscopic biopsy with a cutting mucosal incision is an important technique for evaluation of submucosal lesions after rectal resection. PMID:27114752

  20. The role of chemoradiation for patients with resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Russo, Suzanne; Monjazeb, Arta; Blackstock, A William

    2012-04-01

    Conflicting data and substantial controversy exist regarding optimal adjuvant treatment for those patients with resectable or potentially resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Despite improvements in short-term surgical outcomes, the use of newer chemotherapeutic agents, development of targeted agents and more precise delivery of radiation, the 5-year survival rates for early-stage patients remains less than 25%. This article critically reviews the existing data for various adjuvant treatment approaches for patients with surgically resectable pancreatic cancer. Our review confirms that despite several randomized clinical trials, the optimal adjuvant treatment approach for these patients remains unclear. PMID:22500684

  1. Advances and Challenges in Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Joshua; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer have occurred over the past 30 years. Advances in surgical pathology, refinements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, new imaging modalities, and the widespread use of neoadjuvant therapy have all contributed to these improvements. Several questions emerge as we learn of the benefits or lack thereof for components of the current multimodality treatment in subgroups of patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). What is the optimal surgical technique for distal rectal cancers? Do all patients need postoperative chemotherapy? Do all patients need radiation? Do all patients need surgery, or is a nonoperative, organ-preserving approach warranted in selected patients? Answering these questions will lead to more precise treatment regimens, based on patient and tumor characteristics, that will improve outcomes while preserving quality of life. However, the idea of shifting the treatment paradigm (chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant therapy) currently applied to all patients with LARC to a more individually tailored approach is controversial. The paradigm shift toward organ preservation in highly selected patients whose tumors demonstrate clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment is also controversial. Herein, we highlight many of the advances and resultant controversies that are likely to dominate the research agenda for LARC in the modern era. PMID:25918296

  2. Clinical results of sublobar resection versus lobectomy or more extensive resection for lung cancer patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Seok; Sim, Hee Je; Lee, Geun Dong; Hwang, Su Kyung; Choi, Sehoon; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Kim, Yong-Hee; Park, Seung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are at a high risk of requiring lung resection. The optimal surgical strategy for these patients remains unclear. This study aimed to compare the clinical results of a sublobar resection versus a lobectomy or more extensive resection for lung cancer in patients with IPF. Methods From January 1995 to December 2012, 80 patients with simultaneous non-small cell lung cancer and IPF were treated surgically at Asan Medical Center. Predictors of recurrence-free survival and overall survival were evaluated in the series. Results Lobectomy or more extensive resection of the lung (lobar resection group) was performed in 65 patients and sublobar resection (sublobar resection group) was carried out in 15 patients. The sublobar resection group showed fewer in-hospital mortalities than the lobar resection group (6.7% vs. 15.4%; P=0.68). For late mortality after lung resection, cancer-related deaths were not significantly different in incidence between the two groups (55.6% vs. 30.6%; P=0.18). Recurrence-free survival after lung resection was significantly greater in the lobar than in the sublobar resection group (P=0.01). However, overall survival after lung resection was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.05). Sublobar resection was not a significant predictive factor for overall survival (hazard ratio =0.50; 95% CI: 0.21–1.15; P=0.10). Conclusions Although not statistically significant, a sublobar resection results in less in-hospital mortality than a lobar resection for lung cancer patients with IPF. There is no significant difference in overall survival compared with lobar resection. A sublobar resection may be another therapeutic option for lung cancer patients with IPF. PMID:27162674

  3. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gene-hyuk; Kim, Kyung Ah; Hwang, Seong Su; Park, Soo Youn; Kim, Hyun A.; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Ji Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI. Methods We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2) of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI) and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Results All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471), while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI) was marginally significant (p = 0.0534). Conclusion The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis. PMID:26348217

  4. Impact of age on efficacy of postoperative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yong-xi; Sun, Jing-xu; Chen, Xiao-wan; Zhao, Jun-hua; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhen-ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines focusing on age-related adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer are currently limited. The present study aimed to explore the impact of age on the efficacy of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked database from 1992–2009. We enrolled patients with yp stages I–III rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and underwent curative resection. The age-related survival benefit of adding oxaliplatin to adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis with propensity score-matching and Cox proportional hazards models. Results Comparing the oxaliplatin group with the 5-FU group, there were significant interactions between age and chemotherapy efficacy in terms of overall survival (OS) (p for interaction = 0.017) among patients with positive lymph nodes (ypN+). Adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong survival in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category, and but did not translate into survival benefits in patients aged ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category. No significant interactions were observed among ypN− patients, and oxaliplatin did not significantly improve OS, regardless of age. Conclusions In patients with rectal cancer who have already received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and undergone curative resection, adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong OS in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category. However, adding oxaliplatin did not translate into survival benefits in patients age ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category, or in ypN− patients. PMID:26910371

  5. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, < 5 cm from anal verge; and patients facing tumors with enlarged nodes and/or CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  6. Application of Laparoscopic Extralevator Abdominoperineal Excision in Locally Advanced Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Lei; Dai, Yong; Jiang, Jin-Bo; Yuan, Hui-Yang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: When compared with conventional abdominoperineal resection (APR), extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE) has been demonstrated to reduce the risk of local recurrence for the treatment of locally advanced low rectal cancer. Combined with the laparoscopic technique, laparoscopic ELAPE (LELAPE) has the potential to reduce invasion and hasten postoperative recovery. In this study, we aim to investigate the advantages of LELAPE in comparison with conventional APR. Methods: From October 2010 to February 2013, 23 patients with low rectal cancer (T3–4N0–2M0) underwent LELAPE; while during the same period, 25 patients were treated with conventional APR. The patient characteristics, intraoperative data, postoperative complications, and follow-up results were retrospectively compared and analyzed. Results: The basic patient characteristics were similar; but the total operative time for the LELAPE was longer than that of the conventional APR group (P = 0.014). However, the operative time for the perineal portion was comparable between the two groups (P = 0.328). The LELAPE group had less intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.022), a lower bowel perforation rate (P = 0.023), and a positive circumferential margin (P = 0.028). Moreover, the patients, who received the LELAPE, had a lower postoperative Visual Analog Scale, quicker recovery of bowel function (P = 0.001), and a shorter hospital stay (P = 0.047). However, patients in the LELAPE group suffered more chronic perineal pain (P = 0.002), which may be related to the coccygectomy (P = 0.033). Although the metastasis rate and mortality rate were similar between the two groups, the local recurrence rate of the LELAPE group was statistically improved (P = 0.047). Conclusions: When compared with conventional APR, LELAPE has the potential to reduce the risk of local recurrence, and decreases operative invasion for the treatment of locally advanced low rectal cancer. PMID:25963355

  7. Preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer: comparison of three radiation dose and fractionation schedules

