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Sample records for rectal gastrointestinal stromal

  1. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach. PMID:19776004

  2. Laparoscopic excision of large lower rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST): A case report

    PubMed Central

    Somu, Karthik; Dashore, Amit R.; Shah, Aashish R.; Anandh, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) involving rectum is rare. No definite method of treatment has been established because of a small number of cases being reported. It is usually managed with invasive or ablative surgery, such as abdominoperineal resection (APR). The acceptance of minimally invasive (laparoscopic) surgery in colorectal disease plays a pivotal role in improving the postoperative quality of life. We report a case of a large lower rectal GIST who underwent laparoscopic excision of tumour through a subserosal approach whilst preserving the anal sphincter and without any rectal resection. PMID:27279404

  3. Multimodality therapy of rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the era of imatinib—an Indian series

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vishwas D.; Demenezes, Jean L.; Patil, Prachi S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary objective was to determine if sphincter preservation is possible with the use of neoadjuvant imatinib in cases of rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Secondary objectives were to determine clinicopathological characteristics and intermediate term oncological outcomes of the cases of rectal GIST. Methods This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of GIST of the rectum diagnosed between January 1, 2010 and June 30, 2015 at Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. Clinical parameters that were assessed were duration of the neoadjuvant imatinib therapy, type of surgery performed as well as perioperative morbidity. Pathological parameters that were assessed included the size of the tumor, completeness of resection, mitotic count and mutational analysis. Results Of the 13 patients included, 11 were nonmetastatic at the time of presentation. All the patients received neoadjuvant imatinib in view of locally advanced nature of the tumors. Median distance from anal verge was 2 cm. Median duration of imatinib was 9 months. Of the 9 patients who underwent surgery, three had sphincter preserving surgery (33%) whereas the rest had abdomino-perineal resection. Two patients had perineal wound infections. All the operated patients received adjuvant imatinib therapy for 3 years. Median follow up period was 34 months. One patient developed distant metastasis; otherwise rest had no local or distant recurrence. Conclusions In cases of rectal GIST, sphincter preservation may not be possible in spite of neoadjuvant therapy with imatinib. PMID:27034795

  4. Collision tumour involving a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumour with invasion of the prostate and a prostatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal neoplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, although they represent only a small fraction of total gastrointestinal malignancies in adults (<2%). GISTs can be located at any level of the gastrointestinal tract; the stomach is the most common location (60-70%), in contrast to the rectum, which is most rare (4%). When a GIST invades into the adjacent prostate tissue, it can simulate prostate cancer. In this study, we report on a case comprising the unexpected collision between a rectal GIST tumour and a prostatic adenocarcinoma. Findings We describe the complexity of the clinical, endoscopic and radiological diagnosis, of the differential diagnosis based on tumour biopsy, and of the role of neoadjuvant therapy using imatinib prior to surgical treatment. Conclusions Although isolated cases of coexisting GISTs and prostatic adenocarcinomas have previously been described, this is the first reported case in the medical literature of a collision tumour involving a rectal GIST and prostatic adenocarcinoma components. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1238437468776331. PMID:23111239

  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; Hohenberger, Peter; Corless, Christopher L

    2013-09-14

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms that arise in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. They can occur at any age, the median age being 60-65 years, and typically cause bleeding, anaemia, and pain. GISTs have variable malignant potential, ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. Most tumours stain positively for the mast/stem cell growth factor receptor KIT and anoctamin 1 and harbour a kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or PDGFRA. Tumours without such mutations could have alterations in genes of the succinate dehydrogenase complex or in BRAF, or rarely RAS family genes. About 60% of patients are cured by surgery. Adjuvant treatment with imatinib is recommended for patients with a substantial risk of recurrence, if the tumour has an imatinib-sensitive mutation. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors substantially improve survival in advanced disease, but secondary drug resistance is common. PMID:23623056

  6. Genetics Home Reference: gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in the gastrointestinal tract and patches of dark skin on various areas of the body. Some ... Cancer Society: Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Cancer.Net: Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor--Diagnosis Genetic Testing Registry: Gastrointestinal ...

  7. What's New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for gastrointestinal stromal tumor What’s new in gastrointestinal stromal tumor research and treatment? There ... GIST) Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Research? Other Resources ...

  8. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for gastrointestinal stromal tumors? What are the key statistics about gastrointestinal stromal tumors? Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) ... They are slightly more common in men. Survival statistics for GIST are discussed in “ Survival rates for ...

  9. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sashidharan, Palankezhe; Matele, Apoorva; Matele, Usha; Al Felahi, Nowfel; Kassem, Khalid F.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the identification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, its molecular and immunohiostochemical basis, and its management have been a watershed in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. This paradigm shift occurred over the last two decades and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have now come to be understood as rare gastrointestinal tract tumors with predictable behavior and outcome, replacing the older terminologies like leiomyoma, schwannoma or leiomyosarcoma. This report presents a case of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor operated recently in a 47-year-old female patient and the outcome, as well as literature review of the pathological identification, sites of origin, and factors predicting its behavior, prognosis and treatment. PMID:24715944

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (gist) of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfar, Shahriyar; Sial, Khadim S; Quraishy, M S

    2007-06-01

    This is a report of a rare gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the duodenum in a 75 years old man who presented with recurrent episodes of intestinal obstruction and melena. The patient underwent successful Whipple's procedure. PMID:17623589

  11. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shailaja; Singh, Sanjeet K; Pujani, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST.We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS). Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. PMID:19568556

  12. Surgical Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and is most frequently developed in the stomach in the form of submucosal tumor. The incidence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is estimated to be as high as 25% of the population when all small and asymptomatic tumors are included. Because gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not completely distinguished from other submucosal tumors, a surgical excisional biopsy is recommended for tumors >2 cm. The surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumor are composed of an R0 resection with a normal mucosa margin, no systemic lymph node dissection, and avoidance of perforation, which results in peritoneal seeding even in cases with otherwise low risk profiles. Laparoscopic surgery has been indicated for gastrointestinal stromal tumors <5 cm, and the indication for laparoscopic surgery is expanded to larger tumors if the above mentioned surgical principles can be maintained. A simple exogastric resection and various transgastric resection techniques are used for gastrointestinal stromal tumors in favorable locations (the fundus, body, greater curvature side). For a lesion at the gastroesophageal junction in the posterior wall of the stomach, enucleation techniques have been tried preserve the organ's function. Those methods have a theoretical risk of seeding a ruptured tumor, but this risk has not been evaluated by well-designed clinical trials. While some clinical trials are still on-going, neoadjuvant imatinib is suggested when marginally unresectable or multiorgan resection is anticipated to reduce the extent of surgery and the chance of incomplete resection, rupture or bleeding. PMID:23610714

  13. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastrointestinal stromal tumors? What should you ask your doctor about gastrointestinal stromal tumors? As you cope with ... we encourage you to talk openly with your doctor, nurse, and cancer care team. You should feel ...

  14. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... what causes gastrointestinal stromal tumors? What are the risk factors for gastrointestinal stromal tumors? A risk factor is ... disease like cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. Some risk factors, like smoking, can be changed. Others, like ...

  15. What Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the digestive system. The gastrointestinal system The gastrointestinal (GI) system (or digestive system) processes food for energy ... bloodstream. This is the longest section of the GI tract, measuring more than 20 feet. The small ...

  16. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: May Mimic Adnexal Mass.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Nilay; Akpak, Yasam Kemal; Tatar, Zeynep; Batmaz, Gonca; Erken, Aslihan

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs occur in the entire gastrointestinal tract and may also arise from the retroperitoneum, omentum and mesenteries. They are originated from gastrointestinal pacemaker cells (Cajal's interstitial cells) and range from benign tumors to sarcomas at all sites of occurrence. Diagnosis of GIST could be deceptive because of their similarity in appearance to gynecological neoplasms. We would like to present a case of a woman with GIST in the small intestine giving a imprint of an adnexal mass was diagnosed correctly during surgery. The diagnosis and treatment of GIST has been reformed over the past years. It is crucial to separate GISTs from possible misdiagnosis because their prognosis and treatment could be unlike clearly. The purpose of this case is to evaluate this rarely seen clinical entity, and thus, make some contribution to the literature. PMID:26383211

  17. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: May Mimic Adnexal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Nilay; Akpak, Yaşam Kemal; Tatar, Zeynep; Batmaz, Gonca; Erken, Aslihan

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs occur in the entire gastrointestinal tract and may also arise from the retroperitoneum, omentum and mesenteries. They are originated from gastrointestinal pacemaker cells (Cajal’s interstitial cells) and range from benign tumors to sarcomas at all sites of occurrence. Diagnosis of GIST could be deceptive because of their similarity in appearance to gynecological neoplasms. We would like to present a case of a woman with GIST in the small intestine giving a imprint of an adnexal mass was diagnosed correctly during surgery. The diagnosis and treatment of GIST has been reformed over the past years. It is crucial to separate GISTs from possible misdiagnosis because their prognosis and treatment could be unlike clearly. The purpose of this case is to evaluate this rarely seen clinical entity, and thus, make some contribution to the literature. PMID:26383211

  18. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the rectum.

    PubMed

    Hama, Y; Okizuka, H; Odajima, K; Hayakawa, M; Kusano, S

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by remarkable variability in their differentiation potential, but most of these lesions do not display convincing smooth muscle or neuronal differentiation. The GISTs arising from the rectum or anal canal are extremely uncommon. We present a case of immunohistochemically proven GIST of the rectum, which was characterized by homogenous isointensity mass without necrosis or hemorrhage on T2-weighted image and by enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced study. PMID:11218017

  19. Tumeur stromale rectale: à propos d'une observation

    PubMed Central

    Rejab, Haitham; Kridis, Wala Ben; Ben Ameur, Hazem; Feki, Jihene; Frikha, Mounir; Beyrouti, Mohamed Issam

    2014-01-01

    Les tumeurs stromales gastro-intestinales sont des tumeurs mésenchymateuses peu fréquentes. Elles sont localisées préférentiellement eu niveau de l'estomac. La localisation rectale reste rare. A un nouveau cas de tumeur stromale du rectum ainsi qu'une bref revue de la littérature, on se propose d’étudier les particularités cliniques, radiologiques et thérapeutiques de cette entité rare. PMID:25120863

  20. Combined Therapy of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Piotr; Hompes, Daphne

    2016-10-01

    Radical surgery is the mainstay of therapy for primary resectable, localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Nevertheless, approximately 40% to 50% of patients with potentially curative resections develop recurrent or metastatic disease. The introduction of imatinib mesylate has revolutionized the therapy of advanced (inoperable and/or metastatic) GIST and has become the standard of care in treatment of patients with advanced GIST. This article discusses the proper selection of candidates for adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in locally advanced GIST, exploring the available evidence behind the combination of preoperative imatinib and surgery. PMID:27591496

  1. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor – An Evolving Concept

    PubMed Central

    Tornillo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with RTK inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan) the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other “entities,” have been discovered (e.g., succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, and mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway). The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data. PMID:25593916

  2. Leiomyoma of the gastrointestinal tract with interstitial cells of Cajal: a mimic of gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Anita; Nelson, Dylan; Corless, Christopher L; Deshpande, Vikram; O'Brien, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Leiomyomas (LMs) of the gastrointestinal tract arise within the muscularis mucosae (superficial) and muscularis propria (deep). There are isolated reports of KIT-positive cells, presumed interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), within gastrointestinal LMs. We have encountered esophageal LMs with a high proportion of KIT-positive and DOG1-positive spindle-shaped cells, an appearance that mimicked gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Our aim was to explore the prevalence of ICCs in LMs of the gastrointestinal tract and the etiopathogenic significance of these cells in this benign neoplasm. We identified 34 esophageal LMs (28 deep, 6 superficial), 8 gastric LMs, and 5 small-bowel LMs (all lesions in muscularis propria). We performed immunohistochemical staining studies for desmin, DOG1, and KIT on these neoplasms. We also evaluated 12 superficial colonic LMs. ICCs were distinguished from mast cells on the basis of morphology (elongated and occasionally branching spindle-shaped cells) and the presence of DOG1 reactivity. Four cases were screened for mutations in PDGFRA exons 12, 14, and 18 and KIT exons 9, 11, 13, and 17. ICCs were identified in all deep esophageal LMs and constituted an average of 20% of the lesional cells; focally, these cells comprised >50% of cells. The density of these cells was significantly higher than the background muscularis propria, and hyperplasia of ICCs was not identified in the adjacent muscle. ICCs were identified in 6 of 8 gastric LMs and 1 of 5 small-bowel LMs and were entirely absent in all superficial esophageal and colonic/rectal LMs. There were no mutations in KIT or PDGFRA. ICCs are universally present in deep esophageal LMs, and thus these neoplasms could be mistaken for gastrointestinal stromal tumors, particularly on biopsy samples, an error associated with adverse clinical consequences. ICCs are also identified in gastric and intestinal LMs, albeit in a smaller proportion of cases. Colonization and hyperplasia by non-neoplastic ICCs

  3. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins. PMID:19968734

  4. [Soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Reichardt, P

    2016-03-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare tumors that represent a major challenge due to varying clinical presentations and often interdisciplinary treatment concepts. Gold standard for the treatment of localized resectable soft tissue sarcomas is complete surgical removal. In metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, systemic therapy is the treatment of choice. The most active drugs are anthracyclines and ifosfamide. Combination chemotherapy has improved both response rate and progression-free survival at the cost of increased toxicity. Imatinib at a dose of 400 mg/day is the gold standard for patients with advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). In patients with a mutation in KIT exon 9, 800 mg/day is the recommended dose. In imatinib refractory or intolerant patients, sunitinib is recommended. Regorafenib has been approved for third-line therapy. PMID:26907871

  5. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-05-27

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  6. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  7. Targeting Disease Persistence in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zörnig, Martin; Hayashi, Yujiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent 20%–40% of human sarcomas. Although approximately half of GISTs are cured by surgery, prognosis of advanced disease used to be poor due to the high resistance of these tumors to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The introduction of molecularly targeted therapy (e.g., with imatinib mesylate) following the discovery of the role of oncogenic mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinases KIT and platelet-derived growth factor α (PDGFRA) significantly increased patient survival. However, GIST cells persist in 95%–97% of imatinib-treated patients who eventually progress and die of the disease because of the emergence of clones with drug-resistant mutations. Because these secondary mutations are highly heterogeneous, even second- and third-line drugs that are effective against certain genotypes have only moderately increased progression-free survival. Consequently, alternative strategies such as targeting molecular mechanisms underlying disease persistence should be considered. We reviewed recently discovered cell-autonomous and microenvironmental mechanisms that could promote the survival of GIST cells in the presence of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. We particularly focused on the potential role of adult precursors for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), the normal counterpart of GISTs. ICC precursors share phenotypic characteristics with cells that emerge in a subset of patients treated with imatinib and in young patients with GIST characterized by loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex proteins and lack of KIT or PDGFRA mutations. Eradication of residual GIST cells and cure of GIST will likely require individualized combinations of several approaches tailored to tumor genotype and phenotype. Significance Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are one of the most common connective tissue cancers. Most GISTs that cannot be cured by surgery respond to molecularly targeted therapy (e.g., with imatinib

  8. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  9. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  10. Drug repurposing for gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Weir, Scott J; Sethi, Geetika; Broward, Melinda A; Godwin, Andrew K

