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Sample records for rectal contrast medium

  1. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gene-hyuk; Kim, Kyung Ah; Hwang, Seong Su; Park, Soo Youn; Kim, Hyun A.; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Ji Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI. Methods We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2) of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI) and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Results All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471), while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI) was marginally significant (p = 0.0534). Conclusion The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis. PMID:26348217

  2. Contrast Medium-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sadat, Umar; Usman, Ammara; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Hayes, Paul D.; Solomon, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Contrast medium-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is a predominant cause of hospital-acquired renal insufficiency. With an increasing number of contrast medium-enhanced radiological procedures being performed in a rapidly increasing ageing population in the Western world, it is imperative that more attention is given to understand the aetiology of CI-AKI to devise novel diagnostic methods and to formulate effective prophylactic and therapeutic regimens to reduce its incidence and its associated morbidity and mortality. This article presents high-yield information on the above-mentioned aspects of CI-AKI, primarily based on results of randomised controlled trials, meta-analyses, systematic reviews and international consensus guidelines. PMID:26195974

  3. Contrast medium usage reduction in abdominal computed tomography by using high-iodinated concentration contrast medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannasri, A.; Kaewlai, R.; Asavaphatiboon, S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to determine if administration of a low volume high-concentration iodinated contrast medium can preserve image quality in comparison with regular-concentration intravenous contrast medium in patient undergoing contrast-enhancement abdominal computed tomography (CT). Eighty-four patients were randomly divided into 3 groups of similar iodine delivery rate; A: 1.2 cc/kg of iomeprol-400, B: 1.0 cc/kg of iomeprol-400 and C: 1.5 cc/kg of ioversol-350. Contrast enhancement of the liver parenchyma, pancreas and aorta was quantitatively measured in Hounsfield units and qualitative assessed by a radiologist. T-test was used to evaluate contrast enhancement, and Chi-square test was used to evaluate qualitative image assessment, at significance level of 0.05 with 95% confidence intervals. There were no statistically significant differences in contrast enhancement of liver parenchyma and pancreas between group A and group C in both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Group C showed superior vascular enhancement to group A and B on quantitative analysis.

  4. [Lethal reaction after contrast medium administration].

    PubMed

    Risgaard, Ole; Søe, Charlotte Krabbe; Zejden, Anna

    2008-04-21

    A 49-year-old healthy woman was admitted after a horse-riding accident. On arrival to the emergency department she complained of lower abdominal pain. A CT-scan of the abdomen with non ionic contrast media (iomeprol, 150 ml 4 ml/s) was conducted. The patient died nine hours later due to an anaphylactoid reaction to radio contrast media. The autopsy showed pulmonary oedema and pleural effusion, but did not show any sign of trauma. Early interventions with appropriate therapy had no effect on the fatal outcome. PMID:18462629

  5. Modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter Medium for Direct Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Strains in Nasal and Rectal Swab Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacob; Kim, Taek-Kyung; Park, Min-Jeong; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether CHROMagar Acinetobacter medium (CHROMagar, France) in combination with an antimicrobial supplement (modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter; CHROMagar, France) can be used for detecting and isolating multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species (MRA) in nasal and rectal surveillance cultures. Nasal and rectal swab samples were collected from patients in an intensive care unit at a teaching hospital. The samples were used to inoculate modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter plates, which were examined after 24 and 48 hr of incubation at 37℃. Their susceptibility against the antimicrobial agents meropenem, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin was analyzed using the Etest (bioMerieux, France). A total of 406 paired samples (406 nasal swabs and 406 rectal swabs) were obtained from 226 patients, and 120 samples (28 nasal and 28 rectal cultures, 47 nasal cultures only, and 17 rectal cultures only) yielded MRA. Seventy-five MRA isolates (18.5%) were recovered from the 406 nasal samples, and 45 MRA isolates (11.1%) were recovered from the 406 rectal samples. Of the 120 MRA isolates, 3 (2.5%) were detected only after 48 hr of incubation. The use of modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter together with nasal and rectal swabs and 1-day incubation is an effective surveillance tool for detecting MRA colonization. PMID:23667846

  6. The use of a radiopaque contrast medium in endodontic radiography.

    PubMed

    Shearer, A C; Wasti, F; Wilson, N H

    1996-03-01

    A series of in vitro studies were carried out to investigate the use and application of a radiopaque contrast medium in conventional periapical dental radiography for the diagnosis and evaluation of root canal systems. The water-soluble radiopaque contrast medium was introduced into the root canals of 30 first permanent maxillary and 30 first permanent mandibular molar teeth. The radiographic images of these teeth with and without radiopaque contrast medium in the root canal systems were compared and contrasted. Further comparisons were made with the same teeth rendered transparent. The results indicate that by standardizing the diagnostic criteria the inter-examiner reliability was in good agreement; it was independent of the radiographic technique used. The validity of the radiographs was enhanced by the use of the radiopaque contrast medium. The results confirm that, with the use of a radiopaque contrast medium, images of root canal systems are easier to read and interpret than plain radiographic images of root canal systems. The use of radiopaque contrast medium in endodontic radiography may be a valuable aid in the diagnosis and evaluation of root canal systems. This system would complement rather than replace plain radiography. PMID:9206431

  7. Accuracy of digital videodensitometry in quantitating contrast medium concentration.

    PubMed

    Yang, X M; Manninen, H; Ji, H X; Vainio, P; Soimakallio, S

    1994-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of digital videodensitometric technique in directly quantitating concentration of contrast medium, iohexol 300 mg I/ml was injected into a 2-mm-diameter plastic tube, in which clean water was circulated at a 190 ml/min flow, for digital subtraction angiography. Altogether 27 injections were performed with 3, 4 and 5 ml volumes at 3-, 4- and 5-ml/s flows of the contrast medium. A time-density curve was achieved by selecting a "vessel" region of interest (ROI) and a background ROI. Then, a frame corresponding to the maximum opacification of the contrast medium could be calculated. Finally, the average density and the time to peak density of the contrast medium were obtained. The average density was statistically higher (p < 0.01) with 5 ml/s flow than with 4- and 3-ml/s flows. Times to peak density reduced as injection flows or volumes increased. The results support the conclusion that digital videodensitometric technique is an accurate method for quantitation of contrast medium concentration during angiography. The angiographic opacification may be improved by injecting the iodine contrast medium with higher flows or larger volumes. PMID:8011389

  8. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  9. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rectal cancer and its correlation with tumor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, FU; LU, JIANPING; CHEN, LUGUANG; WANG, ZHEN; CHEN, YUKUN

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a novel imaging modality that can be used to reflect the microcirculation, although its value in diagnosing rectal cancer is unknown. The present study aimed to explore the clinical application of DCE-MRI in the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer, and its correlation with tumor differentiation. To achieve this, 40 pathologically confirmed patients with rectal cancer and 15 controls were scanned using DCE-MRI. The Tofts model was applied to obtain the perfusion parameters, including the plasma to extravascular volume transfer (Ktrans), the extravascular to plasma volume transfer (Kep), the extravascular fluid volume (Ve) and the initial area under the enhancement curve (iAUC). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to determine the diagnostic value. The results demonstrated that the time-signal intensity curve of the rectal cancer lesion exhibited an outflow pattern. The Ktrans, Kep, Ve, and iAUC values were higher in the cancer patients compared with controls (P<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficients of Ktrans, Kep, Ve and iAUC, as measured by two independent radiologists, were 0.991, 0.988, 0.972 and 0.984, respectively (all P<0.001), indicating a good consistency. The areas under the ROC curves for Ktrans and iAUC were both >0.9, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 93.3% for Ktrans, and of 92.5%, and 93.3% or 100%, for iAUC, respectively. In the 40 rectal cancer cases, there was a moderate correlation between Ktrans and iAUC, and pathological differentiation (0.3rectal cancer and differentiation, and therefore may provide novel insights into the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer. PMID:27073650

  10. Contrast-Medium-Enhanced Digital Mammography: Contrast vs. Iodine Concentration Phantom Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado-Mendez, I.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor, Y.; Benitez-Bribiesca, L.

    2008-08-11

    This work deals with the application of the contrast-medium-enhanced digital subtraction mammography technique in order to calibrate the contrast level in subtracted phantom images as function of iodine concentration to perform dynamic studies of the contrast-medium uptake in the breast. Previously optimized dual-energy temporal subtraction modalities were used (a) to determine radiological parameters for a dynamic clinical study composed of 1 mask+3 post-contrast images limiting the total mean glandular dose to 2.5 mGy, and (b) to perform a contrast vs iodine concentration calibration using a custom-made phantom. Calculated exposure values were applied using a commercial full-field digital mammography unit. Contrast in subtracted phantom images (one mask and one post-CM) is linear as function of iodine concentration, although the sensitivity (contrast per iodine concentration) decreases beyond 8 mg/mL. This calibration seems to apply only to thin and normal thickness breasts.

  11. Targeting cancer chemotherapeutic agents by use of lipiodol contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, T. )

    1990-11-01

    Arterially administered Lipiodol Ultrafluid contrast medium selectively remained in various malignant solid tumors because of the difference in time required for the removal of Lipiodol contrast medium from normal capillaries and tumor neovasculature. Although blood flow was maintained in the tumor, even immediately after injection Lipiodol contrast medium remained in the neovasculature of the tumor. To target anti-cancer agents to tumors by using Lipiodol contrast medium as a carrier, the characteristics of the agents were examined. Anti-cancer agents had to be soluble in Lipiodol, be stable in it, and separate gradually from it so that the anti-cancer agents would selectively remain in the tumor. These conditions were found to be necessary on the basis of the measurement of radioactivity in VX2 tumors implanted in the liver of 16 rabbits that received arterial injections of 14C-labeled doxorubicin. Antitumor activities and side effects of arterial injections of two types of anti-cancer agents were compared in 76 rabbits with VX2 tumors. Oily anti-cancer agents that had characteristics essential for targeting were compared with simple mixtures of anti-cancer agents with Lipiodol contrast medium that did not have these essential characteristics. Groups of rabbits that received oily anti-cancer agents responded significantly better than groups that received simple mixtures, and side effects were observed more frequently in the groups that received the simple mixtures. These results suggest that targeting of the anti-cancer agent to the tumor is important for treatment of solid malignant tumors.

  12. Transient oxygen desaturation following radiographic contrast medium administration.

    PubMed

    Neagley, S R; Vought, M B; Weidner, W A; Zwillich, C W

    1986-06-01

    To determine if angiography results in arterial oxygen desaturation, we prospectively studied 40 clinically stable patients undergoing arterial angiography. Arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) was monitored before, during, and for at least three minutes after contrast medium injection. The mean (+/- SEM) Sao2 was 94.2% +/- 0.39% before injection and fell to 92.6% +/- 0.66% following injection. Eleven patients (28%) demonstrated a decrease in Sao2 of more than 3%, with six (15%) having a postinjection Sao2 of less than 90%. To determine if the vascular route of injected contrast medium influenced the subsequent level of oxygenation, we similarly evaluated the Sao2 of 20 consecutive patients undergoing venous angiography. The Sao2 was 94.2% +/- 0.33% before contrast medium injection and fell to 92.5% +/- 0.78% following injection. Six patients (30%) experienced a fall in Sao2 of more than 3%, with four (20%) having a postinjection Sao2 of less than 90%. We conclude that arterial oxygen desaturation occurs frequently in patients undergoing angiography. PMID:3718095

  13. INTRAARTERIAL INJECTION OF IODINATED CONTRAST MEDIUM FOR CONTRAST ENHANCED COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF THE EQUINE HEAD.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Montgomery, James

    2015-01-01

    Minimizing the volume of contrast administered for contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the equine head is desirable for reducing costs and risks of adverse reactions, however evidence-based studies on the effects of varying volumes on image quality are currently lacking. The objective of the current study was to determine whether low-volume intraarterial administration of contrast medium would result in an equivalent image quality and tissue attenuation vs. high-volume intravenous bolus administration. A prospective cross-over experimental design was used in a sample of six horses. After anesthetic induction, the right carotid artery was exposed surgically and catheterized. Four CT scans of the cranium were performed for each horse: baseline, immediately following intraarterial contrast injection, five-min postinjection (return to baseline) and a final scan after intravenous contrast administration. Soft tissue attenuation in predetermined regions of interest (ROI); and length, width, and height measurements of the pituitary gland were recorded at each time point. Horses were euthanized and measurements of the pituitary gland were repeated postmortem. No adverse reactions to contrast administration were observed. Intraarterial and intravenous administration of contrast medium resulted in significantly greater soft tissue enhancement of some brain ROI's and the pituitary gland vs. baseline values. Pituitary gland measurements made on postcontrast CT images did not differ from those obtained during postmortem examination. Findings indicated that low-dose intraarterial administration of contrast material in the equine head resulted in comparable soft tissue enhancement vs. high volume intravenous administration. PMID:25782997

  14. Reduction of iodinated contrast medium in CT: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Kopp, Felix K.; Penchev, Petar; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-03-01

    In CT, the magnitude of enhancement is proportional to the amount of contrast medium (CM) injected. However, high doses of iodinated CM pose health risks, ranging from mild side effects to serious complications such as contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). This work presents a method that enables the reduction of CM dosage, without affecting the diagnostic image quality. The technique proposed takes advantage of the additional spectral information provided by photon-counting CT systems. In the first step, we apply a material decomposition technique on the projection data to discriminate iodine from other materials. Then, we estimated the noise of the decomposed image by calculating the Cramér-Rao lower bound of the parameter estimator. Next, we iteratively reconstruct the iodine-only image by using the decomposed image and the estimation of noise as an input into a maximum-likelihood iterative reconstruction algorithm. Finally, we combine the iodine-only image with the original image to enhance the contrast of low iodine concentrations. The resulting reconstructions show a notably improved contrast in the final images. Quantitatively, the combined image has a significantly improved CNR, while the measured concentrations are closer to the actual concentrations of the iodine. The preliminary results from our technique show the possibility of reducing the clinical dosage of iodine, without affecting the diagnostic image quality.

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of radiation therapy-induced microcirculation changes in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lussanet, Quido G. de . E-mail: qdlu@rdia.azm.nl; Backes, Walter H.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Padhani, Anwar R.; Baeten, Coen I.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Lambin, Philippe; Beets, Geerard L.; Engelshoven, Jos van; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) allows noninvasive evaluation of tumor microvasculature characteristics. This study evaluated radiation therapy related microvascular changes in locally advanced rectal cancer by DCE-MRI and histology. Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI was performed in 17 patients with primary rectal cancer. Seven patients underwent 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy radiation therapy (RT) (long RT) before DCE-MRI and 10 did not. Of these 10, 3 patients underwent five fractions of 5 Gy RT (short RT) in the week before surgery. The RT treated and nontreated groups were compared in terms of endothelial transfer coefficient (K{sup PS}, measured by DCE-MRI), microvessel density (MVD) (scored by immunoreactivity to CD31 and CD34), and tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation (scored by immunoreactivity to Ki67). Results: Tumor K{sup PS} was 77% (p = 0.03) lower in the RT-treated group. Histogram analyses showed that RT reduced both magnitude and intratumor heterogeneity of K{sup PS} (p = 0.01). MVD was significantly lower (37%, p 0.03) in tumors treated with long RT than in nonirradiated tumors, but this was not the case with short RT. Endothelial cell proliferation was reduced with short RT (81%, p = 0.02) just before surgery, but not with long RT (p > 0.8). Tumor cell proliferation was reduced with both long (57%, p < 0.001) and short RT (52%, p = 0.002). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI-derived K{sup PS} values showed significant radiation therapy related reductions in microvessel blood flow in locally advanced rectal cancer. These findings may be useful in evaluating effects of radiation combination therapies (e.g., chemoradiation or RT combined with antiangiogenesis therapy), to account for effects of RT alone.

  16. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich; Piringer, Gudrun; Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner; Saely, Christoph Hubert; Lukas, Peter; Öfner, Dietmar

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with retrograde intralumen contrast enhancement of the rectum in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer. Experience of application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usova, A.; Frolova, I.; Afanasev, S.; Tarasova, A.; Molchanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiment of use of MRI in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer is shown on clinical examples. We used retrograde contrasting of a rectum with 150ml ultrasonic gel to make MRI more informative in case of low diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound, colonoscopy and gynecological examination.

  18. Speckle contrast diffuse correlation tomography of complex turbid medium flow

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; He, Lian; Kong, Weikai; Yu, Guoqiang; Luo, Jia

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Developed herein is a three-dimensional (3D) flow contrast imaging system leveraging advancements in the extension of laser speckle contrast imaging theories to deep tissues along with our recently developed finite-element diffuse correlation tomography (DCT) reconstruction scheme. This technique, termed speckle contrast diffuse correlation tomography (scDCT), enables incorporation of complex optical property heterogeneities and sample boundaries. When combined with a reflectance-based design, this system facilitates a rapid segue into flow contrast imaging of larger, in vivo applications such as humans. Methods: A highly sensitive CCD camera was integrated into a reflectance-based optical system. Four long-coherence laser source positions were coupled to an optical switch for sequencing of tomographic data acquisition providing multiple projections through the sample. This system was investigated through incorporation of liquid and solid tissue-like phantoms exhibiting optical properties and flow characteristics typical of human tissues. Computer simulations were also performed for comparisons. A uniquely encountered smear correction algorithm was employed to correct point-source illumination contributions during image capture with the frame-transfer CCD and reflectance setup. Results: Measurements with scDCT on a homogeneous liquid phantom showed that speckle contrast-based deep flow indices were within 12% of those from standard DCT. Inclusion of a solid phantom submerged below the liquid phantom surface allowed for heterogeneity detection and validation. The heterogeneity was identified successfully by reconstructed 3D flow contrast tomography with scDCT. The heterogeneity center and dimensions and averaged relative flow (within 3%) and localization were in agreement with actuality and computer simulations, respectively. Conclusions: A custom cost-effective CCD-based reflectance 3D flow imaging system demonstrated rapid acquisition of dense boundary

  19. Dual Energy CT Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Disease: Feasibility of Using Lower Contrast Medium Volume

    PubMed Central

    Almutairi, Abdulrahman; Sun, Zhonghua; Poovathumkadavi, Abduljaleel; Assar, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Objective One of the main drawbacks associated with Dual Energy Computed Tomography Angiography (DECTA) is the risk of developing contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). The aim of the present study was firstly, to design an optimal CT imaging protocol by determining the feasibility of using a reduced contrast medium volume in peripheral arterial DECTA, and secondly, to compare the results with those obtained from using routine contrast medium volume. Methods Thirty four patients underwent DECTA for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease. They were randomly divided into two groups: Group 1 (routine contrast volume group) with n = 17, injection rate 4–5 ml/s, and 1.5 ml/kg of contrast medium, and Group 2 ((low contrast volume group), with n = 17, injection rate 4–5ml/s, and contrast medium volume 0.75 ml/kg. A fast kilovoltage—switching 64-slice CT scanner in the dual-energy mode was employed for the study. A total of 6 datasets of monochromatic images at 50, 55, 60, 65, 70 and 75 keV levels were reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) at 50%. A 4-point scale was the tool for qualitative analysis of results. The two groups were compared and assessed quantitatively for image quality on the basis of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). Radiation and contrast medium doses were also compared. Results The overall mean CT attenuation and mean noise for all lower extremity body parts was significantly lower for the low volume contrast group (p<0.001), and varied significantly between groups (p = 0.001), body parts (p<0.001) and keVs (p<0.001). The interaction between group body parts was significant with CT attenuation and CNR (p = 0.002 and 0.003 respectively), and marginally significant with SNR (p = 0.047), with minimal changes noticed between the two groups. Group 2 (low contrast volume group) displayed the lowest image noise between 65 and 70 keV, recorded the highest SNR and CNR at 65 keV, and

  20. Contrast medium induced changes in granulocyte adherence in vitro and during angiography.

    PubMed

    Lang, E V; Lasser, E C

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ioxaglate and diatrizoate on per cent granulocyte adherence to nylon fibers was investigated in blood to which contrast medium was added in vitro and in blood from patients undergoing angiography. Very high concentrations of contrast medium, added to blood in vitro, directly abolished granulocyte adherence to nylon fibers. Intraaortic bolus injections of ioxaglate, but not of saline, transiently increased granulocyte concentrations in the femoral vein. Fractional granulocyte adherence to nylon fibers increased significantly above the baseline when angiographic dosages of contrast medium were diluted by circulation within the human body. On the other hand, dilute concentrations of contrast medium had no effect on per cent granulocyte adherence when added to whole blood in vitro. This indicates that the increased adherence produced in vivo is an indirect effect, which, usually, cannot be simulated in vitro. PMID:3166881

  1. Preoperative diagnosis and staging of rectal cancer using diffusion-weighted and water imaging combined with dynamic contrast-enhanced scanning

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, QILI; LIU, LIJIAN; WANG, QIUYAN; LIANG, ZEXIA; SHI, GAOFENG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and water imaging combined with dynamic contrast-enhanced scanning for the preoperative diagnosis and staging of rectal cancer. In total, 72 patients with pathologically confirmed rectal cancer were selected for examination using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with phased-array coils, DWI, water imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced scanning. The patients were divided into two groups, experimental (simple enhanced scanning plus diffusion combined with water imaging) and control (simple enhanced scanning), for the pathological observations. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the T staging of the carcinomas using scan enhancement with DWI and the evaluation of cancer using water imaging were 98.5% (65/66), 66.7% (4/6) and 95.8% (69/72), respectively, and the accuracy for N staging was 89%. Whereas, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the T staging of the carcinomas using simple scan enhancement were 85.7% (42/49), 78.3% (18/23) and 83.3% (60/72), respectively, and the accuracy for N staging was 61%. Therefore, the combination of multiple MRI techniques may be of high value for the early diagnosis and exact staging of rectal cancer. PMID:25360178

  2. Syringomyelia caused by intrathecal remnants of oil-based contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Mayumi; Shin, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Makoto; Terao, Toru; Nakauchi, Jun; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    Oily contrast medium had been in use since the early 19th century as a radiographic agent for detecting spinal lesions and spinal cord tumors until the late 20th century. At that point computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging, or other hydrophilic contrast medium substituted for it. Adverse effects of oil-based dye, both acute and chronic, had been reported since the middle of the 20th century. In this paper the authors report the case of syringomyelia that seemed to be caused mainly by remaining oily contrast medium for 44 years. Syringomyelia secondary to adhesive arachnoiditis caused by oily contrast medium after a long period of time is well known. In the present case, however, surgery revealed only mild arachnoiditis at the level of syringomyelia as well as both solid and liquid remnants of contrast medium. Generally, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) blockage due to an arachnoid adhesion is considered to cause syringomyelia following adhesive arachnoiditis. The authors speculated that in the present case syringomyelia was induced by a mechanism different from that in the previously reported cases; the oily contrast medium itself seems to have induced the functional block of CSF and impaired the buffer system of the intrathecal pressure. No reports on thoracic adhesive arachnoiditis and syringomyelia caused by oil-based dye referred to this mechanism in reviewing the literature. PMID:18248289

  3. [1st experience with Solutrast, a new contrast medium for myelography].

    PubMed

    Thun, F

    1983-01-01

    Following a brief survey of myelographic results with aqueous contrast media, the article reports on the results obtained in 150 myelographies with the new contrast medium Lopamidol = Solutrast. This substance was found to be very well tolerated, involving low risk, and is suitable for examining the entire vertebral canal. The image quality is faultless. PMID:6823535

  4. Optical tracking of contrast medium bolus to optimize bolus shape and timing in dynamic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Peetz, Alexander; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-05-01

    One of the biggest challenges in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is the optimal synchronization of scan start and duration with contrast medium administration in order to optimize image contrast and to reduce the amount of contrast medium. We present a new optically based approach, which was developed to investigate and optimize bolus timing and shape. The time-concentration curve of an intravenously injected test bolus of a dye is measured in peripheral vessels with an optical sensor prior to the diagnostic CT scan. The curves can be used to assess bolus shapes as a function of injection protocols and to determine contrast medium arrival times. Preliminary results for phantom and animal experiments showed the expected linear behavior between dye concentration and absorption. The kinetics of the dye was compared to iodinated contrast medium and was found to be in good agreement. The contrast enhancement curves were reliably detected in three mice with individual bolus shapes and delay times of 2.1, 3.5 and 6.1 s, respectively. The optical sensor appears to be a promising approach to optimize injection protocols and contrast enhancement timing and is applicable to all modalities without implying any additional radiation dose. Clinical tests are still necessary.