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The standard radiation dose for patients with locally rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy is 45–50 Gy in 25–28 fractions. We aimed to assess whether a difference exists within this dose fractionation range. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare three dose fractionation schedules. Patients received 50 Gy in 25 fractions (group A), 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (group B), or 45 Gy in 25 fractions (group C) to the whole pelvis, as well as concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Radical resection was scheduled for 8 weeks after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Results: Between September 2010 and August 2013, 175 patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy at our institution. Among those patients, 154 were eligible for analysis (55, 50, and 49 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively). After the median follow-up period of 29 months (range, 5 to 48 months), no differences were found between the 3 groups regarding pathologic complete remission rate, tumor regression grade, treatment-related toxicity, 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, or overall survival. The circumferential resection margin width was a prognostic factor for 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, whereas ypN category was associated with distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. High tumor regression grading score was correlated with 2-year distant metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival in univariate analysis. Conclusion: Three different radiation dose fractionation schedules, within the dose range recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, had no impact on pathologic tumor regression and early clinical outcome for locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:27306773

  8. Evaluation of preoperative serum markers for individual patient prognosis in stage I-III rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Giessen, Clemens; Nagel, Dorothea; Glas, Maria; Spelsberg, Fritz; Lau-Werner, Ulla; Modest, Dominik Paul; Michl, Marlies; Heinemann, Volker; Stieber, Petra; Schulz, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    Several independent serum biomarkers have been proposed as prognostic and/or predictive markers for colorectal cancer (CRC). To this date, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) remains the only recommended serological CRC biomarker. The present retrospective analysis investigates the prognostic value of several serum markers. A total of 256 patients with rectal cancer underwent surgery for curative intent in a university cancer center between January 1988 and June 2007. Preoperative serum was retrospectively analyzed for albumin, alkaline phosphatase (aP), beta-human chorionic gonadotropin, bilirubin, CA 125, cancer antigen 19-9, cancer antigen 72-4 (CA 72-4), CEA, CRP, CYFRA 21-1, ferritin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, glutamate oxaloacetate transanunase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, hemoglobin, haptoglobin, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, creatinine, lactate-dehydrogenase, serum amyloid A (SAA), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated. Median follow-up time was 8.4 years. Overall 3- and 5-year CSS was 88.6 and 78.9 %, respectively. DFS rates were 72.8 % (3 years) and 67.5 % (5 years). Univariate analysis of CSS indicated aP, CA 72-4, CEA, and SAA as prognostic factors, while aP, CEA, and SAA were also prognostic with regard to DFS. Multivariate analysis confirmed SAA together with T and N stage as prognostic factors. According to UICC stage, CEA and SAA add prognostic value in stages II and III with regard to DFS and CSS, respectively. The combined use of CEA and SAA is able to identify patients with favorable and poor prognosis. In addition to tumor baseline parameters, routine analysis of SAA together with CEA provided markedly improved prognostic value on CSS and DFS in resected rectal cancer. PMID:25027407

  9. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  10. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  11. Current State of Vascular Resections in Pancreatic Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hackert, Thilo; Schneider, Lutz; Büchler, Markus W.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the Western world and, even in 2014, a therapeutic challenge. The only chance for long-term survival is radical surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy which can be performed in about 20% of all PDAC patients by the time of diagnosis. As pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years, extended operations, including vascular resections, have become more frequently performed in specialized centres and the border of resectability has been pushed forward to achieve a potentially curative approach in the respective patients in combination with neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment strategies. In contrast to adjuvant treatment which has to be regarded as a cornerstone to achieve long-term survival after resection, neoadjuvant treatment strategies for locally advanced findings are currently under debate. This overview summarizes the possibilities and evidence of vascular, namely, venous and arterial, resections in PDAC surgery. PMID:26609306

  12. [A Case of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Successfully Treated by Conversion Surgery after Multidisciplinary Treatment].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yosuke; Yamashita, Shinya; Tominaga, Harumi; Kimura, Yuri; Odagiri, Kazuki; Kurokawa, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Takahashi, Gen; Sawada, Genta; Jeongho, Moon; Inoue, Masasi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Nakahira, Sin; Hatanaka, Nobutaka

    2015-10-01

    A 70-year-old woman who complained of abdominal pain and a prolapsed tumor from the anus was diagnosed with an intestinal obstruction resulting from anal canal cancer. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a huge tumor (11×5×12 cm) invading the vagina and levator ani muscle. Enlarged inguinal lymph nodes on both sides indicated metastasis. The clinical stage was T4b (vagina, levator ani muscle, and pudenda) N0H0M1a (LYM), stage IV (Japanese Classification of Colorectal Carcinoma: 8th edition). As curative resection was not possible, a transvers colostomy was performed to relieve the intestinal obstruction. This was followed by chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy/1.8 Gy×25; TS-1, 80 mg/body for 2 weeks and a 1-week interval, for 2 courses) and up to 10 courses of Bev+mFOLFOX6 continuously. After this regimen, there was a remarkable reduction in tumor size. Positron emission tomography-CT revealed no FDG uptake in the primary rectal site or inguinal lymph nodes, but a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 6.3 was detected in the vagina. Six weeks after chemotherapy, the patient underwent a pelvic exenteration including resection of the vagina, bladder, and pudenda. The pathological stage was yp T4b (vagina) N0H0M0, stageⅡ. Curative resection was performed, and the patient had a Grade 2 pathological response after chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26489576

  13. Local Recurrence in Rectal Cancer: Anatomic Localization and Effect on Radiation Target

    SciTech Connect

    Syk, Erik Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nilsson, Per J.; Glimelius, Bengt

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the sites of local recurrence after total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer in an effort to optimize the radiation target. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients with recurrence after abdominal resection for rectal cancer were identified from a population-based consecutive cohort of 2,315 patients who had undergone surgery by surgeons trained in the total mesorectal excision procedure. A total of 99 cross-sectional imaging studies were retrieved and re-examined by one radiologist. The clinical records were examined for the remaining patients. Results: Evidence of residual mesorectal fat was identified in 50 of the 99 patients. In 83 patients, local recurrence was identified on the imaging studies. All recurrences were within the irradiated volume if the patients had undergone preoperative radiotherapy or within the same volume if they had not. The site of recurrence was in the lower 75% of the pelvis, anatomically below the S1-S2 interspace for all patients. Only 5 of the 44 recurrences in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge were in the lowest 20% of the pelvis. Six recurrences involved the lateral lymph nodes. Conclusion: These data suggest that a lowering of the upper limit of the clinical target volume could be introduced. The anal sphincter complex with surrounding tissue could also be excluded in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge.

  14. Brachytherapy and Local Excision for Sphincter Preservation in T1 and T2 Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grimard, Laval Stern, Hartley; Spaans, Johanna N. M.Sc.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of brachytherapy after local excision (LE) in the treatment of T1 and T2 rectal cancer at risk of recurrence due to residual subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2007, 32 patients undergoing LE and brachytherapy were followed prospectively for a mean of 6.2 years. Estimates of local recurrence (LR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were generated. Treatment-related toxicity and the effect of known prognostic factors were determined. Results: There were 8 LR (3 T1, 5 T2), of which 5 were salvaged surgically. Median time to the 8 LR was 14 months, and the 5-year rate of local control was 76%. Although there have been 9 deaths to date, only 5 were from disease. Five-year DSS and OS rates were 85% and 78%, respectively. There were 4 cases of Grade 2-3 radionecrosis and 1 case of mild stool incontinence. The sphincter was preserved in 27 of 32 patients. Conclusion: Local excision and adjuvant brachytherapy for T1 and T2 rectal cancer is an appealing treatment alternative to immediate radical resection, particularly in the frail and elderly who are unable to undergo major surgery, as well as for patients wanting to avoid a permanent colostomy.