    2013-07-01

    Despite significant treatment advances over the past decade, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) remains largely incurable. Rare diseases, such as GIST, individually affect small groups of patients but collectively are estimated to affect 25 to 30 million people in the United States alone. Given the costs associated with the discovery, development, and registration of new drugs, orphan diseases such as GIST are often not pursued by mainstream pharmaceutical companies. As a result, "drug repurposing" or "repositioning," has emerged as an alternative to the traditional drug development process. In this study, we screened 796 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and found that two of these compounds, auranofin (Ridaura) and fludarabine phosphate, effectively and selectively inhibited the proliferation of GISTs, including imatinib-resistant cells. One of the most notable drug hits, auranofin, an oral, gold-containing agent approved by the FDA in 1985 for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was found to inhibit thioredoxin reductase activity and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to dramatic inhibition of GIST cell growth and viability. Importantly, the anticancer activity associated with auranofin was independent of imatinib-resistant status, but was closely related to the endogenous and inducible levels of ROS. Coupled with the fact that auranofin has an established safety profile in patients, these findings suggest for the first time that auranofin may have clinical benefit for patients with GIST, particularly in those suffering from imatinib-resistant and recurrent forms of this disease. PMID:23657945

  11. Drug Repurposing for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Pessetto, Ziyan Y.; Weir, Scott J.; Sethi, Geetika; Broward, Melinda A.; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant treatment advances over the past decade, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) remains largely incurable. Rare diseases, such as GIST, individually affect small groups of patients but collectively are estimated to affect 25–30 million people in the U.S. alone. Given the costs associated with the discovery, development and registration of new drugs, orphan diseases such as GIST are often not pursued by mainstream pharmaceutical companies. As a result, “drug repurposing” or “repositioning”, has emerged as an alternative to the traditional drug development process. In this study we screened 796 FDA-approved drugs and found that two of these compounds, auranofin and fludarabine phosphate, effectively and selectively inhibited the proliferation of GISTs including imatinib-resistant cells. One of the most notable drug hits, auranofin (Ridaura®), an oral, gold-containing agent approved by the FDA in 1985 for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), was found to inhibit thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to dramatic inhibition of GIST cell growth and viability. Importantly, the anti-cancer activity associated with auranofin was independent of IM resistant status, but was closely related to the endogenous and inducible levels of ROS, therefore is prior to IM response. Coupled with the fact auranofin has an established safety profile in patients, these findings suggest for the first time that auranofin may have clinical benefit for GIST patients, particularly in those suffering from imatinib-resistant and recurrent forms of this disease. PMID:23657945

  12. Huge Perineal Tumour: A Rare Presentation of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour of Rectum.

    PubMed

    Nahar, K; Salahuddin, G M; Islam, M R; Islam, M S; Quddus, M A; Islam, M A; Debnath, B C

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is a relatively rare neoplasm of gastrointestinal tract of which Rectal GIST is uncommon. It produces symptoms of per rectal bleeding or change in bowel habit. Recurrences following curative resection are predominantly intraabdominal, hepatic metastasis occurring at a median 20-25 months following the primary surgery. A 42 years old male presented a huge mass in hypogastrium, the size of which was reduced ofter neoadjuvant therapy for period of 1.5 years. He underwent abdominoperineal resection. He developed recurrences in perineum three times and in thigh at short intervals after primary resection. He also developed liver metastasis. He died two and half years after primary diagnosis. Rectal GIST should be included in differential diagnosis of intraabdominal mass and preoperative diagnosis based on histopathological as well as the immunohistochemical feature of the CD(117) and CD(34). Although complete surgical resection with negative tumour margin is the principal curative procedure for primary and non metastatic tumours, further studies are still needed for the determination of the most effective treatment strategy for patients of rectal GIST. PMID:27277373

  13. Laparoscopic en bloc excision of gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the rectum after neoadjuvant imatinib therapy: anteriorly extended intersphincteric resection combined with partial resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ueki, T; Nagayoshi, K; Manabe, T; Maeyama, R; Yokomizo, A; Yamamoto, H; Oda, Y; Tanaka, M

    2015-04-01

    We herein present a novel technique for laparoscopic en bloc excision involving anteriorly extended intersphincteric resection with partial resection of the posterior lobe of the prostate for large rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The sequence of neoadjuvant imatinib therapy and this less invasive surgery for marginally resectable rectal GISTs has the potential to obviate the need for urinary reconstruction and permanent stomas without jeopardizing the tumor margin status. PMID:25550117

  14. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors. A case of small intestine stromal tumor (SIST) with an uncertain biological aspect].

    PubMed

    Quaglino, F; Borello, M; Cumbo, P; Pietribiasi, F; Poma, A; Seglie, E; Do, D

    2000-05-01

    Tumors of the small intestine are relatively rare. The diagnosis is difficult to establish because the symptoms are vague and non-specific. Although the small intestine constitutes 75% of the length and over 90% of the mucosal surface area of the gastrointestinal tract, only 1 to 2% of gastrointestinal malignancies occur in this segment. Metastases are usually present at the time of diagnosis. The outcome of these patients can be improved if the possibility of a malignant small bowel tumor is considered in all cases of unexplained abdominal pain or gastrointestinal bleeding, especially in younger age. Malignant tumors occur with increasing frequency in distal small bowel with a preponderance of malignant lesions in the ileum compared with the jejunum and the duodenum. Adenocarcinoma is the most common tumor of the primary malignant small bowel tumors, followed by carcinoid, lymphoma and leiomyosarcoma. Mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, traditionally regarded as smooth muscle tumors, have demonstrated different cellular differentiations based on immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features. Therefore the terms leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma have been replaced by a more encompassing term, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The majority of GISTs occurs in the stomach; stromal tumors involving the small intestine (SISTs) are far less common but seem to have greater malignant potential. The clinical a case of a small intestinal stromal tumor (SIST), localised in the jejunum and characterised by an uncertain histological aspect, is presented and a review of the literature is made. PMID:10953571

  15. [Surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumors at different locations].

    PubMed

    Ye, Yingjiang; Gao, Zhidong; Wang, Shan

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors(GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors in gastrointestinal tract. At present, surgical and molecular targeted therapies are the main treatments. Operation is properly the only way of radical resection. The general principles of surgery are complete resection of the tumor, negative margins, as well as no intraoperative tumor rupture. The choice of surgical skills for GIST is obviously affected by different locations. This paper reviews current literatures combined with our experiences, and elaborates relevant contents in detail. PMID:25940165

  16. Collection of Biospecimen & Clinical Information in Patients w/ Gastrointestinal Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-24

    Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Gynecologic Cancers; Gynecologic Cancers Cervical Cancer; Gastric (Stomach) Cancer; Gastro-Esophageal(GE) Junction Cancer; Gastrointenstinal Stromal Tumor (GIST); Colon/Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Colon Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Anal Cancer; Anal Cancer; Hepatobiliary Cancers; Hepatobiliary Cancers Liver; Pancreatic Cancer

  17. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)--medical rarities?].

    PubMed

    Predescu, D; Gheorghe, M; Predoiu, I; Iosif, C; Constantin, A; Chiru, F; Cociu, L; Constantinoiu, S

    2010-01-01

    Although their overall incidence is low, GISTs are distinctive subgroup of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors which express CD117 or platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA). Considered as rare digestive cancers, tumors like schwannomas, neurofibromas, gastrointestinal leiomiomas are now reclassified as GIST based on immunohistochemistry studies. GIST are more frequent in stomach (40-70%), small bowel (20-40%), colon (5-15%), meanwhile locations such as mesentery, omentum, retro peritoneum in less of 5%. 10 GIST patients were surgically managed during 2004-2009. 5 gastric and 5 small bowel GIST. Most with symptomatic disease: palpable tumor, abdominal pain, anemia, fatigue, superior digestive hemorrhage or occlusion. Imagistic diagnosis consisted of: barium swallow, abdominal sonography, CT and PET-CT. Confirmation was made by hystopathological exam and immunohistochemistry. All patients had more or less wide surgical resections. For some patients there was also a specific adjuvant treatment. All patients survived after surgery. The principle of surgery for GIST is RO resection of the tumor. Tumor rupture or R1 resection of the primary tumor has a negative impact on disease free survival. Some patients (great volume tumors, R1 or R2 resection) had adjuvant treatment. Imatinib mesylate and derivates showed a significant improvement of recurrence free survival with one condition: permanent treatment. Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment in patients with localized, resectable GIST. Recurrence rate of 17-21% and 5 years survival rate of 48-70%, even in resectable GIST, impose an adjuvant treatment. PMID:20941986

  18. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Arising From a Gastric Duplication Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Machicado, Jorge; Davogustto, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts (GDC) are rarely diagnosed in adults, but previous cases have been associated with malignancy. We present a case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) arising from a GDC in a 71-year-old woman who presented with 3 years of early satiety, anorexia, abdominal distention, and weight loss. Abdominal CT showed a 9.3 x 5.2 x 9.5-cm well-circumscribed cystic mass arising 3 cm above the gastroduodenal junction. The cyst was resected, and histopathology was consistent with GDC. Future studies are needed to clarify the malignant potential of GDC and the molecular pathways for its development. PMID:27144196

  19. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: molecular markers and genetic subtypes.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christine M; Corless, Christopher L; Heinrich, Michael C

    2013-10-01

    Mutation-activated signaling from the KIT and PDGFRA kinases has been successfully targeted in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), with subtle differences between the mutations serving to refine prognosis and more precisely tailor therapy. There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of GISTs lacking mutations in KIT or PDGFRA, so called wild-type GISTs, further aiding in management decisions. This article provides an overview of all the known molecular subtypes of GIST and provides information about clinical correlates, treatment, and prognosis depending on the subtype. PMID:24093165

  20. Targeting gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the role of regorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Brett; Li, Zula; Cranmer, Lee D; Jones, Robin L; Pollack, Seth M

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a devastating disease in the metastatic setting, but its natural history has been dramatically altered by the development of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, most notably imatinib. Although patients with advanced GIST live much longer today than they did in the past, imatinib-refractory disease remains a tremendous problem. For disease that is refractory to imatinib and sunitinib, regorafenib is an excellent option. In this review, we discuss the biology and clinical work establishing regorafenib as the standard of care for advanced GIST refractory to both imatinib and sunitinib. PMID:27284251

  1. Targeting gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the role of regorafenib.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Brett; Li, Zula; Cranmer, Lee D; Jones, Robin L; Pollack, Seth M

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a devastating disease in the metastatic setting, but its natural history has been dramatically altered by the development of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, most notably imatinib. Although patients with advanced GIST live much longer today than they did in the past, imatinib-refractory disease remains a tremendous problem. For disease that is refractory to imatinib and sunitinib, regorafenib is an excellent option. In this review, we discuss the biology and clinical work establishing regorafenib as the standard of care for advanced GIST refractory to both imatinib and sunitinib. PMID:27284251

  2. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Li; Liu, Dan; Yang, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Min-Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the liver. A 17-year-old man with a solid mass in the anterior segment of the right liver was asymptomatic with negative laboratory examinations with the exception of positive HBV. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) revealed a hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase and hypoechoic features during the portal and late phases. However, enhanced spiral computed tomography (CT) showed hypoattenuation in all three phases. Following biopsy, immunohistochemical evaluation demonstrated positive CD117. Different imaging features of primary GISTs of the liver are due to pathological properties and different working systems between CEUS and enhanced spiral CT. PMID:19653356

  3. Knowns and Known Unknowns of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Marín, Virginia; Maki, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    The first 15 years of management of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) have led to 3 lines of therapy for metastatic disease: imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib. In the adjuvant setting, imatinib is usually given for 3 years postoperatively to patients with higher-risk primary tumors that are completely resected. In this review, issues regarding GIST adjuvant therapy are discussed. It is hoped this review will help the reader understand the present standard of care to improve upon it in years to come. PMID:27546844

  4. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF CANINE GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS COMPARED TO OTHER GASTROINTESTINAL SPINDLE CELL TUMORS.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Joshua; Sutherland-Smith, James; Penninck, Dominique; Jennings, Samuel; Barber, Lisa; Barton, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Canine gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are a recent subtype of gastrointestinal spindle cell tumor recognized with the increasing use of immunohistochemistry. To our knowledge, no imaging features have been described in immunostochemically confirmed canine GISTs. The objective of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe ultrasonographic features of canine GISTs compared with other spindle cell tumors. Thirty-seven dogs with an ultrasonographically visible gastrointestinal mass and a histopathologic diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasia were examined. Immunohistochemistry staining was performed for retrieved tissue samples to further differentiate the tumor type and each sample was interpreted by a single veterinary pathologist. Ultrasonographic features recorded examined included mass echogenicity, homogeneity, presence of cavitation, layer of origin, bowel wall symmetry, and loss of wall layering, location, size, vascularity, and evidence of perforation or ulceration. Tumor types included 19 GISTs, eight leiomyosarcomas, six leiomyomas, and four nonspecified sarcomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors were significantly more likely to be associated (P < 0.03) with abdominal effusion than other tumor types. There was overlap between the anatomical locations of all tumors types with the exception of the cecum where all eight tumors identified were GISTs. Besides location, there were no unique ultrasound features of GISTs that would allow distinction from other gastrointestinal spindle cell tumors. Similar to previous studies, GISTs appeared to be the most common spindle cell tumor associated with the cecum in our sample of dogs. The high frequency of abdominal effusion with GIST's was of unknown etiology could possibly have been due to septic peritonitis. PMID:25846814

  5. Characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumours, diagnostic procedure and therapeutic management and main directions of nursing practice in gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Głuszek, Stanisław; Kozieł, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) constitute a separate group of mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. They have been commonly recognized for a few years, they have created a new problem in medical practice. GIST are more often centred in the stomach. They equally affect female and male patients and occur mainly in patients older than 50 years of age. The clinical picture of the tumour is non-specific. Radical surgical treatment and molecularly targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors are used in GIST treatment. Nursing practice with reference to GIST danger is connected with biopsychosocial interventions of perioperative, oncological and palliative procedures and involves the area of health education mainly oriented towards shaping preventive procedures which favour early disease detection and support therapy and recovery. PMID:25784835

  6. Management of early asymptomatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Faiss, Siegbert; Knoefel, Wolfram-Trudo; Wardelmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Approximately two thirds of clinically manifest tumors occur in the stomach, nearly one third in the small bowel, and the rest in the colorectal region with a few cases in the esophagus. GIST originate within the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the tubular gastrointestinal tract and grow mostly toward the serosa, far less often toward the mucosa. In the latter case, ulceration may develop and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding as the cardinal symptom. However, most GIST of the stomach are asymptomatic. They are increasingly detected incidentally as small intramural or submucosal tumors during endoscopy and particularly during endoscopic ultrasound. Epidemiological and molecular genetic findings suggest that early asymptomatic GIST of the stomach (< 1 cm) show self-limiting tumorigenesis. Thus, early (< 1 cm) asymptomatic gastric GIST (synonym: micro-GIST) are found in 20%-30% of the elderly. The mostly elderly people with early gastric GIST have an excellent GIST-specific prognosis. Patients with early GIST of the stomach can therefore be managed by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25031785

  7. Ectopic Pancreas Imitating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) In The Stomach.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Bandurski, Roman; Pryczynicz, Anna; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare congenital disorder defined as pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal body of the pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic, but it may become clinically evident depending on the size, location and the pathological changes similar to those observed in case of the normal pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be located at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common locations are: the stomach, duodenum or the proximal part of small intestine. The risk of malignancy, bleeding and occlusion are the most serious complications. Despite the development in diagnostics, it still remains a challenge for the clinician to differentiate it from neoplasm. In this report, we described a case of 28-years old woman who presented recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor on the border of the body and antrum of the back wall of great curvature of the stomach. The histopathological examination after surgery showed heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions. PMID:26172167