  5. Intravenous contrast medium aggravates the impairment of pancreatic microcirculation in necrotizing pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J; Hotz, H G; Foitzik, T; Ryschich, E; Buhr, H J; Warshaw, A L; Herfarth, C; Klar, E

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous reports demonstrated that radiographic contrast medium, as used in contrast-enhanced computed tomography, increases acinar necrosis and mortality in experimental pancreatitis. The authors studied the possibility that these changes may be related to an additional impairment of pancreatic microcirculation. METHODS: Fifty Wistar rats had acute pancreatitis induced by intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (10 mmol/L for 10 min) and intravenous cerulein (5 micrograms/kg/hr for 6 hrs). After rehydration (16 mL/kg), pancreatic capillary perfusion was quantified by means of intravital microscopy at baseline before intravenous infusion of contrast medium (n = 25) or saline (n = 25), and 30 and 60 minutes thereafter. In addition to total capillary flow, capillaries were categorized as high- or low-flow (> or < 1.6 nL/min). RESULTS: Pancreatic capillary flow did not change in either high- or low-flow capillaries after saline infusion. However, contrast medium infusion induced a significant decrease of total capillary flow (p < 0.001). Analysis according to the relative flow rate revealed that this was primarily because of a significant additional reduction of perfusion in low-flow capillaries (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, complete capillary stasis was observed in 15.9 +/- 3.4% after contrast medium as compared with 3.2 +/- 1.2% after saline infusion (p < 0.006). CONCLUSION: Radiographic contrast medium aggravates the impairment of pancreatic microcirculation in experimental necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:7717779

  6. Successful management of contrast medium extravasation injury through stellate ganglion block and intra-arterial nitroglycerin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chien-Ching; Chuang, Chia-Chun; Liou, Jing-Yang; Hsieh, Ying-Chou; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chen, Kwok-Hon

    2011-09-01

    We describe the successful management of extravasation injury to the left hand by contrast medium with stellate ganglion block and intra-arterial nitroglycerin in a patient which befell during contrast-enhanced imaging. The incidence of contrast-medium extravasation injury is increasing because of the convenience and availability of contrast-enhanced imaging and ease of injection access. Extravasation of contrast medium may results in severe pain, erythema, cyanosis, and edema or even skin necrosis, which is largely related to the ionization, osmolarity, and volume of the contrast medium. The conservative treatment is often adequate in small amount extravasation, but if the extravasation is overwhelming further energetic management is mandatory. A 29-year-old man was brought to our emergency because of diffuse abdominal pain and he was arranged to receive intravenous contrast media enhanced abdominal computed tomography for diagnosis. Ruptured appendicitis with abscess formation was suspected; then the patient underwent emergent appendectomy and drainage of the abscess. However, severe swelling and cyanotic change that radiated from the intravenous catheter insertion site in every direction over the entire dorsum of the left hand were noted after the surgery. Contrast-medium extravasation injury was highly contemplated and a left stellate ganglion block was performed immediately for relief of symptoms. The consulting surgeon ruled out compartment syndrome, but advised emergent left upper limb arteriography, which revealed signs of vasospasm with high intravascular pressure of the left distal ulnar and radial arteries; thus nitroglycerin was injected into left distal ulnar and radial arteries for relief of vasospasm. The clinical symptoms were improved after the above managements and the patient was discharged 7 days later without any sequela. PMID:21982175

  7. Liver-specific magnetic resonance contrast medium in the evaluation of chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Marcio Augusto Correia Rodrigues; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatobiliary-specific contrast medium (gadoxetic acid – Primovist®) is primarily used to improve detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, such as in chronic liver disease patients with suspected hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the contrast medium is selectively taken up by functioning hepatocytes in the late hepatobiliary phase, it helps to detect typical hepatocellular carcinoma, which show low signal intensity on this phase. This imaging feature also assists in differentiating regenerative/dysplastic nodules from early hepatocellular carcinomas (with over 90% accuracy), as well as hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas from arterial pseudo-enhancement foci. Future perspectives include its use in quantification of hepatic function and fibrosis. PMID:26154554

  8. Rectal melanoma presenting as a solitary complex cystic liver lesion: role of contrast-specific low-MI real-time ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Corvino, Antonio; Catalano, Orlando; Corvino, Fabio; Petrillo, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hepatic metastases arising from malignant melanoma are extremely rare, with the few such cases reported in the literature to date describing indeterminate imaging findings, being focused more on computed tomography. To the best of our knowledge, there is no prior report describing contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings of a solitary cystic liver metastasis from a primary rectal melanoma. We herein describe a case of a 41-year-old patient with a rectal melanoma, in whom the first manifestation of disease was a solitary complex cystic liver metastasis incidentally detected by ultrasound. On admission, our patient was free of specific symptoms and his laboratory test was normal. In this setting, contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed some distinctive features that helped us to make the correct diagnosis, confirmed subsequently by FNAC examination, thus allowing to provide the correct management for our patient. Although cystic metastases are rare, knowledge of CEUS imaging findings will be invaluable for radiologists and other medical subspecialties that may face such cases in the future in helping to provide adequate management for affected patients. PMID:27298643

  9. Carbon dioxide contrast medium for endovascular treatment of ilio-femoral occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Mendes, Cynthia; de Arruda Martins, Alexandre; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Kuzniec, Sergio; Varella, Andrea Yasbek Monteiro; Fioranelli, Alexandre; Wolosker, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Compare the use of carbon dioxide contrast medium with iodine contrast medium for the endovascular treatment of ilio-femoral occlusive disease in patients without contraindications to iodine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From August 2012 to August 2014, 21 consecutive patients with ilio-femoral occlusive disease who were eligible for endovascular treatment and lacked contraindications to either iodine contrast or carbon dioxide were randomized into the carbon dioxide or iodine groups and subjected to ilio-femoral angioplasty. We analyzed the feasibility of the procedures, the surgical and clinical outcomes, the procedure lengths, the endovascular material costs, the contrast costs and the quality of the angiographic images in each group. RESULTS: No conversions to open surgery and no contrast media related complications were noted in either group. A post-operative femoral pulse was present in 88.9% of the iodine group and 80% of the carbon dioxide group. No differences in procedure length, endovascular material cost or renal function variation were noted between the groups. Four patients in the carbon dioxide group required iodine supplementation to complete the procedure. Contrast media expenses were reduced in the carbon dioxide group. Regarding angiographic image quality, 82% of the carbon dioxide images were graded as either good or fair by observers. CONCLUSIONS: The use of carbon dioxide contrast medium is a good option for ilio-femoral angioplasty in patients without contraindications to iodine and is not characterized by differences in endovascular material costs, procedure duration and surgical outcomes. In addition, carbon dioxide has lower contrast expenses compared with iodine. PMID:26598079

  10. A method to evaluate the dose increase in CT with iodinated contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, Ernesto; Lizio, Domenico; Settineri, Nicola; Di Pasquale, Andrea; Salamone, Ignazio; Pandolfo, Ignazio

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to develop a method to calculate the relative dose increase when a computerized tomography scan (CT) is carried out after administration of iodinated contrast medium, with respect to the same CT scan in absence of contrast medium. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of anthropomorphic neck and abdomen phantoms exposed to a simplified model of CT scanner was set up in order to calculate the increase of dose to thyroid, liver, spleen, kidneys, and pancreas as a function of the quantity of iodine accumulated; a series of experimental measurements of Hounsfield unit (HU) increment for known concentrations of iodinated contrast medium was carried out on a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner in order to obtain a relationship between the increment in HU and the relative dose increase in the organs studied. The authors applied such a method to calculate the average dose increase in three patients who underwent standard CT protocols consisting of one native scan in absence of contrast, followed by a contrast-enhanced scan in venous phase. Results: The authors validated their GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation by comparing the resulting dose increases for iodine solutions in water with the ones presented in literature and with their experimental data obtained through a Roentgen therapy unit. The relative dose increases as a function of the iodine mass fraction accumulated and as a function of the Hounsfield unit increment between the contrast-enhanced scan and the native scan are presented. The data shown for the three patients exhibit an average relative dose increase between 22% for liver and 74% for kidneys; also, spleen (34%), pancreas (28%), and thyroid (48%) show a remarkable average increase. Conclusions: The method developed allows a simple evaluation of the dose increase when iodinated contrast medium is used in CT scans, basing on the increment in Hounsfield units observed on the patients' organs. Since many clinical protocols

  11. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  12. Low contrast medium and radiation dose for hepatic computed tomography perfusion of rabbit VX2 tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cai-Yuan; Cui, Yan-Fen; Guo, Chen; Cai, Jing; Weng, Ya-Fang; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Deng-Bin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of low contrast medium and radiation dose for hepatic computed tomography (CT) perfusion of rabbit VX2 tumor. METHODS: Eleven rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumor underwent perfusion CT scanning with a 24-h interval between a conventional tube potential (120 kVp) protocol with 350 mgI/mL contrast medium and filtered back projection, and a low tube potential (80 kVp) protocol with 270 mgI/mL contrast medium with iterative reconstruction. Correlation and agreement among perfusion parameters acquired by the conventional and low dose protocols were assessed for the viable tumor component as well as whole tumor. Image noise and tumor-to-liver contrast to noise ratio during arterial and portal venous phases were evaluated. RESULTS: A 38% reduction in contrast medium dose (360.1 ± 13.3 mgI/kg vs 583.5 ± 21.5 mgI/kg, P < 0.001) and a 73% decrease in radiation dose (1898.5 mGy • cm vs 6951.8 mGy • cm) were observed. Interestingly, there was a strong positive correlation in hepatic arterial perfusion (r = 0.907, P < 0.001; r = 0.879, P < 0.001), hepatic portal perfusion (r = 0.819, P = 0.002; r = 0.831, P = 0.002), and hepatic blood flow (r = 0.945, P < 0.001; r = 0.930, P < 0.001) as well as a moderate correlation in hepatic perfusion index (r = 0.736, P = 0.01; r = 0.636, P = 0.035) between the low dose protocol with iterative reconstruction and the conventional protocol for the viable tumor component and the whole tumor. These two imaging protocols provided a moderate but acceptable agreement for perfusion parameters and similar tumor-to-liver CNR during arterial and portal venous phases (5.63 ± 2.38 vs 6.16 ± 2.60, P = 0.814; 4.60 ± 1.27 vs 5.11 ± 1.74, P = 0.587). CONCLUSION: Compared with the conventional protocol, low contrast medium and radiation dose with iterative reconstruction has no significant influence on hepatic perfusion parameters for rabbits VX2 tumor. PMID:25954099

  13. Object reconstruction in scattering medium using multiple elliptical polarized speckle contrast projections and optical clearing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshe, Tomer; Firer, Michael A.; Abookasis, David

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a hybrid method for improving the imaging quality of objects obscured within a scattering environment by combining multiple elliptical polarized speckle contrast projections with the use of optical clearing agents (OCAs). Elliptically polarized light enables the probing of subsurface volumes, where OCAs decrease light scattering while increasing photons' penetration depth through the medium. Experiments were conducted on object sample and prostate cancer cells embedded within ex vivo biological samples (chicken breasts) in reflection configuration. After immersion with OCAs, the medium was irradiated with an elliptically polarized laser beam and multiple polarized speckled images obtained from a lens array were first converted to speckled contrast images and then processed using a self-deconvolution shift-and-add algorithm. The conversion to contrast images and multiple perspectives acquisition was found to emphasize contrast. Analysis of image quality indicated improvement in object visualization by the combination of elliptical polarization and OCAs. This enhanced imaging strategy may advance the development of improved methods in biomedicine field, specifically biomedical tomography.

  14. Efficacy of coronary fractional flow reserve using contrast medium compared to adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Tanboğa, Ibrahim Halil; Aksakal, Enbiya; Aksu, Uğur; Gulcu, Oktay; Birdal, Oğuzhan; Arısoy, Arif; Kalaycı, Arzu; Ulusoy, Fatih Rifat; Sevimli, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Coronary fractional flow reserve (FFR) is recommended as the gold standard method in evaluating intermediate coronary stenoses. However, there are significant debates concerning the agents and the timing of the measurement. Aim To compare the contrast medium induced Pd/Pa ratio (CMR) with the FFR. Material and methods We enrolled 28 consecutive patients with 34 intermediate lesions who underwent coronary FFR measurement by intracoronary (i.c.) adenosine. After baseline Pd/Pa was calculated, a single contrast medium (Iomeron) injection of 6 ml (3 ml/s) was performed manually. Within 10 s after the contrast medium injection, the CMR was calculated. Bolus injection of i.c. adenosine was performed to induce maximal hyperemia (from 60 µg to 600 µg), and when it was ≤ 0.80, the intermediate lesion was considered as significant. Results After bolus i.c. adenosine, 12 lesions of 34 (35.3%) were identified as significant. The CMR value was 0.86 ±0.06 (range: 0.71–0.97). There were no significant differences between FFR and CMR values (p = 0.108). A substantial positive correlation between adenosine and contrast values was detected (0.886 and p < 0.001). Good agreement in Bland-Altman analysis was revealed (mean bias was 0.027, 95% confidence interval 0.038–0.092). Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed 90.9% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity for a cut-off value of 0.85 for the CMR compared to FFR (≤ 0.80). Conclusions Our study showed that measuring the CMR is a feasible method compared to FFR. The CMR may be used in situations where adenosine cannot be administered. PMID:27625683

  15. A method to remove the projection error in triple-energy radiography with contrast medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldazzi, G.; Lanconelli, N.; Masetti, S.; Fiaschetti, M.; Maccagnani, M.; Roma, L.; Rossi, P. L.; Levi, G.; Sbarra, C.

    2009-10-01

    The density-map reconstruction of a radiological contrast medium is affected by noise arising from the background lack of homogeneity (the so-called "projection error") if images of the medium are collected starting from quasi-monochromatic X-ray beams. This noise, especially for a dual-energy reconstruction algorithm, becomes more significant than the statistical fluctuations of the photon-transmitted flux, dramatically reducing the accuracy and the sensitivity of the reconstruction. In this work, we investigate the efficacy of the triple-energy technique, which is based on the simultaneous acquisition of three monochromatic images of the same target injected with contrast medium. A theoretical analysis allows to estimate the sensitivity and the accuracy of the reconstructed density map compared with the dual-energy one (i.e., the density map reconstructed acquiring only two monochromatic images). To validate the theory, a set of experimental measurements was performed: results show that triple energy drastically reduces the projection errors (from 10 to 60 times smaller than the dual-energy one), making it negligible with respect to the statistical noise.

  16. Imaging Quality Evaluation of Low Tube Voltage Coronary CT Angiography Using Low Concentration Contrast Medium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zaixian; Wang, Qingguo; Zheng, Linfeng; Feng, Yan; Zhou, Zhiguo; Zhang, Guixiang; Li, Kangan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the image quality of prospectively ECG-gated low voltage coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) with an administration of low concentration contrast medium. Method and Materials A total of 101 patients, each with a heart rate below 65 beats per minute (BPM), underwent a prospectively ECG-gated axial scan in CT coronary angiography on a 64-slice CT scanner. All patients were allocated in three groups (group A: n=31, 80kVp, 300 mgI/ml; group B: n=34, 100kVp, 300 mgI/ml; group C: n=36, 120kVp, 370 mgI/ml). The CT attenuation values of aortic root (AR), left main coronary artery (LMA), right main coronary artery (RMA) and chest subcutaneous fat tissue were measured. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of AR, LMA and RMA were calculated according to the formulas below. The values of computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded. Image quality was assessed on a 5-point scale. The results were compared using the one-way ANOVA and rank sum tests. Results The values of CNR and SNR for vessels in group A and group B were not significantly different from group C (each p > 0.05). The effective radiation dose in group A (1.51±0.70 mSv) and group B (2.59±1.24 mSv) were both lower than group C (4.92±2.82 mSv) (each p < 0.05). There was no significant difference among the image quality scores of group A (4.10±0.41), group B (3.90±0.48) and group C (4.04±0.36) (each P > 0.05). Conclusion Low tube voltage coronary CT angiography using low concentration contrast medium does not affect the imaging quality for assessing the coronary arteries compared with high voltage coronary CT angiography using high concentration contrast medium. Meanwhile low concentration contrast medium allowed 47-69% of radiation dose reduction. PMID:25811785

  17. The effect of bilipolinum (Adipiodon), an iodine contrast medium on erythrocyte enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, J; Kwiatkowska, D; Dawiskiba, J

    1980-01-01

    Bilipolinum (Adipiodon), iodine contrast medium used in cholangiography, showed an inhibitory effect on the activity of human erythrocyte phosphohexoseisomerase, phosphofructokinase, aldolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The addition of glucose metabolites (glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, fructose-1,6-bis-phosphate, pyruvate and lactate) abolished the inhibitory effect of Bilipolinum. In the presence of Bilipolinum purified erythrocyte phosphofructokinase showed a decreased affinity towards substrate, modified allosteric properties and reduced stability at pH below 7.5. Purified erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was also affected by Bilipolinum and its affinity for NADP was decreased. Testing of erythrocyte enzymes in the evaluation of toxicity of iodine contrast media is discussed. PMID:6452104

  18. Real-time contrast medium detection in x-ray images by mathematical morphology operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Dieu Sang; Beucher, Serge; Bilodeau, Michel

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a solution to contrast agent (CA) detection in angiograms by considering x-ray images as intensity images and applying mathematical morphology operators. We present two detection approaches, one based on the intensity infimum and the other based on the dual reconstruction. The evaluation using several data sets shows that both techniques are able to detect the presence of the contrast medium volume. Moreover, the dual reconstruction-based method is proven to be faster in processing time and more effective than the intensity infimum-based method in distinguishing the intensity change at the same location from the displacement of the same region. In addition, we show how to track the CA passage through a region of interest by observing the intensity evolution in successive submasks.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of a Prototype Chromogenic Medium (ChromID CARBA) for Detecting Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Surveillance Rectal Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Vrioni, Georgia; Daniil, Ioannis; Voulgari, Evangelia; Ranellou, Kyriaki; Koumaki, Vasiliki; Ghirardi, Sandrine; Kimouli, Maria; Zambardi, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are an increasing problem worldwide, and rectal swab surveillance is recommended as a component of infection control programs. The performance of a prototype chromogenic medium (chromID CARBA) was evaluated and compared with media tested by four other screening methods: (i) overnight selective enrichment in 5 ml tryptic soy broth with a 10-μg ertapenem disk followed by plating onto MacConkey agar (CDC-TS), (ii) short selective enrichment in 9 ml brain heart infusion broth with a 10-μg ertapenem disk followed by plating onto chromID ESBL medium (ESBL-BH), (iii) direct plating onto chromID ESBL, and (iv) direct plating onto MacConkey agar supplemented with meropenem (1 μg/ml) (MCM). The screening methods were applied to detect CPE in 200 rectal swab specimens taken from different hospitalized patients. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility were performed by the Vitek 2 system. Carbapenem MICs were checked by Etest. Carbapenemase production was confirmed using the modified Hodge test, combined-disk tests, and PCR assays. In total, 133 presumptive CPE strains were detected. Phenotypic and genotypic assays confirmed 92 strains to be CPE (56 KPC-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae, 29 VIM-positive K. pneumoniae, and 7 KPC-positive Enterobacter aerogenes strains) recovered from 73 patients, while the remaining 41 strains were confirmed to be CPE negative (19 ESBL producers and 22 nonfermenters). chromID CARBA, ESBL-BH, and chromID ESBL exhibited the highest sensitivity (92.4%), followed by CDC-TS and MCM (89.1%) (P = 0.631). The specificity was greater for chromID CARBA (96.9%) and ESBL-BH (93.2%) than for CDC-TS (86.4%), MCM (85.2%), and chromID ESBL (84.7%) (P = 0.014). In conclusion, chromID CARBA was found to be a rapid and accurate culture screening method for active CPE surveillance. PMID:22461675

  20. High-Pitch Coronary CT Angiography at 70 kVp With Low Contrast Medium Volume

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Qi, Li; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Spearman, James V.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Lu, Guang Ming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this article is to evaluate image quality and radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) at 70 kVp and 30 mL contrast medium. One hundred fifty patients with a heart rate ≤70 beats per minute (bpm) underwent CCTA using a second-generation dual-source computed tomography (CT) scanner and were randomized into 3 groups according to tube voltage and contrast medium volume (370 mg/mL iodine concentration) (100 kVp group, 100 kVp/60 mL, n = 55; 80 kVp group, 80 kVp/60 mL, n = 44; 70 kVp group, 70 kVp/30 mL, n = 51). Objective and subjective image quality along with the effect of heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI) was evaluated and compared between the groups. Radiation dose was estimated for each patient. CT attenuation and image noise were higher in the 80 and 70 kVp groups than in the 100 kVp group (all P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were lower in the 70 kVp group than in the 80 and 100 kVp groups (all P < 0.05). There was no difference for subjective image quality between the groups (P > 0.05). HR did not affect subjective image quality (all P > 0.05), while patients with BMI <23 kg/m2 had higher image quality than patients with BMI ≥23 kg/m2 (P < 0.05). Compared with the 100 kVp group, the radiation dose of the 70 kVp group was reduced by 75%. In conclusion, prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch 70 kVp/30 mL CCTA can obtain diagnostic image quality with lower radiation dose in selected patients with BMI <23 kg/m2 compared with 80/100 kVp/60 mL CCTA. PMID:25396334

  1. Diazepam Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Diazepam rectal gel is used in emergency situations to stop cluster seizures (episodes of increased seizure activity) in people who are taking other medications to treat epilepsy (seizures). Diazepam is in ...

  2. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  3. [Preclinical evaluation of iotrolan as a contrast medium for angiography and urography].

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, T; Murayama, C; Uchimoto, R; Fritz-Zieroth, B

    1992-09-25

    Efficacy and tolerability of iotrolan, a nonionic isotonic dimer, as a contrast medium for angiography and urography were investigated in animals. In the arteriography of rabbit femur, the efficacy of iotrolan 280 mgI/ml was as good as iopamidol 300 mgI/ml and better than meglumine diatrizoate 306 mgI/ml. In rat urography, the efficacy of iotrolan 280 mgI/ml was better than both iopamidol 370 mgI/ml and iohexol 350 mgI/ml. Vascular pain was less with iotrolan 280 mgI/ml than with iohexol 300 mgI/ml in rats. Effect of iotrolan on the pulmo-cardiovascular parameters, arterial pO2, hematocrit and plasma osmolality was less than iopamidol and diatrizoate in rabbits. Iotrolan induced no renal dysfunction and diuresis where iopamidol induced diuresis in rats. Effect of iotrolan on the blood coagulation was similar to nonionic monomers and less than diatrizoate in rabbits. Because of its isotonicity, iotrolan induced little water shift in the blood vessel and urinary tract, which would result in good efficacy and tolerability. These results suggest that iotrolan is superior to ionic and nonionic monomers for angiography and urography. PMID:1437534

  4. Removal of the iodinated X-ray contrast medium diatrizoate by anaerobic transformation.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Maria; Wick, Arne; Meermann, Björn; Ternes, Thomas A

    2014-09-01

    The iodinated X-ray contrast medium diatrizoate is known to be very persistent in current wastewater treatment as well as in environmental compartments. In this study, the potential of anaerobic processes in soils, sediments, and during wastewater treatment to remove and transform diatrizoate was investigated. In anaerobic batch experiments with soil and sediment seven biologically formed transformation products (TPs) as well as the corresponding transformation pathway were identified. The TPs resulted from successive deiodinations and deacetylations. The final TP 3,5-diaminobenzoic acid (DABA) was stable under anaerobic conditions. However, DABA was further transformed under air atmosphere, indicating the potential for the mineralization of diatrizoate by combining anaerobic and aerobic conditions. With the development of a methodology using complementary liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry techniques, all identified TPs were quantified and the mass balance could be closed without having authentic standards for four of the TPs available. The detection and quantification of diatrizoate TPs in groundwater, in technical wetlands with anaerobic zones, and in a pilot wastewater treatment plant established for anaerobic treatment highlights the transferability and up-scaling of the results attained by laboratory experiments to environmental conditions. PMID:25140788

  5. Breviscapine attenuatted contrast medium-induced nephropathy via PKC/Akt/MAPK signalling in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenbin; Li, Zhengwei; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Hao; Wu, Youyang; Wang, Yi; Shen, Zhida; He, Jialin; Chen, Shengyu; Zhang, Jiefang; Fu, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    Contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) remains a major cause of iatrogenic, drug-induced renal injury. Recent studies reveal that Breviscapine can ameliorate diabetic nephropathy in mice. Yet it remains unknown if Breviscapine could reduce CIN in diabetic mice. In this study, male C57/BL6J mice were randomly divided into 7 groups: control, diabetes mellitus, CIN, diabetes mellitus+CIN, diabetes mellitus+Breviscapine, CIN+Breviscapine and diabetes mellitus+CIN+Breviscapine. Model of CIN was induced by tail intravenous administration of iopromide and model of diabetes mellitus was induced by Streptozotocin intraperitoneally. Breviscapine was administered intragastrically for 4 weeks. Renal function parameters, kidney histology, markers of renal fibrosis, phosphorylation of protein kinase C/Akt/mitogen activated protein kinases were measured by western blot. We found out that diabetes mellitus aggravated CIN damage. Renal histological analysis showed Breviscapine reduced of renal fibrosis and tubular damage. Breviscapine was also shown markedly to ameliorate CIN fibrotic markers expression, reduced proteinuria and serum creatinine. Furthermore, Breviscapine decreased phosphorylation of PKCβII, Akt, JNK1/2 and p38. Therefore, Breviscapine treatment could ameliorate the development of CIN in diabetic mice, which was partly attributed to its suppression of renal fibrosis via phosphorylation of PKCβII/Akt/JNK1/2/p38 signalling. PMID:27158329

  6. [General pharmacological study of iodixanol, a new non-ionic isotonic contrast medium].

    PubMed

    Takasuna, K; Kasai, Y; Kitano, Y; Mori, K; Kobayashi, R; Makino, M; Hagiwara, T; Hirohashi, M; Nomura, M; Algate, D R

    1995-10-01

    The general pharmacological study of iodixanol, a non-ionic isotonic contrast medium, was conducted. 1) Iodixanol administered intravenously over a dose range of 320 to 3,200 mgI/kg had little or no effect on the general behavior, spontaneous locomotor activity, hexobarbital sleeping time, pain response, electroshock- or pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsion (mouse), EEG or body temperature (rabbit), gastrointestinal propulsion (mouse) or skeletal muscle contraction (rabbit). Iodixanol had no specific interaction with acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin, nicotin, BaCl2 (ileum), methacholine (trachea), isoprenaline (atrium) or oxytocin (pregnant uterus), nor had any effect on spontaneous contractility (atrium and uterus), or transmural electrostimulation-induced contractility (vas deferens) at concentrations of < or = 3.2 x 10(-3) gI/ml in vitro. Iodixanol had no effect on the cardiovascular system of dog, except that it increased femoral blood flow and respiratory rate at doses of > or = 1,000 mgI/kg. Iodixanol at 3,200 mgI/kg i.v. reduced urine output with a decrease in Na+ and Cl- excretion, whereas at 320 mgI/kg i.v., it slightly increased urine output (rat). 2) Injections of iodixanol into the cerebroventricular (0.96, 9.6 mgI/mouse and 3.2, 32 mgI/rat), left ventricular (1,920, 6,400 mgI/dog) or coronary artery (640, 1,920 mgI/dog) had no conspicuous effect on the central nervous system or the cardiovascular system, respectively. There was no marked difference among iodixanol, iohexol and iopamidol in this respect. Vascular pain during injection into the femoral artery (300-320 mgI/guinea pig) appeared to be less intense with iodixanol, compared with the other contrast media iohexol and iopamidol. These results suggest that intravenous injection of iodixanol is relatively free from pharmacological activity, and effects of iodixanol on the central nervous system (intracerebroventricular injection) and cardiovascular system (intra-left ventricular and -coronary

  7. Fox baiting against Echinococcus multilocularis: contrasted achievements among two medium size cities.

    PubMed

    Comte, S; Raton, V; Raoul, F; Hegglin, D; Giraudoux, P; Deplazes, P; Favier, S; Gottschek, D; Umhang, G; Boué, F; Combes, B

    2013-08-01

    In Europe, most cities are currently colonized by red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), which are considered to be the main definitive host of the zoonotic cestode Echinococcus multilocularis. The risk of transmission to humans is of particular concern where high fox populations overlap with high human populations. The distribution of baits containing praziquantel has successfully reduced the infection pressure in rural areas and in small plots within large cities. The purpose of this study was to assess its efficiency in two medium size cities (less than 100,000 inhabitants) in areas of high human alveolar echinococcosis incidence. From August 2006 to March 2009, 14 baiting campaigns of praziquantel treatment were run in Annemasse and Pontarlier (Eastern France), each of which encompassed 33 km(2), with a density of 40 baits/km(2). The bait consumption appeared to be lower in strictly urban context compared to suburban areas (78.9% vs. 93.4%) and lower in Annemasse than in Pontarlier (82.2% vs. 89.5%). During our study, the prevalence of E. multilocularis, as assessed by EM-ELISA on fox faeces collected in the field in Annemasse, was lower within the treated area than in the rural control area. A "before/during" treatment comparison revealed a significant decrease of spring prevalence from 13.3% to 2.2%. No significant change in prevalence was detected in Pontarlier (stable prevalence: 9.1%) where the contamination of the treated area followed the temporal trend observed in the control area. There, a greater resilience of the parasite's life cycle, probably due to a strong pressure of recontamination from outside the treated area, may have counteracted the prophylaxis treatment. These contrasted outcomes suggest that the frequency of fox anthelmintic treatment should be adapted to the local situation. PMID:23642656

  8. Bisacodyl Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal bisacodyl is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation. It also is used to empty the bowels before surgery and certain medical procedures. Bisacodyl is in a class of medications called stimulant laxatives. It works by increasing activity of the intestines ...

  9. Bisacodyl Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal bisacodyl is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation. It also is used to empty the bowels before surgery and certain medical procedures. Bisacodyl is in a class of medications called stimulant laxatives. It works by increasing activity of the intestines to cause a bowel movement.

  10. Rectal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... the best treatment. How to Prepare for the Test The health care provider does a rectal exam and collects the ... vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your health care provider about the meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Mean Abnormal results may ...