  15. Pathological complete response after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer and the role of adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Valerie M; Benson, Al B

    2013-04-01

    Both the addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and improvements in surgical techniques have improved local control and overall survival for locally advanced rectal cancer patients over the past few decades. The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy has likely improved outcomes as well, though the contribution has been more difficult to quantify. At present, the majority of resected locally advanced rectal cancer patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy, though there is great variability in this practice based on both patient and institution characteristics. Recently, questions have been raised regarding which sub-groups of patients benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy. As pathologic complete response (pCR) is increasingly found to be a reasonable surrogate for long-term favorable outcomes, some have questioned the need for adjuvant therapy in this select group of patients. Multiple retrospective analyses have shown minimal to no benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy in this group. Indeed, the patients most consistently shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy both in terms of disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) are those who achieve an intermediate pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment. Tumors that have high expression of thymidylate synthetase have also shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy. More study is needed into clinical and molecular features that predict patient benefit from adjuvant therapy. PMID:23381584

  16. Risk factors causing structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage in mid to low rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Woong Bae; Kwak, Jung Myun; Kim, Jin; Um, Jun Won; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk factors causing structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage in patients with mid to low rectal cancer. METHODS: Prospectively collected data of consecutive subjects who had anastomotic leakage after surgical resection for rectal cancer from March 2006 to May 2013 at Korea University Anam Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Two subgroup analyses were performed. The patients were initially divided into the sequelae (stricture, fistula, or sinus) and no sequelae groups and then divided into the permanent stoma (PS) and no PS groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors of structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage. RESULTS: Structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage were identified in 29 patients (39.7%). Multivariate analysis revealed that diversion ileostomy at the first operation increases the risk of structural sequelae [odds ratio (OR) = 6.741; P = 0.017]. Fourteen patients (17.7%) had permanent stoma during the follow-up period (median, 37 mo). Multivariate analysis showed that the tumor level from the dentate line was associated with the risk of permanent stoma (OR = 0.751; P = 0.045). CONCLUSION: Diversion ileostomy at the first operation increased the risk of structural sequelae of the anastomosis, while lower tumor location was associated with the risk of permanent stoma in the management of anastomotic leakage. PMID:26019455

  17. Selecting Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer for Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dewdney, Alice; Cunningham, David

    2013-01-01

    Rectal cancer remains a significant problem worldwide. Outcomes vary significantly according to the stage of disease and prognostic factors, including the distance of the tumor from the circumferential resection margin. Accurate staging, including high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, allows stratification of patients into low-, moderate-, and high-risk disease; this information can be used to inform multidisciplinary team decisions regarding the role of neoadjuvant therapy. Both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation reduce the risk of local recurrence compared with surgery alone, but they have little impact on survival. Although there remains a need to reduce overtreatment of those patients at moderate risk, evaluation of intensified regimens for those with high-risk disease is still required to reduce distant failure rates and improve survival in these patients with an otherwise poor prognosis. PMID:23821325

  18. [A Case of Unresectable Rectal Cancer Associated with Hemorrhage of the Primary Tumor after Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Moyuru; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Murata, Masaru; Tanaka, Nobuo; Asai, Kensuke; Saso, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Tomoko; Katsuyama, Shinsuke; Sawami, Hirokazu; Takayama, Osamu; Baba, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hiratsuka, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    A 47-year-old man visited our hospital with complaints of abdominal pain and hematuria.He was diagnosed with unresectable rectal cancer invading the urinary bladder with multiple liver metastases. Systemic chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 and panitumumab was started soon after sigmoid colostomy. Three months later, both the primary tumor and the liver metastases had partially responded. Another 2 months later, he complained of terrible abdominal pain. CT images revealed a huge primary tumor and hemorrhage in the sigmoid mesocolon occupying the pelvic cavity. A salvage operation was performed and the primary tumor was palliatively resected. Soon after the operation, a local recurrence appeared and grew rapidly. He died 8 months after diagnosis. Rapid growth of the primary tumor seemed a limiting factor for the prognosis. PMID:26805129

  19. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  20. Favorable perioperative outcomes after resection of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant stereotactic radiation and chemotherapy compared with upfront pancreatectomy for resectable cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Eric A.; Strom, Tobin J.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Frakes, Jessica M.; Springett, Gregory M.; Hodul, Pamela J.; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Chuong, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are utilized to increase margin negative (R0) resection rates in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) or locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients. Concerns persist that these neoadjuvant therapies may worsen perioperative morbidities and mortality. Methods Upfront resection patients (n=241) underwent resection without neoadjuvant treatment for resectable disease. They were compared to BRPC or LAPC patients (n=61) who underwent resection after chemotherapy and 5 fraction SBRT. Group comparisons were performed by Mann-Whitney U or Fisher’s exact test. Overall Survival (OS) was estimated by Kaplan-Meier and compared by log-rank methods. Results In the neoadjuvant therapy group, there was significantly higher T classification, N classification, and vascular resection/repair rate. Surgical positive margin rate was lower after neoadjuvant therapy (3.3% vs. 16.2%, P=0.006). Post-operative morbidities (39.3% vs. 31.1%, P=0.226) and 90-day mortality (2% vs. 4%, P=0.693) were similar between the groups. Median OS was 33.5 months in the neoadjuvant therapy group compared to 23.1 months in upfront resection patients who received adjuvant treatment (P=0.057). Conclusions Patients with BRPC or LAPC and sufficient response to neoadjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and SBRT have similar or improved peri-operative and long-term survival outcomes compared to upfront resection patients. PMID:27563444

  1. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer in Patients With Prior Pelvic Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Eng, Cathy; Bedi, Manpreet; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine rates of toxicity, freedom from local progression, and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with reirradiation. Methods and Materials: Between February 2001 and February 2005, 50 patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy were treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for primary (n = 2 patients) or recurrent (n = 48 patients) rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients were treated with 150-cGy fractions twice daily, with a total dose of 39 Gy (n = 47 patients) if the retreatment interval was >=1 year or 30 Gy (n = 3) if the retreatment interval was <1 year. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 48 (96%) patients. Eighteen (36%) patients underwent surgical resection following radiotherapy. Results: Two patients had grade 3 acute toxicity and 13 patients had grade 3 to 4 late toxicity. The 3-year rate of grade 3 to 4 late toxicity was 35%. The 3-year rate of freedom from local progression was 33%. The 3-year freedom from local progression rate was 47% in patients undergoing surgery and 21% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.057). The 3-year overall survival rate was 39%. The 3-year overall survival rate was 66% in patients undergoing surgery and 27% in those not undergoing surgery (p = 0.003). The 3-year overall survival rate was 53% in patients with a retreatment interval of >2 years and 21% in those with a retreatment interval of <=2 years (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated, accelerated reirradiation was well tolerated, with low rates of acute toxicity and moderate rates of late toxicity. Reirradiation may help improve pelvic control in rectal cancer patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy.