  8. The neo-adjuvant treatment in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Catania, V; Consoli, A; Cavallaro, A; Liardo, R L E; Malaguarnera, M

    2010-08-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) is a rare intra-abdominal tumor, characterized by a specific histological and immunohistochemical pattern. These tumors affect with higher frequency stomach and small bowel and occur at a median age of 60 years with a slight male predominance. An early stage of GIST often don't cause any symptoms, so most GISTs are diagnosed in later stages of the disease. We report a case of GIST diagnosed only with clinical data and positron emission tomography (PET). We demonstrate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment with Imatinib mesylate, a newly developed tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. The neoadjuvant treatment with Imatinib reduced the mass size and vascularization, making possible a surgical approach. PMID:20707293

  9. Acute Pancreatitis and Gastroduodenal Intussusception Induced by an Underlying Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Ahmet; Koparan, Ibrahim Halil; Adin, Mehmet Emin

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumors of the gastrointestinal system and comprise only 1% to 3% of all gastrointestinal tract tumors, with the majority of them arising in the stomach. In this report, we present the unique findings of a case of gastroduodenal intussusception caused by an underlying gastric GIST and complicated with severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:27104028

  10. An update on molecular genetics of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tornillo, L; Terracciano, L M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. Most of them show activating mutations of the genes coding for KIT or platelet‐derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα), two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). The RTK inhibitor Imatinib (Gleevec®, Novartis, Switzerland), induces regression of the tumour. The level of response to treatment, together with other clinicopathological parameters is related to the type and site of the activating mutation, thus suggesting that these tumours should be classified according to the molecular context. This is confirmed also by the phenomenon of the resistance to treatment, which arises because of different mechanisms (second mutation, amplification, activation of other RTKs) and can be fought only by specific RTK inhibitors, that are at present under development. RTK activation involves an homogeneous transduction pathway whose components (MAPK, AKT, PI3K, mTOR and RAS) are possible targets of new molecular treatment. A new paradigm of classification integrating the classic pathological criteria with the molecular changes will permit personalised prognosis and treatment. PMID:16731599

  11. Molecular targets in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) therapy.

    PubMed

    Braconi, C; Bracci, R; Cellerino, R

    2008-08-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchimal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Such tumors usually have activating mutations in either KIT (75-80%) or Platelet Derived Growth Factor Receptor alpha (PDGFRa) (5-10%) which lead to ligand-independent signal transduction. Targeting these activated proteins with Imatinib mesylate, a small-molecule kinase inhibitor, has proven useful in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic GISTs. However, more than half of patients develop resistance to Imatinib after about 2 years. Therefore, other targets have been studying in order to implement the therapeutical armamentarium for this disease. Sunitinib malate is an oral multikinase inhibitor that targets several receptor tyrosine kinases and has proved to prolong survival in Imatinib-resistant patients. Other molecules, such as Nilotinib, Sorafenib and Dasatinib were shown to be useful in Imatinib resistant mutant cell lines and the results of their activity in humans are being awaited. Recent evidence suggests that GIST cells acquire the capability to escape from the control of KIT and PDGFRa through the activation of alternative pathways. Therefore, further effort should be invested in the discovery of new signaling pathways, such as AXL, MET, IGF-R, which might be involved in the evolution of the disease. After a description of KIT and PDGFRa as known targets of anti-GIST treatments, we review other mechanisms and mediators that might be potential targets of new therapies, providing a comprehensive revision of the new molecular strategies under investigation. PMID:18690842

  12. Current Techniques for Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Weon Jin; Cho, Joo Young

    2016-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) arise from the proper muscle layer of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract and have a low malignant potential. They are sometimes accompanied by symptoms, but in most cases are detected by chance. Endoscopic surgery of subepithelial tumors in the upper GI tract has been actively performed, and its merits include the need for fewer medical devices compared with other surgical procedures and post-resection organ preservation. However, because endoscopic procedures are still limited to small or pilot studies, a multidisciplinary approach combining laparoscopy and endoscopy is needed for more effective and pathologically acceptable management of GISTs. Many new endoscopic surgeries have been developed, and this review describes the current status of and the new approaches for endoscopic surgery of GISTs in the upper GI tract. PMID:27214386

  13. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma or Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  14. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of small gastrointestinal stromal tumors outside the stomach

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YONG-PENG; LI, YI; SONG, CHUN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the clinicopathological features and prognostic factors of primary small gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) outside the stomach. The clinical data, clinicopathological features and prognostic factors of 20 patients with a pathologically-confirmed diagnosis of non-gastric GIST that were treated at Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Institute between July 2006 and December 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. In total, 15 patients were male and 5 were female, with a median age of 58 years (range, 44–82 years). A change in bowel habits was the original symptom of rectal small GISTs in 6 out of 8 patients, while patients with small GISTs in other locations demonstrated no overt symptoms and the lesions were detected by systematic examinations of other diseases or abdominal surgical procedures performed on other organs. In total, 19 patients out of the total 20 patients underwent surgery, and 1 patient with rectal GIST received continuous oral imatinib mesylate (400 mg once a day) instead of undergoing surgery. The mean diameter of tumors was 1.55±0.54 cm (range, 0.3–2.0 cm) and the median was 1.70 cm. The pathomorphology of the lesions was mainly spindle cell, and immunohistochemistry revealed the expression rate of cluster of differentiation (CD)117, CD34 and discovered on GIST-1 were 85, 80 and 70%. According to the mitosis index, small rectal GISTs were more frequent compared with other positions (P<0.05), while the frequency of small GISTs >1 cm in size was not significantly different from the frequency of small GISTs ≤1 cm in size (P=0.995). All 20 patients were followed up, with a median follow-up duration of 49.5 months (range, 10.5–94.4 months). At the end of the follow-up period, tumor recurrence occurred in 5 patients and 1 patient succumbed following progression. According to the analysis of the tumor sites, the RFS time of patients with small rectal GISTs was significantly different than the RFS time in

  15. Imaging of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: From Diagnosis to Evaluation of Therapeutic Response.

    PubMed

    Vernuccio, Federica; Taibbi, Adele; Picone, Dario; LA Grutta, Ludovico; Midiri, Massimo; Lagalla, Roberto; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Bartolotta, Tommaso Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    Once considered an obscure tumor entity with poor prognosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are nowadays recognized as the most common mesenchymal tumors of the alimentary tract. GISTs differ from other mesenchymal neoplasms at pathology since 90% of them exhibit strong immunohistochemical staining for KIT, a tyrosinase kinase growth factor receptor. In the early 2000s, the ability of imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, to inhibit KIT established a new paradigm for cancer treatment. A reduction in lesion size may not be observed or may appear many months after therapy; thus, tumor response criteria alternative to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors were developed. This review highlights the role of imaging in the detection, characterization, preoperative staging, postoperative assessment, therapy-response evaluation and treatment-related toxicities. All this information is crucial in optimizing patient management. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the most commonly used modality for staging the disease and assessing treatment response, whereas positron-emission tomography adds valuable functional information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may also be useful, especially in ano-rectal GISTs. Diffusion-weighted MRI may provide promising indicators of tumor response to targeted molecular therapy. Radiologists and oncologists should be aware of all these issues related to GISTs, since multidisciplinary teams gathering different expertise are usually needed to properly treat patients with GISTs. PMID:27272772

  16. Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) approach for large juxta-anal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Nicolas; Wörns, Marcus-Alexander; dos Santos, Daniel Pinto; Lang, Hauke; Huber, Tobias; Kneist, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rarely found in the rectum. Large rectal GISTs in the narrow pelvis sometimes require extended abdominal surgery to obtain free resection margins, and it is a challenge to preserve sufficient anal sphincter and urogenital function. Here we present a 56-year-old male with a locally advanced juxta-anal non-metastatic GIST of approximately 10 cm in diameter. Therapy with imatinib reduced the tumour size and allowed partial intersphincteric resection (pISR). The patient underwent an electrophysiology-controlled nerve-sparing hybrid of laparoscopic and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) in a multimodal setting. The down-to-up approach provided sufficient dissection plane visualisation and allowed the confirmed nerve-sparing. Lateroterminal coloanal anastomosis was performed. Follow-up showed preserved urogenital function and good anorectal function, and the patient remains disease-free under adjuvant chemotherapy as of 12 months after surgery. This report suggests that the TAMIS approach enables extraluminal high-quality oncological and function-preserving excision of high-risk GISTs. PMID:27279406

  17. A Case of a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor with Skeinoid Fibers of the Sigmoid Colon

    PubMed Central

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Katsumata, Kenji; Shibuya, Makoto; Katayanagi, Sou; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Serizawa, Hiromi; Shimazu, Motohide; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was diagnosed with rectal cancer and underwent Hartmann's procedure. Although no tumors were identified during the preoperative examination, gross examination of the resected specimen incidentally revealed a submucosal tumor that was 9 mm in diameter at the oral side and located in the proximal stump of the specimen from the sigmoid colon. We suspected a concurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and performed a histopathological examination. An L-shaped nodular lesion measuring 9 × 6 mm was histologically composed of a patternless proliferation of spindle cells intermingled with eosinophilic globules. Cellular atypia, prominent mitotic figures and necrotic foci were not observed in the nodule. The spindle cells were positive for CD34, CD117 and vimentin, but negative for CD56, smooth muscle actin and S-100 protein. MIB-1 positivity was estimated to be as low as approximately 1–2%. Electron microscopy showed a bundle of wool-like fibers with a periodicity of approximately 40 nm. We therefore considered the lesion to be a low-risk GIST with skeinoid fibers in the large intestine. Although numerous previous reports have reported skeinoid fibers in the stomach and small intestines, there have been only 9 cases (including the present case) of skeinoid fibers in the large intestine. PMID:25408627

  18. Immune infiltrates are prognostic factors in localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Semeraro, Michaela; Sarabi, Matthieu; Desbois, Mélanie; Locher, Clara; Mendez, Rosa; Vimond, Nadège; Concha, Angel; Garrido, Federico; Isambert, Nicolas; Chaigneau, Loic; Le Brun-Ly, Valérie; Dubreuil, Patrice; Cremer, Isabelle; Caignard, Anne; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Chaba, Kariman; Flament, Caroline; Halama, Niels; Jäger, Dirk; Eggermont, Alexander; Bonvalot, Sylvie; Commo, Frédéric; Terrier, Philippe; Opolon, Paule; Emile, Jean-François; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Kroemer, Guido; Chaput, Nathalie; Le Cesne, Axel; Blay, Jean-Yves; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2013-06-15

    Cancer immunosurveillance relies on effector/memory tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells with a T-helper cell 1 (TH1) profile. Evidence for a natural killer (NK) cell-based control of human malignancies is still largely missing. The KIT tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate markedly prolongs the survival of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) by direct effects on tumor cells as well as by indirect immunostimulatory effects on T and NK cells. Here, we investigated the prognostic value of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) expressing CD3, Foxp3, or NKp46 (NCR1) in a cohort of patients with localized GIST. We found that CD3(+) TIL were highly activated in GIST and were especially enriched in areas of the tumor that conserve class I MHC expression despite imatinib mesylate treatment. High densities of CD3(+) TIL predicted progression-free survival (PFS) in multivariate analyses. Moreover, GIST were infiltrated by a homogeneous subset of cytokine-secreting CD56(bright) (NCAM1) NK cells that accumulated in tumor foci after imatinib mesylate treatment. The density of the NK infiltrate independently predicted PFS and added prognostic information to the Miettinen score, as well as to the KIT mutational status. NK and T lymphocytes preferentially distributed to distinct areas of tumor sections and probably contributed independently to GIST immunosurveillance. These findings encourage the prospective validation of immune biomarkers for optimal risk stratification of patients with GIST. PMID:23592754

  19. Optimizing Adherence to Adjuvant Imatinib in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tetzlaff, Eric D.; Davey, Monica P.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of patient-administered oral anticancer drugs is paralleled by new challenges in maintaining treatment adherence. These challenges are particularly significant with adjuvant therapies for prevention of disease recurrence, where the benefits of ongoing treatment are not readily apparent to patients. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants (collectively referred to as advanced practitioners) play integral roles in providing education on disease and treatment to patients that can increase adherence to oral therapies and ideally improve outcomes. For patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), the oral targeted therapy imatinib has become the mainstay of treatment for advanced and recurrent disease and as adjuvant therapy following surgical resection. Recent data indicate significantly improved overall survival with 3 years vs. 1 year of adjuvant imatinib therapy. Continuous dosing with imatinib is needed for optimal efficacy and to limit additional health-care costs associated with management of disease progression in GIST. However, longer duration of therapy increases the risk of nonadherence. Imatinib adherence rates, as well as factors contributing to nonadherence to adjuvant therapy in routine clinical practice, are discussed in this review. Also explored are practical approaches for improving adherence to adjuvant imatinib therapy through greater patient education, in light of the increased duration of therapy in select patients. PMID:25032004

  20. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: what do we know now?

    PubMed

    Corless, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the GI tract, arising from the interstitial cells of Cajal, primarily in the stomach and small intestine. They manifest a wide range of morphologies, from spindle cell to epithelioid, but are immunopositive for KIT (CD117) and/or DOG1 in essentially all cases. Although most tumors are localized at presentation, up to half will recur in the abdomen or spread to the liver. The growth of most GISTs is driven by oncogenic mutations in either of two receptor tyrosine kinases: KIT (75% of cases) or PDGFRA (10%). Treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib is effective in controlling unresectable disease; however, drug resistance caused by secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations eventually develops in 90% of cases. Adjuvant therapy with imatinib is commonly used to reduce the likelihood of disease recurrence after primary surgery, and for this reason assessing the prognosis of newly resected tumors is one of the most important roles for pathologists. Approximately 15% of GISTs are negative for mutations in KIT and PDGFRA. Recent studies of these so-called wild-type GISTs have uncovered a number of other oncogenic drivers, including mutations in neurofibromatosis type I, RAS genes, BRAF, and subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase complex. Routine genotyping is strongly recommended for optimal management of GISTs, as the type and dose of TKI used for treatment is dependent on the mutation identified. PMID:24384849

  1. Succinate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Pediatric and Adult Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Belinsky, Martin G.; Rink, Lori; von Mehren, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in adults are generally driven by somatic gain-of-function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA, and biological therapies targeted to these receptor tyrosine kinases comprise part of the treatment regimen for metastatic and inoperable GISTs. A minority (10–15%) of GISTs in adults, along with ∼85% of pediatric GISTs, lacks oncogenic mutations in KIT and PDGFRA. Not surprisingly these wild type (WT) GISTs respond poorly to kinase inhibitor therapy. A subset of WT GISTs shares a set of distinguishing clinical and pathological features, and a flurry of recent reports has convincingly demonstrated shared molecular characteristics. These GISTs have a distinct transcriptional profile including over-expression of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, and exhibit deficiency in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme complex. The latter is often but not always linked to bi-allelic inactivation of SDH subunit genes, particularly SDHA. This review will summarize the molecular, pathological, and clinical connections that link this group of SDH-deficient neoplasms, and offer a view toward understanding the underlying biology of the disease and the therapeutic challenges implicit to this biology. PMID:23730622