  11. A novel foam fluid negative contrast medium for clear visualization of the colon wall in CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jiong; Gong, Hongxia; Xu, Jianrong; Xu, Yuhong

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging is a valuable tool for the diagnosis of colorectal diseases. However, the colonic wall depiction in 2D CT images is usually poor because of the low contrast between the colonic wall and the luminal content. In order to improve the visualization of the colonic wall and any abnormality on its surface, we report in this paper the development of an oil-free foam fluid negative contrast medium for improved CT imaging of the colon. The foam fluid negative contrast medium was prepared by dispersing and stabilizing microbubbles in a polymeric solution. The stabilities of both the individual bubbles and the foam fluid system were optimized by incorporating bovine serum albumin and gluconolactone as the stabilization agent. The medium had a mean X-ray density of -120 Hounsfield units (close to that of the extraluminal tissues), and enabled clear 2D visualization of the colonic wall in both ex vivo and in vivo imaging studies. The measured colonic wall thicknesses at different segments in a beagle dog based on the 2D CT images obtained with the negative contrast medium accurately reflected the anatomical values, as compared with the values based on air-contrasted images. In vivo study of a simulated polyps pig model demonstrated sensitive detection of 11 out of 12 polyps with the smallest one 2 mm in diameter. We believe this new and safe foam fluid negative medium would enable the implementation of CT imaging as a convenient and useful tool for diagnosis of colon cancer, especially in the elderly population. PMID:22144024

  12. [Oral magnetic particles as an MR contrast medium for the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Rinck, P A; Myhr, G; Smevik, O; Børseth, A

    1992-12-01

    The authors summarise their experience of four clinical studies with a negative oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis. 140 patients were enrolled in the studies. These were partly comparative studies pre- and post-contrast, partly at 0.5 and 1.5 T, partly pre-injection and post-injection of glucagon. All patients received 800 ml of a suspension of oral magnetic particles "OMP". The distribution of this contrast agent was homogeneous throughout the entire GI tract. A complete or partial signal void was observed in all patients in T1, T2-, and intermediately weighted images. Generally, diagnostic information was higher after contrast. Artifacts caused by peristalsis and movement of the diaphragm were fewer after contrast. After contrast metallic artifacts were observed in a minority of patients. Adverse events after contrast were minimal; they included nausea and vomiting. PMID:1457787

  13. Contrast evaluation of the polarimetric images of different targets in turbid medium: possible sources of systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, T.; Bénière, A.; Goudail, F.; De Martino, A.

    2010-04-01

    Subsurface polarimetric (differential polarization, degree of polarization or Mueller matrix) imaging of various targets in turbid media shows image contrast enhancement compared with total intensity measurements. The image contrast depends on the target immersion depth and on both target and background medium optical properties, such as scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy. The differential polarization image contrast is usually not the same for circularly and linearly polarized light. With linearly and circularly polarized light we acquired the orthogonal state contrast (OSC) images of reflecting, scattering and absorbing targets. The targets were positioned at various depths within the container filled with polystyrene particle suspension in water. We also performed numerical Monte Carlo modelling of backscattering Mueller matrix images of the experimental set-up. Quite often the dimensions of container, its shape and optical properties of container walls are not reported for similar experiments and numerical simulations. However, we found, that depending on the photon transport mean free path in the scattering medium, the above mentioned parameters, as well as multiple target design could all be sources of significant systematic errors in the evaluation of polarimetric image contrast. Thus, proper design of experiment geometry is of prime importance in order to remove the sources of possible artefacts in the image contrast evaluation and to make a correct choice between linear and circular polarization of the light for better target detection.

  14. Contrast medium administration and image acquisition parameters in renal CT angiography: what radiologists need to know

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Charbel; Deeb, Ibrahim Alsheikh; Mohamad, Maha; Al-Mohiy, Hussain; El-Merhi, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, exponential advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have resulted in improved spatial and temporal resolution. Faster image acquisition enabled renal CT angiography to become a viable and effective noninvasive alternative in diagnosing renal vascular pathologies. However, with these advances, new challenges in contrast media administration have emerged. Poor synchronization between scanner and contrast media administration have reduced the consistency in image quality with poor spatial and contrast resolution. Comprehensive understanding of contrast media dynamics is essential in the design and implementation of contrast administration and image acquisition protocols. This review includes an overview of the parameters affecting renal artery opacification and current protocol strategies to achieve optimal image quality during renal CT angiography with iodinated contrast media, with current safety issues highlighted. PMID:26728701

  15. Improvement of the optical imaging of objects in a strongly scattering medium by means of contrast-enhancing dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai S; Smirnov, A V; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M; Tereshchenko, Sergei A; Tomilova, Larisa G

    1999-12-31

    The problem of enhancing the contrast of optical images in a strongly scattering medium by means of luminescent and absorbing dyes, topical in laser tomography, is examined. Preparations based on diphthalocyanine compounds were selected on the grounds of their tropism and resistance to the action of heat and light. Images with enhanced contrast in model scattering media (an aqueous solution of milk and margarine) were obtained in the IR region of the spectrum using the radiation of a picosecond neodymium laser. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Contrast medium accumulation and washout in canine brain tumors and irradiated normal brain: a CT study of kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Fike, J.R.; Cann, C.E.

    1984-04-01

    Kinetics of an iodinated contrast medium were evaluated quantitatively as a function of time up to one hour after intravenous infusion in the brains of dogs with experimentally induced radiation damage and dogs with spontaneous brain tumor. Radiation damage was characterized by an increase in iodine accumulation soon after the infusion, while tumor concentration of iodine either showed no change or decreased with time. These results suggest that contrast kinetic studies may be useful in differentiating radiation damage to normal brain tissue from a malignant brain tumor.

  17. Importance of extracolonic findings at IV contrast medium-enhanced CT colonography versus those at non-enhanced CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Spreng, Adrian; Netzer, Peter; Mattich, Joerg; Dinkel, Hans-Peter; Vock, Peter; Hoppe, Hanno

    2005-10-01

    To compare the clinical importance of extracolonic findings at intravenous (IV) contrast-enhanced CT colonography versus those at non-enhanced CT colonography. IV contrast medium-enhanced (n=72) and non-enhanced (n=30) multidetector CT colonography was performed in 102 symptomatic patients followed by conventional colonoscopy on the same day. The impact of extracolonic findings on further work up and treatment was assessed by a review of patient records. Extracolonic findings were divided into two groups: either leading to further work up respectively having an impact on therapy or not. A total of 303 extracolonic findings were detected. Of those, 71% (215/303) were found on IV contrast-enhanced CT, and 29% (88/303) were found on non-enhanced CT colonography. The extracolonic findings in 25% (26/102) of all patients led to further work up or had an impact on therapy. Twenty-two of these patients underwent CT colonography with IV contrast enhancement, and four without. The percentage of extracolonic findings leading to further work up or having an impact on therapy was higher for IV contrast-enhanced (31%; 22/72) than for non-enhanced (13%; 4/30) CT scans (P=0.12). IV contrast-enhanced CT colonography produced more extracolonic findings than non-enhanced CT colonography. A substantially greater proportion of findings on IV contrast-enhanced CT colonography led to further work up and treatment than did non-enhanced CT colonography. PMID:15965661

  18. Estimation of shear velocity contrast for dipping or anisotropic medium from transmitted Ps amplitude variation with ray-parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prakash

    2015-12-01

    Amplitude versus offset analysis of P to P reflection is often used in exploration seismology for hydrocarbon exploration. In the present work, the feasibility to estimate crustal velocity structure from transmitted P to S wave amplitude variation with ray-parameter has been investigated separately for dipping layer and anisotropy medium. First, for horizontal and isotropic medium, the approximation of P-to-s conversion is used that is expressed as a linear form in terms of slowness. Next, the intercept of the linear regression has been used to estimate the shear wave velocity contrast (δβ) across an interface. The formulation holds good for isotropic and horizontal layer medium. Application of such formula to anisotropic medium or dipping layer data may lead to erroneous estimation of δβ. In order to overcome this problem, a method has been proposed to compensate the SV-amplitude using shifted version of SH-amplitude, and subsequently transforming SV amplitudes equivalent to that from isotropic or horizontal layer medium as the case may be. Once this transformation has been done, δβ can be estimated using isotropic horizontal layer formula. The shifts required in SH for the compensation are π/2 and π/4 for dipping layer and anisotropic medium, respectively. The effectiveness of the approach has been reported using various synthetic data sets. The methodology is also tested on real data from HI-CLIMB network in Himalaya, where the presence of dipping Moho has already been reported. The result reveals that the average shear wave velocity contrast across the Moho is larger towards the Indian side compared to the higher Himalayan and Tibetan regions.

  19. Does iodinated contrast medium amplify DNA damage during exposure to radiation.

    PubMed

    Riley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognized increased risk of cancer following exposure of humans to ionizing radiation; this is felt to be most likely due to damage to DNA strands during exposure. Damage to DNA strands can be demonstrated microscopically following exposure to X-rays, and new evidence is emerging that this effect may be compounded by administration of iodinated contrast agents. PMID:26234959

  20. Thromboelastographic Changes Following Nonionic Contrast Medium Injection During Transfemoral Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, V.K. Handa, A.; Philips-Hughes, J.; Boardman, P.; Uberoi, R.; Hands, L.J.

    2006-12-15

    Background/Purpose. Patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) are known to be systemically hypercoagulable and there is concern that exposing them to contrast media during angiography may exacerbate that thrombotic tendency. Many in vitro studies in which blood is exposed to contrast media suggest that nonionic contrast medium (NICM) has a weaker anticoagulant effect than ionic contrast medium (ICM) and some studies suggest that NICM can lead to activation of coagulation thus increasing the risk of thrombotic events where it is employed. We have looked at the changes in coagulation adjacent to the site of contrast injection/potential angioplasty to determine the magnitude of change locally. Methods. We measured changes in the coagulability of aortic blood samples immediately before and within 2 min after injection of the last bolus of iohexol (NICM) prior to any intervention procedure in 30 patients with PAOD. Samples were analyzed using thromboelastography (TEG) to identify changes in the coagulability of the aortic blood samples. Results. TEG tracings of samples taken from the aorta after injection of NICM showed a significant increase in R time (time to fibrin formation) (p = 0.036) and in k time (dynamics of clot formation) (p = 0.028) and a reduction in Angle (decreased acceleration of fibrin build-up) (p = 0.013), Maximal amplitude (MA) (reduced ultimate clot strength) (p = 0.018) and Coagulation Index (CI) (p = 0.032). Conclusion. These changes in TEG parameters show that the local effect of NICM is a reduction in coagulation activity rather than the activation suggested by some previous studies.

  1. Nanotoxic Profiling of Novel Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Functionalized with Perchloric Acid and SiPEG as a Radiographic Contrast Medium

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Md Saad, Wan Mazlina

    2015-01-01

    Emerging syntheses and findings of new metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) have become an important aspect in various fields including diagnostic imaging. To date, iodine has been utilized as a radiographic contrast medium. However, the raise concern of iodine threats on iodine-intolerance patient has led to search of new contrast media with lower toxic level. In this animal modeling study, 14 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with silane-polyethylene glycol (SiPEG) and perchloric acid have been assessed for toxicity level as compared to conventional iodine. The nanotoxicity of IONPs was evaluated in liver biochemistry, reactive oxygen species production (ROS), lipid peroxidation mechanism, and ultrastructural evaluation using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The hematological analysis and liver function test (LFT) revealed that most of the liver enzymes were significantly higher in iodine-administered group as compared to those in normal and IONPs groups (P < 0.05). ROS production assay and lipid peroxidation indicator, malondialdehyde (MDA), also showed significant reductions in comparison with iodine group (P < 0.05). TEM evaluation yielded the aberration of nucleus structure of iodine-administered group as compared to those in control and IONPs groups. This study has demonstrated the less toxic properties of IONPs and it may postulate that IONPs are safe to be applied as radiographic contrast medium. PMID:26075217

  2. Nanotoxic profiling of novel iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with perchloric acid and SiPEG as a radiographic contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Saad, Wan Mazlina Md

    2015-01-01

    Emerging syntheses and findings of new metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) have become an important aspect in various fields including diagnostic imaging. To date, iodine has been utilized as a radiographic contrast medium. However, the raise concern of iodine threats on iodine-intolerance patient has led to search of new contrast media with lower toxic level. In this animal modeling study, 14 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with silane-polyethylene glycol (SiPEG) and perchloric acid have been assessed for toxicity level as compared to conventional iodine. The nanotoxicity of IONPs was evaluated in liver biochemistry, reactive oxygen species production (ROS), lipid peroxidation mechanism, and ultrastructural evaluation using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The hematological analysis and liver function test (LFT) revealed that most of the liver enzymes were significantly higher in iodine-administered group as compared to those in normal and IONPs groups (P < 0.05). ROS production assay and lipid peroxidation indicator, malondialdehyde (MDA), also showed significant reductions in comparison with iodine group (P < 0.05). TEM evaluation yielded the aberration of nucleus structure of iodine-administered group as compared to those in control and IONPs groups. This study has demonstrated the less toxic properties of IONPs and it may postulate that IONPs are safe to be applied as radiographic contrast medium. PMID:26075217

  3. Misleading changes of the signal intensity on opposed-phase MRI after injection of contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Hoefer, H.; Spielmann, R.P.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of opposed-phase imaging on the interpretation of MR contrast studies is highlighted. A model calculation is performed. It demonstrates the change of signal intensity of an average tumor before and after application of Gd-DTPA on an in-phase and an opposed-phase image, depending on the percentage of fat within the voxels. The effect is then demonstrated, using a small cotton stick soaked with water or a solution of contrast agent representing a tumor before and after i.v. application of Gd-DTPA. If an average enhancing tumor, which is surrounded by fat, occupies less than 50-60% of the slice thickness, it becomes undetectable on opposed-phase images. The reason is that due to signal cancellation on the the opposed image, no signal change or even signal decrease results, while signal increase is visible on the in-phase image. In those areas of the body where significant partial volume of a tumor with fat may occur (such as for breast tumors growing along ducts, which are surrounded by fat), severe errors can result. Therefore we explicitly warn from using opposed-image sequences for MR contrast studies. 14 ref.s, 4 figs.

  4. High-contrast 3D microscopic imaging of deep layers in a biological medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faridian, Ahmad; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Multilayer imaging of biological specimens is a demanding field of research, but scattering is one of the major obstacles in imaging the internal layers of a specimen. Although in many studies the biological object is assumed to be a weak scatterer, this condition is hardly satisfied for sub-millimeter sized organisms. The scattering medium is inhomogeneously distributed inside the specimen. Therefore, the scattering which occurs in the upper layers of a given internal layer of interest is different from the lower layers. That results in a different amount of collectable information for a specific point in the layer from each view. An opposed view dark-field digital holographic microscope (DHM) has been implemented in this work to collect the information concurrently from both views and increase the image quality. Implementing a DHM system gives the possibility to perform digital refocusing process and obtain multilayer images from each side without depth scanning of the object. The results have been presented and discussed here for a Drosophila embryo.

  5. Current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for external and internal rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    van Iersel, Jan J; Paulides, Tim J C; Verheijen, Paul M; Lumley, John W; Broeders, Ivo A M J; Consten, Esther C J

    2016-01-01

    External and internal rectal prolapse with their affiliated rectocele and enterocele, are associated with debilitating symptoms such as obstructed defecation, pelvic pain and faecal incontinence. Since perineal procedures are associated with a higher recurrence rate, an abdominal approach is commonly preferred. Despite the description of greater than three hundred different procedures, thus far no clear superiority of one surgical technique has been demonstrated. Ventral mesh rectopexy (VMR) is a relatively new and promising technique to correct rectal prolapse. In contrast to the abdominal procedures of past decades, VMR avoids posterolateral rectal mobilisation and thereby minimizes the risk of postoperative constipation. Because of a perceived acceptable recurrence rate, good functional results and low mesh-related morbidity in the short to medium term, VMR has been popularized in the past decade. Laparoscopic or robotic-assisted VMR is now being progressively performed internationally and several articles and guidelines propose the procedure as the treatment of choice for rectal prolapse. In this article, an outline of the current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for the treatment of internal and external rectal prolapse is presented. PMID:27275090

  6. Current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for external and internal rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    van Iersel, Jan J; Paulides, Tim J C; Verheijen, Paul M; Lumley, John W; Broeders, Ivo A M J; Consten, Esther C J

    2016-06-01

    External and internal rectal prolapse with their affiliated rectocele and enterocele, are associated with debilitating symptoms such as obstructed defecation, pelvic pain and faecal incontinence. Since perineal procedures are associated with a higher recurrence rate, an abdominal approach is commonly preferred. Despite the description of greater than three hundred different procedures, thus far no clear superiority of one surgical technique has been demonstrated. Ventral mesh rectopexy (VMR) is a relatively new and promising technique to correct rectal prolapse. In contrast to the abdominal procedures of past decades, VMR avoids posterolateral rectal mobilisation and thereby minimizes the risk of postoperative constipation. Because of a perceived acceptable recurrence rate, good functional results and low mesh-related morbidity in the short to medium term, VMR has been popularized in the past decade. Laparoscopic or robotic-assisted VMR is now being progressively performed internationally and several articles and guidelines propose the procedure as the treatment of choice for rectal prolapse. In this article, an outline of the current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for the treatment of internal and external rectal prolapse is presented. PMID:27275090

  7. [Manganese DPDP as a contrast medium for MR tomography of focal liver lesions. Tolerance and image quality in 20 patients].

    PubMed

    Kopp, A F; Laniado, M; Aicher, K P; Grönewäller, E F; Claussen, C D

    1992-12-01

    Twenty patients with focal liver lesions (18 metastases, 1 hepatocellular carcinoma, 1 cholangiocarcinoma) were given manganese DPDP as part of a multicentric phase II study of paramagnetic hepatobiliary MR contrast media. 5 mumol/kg manganese DPDP were injected into 10 patients in a concentration of 50 mumol/ml or 10 mumol/ml (3 ml/min). Blood pressure, pulse rate, ECG, respiratory rate, body temperature, blood and serum parameters and the patients' subjective feelings were recorded. MRI was performed with 1.5 T using T1- and T2-weighted sequences. 6 patients reported 8 side effects (flushing, feeling of warmth, metallic taste); 7 of these were produced by the 50 mumol concentration. Two hours after injection there was a significant reduction in alkaline phosphatase which was no longer present after 24 hours. On T1-weighted images manganese DPDP resulted in marked improvement in the contrast difference between the lesions and the liver parenchyma which resulted in a marked increase in the signal to noise ratio. Comparing the two concentrations, better results were obtained by the lower concentration. Extrahepatic uptake was found in the gallbladder, duodenum, pancreas, kidneys, gastric mucosa and myocardium. Manganese DPDP in a concentration of 10 mumol/ml and a dose of 5 mumol/kg is a well tolerated contrast medium which improves the demonstration of focal liver lesions in view of its distribution and uptake. The mechanisms for the transitory side effects require further studies. PMID:1457788

  8. Contrast Medium Induced Nephropathy after Endovascular Stent Graft Placement: An Examination of Its Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Mochida, Yoshihiko; Yamauchi, Naoya; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular stent graft placement has become a major treatment for thoracic and abdominal aneurysms. While endovascular therapy is less invasive than open surgery, it involves the use of a contrast medium. Contrast media can cause renal impairment, a condition termed as contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). This study sought to evaluate the incidence and risk factors of CIN following endovascular stent graft placement for aortic aneurysm repair. The study included 167 consecutive patients who underwent endovascular stent graft placement in our hospital from October 2013 to June 2014. CIN was diagnosed using the European Society of Urogenital Radiology criteria. Patients with and without CIN were compared. Chi-squared tests, t-tests, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Thirteen patients (7.8%) developed CIN. Left ventricular dysfunction and intraoperative blood transfusion were significantly more frequent in the CIN group (P = 0.017 and P = 0.032, resp.). Multivariate analysis showed that left ventricular dysfunction had the strongest influence on CIN development (odds ratio 9.34, P = 0.018, and 95% CI = 1.46–59.7). Patients with CIN also experienced longer ICU and hospital stays. Measures to improve renal perfusion flow should be considered for patients with left ventricular dysfunction who are undergoing endovascular stent graft placement. PMID:27069685

  9. Quantitative analysis applied to contrast medium extravasation by using the computed-tomography number within the region of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kim, Moon-Jib; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kim, Sun-Ju; Kim, Kwang; Kwak, Byung-Joon

    2014-02-01

    The present study was carried out to present a method to analyze extravasation quantitatively by measuring the computed tomography (CT) number after determining the region of interest (ROI) in the CT images obtained from patients suspected of extravasation induced by contrast medium auto-injection. To achieve this, we divided the study subjects into a group of patients who incurred extravasation and a group of patients who underwent routine scans without incurring extravasation. The CT numbers at IV sites were obtained as reference values, and CT numbers at extravasation sites and hepatic portal veins, respectively, were obtained as relative values. Thereupon, the predicted time for extravasation ( T EP ) and the predicted ratio for extravasation ( R EP ) of an extravasation site were obtained and analyzed quantitatively. In the case of extravasation induced by a dual auto-injector, the values of the CT numbers were confirmed to be lower and the extravasation site to be enlarged when compared to the extravasation induced by a single autoinjector. This is because the physiological saline introduced after the injection of the contrast agent diluted the concentration of the extravasated contrast agent. Additionally, the T EP caused by the auto-injector was about 40 seconds, and we could perform a precise quantitative assessment of the site suspected of extravasation. In conclusion, the dual auto-injection method, despite its advantage of reducing the volume of contrast agent and improving the quality of images for patients with good vascular integrity, was judged to be likely to increase the risk of extravasation and aggravate outcomes for patients with poor vascular integrity by enlarging extravasation sites.

  10. Case Report: Atrial Fibrillation After Intravenous Administration of Iodinated Contrast Medium in a Patient With Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maimone, Sergio; Filomia, Roberto; Saitta, Carlo; Raimondo, Giovanni; Squadrito, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    We describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who developed 2 distinct episodes of paroxystic atrial fibrillation (AF) each of which occurred 1 to 4 hours after iodine medium contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Sinus rhythm was restored by amiodarone therapy after the first AF episode and by electrical cardioversion after the second one. A careful clinical, biochemical, and instrumental examination showed that the patient had subclinical hyperthyroidism and moderate mitral insufficiency with mild atrial enlargement.Thus, the coexistence of both subclinical disthyroidism and of cardiac anatomical alterations may have predisposed the patient to AF that in fact occurred when exogenous iodine administration triggered a hyperthyroidism status. PMID:26334896

  11. Case Report: Atrial Fibrillation After Intravenous Administration of Iodinated Contrast Medium in a Patient With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maimone, Sergio; Filomia, Roberto; Saitta, Carlo; Raimondo, Giovanni; Squadrito, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who developed 2 distinct episodes of paroxystic atrial fibrillation (AF) each of which occurred 1 to 4 hours after iodine medium contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Sinus rhythm was restored by amiodarone therapy after the first AF episode and by electrical cardioversion after the second one. A careful clinical, biochemical, and instrumental examination showed that the patient had subclinical hyperthyroidism and moderate mitral insufficiency with mild atrial enlargement. Thus, the coexistence of both subclinical disthyroidism and of cardiac anatomical alterations may have predisposed the patient to AF that in fact occurred when exogenous iodine administration triggered a hyperthyroidism status. PMID:26334896

  12. Phantom study to evaluate contrast-medium-enhanced digital subtraction mammography with a full-field indirect-detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, B. A.; Rosado-Mendez, I.; Villasenor, Y.; Brandan, M. E.

    2010-02-15

    This phantom study simulates contrast-medium-enhanced digital subtraction mammography (CEDM) and compares subtracted image quality and total mean glandular dose for two alternative spectral combinations available in a GE Senographe DS mammography unit. The first choice takes advantage of large iodine attenuation at low photon energies and uses traditionally available spectra (anode/filter combinations Mo/Mo at 25 kV and Rh/Rh at 40 kV, ''Mo25-Rh40''). The second choice, selected from a previous analytical optimization, includes harder spectra obtained by adding external filtration to traditional beams (Rh/Rh at 34 kV and Rh/Rh+5 mm of Al at 45 kV, ''Rh34-Rh45H''). Individual images of a custom-made phantom containing tubes of various diameters filled with water- or iodine-based contrast agent were acquired with both spectral combinations. The total breast entrance air kerma, considering subtraction of two images, was limited to 8.76 mGy (1 R). The results were compared to predictions obtained through an analytical formalism that assumes noise of stochastic origin. Individual images were evaluated and subtracted under five combinations of temporal and dual-energy modalities. Signal variance analysis in individual raw images showed important contributions of nonstochastic origin, associated with the software applied to raw images, the curved geometry, and strong attenuation of the phantom cylindrical iodine-filled tubes, causing experimental SNR to vary from 2.2 to 0.8 times the predictions from low to high values of SNR. Iodine contrast in the subtracted images was found to be mainly defined by the spectra, independent of exposure, and linearly dependent on the iodine mass thickness. The highest contrast was obtained with the combined dual-energy temporal subtraction with Rh34-Rh45H, its value was 7% larger than the highest value measured with Mo25-Rh40. As expected, temporal modalities (single and dual energy, any spectral choice) led to higher contrast

  13. Dose perturbations due to contrast medium and air in MammoSite registered treatment: An experimental and Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.-W.; Mitra, R.; Allen Li, X.; Das, Indra J.

    2005-07-15

    In the management of early breast cancer, a partial breast irradiation technique called MammoSite registered (Proxima Therapeutic Inc., Alpharetta, GA) has been advocated in recent years. In MammoSite, a balloon implanted at the surgical cavity during tumor excision is filled with a radio-opaque solution, and radiation is delivered via a high dose rate brachytherapy source situated at the center of the balloon. Frequently air may be introduced during placement of the balloon and/or injection of the contrast solution into the balloon. The purpose of this work is to quantify as well as to understand dose perturbations due to the presence of a high-Z contrast medium and/or an air bubble with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. In addition, the measured dose distribution is compared with that obtained from a commercial treatment planning system (Nucletron PLATO system). For a balloon diameter of 42 mm, the dose variation as a function of distance from the balloon surface is measured for various concentrations of a radio-opaque solution (in the range 5%-25% by volume) with a small volume parallel plate ion chamber and a micro-diode detector placed perpendicular to the balloon axis. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to provide a basic understanding of the interaction mechanism and the magnitude of dose perturbation at the interface near balloon surface. Our results show that the radio-opaque concentration produces dose perturbation up to 6%. The dose perturbation occurs mostly within the distances <1 mm from the balloon surface. The Plato system that does not include heterogeneity correction may be sufficient for dose planning at distances {>=}10 mm from the balloon surface for the iodine concentrations used in the MammoSite procedures. The dose enhancement effect near the balloon surface (<1 mm) due to the higher iodine concentration is not correctly predicted by the Plato system. The dose near the balloon surface may be increased by 0.5% per cm{sup 3} of air

  14. A study on quantitative analyses before and after injection of contrast medium in spine examinations performed by using diffusion weighted image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Joo, Kyu-Ji

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the changes in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of metastatic cancer in the lumbar region by using diffusion weighted image taken with a 1.5 T (Tesla) magnetic resonance (MR) scanner before and after injecting a contrast medium. The study enrolled 30 healthy people and 30 patients with metastatic spine cancer from patients who underwent a lumbar MRI scan from January 2011 to October 2012. A 1.5 T MR scanner was used to obtain the diffusion weighted images (DWIs) before and after injecting the contrast medium. In the group with metastatic spine cancer, the SNR and the CNR were measured in three parts among the L1-L5 lumbar vertebrae, which included the part with metastatic spine cancer, the area of the spine with spine cancer, and the area of spine under the region with cancer. In the acquired ADC map image, the SNRs and the ADCs of the three parts were measured in ADC map images. Among the healthy subjects, the measurements were conducted for the lumbar regions of L3-L5. According to the results, in the group with metastatic spine cancer, the SNR in the DWI before the contrast medium had been injected was lowest in the part with spine cancer. In the DWI after the contrast medium had been injected, the SNR and the CNR were increased in all three parts. In the ADC map image after the contrast medium had been injected, the SNR decreased in all three parts compared to the SNR before the contrast had been injected. The ADC after had been injected the contrast medium was decreased in all three parts compared to that before the contrast medium had been injected. In the healthy group, the SNR was increased in the L3-L5 lumbar regions in the DWI. In the ADC map image, the SNR in all the three parts was decreased in the DWI after injecting the contrast medium had been injected. The ADC in the ADC map image was also decreased in all three parts.