  2. Preoperative CT versus diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in patients with rectal cancer; a prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Løgager, Vibeke B.; Skjoldbye, Bjørn; Møller, Jakob M.; Lorenzen, Torben; Rasmussen, Vera L.; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Mollerup, Talie H.; Okholm, Cecilie; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world and liver metastases are seen in up to 19% of patients with colorectal cancers. Detection of liver metastases is not only vital for sufficient treatment and survival, but also for a better estimation of prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion weighted MRI of the liver as part of a combined MR evaluation of patients with rectal cancers and compare it with the standard preoperative evaluation of the liver with CT. Methods. Consecutive patients diagnosed with rectal cancers were asked to participate in the study. Preoperative CT and diffusion weighted MR (DWMR) were compared to contrast enhanced laparoscopic ultrasound (CELUS). Results. A total of 35 patients were included, 15 patients in Group-1 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and 20 patients in Group-2 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and DWMR of the liver. Compared with CELUS, the per-patient sensitivity/specificity was 50/100% for CT, and for DWMR: 100/94% and 100/100% for Reader 1 and 2, respectively. The per-lesion sensitivity of CT and DWMR were 17% and 89%, respectively compared with CELUS. Furthermore, one patient had non-resectable metastases after DWMR despite being diagnosed with resectable metastases after CT. Another patient was diagnosed with multiple liver metastases during CELUS, despite a negative CT-scan. Discussion. DWMR is feasible for preoperative evaluation of liver metastases. The current standard preoperative evaluation with CT-scan results in disadvantages like missed metastases and futile operations. We recommend that patients with rectal cancer, who are scheduled for MR of the rectum, should have a DWMR of the liver performed at the same time. PMID:26793420

  3. Preservation of the vegetative pelvic nerves and local reccurence in the operative treatment of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jota, G J; Karadzov, Z; Panovski, M; Vasilevski, V; Serafimoski, V

    2006-12-01

    Life quality of the patients operated from rectal cancer is a serious problem. Despite the curing as a primary objective in the treatment of the rectal cancer, special attention is paid to the life quality upon the performed operation on the subjected patients. The analyzed series consists of 29 patients with rectal cancer, operated on at the Digestive Surgery Clinic within the framework of the Clinical Centre in Skopje, in the period between 2001-2006. Our series involves patients from the T2 and T3 stage of the illness, where it possible to preserve the vegetative pelvic nerves, that are characterized by a relatively long-lasting symptomatology and relatively high percentage of lymphatic metastases. The standardization of the operative intervention resulted in an increase in the number of patients with continuous operations and preservation of the neuro-vegetative plexus without influencing the radicalism of the intervention. The application of the Stapler and Double Stapler technique brought about an increase in the number of continuous operations characterized by a termino-terminal colorectal anastomosis. On the other hand the preventive creation of LOOP ileostomies in the case of the ultra low resections resulted in a decrease in the level of dehiscence of this type as one of the most common and most difficult complications. The preservation of the pelvic neuro-vegetative plexus prolongs the operation time by 30 to 60 minutes, depending on the case and the patient. We assume that the procedure does not have a particular influence on the frequency of the complications, and at the same time it positively affects the revival of the urinal and sexual function. Taking into consideration the fact that the lymphatic dissection increases the possibility of removal of the malignant tissue and enables an adequate "staging" and on the other hand the preservation of the pelvic plexus improves the quality of life, both in terms of the sexual function and the function of

  4. [Spontaneous Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta after Surgery of Rectal Cancer in an Elderly Patient;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Tokumo, Masaki; Okada, Koichiro; Kunisue, Hironori; Teruta, Shoma; Kakishita, Tomokazu; Naito, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    We reported a case of a 90-year-old man who underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum for advanced rectal cancer. On the 16th postoperative day, he suddenly lost consciousness during an exchange of the colostomy pouches. His heart arrested in a moment, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately performed, but in vain. The autopsy imaging revealed collapse of the heart and the thoracic aorta, as well as profuse blood-like effusion in the left pleural cavity. We considered that hemorrhagic shock due to spontaneous rupture of the thoracic aorta was the cause of his death. PMID:27075292

  5. Rectal wall sparing by dosimetric effect of rectal balloon used during Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Teh, Bin S.

    2005-03-31

    The use of an air-filled rectal balloon has been shown to decrease prostate motion during prostate radiotherapy. However, the perturbation of radiation dose near the air-tissue interfaces has raised clinical concerns of underdosing the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effects of an air-filled rectal balloon on the rectal wall/mucosa and prostate gland. Clinical rectal toxicity and dose-volume histogram (DVH) were also assessed to evaluate for any correlation. A film phantom was constructed to simulate the 4-cm diameter air cavity created by a rectal balloon. Kodak XV2 films were utilized to measure and compare dose distribution with and without air cavity. To study the effect in a typical clinical situation, the phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned on a Siemens DR CT scanner for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. A target object was drawn on the phantom CT images to simulate the treatment of prostate cancer. Because patients were treated in prone position, the air cavity was situated superiorly to the target. The treatment used a serial tomotherapy technique with the Multivane Intensity Modulating Collimator (MIMiC) in arc treatment mode. Rectal toxicity was assessed in 116 patients treated with IMRT to a mean dose of 76 Gy over 35 fractions (2.17-Gy fraction size). They were treated in the prone position, immobilized using a Vac-LokTM bag and carrier-box system. Rectal balloon inflated with 100 cc of air was used for prostate gland immobilization during daily treatment. Rectal toxicity was assessed using modifications of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and late effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT) scales systems. DVH of the rectum was also evaluated. From film dosimetry, there was a dose reduction at the distal air-tissue interface as much as 60% compared with the same geometry without the air cavity for 15-MV photon beam and 2 x 2-cm field size. The dose beyond the

  6. Generic Planning Target Margin for Rectal Cancer Treatment Setup Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M. Campbell, Jonathon P.; Yan Di

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To calculate the generic planning target margin (GPTM) for patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for rectal cancer placed in a prone position with a customized cradle for small-bowel exclusion. Methods and Materials: A total of 25 consecutive rectal cancer patients were treated for 25 or 28 fractions in a prone position using a cradle to maximize small bowel exclusion. Treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans were used to create orthogonally digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for portal image registration, which were compared with daily portal images from an electronic portal-imaging device (EPID). Translation values needed to align the DRRs and EPIDs were recorded for the superior to inferior (SI), right to left (RL), and anterior to posterior (AP) directions, and used to calculate the GPTM using the four-parameter model. Age, weight, and body mass index were tested compared with the setup variation using a Pearson correlation and a t test for significance. Gender versus setup variation was compared with a t test. Results: A total of 1,723 EPID images were reviewed. The GPTM was 10 mm superior, 8 mm inferior, 7 mm RL and 10 mm AP. Age and gender were unrelated to setup variation. Weight was significantly associated with systematic AP variation (p < 0.05). BMI was significantly associated with systematic SI (p < 0.05) and AP (p < 0.01) variation and random RL variation (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The GPTM for rectal cancer is asymmetric with a maximum of 10 mm in the superior, anterior and posterior dimensions. Body mass index may effect setup variation. Research using advanced treatment planning should include these margins in the planning target volume definition.