  2. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis. Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center. The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs. The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  3. Imaging and Clinicopathologic Features of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Abbey J.; Gollub, Marc J.; Shia, Jinru; Antonescu, Christina; Bains, Manjit S.; Levine, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging and clinicopathologic characteristics of esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and to emphasize the features that differentiate esophageal GISTs from esophageal leiomyomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS A pathology database search identified all surgically resected or biopsied esophageal GISTs, esophageal leiomyomas, and esophageal leiomyosarcomas from 1994 to 2012. Esophageal GISTs were included only if imaging studies (including CT, fluoroscopic, or 18F-FDG PET/CT scans) and clinical data were available. RESULTS Nineteen esophageal mesenchymal tumors were identified, including eight esophageal GISTs (42%), 10 esophageal leiomyomas (53%), and one esophageal leiomyosarcoma (5%). Four patients (50%) with esophageal GIST had symptoms, including dysphagia in three (38%), cough in one (13%), and chest pain in one (13%). One esophageal GIST appeared on barium study as a smooth submucosal mass. All esophageal GISTs appeared on CT as well-marginated predominantly distal lesions, isoattenuating to muscle, that moderately enhanced after IV contrast agent administration. Compared with esophageal leiomyomas, esophageal GISTs tended to be more distal, larger, and more heterogeneous and showed greater IV enhancement on CT. All esophageal GISTs showed marked avidity (mean maximum standardized uptake value, 16) on PET scans. All esophageal GISTs were positive for c-KIT (a cell-surface transmembrane tyrosine kinase also known as CD117) and CD34. On histopathology, six esophageal GISTs (75%) were of the spindle pattern and two (25%) were of a mixed spindle and epithelioid pattern. Five esophageal GISTs had exon 11 mutations (with imatinib sensitivity). Clinical outcome correlated with treatment strategy (resection plus adjuvant therapy or resection alone) rather than risk stratification. CONCLUSION Esophageal GISTs are unusual but clinically important mesenchymal neoplasms. Although esophageal GISTs and

  4. Recurrent epimutation of SDHC in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Miettinen, Markku; Walker, Robert L; Wang, Yonghong; Zhu, Yuelin Jack; Waterfall, Joshua J; Noyes, Natalia; Retnakumar, Parvathy; Yang, Zhiming; Smith, William I; Killian, M Scott; Lau, C Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Walling, Jennifer; Stevenson, Holly; Smith, Carly; Wang, Zengfeng; Lasota, Jerzy; Kim, Su Young; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Helman, Lee J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2014-12-24

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a conserved effector of cellular metabolism and energy production, and loss of SDH function is a driver mechanism in several cancers. SDH-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors (dSDH GISTs) collectively manifest similar phenotypes, including hypermethylated epigenomic signatures, tendency to occur in pediatric patients, and lack of KIT/PDGFRA mutations. dSDH GISTs often harbor deleterious mutations in SDH subunit genes (SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD, termed SDHx), but some are SDHx wild type (WT). To further elucidate mechanisms of SDH deactivation in SDHx-WT GIST, we performed targeted exome sequencing on 59 dSDH GISTs to identify 43 SDHx-mutant and 16 SDHx-WT cases. Genome-wide DNA methylation and expression profiling exposed SDHC promoter-specific CpG island hypermethylation and gene silencing in SDHx-WT dSDH GISTs [15 of 16 cases (94%)]. Six of 15 SDHC-epimutant GISTs occurred in the setting of the multitumor syndrome Carney triad. We observed neither SDHB promoter hypermethylation nor large deletions on chromosome 1q in any SDHx-WT cases. Deep genome sequencing of a 130-kbp (kilo-base pair) window around SDHC revealed no recognizable sequence anomalies in SDHC-epimutant tumors. More than 2000 benign and tumor reference tissues, including stem cells and malignancies with a hypermethylator epigenotype, exhibit solely a non-epimutant SDHC promoter. Mosaic constitutional SDHC promoter hypermethylation in blood and saliva from patients with SDHC-epimutant GIST implicates a postzygotic mechanism in the establishment and maintenance of SDHC epimutation. The discovery of SDHC epimutation provides a unifying explanation for the pathogenesis of dSDH GIST, whereby loss of SDH function stems from either SDHx mutation or SDHC epimutation. PMID:25540324

  5. Gastric Schwannoma: A Benign Tumor Often Misdiagnosed as Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Pravin M.; Somani, Vaibhav S.; Mulani, Astha M.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric schwannomas are rare mesenchymal tumors that arise from the nerve plexus of gut wall. They present with nonspecific symptoms and are often detected incidentally. Preoperative investigation is not pathognomic and many are therefore misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We report a rare case of a 37-year old woman who underwent laparotomy for complex bilateral ovarian cyst with resection of gastric-gastrointestinal stromal tumor preoperatively, but confirmed to have a gastric schwannomas postoperatively. This case underscores the differential diagnosis of submucosal, exophytic gastric mass as schwannoma. PMID:26664714

  6. Gastric Schwannoma: A Benign Tumor Often Misdiagnosed as Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Shah, Apurva S; Rathi, Pravin M; Somani, Vaibhav S; Mulani, Astha M

    2015-09-28

    Gastric schwannomas are rare mesenchymal tumors that arise from the nerve plexus of gut wall. They present with nonspecific symptoms and are often detected incidentally. Preoperative investigation is not pathognomic and many are therefore misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We report a rare case of a 37-year old woman who underwent laparotomy for complex bilateral ovarian cyst with resection of gastric-gastrointestinal stromal tumor preoperatively, but confirmed to have a gastric schwannomas postoperatively. This case underscores the differential diagnosis of submucosal, exophytic gastric mass as schwannoma. PMID:26664714

  7. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites. PMID:25120735

  8. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor with an unusual presentation as an enlarged prostate gland: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Deisch, Jeremy K.; Reinke, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 78-year-old male who presented with urinary retention, constipation and an enlarged prostate gland. A transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed. Pathologic examination revealed a hypercellular-spindled neoplasm with frequent mitoses, nuclear pleomorphism, and multifocal geographic tumoral necrosis. A pathologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was made based on morphologic and immunohistochemical findings, and was later reinforced by molecular study results. This lesion was initially thought to represent a primary prostatic GIST. To the best of our knowledge, there have been only five cases of primary prostatic GISTs. Subsequent imaging studies revealed the mass to be contiguous with the anterior rectal wall, suggesting the possibility of a rectal primary with extension to the prostate gland. The patient was treated with imatinib mesylate, and after twelve months of follow up failed to demonstrate any evidence of progression or metastatic disease. GIST should be considered in cases of prostatic tumors with a spindled or epithelioid morphology, and immunohistochemistry and possible molecular studies are recommended to aid in diagnosis and guide treatment decisions. PMID:27034816

  9. Small Intestinal and Mesenteric Multiple Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Causing Occult Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Erdogan, Ahmet; Cetinkaya, Erdinc; Akgul, Ozgur; Coskun, Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the meseancymal neoplasms which may involve any part of gastrointestinal tract. C-Kit and platelet derived factor receptor alpha polypeptide are believed to be responsible for the genetic basis. This case presentation aimed to discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic modality of multiple small intestinal, omental, and mesenteric GISTs with different sizes which caused occult bleeding in a 43-year-old male patient. PMID:26989528

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) with a thousand faces: atypical manifestations and causes of misdiagnosis on imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, S W; Kim, H C; Yang, D M; Won, K Y

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) can lead to emergency situations, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction, and tumoural rupture with haemoperitoneum or peritonitis. In addition, if a GIST grows exophytically to a large size, it is often misdiagnosed as a tumour arising from adjacent organs. Sometimes, the atypical appearance of GISTs on imaging causes diagnostic confusion. In this article, we illustrate a variety of GISTs with atypical presentations and also discuss the important diagnostic clues for differentiating GISTs from other lesions. PMID:26646370

  11. Mucinous cyst exhibiting severe dysplasia in gastric heterotopic pancreas associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Antony; Storey, David; Lee, Cheok Soon; Murali, Rajmohan

    2007-11-21

    Heterotopic pancreatic tissue within the stomach is rare and dysplasia within heterotopic pancreatic tissue is very rare. We present the first report of a patient with concurrent occurrence of heterotopic pancreas in the stomach with a gastrointestinal stromal tumour. PMID:17963310

  12. CT and MR imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumor of stomach: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jingshan; Kang, Wenyan; Zhu, Jin; Xu, Jianmin

    2012-12-01

    This pictorial review illustrates CT and MR imaging appearance of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach and other lesions with similar imaging appearance. GIST of the stomach appears as well-defined enhanced masses with characteristics of subeppthial neoplasms. Majority are exophytic growth, but can also be of intra-luminal growth. GIST can growth into a large mass without gastrointestinal tract obstruction. Necrosis is often seen in GIST and results in heterogeneous enhancement and communication with gastrointestinal tract. CT and MRI features of several other neoplasms mimicking GISTs in the stomach are also described in this review. PMID:23289087

  13. Gastrointestinal tract spindle cell tumors with interstitial cells of Cajal: Prevalence excluding gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Jung; Hwang, Chung Su; Kim, Ahrong; Kim, Kyungbin; Choi, Kyung Un

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas and schwannomas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are mainly comprised of spindle-shaped tumor cells and should always be differentiated from gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Mast/stem cell growth factor receptor Kit (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG1) are well-known diagnostic markers for the detection of a GIST by immunohistochemical staining. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and significance of spindle cell tumors of the GIT with KIT- or DOG1-positive spindle-shaped cells, presumed to be interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), other than GISTs. A total of 71 leiomyomas and 35 schwannomas were examined and clinicopathological information was obtained. KIT and DOG1 immunostaining was performed to determine the proportions of positive cells. Mutation screening of KIT exons 9, 11, 13 and 17, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) exons 12 and 18 was performed in cases with a relatively high proportion of either KIT- or DOG1-positive cells. The frequency of leiomyomas and schwannomas with KIT- and DOG1-positive ICCs was 35.2% (25/71 cases) and 5.7% (2/35 cases), respectively. Among the esophageal leiomyomas with KIT- and DOG-positive ICCs (14/25; 56.0%), 5 leiomyomas involved the muscularis mucosa and 9 leiomyomas involved the muscularis propria. All gastric leiomyomas with KIT- and DOG1-positive ICCs (11/25; 44%) involved the muscularis propria. All schwannomas with an increased proportion of KIT- or DOG1-positive ICCs were of gastric origin. No KIT or PDGFRA mutations were detected in 7 leiomyomas and 2 schwannomas. In conclusion, the majority of leiomyomas and the minority of schwannomas in the GIT had a significant portion of KIT- and DOG1-positive cells. All of the tumors were located in the upper GIT, and could be present in the muscularis propria or muscularis mucosa. The tumors represented a non-neoplastic proliferation of KIT- and DOG1-positive cells in the GIT. Careful evaluation of KIT- or DOG1

  14. Cytokeratin expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 687 cases.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common clinically significant mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. The expression of the intermediate filament cytokeratin in gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not frequently reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of several types of cytokeratin in a large number of cases (n=687), including a pan-cytokeratin marker (AE1/AE3 cocktail antibodies), high-molecular weight cytokeratins (34ßE12 antibody), and individual cytokeratins 8 (35ßH11 and CAM5.2 antibodies), 7, 14, and 20. Ki-67 antigen was used for the determination of cell proliferation index, and the correlation between Ki-67 and cytokeratin expression was evaluated. Cytokeratin expression was also correlated with several clinicopathologic parameters. The expression of pan-cytokeratin was observed in 24 (3.5%) cases, with variable intensity. Only 1 of 687 (0.1%) cases showed cytokeratin 14 expression. All 687 cases revealed no expression of high-molecular weight cytokeratins, cytokeratins 7, 8, and 20. No significant statistical association was found between AE1/AE3 immunoreactivity and several clinicopathologic parameters, including sex, tumor location and size, cell morphology, mitotic count, risk of aggressive behavior, and Ki-67 antigen cell proliferation index. However, statistical correlation between AE1/AE3 immunoreactivity and a higher age at diagnosis was detected. These results show that cytokeratin expression is not frequent in gastrointestinal stromal tumor, but caution is necessary to avoid erroneous diagnoses. PMID:22157057

  15. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols. PMID:27042477

  16. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols. PMID:27042477

  17. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor masquerading as a lung neoplasm. A case presentation and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Papaspyros, S; Papagiannopoulos, K

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Their incidence in the esophagus is 1%–3%. Never has a GIST been documented to directly invade the lung. We report a primary esophageal GIST with direct invasion into the lung parenchyma, presenting predominantly with respiratory symptoms. We include a retrospective literature review. Although the principle 'common things are common' usually guides our everyday clinical practice, this case emphasizes that rare entities can mimic common pathologies and underlines the importance of having a clearly defined differential diagnostic list which should be meticulously scrutinized. PMID:18495011

  18. [Evaluation and endoscopic treatment of small and micro gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Shen, Kuntang; Gao, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of small and micro gastrointestinal stromal tumors is increasing significantly because of the enhanced health consciousness and advanced endoscopic technology. But there still is controversial in the biological behavior and clinical treatment of GIST. The treatment of the GIST with endoscopic technology has obvious advantages. This method can remove tumor and avoid significant trauma. In this paper, the biological behavior, clinical evaluation and endoscopic treatment of the GIST are discussed. PMID:25940172

  19. Pancreatic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor after Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage and Performance of Whipple Procedure: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Aziret, Mehmet; Çetinkünar, Süleyman; Aktaş, Elife; İrkörücü, Oktay; Bali, İlhan; Erdem, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 56 Final Diagnosis: Pancreatic GIST Symptoms: Abdominal pain Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Whipple procedure Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors in the gastrointestinal system. These types of tumors originate from any part of the tract as well as from the intestine, colon, omentum, mesentery or retroperitoneum. GIST is a rare tumor compared to other types of tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all gastrointestinal tumors. Case Report: A 56-year-old male patient was hospitalized due to an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the start of abdominal pain on the same day. In the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that was performed, a solitary mass was found in the second section of the duodenum and a blood vessel (Forrest type 2a) was seen. The extent and location of the mass was detected by abdominal tomography. After hemodynamic recovery, a Whipple procedure was performed without any complications. A subsequent histopathological examination detected a c-kit-positive (CD117) pancreatic GIST with high mitotic index. Conclusions: The most effective treatment method for GISTs is surgical resection. In patients with a head of pancreatic GIST, the Whipple procedure can be used more safely and effectively. PMID:26237079

  20. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor with KIT mutation in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Namgung, Hwan

    2011-10-01

    Multiple jejunalgastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) were found in a 52-year-old woman with a history of neurofibromatosis type 1. These tumors were composed of interlacing fascicles of uniform spindle cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for CD117, CD34 and negative for S-100, smooth muscle actin. Molecular analysis for activating mutations of KIT and PDGFRA was performed in two tumors. Contrary to sporadic GISTs, the NF1-associated GISTs are characterized by rare mutations of KIT or PDGFRA. But, one missense point mutation (Trp557Gly) was identified in KIT exon 11 of the extramural portion of the largest tumor in this case. The intramural portion of the largest tumor and the other tumor had wild type KIT and PDGFRA. PMID:22111084

  1. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: molecular aspects and therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Bui, Binh