  15. Conventional versus storage phosphor-plate digital images to visualize the root canal system contrasted with a radiopaque medium.

    PubMed

    Naoum, Hani J; Chandler, Nicholas P; Love, Robert M

    2003-05-01

    The pulp tissue was removed from 20 mandibular first molar teeth using 2.5% NaOCl irrigation and hand files. The dried canals were infused with radiopaque contrast medium. Standardized conventional and Digora digital images were obtained of each tooth positioned in a dried mandible at 0- and 30-degree horizontal angulations. Three evaluators rated the image clarity of the 0- and 30-degree original, enhanced, three-dimensional, zoom, and reverse digital image modes as superior, equal, or inferior to corresponding 0- and 30-degree conventional radiographs. The ratings were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The original, three-dimensional, zoom, or reverse digital images were inferior to the conventional radiographs for clarity of canal anatomy. The enhanced digital images were not always inferior to the conventional radiographs and were the only images superior to the original digital images. Overall, evaluators rated the image clarity of root canal anatomy on conventional radiographs better than on Digora images. However, factors in the experimental design may have contributed to this result. PMID:12775009

  16. [Consciousness Impairment and Left Hemiparesis due to Contrast Medium in the Coil Embolization of Unruptured Large Right Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Nobuhiko; Koyanagi, Masaomi; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Enatsu, Rei; Oda, Masashi; Saiki, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Neurological deficits following coil embolization of anterior circulation aneurysms due to the toxicity of contrast medium are rare. Here, we describe a patient with mild consciousness impairment and left hemiparesis following coil embolization of a large right middle cerebral artery aneurysm without evidence of ischemia or hemorrhage, who recovered completely with conservative treatment. The patient's clinical course and radiological findings led us to conclude that the neurological deficits were due to the toxic effect of contrast medium used during the coil embolization. PMID:27166842

  17. SU-C-12A-03: The Impact of Contrast Medium On Radiation Dose in CT: A Systematic Evaluation Across 58 Patient Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, P; Samei, E; Segars, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of contrast medium on radiation dose as a function of time via Monte Carlo simulation from the liver CT scan across a library of 5D XCAT models Methods: A validated Monte Carlo simulation package (PENELOPE) was employed to model a CT system (LightSpeed 64 VCT, GE Healthcare). The radiation dose was estimated from a common abdomen CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on a library of adult extended cardiac-torso (5D XCAT) phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The 5D XCAT models were created based on patient-specific iodine concentration-time results from our computational contrast medium propagation model for different intravenous injection protocols. To enable a dynamic estimation of radiation dose, each organ in the model was assigned to its own time-concentration curve via the PENELOPE package, material.exe. Using the Monte Carlo, for each scan time point after the injection, 80 million photons were initiated and tracked through the phantoms. Finally, the dose to the liver was tallied from the deposited energy. Results: Monte Carlo simulation results of radiation dose delivered to the liver from the XCAT models indicated up to 30% increase in dose for different time after the administration of contrast medium. Conclusion: The contrast enhancement is employed in over 60% of imaging modalities, which not only remarkably affects the CT image quality, but also increases the radiation dose by as much as 70%. The postinjection multiple acquisition in several enhanced CT protocols, makes the radiation dose increment through the use of contrast medium, an inevitable factor in optimization of these protocols. The relationship between radiation dose and injected contrast medium as a function of time studied in this work allows optimization of contrast administration for vulnerable individuals.

  18. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Improvement of the optical imaging of objects in a strongly scattering medium by means of contrast-enhancing dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai S.; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M.; Smirnov, A. V.; Tereshchenko, Sergei A.; Tomilova, Larisa G.

    1999-12-01

    The problem of enhancing the contrast of optical images in a strongly scattering medium by means of luminescent and absorbing dyes, topical in laser tomography, is examined. Preparations based on diphthalocyanine compounds were selected on the grounds of their tropism and resistance to the action of heat and light. Images with enhanced contrast in model scattering media (an aqueous solution of milk and margarine) were obtained in the IR region of the spectrum using the radiation of a picosecond neodymium laser.

  19. Evaluation of the Dark-Medium Objective Lens in Counting Asbestos Fibers by Phase-Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Nelson, John H.; Kashon, Michael L.; Harper, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A Japanese round-robin study revealed that analysts who used a dark-medium (DM) objective lens reported higher fiber counts from American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) Proficiency Analytical Testing (PAT) chrysotile samples than those using a standard objective lens, but the cause of this difference was not investigated at that time. The purpose of this study is to determine any major source of this difference by performing two sets of round-robin studies. For the first round-robin study, 15 AIHA PAT samples (five each of chrysotile and amosite generated by water-suspended method, and five chrysotile generated by aerosolization method) were prepared with relocatable cover slips and examined by nine laboratories. A second round-robin study was then performed with six chrysotile field sample slides by six out of nine laboratories who participated in the first round-robin study. In addition, two phase-shift test slides to check analysts’ visibility and an eight-form diatom test plate to compare resolution between the two objectives were examined. For the AIHA PAT chrysotile reference slides, use of the DM objective resulted in consistently higher fiber counts (1.45 times for all data) than the standard objective (P-value < 0.05), regardless of the filter generation (water-suspension or aerosol) method. For the AIHA PAT amosite reference and chrysotile field sample slides, the fiber counts between the two objectives were not significantly different. No statistically significant differences were observed in the visibility of blocks of the test slides between the two objectives. Also, the DM and standard objectives showed no pattern of differences in viewing the fine lines and/or dots of each species images on the eight-form diatom test plate. Among various potential factors that might affect the analysts’ performance of fiber counts, this study supports the greater contrast caused by the different phase plate absorptions as the main cause of high counts for

  20. Use of computed tomography-lymphangiography with direct injection of water-soluble contrast medium to identify the origin of chylous ascites.

    PubMed

    Otake, Kohei; Uchida, Keiichi; Inoue, Mikihiro; Koike, Yuhki; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Contrast lymphangiography is a useful technique to determine the site of lymphatic leakage in the patient with chylous ascites. Conventional lymphangiography with lipid-soluble contrast material carries the disadvantage of complications, such as oil emboli and lymphedema. The authors report a successful case of computed tomography (CT)-lymphangiography with direct injection of water-soluble contrast medium into a lower limb lymphatic vessel to determine the site of lymphatic leakage in a pediatric patient with refractory primary chylous ascites. The patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic ligation of the leaking site and recovered well. This novel technique offers superior potential for preoperative assessment and the planning of laparoscopic repair. PMID:26993687

  1. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66–1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57–11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39–19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use. This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  2. MO-E-17A-02: Incorporation of Contrast Medium Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms: The Advent of 5D XCAT Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, P; Samei, E; Segars, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a unique method to incorporate the dynamics of contrast-medium propagation into the anthropomorphic phantom, to generate a five-dimensional (5D) patient model for multimodality imaging studies. Methods: A compartmental model of blood circulation network within the body was embodied into an extended cardiac-torso (4D-XCAT) patient model. To do so, a computational physiologic model of the human cardiovascular system was developed which includes a series of compartments representing heart, vessels, and organs. Patient-specific cardiac output and blood volume were used as inputs influenced by the weight, height, age, and gender of the patient's model. For a given injection protocol and given XCAT model, the contrast-medium transmission within the body was described by a series of mass balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast enhancement-time curves for each organ; thereby defining the tissue materials including the contrastmedium within the XCAT model. A library of time-dependent organ materials was then defined. Each organ in each voxelized 4D-XCAT phantom was assigned to a corresponding time-varying material to create the 5D-XCAT phantom in which the fifth dimension is blood/contrast-medium within the temporal domain. Results: The model effectively predicts the time-varying concentration behavior of various contrast-medium administration in each organ for different patient models as function of patient size (weight/height) and different injection protocol factors (injection rate and pattern, iodine concentration or volume). The contrast enhanced XCAT patient models was developed based on the concentration of iodine as a function of time after injection. Conclusion: Majority of medical imaging systems take advantage of contrast-medium administration in terms of better image quality, the effect of which was ignored in previous optimization studies. The study enables a comprehensive optimization of contrast

  3. Drug eruption caused by the nonionic contrast medium iohexol. "Recall-like phenomenon" appearing on an area previously affected by herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Takumi; Watanabe, Hideaki; Batchelor, Jonathan; Sueki, Hirohiko; Iijima, Masafumi

    2006-10-01

    We report a case of "recall-like phenomenon" caused by nonionic contrast medium. A 62-year-old woman suffering from postherpetic neuralgia developed erythematous plaques 12 h after an intercostal nerve block under X-ray guidance using iohexol (Omnipaque) as contrast medium. The erythematous plaques were preferentially located in the sites where she had experienced herpes zoster 4 months previously. The lesions cleared spontaneously leaving no pigmentation. Both patch testing and intradermal testing with iohexol and ioversol were positive. We postulate that local immunological changes in the skin, such as an increased number and/or accelerated activity of Langerhans cells and mast cells in the herpes zoster lesions, were responsible for this phenomenon. This "recall-like phenomenon", occurring preferentially in skin previously affected by herpes zoster, could facilitate understanding of the pathology of drug eruptions. PMID:17040501

  4. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or significant rectal bleeding. Laser or infrared coagulation and sclerotherapy (injection of medicine directly into the ... or if symptoms persist despite rubber band ligation, coagulation or sclerotherapy. What are anal fissures? Tears that ...

  5. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  6. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  7. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 99. Read More Colon cancer Prostate cancer Update Date 11/1/2015 Updated by: ... Health Topics Anal Disorders Enlarged Prostate (BPH) Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Prostate Diseases Rectal Disorders Browse the ...

  8. [Anaphylactic shock from an iodine contrast medium: role of the allergy check-up in one case].

    PubMed

    Halna du Fretay, X; Gaillet, G; Hoarau, C; Blanchard-Lemoine, B

    2012-12-01

    Anaphylactoid reactions to iodine contrast media are rare but serious, possibly life-threatening and calling an appropriate and urgent care. The physiopathological mechanism of these reactions remains to be fully elucidated. This reaction is still mostly called "pseudoallergic" in the literature. However, recent papers emphasise that a true allergic process is more frequent than previously expected. They also insist on the interest of running allergy tests including skin testing. We report the case of an anaphylactic shock to iodine contrast media, occurring during coronary angiography. We performed an allergy check-up and found the culprit allergen. We also evidenced a cross-reaction to another contrast media from the similar group. On the other hand, there was no reaction to contrast media of other types. With these results, another coronary angiography could be performed without any adverse event. When hypersensitivity reactions to iodine contrast media occur, it is mandatory to perform a complete allergy check-up. This will help determine the precise mechanism of the reaction and find the culprit allergen. PMID:23102513

  9. Blackberry (Rubus spp.): a pH-dependent oral contrast medium for gastrointestinal tract images by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, María G; Sosa, Modesto; De León-Rodríguez, Luis M; Córdova, Teodoro; Bernal-Alvarado, Jesus; Avila-Rodríguez, Mario; Reyes-Aguilera, Jose A; Ortíz, Juan J; Barrios, Fernando A

    2006-02-01

    In this study, seven fruits have been tested on their magnetic properties, paramagnetic metal content and contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of phantom and in vivo. Magnetic susceptibility was determined for the fruit pulps, as well as the contents of paramagnetic metals; iron, manganese and copper. The total content of these metals was 4.3, 8.6, 11.1, 10.9, 12.3, 8.3 and 29.3 mg/kg of fruit for plum, blueberry, apple (red), pineapple, beet, grape, blackberry, respectively, and with magnetic susceptibility of -2.29+/-0.07, -2.43+/-0.07, -2.13+/-0.07, -1.84+/-0.02, -1.75+/-0.01, -1.78+/-0.06, -2.18+/-0.07 SI, respectively. T(1)- and T(2)-weighted MR images were performed for the seven fruits and water (chi= -9.98 x 10(-3) SI) and in one subject. While there was no correlation between the magnetic susceptibility and contrast enhancement, there is a correlation with the total paramagnetic metal content determined with contrast enhancement in MRI. Thus, blackberry (Rubus spp.) contrast enhancement was the highest among the fruits in T(1)-weighted images. Furthermore, this fruit's contrast enhancement shows to be pH-dependent. These characteristics and the wide availability of the Rubus spp. suggest that it should be implemented as an oral contrast agent in images by MR to assess the function of the gastric section of the GI tract. Furthermore, it has the advantage of being a natural meal, so that it can be well tolerated by the patients and use as much as it is needed without side effects. PMID:16455409

  10. Rectal Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    The last few years have seen important progress in demonstrating the efficacy of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, vaginal microbicides, and treatment as prevention as effective strategies for reducing the risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV infection. There has also been significant progress in the development of rectal microbicides. Preclinical non-human primate studies have demonstrated that antiretroviral microbicides can provide significant protection from rectal challenge with SIV or SHIV. Recent Phase 1 rectal microbicide studies have characterized the safety, acceptability, compartmental pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmaco-dynamics (PD) of both UC781 and tenofovir gels. The tenofovir gel formulation used in vaginal studies was not well tolerated in the rectum and newer rectal-specific formulations have been developed and evaluated in Phase 1 studies. The PK/PD data generated in these Phase 1 studies may reduce the risk of advancing ineffective candidate rectal microbicides into late stage development. Tenofovir gel is currently poised to move into Phase 2 evaluation and it is possible that a Phase 2B/3 effectiveness study with this product could be initiated in the next 2–3 years. PMID:23612991

  11. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. [Color-coded duplex sonography and ultrasound contrast medium in the study of peripheral arteries--initial clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Fobbe, F; Ohnesorge, I; Reichel, M; Dollinger, P; Schürmann, R; Wolf, K J

    1992-08-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (US-CA) amplify reflected sound waves. Most substances used as contrast agents are destroyed when passing the lungs. SH U 508 is a new US-CA that can pass the lungs without impairment after peripheral intravenous application. In a clinical trial of this US-CA, we investigated its effect on the visualization of blood movement in peripheral arteries by color-coded Duplex sonography (CCDS). The leg arteries of 20 patients with severe chronic arterial occlusion were examined by CCDS (QAD I and Platinum) after i.v. application of the US-CA. After passage of the pulmonary capillaries, the US-CA amplified blood flow signals in the arterial system in a dose-dependent manner with both systems used. Undesired side-effects were not observed. The amplification produced by appropriate concentrations of the US-CA markedly improved the visualization of blood movement. Further studies are required to determine the optimal dosage and application technique as well as the indication for using this US-CA. PMID:1411473

  13. Low kV settings CT angiography (CTA) with low dose contrast medium volume protocol in the assessment of thoracic and abdominal aorta disease: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Talei Franzesi, C; Fior, D; Bonaffini, P A; Minutolo, O; Sironi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic quality of low dose (100 kV) CT angiography (CTA), by using ultra-low contrast medium volume (30 ml), for thoracic and abdominal aorta evaluation. Methods: 67 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease underwent multidetector CT study using a 256 slice scanner, with low dose radiation protocol (automated tube current modulation, 100 kV) and low contrast medium volume (30 ml; 4 ml s−1). Density measurements were performed on ascending, arch, descending thoracic aorta, anonymous branch, abdominal aorta, and renal and common iliac arteries. Radiation dose exposure [dose–length product (DLP)] was calculated. A control group of 35 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease were evaluated with standard CTA protocol (automated tube current modulation, 120 kV; contrast medium, 80 ml). Results: In all patients, we correctly visualized and evaluated main branches of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. No difference in density measurements was achieved between low tube voltage protocol (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 304 HU; abdominal, 343 HU; renal arteries, 331 HU) and control group (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 320 HU; abdominal, 339; renal arteries, 303 HU). Radiation dose exposure in low tube voltage protocol was significantly different between thoracic and abdominal low tube voltage studies (490 and 324 DLP, respectively) and the control group (thoracic DLP, 1032; abdomen, DLP 1078). Conclusion: Low-tube-voltage protocol may provide a diagnostic performance comparable with that of the standard protocol, decreasing radiation dose exposure and contrast material volume amount. Advances in knowledge: Low-tube-voltage-setting protocol combined with ultra-low contrast agent volume (30 ml), by using new multidetector-row CT scanners, represents a feasible diagnostic tool to significantly reduce the radiation dose delivered to patients and to preserve renal function

  14. Physical modelling of a surface-wave survey over a laterally varying granular medium with property contrasts and velocity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamo, Paolo; Bodet, Ludovic; Socco, Laura Valentina; Mourgues, Régis; Tournat, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Laboratory experiments using laser-based ultrasonic techniques can be used to simulate seismic surveys on highly controlled small-scale physical models of the subsurface. Most of the time, such models consist in assemblies of homogeneous and consolidated materials. To enable the physical modelling of unconsolidated, heterogeneous and porous media, the use of granular materials is suggested here. We describe a simple technique to build a two-layer physical model characterized by lateral variations, strong property contrasts and velocity gradients. We use this model to address the efficiency of an innovative surface-wave processing technique developed to retrieve 2-D structures from a limited number of receivers. A step by step inversion procedure of the extracted dispersion curves yields accurate results so that the 2-D structure of the physical model is satisfactorily reconstructed. The velocity gradients within each layer are accurately retrieved as well, confirming current theoretical and experimental studies regarding guided surface acoustic modes in unconsolidated granular media.

  15. Use of postmortem coronary computed tomography angiography with water-insoluble contrast medium to detect stenosis of the left anterior descending artery in a case of sudden death.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoichiro; Sano, Rie; Takahashi, Keiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Takei, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Susumu; Shimada, Takehiro; Tokue, Hiroyuki; Awata, Sachiko; Hirasawa, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    A 40-year-old man was found dead on a sidewalk in an expressway parking area one hour after he had entered the area on a motorcycle. A medicolegal autopsy was performed to reveal the cause of this sudden and unexpected death. Postmortem coronary CT angiography after introduction of 5% gelatin-barium emulsion as a radiopaque contrast medium into the heart demonstrated a significant arterial luminal filling defect in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations revealed that a thrombus had become deposited on ruptured plaque within the LAD artery, and that a small amount of the contrast medium was present between the thrombus and the vessel endothelium. These histological findings were consistent with incomplete occlusion of the LAD artery in the 3D reconstructed image. The cause of death in this case was definitively determined to be ischemic heart disease. Postmortem angiography played a role in screening of a vascular lesion that was subsequently verified by histology to have been responsible for sudden and unexpected death. PMID:26980254

  16. Rectal prolapse repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... the anus. This is called rectal prolapse. Update Date 7/30/2014 Updated by: Jon A. Daller, MD, PhD, Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ...

  17. Electromagnetic induction in a conductive strip in a medium of contrasting conductivity: application to VLF and MT above molten dykes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2014-11-01

    Very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic waves that penetrate conductive magma-filled dykes generate secondary fields on the surface that can be used to invert for dyke properties. The model used for the interpretation calculates currents induced in a conductive strip by an inducing field that decays exponentially with depth due to the conductivity of the surrounding medium. The differential equations are integrated to give an inhomogeneous Fredholm equation of the second kind with a kernel consisting of a modified Bessel function of the second kind. Numerical methods are typically used to solve for the induced currents in the strip. In this paper, we apply a modified Galerkin-Chebyshev method, which involves separating the kernel into source and field spectra and integrating the source terms to obtain a matrix equation for the unknown coefficients. The incident wave is expressed as a Chebyshev series. The modified Bessel function is separated into a logarithmic singularity and a non-singular remainder, both of which are expanded in complex Chebyshev polynomials. The Chebyshev coefficients for the remainder are evaluated using a fast Fourier transform, while the logarithmic term and incident field have analytic series. The deconvolution then involves a matrix inversion. The results depend on the ratio of strip-size to skin-depth. For infinite skin-depth and a singular conductivity distribution given by τ_0 a/√{a^2 - z^2 } (where τ0 is the conductance, a is the half-length and z the distance from the centre), Parker gives an analytic solution. We present a similar analytic series solution for the finite skin-depth case, where the size to skin depth ratio is small. Results are presented for different ratios of size to skin depth that can be compared with numerical solutions. We compare full-space and half-space solutions. A fit of the model to VLF data taken above a magma filled dykes in Hawaii and Mt Etna demonstrates that while properties such as depth to top

  18. Rectal Mechano-sensory Function in Patients with Carcinoid Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Brock, Christina; Haase, Anne-Mette; Laurberg, Søren; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Grønbæk, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In patients with neuroendocrine tumors, excessive production of serotonin and other amines may cause the carcinoid syndrome, which is mainly characterized by diarrhea and flushing. Little is known about the pathophysiology of carcinoid diarrhea. In several other groups of patients, diarrhea may be associated with rectal hypersensitivity and increased rectal tone. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare rectal sensitivity and compliance in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and in healthy subjects. Methods Twelve patients (6 males, aged 54–78 years, median 65 years), with carcinoid diarrhea and 19 healthy subjects (7 males, aged 50–78 years, median 61 years) were included. Rectal mechanical and heat stimulation was used for assessment of rectal mechano-sensory properties. Results Overall, 5.3% higher temperatures were needed to elicit sensory responses in patients with carcinoid diarrhea than in healthy subjects (P = 0.015). Posthoc analyses revealed that the sensory threshold to heat was 48.1 ± 3.1°C in patients vs 44.7 ± 4.7°C in healthy subjects (P = 0.041). In contrast, patients and healthy subjects showed no overall differences in rectal sensory response to mechanical distension (P = 0.731) or rectal compliance (P = 0.990). Conclusions Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have higher sensory thresholds to heat stimulation in comparison to healthy subjects, but normal rectal sensation to mechanical distension and normal compliance. Therefore, treatment of carcinoid diarrhea should aim at prolonging gastrointestinal transit and decreasing secretion, rather than modifying rectal mechano-sensory function. PMID:26690884

  19. Intramuscular and rectal therapies of acute seizures.

    PubMed

    Leppik, Ilo E; Patel, Sima I

    2015-08-01

    The intramuscular (IM) and rectal routes are alternative routes of delivery for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) when the intravenous route is not practical or possible. For treatment of acute seizures, the AED used should have a short time to maximum concentration (Tmax). Some AEDs have preparations that may be given intramuscularly. These include the benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam, and midazolam) and others (fosphenytoin, levetiracetam). Although phenytoin and valproate have parenteral preparations, these should not be given intramuscularly. A recent study of prehospital treatment of status epilepticus evaluated a midazolam (MDZ) autoinjector delivering IM drug compared to IV lorazepam (LZP). Seizures were absent on arrival to the emergency department in 73.4% of the IM MDZ compared to a 63.4% response in LZP-treated subjects (p < 0.001 for superiority). Almost all AEDs have been evaluated for rectal administration as solutions, gels, and suppositories. In a placebo-controlled study, diazepam (DZP) was administered at home by caregivers in doses that ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 mg/kg. Diazepam was superior to placebo in reduced seizure frequency in children (p < 0.001) and in adults (p = 0.02) and time to recurrent seizures after an initial treatment (p < 0.001). Thus, at this time, only MZD given intramuscularly and DZP given rectally appear to have the properties required for rapid enough absorption to be useful when intravenous routes are not possible. Some drugs cannot be administered rectally owing to factors such as poor absorption or poor solubility in aqueous solutions. The relative rectal bioavailability of gabapentin, oxcarbazepine, and phenytoin is so low that the current formulations are not considered to be suitable for administration by this route. When administered as a solution, diazepam is rapidly absorbed rectally, reaching the Tmax within 5-20 min in children. By contrast, rectal administration of lorazepam is relatively slow, with a Tmax of 1-2h

  20. Postoperative rectal anastomotic complications.

    PubMed

    Polanecky, O; Adamek, S; Sedy, J; Skorepa, J; Hladik, P; Smejkal, M; Pafko, P; Lischke, R

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer represents the most common tumour of the gastrointestinal tract and the second most common tumour in men as well as women. The trend of increasing incidence of colorectal cancer is alerting. We undertook a retrospective study on 588 patients with rectal cancer and operated by rectal resection with anastomosis between the years 2002-2012. In our sample, we observed 54 (9.2 %) cases of anastomosis insufficiencies requiring reoperation. Out of 54 insufficient anastomoses, 36 (66 %) were in the lower two thirds of the rectum and only 18 (34 %) in the oral one. Although we have observed similar occurrences of anastomosis insufficiency in both groups - classical vs. staple suture (9.5 % and 9.0 %, respectively), the majority of stapler anastomoses (94 %) were made in the aboral part of the rectum. However, we can state that a majority of authors prefer the staple anastomosis as the one with lowest risk, mainly in the distal region of anastomosis. The high ligation of inferior mesenteric artery was performed in 182 (31 %) patients; out of these, we observed anastomosis insufficiency in 12 cases (22 %), which is exactly similar to that in the group of patients without high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery. We did not observe the use of antibiotics in therapeutical doses as a positive factor for anastomosis insufficiencies, and neither was oncological therapy observed as a risk factor. In our group of patients we agreed that age, level of anastomosis and corticosteroids are high-risk factors. The purpose of these reports, is for the sake of future to share and reference our experiences with cases of rectal and rectosigmoideal resection over the last 11 years. We consider it important to reference our results, especially the risk factors regarding the healing of rectal anastomosis, because anastomotic healing is a surgical problem with potentially deadly consequences for patients (Tab. 4, Ref. 24). PMID:25520228

  1. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  2. High-pitch coronary CT angiography at 70 kVp with low contrast medium volume: comparison of 80 and 100 kVp high-pitch protocols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Qi, Li; De Cecco, Carlo N; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Spearman, James V; Schoepf, U Joseph; Lu, Guang Ming

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate image quality and radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) at 70 kVp and 30 mL contrast medium.One hundred fifty patients with a heart rate ≤70 beats per minute (bpm) underwent CCTA using a second-generation dual-source computed tomography (CT) scanner and were randomized into 3 groups according to tube voltage and contrast medium volume (370 mg/mL iodine concentration) (100 kVp group, 100 kVp/60 mL, n = 55; 80 kVp group, 80 kVp/60 mL, n = 44; 70 kVp group, 70 kVp/30 mL, n = 51). Objective and subjective image quality along with the effect of heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI) was evaluated and compared between the groups. Radiation dose was estimated for each patient.CT attenuation and image noise were higher in the 80 and 70 kVp groups than in the 100 kVp group (all P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were lower in the 70 kVp group than in the 80 and 100 kVp groups (all P < 0.05). There was no difference for subjective image quality between the groups (P > 0.05). HR did not affect subjective image quality (all P > 0.05), while patients with BMI <23 kg/m had higher image quality than patients with BMI ≥23 kg/m (P < 0.05). Compared with the 100 kVp group, the radiation dose of the 70 kVp group was reduced by 75%.In conclusion, prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch 70 kVp/30 mL CCTA can obtain diagnostic image quality with lower radiation dose in selected patients with BMI <23 kg/m compared with 80/100 kVp/60 mL CCTA. PMID:25396334

  3. Feasibility of low-concentration iodinated contrast medium with lower-tube-voltage dual-source CT aortography using iterative reconstruction: comparison with automatic exposure control CT aortography.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Jeong; Kim, Song Soo; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Jin, Seon Ah; Shin, Byung Seok; Shin, Kyung-Sook; Ahn, Moonsang