  7. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  8. Causes and outcomes of emergency presentation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Comber, Harry; Sharp, Linda; de Camargo Cancela, Marianna; Haase, Trutz; Johnson, Howard; Pratschke, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Emergency presentation of rectal cancer carries a relatively poor prognosis, but the roles and interactions of causative factors remain unclear. We describe an innovative statistical approach which distinguishes between direct and indirect effects of a number of contextual, patient and tumour factors on emergency presentation and outcome of rectal cancer. All patients diagnosed with rectal cancer in Ireland 2004-2008 were included. Registry information, linked to hospital discharge data, provided data on patient demographics, comorbidity and health insurance; population density and deprivation of area of residence; tumour type, site, grade and stage; treatment type and optimality; and emergency presentation and hospital caseload. Data were modelled using a structural equation model with a discrete-time survival outcome, allowing us to estimate direct and mediated effects of the above factors on hazard, and their inter-relationships. Two thousand seven hundred and fifty patients were included in the analysis. Around 12% had emergency presentations, which increased hazard by 80%. Affluence, private patient status and being married reduced hazard indirectly by reducing emergency presentation. Older patients had more emergency presentations, while married patients, private patients or those living in less deprived areas had fewer than expected. Patients presenting as an emergency were less likely to receive optimal treatment or to have this in a high caseload hospital. Apart from stage, emergency admission was the strongest determinant of poor survival. The factors contributing to emergency admission in this study are similar to those associated with diagnostic delay. The socio-economic gradient found suggests that patient education and earlier access to endoscopic investigation for public patients could reduce emergency presentation. PMID:27087482

  9. Anastomotic leakage in rectal cancer surgery: The role of blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rutegård, Martin; Rutegård, Jörgen

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer remains a common and often devastating complication. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been studied extensively and are used for patient selection, especially whether to perform a diverting stoma or not. From the current literature, data suggest that perfusion in the rectal stump rather than in the colonic limb may be more important for the integrity of the colorectal anastomosis. Moreover, available research suggests that the mid and upper rectum is considerably more vascularized than the lower part, in which the posterior compartment seems most vulnerable. These data fit neatly with the observation that anastomotic leaks are far more frequent in patients undergoing total compared to partial mesorectal excision, and also that most leaks occur dorsally. Clinical judgment has been shown to ineffectively assess anastomotic viability, while promising methods to measure blood perfusion are evolving. Much interest has recently been turned to near-infrared light technology, enhanced with fluorescent agents, which enables intraoperative perfusion assessment. Preliminary data are promising, but large-scale controlled trials are lacking. With maturation of such technology, perfusion measurements may in the future inform the surgeon whether anastomoses are at risk. In high colorectal anastomoses, anastomotic revision might be feasible, while a diverting stoma could be fashioned selectively instead of routinely for low anastomoses. PMID:26649151

  10. Limits of Surgical Resection for Bile Duct Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Fabian; Heinrich, Stefan; Lang, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma is the most frequent cholangiocarcinoma and poses difficulties in preoperative evaluation. For its therapy, often major hepatic resections as well as resection and reconstruction of the hepatic artery or the portal vein are necessary. In the last decades, great advances were made in both the surgical procedures and the perioperative anesthetic management. In this article, we describe from our point of view which facts represent the limits for curative (R0) resection in perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods Retrospective data of a 6-year period (2008-2014) was collected in an SPSS 22 database and further analyzed with focus on the surgical approach and the postoperative as well as histological results. Results Out of 96 patients in total we were able to intend a curative resection in 73 patients (76%). In 58/73 (79.5%) resections an R0 situation could be reached (R1 n = 14; R2 n = 1). 23 patients were irresectable because of peritoneal carcinosis (n = 8), broad infiltration of major blood vessels (n = 8), bilateral advanced tumor growth to the intrahepatic bile ducts (n = 3), infiltration of the complete liver hilum (n = 2), infiltration of the gallbladder (n = 1), and liver cirrhosis (n = 1). Patients with a T4 stadium were treated with curative intention twice, and in each case an R1 resection was achieved. Most patients with irresectable tumors can be suspected to have a T4 stadium as well. In a T3 situation (n = 6) we could establish five R0 resections and one R1 resection. Conclusion The limit of surgical resection for bile duct cancer is the advanced tumor stage (T stadium). While in a T3 stadium an R0 resection is possible in most cases, we were not able to perform an R0 resection in a T4 stadium. From our point of view, early T stadium cannot usually be estimated through expanded diagnostics but only through surgical exploration. PMID:26468314

  11. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Local Excision in Early Stage Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Suzanne; Blackstock, A William; Herman, Joseph M; Abdel-Wahab, May; Azad, Nilofer; Das, Prajnan; Goodman, Karyn A; Hong, Theodore S; Jabbour, Salma K; Jones, William E; Konski, Andre A; Koong, Albert C; Kumar, Rachit; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Small, William; Thomas, Charles R; Suh, W Warren

    2015-10-01

    Low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection are considered standard treatments for early rectal cancer but may be associated with morbidity in selected patients who are candidates for early distal lesions amenable to local excision (LE). The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. The panel recognizes the importance of accurate staging to identify patients who may be candidates for a LE approach. Patients who may be candidates for LE alone include those with small, low-lying T1 tumors, without adverse pathologic features. Several surgical approaches can be utilized for LE however none include lymph node evaluation. Adjuvant radiation±chemotherapy may be warranted depending on the risk of nodal metastases. Patients with high-risk T1 tumors, T2 tumors not amenable to radical surgery may also benefit from adjuvant treatment; however, patients with positive margins or T3 lesions should be offered abdominoperineal resection or low anterior resection. Neoadjuvant radiation±chemotherapy followed by LE in higher risk patients results in excellent local control, but it is not clear if this approach reduces recurrence rates over surgery alone. PMID:26371522

  12. Results of Neoadjuvant Short-Course Radiation Therapy Followed by Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for T1-T2 N0 Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arezzo, Alberto; Arolfo, Simone; Allaix, Marco Ettore; Munoz, Fernando; Cassoni, Paola; Monagheddu, Chiara; Ricardi, Umberto; Ciccone, Giovannino; Morino, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the short-term outcomes of neoadjuvant short-course radiation therapy (SCRT) followed by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) for T1-T2 N0 extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Recent studies suggest that neoadjuvant radiation therapy followed by TEM is safe and has results similar to those with abdominal rectal resection for the treatment of extraperitoneal early rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We planned a prospective pilot study including 25 consecutive patients with extraperitoneal T1-T2 N0 M0 rectal adenocarcinoma undergoing SCRT followed by TEM 4 to 10 weeks later (SCRT-TEM). Safety, efficacy, and acceptability of this treatment modality were compared with historical groups of patients with similar rectal cancer stage and treated with long-course radiation therapy (LCRT) followed by TEM (LCRT-TEM), TEM alone, or laparoscopic rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) at our institution. Results: The study was interrupted after 14 patients underwent SCRT of 25 Gy in 5 fractions followed by TEM. Median time between SCRT and TEM was 7 weeks (range: 4-10 weeks). Although no preoperative complications occurred, rectal suture dehiscence was observed in 7 patients (50%) at 4 weeks follow-up, associated with an enterocutaneous fistula in the sacral area in 2 cases. One patient required a colostomy. Quality of life at 1-month follow-up, according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 survey score, was significantly worse in SCRT-TEM patients than in LCRT-TEM patients (P=.0277) or TEM patients (P=.0004), whereas no differences were observed with TME patients (P=.604). At a median follow-up of 10 months (range: 6-26 months), we observed 1 (7%) local recurrence at 6 months that was treated with abdominoperineal resection. Conclusions: SCRT followed by TEM for T1-T2 N0 rectal cancer is burdened by a high rate of painful dehiscence of the suture line and enterocutaneous