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 90 % of gastrointestinal tumors (GISTs) harbor an activating mutation in KIT or PDGFR alpha oncogene known to confer imatinib sensitivity. Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of KIT and PDGFRs that yields a 6-months progression-free survival (PFS) rate of 80 % in patients with advanced GISTs. Several studies have shown that response to imatinib in GIST patients mainly depends on the mutational status of KIT or PDGFR alpha. Moreover, most if not all patients treated with imatinib for advanced GIST will secondarily develop progressive disease under treatment. In the majority of cases, such progressions are the result of acquired resistance due to occurrence of secondary C-KIT mutations; especially for GIST with primary exon 11 mutations. Sunitinib is another approved drug and an inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinases including KIT, PDGFR alpha as well as PDGFR beta and VEGFRs which are associated with angiogenesis. Sunitinib, in phase II and III trials was associated with durable clinical benefit in nearly 25 % of patients with advanced GIST resistant/intolerant to imatinib. Clearly, a better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance to imatinib as well as the development of a new class of broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitors may allow in the near future new individualized therapeutic strategies for GISTs patients. PMID:18230576

  2. SLITRK3 expression correlation to gastrointestinal stromal tumor risk rating and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Xu, Jia; Wang, Ming; Zhao, Wen-Yi; Tu, Lin; Zhuang, Chun; Liu, Qiang; Shen, Yan-Yin; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the influence of SLIT and NTRK-like family member 3 (SLITRK3) on the prognosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and determine whether SLITRK3 can help improve current risk stratification systems. METHODS: We hypothesized that SLITRK3 could be used as a prognostic molecular biomarker for GIST. 35 fresh tumor samples and 417 paraffin-embedded specimens from GIST patients were utilized. SLITRK3 mRNA expression in GIST tumor tissue was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and SLITRK3 protein levels were estimated by immunohistochemistry. The correlation of SLITRK3 expression with various tumor clinicopathological characteristics and follow-up data were analyzed. RESULTS: GIST tumors had high expression of SLITRK3 compared with adjacent normal tissues and the expression level gradually increased with risk grade. SLITRK3 protein expression was closely associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, tumor site, tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) classification. Survival analysis showed that SLITRK3 expression was closely correlated with overall survival and disease-free survival of GIST patients. Multivariate analysis also identified SLITRK3 expression, mitotic index, and NIH stage as significant risk factors of GIST recurrence. CONCLUSION: SLITRK3 expression is a highly significant predictor of GIST recurrence and metastasis. Combinations of SLITRK3 and NIH stage have strong predictive and prognostic value, and are feasible markers for clinical practice in gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:26217092

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors presenting as pelvic masses: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Erkanli, S; Kayaselcuk, F; Törer, N; Bolat, F; Tarim, E; Simsek, E; Kuscu, E

    2006-01-01

    We present two cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) that presented as pelvic masses. These tumors can present diagnostic problems and they may be difficult to discover preoperatively. GISTs are neoplasms that can be diagnosed utilizing immunohistochemistry, especially detecting CD117 (c-kit) reactivity along with associated histological features. GISTs, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ovarian tumors especially when imaging studies and rectovaginal examination findings are inconclusive and vague. Histologic diagnosis of these tumors are important considering the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy after surgery in such cases. PMID:16550984

  4. Large mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moschos, John; Tzilves, Dimitrios; Paikos, Dimitrios; Tagarakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Antonopoulos, Zissis; Kadis, Savvas; Katsos, Ioannis; Tarpagos, Anestis

    2006-06-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old man who presented with severe debilitation, anemia and diarrhea over two months. Colonoscopy revealed many (>100) polyps (familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome). Abdominal CT scan showed a large mass at the left upper abdomen in conjunction with the splenic flexure. Total colectomy with mesenteric mass and adjacent small bowel removal and ileoanal pouch was performed. Examination of the resected mesenteric mass showed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with scarce mitosis and infiltration of the adjacent small bowel. We describe for the first time in medical literature the coexistence of familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome and GIST in a 30-year-old man. PMID:16855925

  5. Gastric Schwannoma Mimicking Malignant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Exhibiting Increased Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung Jin; Suh, Byoung Jo; Park, Jong Kwon

    2016-01-01

    A schwannoma is a kind of neurogenic tumor that rarely occurs in the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric schwannomas make up 0.2% of all gastric neoplasms. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors and up to 60–70% of GIST occur in the stomach. Schwannoma and GIST are similar in clinical features, so they are difficult to differentiate preoperatively. Differential diagnosis of these two submucosal tumors is important because of the malignant potential of GIST and the relatively benign course of gastric schwannomas. We report a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed after operation with a gastric schwannoma, which was suspected a malignant GIST by fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography imaging. PMID:27194983

  6. Dedifferentiated gastrointestinal stromal tumor arising de novo from the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jacqueline J; Sinada-Bottros, Laura; Maker, Ajay V; Weisenberg, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and usually display monotonous cytologic features and immunoactivity for CD117. Anaplastic GIST, with pleomorphic cells and loss of CD117, until recently have only been reported in patients with chronic imatinib mesylate treatment. Dedifferentiated GISTs arising de novo is a newly identified entity that may prove to be difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 52-year-old female found to have a dedifferentiated GIST without prior imatinib mesylate therapy. This case is the first reported dedifferentiated GIST arising de novo from the small bowel, and at 30cm in greatest diameter, the largest reported to date. Additionally, we demonstrate for the first time the loss of DOG1 in the anaplastic component of the tumor. De novo dedifferentiated GIST is a rare and diagnostically challenging tumor that may be mischaracterized unless considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:24484970

  7. Synchronous occurrence of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    NAM, SEUNG-JOO; CHOI, HYUK SOON; KIM, EUN SUN; KEUM, BORA; JEEN, YOON TAE; CHUN, HOON JAI

    2015-01-01

    Various cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) coinciding with other gastrointestinal malignancies have been reported to date, however, the synchronous occurrence of GIST and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is exceptionally rare and, to the best of our knowledge, has only been reported once. The coinciding malignancy has usually been encountered incidentally during surgical exploration. Thus, this is the first report where a targeted biopsy of the clinically suspicious lesion was used to determine the diagnosis of ICC concurrent with GIST. The liver is the most frequent metastatic site of GIST, therefore, additional hepatic masses may be mistakenly diagnosed as metastatic disease, rather than the presentation of multiple primary tumors. This subsequently delays the accurate diagnosis and complicates the performance of a curable resection. The current study reports a case of advanced synchronous GIST and ICC, which was operable at initial presentation, but progressed to become surgically unresectable. PMID:25435952

  8. Synchronous colorectal adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumor in Meckel's diverticulum; an unusual association

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Christopher; Efthimiadis, Christopher; Levva, Sofia; Anthimidis, George; Baka, Sofia; Grigoriou, Marios; Tzeveleki, Ioanna; Masmanidou, Maria; Zaramboukas, Thomas; Basdanis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    Background Coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumor with synchronous or metachronous colorectal cancer represents a phenomenon with increasing number of relative reports in the last 5 years. Synchronous occurence of GISTs with other gastrointestinal tumors of different histogenesis presents a special interest. We herein report a case of GIST in Meckel's diverticulum synchronous with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Case presentation A 69 year old man, presented with abdominal distension and anal bleeding on defecation. Colonoscopy revealed colorectal cancer and a low anterior resection was performed, during which a tumor in Meckel's diverticulum was discovered. Histologic examination revealed GIST in Meckel's diverticulum and a rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma. Conclusion Whenever GIST is encountered, the surgeon should be alert to recognize a possible coexistent tumor with different histological origin. Correct diagnosis of synchronous tumors of different origin is the cornerstone of treatment. PMID:19309498

  9. Metachronous Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung During Adjuvant Imatinib Mesylate Therapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meng-jie; Weng, Shan-Shan; Cao, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Wang, Liu-Hong; Xu, Jing-Hong; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in gastrointestinal tracts; however, the synchronous or metachronous coexistence of GIST with additional primary malignancy is not common. Here, we present an unusual case of gastric GIST with metachronous primary lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed during his adjuvant treatment with oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (400 mg daily). After 6-month use of imatinib, the patient suffered from dry cough and dyspnea. Subsequent lung biopsy demonstrated adenocarcinoma with diffuse interstitial changes. Our research emphasizes the possibility of an additional primary tumor with GIST, and reminds the clinicians to strengthen the surveillance of the additional cancer during the follow-up of GIST patients. PMID:26356712

  10. Gastrointestinal and Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulos, Petros; Leonardou, Polytimi; Barbagiannis, Nikolaos; Alexiou, Konstantinos; Demonakou, Maria; Economou, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    We present two cases, one of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach and one of an extragastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST) in the hepatogastric ligament, which were discovered as incidental findings during computed tomography (CT) scans performed for other reasons. In both cases the diagnosis of the tumor was confirmed histologically and immunohistochemically. During the follow-up CT examinations these tumors proved to have a completely different natural course. The first case refers to an 82-year-old male patient with GIST of the stomach who refused to be operated and was followed by CT scans for a 4-year period. This patient did not show any significant changes in the morphology, size and density of the lesion. The second case refers to a 58-year-old female patient with EGIST of the hepatogastric ligament who presented with simultaneous liver metastases and remained healthy for 2 years after surgical resection, but developed local recurrence later. As a conclusion, both GISTs/EGISTs can be revealed as incidental findings in a CT scan performed for other purposes. Moreover, an untreated GIST located in the stomach can remain unchanged and without metastatic lesions for a long period of time, as in our case for a 4-year period. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature in whom a GIST was proved to remain almost unchanged for many years without any treatment, and we therefore attempt a further review of the current literature on stromal tumors. PMID:24707244

  11. Key Issues in the Clinical Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: An Expert Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Blay, Jean-Yves; Demetri, George D.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Joensuu, Heikki; Martín-Broto, Javier; Nishida, Toshirou; Reichardt, Peter; Schöffski, Patrick; Trent, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    After the revelation of kinase targeting with orally available small molecules, the use of imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia and in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has now become commonplace and just two of many examples of the use of kinase inhibitors in cancer. In this article, we discuss important practice points that may impact upon questions of therapy of primary and metastatic GIST, with the hope that the questions addressed in this rare solid tumor can serve as examples of what can be achieved with kinase-directed therapies in other cancers. We present cases that highlight some of the key issues in GIST management and afterward discuss both points of consensus and controversial issues in what is now recognized as one of the most common forms of sarcoma. Implications for Practice: The treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has become sophisticated with the availability of three approved agents in many countries and 15 years of experience with primary and metastatic disease. Important lessons from tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in GIST can be gleaned from this experience and will impact implementation of similar agents for other cancers. PMID:26070915

  12. Successful treatment with personalized dosage of imatinib in elderly patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Maristella; Gatto, Lidia; Di Nunno, Vincenzo; Tabacchi, Elena; Fanti, Stefano; Di Scioscio, Valerio; Nannini, Margherita; Gruppioni, Elisa; Altimari, Annalisa; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Santini, Donatella; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Zompatori, Maurizio; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza

    2016-04-01

    Imatinib is the standard first-line therapy for metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors. It has markedly improved the prognosis and outcome of patients affected by gastrointestinal stromal tumors, especially in the case of exon 11 KIT mutations. Imatinib-associated adverse events are generally mild to moderate; however, in clinical practice, intolerance caused by chronic toxicities frequently leads to breaks in treatment. This is particularly true in elderly patients in whom age, decline in drug metabolism, and polypharmacy, with a possible drug-drug interaction, may influence the tolerability of imatinib. In the present article, we report our extensive experience with the management of imatinib therapy in a 'real' population, in particular in very elderly patients, discussing whether the use of personalized imatinib dosage could be a safe and advantageous option, enabling continuous administration, thus ensuring effective treatment. Only a few case reports in the literature provide data on outcome with low tailored dosage of imatinib and none of them has been carried out on a Western population. Here, we report four cases treated with low imatinib dosage as a safe and useful option enabling continued treatment with imatinib, improving tolerance, and maintaining good and lasting disease control. PMID:26720290

  13. Laparoscopic resection of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the lower rectum in a patient with coronary artery disease following long-term neoadjuvant imatinib treatment and anticoagulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). However, complete resection of rectal GISTs is sometimes difficult because of bulkiness and/or anatomical reasons. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy has gained attention as an alternative treatment to increase the chance of en bloc resection of rectal GISTs, although it usually takes several months. In this case report, we first demonstrated that neoadjuvant imatinib therapy can be performed safely not only to downsize tumors, but also to allow adequate time for the effective treatment of major comorbid illnesses. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with a 45 mm GIST of the lower rectum. He also had severe stenosis in the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Following the implantation of a drug-eluting stent, the patient received imatinib together with dual anti-platelet therapy for 12 months without obvious side effects. Follow-up image studies revealed tumor shrinkage as well as stent patency. En bloc resection of the GIST was performed laparoscopically, which preserved the anus. The patient is currently alive without any evidence of relapse for 12 months after surgery. PMID:25022862

  14. Tissue microarrays characterise the clinical significance of a VEGF-A protein expression signature in gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Salto-Tellez, M; Nga, M E; Han, H C; Wong, A S-C; Lee, C K; Anuar, D; Ng, S S; Ho, M; Wee, A; Chan, Y H; Soong, R

    2007-01-01

    A tissue microarray analysis of 22 proteins in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST), followed by an unsupervised, hierarchical monothetic cluster statistical analysis of the results, allowed us to detect a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein overexpression signature discriminator of prognosis in GIST, and discover novel VEGF-A DNA variants that may have functional significance. PMID:17299397

  15. miRNA profiling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: implication as diagnostic and prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    Nannini, Margherita; Ravegnini, Gloria; Angelini, Sabrina; Astolfi, Annalisa; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of short noncoding RNAs, that play a relevant role in multiple biological processes, such as differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered as a paradigm of molecular biology in solid tumors worldwide, and after the discovery of specific alterations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes, they have emerged from anonymity to become a model for targeted therapy. Epigenetics have an emerging and relevant role in different steps of GIST biology such as tumorigenesis, disease progression, prognosis and drug resistance. The aim of the present review was to summarize the current evidence about the role of microRNAs in GIST, including their potential application as well as their limits. PMID:26447534

  16. Spontaneous intraperitoneal hemorrhage as the initial presentation of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Critchlow, Jonathan F.; Cohen, Steven; Edlow, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Spontaneous hemoperitoneum is rare. The most common etiologies are gynecologic, splenic, and hepatic. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are commonly associated with intraluminal bleeding, but rarely with spontaneous hemoperitoneum. We report a case of spontaneous hemoperitoneum caused by a gastric GIST. Case report A 54-year-old male presented with the acute onset of abdominal pain and a drop in hemoglobin. Subsequent evaluation, including a CT, MRI, and EUS, revealed a 1.2-cm mass along the greater curvature of the stomach and associated hemoperitoneum. The patient was taken electively to the operating room for laparoscopic removal of the mass. Pathology confirmed that it was a GIST. Conclusion GIST is a rare clinical entity that infrequently presents with spontaneous hemoperitoneum. Emergent treatment should be guided towards treating the spontaneous hemoperitoneum. PMID:20414383

  17. The role of surgery in the multidisciplinary management of patients with localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Brian K; Pisters, Peter W T; Hunt, Kelly K

    2012-08-01

    Surgical resection of localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) is associated with recurrence rates of approximately 50% at 5 years of follow-up. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib, improved overall survival rates in advanced disease, while in the adjuvant setting, improved recurrence-free survival following resection of high-risk GIST. The demonstration of the clinical benefit of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in both the metastatic and adjuvant settings generated interest in neoadjuvant approaches for patients with operable locally advanced disease, particularly in difficult anatomic locations. The potential impact of tumor downsizing in areas such as the gastroesophageal junction, the duodenum or the rectum, on the extent of surgical resection and morbidity is real. The ongoing research regarding neoadjuvant therapy, the duration of adjuvant therapy and the optimal means by which to risk stratify patients with GIST continues to keep the treatment of this disease at the forefront of personalized cancer care. PMID:23030225