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of low-concentration contrast medium (CM) for vascular enhancement, image quality, and radiation dose on computed tomography aortography (CTA) using a combined low-tube-voltage and iterative reconstruction (IR) technique. Ninety subjects underwent dual-source CT (DSCT) operating in dual-source, high-pitch mode. DSCT scans were performed using both high-concentration CM (Group A, n = 50; Iomeprol 400) and low-concentration CM (Group B, n = 40; Iodixanol 270). Group A was scanned using a reference tube potential of 120 kVp and 120 reference mAs under automatic exposure control with IR. Group B was scanned using low-tube-voltage (80 or 100 kVp if body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)) at a fixed current of 150 mAs, along with IR. Images of the two groups were compared regarding attenuation, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), iodine load, and radiation dose in various locations of the CTA. In comparison between Group A and Group B, the average mean attenuation (454.73 ± 86.66 vs. 515.96 ± 101.55 HU), SNR (25.28 ± 4.34 vs. 31.29 ± 4.58), and CNR (21.83 ± 4.20 vs. 27.55 ± 4.81) on CTA in Group B showed significantly greater values and significantly lower image noise values (18.76 ± 2.19 vs. 17.48 ± 3.34) than those in Group A (all Ps < 0.05). Homogeneous contrast enhancement from the ascending thoracic aorta to the infrarenal abdominal aorta was significantly superior in Group B (P < 0.05). Low-concentration CM and a low-tube-voltage combination technique using IR is a feasible method, showing sufficient contrast enhancement and image quality. PMID:26621755

  4. Rectal arteriovenous fistula resected laparoscopically after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ushigome, Hajime; Hayakawa, Tetsushi; Morimoto, Mamoru; Kitagami, Hidehiko; Tanaka, Moritsugu

    2014-01-01

    We report a very rare case of rectal arteriovenous fistula following sigmoidectomy and discuss this case in the context of the existing literature. In April 2011, the patient, a man in his 60s, underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with lymph node dissection for sigmoid colon cancer. Beginning in February 2012, he experienced frequent diarrhea. Abdominal contrast-enhanced CT revealed local thickening of the rectal wall and rectal arteriovenous fistula near the anastomosis site. Rectitis from the rectal arteriovenous fistula was diagnosed. No improvement was seen with conservative treatment. Therefore, surgical resection was performed laparoscopically and the site of the lesion was confirmed by intraoperative angiography. The arteriovenous fistula was identified and resected. Postoperatively, diarrhea symptoms resolved, and improvement in rectal wall thickening was seen on abdominal CT. No recurrence has been seen as of 1 year postoperatively. PMID:24450345

  5. Proctoclysis: emergency rectal fluid infusion.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Vincent

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of proctoclysis (rectal fluid infusion) in providing fluid resuscitation in the absence of intravenous access in rural and remote environments. PMID:19856644

  6. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based, Propensity Score-Matched, Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression.Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66-1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57-11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39-19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use.This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  7. The role of gadoxetic acid as a paramagnetic contrast medium in the characterization and detection of focal liver lesions: a review

    PubMed Central

    Bormann, Renata Lilian; da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Kierzenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; Torres, Lucas Rios; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the use of paramagnetic hepatobiliary contrast agents in the acquisition of magnetic resonance images remarkably improves the detection and differentiation of focal liver lesions, as compared with extracellular contrast agents. Paramagnetic hepatobiliary contrast agents initially show the perfusion of the lesions, as do extracellular agents, but delayed contrast-enhanced images can demonstrate contrast uptake by functional hepatocytes, providing further information for a better characterization of the lesions. Additionally, this intrinsic characteristic increases the accuracy in the detection of hepatocellular carcinomas and metastases, particularly the small-sized ones. Recently, a hepatobiliary contrast agent called gadolinium ethoxybenzyl dimeglumine, that is simply known as gadoxetic acid, was approved by the National Health Surveillance Agency for use in humans. The authors present a literature review and a practical approach of magnetic resonance imaging utilizing gadoxetic acid as contrast agent, based on patients' images acquired during their initial experiment. PMID:25798007

  8. [Measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after administration of iodine contrast medium with the Renalyzer PRX90 in healthy cats and cats with kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Westhoff, A; Wohlsein, P; Pohlenz, J; Nolte, I

    1998-09-01

    In the present study, the measurement of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in the cat with the aid of an iodine contrast medium clearance with the renalyzer PRX90 is introduced. Investigations on the accuracy of measurement showed that even repeated measurement of plasma samples after two days of storage at room temperature yielded reproducible clearance results. Also, partial dilution of the plasma sample (2 ml with 1 ml Aqua bidest.) to reduce the volume of blood withdrawn still produced reliable results. Further dilution of the plasma volume (1 ml with 2 ml Aqua bidest.) however did not allow for accurate measurements. A total of 59 cats of different age and sex were included in the study. 31 cats had healthy kidneys with urea and creatinine values within the reference range, unchanged urine findings and physiologic urine protein patterns (SDS-PAGE). These cats served as reference group. The GFR reference value ascertained for these animals was 2.1 ml/min/kg BW (mean = 3.45 ml/min/kg with s = +/- 1.0 ml/min/kg). 28 cats had elevated values of urea and creatinine in the blood, as well as partially changed urine findings. For further diagnosis of renal disease, separation of urine proteins was done with the SDS-PAGE in the PhastSystem, which in all cases yielded a pathologic urine protein pattern. In 11 cases the renal disease could be further confirmed by histological investigation. GFR in these patients was clearly lowered compared with healthy cats, with measured values between 0 and 1.8 ml/min/kg. It can be concluded that the renalyzer allows reliable determination of the GFR also in the cat. To what extent measurement of the GFR is also helpful to diagnose nephropathies in the stage of compensation needs to be further investigated. In cats with high grade uremia and a GFR below 1 ml/min however, an exact calculation is not possible, since the accuracy of measurement within this range is inadequate. Thus, in severe disease no correct assessment is possible

  9. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental. PMID:23584263

  10. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  11. Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  12. Comparison of rectal suction versus rectal tube insertion for reducing abdominal symptoms immediately after unsedated colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tso-Tsai; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Yu, Hao-Chun; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Abdominal discomfort and bloating are common symptoms after colonoscopy. We aimed to compare the effects of direct rectal suction with insertion of a rectal tube on reducing abdominal symptoms after unsedated colonoscopy. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy were randomized to have direct rectal suction or placement of a rectal tube immediately after colonoscopy. Post-procedure abdominal pain and bloating were measured with a 0 – 100 visual analogue scale. All participants ranked their satisfaction with either direct rectal suction or insertion of a rectal tube. Results: Abdominal pain and bloating were significantly reduced by direct rectal suction and placement of a rectal tube at 1 minute (both P < 0.05) and 3 minutes (both P < 0.05) after the colonoscopy. Direct rectal suction significantly reduced abdominal pain at 1 minute (P = 0.001) and 3 minutes (P = 0.005) after colonoscopy compared with rectal tube insertion. Bloating was significantly lower in patients with direct rectal suction compared to those with rectal tube insertion at 1 minute (P = 0.03) after colonoscopy. Greater satisfaction was found in patients with direct rectal suction compared to those with rectal tube insertion (P = 0.009). Conclusion: Direct rectal suction is more effective than rectal tube placement in reducing abdominal symptoms immediately after colonoscopy. Our study suggests that direct rectal suction is useful in providing relief of symptoms when patients are having difficulty expelling air or are experiencing abdominal symptoms following colonoscopy. PMID:27336061

  13. [Rectal resection with colo-anal anastomosis for ergotamine-induced rectal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Panis, Y; Valleur, P; Kleinmann, P; Willems, G; Hautefeuille, P

    1990-01-01

    Anorectal ulcers due to ergotamine suppositories are extremely rare. We report the first case of rectal stenosis following regular abuse of ergotamine suppositories which required rectal resection and coloanal anastomosis, despite stopping the intoxication 1 year previously. The rectal eversion during the perineal procedure allowed a low anastomosis to be performed, on the dentate line. One year later, the functional result was considered to be good, demonstrating the place of coloanal anastomosis in benign rectal pathology. PMID:2100123

  14. Optimizing Treatment for Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, Jennifer; Gurland, Brooke

    2016-09-01

    Rectal prolapse is associated with debilitating symptoms and leads to both functional impairment and anatomic distortion. Symptoms include rectal bulge, mucous drainage, bleeding, incontinence, constipation, tenesmus, as well as discomfort, pressure, and pain. The only cure is surgical. The optimal surgical repair is not yet defined though laparoscopic rectopexy with mesh is emerging as a more durable approach. The chosen approach should be individually tailored, taking into account factors such as presence of pelvic floor defects and coexistence of vaginal prolapse, severe constipation, surgical fitness, and whether the patient has had a previous prolapse procedure. Consideration of a multidisciplinary approach is critical in patients with concomitant vaginal prolapse. Surgeons must weigh their familiarity with each approach and should have in their armamentarium both perineal and abdominal approaches. Previous barriers to abdominal procedures, such as age and comorbidities, are waning as minimally invasive approaches have gained acceptance. Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is one such approach offering relatively low morbidity, low recurrence rates, and good functional improvement. However, proficiency with this procedure may require advanced training. Robotic rectopexy is another burgeoning approach which facilitates suturing in the pelvis. Successful rectal prolapse surgeries improve function and have low recurrence rates, though it is important to note that correcting the prolapse does not assure functional improvement. PMID:27582654

  15. Magnamosis: a novel technique for the management of rectal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Katie W; Rollins, Michael D; Feola, G Peter; Scaife, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of rectal atresia treated using magnets to create a rectal anastomosis. This minimally invasive technique is straightforward and effective for the treatment of rectal atresia in children. PMID:25096648

  16. Rectovaginal fistula: a new approach by stapled transanal rectal resection.

    PubMed

    Li Destri, Giovanni; Scilletta, Beniamino; Tomaselli, Tiziana Grazia; Zarbo, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Many surgical procedures have been developed to repair rectovaginal fistulas even if no "procedure of choice" is reported. The authors report a case of relatively uncommon, complex, medium-high post-obstetric rectovaginal fistula without sphincteral lesions and treated with a novel tailored technique. Our innovative surgical management consisted of preparing the neck of the fistula inside the vagina and folding it into the rectum so as to enclose the fistula within two semicontinuous sutures (stapled transanal rectal resection); no fecal diversion was performed. Postoperative follow-up at 9 months showed no recurrence of the fistula. PMID:17899300

  17. Follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Preliminary validation of digital tomosynthesis and contrast enhanced ultrasound in detection of medium- to long-term complications

    PubMed Central

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Notaro, Dario; de Donato, Gianmarco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Sacco, Palmino; Setacci, Francesco; Volterrani, Luca; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis of the abdomen (DTA) combined with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in assessing complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) by using computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the gold standard. METHODS: For this prospective study we enrolled 163 patients (123 men; mean age, 65.7 years) referred for CTA for EVAR follow-up. CTA, DTA and CEUS were performed at 1 and 12 mo in all patients, with a maximum time interval of 2 d. RESULTS: Among 163 patients 33 presented complications at CTA. DTA and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 32/33 (96.96%) patients and for the absence of complications in 127/130 (97.69%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of DTA were 97%, 98%, 91%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. CEUS and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 19/33 (57.57%) patients and for the absence of complications in 129/130 (99.23%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of CEUS were 58%, 99%, 95%, 90%, and 91%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of combining DTA and CEUS together in detecting EVAR complications were 77%, 98% and 95%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Combining DTA and CEUS in EVAR follow-up has the potential to limit the use of CTA only in doubtful cases. PMID:27247719

  18. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  19. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  20. Multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Doi, Momoko; Ikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Kawamura, Takuji; Katsura, Kanade

    2016-08-01

    We report multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins who, respectively, had 42 and 36 carcinoid tumors in the lower rectum. This is the first report about carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins. Both twins developed a similar number of rectal carcinoids with a similar distribution. Investigation of their genetic background may provide information about the origin of these tumors. PMID:27334481

  1. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  3. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Majdoub, Karim Ibn; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100 000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:26161211

  4. Rectal mucocoele following subtotal colectomy for colitis

    PubMed Central

    Day, N; Walsh, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a unique case of a rectal mucocoele affecting a patient several years after his subtotal colectomy for ulcerative colitis. This was secondary to both a benign anorectal stenosis and a benign mucus secreting rectal adenoma. This case highlights the importance of surveillance in such patients. PMID:25198962

  5. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  6. Treatment delay in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Law, C W; Roslani, A C; Ng, L L C

    2009-06-01

    Early diagnosis of rectal cancer is important for prompt treatment and better outcome. Little data exists for comparison or to set standards. The primary objective of this study is to identify factors resulting in delays in treatment of rectal cancer, the correlation between the disease stage and diagnosis waiting time, treatment waiting time and duration of symptoms. A five year retrospective audit was undertaken in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). There were 137 patients recruited and the median time to diagnosis was nine days after the first UMMC Surgical Unit consultation with a mean of 18.7 days. Some 11% had to wait more than four weeks for diagnosis. The median time from confirmation of diagnosis to surgery was 11 days with a mean of 18.6 days. Sixty-two percent of patients were operated upon within two weeks of diagnosis and more than 88% by four weeks. However, 10% of them had delayed surgery done four weeks after diagnosis. Long colonoscopy waiting time was the main cause for delay in diagnosis while delay in staging CTs were the main reason for treatment delays. PMID:20058579

  7. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  8. Magnetic Resonance (MR) rectography in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usova, AV; Frolova, IG; Trukhacheva, NG; Cheremisina, OV; Afanas'ev, SG

    2016-02-01

    Purpose was the assessment of diagnostic efficiency of MR-rectography in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms. 12 patients with polyps and small tumors of a rectum are examined, the size of detected neoplasms varied in the range 3-18 mm. Native MRI and MRI with retrograde contrasting by ultrasonic gel was carried out. Results of MRI are compared with results of videocolonoscopy. Sensitivity of native MRT was 24%, MR- rectography was 88%. MR-rectography can be used in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms.

  9. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Rectal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Rectal Prolapse in a Toddler.

    PubMed

    Khushbakht, Samreen; ul Haq, Anwar

    2015-12-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. They constitute only 4% of the total gastrointestinal anomalies. They usually present in childhood. The common presenting symptoms are mass or pressure effects like constipation, tenesmus, urinary retention, local infection or bleeding due to presence of ectopic gastric mucosa. We are reporting a rare presenting symptom of rectal duplication cyst in a 4-year-old boy/toddler who presented with rectal prolapse. He also had bleeding per rectum. Rectal examination revealed a soft mass palpable in the posterior rectal wall. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the posterior wall of the rectum. It was excised trans-anally and the postoperative recovery was uneventful. Biopsy report showed rectal duplication cyst. PMID:26691370

  11. Rectal Cancer, Version 2.2015.

    PubMed

    Benson, Al B; Venook, Alan P; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chan, Emily; Chen, Yi-Jen; Cooper, Harry S; Engstrom, Paul F; Enzinger, Peter C; Fenton, Moon J; Fuchs, Charles S; Grem, Jean L; Grothey, Axel; Hochster, Howard S; Hunt, Steven; Kamel, Ahmed; Kirilcuk, Natalie; Leong, Lucille A; Lin, Edward; Messersmith, Wells A; Mulcahy, Mary F; Murphy, James D; Nurkin, Steven; Rohren, Eric; Ryan, David P; Saltz, Leonard; Sharma, Sunil; Shibata, David; Skibber, John M; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Stoffel, Elena M; Stotsky-Himelfarb, Eden; Willett, Christopher G; Gregory, Kristina M; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Rectal Cancer begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, posttreatment surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and survivorship. The NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant new data from publications and abstracts, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points from the 2015 NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were perioperative therapy options and surveillance for patients with stage I through III disease. PMID:26085388

  12. [Perianal and rectal impalement injuries].

    PubMed

    Joos, A K; Herold, A; Palma, P; Post, S

    2006-09-01

    Perianal impalement injuries with or without involvement of the anorectum are rare. Apart from a high variety of injury patterns, there is a multiplicity of diagnostic and therapeutic options. Causes of perianal impalement injury are gunshot, accidents, and medical treatment. The diagnostic work-up includes digital rectal examination followed by rectoscopy and flexible endoscopy under anaesthesia. We propose a new classification for primary extraperitoneal perianal impalement injuries in four stages in which the extension of sphincter and/or rectum injury is of crucial importance. Therapeutic aspects such as wound treatment, enterostomy, drains, and antibiotic treatment are discussed. The proposed classification encompasses recommendations for stage-adapted management and prognosis of these rare injuries. PMID:16896899

  13. Rectal biopsy in patients presenting to an infectious disease unit with diarrhoeal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, R J; Gilmour, H M; McClelland, D B

    1979-01-01

    The role of sigmoidoscopy and rectal biopsy was investigated in patients referred to an infectious diseases unit with diarrhoea. Seventy-four patients were studied. Nine patients (12%) had inflammatory bowel disease, either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. Thirty-six patients (48%) had infective diarrhoea. A wide variety of conditions accounted for the diarrhoea in the remaining patients. Sigmoidoscopy was abnormal in 25 patients and rectal biopsy in 56. The abnormalities in rectal mucosal histology were classified into six grades. Some patients with infective diarrhoea showed rather characteristic histological changes which may be of diagnostic value. Eight showed features which suggested a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. However, repeat rectal biopsy in the convalescent period showed a striking improvement in the patients with infective diarrhoea. In contrast, the histological changes persisted in the patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Repeat rectal biopsy may be essential before making a firm diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease in some patients who present with diarrhoea and apparently typical histological changes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:428826

  14. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  15. How to Use Rectal Suppositories Properly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lubricate the suppository tip with a water-soluble lubricant such as K-Y Jelly, not petroleum jelly (Vaseline). If you do not have this lubricant, moisten your rectal area with cool tap water. ...

  16. Transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Suguru; Takahashi, Ryo; Hida, Koya; Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-06-01

    Although laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer has been gaining acceptance with the gradual accumulation of evidence, it remains a technically demanding procedure in patients with a narrow pelvis, bulky tumors, or obesity. To overcome the technical difficulties associated with laparoscopic rectal dissection and transection, transanal endoscopic rectal dissection, which is also referred to as transanal (reverse, bottom-up) total mesorectal excision (TME), has recently been introduced. Its potential advantages include the facilitation of the dissection of the anorectum, regardless of the patient body habitus, and a clearly defined safe distal margin and transanal extraction of the specimen. This literature review shows that this approach seems to be feasible with regard to the operative and short-term postoperative outcomes. In experienced hands, transanal TME is a promising method for the resection of mid- and low-rectal cancers. Further investigations are required to clarify the long-term oncological and functional outcomes. PMID:26055500

  17. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  18. Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma Presenting as a Rectal Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Erin; Chen, Lilian; Guelrud, Moises; Allison, Harmony; Zuo, Tao; Suarez, Yvelisse; Yoo, James

    2016-01-01

    Appendiceal adenocarcinoma typically presents as an incidentally noted appendiceal mass, or with symptoms of right lower quadrant pain that can mimic appendicitis, but local involvement of adjacent organs is uncommon, particularly as the presenting sign. We report on a case of a primary appendiceal cancer initially diagnosed as a rectal polyp based on its appearance in the rectal lumen. The management of the patient was in keeping with standard practice for a rectal polyp, and the diagnosis of appendiceal adenocarcinoma was made intraoperatively. The operative strategy had to be adjusted due to this unexpected finding. Although there are published cases of appendiceal adenocarcinoma inducing intussusception and thus mimicking a cecal polyp, there are no reports in the literature describing invasion of the appendix through the rectal wall and thus mimicking a rectal polyp. The patient is a 75-year-old female who presented with spontaneous hematochezia and, on colonoscopy, was noted to have a rectal polyp that appeared to be located within a diverticulum. When endoscopic mucosal resection was not successful, she was referred to colorectal surgery for a low anterior resection. Preoperative imaging was notable for an enlarged appendix adjacent to the rectum. Intraoperatively, the appendix was found to be densely adherent to the right lateral rectal wall. An en bloc resection of the distal sigmoid colon, proximal rectum and appendix was performed, with pathology demonstrating appendiceal adenocarcinoma that invaded through the rectal wall. The prognosis in this type of malignancy weighs heavily on whether or not perforation and spread throughout the peritoneal cavity have occurred. In this unusual presentation, an en bloc resection is required for a complete resection and to minimize the risk of peritoneal spread. Unusual appearing polyps do not always originate from the bowel wall. Abnormal radiographic findings adjacent to an area of gastrointestinal pathology may

  19. Contrast studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Susan M

    2006-01-01

    Contrast media plays an important role in imaging soft tissues and organs. Though contrast imaging is considered safe, radiologic technologists can improve the safety of contrast examinations by reviewing institutional safety procedures, safe practices for different methods of contrast administration and possible complications. The need for efficient communication and attention to detail during contrast procedures is essential for patient safety. PMID:16998193

  20. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  1. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-12-28

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  2. Predictive value of rectal bleeding in screening for rectal and sigmoid polyps.

    PubMed Central

    Chapuis, P H; Goulston, K J; Dent, O F; Tait, A D

    1985-01-01

    Overt rectal bleeding is a common symptom of colorectal cancer and polyps but also occurs in apparently healthy people. It is not known how often this represents bleeding from an undiagnosed rectal or sigmoid polyp or cancer. Three hundred and nineteen apparently healthy men aged over 50, selected by random sampling, were interviewed and underwent flexible sigmoidoscopy to at least 30 cm. Polyps of 10 mm or more in diameter were diagnosed in 12, one of whom also had an adenocarcinoma. Rectal bleeding during the previous six months was reported by 48, four of whom were found to have polyps; seven polyps and one cancer were diagnosed among the 271 who reported no rectal bleeding. Rectal bleeding had a specificity of 86%, a sensitivity of 33%, and a positive predictive value of 8% for rectal or sigmoid polyps or cancer. Restricting the analysis to those subjects who regularly inspected their stools did not improve the predictive value. Sigmoidoscopy in apparently healthy subjects with rectal bleeding will not result in the diagnosis of appreciable numbers of rectal and sigmoid polyps or cancers. PMID:3924158

  3. Rectal Motion in Patients Receiving Preoperative Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, James D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sampson, Elliott; Bayley, Andrew; Scott, Sandra; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Timothy; Cummings, Bernard; Dinniwell, Robert; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the movement of rectum, mesorectum, and rectal primary during a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer had a planning CT scan with rectal contrast before commencement of preoperative chemoradiation. The scan was repeated during Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of chemoradiation. The rectal primary (gross tumor volume), rectum, mesorectum, and bladder were contoured on all four scans. An in-house biomechanical model-based deformable image registration technique, Morfeus, was used to measure the three-dimensional spatial change in these structures after bony alignment. The required planning target volume margin for this spatial change, after bone alignment, was also calculated. Results: Rectal contrast was found to introduce a systematic error in the position of all organs compared with the noncontrast state. The largest change in structures during radiotherapy was in the anterior and posterior directions for the mesorectum and rectum and in the superior and inferior directions for the gross tumor volume. The planning target volume margins required for internal movement for the mesorectum based on the three scans acquired during treatment are 4 mm right, 5 mm left, 7 mm anterior, and 6 mm posterior. For the rectum, values were 8 mm right, 8 mm left, 8 mm anterior, and 9 mm posterior. The greatest movement of the rectum occurred in the upper third. Conclusions: Contrast is no longer used in CT simulation. Assuming bony alignment, a nonuniform margin of 8 mm anteriorly, 9 mm posteriorly, and 8 mm left and right is recommended.

  4. Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma: Which are strong prognostic factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier . E-mail: ochapet@med.umich.edu; Romestaing, Pascale; Mornex, Francoise; Souquet, Jean-Christophe; Favrel, Veronique; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; D'Hombres, Anne; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: This retrospective 12-year study evaluated the prognostic value of initial and postoperative staging of rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1996, 297 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (39 Gy in 13 fractions) and surgery for Stage T2-T4N0-N1M0 rectal adenocarcinoma. Pretreatment staging included a clinical examination and endorectal ultrasonography (EUS) since 1988. Clinical staging was performed by digital rectal examination and rigid proctoscopy. EUS was performed in 236 patients. Postoperative staging was performed by examination of the pathologic specimen. Results: The median follow-up was 49 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 67%, with a local failure rate of 9%. The rate of sphincter preservation was 65%. The clinical examination findings were strong prognostic factor for both cT stage (p < 0.001) and cN stage (p < 0.006) but had poor specificity for cN stage (only 25 lymph nodes detected). In both univariate and multivariate analyses, EUS had a statistically significant prognostic value for uT (p < 0.014) but not for uN (p < 0.47) stage. In contrast, pT and pN stages were strong prognostic factors (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Pretreatment staging, including clinical examination and EUS, seemed accurate enough to present a high prognostic value for the T stage. EUS was insufficient to stage lymph node involvement. Owing to its lack of specificity, uN stage was not a reliable prognostic factor. An improvement in N staging is necessary and essential. Despite downstaging, postoperative staging remained a very strong prognostic factor for both T and N stages.

  5. Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158339.html Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment: ... therapy for rectal cancer in the United States, only slightly more than half of patients receive it, ...

  6. A case of rectal neuroendocrine tumor presenting as polyp

    PubMed Central

    RAKICI, Halil; AKDOGAN, Remzi Adnan; YURDAKUL, Cüneyt; CANTURK, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is detected in the examination of polypectomy material, presenting as rectal polyp. Since this is a rare case, we aimed to summarize the approach to rectal NET’s. PMID:25625492

  7. The Great Pretender: Rectal Syphilis Mimic a Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisani Ceretti, Andrea; Virdis, Matteo; Maroni, Nirvana; Arena, Monica; Masci, Enzo; Magenta, Alberto; Opocher, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Rectal syphilis is a rare expression of the widely recognised sexual transmitted disease, also known as the great imitator for its peculiarity of being confused with mild anorectal diseases because of its vague symptoms or believed rectal malignancy, with the concrete risk of overtreatment. We present the case of a male patient with primary rectal syphilis, firstly diagnosed as rectal cancer; the medical, radiological, and endoscopic features are discussed below. PMID:26451271

  8. Management of rectal foreign bodies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Entrapped anorectal foreign bodies are being encountered more frequently in clinical practice. Although entrapped foreign bodies are most often related to sexual behavior, they can also result from ingestion or sexual assault. Methods Between 1999 and 2009, 15 patients with foreign bodies in the rectum were diagnosed and treated, at Izmir Training and Research Hospital, in Izmir. Information regarding the foreign body, clinical presentation, treatment strategies, and outcomes were documented. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these unusual patients. Results All patients were males, and their mean age was 48 years (range, 33–68 years). The objects in the rectum of these 15 patients were an impulse body spray can (4 patients), a bottle (4 patients), a dildo (2 patient), an eggplant (1 patient), a brush (1 patient), a tea glass (1 patient), a ball point pen (1 patient) and a wishbone (1 patient, after oral ingestion). Twelve objects were removed transanally by anal dilatation under general anesthesia. Three patients required laparotomy. Routine rectosigmoidoscopic examination was performed after removal. One patient had perforation of the rectosigmoid and 4 had lacerations of the mucosa. None of the patients died. Conclusions Foreign bodies in the rectum should be managed in a well-organized manner. The diagnosis is confirmed by plain abdominal radiographs and rectal examination. Manual extraction without anaesthesia is only possible for very low-lying objects. Patients with high- lying foreign bodies generally require general anaesthesia to achieve complete relaxation of the anal sphincters to facilitate extraction. Open surgery should be reserved only for patients with perforation, peritonitis, or impaction of the foreign body. PMID:23497492

  9. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  10. Ischemic fecal incontinence and rectal angina.