  13. Rectal metastasis from Breast cancer: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Cho Ee; Wright, Lucie; Pieri, Andrew; Belhasan, Anas; Fasih, Tarannum

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer metastases occurs in around 50% of all presentation. It is the second most common type of cancer to metastasise to the GI tract but this only occurs in less than 1% of cases. Presentation of case We report a case that underwent treatment for invasive lobular cancer (ILC) of the breast and 5 years later was found to have rectal and peritoneal metastasis. She is currently receiving palliative management including chemotherapy in the form of weekly Paclitaxel (Taxol®) and stenting to relieve obstruction. Conclusion There should be high clinical suspicion of bowel metastasis in patients presenting with positive faecal occult blood with or without bowel symptoms even if the incidence is less <1% of metastases, particularly in cases where the initial breast tumour was large, with positive axillary nodes. PMID:26188979

  14. Local excision for early rectal cancer: transanal endoscopic microsurgery and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of treatment for early stage rectal cancer is to optimize oncologic control while minimizing the long-term impact of treatment on quality of life. The standard of care treatment for most stage I and II rectal cancers is radical surgery alone, specifically total mesorectal excision (TME). For early rectal cancers, this procedure is usually curative but can have a substantial impact on quality of life, including the possibility of permanent colostomy and the potential for short and long-term bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction. Given the morbidity associated with radical surgery, alternative approaches to management of early rectal cancer have been explored, including local excision (LE) via transanal excision (TAE) or transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS). Compared to the gold standard of radical surgery, local procedures for strictly selected early rectal cancers should lead to identical oncological results and even better outcomes regarding morbidity, mortality, and quality of life. PMID:26029457

  15. Distal intramural spread of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy: The results of a multicenter randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielik, Ewa; Bujko, Krzysztof . E-mail: bujko@coi.waw.pl; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Sopylo, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Majewski, Przemyslaw; Sygut, Jacek; Karmolinski, Andrzej; Huzarski, Tomasz; Wandzel, Piotr

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the extent of distal intramural spread (DIS) after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 patients with T{sub 3-4} primary resectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive either preoperative 5x5 Gy radiation with immediate surgery or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) with delayed surgery. The slides of the 106 patients who received short-course radiation and of the 86 who received chemoradiation were available for central microscopic evaluation of DIS. Results: The length of DIS did not differ significantly (p = 0.64) between the short-course group and the chemoradiation group and was 0 in 47% vs. 49%; 1 to 5 mm in 41% vs. 42%; 6 to 10 mm in 8% vs. 9%, and greater than 10 mm in 4% vs. 0, respectively. Among the 11 clinically complete responders, DIS was found 1 to 5 mm from the microscopically detected ulceration of the mucosa in 5 patients. The discontinuous DIS was more frequent in the chemoradiation group as compared with the short-course group (i.e., 57% vs. 16% of cases, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Approximately 1 out of 10 advanced rectal cancers after preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy was characterized by DIS of over 5 mm. No significant difference was seen in the length of DIS between the 2 groups.

  16. An 80-gene set to predict response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer by principle component analysis

    PubMed Central

    EMPUKU, SHINICHIRO; NAKAJIMA, KENTARO; AKAGI, TOMONORI; KANEKO, KUNIHIKO; HIJIYA, NAOKI; ETOH, TSUYOSHI; SHIRAISHI, NORIO; MORIYAMA, MASATSUGU; INOMATA, MASAFUMI

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer not only improves the postoperative local control rate, but also induces downstaging. However, it has not been established how to individually select patients who receive effective preoperative CRT. The aim of this study was to identify a predictor of response to preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. This study is additional to our multicenter phase II study evaluating the safety and efficacy of preoperative CRT using oral fluorouracil (UMIN ID: 03396). From April, 2009 to August, 2011, 26 biopsy specimens obtained prior to CRT were analyzed by cyclopedic microarray analysis. Response to CRT was evaluated according to a histological grading system using surgically resected specimens. To decide on the number of genes for dividing into responder and non-responder groups, we statistically analyzed the data using a dimension reduction method, a principle component analysis. Of the 26 cases, 11 were responders and 15 non-responders. No significant difference was found in clinical background data between the two groups. We determined that the optimal number of genes for the prediction of response was 80 of 40,000 and the functions of these genes were analyzed. When comparing non-responders with responders, genes expressed at a high level functioned in alternative splicing, whereas those expressed at a low level functioned in the septin complex. Thus, an 80-gene expression set that predicts response to preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer was identified using a novel statistical method. PMID:27123272

  17. Technique of sentinel lymph node biopsy and lymphatic mapping during laparoscopic colon resection for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, PP; Andreoni, B; Rottoli, M; Celotti, S; Chiappa, A; Montorsi, M

    2007-01-01

    Background: The utility of lymph node mapping to improve staging in colon cancer is still under evaluation. Laparoscopic colectomy for colon cancer has been validated in multi-centric trials. This study assessed the feasibility and technical aspects of lymph node mapping in laparoscopic colectomy for colon cancer. Methods: A total of 42 patients with histologically proven colon cancer were studied from January 2006 to September 2007. Exclusion criteria were: advanced disease (clinical stage III), rectal cancer, previous colon resection and contraindication to laparoscopy. Lymph-nodal status was assessed preoperatively by computed tomography (CT) scan and intra-operatively with the aid of laparoscopic ultrasound. Before resection, 2–3 ml of Patent Blue V dye was injected sub-serosally around the tumour. Coloured lymph nodes were marked as sentinel (SN) with metal clips or suture and laparoscopic colectomy with lymphadenectomy completed as normal. In case of failure of the intra-operative procedure, an ex vivo SN biopsy was performed on the colectomy specimen after resection. Results: A total number of 904 lymph nodes were examined, with a median number of 22 lymph nodes harvested per patient. The SN detection rate was 100%, an ex vivo lymph node mapping was necessary in four patients. Eleven (26.2%) patients had lymph-nodal metastases and in five (45.5%) of these patients, SN was the only positive lymph node. There were two (18.2%) false-negative SN. In three cases (7.1%) with aberrant lymphatic drainage, lymphadenectomy was extended. The accuracy of SN mapping was 95.2% and negative predictive value was 93.9%. Conclusions: Laparoscopic lymphatic mapping and SN removal is feasible in laparoscopic colectomy for colon cancer. The ex vivo technique is useful as a salvage technique in case of failure of the intra-operative procedure. Prospective studies are justified to determine the real accuracy and false-negative rate of the technique. PMID:22275957

  18. Caveolin-1 as a Prognostic Marker for Local Control After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz Capalbo, Gianni; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Caveolin-1 is a protein marker for caveolae organelles and has an essential impact on cellular signal transduction pathways (e.g., receptor tyrosine kinases, adhesion molecules, and G-protein-coupled receptors). In the present study, we investigated the expression of caveolin-1 in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and correlated its expression pattern with the risk for disease recurrences after preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and surgical resection. Methods and Materials: Caveolin-1 mRNA and protein expression were evaluated by Affymetrix microarray analysis (n = 20) and immunohistochemistry (n = 44) on pretreatment biopsy samples of patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum, and were correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics as well as with 5-year rates of local failure and overall survival. Results: A significantly decreased median caveolin-1 intracellular mRNA level was observed in tumor biopsy samples as compared with noncancerous mucosa. Individual mRNA levels and immunohistologic staining, however, revealed an overexpression in 7 of 20 patients (35%) and 17 of 44 patients (38.6%), respectively. Based on immunohistochemical evaluation, local control rates at 5 years for patients with tumors showing low caveolin-1 expression were significantly better than for patients with high caveolin-1-expressing carcinoma cells (p = 0.05; 92%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 82-102% vs. 72%, 95% CI = 49-84%). A low caveolin-1 protein expression was also significantly related to an increased overall survival rate (p = 0.05; 45%, 95% CI 16-60% vs. 82%, 95% CI = 67-97%). Conclusion: Caveolin-1 may provide a novel prognostic marker for local control and survival after preoperative CRT and surgical resection in rectal cancer.