  18. The management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a model for targeted and multidisciplinary therapy of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has become a model for targeted therapy in cancer. The vast majority of GISTs contain an activating mutation in either the KIT or platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFRA) gene. GIST is highly responsive to several selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In fact, this cancer has been converted to a chronic disease in some patients. Considerable progress has been made recently in our understanding of the natural history and molecular biology of GIST, risk stratification, and drug resistance. Despite the efficacy of targeted therapy, though, surgery remains the only curative primary treatment and cures >50% of GIST patients who present with localized disease. Adjuvant therapy with imatinib prolongs recurrence-free survival and may improve overall survival. Combined or sequential use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors with other agents following tumor molecular subtyping is an attractive next step in the management of GIST. PMID:22017446

  19. A Case of Malignant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Initially Misdiagnosed as Malignant B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Byoung Jo

    2016-01-01

    Errors that occur in anatomic pathology influence the treatment strategy of patients with malignancy. There are four general types of error with three subtypes in the category of defective interpretation. The first subtype is a false-negative diagnosis or undercall of the extent or severity of the lesion, the second is a false-positive diagnosis, and the third is misclassification. We herein report a 65-year-old female patient with malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor that was diagnosed after reevaluation of the lesion at our hospital – and treated with proximal gastrectomy – after initial diagnosis as malignant B-cell lymphoma on esophagogastroduodenoscopy biopsy of a small gastric fundic mass and subsequent treatment with six cycles of CHOP chemotherapy with aggravation of the mass at another hospital. PMID:27462236

  20. Gut wall replacing type of gastrointestinal stromal tumor presenting as a perforation of the ileal diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Masako; Kunita, Akiko; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Jimbo, Keiichi; Mori, Kazuhiko; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-11-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) usually form a well-circumscribed mass. Very rarely, however, sporadic GISTs show gut-wall replacing growth, similar to the diffuse hyperplasia of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) observed in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and hereditary GIST. Here we describe a patient with ileal perforation caused by this unusual type of GIST. An 82-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department with sudden abdominal pain. Following a provisional diagnosis of perforation of Meckel's diverticulum, he underwent segmental resection of the small intestine. Macroscopic examination revealed a diverticulum-like structure 2.5cm in size near the site of mesenteric attachment of the ileum. Histological examination showed diffuse and nodular proliferation of spindle cells positive for c-KIT and CD34 that had replaced the muscularis propria of the small intestine. Mutational analyses of the lesions revealed monoclonality of proliferating cells with a somatic mutation in c-kit exon 11 (p.Leu576Pro). Gut-wall replacing type of GIST should be recognized as a specific type of GIST causing diverticulum-like structures of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26298631

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a cyst in the lesser sac

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Ahmed Mahmoud; Ayyash, Emad Helmi; Alzafiri, Raed; Francis, Issam; Asfar, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are solid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, mostly found in the stomach and intestine. They rarely present as cystic lesions. A 74-year-old woman referred to the hepatopancreaticobiliary unit, with 3 months history of upper abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound scan showed a large cystic lesion in the epigastric region suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. The CT-scan showed a 6.6×6×6.3 cm size cyst related to the pancreas and extending to the hepatogastric omentum. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) scan was suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Aspirated Cyst fluid via EUS showed benign cytology with normal amylase, lipase and tumour markers (CEA, CA-19.9 and CA-125). She was referred as a case of pancreatic pseudocyst. After surgical excision, the histopathology confirmed the presence GIST in the wall of the cystic lesion. The possibility of GIST should be kept in mind in the presence of unusual features of a cyst on abdominal imaging. PMID:27469382

  2. Brunner's gland cyst in combination with gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HUO, XIQIAN; WEI, JISHU; LIU, XINCHUN; WU, JUNLI; GAO, WENTAO; LI, QIANG; JIANG, KUIRONG; DAI, CUNCAI; MIAO, YI

    2016-01-01

    Brunner's gland cysts are rare benign lesions that are mainly observed in the first and the second regions of the duodenum. Patients with Brunner's gland cyst demonstrate no specific symptoms. The present study reports the case of a patient with Brunner's gland cyst located in the duodenum in combination with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the same region. To the best of our knowledge, the present study reports the first case of Brunner's gland cyst with GIST. A 58-year-old female patient was referred to Tianchang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Tianchang, China) with a one-month history of upper abdominal discomfort, diarrhea and recurrent vomiting following the intake of food. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and a computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a round, cystic-like lesion with internal low density located within the duodenum. Pathological examination revealed that the cyst measured 0.3 cm in diameter and was consistent with a diagnosis of Brunner's gland cyst. Histopathology revealed that the cyst possessed characteristics of GIST. The patient underwent surgical exploration and tumor resection, and was discharged 2 weeks post-surgery. During the 12 month post-operative follow-up period, the outcome of the patient was good. This case study of Brunner's gland cyst combined with GIST enriches the present literature and promotes better understanding of the two diseases. Further investigation is required to explain the mechanism and association between the two rare diseases. PMID:27123125

  3. Status of the gastric mucosa with endoscopically diagnosed gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Kouichi; Ban, Shinichi; Hiejima, Yoshimitsu; Narita, Rei; Shimizu, Michio; Aikawa, Masayasu; Ohata, Ken; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Arai, Shin; Kita, Hiroto

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal submucosal tumor, the endosonographic, CT, and MRI features of gastric GISTs have been widely investigated. However, the GIST-bearing gastric mucosa status has not been reported. Objective. To characterize the GIST-bearing gastric mucosa status in terms of the degree of inflammation and atrophy, assessed endoscopically. Subjects and Methods. The subjects were 46 patients with submucosal tumors (histologically proven gastric GISTs) who had undergone upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in our hospital between April 2007 and September 2012. They were retrospectively evaluated regarding clinicopathological features, the endoscopically determined status of the entire gastric mucosa (presence or absence and degree of atrophy), presence or absence and severity of endoscopic gastritis/atrophy (A-B classification) at the GIST site, and presence or absence of H. pylori infection. Results. Twenty-three patients had no mucosal atrophy, but 17 and 6 had closed- and open-type atrophy, respectively. Twenty-six, 5, 12, 1, 1, and 1 patients had grades B0, B1, B2, B3, A0, and A1 gastritis/atrophy at the lesion site, respectively, with no grade A2 gastritis/atrophy. Conclusion. The results suggest that gastric GISTs tend to arise in the stomach wall with H. pylori-negative, nonatrophic mucosa or H. pylori-positive, mildly atrophic mucosa. PMID:25104899

  4. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach Presenting as Multilobular with Diffuse Calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Hee; Cho, Byung Sun; Park, Joo-Seung; Han, Hyun-Young; Kang, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract and usually appear as a well-circumscribed mass. However, it may be difficult to confirm the extent of the disease for some GISTs. A 70-year-old asymptomatic female presented for a regular physical exam. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a 2.0 cm protruding mass on the gastric fundus. Endoscopic ultrasound revealed an ill-defined heterogenous hypoechoic lesion (3.0×1.5 cm). A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a 4.5 cm multifocal calcified mass at the gastric body as well as at the gastric fundus. Laparoscopic gastric wedge resection was performed according to the extent of multifocal calcifications that are shown on the CT. Intraoperative specimen mammography and intraoperative biopsy might be helpful to obtain a tumor-free margin. Final pathologic diagnosis was an intermediate risk GIST in multilobular form. In patients with diffuse multifocal calcifications in the stomach, the possibility of GIST should be considered. PMID:27104029

  5. Genetic variations in the TERT and CLPTM1L gene region and gastrointestinal stromal tumors risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Jian; Xu, Jian; Liu, Fang; Xu, Yongqing; Bu, Xianmin; Dai, Chaoliu; Song, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested polymorphisms in the TERT and CLPTM1L region are associated with carcinogenesis of many distinct cancer types, including gastrointestinal cancers. However, the contribution of polymorphisms in the TERT and CLPTM1L gene region to gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) risk is still unknown. We tested the six tagSNPs on TERT and CLPTM1L region with GIST risk, using a population-based, two-stage, case-control study in 2,000 subjects. Functional validation was conducted to validate our findings of TERT rs2736098 and explore its influence on relative telomere length (RTL) in GIST cells. It showed that variant rs2736098 was significantly associated with increased risk of GIST (per allele OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.14–1.47, P = 7.03 × 10−5). The difference remain significant after Bonferroni correction (P = 7.03 × 10−5 * 6 = 4.2 × 10−4). Real-time PCR showed carriers of genotype CC have the longest RTL, following by carriers of genotype CT, while carriers of genotype TT have the shortest RTL in GIST tissues (P < 0.001). Our data provide evidence to implicate TERT rs2736098 polymorphism as a novel susceptibility factor for GIST risk. PMID:26372813

  6. Malignant extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YINGCHAO; LIU, YAHUI; ZHONG, YANPING; JI, BAI

    2016-01-01

    Extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) predominantly occur outside of the gastrointestinal tract, and their biological and histological characteristics are similar to those of GISTs. Primary EGIST occurrence in the liver is extremely rare. The present study reports a case of primary EGIST in the caudate lobe of the liver in a 61-year-old Chinese man. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a 7.3×5.1-cm heterogeneously enhanced neoplasm with solid and cystic components located in the caudate lobe of the liver. The patient underwent caudate lobe (specifically, Spiegel lobe) resection. Immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor revealed a strong positivity for cluster of differentiation (CD)117, discovered on GIST-1 and CD34. Thus, based on the histological and immunohistochemical findings, the final diagnosis was primary hepatic EGIST. Follow up was conducted at 3-month intervals for the first year and 6-months thereafter. The patient was asymptomatic without any sign of recurrence during the follow-up period. Lab tests were in normal range, and no mass was found in CT scan. PMID:27313719

  7. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a cyst in the lesser sac.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Ahmed Mahmoud; Ayyash, Emad Helmi; Alzafiri, Raed; Francis, Issam; Asfar, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are solid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, mostly found in the stomach and intestine. They rarely present as cystic lesions. A 74-year-old woman referred to the hepatopancreaticobiliary unit, with 3 months history of upper abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound scan showed a large cystic lesion in the epigastric region suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. The CT-scan showed a 6.6×6×6.3 cm size cyst related to the pancreas and extending to the hepatogastric omentum. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) scan was suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Aspirated Cyst fluid via EUS showed benign cytology with normal amylase, lipase and tumour markers (CEA, CA-19.9 and CA-125). She was referred as a case of pancreatic pseudocyst. After surgical excision, the histopathology confirmed the presence GIST in the wall of the cystic lesion. The possibility of GIST should be kept in mind in the presence of unusual features of a cyst on abdominal imaging. PMID:27469382

  8. A case of diffuse infiltrating gastrointestinal stromal tumor of sigmoid colon with perforation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Daisuke; Usami, Yu; Toyosawa, Satoru; Hirota, Seiichi; Imai, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and typically present as discrete well-circumscribed but non-encapsulated tumor masses. In this report, we describe a case of colonic perforation caused by an unusual form of GIST. A 72-year-old Japanese woman presented to the emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Under the provisional diagnosis of sigmoid colon perforation, a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy was performed. Although the tumor mass was undetectable during the preoperative examination, a spindle cell lesion with a diffuse longitudinal growth pattern replacing the muscularis propria was revealed by microscopic examination. The spindle cell lesion was exposed at the perforation, suggesting a causal relationship between the lesion and the perforation. The spindle cell lesion was KIT-positive and had a mutation in the C-KIT gene at exon 11. We diagnosed it as diffuse infiltrating GIST. We consider that the lesion would be a cause of the colonic perforation, and emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis of the lesion by histological, immunohistochemical and genetic examinations. PMID:24471968

  9. Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour: Current Practices and Visions for the Future.

    PubMed

    Blay, Jean-Yves; Casali, Paolo G; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Le Cesne, Axel; Reichardt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), while relatively rare, is the most common mesenchymal tumour of the gastrointestinal tract. These tumours are largely resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy and, in the past, were typically managed surgically. However, as a result of the identification of activating mutations in the proto-oncogene KIT and the development of compounds that inhibit the KIT receptor tyrosine kinase, GISTs have, in the last 14 years, become the archetype of a targeted agent-responsive tumour. Due to the almost continual emergence of new data from clinical trials and other studies on GIST diagnosis and treatment, the management of this disease requires regular review. The 2013 ArcheoloGIST summit was convened in Prague, Czech Republic. Interaction between attending physicians and the expert faculty was a core component of the summit. The current article is based on discussions held during two interactive sessions at ArcheoloGIST 2013 in which the authors aimed to: (1) reach a consensus on the current management of GIST and (2) provide a vision for the future diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:25720422

  10. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  11. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor’s dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  12. Differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors from gastric adenocarcinomas and normal mucosae using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and gastric adenocarcinomas are a common cancer worldwide. To differentiate GISTs from adenocarcinomas is important because the surgical processes for both are different; the former excises the tumor with negative margins, while the latter requires radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Endoscopy with biopsy is used to distinguish GISTs from adenocarcinomas; however, it may cause tumor bleeding in GISTs. We reported here the confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an effective tool to differentiate GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal mucosae. Of 119 patients enrolled in this study, 102 patients underwent gastrectomy (40 GISTs and 62 adenocarcinomas), and 17 patients with benign lesions were obtained as normal mucosae. Raman signals were integrated for 100 s for each spot on the specimen, and 5 to 10 spots, depending on the sample size, were chosen for each specimen. There were significant differences among those tissues as evidenced by different Raman signal responding to phospholipids and protein structures. The spectral data were further processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis. A two-dimensional plot demonstrated that GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal gastric mucosae could be effectively differentiated from each other.