    PubMed

    Devroede, G; Vobecky, S; Massé, S; Arhan, P; Léger, C; Duguay, C; Hémond, M

    1982-11-01

    In 36 patients who consulted for fecal incontinence or rectal pain, or both, there was grossly visible scarring of the rectum and biopsy revealed mucosal atrophy and fibrosis. A steal from the hemorrhoidal arteries to the iliac vessels was demonstrated in 3 subjects. Maximum tolerable volumes within a rectal balloon were smaller than in control subjects, both in men (192 vs. 273 ml) and in women (142 vs. 217 ml) (p less than 0.01). The rectoanal inhibitory reflex was abnormal in all but 1 patient. Specific abnormalities were a decreased amplitude or a prolonged duration of the reflex. It was totally absent in 2 patients. This study is compatible with the hypothesis that chronic ischemia of the rectum may cause fecal incontinence or rectal pain. PMID:7117809

  11. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  12. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  13. Rectal atresia: a rare cause of failure to pass meconium

    PubMed Central

    Laamrani, Fatima Zahrae; Dafiri, Rachida

    2014-01-01

    Rectal atresia or stenosis is an extremely rare anorectal malformation associating a normal anal canal with a stricture or a complete rectal atresia. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn female presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. PMID:25821541

  14. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer. PMID:14605930

  15. Rectal strictures following abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. M.; Bentley, P. G.

    2000-01-01

    Rectal stricture formation is a rare complication of aortic aneurysm repair. Two case are described here. A combination of hypotension, a compromised internal iliac circulation and poor collateral supply following inferior mesenteric artery ligation can result in acute ischaemic proctitis--an infrequently described clinical entity. Ulceration and necrosis are the sequelae of prolonged ischaemia and fibrous stricture formation may result. One patient responded to dilatation and posterior mid-rectal myotomy; the other failed to respond to conservative measures and eventually had an end colostomy fashioned following intractable symptoms. PMID:11103163

  16. Cyclical rectal bleeding in colorectal endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Levitt, M D; Hodby, K J; van Merwyk, A J; Glancy, R J

    1989-12-01

    Three case reports of cyclical rectal bleeding in endometriosis affecting rectum and sigmoid colon emphasize the close relationship between such cyclical bleeding and intestinal endometriosis. The cause of bleeding, however, is still unclear. The predilection of endometriotic deposits for the outer layers of the bowel wall suggests that mucosal involvement is not a prerequisite for rectal bleeding. The frequent absence of identifiable intramural haemorrhage casts doubt on the premise that intestinal endometriotic deposits 'menstruate'. The cause may simply be a transient tear in normal mucosa due to swelling of an underlying endometriotic deposit at the time of menstruation. PMID:2597100

  17. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for gangrenous rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Voulimeneas, Ioannis; Antonopoulos, Constantine; Alifierakis, Evangelos; Ioannides, Pavlos

    2010-06-01

    Incarceration rarely complicates the chronically progressive form of the full thickness rectal prolapse. Even more rarely, it becomes strangulated, necessitating emergency surgery. We describe an extremely rare case of incarcerated acute rectal prolapse, without a relevant previous history or symptoms of predisposing pathology. The patient underwent emergency perineal proctosigmoidectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy. The postoperative course was quite uneventful with an excellent final result after colostomy closure. The successful treatment of this patient illustrates the value of the Altemeier procedure in the difficult and unusual case scenario of bowel incarceration. PMID:20518093

  18. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. A new method of assessing the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma—using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; Deng, Tongxin; Jiang, Liwei; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Xing; Jiang, Weizhong; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Guan, Guoxian; Chi, Pan; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, surgical resection is still the most effective treatment strategy for rectal carcinoma and one of the most important factors affecting whether the operation is successful or not is the surgical margin determination, especially in the distal rectal carcinoma which should take the sphincter-preserving issue into consideration. However, until recently no reliable evaluation method has been developed for this purpose. There are some shortcomings in intraoperative negative surgical margin assessment such as either lack of enough detailed information of biological tissues or the fact that it is time-consuming. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM)—nonlinear optical microscopy, which is based on the nonlinear optical process two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), has the ability to label freely and noninvasively visualize tissue micro-architecture at the sub-cellular level. The advantage of providing high contrast and high resolution biomedical image in real time makes MPM have a wide range of applications in life sciences. In this study, we introduced MPM to identify the boundary between normal and abnormal rectal tissues. MPM images clearly exhibit biological tissue microstructure and its morphological changes in the regions of our interest, which enable it to determine the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma. It can be foreseen that once MPM imaging system is used in clinical examination, it will greatly improve the accuracy of surgical resection.

  20. Recognition of Anterior Peritoneal Reflections and Their Relationship With Rectal Tumors Using Rectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yiqun, Sun; Tong, Tong; Fangqi, Liu; Sanjun, Cai; Chao, Xin; Yajia, Gu; Ye, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our goal was to explore the factors influencing the visualization of anterior peritoneal reflections (APRs) using rectal MRI. We evaluated the usefulness of rectal MRI in measuring the distance from the anal verge to the APR and determining the relationship between the APR and the rectal tumor. Clinical and imaging data from 319 patients who underwent surgery after MRI examination between October 2010 and December 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The distance from the anal verge to the APR and the relationship between the APR and the location of the rectal tumor was evaluated. analysis of variance, logistic regression, independent samples t tests, and Kappa tests were used for statistical analysis. The APR was visible in 283 of 319 cases using rectal MRI. The APR was more readily observed in patients who were older than 58 years (P = 0.046), in patients whose subcutaneous fat thicknesses were >22.2 mm (P = 0.004), in patients with nondistended bladders (P = 0.001), and in those with an anteversion of the uterus (P = 0.001). There was a significant difference between the distance from the anal verge to the APR between females (10.4 ± 1.1 cm) and males (10.0 ± 1.2 cm; P = 0.014). The accuracy in predicting tumor location with respect to the APR was 70%, 50%, 98.2%, respectively for patients with tumors located above, at, and below the APR (compared with the location determined during surgery). Most of the APRs were visible using rectal MRI, whereas certain internal factors influence visualization. Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the distance from the anal verge to the APR and relationship between rectal tumors and the APR. PMID:26945377

  1. Rectal ulcers induced by systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Alan Hoi Lun; Chu, Karen; Yang, Hui Min; Ko, Hin Hin

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with diarrhoea, haematochezia, tenesmus and rectal pain for 2 months. She was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) 8 years ago and remained on prednisone, azathioprine and hydroxychloroquine. Blood work revealed a positive ANA (antinuclear antibody test), anti-dsDNA 749 IU/mL (0–300 IU/mL), C3 0.22 g/L (0.65–1.65 g/L) and C4 0.05 g/L (0.16–0.60 g/L). Stool studies were unremarkable. MRI of the pelvis showed a rectum with eccentric wall thickening. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed severe proctitis with multiple deep ulcers and diffuse submucosal haemorrhage. Rectal biopsy revealed crypt architectural distortion and reactive fibrosis in the lamina propria. The patient was given mesalamine suppository for 2 weeks with minimal improvement. Repeat flexible sigmoidoscopy showed a coalesced 3×4 cm full-thickness rectal ulcer. Therefore, the patient was given intravenous methylprednisolone for 3 days, followed by intravenous cyclophosphamide for 2 weeks. Her symptoms resolved and repeat flexible sigmoidoscopy showed fibrotic healing of the rectal ulcers. PMID:25150239

  2. Severe rectal injury following radiation for prostatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.; Goldberg, H.; Goldman, H.; Lombardo, L.; Skaist, L.

    1984-04-01

    Between 1970 and 1981, 348 patients underwent definitive irradiation. Of these patients 6 (1.7 per cent) sustained severe rectal injury as manifest by major rectal bleeding, rectal stricture, rectal mucosal slough and rectal ulceration. Severe rectal injury was observed in 0 of 13 patients (0 per cent) treated with 125iodine, 3 of 329 (1 per cent) treated with 6,400 to 6,800 rad external irradiation, 2 of 39 (5 per cent) treated with 7,000 to 7,300 rad external irradiation, and 1 of 7 (14 per cent) treated with 198gold and external irradiation. The impact of radiation dose, radiation therapy technique and surgical trauma was assessed. Rectal injury was managed by supportive measures in 2 patients and by diverting colostomy in 3 with benefit. One patient underwent abdominoperineal resection. A small bowel fistula and an intra-abdominal abscess developed, and the patient died.

  3. [Rectal cancer and adjuvant chemotherapy: which conclusions?].

    PubMed

    Bachet, J-B; Rougier, P; de Gramont, A; André, T

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rectum represents about a third of cases of colorectal cancer, with an annual incidence of 12,000 cases in France. On the contrary of colon cancer, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer has not been definitively proved, more because this question was assessed in few recent studies than because negative results. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is now the reference treatment for mid and lower rectal cancers, and allow to increase the local control without improvement of progression free survival and overall survival. The data of the "historical studies" of adjuvant treatment in rectal cancer published before 1990, of the meta-analysis of adjuvant trials in rectal cancer and of the QUASAR study suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (intravenous or oral), in absence of pre-operative treatment, decrease the risk of metastatic relapse after curative surgery for a rectal cancer of stage II or III. This benefice seems similar to the one observed in colon cancer. In the EORTC radiotherapy group trial 22921, an adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low dose of leucovorin was not associated with a significantly improvement of overall survival but, despite the fact that only 42.9% of patients received all planed cycles, the progression free survival was increased (not significantly) in groups receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The French recommendations are to discuss the indication of adjuvant chemotherapy by fluoropyrimidines in cases of stage III rectal cancer on histopathologic reports and no chemotherapy in case of stade II. Despite the fact that none study have assessed a combination of fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin in adjuvant setting in rectal cancer, like in colon cancer, the Folfox4, modified Folfox6 or Xelox regimens are valid options in stage III (experts opinion). In cases of pathologic complete remission or in absence of involved nodes, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy is not assessed. In

  4. Iodinated Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography Increase the Risk of Subsequent Development of Thyroid Disorders in Patients Without Known Thyroid Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based, Propensity Score-Matched, Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; Chen, Wen-Chi; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Meng-Yu; Chang, Shih-Liang; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the association between iodinated contrast medium (ICM) exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of thyroid disorders in patients without known thyroid disease in Taiwan, an iodine-sufficient area. We conducted a population-based cohort study by using data from 1996 to 2012 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 33,426 patients who underwent ICM-enhanced CT were included as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used propensity score and matched for the index year (defined as the year of first ICM exposure) to retrieve 33,426 patients as the comparison cohort. No patients in the 2 cohorts had any known thyroid disease before the index year. Patients with a history of amiodarone treatment or coronary angiography and those with <1 year follow-up were excluded. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of thyroid disorder or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. An association was identified between ICM exposure and the subsequent development of thyroid disorders after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted HR = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.07-1.29; P = 0.001). Male patients and patients' ages ≥40 years in the ICM-exposure cohort had a higher adjusted HR for developing thyroid disorders than did those in the non-ICM-exposure cohort. Hypothyroidism had the highest adjusted HR (HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.06-1.78; P < 0.05) among all thyroid disorders and had a higher risk of development or detection during >0.5-year post-ICM exposure compared with that during ≤0.5-year post-ICM exposure (HR = 1.26; 95% CI: 1.01-1.58; P < 0.05). Repeated ICM exposure increased the risk of thyroid disorders in patients who accepted >1 time of ICM per year on average compared with those who accepted ≤1 time per year on average (adjusted HR = 3.04; 95% CI: 2.47-3.73; P < 0

  5. Contrastive Lexicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, R. R. K.

    This paper deals with the relation between etymologically related words in different languages. A survey is made of seven stages in the development of contrastive lexicology. These are: prelinguistic word studies, semantics, lexicography, translation, foreign language learning, bilingualism, and finally contrastive analysis. Concerning contrastive…

  6. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other reactions to contrast materials are rare, radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. ... is given. However, both the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology ...

  7. Rectal-specific microbicide applicator: evaluation and comparison with a vaginal applicator used rectally.

    PubMed

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Giguere, Rebecca; Dolezal, Curtis; Bauermeister, José; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Valladares, Juan; Rohan, Lisa C; Anton, Peter A; Cranston, Ross D; Febo, Irma; Mayer, Kenneth; McGowan, Ian

    2014-09-01

    An applicator designed for rectal delivery of microbicides was tested for acceptability by 95 young men who have sex with men, who self-administered 4 mL of placebo gel prior to receptive anal intercourse over 90 days. Subsequently, 24 of the participants self-administered rectally 4 mL of tenofovir or placebo gel over 7 days using a vaginal applicator, and compared both applicators on a Likert scale of 1-10, with 10 the highest rating. Participants reported high likelihood to use either applicator in the future (mean scores 9.3 and 8.8 respectively, p = ns). Those who tested both liked the vaginal applicator significantly more than the rectal applicator (7.8 vs. 5.2, p = 0.003). Improvements in portability, conspicuousness, aesthetics, tip comfort, product assembly and packaging were suggested for both. This rectal-specific applicator was not superior to a vaginal applicator. While likelihood of future use is reportedly high, factors that decrease acceptability may erode product use over time in clinical trials. Further attention is needed to develop user-friendly, quick-acting rectal microbicide delivery systems. PMID:24858481

  8. RECTAL-SPECIFIC MICROBICIDE APPLICATOR: EVALUATION AND COMPARISON WITH A VAGINAL APPLICATOR USED RECTALLY

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Giguere, Rebecca; Dolezal, Curtis; Bauermeister, José; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Valladares, Juan; Rohan, Lisa C.; Anton, Peter A.; Cranston, Ross D.; Febo, Irma; Mayer, Kenneth; McGowan, Ian

    2014-01-01

    An applicator designed for rectal delivery of microbicides was tested for acceptability by 95 young men who have sex with men, who self-administered 4mL of placebo gel prior to receptive anal intercourse over 90 days. Subsequently, 24 of the participants self-administered rectally 4mL of tenofovir or placebo gel over 7 days using a vaginal applicator, and compared both applicators on a Likert scale of 1–10, with 10 the highest rating. Participants reported high likelihood to use either applicator in the future (mean scores 9.3 and 8.8 respectively, p= ns). Those who tested both liked the vaginal applicator significantly more than the rectal applicator (7.8 vs. 5.2, p=0.003). Improvements in portability, conspicuousness, aesthetics, tip comfort, product assembly and packaging were suggested for both. This rectal-specific applicator was not superior to a vaginal applicator. While likelihood of future use is reportedly high, factors that decrease acceptability may erode product use over time in clinical trials. Further attention is needed to develop user-friendly, quick-acting rectal microbicide delivery systems. PMID:24858481

  9. Rectal ectasia associated with anorectal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Zia-ul-Miraj, M; Brereton, R J

    1997-04-01

    Rectal ectasia may be associated with anorectal anomalies. If not recognized at the time of surgical reconstruction it may lead to megarectosigmoid, resulting in severe constipation and overflow incontinence postoperatively. The authors treated four patients presenting with this condition. One patient born with a low anorectal anomaly and two with high anorectal anomalies experienced intractable constipation caused by megarectum despite otherwise adequate primary reconstructive procedures. A fourth patient had rectal stenosis in association with megarectosigmoid. The ectatic megarectum had to be resected in all the patients to achieve normal bowel actions. The authors feel that resection or tailoring of the ectatic segment should be an integral part of the primary reconstructive procedure. PMID:9126769

  10. Transanal Evisceration Caused by Rectal Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Torres Sánchez, María Teresa; Richart Aznar, Jose Manuel; Martí Martínez, Eva María; Martínez-Abad, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Transrectal evisceration caused by colorectal injury is an unusual entity. This pathology is more frequent in elderly patients and it is usually produced spontaneously. Rectal prolapse is the principal predisposing factor. An 81-year-old woman was taken to the hospital presenting exit of intestinal loops through the anus. After first reanimation measures, an urgent surgery was indicated. We observed the absence of almost every small intestine loop in the abdominal cavity; these had been moved to the pelvis. After doing the reduction, a 3 to 4 cm linear craniocaudal perforation in upper rectum was objectified, and Hartmann's procedure was performed. We investigated and knew that she frequently manipulate herself to extract her faeces. The fast preoperative management avoided a fatal conclusion or an extensive intestinal resection. Reasons that make us consider rectal self-injury as the etiologic factor are explained. PMID:24639971

  11. Quality of care indicators in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Demetter, P; Ceelen, W; Danse, E; Haustermans, K; Jouret-Mourin, A; Kartheuser, A; Laurent, S; Mollet, G; Nagy, N; Scalliet, P; Van Cutsem, E; Van Den Eynde, M; Van de Stadt, J; Van Eycken, E; Van Laethem, J L; Vindevoghel, K; Penninckx, F

    2011-09-01

    Quality of health care is a hot topic, especially with regard to cancer. Although rectal cancer is, in many aspects, a model oncologic entity, there seem to be substantial differences in quality of care between countries, hospitals and physicians. PROCARE, a Belgian multidisciplinary national project to improve outcome in all patients with rectum cancer, identified a set of quality of care indicators covering all aspects of the management of rectal cancer. This set should permit national and international benchmarking, i.e. comparing results from individual hospitals or teams with national and international performances with feedback to participating teams. Such comparison could indicate whether further improvement is possible and/or warranted. PMID:22103052

  12. Prostatic carcinoma: rectal bleeding after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, A.R.; Steckel, R.J.

    1981-06-01

    A 64-year-old man had a prostatic nodule on routine physical examination; per-rectal needle biopsies revealed a single focus of well differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient had no history of urinary obstruction or of bowel difficulties. Accordingly, this was clinical stage II carcinoma of the prostate. The patient chose to receive external radiation therapy and was given small-field rotational treatment to a dose of 7000 rad (70 Gy) at a rate of 800 rad (8 Gy) weekly. Late in treatment, he experienced transitory diarrhea with flatulence, but this cleared with completion of treatment. Twenty months later he began to note frequent soft bowel movements, occasionally with red blood. At sigmoidoscopy 24 months after completion of treatment, the rectal mucosa was noted to be friable with minimal bleeding, presumably the result of radiation proctitis.

  13. The Molecular Basis of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiller, Michelle; Boostrom, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The majority of rectal carcinomas are sporadic in nature, and relevant testing for driver mutations to guide therapy is important. A thorough family history is necessary and helpful in elucidating a potential hereditary predilection for a patient's carcinoma. The adequate diagnosis of a heritable tendency toward colorectal carcinoma alters the management of a patient disease and permits the implementation of various surveillance algorithms as preventive measures. PMID:25733974

  14. MicroRNA in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Gruber, Jens; Ghadimi, B Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide, the proper staging of the disease determines the subsequent therapy. For those with locally advanced rectal cancer, a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is recommended before any surgery. However, response to CRT ranges from complete response (responders) to complete resistance (non-responders). To date we are not able to separate in advance the first group from the second, due to the absence of a valid biomarker. Therefore all patients receive the same therapy regardless of whether they reap benefits. On the other hand almost all patients receive a surgical resection after the CRT, although a watch-and-wait procedure or an endoscopic resection might be sufficient for those who responded well to the CRT. Being highly conserved regulators of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) seem to be promising candidates for biomarkers. Many studies have been analyzing the miRNAs expressed in rectal cancer tissue to determine a specific miRNA profile for the ailment. Unfortunately, there is only a small overlap of identified miRNAs between different studies, posing the question as to whether different methods or differences in tissue storage may contribute to that fact or if the results simply are not reproducible, due to unknown factors with undetected influences on miRNA expression. Other studies sought to find miRNAs which correlate to clinical parameters (tumor grade, nodal stage, metastasis, survival) and therapy response. Although several miRNAs seem to have an impact on the response to CRT or might predict nodal stage, there is still only little overlap between different studies. We here aimed to summarize the current literature on rectal cancer and miRNA expression with respect to the different relevant clinical parameters. PMID:27190581

  15. Career Options in Colon and Rectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Karim; Madoff, Robert D.; Rothenberger, David A.

    2011-01-01

    As Colon and Rectal Surgery has grown and diversified, the practice opportunities available have greatly expanded. The wealth of choices, may be daunting and even paralyzing for the new graduate or practitioner looking for a career change. Prior to making a decision, candidates must first make an honest assessment of their goals, abilities, and priorities. In this article, the authors briefly outline some of these challenges and help lay the groundwork for a successful decision process. PMID:22654567

  16. Importance of surgical margins in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukkai Krishnamurty, Devi; Wise, Paul E

    2016-03-01

    Distal resection margin (DRM) and circumferential resection margin (CRM) are two important considerations in rectal cancer management. Although guidelines recommend a 2 cm DRM, studies have shown that a shorter DRM is adequate, especially in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Standardization of total mesorectal excision has greatly improved quality of CRM. Although more patients are undergoing sphincter-saving procedures, abdominoperineal resection is indicated for very distal tumors, and pelvic exenteration is often necessary for tumors involving pelvic organs. PMID:27094456

  17. [Catamenial rectal bleeding and sigmoid endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Kazadi Buanga, J; Alcazar, J L; Laparte, M C; Lopez Garcia, G

    1992-01-01

    We describe a case of menstrual rectal bleeding due to sigmoid endometriosis. The history led us to the diagnosis and since a small biopsy of the lesion and scanning could not help us to a conclusive diagnosis we carried out histological examination of a piece removed at operation. This case has led us to estimate the incidence, the difficulties of diagnosis and the present therapeutic measures. PMID:1469232

  18. Current status of laparoscopy for the treatment of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shussman, Noam; Wexner, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Surgery for rectal cancer in complex and entails many challenges. While the laparoscopic approach in general and specific to colon cancer has been long proven to have short term benefits and to be oncologically safe, it is still a debatable topic for rectal cancer. The attempt to benefit rectal cancer patients with the known advantages of the laparoscopic approach while not compromising their oncologic outcome has led to the conduction of many studies during the past decade. Herein we describe our technique for laparoscopic proctectomy and assess the current literature dealing with short term outcomes, immediate oncologic measures (such as lymph node yield and specimen quality) and long term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. We also briefly evaluate the evolving issues of robotic assisted rectal cancer surgery and the current innovations and trends in the minimally invasive approach to rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25386061

  19. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery in the management of rectal wall endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Banky, Balazs; Saleki, Mahsa; Gill, Talvinder S

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with known history of endometriosis was referred to colorectal outpatient clinic from gynaecology with a history of intermittent rectal bleeding and no associated bowel symptoms. Flexible sigmoidoscopy in concordance with pelvic MRI revealed a 3×2×2 cm sessile lesion in the anterior rectal wall. The lesion was also palpable as a firm mass on digital rectal examination. From the gynaecological point of view no intra-abdominal exploration was required; the sole rectal wall lesion was removed with the minimally invasive surgical technique of transanal endoscopic microsurgery. Full thickness rectal wall excision sample was reported to be histologically complete and confirmed endometriosis. No recurrence was detected at endoscopic follow-up at 6 months. The patient remained symptom free. Therefore, we demonstrated a case of minimally invasive removal of a rectal wall large endometriosis nodule in a fertile woman with a complete, symptomatic, uneventful recovery. PMID:27495176

  20. Irinotecan and radiosensitization in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Illum, Henrik

    2011-04-01

    Neoadjuvant radiation therapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is currently considered the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. Pathologically complete response is a desirable outcome and has been associated with increased disease-free survival. There is a need to improve on this approach given that only approximately 10% achieve a pathologically complete response. Irinotecan has an established role in the treatment of metastatic rectal cancer. Both in-vitro and in-vivo data have shown promising radiosensitization properties. This study provides an overview of the published clinical trials evaluating the role of irinotecan as a radiosensitizer in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Although early-phase clinical trials initially showed promising results, this did not translate into improved outcome in a larger randomized phase II trial. Increased topoisomerase I expression has recently been identified as a possible predictive marker for improved response to irinotecan-based radiosensitization. This finding could help identify a subset of patients more likely to benefit from the addition of irinotecan in future trials. PMID:21160419

  1. [Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for resectable lower rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takase, Shiro; Kamigaki, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishimura, Hideki; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2009-11-01

    To suppress local recurrence and preserve sphincter function, we performed preoperative chemoradiotherapy( CRT) of rectal cancer. Sixteen patients with lower advanced rectal cancer received tegafur/uracil/calcium folinate+RT followed by curative resection with lateral lymph node dissection 2-8 weeks later. The male/female ratio was found to be 11:5 (41-75 years old) and the CRT was feasible for all patients. There were 11-PR and 5-SD according to RECIST criteria, and lower isotope accumulation was observed for all primary tumors in FDG-PET study. After CRT, all patients received R0 curative resection (11 APR, 2 LAR, 1 Hartmann and 1 ISR). On pathological study, 3 patients showed complete response. Surgical complications including pelvic infection, delayed a wound healing and deep venous thrombosis, etc. In conclusion, preoperative CRT of advanced rectal cancer could potentially be useful for local control and sphincter saving, however, it is necessary to manage specific surgical complications due to radiation. PMID:20037306

  2. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic [correction of laparoscopis] anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Ignjatovic, D; Bergamaschi, R

    2002-01-01

    Anterior resection for the treatment of full thickness rectal prolapse has been around for over four decades. 1 However, its use has been limited due to fear of anastomotic leakage and related morbidity. It has been shown that high anterior resection is preferable to its low counterpart as the latter increases complication rates. 2 Although sparing the inferior mesenteric artery in sigmoid resection for diverticular disease has been shown to decrease leak rates in a randomized setting, 3 vascular division is current practice. We shall challenged this current practice of dividing the mesorectum in anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse developing a technique that allows the preservation of the superior rectal artery. PMID:12587465

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound for the characterization and staging of rectal cancer. Current state of the method. Technological advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Graur, Florin; Hajja, Nadim Al; Furcea, Luminita; Dudea, Sorin M

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate type of examination for the assessment of rectal tumors. Over the years, the method has advanced from gray-scale examination to intravenous contrast media administration and to different types of elastography. The multimodal approach of tumors (transrectal, transvaginal) is adapted to each case. 3D ultrasound is useful for spatial representation and precise measurement of tumor formations, using CT/MR image reconstruction; color elastography is useful for tumor characterization and staging; endoscopic ultrasound using intravenous contrast agents can help study the amount of contrast agent targeted at the level of the tumor formations and contrast wash-in/wash-out time, based on the curves displayed on the device. The transvaginal approach often allows better visualization of the tumor than the transrectal approach. Performing the procedure with the rectal ampulla distended with contrast agent may be seen as an optimization of the examination methodology. All these aspects are additional methods for gray-scale endoscopic ultrasound, capable of increasing diagnostic accuracy. This paper aims at reviewing the progress of transrectal and transvaginal ultrasound, generically called endoscopic ultrasound, for rectal tumor diagnosis and staging, with emphasis on the current state of the method and its development trends. PMID:26052575

  5. Rectal Diclofenac Versus Rectal Paracetamol: Comparison of Antipyretic Effectiveness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sarami, Golbahareh; Rangraz, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is the most common complaint in pediatric medicine and its treatment is recommended in some situations. Paracetamol is the most common antipyretic drug, which has serious side effects such as toxicity along with its positive effects. Diclofenac is one of the strongest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs, which has received little attention as an antipyretic drug. Objectives This study was designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of the rectal form of Paracetamol and Diclofenac. Patients and Methods This double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 children aged six months to six years old. One group was treated with rectal Paracetamol suppositories at 15 mg/kg dose and the other group received Diclofenac at 1 mg/kg by rectal administration (n = 40). Rectal temperature was measured before and one hour after the intervention. Temperature changes in the two groups were compared. Results The average rectal temperature in the Paracetamol group was 39.6 ± 1.13°C, and 39.82 ± 1.07°C in the Diclofenac group (P = 0.37). The average rectal temperature, one hour after the intervention, in the Paracetamol and the Diclofenac group was 38.39 ± 0.89°C and 38.95 ± 1.09°C, respectively (P = 0.02). Average temperature changes were 0.65 ± 0.17°C in the Paracetamol group and 1.73 ± 0.69°C in the Diclofenac group (P < 0.001). Conclusions In the first one hour, Diclofenac suppository is able to control the fever more efficient than Paracetamol suppositories. PMID:26889398