  19. Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine, Bevacizumab, and Erlotinib for Rectal Cancer: A Phase 1 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan; Eng, Cathy; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; You, Y. Nancy; Maru, Dipen M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Clemons, Marilyn V.; Kopetz, Scott E.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Shureiqi, Imad; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this phase 1 trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib with preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with clinical stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma, within 12 cm from the anal verge, were treated in 4 escalating dose levels, using the continual reassessment method. Patients received preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks), erlotinib, and capecitabine. Capecitabine dose was increased from 650 mg/m{sup 2} to 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the days of radiation therapy; erlotinib dose was increased from 50 mg orally daily in weeks 1 to 3, to 50 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6, to 100 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6. Patients underwent surgery at least 9 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Results: A total of 19 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients were considered evaluable. No patient had grade 4 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had grade 3 acute toxicity (hypertension). The MTD was not reached. All 18 evaluable patients underwent surgery, with low anterior resection in 7 (39%), proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis in 4 patients (22%), posterior pelvic exenteration in 1 (6%), and abdominoperineal resection in 6 (33%). Of the 18 patients, 8 (44%) had pathologic complete response, and 1 had complete response of the primary tumor with positive nodes. Three patients (17%) had grade 3 postoperative complications (ileus, small bowel obstruction, and infection). With a median follow-up of 34 months, 1 patient developed distant metastasis, and no patient had local recurrence or died. The 3-year disease-free survival was 94%. Conclusions: The combination of preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib was well tolerated. The pathologic complete response rate appears promising and may warrant further investigation.

  20. [Prevention of intraoperative incidental injuries during sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer and management of postoperative complication].

    PubMed

    Han, Fanghai; Li, Hongming

    2016-06-01

    Prevention of intraoperative incidental injuries during radical operation for rectal cancer and management of postoperative complication are associated with successful operation and prognosis of patients. This paper discusses how to prevent such intraoperative incidental injuries and how to manage postoperative complication. (1) Accurate clinical evaluation should be performed before operation and reasonable treatment decision should be made, including determination of the distance from transection to lower margin of the tumor, T and M staging evaluated by MRI, fascia invasion of mesorectum, metastasis of lateral lymph nodes, metastatic station of mesentery lymph node, association between levator ani muscle and anal sphincter, course and length of sigmoid observed by Barium enema, length assessment of pull-through bowel. Meanwhile individual factors of patients and tumors must be realized accurately. (2) Injury of pelvic visceral fascia should be avoided during operation. Negative low and circumference cutting edge must be ensured. Blood supply and adequate length of pull-down bowel must be also ensured. Urinary system injury, pelvic bleeding and intestinal damage should be avoided. Team cooperation and anesthesia procedure should be emphasized. Capacity of handling accident events should be cultivated for the team. (3) intraoperative incidental injuries during operation by instruments should be avoided, such as poor clarity of camera due to spray and smog, ineffective instruments resulted from repeated usage. (4) As to the prevention and management of postoperative complication of rectal cancer operation, prophylactic stoma should be regularly performed for rectal cancer patients undergoing anterior resection, while drainage tube placement does not decrease the morbidities of anastomosis and other complications. After sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer, attentions must be paid to the occurrence of anastomotic bleeding, pelvic bleeding, anastomotic

  1. Intra-tumor Genetic Heterogeneity in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardiman, Karin M.; Ulintz, Peter J.; Kuick, Rork; Hovelson, Daniel H.; Gates, Christopher M.; Bhasi, Ashwini; Grant, Ana Rodrigues; Liu, Jianhua; Cani, Andi K.; Greenson, Joel; Tomlins, Scott; Fearon, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer arises in part from the cumulative effects of multiple gene lesions. Recent studies in selected cancer types have revealed significant intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity and highlighted its potential role in disease progression and resistance to therapy. We hypothesized the existence of significant intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in rectal cancers involving variations in localized somatic mutations and copy number abnormalities. Two or three spatially disparate regions from each of six rectal tumors were dissected and subjected to next-generation whole exome DNA sequencing, Oncoscan SNP arrays, and targeted confirmatory sequencing and analysis. The resulting data were integrated to define subclones using SciClone. Mutant-allele tumor heterogeneity (MATH) scores, mutant allele frequency correlation, and mutation percent concordance were calculated, and copy number analysis including measurement of correlation between samples was performed. Somatic mutations profiles in individual cancers were similar to prior studies, with some variants found in previously reported significantly mutated genes and many patient-specific mutations in each tumor. Significant intra-tumor heterogeneity was identified in the spatially disparate regions of individual cancers. All tumors had some heterogeneity but the degree of heterogeneity was quite variable in the samples studied. We found that 67–97% of exonic somatic mutations were shared among all regions of an individual’s tumor. The SciClone computational method identified 2 to 8 shared and unshared subclones in the spatially disparate areas in each tumor. MATH scores ranged from 7 to 41. Allele frequency correlation scores ranged from R2 = 0.69 to 0.96. Measurements of correlation between samples for copy number changes varied from R2 = 0.74 to 0.93. All tumors had some heterogeneity, but the degree was highly variable in the samples studied. The occurrence of significant intra-tumor heterogeneity may allow

  2. Prostatic irradiation is not associated with any measurable increase in the risk of subsequent rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kendal, Wayne S. . E-mail: wkendal@ottawahospital.on.ca; Eapen, Libni; MacRae, Robert; Malone, Shawn; Nicholas, Garth

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate a putative increased risk of rectal cancer subsequent to prostatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In an analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry, we compared men who had radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma with those treated surgically and those treated with neither modality. Kaplan-Meier analyses for the time to failure from rectal cancer were performed between age-matched subgroups of the three cohorts. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to ascertain what influences might affect the incidence of subsequent rectal cancer. Results: In all, 33,831 men were irradiated, 167,607 were treated surgically, and 36,335 received neither modality. Rectal cancers developed in 243 (0.7%) of those irradiated (mean age, 70.7 years), 578 (0.3%) of those treated surgically (68.7 years), and 227 (0.8%) of those treated with neither modality (74.2 years). When age effects and the differences between the surgical and untreated cohorts were controlled for, we were unable to demonstrate any significant increased incidence of rectal cancer in men irradiated for prostatic cancer. Conclusions: An increased frequency of rectal cancer after prostatic irradiation, apparent on crude analysis, could be attributed to age confounding and other unmeasured confounders associated with prostate cancer treatment and rectal cancer risk.