  13. Integrated genomic analyses identify frequent gene fusion events and VHL inactivation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Choong-Hyun; Park, Inho; Lee, Seungmook; Kwon, Jekeun; Do, Ingu; Hong, Min Eui; Van Vrancken, Michael; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh; Cho, Jeonghee; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Sohn, Tae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. We sequenced nine exomes and transcriptomes, and two genomes of GISTs for integrated analyses. We detected 306 somatic variants in nine GISTs and recurrent protein-altering mutations in 29 genes. Transcriptome sequencing revealed 328 gene fusions, and the most frequently involved fusion events were associated with IGF2 fused to several partner genes including CCND1, FUS, and LASP1. We additionally identified three recurrent read-through fusion transcripts: POLA2-CDC42EP2, C8orf42-FBXO25, and STX16-NPEPL1. Notably, we found intragenic deletions in one of three exons of the VHL gene and increased mRNAs of VEGF, PDGF-β, and IGF-1/2 in 56% of GISTs, suggesting a mechanistic link between VHL inactivation and overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor target genes in the absence of hypoxia. We also identified copy number gain and increased mRNA expression of AMACR, CRIM1, SKP2, and CACNA1E. Mapping of copy number and gene expression results to the KEGG pathways revealed activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in small intestinal GISTs and the MAPK pathway in wild-type GISTs. These observations will allow us to determine the genetic basis of GISTs and will facilitate further investigation to develop new therapeutic options. PMID:25987131

  14. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors regularly express synaptic vesicle proteins: evidence of a neuroendocrine phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bümming, Per; Nilsson, Ola; Ahlman, Håkan; Welbencer, Anna; Andersson, Mattias K; Sjölund, Katarina; Nilsson, Bengt

    2007-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are thought to originate from the interstitial cells of Cajal, which share many properties with neurons of the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, we demonstrated expression of the hormone ghrelin in GIST. The aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate a possible neuroendocrine phenotype of GIST. Specimens from 41 GISTs were examined for the expression of 12 different synaptic vesicle proteins. Expression of synaptic-like microvesicle proteins, e.g., Synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2), synaptobrevin, synapsin 1, and amphiphysin was demonstrated in a majority of GISTs by immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and quantitative reversetranscriptase PCR. One-third of the tumors also expressed the large dense core vesicle protein vesicular monoamine transporter 1. Presence of microvesicles and dense core vesicles in GIST was confirmed by electron microscopy. The expression of synaptic-like microvesicle proteins in GIST was not related to risk profile or to KIT/platelet derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) mutational status. Thus, GISTs regularly express a subset of synaptic-like microvesicle proteins necessary for the regulated secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones. Expression of synaptic-like micro-vesicle proteins, ghrelin and peptide hormone receptors in GIST indicate a neuroendocrine phenotype and suggest novel possibilities to treat therapy-resistant GIST. PMID:17914114

  15. Neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with pheochromocytoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    PAN, DONGFENG; LIANG, PEIFENG; XIAO, HONGYAN

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder associated with neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene mutation, which generates an increased risk of variety of tumor types. The current study reports a case involving NF1, pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). A 56-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and polypnea. Clinical investigation revealed multiple diffuse soft-tissue lesions throughout his body, and pigmented macules on the skin. Imaging analyses revealed thoracic scoliosis, multiple subcutaneous nodules in the abdomen and trunk, and a 7.0×7.7×8.9-cm oval-shaped, cystic mass in the left upper abdominal cavity. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that S-100 protein and synaptophysin were highly expressed in adrenal gland neoplasm, whilst CD117 and CD34 were highly expressed in small intestine tumors. The overall clinical and pathological finding suggested a diagnosis of NF1, giant PHEO and small intestinal stromal tumor. In addition, a literature review was conducted to identify the specific clinical features of patients with this condition. Only 11 similar cases have been reported worldwide. In the present study, paroxysmal hypertension occurred in the majority of patients, and GISTs tended to be located in the small intestine. In addition, the present study demonstrated that many of the patients had a poor prognosis. Therefore, the present study indicates that NF1-PHEO-GIST is a special type tumor with varied clinical symptoms, which may be associated with an increased risk for poor prognosis; however, more studies are required to confirm this. PMID:27347193

  16. Combined presence of multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors along with duodenal submucosal somatostatinoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tarun; Gupta, Brijnandan; Das, Prasenjit; Jain, Deepali; Jain, Hemant Ashok; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Dash, Nihar Ranjan; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF-1) is an autosomal dominant disorder, with increased risk of developing benign and malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). However, the synchronous presence of multiple GIT stromal tumors and duodenal submucosal somatostatinoma, like in this 50-year-old female NF-1 patient, is very rare. She presented with hematemesis, malena, along with multiple neurofibromas all over the body. Thorough radiological and peroperative work-up revealed multiple ulcerated submucosal and serosal nodules in the proximal small intestine. Histological work-up revealed diagnosis of a duodenal submucosal somatostatinoma with multifocal serosal gastrointestinal stromal tumors. This case is being reported to highlight the rare coincidence of multiple GIT tumors in an NF-1 patient. PMID:27510677

  17. State of the Art in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Garlipp, Benjamin; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequently diagnosed mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite their biological and clinical heterogeneity, the majority of these tumors are positive for the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT and are driven by KIT- or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA)-activating mutations. There are still uncertainties regarding their clinical and molecular characterization and the optimal treatment regimens, making it difficult to establish a universal treatment algorithm for these tumors. Summary From a clinical perspective, the main difference between GISTs and other gastrointestinal neoplasms is that the benign or malignant behavior of GISTs cannot be predicted from histopathology, but instead relies on empirically established scoring systems. Clinical data suggest that malignant potential may be an inherent quality of some GISTs rather than a feature acquired by the tumor during disease progression. Thus, some patients may require prolonged anti-tumor treatment even after complete surgical removal of the tumor. Key Message Although GISTs are the most frequently occurring mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract, no universal treatment algorithms exist. This paper reviews the current evidence that guides the management of GISTs. Practical Implications The management of localized GISTs involves the use of surgical resection, with the inclusion of preoperative tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment for locally advanced, primarily unresectable tumors and for resectable cases requiring extensive surgery. Imatinib is also indicated as adjuvant therapy after complete surgical removal of GISTs with a high estimated risk of recurrence unless specific mutations conferring imatinib resistance are present. The optimal duration of adjuvant treatment is still controversial. For patients with metastatic imatinib-sensitive GISTs, imatinib constitutes the first-line standard treatment

  18. Comparison between air and carbon dioxide insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Wang, Zi-Hao; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Han; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CO2 insufflation compared with air insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomized to undergo endoscopic submucosal excavation, with the CO2 group (n = 30) and the air group (n = 30) undergoing CO2 insufflation and air insufflation in the ESE, respectively. The end-tidal CO2 level (pETCO2) was observed at 4 time points: at the beginning of ESE, at total removal of the tumors, at completed wound management, and 10 min after ESE. Additionally, the patients’ experience of pain at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after the examination was registered using a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: Both the CO2 group and air group were similar in mean age, sex, body mass index (all P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in PetCO2 values before and after the procedure (P > 0.05). However, the pain scores after the ESE at different time points in the CO2 group decreased significantly compared with the air group (1 h: 21.2 ± 3.4 vs 61.5 ± 1.7; 3 h: 8.5 ± 0.7 vs 42.9 ± 1.3; 6 h: 4.4 ± 1.6 vs 27.6 ± 1.2; 24 h: 2.3 ± 0.4 vs 21.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of VAS scores of 0 in the CO2 group after 1, 3, 6 and 24 h was significantly higher than that in the air group (60.7 ± 1.4 vs 18.9 ± 1.5, 81.5 ± 2.3 vs 20.6 ± 1.2, 89.2 ± 0.7 vs 36.8 ± 0.9, 91.3 ± 0.8 vs 63.8 ± 1.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, the condition of the CO2 group was better than that of the air group with respect to anal exsufflation. CONCLUSION: Insufflation of CO2 in the ESE of gastrointestinal stromal tumors will not cause CO2 retention and it may significantly reduce the level of pain, thus it is safe and effective. PMID:23326136

  19. Coexisting and possible primary extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the pancreas and liver: A single case report

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LEI; ZHU, YINGQIAO; WANG, DONGXUAN; YANG, CHANGBIN; ZHANG, QI; LI, XIUKUN; BAI, YANG

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) that are defined, in part, by the expression of CD117, a c-Kit proto-oncogene protein. GISTs emerge outside of the GI at a very low frequency, typically in a single organ or location. GISTs that occasionally emerge outside of the GI are classified as extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGIST). The present study reports an extremely rare case of EGIST detected in the pancreas and the liver. The pancreatic and liver tumors were 4.5×2.5 cm and 2.0×1.5 cm in size, respectively. Both tumors consisted of CD117-positive spindle cells with a similar mitotic rate of 1–2 per 50 high power fields. The pancreatic and the hepatic EGISTs were at a low risk of malignancy, and both tumors were proposed to be primary stromal tumors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of likely primary EGIST identified in the pancreas and liver of the same patient. PMID:27123107

  20. Interventional digital subtraction angiography for small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors with bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Ting; Sun, Hong-Liang; Luo, Jiang-Hong; Ni, Jia-Yan; Chen, Dong; Jiang, Xiong-Ying; Zhou, Jing-Xing; Xu, Lin-Feng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of interventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for bleeding small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). METHODS: Between January 2006 and December 2013, small bowel tumors in 25 consecutive patients undergoing emergency interventional DSA were histopathologically confirmed as GIST after surgical resection. The medical records of these patients and the effects of interventional DSA and the presentation and management of the condition were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Of the 25 patients with an age range from 34- to 70-year-old (mean: 54 ± 12 years), 8 were male and 17 were female. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, including tarry or bloody stool and intermittent melena, was observed in all cases, and one case also involved hematemesis. Nineteen patients required acute blood transfusion. There were a total of 28 small bowel tumors detected by DSA. Among these, 20 were located in the jejunum and 8 were located in the ileum. The DSA characteristics of the GISTs included a hypervascular mass of well-defined, homogeneous enhancement and early developed draining veins. One case involved a complication of intussusception of the small intestine that was discovered during surgery. No pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous malformations or fistulae, or arterial rupture were observed. The completely excised size was approximately 1.20 to 5.50 cm (mean: 3.05 ± 1.25 cm) in maximum diameter based on measurements after the resection. There were ulcerations (n = 8), erosions (n = 10), hyperemia and edema (n = 10) on the intra-luminal side of the tumors. Eight tumors in patients with a large amount of blood loss were treated with transcatheter arterial embolization with gelfoam particles during interventional DSA. CONCLUSION: Emergency interventional DSA is a useful imaging option for locating and diagnosing small bowel GISTs in patients with bleeding, and is an effective treatment modality. PMID:25548494

  1. The endoscopic appearance of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Muniyappa, Pramodha; Kay, Marsha; Feinberg, Lisa; Mahajan, Lori; Stallion, Anthony; Wyllie, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal tumor that is rare in children. We report a case of GIST in a pediatric patient. A 16-year-old adolescent girl presented after an episode of syncope preceded by one episode of melena. Physical examination results were normal except for Hemoccult-positive stool. Laboratory studies included a hemoglobin level of 6.1 g/dL; complete metabolism profile and coagulation studies revealed normal results. She was transfused with 2 units of packed red blood cells, and an urgent esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated 3 submucosal sessile masses in the gastric antrum ranging from 1 to 3 cm with normal overlying mucosa except for one of the lesions, which was ulcerated. Endoscopic biopsies stained positive for CD117 and were consistent with GIST. Radiologic imaging demonstrated the endoscopically visualized masses and also showed a solitary 1-cm lesion within the liver. She underwent partial gastrectomy and open biopsy of the hepatic lesion. Histologic examination confirmed GIST with hepatic metastasis. Typically with GIST, esophagogastroduodenoscopy will demonstrate a normal surface mucosa and a firm, smooth yellowish submucosal mass, which can be ulcerated. In some cases these tumors can be missed because of their frequent submucosal and extraluminal growth. This case, to our knowledge, is one of the first reports of the endoscopic appearance of GIST in a pediatric patient. Although a rare entity in children, GIST should be considered in pediatric patients with endoscopically visualized submucosal gastric masses. PMID:17618903

  2. Genomic mapping of pathways in endometrial adenocarcinoma and a gastrointestinal stromal tumor located in Meckel's diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    ENGLERT-GOLON, MONIKA; BUDNY, BARTLOMIEJ; BURCHARDT, BARTOSZ; WROTKOWSKA, ELZBIETA; ZIEMNICKA, KATARZYNA; RUCHAŁA, MAREK; SAJDAK, STEFAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a 71-year-old female patient diagnosed with endometrial adenocarcinoma, which was confirmed by histopathology. In the course of performing an elective hysterectomy with adnexa removal, a solid tumor located in Meckel's diverticulum (MD) was identified and excised. Due to the unique nature of the lesion, the tumor tissue underwent broad mapping of any genomic alterations once the histopathological examination was completed. The genetic testing was conducted using a high-resolution microarray and resulted in the identification of 45 genomic abnormalities, including 4 chromosomal aneuploidies. Within those regions, alterations of 87 known cancer genes were assigned. The involvement of v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog gene alteration was noted to be a key player for triggering gastrointestinal stromal tumor transformation for this unusual case. A total of 12 genes, showing mutual interaction in different cancer types or involved in diverse cellular processes, were identified. These reported data may shed light on the carcinogenesis of a rare MD tumor. PMID:26893683

  3. Pharmacological inhibition of KIT activates MET signaling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Noah A.; Zeng, Shan; Seifert, Adrian M.; Kim, Teresa S.; Sorenson, Eric C.; Greer, Jonathan B.; Beckman, Michael J.; Santamaria-Barria, Juan A.; Crawley, Megan H.; Green, Benjamin L.; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common adult sarcomas and the oncogenic driver is usually a KIT or PDGFRA mutation. While GIST are often initially sensitive to imatinib or other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, resistance generally develops necessitating backup strategies for therapy. In this study, we determined that a subset of human GIST specimens that acquired imatinib resistance acquired expression of activated forms of the MET oncogene. MET activation also developed after imatinib therapy in a mouse model of GIST (KitV558del/+ mice), where it was associated with increased tumor hypoxia. MET activation also occurred in imatinib-sensitive human GIST cell lines after imatinib treatment in vitro. MET inhibition by crizotinib or RNA interference was cytotoxic to an imatinib-resistant human GIST cell population. Moreover, combining crizotinib and imatinib was more effective than imatinib alone in imatinib-sensitive GIST models. Lastly, cabozantinib, a dual MET and KIT small molecule inhibitor, was markedly more effective than imatinib in multiple preclinical models of imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant GIST. Collectively, our findings showed that activation of compensatory MET signaling by KIT inhibition may contribute to tumor resistance. Furthermore, our work offered a preclinical proof of concept for MET inhibition by cabozantinib as an effective strategy for GIST treatment. PMID:25836719

  4. The DREAM complex in anti-tumor activity of imatinib mesylate in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs)

    PubMed Central

    DeCaprio, James A.; Duensing, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Although most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) respond well to treatment with the small molecule kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Gleevec), the majority of patients achieve disease stabilization and complete remissions are rare. Furthermore, discontinuation of treatment in the presence of residual tumor mass almost inevitably leads to tumor progression. These observations suggest that a subset of tumor cells not only persists under imatinib treatment, but remains viable. The current article reviews the molecular basis for these findings and explores strategies to exploit them therapeutically. Recent findings Although imatinib can induce apoptosis in a subset of GIST cells, it can induce a reversible exit from the cell division cycle and entry into G0, a cell cycle state called quiescence, in the remaining cells. Mechanistically, this process involves the DREAM complex, a newly identified key regulator of quiescence. Interfering with DREAM complex formation either by siRNA-mediated knockdown or by pharmacological inhibition of the regulatory kinase DYRK1A was shown to enhance imatinib-induced GIST cell death. Summary Targeting the DREAM complex and imatinib-induced quiescence could provide opportunities for future therapeutic interventions toward more efficient imatinib responses. PMID:24840522

  5. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Review of Case Reports, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Christopher B.; Zhi, Wanqing; Shahzad, Ghulamullah; Mustacchia, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a nonepithelial, mesenchymal tumor first described by Mazur and Clark in 1983. Since then, its molecular biology has been studied in great detail. Special interest in the role of tyrosine kinase in its regulation has been the target by different drug research. Mutation in c-kit exons 9, 11, 13, 17 and PDGFRA mutation in exons 12, 14, 18 are responsible for activation of gene signaling system resulting in uncontrolled phosphorylation and tissue growth. However, 5 to 15% of GISTs does not harbor these mutations, which raises additional questions in another alternate signaling pathway mutation yet to be discovered. Diagnosis of GISTs relies heavily on KIT/CD117 immunohistochemical staining, which can detect most GISTs except for a few 3% to 5% that harbors PDGFRA mutation. Newer staining against PKC theta and DOG-1 genes showed promising results but are not readily available. Clinical manifestation of GISTs is broad and highly dependent on tumor size. Surgery still remains the first-line treatment for GISTs. The advancement of molecular biology has revolutionized the availability of newer drugs, Imatinib and Sunitinib. Together with its advancement is the occurrence of Imatinib/Sunitinib drug resistance. With this, newer monoclonal antibody drugs are being developed and are undergoing clinical trials to hopefully improve survival in patients with GISTs. PMID:22577569