  6. Case report: Sigmoid strangulation from evisceration through a perforated rectal prolapse ulcer – An unusual complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer Z.; Kittmer, Tiffaney; Forbes, Shawn; Ruo, Leyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rectal prolapse occurs particularly in elder females and presentation can sometimes lead to complications such as strangulation and evisceration of other organs through the necrotic mucosa. Presentation of case This is a case of a 61 year-old female with rectal prolapse complicated by rectal perforation through which a segment of sigmoid colon eviscerated and became strangulated. This patient initially presented with sepsis requiring ICU admission, but fully recovered following a Hartmann’s procedure with a sacral rectopexy. Discussion Complications of rectal prolapse include incarceration, strangulation, and rarely, perforation with evisceration of other viscera requiring urgent operation. This report provides a brief overview of complications associated with rectal prolapse, reviews similar cases of transrectal evisceration, and discusses the management of chronic rectal prolapse. Conclusion Prompt surgical consult is warranted if any signs or symptoms suggestive of complications from prolapse are present. PMID:25680532

  7. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes Santos, Cristina; Steen, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient's medical file was reviewed, images were found of a barium swallow study that the patient had undergone months earlier, and we were able to observe the exact moment of the aspiration of the contrast material. The patient had been asymptomatic since the test. PMID:25309769

  8. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  9. Contrast lipocryolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Hernán; Melamed, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Alternative crystal structures are possible for all lipids and each different crystal structure is called a polymorphic form. Inter-conversion between polymorphisms would imply the possibility of leaning crystal formation toward the most effective polymorphism for adipocyte destruction. Food industry has been tempering lipids for decades. Tempering technology applied to lipocryolysis gave birth to “contrast lipocryolysis”, which involves pre- and post-lipocryolysis fat layer heating as part of a specific tempering protocol. In this study, we evaluated the skinfold thickness of 10 subjects after a single contrast lipocryolysis session and witnessed important and fast reductions. PMID:25068088

  10. Rapid detection and identification of Brachyspira aalborgi from rectal biopsies and faeces of a patient.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Conter, Mauro; Ragni, Patrizia; Piccolo, Giovanna; Zuelli, Claudia; Bommezzadri, Simona; Guégan, Rozenn; Zambelli, Claudia; Perandin, Francesca; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Manca, Nino; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2003-03-01

    This study reports for the first time the detection of Brachyspira aalborgi in faeces and rectal biopsies of a female suffering for 3-4 months of abdominal pain with long-standing mucosal diarrhoea, rectal bleeding and suspected carcinoma of the rectum. After pre-treatment of samples (faeces and biopsies) with a liquid medium (trypticase soy broth-TSB) containing foetal calf serum (FCS, 10%) and spectinomycin and rifampicin (TSB-SR) the first detection of B. aalborgi isolate HBS1 was observed after 48 h in the primary plates of selective blood agar modified medium (BAM) containing spectinomycin and rifampicin (BAM-SR), where growth zones were signalled by a small weakly beta-haemolytic halo. Attempts to subculture spirochaetes in agar media failed. The new HBS1 isolate was only propagated in TSB broth and at electron microscopy it showed 4 endoflagella inserted at each tapered end. The phenotypic characterization of HBS1 demonstrated absence of hippurate hydrolysis, indole production, alpha-galactosidase, alpha- and beta-glucosidase activities in accordance with the B. aalborgi type strain. Rapid identification of B. aalborgi isolate HBS1 was performed directly from faeces and rectal biopsies and subsequently from pure cultures by a genetic method based on 16S DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sequence of 16S DNA amplicon of the isolate HBS1 was found 99.2% corresponding to that of the B. aalborgi type strain. Our results encourage further investigations for the development of a suitable selective agar medium for the isolating and cultivating B. aalborgi from human specimens. PMID:12648729

  11. Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Primary Rectal Cancer-Standard Protocol and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Papanikolaou, Nickolas

    2016-08-01

    New-generation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners with optimal phased-array body coils have contributed to obtainment of high-resolution T2-weighted turbo spin echo images in which visualization of anatomical details such as the mesorectal fascia and the bowel wall layers is feasible. Preoperative, locoregional staging of rectal cancer with MRI, considered standard of care nowadays, relies on these images for stratification of high-risk patients for local recurrence, patients most likely to benefit from neoadjuvant therapy, as well as patients who exhibit imaging features indicative of a high risk of metastatic disease. Functional imaging, including optimized for rectal cancer diffusion-weighted imaging and more recently use of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, combined with radiologists׳ rising level of familiarity regarding the assessment of reactive changes postchemoradiation treatment, have shown to increase MRI staging accuracy after neoadjuvant treatment. Our intention is to review already established standard protocols for primary rectal cancer and go through potential additional promising imaging tools. PMID:27342896

  12. Rectal impaction with epoxy resin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hemandas, Anil K; Muller, Guy W; Ahmed, Ibrahim

    2005-01-01

    We describe a unique case of a patient presenting with rectal impaction following self-administration of a liquid used as masonry adhesive for anal sexual gratification. The solidified matter required laparotomy for its removal. Strategies for removing rectal foreign bodies are discussed as well as other consequences of inserting foreign material per rectum. PMID:15862274

  13. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlquist, D.A.; Gostout, C.J.; Viggiano, T.R.; Pemberton, J.H.

    1986-12-01

    Four patients with chronic hematochezia and transfusion-dependent anemia from postradiation rectal vascular lesions were successfully managed by endoscopic laser coagulation. In all four patients, symptomatic, hematologic, and endoscopic improvement was evident. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding seems to be safe and efficacious and should be considered before surgical intervention.

  14. Rectal trauma: management based on anatomic distinctions.

    PubMed

    McGrath, V; Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Minard, G; Pritchard, F E

    1998-12-01

    Principles of rectal wound management, including routine diversion, injury repair, presacral drainage and distal washout, evolved from World War II and the Vietnam conflict and have been questioned in recent years. We believe significant confusion arises because of imprecise definition of injury location relative to retroperitoneal involvement. Our 5-year experience with penetrating rectal injuries at a Level I trauma center was analyzed. Injuries to the anterior and lateral surfaces of the upper two-thirds of the rectum were classified as intraperitoneal (IP, serosalized), and those of the posterior surface extraperitoneal (EP, no serosa); injuries to the lower one-third were EP. A total of 58 injuries were managed (92% gunshot wounds). Of these, 16 were IP, and 42 had some EP component. Ten patients underwent repair without diversion (6 IP, 4 EP); there were no leaks. Ten septic complications occurred in the remaining population: 2 necrotizing fasciitis, 5 abdominal abscess, and 3 presacral infections (PIs) (2 presacral abscesses and 1 wound tract infection). PI is the only complication that can be specifically associated with EP rectal injuries relative to management; as associated injury confounds interpretation of the other complications. The operative management in the 38 patients with diverted EP wounds with respect to presacral infection (PI) demonstrated the following: repair injury (n = 10), 0 PI versus no repair (n = 28), 3 PI (P = 0.55); washout (n = 33), 2 PI versus no washout (n = 5), 1 PI (P = 0.35); presacral drain (n = 30), 1 PI versus no drain (n = 8), 2 PI (P = 0.11). We conclude that most IP injuries can be managed with primary repair. EP wounds to the upper two-thirds of the rectum should usually be repaired. EP wounds to the lower one-third, which are explored and repaired, do not require drainage. EP wounds that are not explored should be managed with presacral drainage to minimize the incidence of presacral abscess. PMID:9843331

  15. Laparoscopic rectopexy in solitary rectal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Saeed; Salmanroughani, Hassan; Binesh, Fariba; Taghipoor, Shokoh; Kargar, Shady

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome (SRUS) come to a physician with passage of mucus and bloody liquid within defecation. The treatment for SRUS is depended to the severity of symptoms and the existance of rectal prolapse. This study is a report of the assessing of rectopexy as surgical modalities for 62 medical treatment resistant SRUS patients who were referred to the gastrointestinal department of Shahid Sadoughi Medical University and Mojibian hospital. The present non-randomized clinical trial was carried out in 62 SRUS patients from 1991 till 2005. In these patients SRUS was confirmed by histology. They were symptomatic after conservative therapy and referred for surgical intervention. All of them had been undergone abdominal rectopexy by two laparoscopic surgeons. In our study, rectal bleeding and history of digitalization had the highest and lowest frequency of symptoms and signs in our cases respectively. Abdominal rectopexy was done in 39 cases and complete recovery in our cases was 69.23%. Complete recovery rate in cases with dysplasia (63.8%) was significantly higher than cases without that (P=0.04). Complete recovery rate in cases that had finger defecation (85%) was significantly higher than cases without that (50%) (P=0.03). Laparoscopic rectopexy is one of the main surgical techniques for treatment of SRUS. This technique can present complete recovery for SRUS patients. Some of them include topical medications, behavior modification supplemented by fiber and biofeedback and surgery were more available and studied. But it seems that education of SRUS patient conservative treatment remain cornerstone in the SRUS management. PMID:22174170

  16. Why Rectal Douches May Be Acceptable Rectal-Microbicide Delivery Vehicles for MSM

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Bauermeister, José; Ventuneac, Ana; Dolezal, Curtis; Mayer, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Rationale To explore age of onset of rectal douching among men who have sex with men (MSM) and reasons leading to and maintaining douching behavior; and to consider whether rectal douches containing microbicidal agents might be acceptable for men at HIV risk. Methods In Stage 1, we used qualitative methods to explore douching behavior in a sample of 20 MSM. Subsequently, we developed a structured questionnaire that was administered in Stage 2 to 105 MSM. Results More than half of participants who completed Stage 1 douched during the trial despite having been advised not to do so. Of the 105 HIV uninfected participants in Stage 2, 51% reported using rectal douches in the prior six months; 47% douched before and 25% after anal intercourse. Most participants reported douching frequently or always. On average, men reported douching about two hours prior to or one hour following intercourse. Average age of onset was late 20s. Most men who douched wanted to be clean or were encouraged to douche by their partners. Some men thought douching after sex could prevent STIs. Conclusion Rectal douching appears to be a popular behavior among men who have RAI. It is necessary to identify harmless douches. If HIV/STI preventive douches can be developed, rectal douching prior to or following sexual intercourse could become an important additional prevention tool. To reshape an existing behavior to which some men strongly adhere, like douching, by suggesting use of one type of douche over another may be more successful than trying to convince MSM to engage in behaviors they never practiced before or those they resist (e.g., condom use). PMID:19959973

  17. Anorectal avulsion: an exceptional rectal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ibn Majdoub Hassani, Karim; Ait Laalim, Said; Benjelloun, El Bachir; Toughrai, Imane; Mazaz, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Anorectal avulsion is an exceptional rectal trauma in which the anus and sphincter no longer join the perineum and are pulled upward. As a result, they ventrally follow levator ani muscles. We present a rare case of a 29-years old patient who was admitted in a pelvic trauma context; presenting a complete complex anorectal avulsion. The treatment included a primary repair of the rectum and a diverting colostomy so as to prevent sepsis. Closure of the protective sigmoidostomy was performed seven months after the accident and the evolution was marked by an anal stenosis requiring iterative dilatations. PMID:24094142

  18. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  19. Virus-Host Mucosal Interactions During Early SIV Rectal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wuxun; Ma, Fangrui; Churbanov, Alexander; Wan, Yanmin; Li, Yue; Kang, Guobin; Yuan, Zhe; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Jianqing; Lewis, Mark; Li, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    To deepen our understanding of early rectal transmission of HIV-1, we studied virus-host interactions in the rectal mucosa using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-Indian rhesus macaque model and mRNA deep sequencing. We found that rectal mucosa actively responded to SIV as early as 3 days post-rectal inoculation (dpi) and mobilized more robust responses at 6 and 10 dpi. Our results suggests that the failure of the host to contain virus replication at the portal of entry is attributable to both a high-level expression of lymphocyte chemoattractant, proinflammatory and immune activation genes, which can recruit and activate viral susceptible target cells into mucosa; and a high-level expression of SIV accessory genes, which are known to be able to counter and evade host restriction factors and innate immune responses. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of rectal transmission. PMID:25128762

  20. Immunological Landscape and Clinical Management of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ruiz, Elísabeth; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of rectal cancer and colon cancer differs due to increased local relapses in rectal cancer. However, the current molecular classification does not differentiate rectal cancer and colon cancer as two different entities. In recent years, the impact of the specific immune microenvironment in cancer has attracted renewed interest and is currently recognized as one of the major determinants of clinical progression in a wide range of tumors. In colorectal cancer, the density of lymphocytic infiltration is associated with better overall survival. Due to the need for biomarkers of response to conventional treatment with chemoradiotherapy in rectal tumors, the immune status of rectal cancer emerges as a useful tool to improve the management of patients. PMID:26941741

  1. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  2. Gastric inhibitory peptide, serotonin, and glucagon are unexpected chloride secretagogues in the rectal gland of the skate (Leucoraja erinacea).

    PubMed

    Kelley, Catherine A; Decker, Sarah E; Silva, Patricio; Forrest, John N

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery of the rectal gland of the dogfish shark 50 years ago, experiments with this tissue have greatly aided our understanding of secondary active chloride secretion and the secretagogues responsible for this function. In contrast, very little is known about the rectal gland of skates. In the present experiments, we performed the first studies in the perfused rectal gland of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), an organ weighing less than one-tenth of the shark rectal gland. Our results indicate that the skate gland can be studied by modified perfusion techniques and in primary culture monolayers, and that secretion is blocked by the inhibitors of membrane proteins required for secondary active chloride secretion. Our major finding is that three G protein-coupled receptor agonists, the incretin gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), also known as glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, as well as glucagon and serotonin, are unexpected potent chloride secretagogues in the skate but not the shark. Glucagon stimulated chloride secretion to a mean value of 1,661 ± 587 μeq·h(-1)·g(-1) and serotonin stimulated to 2,893 ± 699 μeq·h(-1)·g(-1). GIP stimulated chloride secretion to 3,733 ± 679 μeq·h(-1)·g(-1) and significantly increased tissue cAMP content compared with basal conditions. This is the first report of GIP functioning as a chloride secretagogue in any species or tissue. PMID:24553297

  3. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Aravantinou, Meropi; Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26886938

  4. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26886938

  5. Evidence-based treatment of patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIANG; YANG, JIE; QIAN, QUN

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a worldwide disease whose incidence has increased significantly. Evidence-based medicine is a category of medicine that optimizes decision making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. Evidence-based medicine can be used to formulate a reasonable treatment plan for newly diagnosed rectal cancer patients. The current review focuses on the application of evidence-based treatment on patients with rectal cancer. The relationship between perioperative blood transfusion and recurrence of rectal cancer after surgery, the selection between minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and traditional laparotomy, choice of chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer prior to surgery, selection between stapled and hand-sewn methods for colorectal anastomosis during rectal cancer resection, and selection between temporary ileostomy and colostomy during the surgery were addressed. Laparoscopy is considered to have more advantages but is time-consuming and has high medical costs. In addition, laparoscopic rectal cancer radical resection is preferred to open surgery. In radical resection surgery, use of a stapling device for anastomosis can reduce postoperative anastomotic fistula, although patients should be informed of possible anastomotic stenosis. PMID:26998054

  6. Significance of Paneth Cells in Histologically Unremarkable Rectal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Pezhouh, Maryam K; Cheng, Edaire; Weinberg, Arthur G; Park, Jason Y

    2016-07-01

    Paneth cell metaplasia of the rectal epithelium is a common histologic finding in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. However, the clinical significance of isolated Paneth cells in otherwise unremarkable rectal mucosa has not been extensively examined. This study examined the frequency and clinical correlates of rectal Paneth cells in 245 biopsies obtained from patients between the ages of 2 weeks to 20 years in a pediatric tertiary care facility from 2010 to 2011. The specimens comprised 193 endoscopic pinch biopsies and 52 rectal suction biopsies. All 245 cases were endoscopically and histologically unremarkable with no prominence of eosinophils, no altered mucosal architecture, and no inflammation. Paneth cells were present in 42 cases (17.1%), which is higher than previous reports. Only 1 of 42 patients with rectal Paneth cells was subsequently diagnosed with Crohn disease. In our study population, the finding of Paneth cells was associated with young age, and the incidence of Paneth cell cases decreased with increasing age (χ=13.69, P=0.0002). Constipation was the most common presenting symptom in patients with rectal Paneth cells and was highly associated with the presence of Paneth cells (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval: 2.2-9.0). Paneth cells in otherwise unremarkable pediatric rectal biopsies are not rare and frequently occur in common conditions such as idiopathic constipation. PMID:26900817

  7. The solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: diagnosis with defecography.

    PubMed

    Goei, R; Baeten, C; Janevski, B; van Engelshoven, J

    1987-11-01

    The solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon entity consisting of a rectal abnormality caused by straining during defecation and characterized by specific histologic changes. Endoscopy may show single or multiple ulcers or a preulcerative phase consisting of mucosal thickening. Findings on barium enema may be normal or nonspecific, consisting of a thickened valve of Houston, nodularity, and rectal stricture. Pathologic changes consist of replacement of the lamina propria by fibroblasts and smooth muscle fibers with marked hypertrophy of the muscularis mucosae. In five patients with histologically proved solitary rectal ulcer syndrome, defecography was performed to evaluate the accompanying defecation disorder. Two patients showed the spastic pelvic floor syndrome, characterized by failure of relaxation of the pelvic floor musculature during straining. In the remaining three, defecography showed an infolding of the rectal wall toward the rectal lumen increasing gradually to form an intussusception. The results indicate that defecography is useful to show the underlying disorder of defecation in the solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. PMID:3499797

  8. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to preoperative chemoradiation or radiation in rectal cancer: should we be more cautious?

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, R; Grainger, J; Harrison, M; Ostler, P; Makris, A

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is a term originally used to describe the administration of chemotherapy preoperatively before surgery. The original rationale for administering NACT or so-called induction chemotherapy to shrink or downstage a locally advanced tumour, and thereby facilitate more effective local treatment with surgery or radiotherapy, has been extended with the introduction of more effective combinations of chemotherapy to include reducing the risks of metastatic disease. It seems logical that survival could be lengthened, or organ preservation rates increased in resectable tumours by NACT. In rectal cancer NACT is being increasingly used in locally advanced and nonmetastatic unresectable tumours. Randomised studies in advanced colorectal cancer show high response rates to combination cytotoxic therapy. This evidence of efficacy coupled with the introduction of novel molecular targeted therapies (such as Bevacizumab and Cetuximab), and long waiting times for radiotherapy have rekindled an interest in delivering NACT in locally advanced rectal cancer. In contrast, this enthusiasm is currently waning in other sites such as head and neck and nasopharynx cancer where traditionally NACT has been used. So, is NACT in rectal cancer a real advance or just history repeating itself? In this review, we aimed to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the separate approaches of neoadjuvant, concurrent and consolidation chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer, drawing on theoretical principles, preclinical studies and clinical experience both in rectal cancer and other disease sites. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may improve outcome in terms of disease-free or overall survival in selected groups in some disease sites, but this strategy has not been shown to be associated with better outcomes than postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. In particular, there is insufficient data in rectal cancer. The evidence for benefit is strongest when NACT is administered

  9. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  10. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  11. [Integrated treatments of rectal carcinoma (review)].

    PubMed

    Gennari, Leandro; Doci, Roberto; Rossetti, Carlo; Bagnoli, Pietro; Eboli, Marco; Brocchi, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    We have reviewed the international literature regarding the treatment of rectal carcinoma. Over the last decades the evolution of treatment methods has led to a drastic fall in the incidence of local recurrences which has gone from a wide range (15-40%) to a much lower figure (10%). This favourable result has been reached also due to improvement in surgical techniques (total mesorectal excision) and to the use of an association of preoperative radio and chemotherapy. However, the drugs and dosage of these as well as of the RT still have to be defined. In our experience the integrated treatment has brought a downstaging of the T in 60% of cases and of the N in 15%. PMID:12613323

  12. Rectal Douching and Implications for Rectal Microbicides among Populations Vulnerable to HIV in South America: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Jerome T.; Kinsler, Janni J.; Imrie, John; Nureña, César R.; Sánchez, Jorge; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While gel-formulated Rectal Microbicides (RM) are the first to enter clinical trials, rectal douching in preparation for anal intercourse is a common practise, thus RMs formulated as douches may be a convenient alternative to gels. Nonetheless, little is known about potential users’ thoughts regarding douche-formulated RMs or rectal douching practises, data needed to inform the advancement of douche-based RMs. This qualitative study examined thoughts regarding douches, their use as a RM and current douching practises among men who have sex with men and transgender women. Methods Ten focus groups and 36 in-depth interviews were conducted (N=140) to examine the overall acceptability of RM, of which one component focused on rectal douching. Focus groups and interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded; text relating to rectal douching was extracted and analysed. Sociodemographic information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results Support for a douche-formulated RM centred on the possibility of combined pre-coital hygiene and HIV protection, and it was believed that a deeply-penetrating liquid douche would confer greater HIV protection than a gel. Drawbacks included rectal dryness; impracticality and portability issues; and, potential side effects. Non-commercial douching apparatus use was common and liquids used included detergents, vinegar, bleach, lemon juice and alcohol. Conclusions A douche-formulated RM while desirable and perceived as more effective than a gel-formulated RM also generated questions regarding practicality and side-effects. Of immediate concern were the non-commercial liquids already being used which likely damage rectal epithelia, potentially increasing HIV infection risk. Pre-coital rectal douching is common and a RM formulated as such is desirable, but education on rectal douching practices is needed now. PMID:23966338

  13. In vivo trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled optical tomography of a transmissible venereal tumor model in the canine pelvic canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Holyoak, G. Reed; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Xu, Guan; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady; Piao, Daqing

    2009-05-01

    In vivo trans-rectal near-infrared (NIR) optical tomography was performed concurrently with, albeit reconstructed without spatial a prior of, trans-rectal ultrasound (US) on transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) developed as a model in the canine pelvic canal. Studies were taken longitudinally at prior to, 14 days after, and 35 days after the TVT injection. As the tumor grew, the nodules became increasingly hyperabsorptive and moderately hyperscattering on NIR. The regions of strong NIR contrast, especially on absorption images, correlated well with those of US hypoechoic masses indicative of tumors. Combining the information of trans-rectal NIR and US detected the tumor more accurately than did the US alone at 14 days postinjection.

  14. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. METHODS: Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images

  15. Rectal wall sparing by dosimetric effect of rectal balloon used during Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Teh, Bin S.

    2005-03-31

    The use of an air-filled rectal balloon has been shown to decrease prostate motion during prostate radiotherapy. However, the perturbation of radiation dose near the air-tissue interfaces has raised clinical concerns of underdosing the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effects of an air-filled rectal balloon on the rectal wall/mucosa and prostate gland. Clinical rectal toxicity and dose-volume histogram (DVH) were also assessed to evaluate for any correlation. A film phantom was constructed to simulate the 4-cm diameter air cavity created by a rectal balloon. Kodak XV2 films were utilized to measure and compare dose distribution with and without air cavity. To study the effect in a typical clinical situation, the phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned on a Siemens DR CT scanner for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. A target object was drawn on the phantom CT images to simulate the treatment of prostate cancer. Because patients were treated in prone position, the air cavity was situated superiorly to the target. The treatment used a serial tomotherapy technique with the Multivane Intensity Modulating Collimator (MIMiC) in arc treatment mode. Rectal toxicity was assessed in 116 patients treated with IMRT to a mean dose of 76 Gy over 35 fractions (2.17-Gy fraction size). They were treated in the prone position, immobilized using a Vac-LokTM bag and carrier-box system. Rectal balloon inflated with 100 cc of air was used for prostate gland immobilization during daily treatment. Rectal toxicity was assessed using modifications of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and late effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT) scales systems. DVH of the rectum was also evaluated. From film dosimetry, there was a dose reduction at the distal air-tissue interface as much as 60% compared with the same geometry without the air cavity for 15-MV photon beam and 2 x 2-cm field size. The dose beyond the

  16. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  17. Adult rectosigmoid junction intussusception presenting with rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing Zeng; Teo, Li Tserng; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2015-05-01

    Most cases of intussusception in adults present with chronic and nonspecific symptoms, and can sometimes be challenging to diagnose. We herein report on a patient with the rare symptom of colonic intussusceptions presenting with rectal prolapse and review the existing literature of similar case reports to discuss how to reach an accurate diagnosis. A 75-year-old woman with dementia presented with per rectal bleeding, rectal prolapse and lower abdominal pain. An operation was scheduled and a large sigmoid intussusception with a polyp as a leading point was found intraoperatively. She subsequently recovered well and was discharged. As large sigmoid intussusceptions may present as rectal prolapse, intussusception should be considered as a differential diagnosis for immobile patients, especially when the leading point is a lesion. PMID:26034324

  18. [Rectal prolapse revealing a tumor: The role of abdominal ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Bequet, E; Stiennon, L; Lhomme, A; Piette, C; Hoyoux, C; Rausin, L; Guidi, O

    2016-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is rare in children and usually benign. However, there are various diseases that can be associated with it, such as cystic fibrosis or other causes of increased abdominal pressure. Here, we review the various underlying conditions that pediatricians or pediatric gastroenterologists should consider in the case of rectal prolapse. We report on three cases of children with a rectal prolapse and intra-abdominal tumors. Current recommendations and practice do not include a systematic check via abdominal imaging in cases of rectal prolapse. However, in some situations, imaging is indicated to detect a possible expansive process. Thus, in the presence of recurrent prolapse or of associated urinary or neurological signs, imaging is justified so as to allow for an early diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms. Given its lack of radiation exposure and good sensitivity in children, ultrasound imaging is the first choice. PMID:27265581

  19. Chronic utero-rectal fistula with menochezia and amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Pinto, P; Sharma, L; Kini, P

    1990-09-01

    Utero-intestinal fistulas are commonly acute in nature and usually follow malignancies of the intestines. Here we report a chronic uterorectal fistula with uncommon symptom of cyclical rectal bleeding (menochezia) and amenorrhea. PMID:1974538

  20. [Rectal tonsil or lymphoid follicular hyperplasia of the rectum].