  3. Early and late toxicity of radiotherapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Joye, Ines; Haustermans, Karin

    2014-01-01

    With the implementation of total mesorectal excision surgery and neoadjuvant (chemo) radiotherapy, the outcome of rectal cancer patients has improved and a substantial proportion of them have become long-term survivors. These advances come at the expense of radiation- and chemotherapy-related toxicity which remains an underestimated problem. Radiation-induced early toxicity in rectal cancer treatment mainly includes diarrhea, cystitis, and perineal dermatitis, while bowel dysfunction, fecal incontinence, bleeding, and perforation, genitourinary dysfunction, and pelvic fractures constitute the majority of late toxicity. It is now generally accepted that short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and immediate surgery is associated with less early toxicity compared to conventionally fractionated chemoradiotherapy with delayed surgery. There are no significant differences in late toxicity between both treatment regimens. While there is hardly an increase in early toxicity after preoperative SCRT with immediate surgery, late toxicity is substantial compared to surgery alone. Early toxicity is more frequent when a longer interval between SCRT and surgery is used and is comparable to the toxicity observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy except that it occurs after the end of the radiotherapy. So far, randomized phase III trials failed to demonstrate a substantial gain in tumoural response when oxaliplatin or molecular agents are added to the multimodality treatment. Moreover, the addition of these drugs increases toxicity and remains therefore experimental. PMID:25103006

  4. Pilot Study of a Clinical Pathway Implementation in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uña, Esther; López-Lara, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer is a highly prevalent disease which needs a multidisciplinary approach to be treated. The absence of specific protocols implies a significant and unjustifiable variability among the different professionals involved in this disease. The purpose is to develop a clinical pathway based on the analysis process and aims to reduce this variability and to reduce unnecessary costs. Methods: We created a multidisciplinary team with contributors from every clinical area involved in the diagnosis and treatment in this disease. We held periodic meetings to agree on a protocol based on the best available clinical practice guidelines. Once we had agreed on the protocol, we implemented its use as a standard in our institution. Every patient older than 18 years who was diagnosed with rectal cancer was considered a candidate to be treated via the pathway. Results: We evaluated 48 patients during the course of this study. Every parameter measured was improved after the implementation of the pathway, except the proportion of patients with 12 nodes or more analysed. The perception that our patients had about this project was very good. Conclusions: Clinical pathways are needed to improve the quality of health care. This kind of project helps reduce hospital costs and optimizes the use of limited resources. On the other hand, unexplained variability is also reduced, with consequent benefits for the patients. PMID:21151842

  5. Cutaneous Metastasis of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Dehal, Ahmed; Patel, Sunal; Kim, Sean; Shapera, Emanuel; Hussain, Farabi

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis of rectal cancer is rare. It typically indicates widespread disease and poor prognosis. We report an exceedingly rare case of rectal cancer with metastasis to the skin and review the literature on cutaneous metastasis of rectal cancer. A 47-year-old man presented with stage IV unresectable adenocarcinoma of the rectum and received palliative chemoradiation for local pain control. About a year later he developed extensive skin lesions involving the genital area, bilateral groin, and perineum. Biopsy specimen showed mucinous adenocarcinoma compatible with rectal origin. Palliative treatment with radiation therapy was initiated. The patient responded well to treatment and is still alive more than a year after diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis. Surgeons should maintain strong suspicion of cutaneous metastases when patients with rectal cancer have new or evolving skin lesions. PMID:26824966

  6. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  7. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  8. An unusual hamartomatous malformation of the rectosigmoid presenting as an irreducible rectal prolapse and necessitating rectosigmoid resection in a 14-week-old infant.

    PubMed

    Lamesch, A J

    1983-07-01

    A 14-week-old female infant presented with an irreducible rectal prolapse and a large polypoid tumor at the tip of the prolapsed mucosa. The tumor and prolapsed rectum were resected. Four weeks after the operation, profuse rectal bleeding occurred and a second similar tumor was diagnosed by endoscopy in the sigmoid colon. Laparotomy, rectosigmoid resection, and endorectal pull-through were performed. At operation, the serosal surface showed ragged polypoid lesions and an abnormal angiomatous vascularization. The postoperative course was uneventful. The histology suggested a congenital mucosal malformation. This pathology is unique in our experience and we have been unable to find anything resembling it in the literature. At age two years a Sertoli cell tumor developed in the girl with pubertas precox and a recurrent colonic polyp of the Peutz-Jeghers type. PMID:6861577

  9. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a longstanding and well-defined role in the treatment of resectable rectal cancer to reduce the historically high risk of local recurrence. In more advanced borderline or unresectable cases, where the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is breached or threatened according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), despite optimized local multimodality treatment and the gains achieved by modern high quality total mesorectal excision (TME), at least half the patients fail to achieve sufficient downstaging with current schedules. Many do not achieve an R0 resection. In less locally advanced cases, even if local control is achieved, this confers only a small impact on distant metastases and a significant proportion of patients (30-40%) still subsequently develop metastatic disease. In fact, distant metastases have now become the predominant cause of failure in rectal cancer. Therefore, increasing the intensity and efficacy of chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy by integrating additional cytotoxics and biologically targetted agents seems an appealing strategy to explore—with the aim of enhancing curative resection rates and improving distant control and survival. However, to date, we lack validated biomarkers for these biological agents apart from wild-type KRAS. For cetuximab, the appearance of an acneiform rash is associated with response, but low levels of magnesium appear more controversial. There are no molecular biomarkers for bevacizumab. Although some less invasive clinical markers have been proposed for bevacizumab, such as circulating endothelial cells (CECS), circulating levels of VEGF and the development of overt hypertension, these biomarkers have not been validated and are observed to emerge only after a trial of the agent. We also lack a simple method of ongoing monitoring of ‘on target’ effects of these biological agents, which could determine and pre-empt the development of resistance, prior to radiological and clinical assessessments

  10. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Radiotherapy has a longstanding and well-defined role in the treatment of resectable rectal cancer to reduce the historically high risk of local recurrence. In more advanced borderline or unresectable cases, where the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is breached or threatened according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), despite optimized local multimodality treatment and the gains achieved by modern high quality total mesorectal excision (TME), at least half the patients fail to achieve sufficient downstaging with current schedules. Many do not achieve an R0 resection. In less locally advanced cases, even if local control is achieved, this confers only a small impact on distant metastases and a significant proportion of patients (30-40%) still subsequently develop metastatic disease. In fact, distant metastases have now become the predominant cause of failure in rectal cancer. Therefore, increasing the intensity and efficacy of chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy by integrating additional cytotoxics and biologically targetted agents seems an appealing strategy to explore-with the aim of enhancing curative resection rates and improving distant control and survival. However, to date, we lack validated biomarkers for these biological agents apart from wild-type KRAS. For cetuximab, the appearance of an acneiform rash is associated with response, but low levels of magnesium appear more controversial. There are no molecular biomarkers for bevacizumab. Although some less invasive clinical markers have been proposed for bevacizumab, such as circulating endothelial cells (CECS), circulating levels of VEGF and the development of overt hypertension, these biomarkers have not been validated and are observed to emerge only after a trial of the agent. We also lack a simple method of ongoing monitoring of 'on target' effects of these biological agents, which could determine and pre-empt the development of resistance, prior to radiological and clinical assessessments or