    PubMed

    Trillo Fandiño, L; Arias González, M; Iglesias Castañón, A; Fernández Eire, M P

    2014-01-01

    The rectal tonsil is a reactive proliferation of lymphoid tissue located in the rectum. The morphology of the lymphoid proliferation of the colon is usually polypoid or, less commonly, nodular. Only in exceptional cases does lymphoid proliferation of the colon present as a mass in the rectum (rectal tonsil), although this is the most common presentation in middle-aged patients. It is important to be familiar with the rectal tonsil because in cases of exuberant growth it can be difficult to distinguish it from other types of masses. We present the case of rectal tonsil in a four-year-old girl. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings and review the literature. PMID:22112591

  1. Successful hemostasis of intractable rectal variceal bleeding using variceal embolization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Seung Up

    2015-02-28

    Portal hypertension causes portosystemic shunting along the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in gastrointestinal varices. Rectal varices and their bleeding is a rare complication, but it can be fatal without appropriate treatment. However, because of its rarity, no established treatment strategy is yet available. In the setting of intractable rectal variceal bleeding, a transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt can be a treatment of choice to enable portal decompression and thus achieve hemostasis. However, in the case of recurrent rectal variceal bleeding despite successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt, alternative measures to control bleeding are required. Here, we report on a patient with liver cirrhosis who experienced recurrent rectal variceal bleeding even after successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt and was successfully treated with variceal embolization. PMID:25741168

  2. Rectal arterio-venous malformation (AVM) with bleeding of an internal hemorrhoid.

    PubMed

    Komekami, Yusuke; Konishi, Fumio; Makita, Kohzoh; Mijin, Toma; Onogawa, Atsushi; Chochi, Takeshi; Lee, Chunyong; Yoshida, Takayoshi; Maeda, Tooru; Mitsusada, Makoto; Hasegawa, Shunji

    2016-02-01

    A 38-year-old male with no past history of illnesses visited the out-patient clinic of Nerima Hikarigaoka Hospital complaining of dizziness and persistent anal bleeding. There was a significant anemia on a blood test and colonoscopy showed a thrombus in a markedly swollen internal hemorrhoid. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed a poorly demarcated area with early face enhancement on the right side of the rectum and anal canal. Based on these findings, an arterio-venous malformation (AVM) of the rectum was suspected. Abdominal angiography showed abnormal vessels receiving a blood supply from the bilateral superior rectal arteries. We suspected that the AVM in the rectum was the cause of the hemorrhage from the internal hemorrhoid, and therefore performed embolization of the AVM. Thereafter, the hemorrhage from the internal hemorrhoid stopped completely and the anemia improved to the normal level, without the need for treatment for the internal hemorrhoid. Colonoscopy performed 6 months after embolization showed shrinkage of the internal hemorrhoid. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports stating a relationship between rectal AVM and internal hemorrhoids. However, we consider that contrast-enhanced CT can be used to detect vessel abnormalities related to severe bleeding of the internal hermorrhoids in patients with internal hemorrhoids and severe anemia. PMID:26879656

  3. A monte carlo comparison of three different media for contrast enhanced radiotherapy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2010-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy makes use of a kilovoltage X-ray beam, either from a diagnostic X-ray tube or modified megavoltage linear accelerator, in conjunction with a high-Z contrast medium deposited into the target volume to enhance the absorption of radiation. In this work, using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and the voxelized Zubal phantom to model a prostate radiotherapy treatment, a comparison between the physical absorbed dose distributions rendered by three different enhancing agents namely bismuth, gadolinium, and iodine is performed. It is assumed that there exists a concentration of 10 mg of enhancing agent per 1 g of tissue in the target volume while in the background a concentration of 1.5 mg per 1 g of tissue is present. The X-ray beam energy spectrum was obtained by means of Monte Carlo simulation of a tungsten target upon which a 220 keV mono-energetic electron pencil beam is made to impinge, and the resultant photon beam is heavily filtrated by 0.2 cm of copper. The treatment delivery is simulated as a 3608 arc collimated to conform to the target from every direction. Cumulative dose-volume histograms and isodose curves are presented for the target as well as five organs-at-risk, namely rectal wall, bladder, femoral heads, skin, and bone marrow. It is shown that under these conditions clinically acceptable treatment plans are obtained for all three contrast agents. A 72 Gy dose to 100% of the target volume results in maximum absorbed doses to the above mentioned organs-at-risk of 65, 56, 44, 32 and 65 Gy respectively when bismuth is used as the contrast agent, but the results obtained with gadolinium follow closely. PMID:20441237

  4. Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography and Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado-Mendez, I.; Palma, B. A.; Villasenor, Y.; Benitez-Bribiesca, L.; Brandan, M. E.

    2007-11-26

    Angiogenesis could be a means for pouring contrast media around tumors. In this work, optimization of radiological parameters for contrast-enhanced subtraction techniques in mammography has been performed. A modification of Lemacks' analytical formalism was implemented to model the X-ray absorption in the breast with contrast medium and detection by a digital image receptor. Preliminary results of signal-to-noise ratio analysis show the advantage of subtracting two images taken at different energies, one prior and one posterior to the injection of contrast medium. Preliminary experimental results using a custom-made phantom have shown good agreement with calculations. A proposal is presented for the clinical application of the optimized technique, which aims at finding correlations between angiogenesis indicators and dynamic variables of contrast medium uptake.

  5. Geometric modeling, functional parameter calculation, and visualization of the in-vivo distended rectal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Manduca, Armando; Camp, Jon J.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Robb, Richard A.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2006-03-01

    The rectum can distend to accommodate stool, and contracts in response to distention during defecation. Rectal motor dysfunctions are implicated in the pathophysiology of functional defecation disorders and fecal incontinence. These rectal motor functions can be studied by intra-luminal measurements of pressure by manometry, or combined with volume during rectal balloon distention. Pressure-volume (p-v) relationships provide a global index of rectal mechanical properties. However, balloon distention alone does not measure luminal radius or wall thickness, which are necessary to compute wall tension and stress respectively. It has been suggested that the elastic modulus, which is the linear slope of the stress-strain relationship, is a more accurate measure of wall stiffness. Also, measurements of compliance may not reflect differences in rectal diameter between subjects prior to inflation, and imaging is necessary to determine if, as has been suggested, rectal pressure-volume relationships are affected by extra-rectal structures. We have developed a technique to measure rectal stress:strain relationships in humans, by simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during rectal balloon distention. After a conditioning distention, a rectal balloon was distended with water from 0 to 400 ml in 50 ml steps, and imaged at each step with MRI. The fluid filled balloon was segmented from each volume, the phase-ordered binary volumes were transformed into a geometric characterization of the inflated rectal surface. Taken together with measurements of balloon pressure and of rectal wall thickness, this model of the rectal surface was used to calculate regional values of curvature, tension, strain, and stress for the rectum. In summary, this technique has the unique ability to non-invasively measure the rectal stress:strain relationship and also determine if rectal expansion is limited by extra-rectal structures. This functional information allows the direct clinical analysis

  6. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic sigmoid resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, R; Lovvik, K; Marvik, R

    2004-01-01

    Sigmoid resection is indicated in the treatment of complete rectal prolapse (CRP) in patients with prolonged colorectal transit time (CTT). Its use however has been limited due to fear of anastomotic leakage. This study challenges the current practice of dividing the mesorectum by prospectively evaluating the impact of sparing the superior rectal artery (SRA) on leak rates after laparoscopic sigmoid resection (LSR) for CRP. During 30 months data on 33 selected patients with CRP were prospectively collected. Three patients were withdrawn from the analysis, as they had neither resection nor anastomosis. Twenty-nine women and one man (median age 55 range 21-83 years) underwent LSR with preservation of SRA for a median CRP of 8 (3-15) cm. There were 20 ASA I and 10 ASA II patients. Ten patients had undergone previous surgery. Four patients complained of dyschezia, whereas incontinence was present in 26 patients. Anal ultrasound showed isolated internal sphincter defects in two patients. Four young adults (21-32 years) had normal CTT, whereas 26 older patients had a median CTT of 5 (4-6) days. Defecography demonstrated 10 enteroceles, two sigmoidoceles, and one rectal hernia through the levator ani muscle. Mortality was nil. Median operating room time was 180 (120-330) min, suprapubic incision length 5 (3-7) cm, estimated blood loss 150 (50-500) ml, specimen length 20 (12-45) cm, solid food resumption 3 (1-6) days, and length of stay 4.5 (2-7) days. Thirty-day complications were not related to anastomosing and occurred in 20% of the patients. Although the evidence provided by the present study suggests that sparing SRA has a favorable impact on anastomotic leak rates, these nonrandomized results need further evaluation. The division of the mesorectum at the rectosigmoid junction seems not necessary, and its sparing should therefore be considered as it may contain anastomotic leak rates. PMID:15771289

  7. Rectal microbicides: clinically relevant approach to the design of rectal specific placebo formulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to identify the critical formulation parameters controlling distribution and function for the rectal administration of microbicides in humans. Four placebo formulations were designed with a wide range of hydrophilic characteristics (aqueous to lipid) and rheological properties (Newtonian, shear thinning, thermal sensitive and thixotropic). Aqueous formulations using typical polymers to control viscosity were iso-osmotic and buffered to pH 7. Lipid formulations were developed from lipid solvent/lipid gelling agent binary mixtures. Testing included pharmaceutical function and stability as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity. Results The aqueous fluid placebo, based on poloxamer, was fluid at room temperature, thickened and became shear thinning at 37°C. The aqueous gel placebo used carbopol as the gelling agent, was shear thinning at room temperature and showed a typical decrease in viscosity with an increase in temperature. The lipid fluid placebo, myristyl myristate in isopropyl myristate, was relatively thin and temperature independent. The lipid gel placebo, glyceryl stearate and PEG-75 stearate in caprylic/capric triglycerides, was also shear thinning at both room temperature and 37°C but with significant time dependency or thixotropy. All formulations showed no rectal irritation in rabbits and were non-toxic using an ex vivo rectal explant model. Conclusions Four placebo formulations ranging from fluid to gel in aqueous and lipid formats with a range of rheological properties were developed, tested, scaled-up, manufactured under cGMP conditions and enrolled in a formal stability program. Clinical testing of these formulations as placebos will serve as the basis for further microbicide formulation development with drug-containing products. PMID:21385339

  8. Role of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Virulence Factors in Colonization at the Bovine Terminal Rectal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Haiqing; Lim, Ji Youn; Knecht, Hannah J.; Li, Jie; Hovde, Carolyn J.

    2006-01-01

    The human pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes hemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening sequelae and transiently colonizes healthy cattle at the terminal rectal mucosa. This study analyzed virulence factors important for the clinical manifestations of human E. coli O157:H7 infection for their contribution to the persistence of E. coli in cattle. The colonizing ability of E. coli O157:H7 was compared with those of nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 and isogenic deletion mutants missing Shiga toxin (Stx), the adhesin intimin, its receptor Tir, hemolysin, or the ∼92-kb pO157. Fully ruminant steers received a single rectal application of one E. coli strain so that effects of mucosal attachment and survival at the terminal rectum could be measured without the impact of bacterial passage through the entire gastrointestinal tract. Colonization was monitored by sensitive recto-anal junction mucosal swab culture. Nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 did not colonize as well as E. coli O157:H7 at the bovine terminal rectal mucosa. The E. coli O157:H7 best able to persist had intimin, Tir, and the pO157. Strains missing even one of these factors were recovered in lower numbers and were cleared faster than the wild type. In contrast, E. coli O157:H7 strains that were missing Stx or hemolysin colonized like the wild type. For these three strains, the number of bacteria increased between days 1 and 4 postapplication and then decreased slowly. In contrast, the numbers of noncolonizing strains (K-12, Δtir, and Δeae) decreased from the day of application. These patterns consistently predicted long-term colonization or clearance of the bacteria from the bovine terminal rectal mucosa. PMID:16861656

  9. Trans-rectal interventional MRI: initial prostate biopsy experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Bernadette M.; Behluli, Meliha R.; Feller, John F.; May, Stuart T.; Princenthal, Robert; Winkel, Alex; Kaminsky, David B.

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland when evaluated along with T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and their corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps can yield valuable information in patients with rising or elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels1. In some cases, patients present with multiple negative trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies, often placing the patient into a cycle of active surveillance. Recently, more patients are undergoing TRIM for targeted biopsy of suspicious findings with a cancer yield of ~59% compared to 15% for second TRUS biopsy2 to solve this diagnostic dilemma and plan treatment. Patients were imaged in two separate sessions on a 1.5T magnet using a cardiac phased array parallel imaging coil. Automated CAD software was used to identify areas of wash-out. If a suspicious finding was identified on all sequences it was followed by a second imaging session. Under MRI-guidance, cores were acquired from each target region3. In one case the microscopic diagnosis was prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), in the other it was invasive adenocarcinoma. Patient 1 had two negative TRUS biopsies and a PSA level of 9ng/mL. Patient 2 had a PSA of 7.2ng/mL. He underwent TRUS biopsy which was negative for malignancy. He was able to go on to treatment for his prostate carcinoma (PCa)4. MRI may have an important role in a subset of patients with multiple negative TRUS biopsies and elevated or rising PSA.

  10. The molecular basis of chloride transport in shark rectal gland.

    PubMed

    Riordan, J R; Forbush, B; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-11-01

    Transepithelial Cl- secretion in vertebrates is accomplished by a secondary active transport process brought about by the coordinated activity of apical and basolateral transport proteins. The principal basolateral components are the Na+/K(+)-ATPase pump, the Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter (symporter) and a K+ channel. The rate-limiting apical component is a cyclic-AMP-stimulated Cl- channel. As postulated nearly two decades ago, the net Cl- movement from the blood to the lumen involves entry into the epithelial cells with Na+ and K+, followed by active Na+ extrusion via the pump and passive K+ exit via a channel. Intracellular [Cl-] is raised above electrochemical equilibrium and exits into the lumen when the apical Cl- channel opens. Cl- secretion is accompanied by a passive paracellular flow of Na+. The tubules of the rectal glands of elasmobranchs are highly specialized for secreting concentrated NaCl by this mechanism and hence have served as an excellent experimental model in which to characterize the individual steps by electrophysiological and ion flux measurements. The recent molecular cloning and heterologous expression of the apical Cl- channel and basolateral cotransporter have enabled more detailed analyses of the mechanisms and their regulation. Not surprisingly, since hormones acting through kinases control secretion, both the Cl- channel, which is the shark counterpart of the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator), and the cotransporter are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The primary stimulation of secretion by hormones employing cyclic AMP as second messenger activates CFTR via the direct action of protein kinase A (PKA), which phosphorylates multiple sites on the R domain. In contrast, phosphorylation of the cotransporter by as yet unidentified kinases is apparently secondary to the decrease in intracellular chloride concentration caused by anion exit through CFTR. PMID:7529818

  11. Neutron Properties in the Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloët, I. C.; Miller, Gerald A.; Piasetzky, E.; Ron, G.

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate that for small values of momentum transfer Q2 the in-medium change of the GE/GM form factor ratio for a bound neutron is dominated by the change in the electric charge radius and predict within stated assumptions that the in-medium ratio will increase relative to the free result. This effect will act to increase the predicted cross section for the neutron recoil polarization transfer process He4(e→,e'n→)He3. This is in contrast with medium modification effects on the proton GE/GM form factor ratio, which act to decrease the predicted cross section for the He4(e→,e'p→)H3 reaction. Experiments to measure the in-medium neutron form factors are currently feasible in the range 0.1

  12. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards. PMID:1681170

  13. Surgical strategy for low rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Dumont, F; Mariani, A; Elias, D; Goéré, D

    2015-02-01

    The two goals of surgery for lower rectal cancer surgery are to obtain clear "curative" margins and to limit post-surgical functional disorders. The question of whether or not to preserve the anal sphincter lies at the center of the therapeutic choice. Histologically, tumor-free distal and circumferential margins of>1mm allow a favorable oncologic outcome. Whether such margins can be obtained depends of TNM staging, tumor location, response to chemoradiotherapy and type of surgical procedure. The technique of intersphincteric resection relies on these narrow margins to spare the sphincter. This procedure provides satisfactory oncologic outcome with a rate of circumferential margin involvement ranging from 5% to 11%, while good continence is maintained in half of the patients. The extralevator abdominoperineal resection provides good oncologic results, however this procedure requires a permanent colostomy. A permanent colostomy alters several domains of quality of life when located at the classical abdominal site but not when brought out at the perineal site as a perineal colostomy. PMID:25455959

  14. Recent advances in robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Soichiro; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Robotic technology, which has recently been introduced to the field of surgery, is expected to be useful, particularly in treating rectal cancer where precise manipulation is necessary in the confined pelvic cavity. Robotic surgery overcomes the technical drawbacks inherent to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer through the use of multi-articulated flexible tools, three-dimensional stable camera platforms, tremor filtering and motion scaling functions, and greater ergonomic and intuitive device manipulation. Assessments of the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have reported similar operation times, blood loss during surgery, rates of postoperative morbidity, and circumferential resection margin involvement when compared with laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, rates of conversion to open surgery are reportedly lower with increased urinary and male sexual functions in the early postoperative period compared with laparoscopic surgery, demonstrating the technical advantages of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. However, long-term outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have not been fully evaluated yet; therefore, large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology. PMID:26059248

  15. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  16. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  17. Toward Restored Bowel Health in Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Steineck, Gunnar; Schmidt, Heike; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Sjöberg, Fei; Bull, Cecilia Magdalena; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    As technology gets better and better, and as clinical research provides more and more knowledge, we can extend our ambition to cure patients from cancer with restored physical health among the survivors. This increased ambition requires attention to grade 1 toxicity that decreases quality of life. It forces us to document the details of grade 1 toxicity and improve our understanding of the mechanisms. Long-term toxicity scores, or adverse events as documented during clinical trials, may be regarded as symptoms or signs of underlying survivorship diseases. However, we lack a survivorship nosology for rectal cancer survivors. Primarily focusing on radiation-induced side effects, we highlight some important observations concerning late toxicity among rectal cancer survivors. With that and other data, we searched for a preliminary survivorship-disease nosology for rectal cancer survivors. We disentangled the following survivorship diseases among rectal cancer survivors: low anterior resection syndrome, radiation-induced anal sphincter dysfunction, gut wall inflammation and fibrosis, blood discharge, excessive gas discharge, excessive mucus discharge, constipation, bacterial overgrowth, and aberrant anatomical structures. The suggested survivorship nosology may form the basis for new instruments capturing long-term symptoms (patient-reported outcomes) and professional-reported signs. For some of the diseases, we can search for animal models. As an end result, the suggested survivorship nosology may accelerate our understanding on how to prevent, ameliorate, or eliminate manifestations of treatment-induced diseases among rectal cancer survivors. PMID:27238476

  18. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  19. Voiding Dysfunction after Total Mesorectal Excision in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Noh, Tae Il; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Gu; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the voiding dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods This was part of a prospective study done in the rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with TME between November 2006 and June 2008. Consecutive uroflowmetry, post-voided residual volume, and a voiding questionnaire were performed at preoperatively and postoperatively. Results A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study, including 28 male and 22 female. In the comparison of the preoperative data with the postoperative 3-month data, a significant decrease in mean maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume were found. In the comparison with the postoperative 6-month data, however only the maximal flow rate was decreased with statistical significance (P=0.02). In the comparison between surgical methods, abdominoperineal resection patients showed delayed recovery of maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume. There was no significant difference in uroflowmetry parameters with advances in rectal cancer stage. Conclusions Voiding dysfunction is common after rectal cancer surgery but can be recovered in 6 months after surgery or earlier. Abdominoperineal resection was shown to be an unfavorable factor for postoperative voiding. Larger prospective study is needed to determine the long-term effect of rectal cancer surgery in relation to male and female baseline voiding condition. PMID:22087426

  20. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  1. Rectal atresia-operative management with endoscopy and transanal approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stenström, Pernilla; Clementson Kockum, Christina; Arnbjörnsson, Einar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the technique and outcome of the management of a newborn child with rectal atresia. A girl born with rectal atresia was diagnosed during physical examination and confirmed with X-ray. The anatomic appearance of the external anus, and lower pelvis was normal. The rectal ending was located 2 cm cranial from the anus and the distance between the rectal endings was 2 cm. A colostomy was established. At the age of five months the child was operated on with a rectal anastomosis using the endoscopic and transanal approach. Closure of the colostomy was performed at the age of ten months. The rectal anastomosis was treated with rectal dilatation weekly in order to avoid stricture. The patient was faecally continent at followup one and three months postoperatively. In conclusion, the endoscopic and transanal approach is an alternative to other surgical techniques in the management of rectal atresia. PMID:22091364

  2. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  3. Same admission colostomy closure (SACC). A new approach to rectal wounds: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Renz, B M; Feliciano, D V; Sherman, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purposes of this project were to study the healing of protected rectal wounds (RWs) using contrast enemas (CEs) and to establish the safety of same admission colostomy closure (SACC) in terms of colostomy closure (CC) and rectal wound-related outcomes, for selected patients with radiologically healed RWs. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Traditional treatment of RWs has included a diverting colostomy that is closed 2 or more months later during a readmission. METHODS: All patients admitted with a rectal injury were entered into this prospective study, treated with a diverting colostomy and presacral drainage, and managed according to a postoperative protocol that included a CE per anus to detect healing of the RW. Patients with no leaking on their first CE, no infection, and anal continence underwent SACC. RESULTS: From 1990 to 1993, 30 consecutive patients had rectal injuries, 90% of which resulted from gunshot wounds. The first CE was performed in 29 patients 5 to 10 days after injury. In this group, 21 patients did not and 8 did have leakage from their RWs. The proportions of RWs radiologically healed at 7 and 10 days after injury were 55.2% and 75%, respectively. Sixteen patients with a normal CE underwent SACC 9 to 19 days after injury (mean, 12.4 days). There were two fecal fistulas (2 of 7; 28.6%) after simple suture closure, none (0 of 9) after resection of the stoma with end-to-end anastomosis, and no RW-related complications after SACC. The mean hospitalization time was 17.4 days. CONCLUSIONS: The following conclusions were drawn: (1) CE confirmed healing of RWs in 75% of patients by 10 days after injury; (2) 60% of patients with RWs were candidates for SACC, and 53% were discharged with their colostomies closed; (3) SACC was performed without complications in 87.5% of patients with radiologically healed RWs; and (4) there were no RW-related complications after SACC. Images Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. PMID:8373271

  4. [Role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer : Is MRI-based selection a future model?].

    PubMed

    Kulu, Y; Hackert, T; Debus, J; Weber, M-A; Büchler, M W; Ulrich, A

    2016-07-01

    Following the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) in the curative treatment of rectal cancer, the role of neoadjuvant therapy has evolved. By improving the surgical technique the local recurrence rate could be reduced by TME surgery alone to below 8 %. Even if local control was further improved by additional preoperative irradiation this did not lead to a general survival benefit. Guidelines advocate that all patients in UICC stage II and III should be pretreated; however, the stage-based indications for neoadjuvant therapy have limitations. This is mainly attributable to the facts that patients with T3 tumors comprise a very heterogeneous prognostic group and preoperative lymph node diagnostics lack accuracy. In contrast, in recent years the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has become an important prognostic parameter. Patients with tumors that are very close to or infiltrate the pelvic fascia (positive CRM) have a higher rate of local recurrence and poorer survival. With high-resolution pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination in patients with rectal cancer, the preoperative CRM can be determined with a high sensitivity and specificity. Improved T staging and better prediction of the resection margins by pelvic MRI potentially facilitate the selection of patients for study-based treatment strategies omitting neoadjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:27339645

  5. [A Case of Stage Ⅳ Rectal Cancer with No Evidence of Disease after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Surgery].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Watanabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Megumi; Shibasaki, Yukari; Miyazaki, Koji; Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Higuchi, Katsuyoshi; Koseki, Keita; Kitago, Kuniaki; Nishi, Naoto; Nihei, Zenro; Ito, Masashi

    2015-11-01

    A 46-year-old man presented with hematochezia in October 2012. A circumferential type 2 rectal cancer was detected with colonoscopy. Contrast-enhanced CT showed multiple liver and lung metastases. Chemotherapy was administered after the diagnosis of cStage Ⅳ rectal cancer. After 1 course of XELOX plus Bmab, the treatment was changed to XELOX plus Cmab for 21 courses. An infusion reaction occurred during the 21st course. Because a complete response of the liver metastases and a reduction in size of the primary tumor had been achieved, we performed a low anterior resection in April 2014. The final pathological diagnosis was type 2, 10×25 mm, tub1, pMP, int, INF b, pN1 (251). There was no evidence of disease (NED) after the surgery. We are closely following up this patient with no postoperative chemotherapy, and as of July 2015, there is no sign of recurrence. We describe a case of a Stage Ⅳ rectal cancer that was resected with radical surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We also include a brief review of the literature. PMID:26805126

  6. Health-related quality of life after laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer in a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, J; Angenete, E; Gellerstedt, M; Angerås, U; Jess, P; Rosenberg, J; Fürst, A; Bonjer, J; Haglind, E

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies comparing laparoscopic and open surgical techniques have reported improved health-related quality of life (HRQL). This analysis compared HRQL 12 months after laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer in a subset of a randomized trial. Methods The setting was a multicentre randomized trial (COLOR II) comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer. Involvement in the HRQL study of COLOR II was optional. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38, and EuroQol – 5D (EQ-5D™) before surgery, and 4 weeks, 6, 12 and 24 months after operation. Analysis was done according to the manual for each instrument. Results Of 617 patients in hospitals participating in the HRQL study of COLOR II, 385 were included. The HRQL deteriorated to moderate/severe degrees after surgery, gradually returning to preoperative values over time. Changes in EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38, and EQ-5D™ were not significantly different between the groups regarding global health score or any of the dimensions or symptoms at 4 weeks, 6 or 12 months after surgery. Conclusion In contrast to previous studies in patients with colonic cancer, HRQL after rectal cancer surgery was not affected by surgical approach. Registration number: NCT0029779 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:23640671

  7. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  8. Concurrent Occurrence of Uterovaginal and Rectal Prolapse: An Uncommon Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Umeh, UA; Ugwu, EO; Obi, SN; Nnagbo, JE

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant uterovaginal and rectal prolapse is an uncommon occurrence. Where laparoscopic equipment and skills are lacking, sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy can be accomplished by laparotomy, especially in women who desire to retain their uterus for either biological or psychological reasons. A 40-year-old primipara with a history of concomitant mass protruding from both her vagina and anus following a spontaneous unsupervised delivery at home. Following pelvic examination, a diagnosis of uterovaginal and rectal prolapse was made. In view of her parity and desire to retain her reproductive function, she was offered abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy with satisfactory postoperative recovery. In resource-limited settings with concomitant uterine and rectal prolapse, open abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy is an effective and safe alternative to Manchester operation in the absence of laparoscopic equipment and skills. PMID:26500795

  9. Concurrent Occurrence of Uterovaginal and Rectal Prolapse: An Uncommon Presentation.

    PubMed

    Umeh, U A; Ugwu, E O; Obi, S N; Nnagbo, J E

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant uterovaginal and rectal prolapse is an uncommon occurrence. Where laparoscopic equipment and skills are lacking, sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy can be accomplished by laparotomy, especially in women who desire to retain their uterus for either biological or psychological reasons. A 40-year-old primipara with a history of concomitant mass protruding from both her vagina and anus following a spontaneous unsupervised delivery at home. Following pelvic examination, a diagnosis of uterovaginal and rectal prolapse was made. In view of her parity and desire to retain her reproductive function, she was offered abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy with satisfactory postoperative recovery. In resource-limited settings with concomitant uterine and rectal prolapse, open abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy is an effective and safe alternative to Manchester operation in the absence of laparoscopic equipment and skills. PMID:26500795

  10. [Robot-assisted rectal surgery: hype or progress?].

    PubMed

    Becker, T; Egberts, J E; Schafmayer, C; Aselmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer has undergone a significant evolution during the last decades and has become the standard approach in specialized centers with better short-term and comparable oncological outcome to open surgery. The laparoscopic approach remains challenging and has various inherent technical challenges particularly associated with rectal cancer resection. Robotic colorectal surgery using the da Vinci® surgical system has been successfully introduced into clinical practice during recent years and provides specific technical advantages. Studies have shown that the robotic approach in colorectal surgery is safe and feasible with comparable results. It is associated with low conversion rates, more R0 situations for low rectal cancer with larger tumors and more neoadjuvant treatment compared to standard laparoscopy. Robot-assisted surgery is an attractive development of minimally invasive surgery and should also be further evaluated with mandatory monitoring of outcome parameters in registries in Germany. PMID:27334630