  6. RACK1 overexpression is linked to acquired imatinib resistance in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaodong; Xue, Anwei; Fang, Yong; Shu, Ping; Ling, Jiaqian; Hou, Yingyong; Shen, Kuntang; Qin, Jing; Sun, Yihong; Qin, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    Although treatment with imatinib, which inhibits KIT and PDGFR, controls advanced disease in about 80% of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients, resistance to imatinib often develops. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a ribosomal protein that contributes to tumor progression by affecting proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and migration. Here, we found that c-KIT binds to RACK1 and increases proteasome-mediated RACK1 degradation. Imatinib treatment inhibits c-KIT activity and prevents RACK1 degradation, and RACK1 is upregulated in imatinib-resistant GIST cells compared to non-resistant parental cells. Moreover, Erk and Akt signaling were reactivated by imatinib in resistant GIST cells. RACK1 functioned as a scaffold protein and mediated Erk and Akt reactivation after imatinib treatment, thereby promoting GIST cell survival even in the presence of imatinib. Combined inhibition of KIT and RACK1 inhibited growth in imatinib-resistant GIST cell lines and reduced tumor relapse in GIST xenografts. These findings provide new insight into the role of RACK1 in imatinib resistance in GIST. PMID:26893362

  7. Multiple Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Isogaki, Jun; Yajima, Kiyoshige; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Hirota, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are relatively common in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1) patients. Approximately 90% of GISTs associated with NF 1 are located in the small intestine, while sporadic GISTs are most commonly located in the stomach. Here we report an extremely rare case of an NF 1 patient with multiple gastric GITs (90 or more) but without multiple small intestinal tumors. A 63-year-old female patient who had a history of NF 1 underwent surgery for a gastric neuroendocrine tumor and gastric submucosal tumor (SMT). During the operation, multiple small nodules were identified on the serosal surface of the upper stomach. SMT and multiple nodules on the serosal surface were diagnosed as GISTs consisting of spindle cells positive for KIT, CD34, and DOG-1. Both GIST and the normal gastric mucosa showed no mutations not only in the c-kit gene (exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17) but also in the PDGFRA gene (exons 12, 14, and 18). This patient is being followed up without the administration of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:27375917

  8. Co-occurrence of liver metastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kohei; Baba, Yoshifumi; Kurashige, Junji; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Imai, Katsunori; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Chikamoto, Akira; Yoshida, Naoya; Beppu, Toru; Baba, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are potentially malignant mesenchymal tumors that can give rise to distant metastases, mainly in the liver. The co-occurrence of synchronous primary liver tumors (e.g., hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)) in patients with GIST is extremely rare. This report describes a 77-year-old male patient with liver metastasis of GIST originating in the small intestine and synchronous HCC. The patient had undergone resection of the small intestine for the primary GIST 3 years earlier and partial hepatectomy and radiofrequency ablation for liver metastases of GIST 1 year earlier. Despite the continuation of adjuvant therapy with imatinib, two new lesions in the liver were detected by follow-up computed tomography scanning, which showed the gradual enlargement of one tumor. A second hepatectomy was performed. Pathological examination revealed that one tumor was a liver metastasis of GIST and the other was a primary HCC. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the synchronous co-occurrence of a liver metastasis of GIST and a primary HCC. PMID:27586263

  9. Crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 Promotes Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Cell Growth and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Traer, Elie; Martinez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Anu; Taguchi, Takehiro; Dunlap, Jennifer; Heinrich, Michael C; Corless, Christopher L; Rubin, Brian P; Druker, Brian J; Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-01

    Kinase inhibitors such as imatinib have dramatically improved outcomes for patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), but many patients develop resistance to these treatments. Although in some patients this event corresponds with mutations in the GIST driver oncogenic kinase KIT, other patients develop resistance without KIT mutations. In this study, we address this patient subset in reporting a functional dependence of GIST on the FGF receptor FGFR3 and its crosstalk with KIT in GIST cells. Addition of the FGFR3 ligand FGF2 to GIST cells restored KIT phosphorylation during imatinib treatment, allowing sensitive cells to proliferate in the presence of the drug. FGF2 expression was increased in imatinib-resistant GIST cells, the growth of which was blocked by RNAi-mediated silencing of FGFR3. Moreover, combining KIT and FGFR3 inhibitors synergized to block the growth of imatinib-resistant cells. Signaling crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 activated the MAPK pathway to promote resistance to imatinib. Clinically, an IHC analysis of tumor specimens from imatinib-resistant GIST patients revealed a relative increase in FGF2 levels, with a trend toward increased expression in imatinib-naïve samples consistent with possible involvement in drug resistance. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to evaluate existing FGFR inhibitors and multikinase inhibitors that target FGFR3 as promising strategies to improve treatment of patients with GIST with de novo or acquired resistance to imatinib. PMID:25432174

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors in a mouse model by targeted mutation of the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Gunhild; Agosti, Valter; Ehlers, Imke; Rossi, Ferdinand; Corbacioglu, Selim; Farkas, Judith; Moore, Malcolm; Manova, Katia; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Besmer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Oncogenic Kit mutations are found in somatic gastrointestinal (GI) stromal tumors (GISTs) and mastocytosis. A mouse model for the study of constitutive activation of Kit in oncogenesis has been produced by a knock-in strategy introducing a Kit exon 11-activating mutation into the mouse genome based on a mutation found in a case of human familial GIST syndrome. Heterozygous mutant KitV558Δ/+ mice develop symptoms of disease and eventually die from pathology in the GI tract. Patchy hyperplasia of Kit-positive cells is evident within the myenteric plexus of the entire GI tract. Neoplastic lesions indistinguishable from human GISTs were observed in the cecum of the mutant mice with high penetrance. In addition, mast cell numbers in the dorsal skin were increased. Therefore KitV558Δ/+ mice reproduce human familial GISTs, and they may be used as a model for the study of the role and mechanisms of Kit in neoplasia. Importantly, these results demonstrate that constitutive Kit signaling is critical and sufficient for induction of GIST and hyperplasia of interstitial cells of Cajal. PMID:12754375

  11. A meta-analysis of prognostic value of KIT mutation status in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jian; Li, Zhi; Liu, Yingjun; Wang, Daohai; Han, Guangsen

    2016-01-01

    Numerous types of KIT mutations have been reported in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs); however, controversy still exists regarding their clinicopathological significance. In this study, we reviewed the publicly available literature to assess the data by a meta-analysis to characterize KIT mutations and different types of KIT mutations in prognostic prediction in patients with GISTs. Twenty-eight studies that included 4,449 patients were identified and analyzed. We found that KIT mutation status was closely correlated with size of tumors and different mitosis indexes, but not with tumor location. KIT mutation was also observed to be significantly correlated with tumor recurrence, metastasis, as well as the overall survival of patients. Interestingly, there was higher risk of progression in KIT exon 9-mutated patients than in exon 11-mutated patients. Five-year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was significantly higher in KIT exon 11-deleted patients than in those with other types of KIT exon 11 mutations. In addition, RFS for 5 years was significantly worse in patients bearing KIT codon 557–558 deletions than in those bearing other KIT exon 11 deletions. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that KIT mutation status is another evaluable factor for prognosis prediction in GISTs. PMID:27350754

  12. Successful surgical resection of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor post neoadjuvent therapy.

    PubMed

    Kamil, Sm; Biswas, M; Imran, Ak; Islam, R; Mukhtar, Aa; Joshi, Sc

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old Indian male who presented with swelling and firmness in his left upper part of the abdomen of one month duration with anorexia and weight loss. Initial examination revealed an intra abdominal mass of around 16.8x11.0x24.5cm with minimal left sided pleural effusion. A biopsy from the mass confirmed the diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GISTs) as supported by immmunohistochemistry results which showed strong positivity for c-kit while stains for smooth muscle actin, desmin, myoglobin, S100 Protein and cytokerstin remained negative. The patient was not suitable for surgical intervention in view of advanced tumor, and Imatinib Mesylate 400mg daily was started with the aim of making the tumor operable. Such therapy lasted for twenty months and was tolerated well by the patient. It then resulted in gradual tumor regression, following which the patient underwent successful tumor resection. Post surgical resection patient had no radiological evidence of intra abdominal tumor but mild left sided pleural effusion with left lower lobe atelectasis. The patient had uneventful post operative recovery and he is currently on Imatinib mesylate and tolerating treatment well with mild skin rash. The experience with preoperative imatinib on surgical resection rates and post operative outcomes is limited especially with primary locally advanced GISTs. In our case successful surgical resection was possible for a huge locally advanced GIST with unusually prolonged treatment of twenty months with imatinib preoperatively. PMID:21483516

  13. KIT and PDGFRA mutations and PDGFRA immunostaining in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Antonella; Fornari, Alessandro; Bonello, Lisa; Tondat, Fabrizio; Chiusa, Luigi; Lista, Patrizia; Pich, Achille

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association of PDGFRA and KIT mutations as well as PDGFRA immunohistochemical expression with clinicopathologic features and prognosis in a series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Tumor DNA from 40 GISTs was sequenced for the presence of mutations in KIT exons 9, 11, 13 and 17, and in PDGFRA exons 12 and 18. Tissue sections were stained with polyclonal anti-PDGFRA antibody. KIT mutations occurred in 26 cases. There were 13 deletions, 6 substitutions, 3 deletion-substitutions, 3 duplications and 1 insertion. Tumors with KIT deletions/insertion were large with a high mitotic index (MI), and were associated with a high rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs, distant metastasis, relapse and a short disease-free survival (DFS). PDGFRA mutations occurred in 6 gastric GISTs. There were 4 deletions and 2 substitutions. Tumors with PDGFRA mutations were small, with a low MI and Ki67 score, and were associated with a very low rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs and distant metastasis. PDGFRA immunopositivity was found in 23 cases: a peculiar 'dotlike' staining was found in 5 out of 6 PDGFRA mutated cases. Patients with positive PDGFRA immunostaining had a longer DFS than those with negative staining. Our data confirm that the type of KIT mutation is associated with various clinicopathologic features of GISTs, and indicate that PDGFRA mutations are associated with rather indolent tumors. PDGFRA immunopositivity reflects PDGFRA mutational status and is associated with a favorable outcome. PMID:21461555

  14. Multiple Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Makoto; Isogaki, Jun; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yajima, Kiyoshige; Okumura, Takuya; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Kawabe, Akihiro; Komiyama, Akira; Hirota, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are relatively common in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1) patients. Approximately 90% of GISTs associated with NF 1 are located in the small intestine, while sporadic GISTs are most commonly located in the stomach. Here we report an extremely rare case of an NF 1 patient with multiple gastric GITs (90 or more) but without multiple small intestinal tumors. A 63-year-old female patient who had a history of NF 1 underwent surgery for a gastric neuroendocrine tumor and gastric submucosal tumor (SMT). During the operation, multiple small nodules were identified on the serosal surface of the upper stomach. SMT and multiple nodules on the serosal surface were diagnosed as GISTs consisting of spindle cells positive for KIT, CD34, and DOG-1. Both GIST and the normal gastric mucosa showed no mutations not only in the c-kit gene (exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17) but also in the PDGFRA gene (exons 12, 14, and 18). This patient is being followed up without the administration of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:27375917

  15. The impact of additional malignancies in patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Myles J; Smith, Henry G; Mahar, Alyson L; Law, Calvin; Ko, Yoo-Joung

    2016-10-15

    A higher incidence of additional malignancies has been described in patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). This study aimed to identify risk factors for developing additional malignancies in patients diagnosed with GIST and evaluate the impact on survival. Individuals diagnosed with GIST from 2001 to2009 were identified from the SEER database. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of additional malignancies and Cox-proportional hazards regression used to identify predictors of survival. In the study period, 1705 cases of GIST were identified, with 181 (10.6%) patients developing additional malignancies. Colorectal cancer was the most common cancer developing within 6 months of GIST diagnosis (30%). The median time to diagnosis of a malignancy after 6 months of GIST diagnosis was 21.9 months. Older age (p < 0.0001) and extraoesophagogastric GIST (p = 0.0027) were significant prognostic factors associated with additional malignancies. The overall 5-year survival was 65%, with the presence of additional malignancies within 6 months of GIST diagnosis associated with poor overall survival (54%, HR 1.55 1.05-2.3 95% CI, p = 0.04). Predictive factors of additional malignancies in patients diagnosed with GIST are increasing age and the primary disease site. Developing additional malignancies within 6 months of GIST diagnosis is associated with poorer overall survival. Targeted surveillance may be warranted in patients diagnosed with GIST that are at high risk of developing additional malignancies. PMID:27299364

  16. Cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a series of 5 cases with molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Lien; Hornick, Jason L; Mallipeddi, Raj; Zelger, Bettina G; Rother, Joshua D; Yang, Dan; Lev, Dina C; Trent, Jonathan C; Prieto, Victor G; Brenn, Thomas; Robson, Alistair; Calonje, Eduardo; Lazar, Alexander J F

    2009-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) rarely metastasize to the skin. We describe 5 patients with GIST with subcutaneous and cutaneous metastases. The mean age at metastasis was 54 years (range 30-68 years) with a male predominance (4:1). Primary tumors occurred in the stomach (n = 3), small bowel (n = 1), and abdomen, not otherwise specified (n = 1). The average time from primary tumor resection to the resection of skin metastases was 59 months (range 11-155 months). The metastases occurred in the scalp (n = 2), cheek (n = 1), and abdomen (n = 2) with 3 patients presenting with solitary nodules and 2 patients with multiple nodules. The average size was 2 cm (range 0.6-4 cm). Histologically, 2 cases were spindled and 3 cases demonstrated mixed epithelioid and spindle cell morphology. All were confirmed to have CD117 reactivity. KIT genotyping was performed in 4 of 5 cases. Two cases harbored a mutation in exon 11, and the remaining 2 cases were wild type in exons 9, 11, 13, and 17. All 5 patients had multiple concurrent or subsequent abdominal and/or hepatic metastases. In 4 patients with an average follow-up of 32 months (range 6-75 months), after the resection of the metastases, 2 were alive with disease and 2 died of disease. Cutaneous metastases seem to be a late complication of GIST, but their presence does not necessarily herald a rapid demise of the patient. PMID:19384074

  17. Clinical Practice Guideline for Accurate Diagnosis and Effective Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Sohn, Taesung; Choi, Dongil; Kang, Hye Jin; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Woo Ho; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2010-01-01

    Despite the rarity in incidence and prevalence, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has emerged as a distinct pathogenetic entity. And the clinical management of GIST has been evolving very rapidly due to the recent recognition of its oncogenic signal transduction pathway and the introduction of new molecular-targeted therapy. Successful management of GIST requires a multidisciplinary approach firmly based on accurate histopathologic diagnosis. However, there was no standardized guideline for the management of Korean GIST patients. In 2007, the Korean GIST study group (KGSG) published the first guideline for optimal diagnosis and treatment of GIST in Korea. As the second version of the guideline, we herein have updated recent clinical recommendations and reflected changes in diagnosis, surgical and medical treatments for more optimal clinical practice for GIST in Korea. We hope the guideline can be of help in enhancing the quality of diagnosis by members of the Korean associate of physicians involving in GIST patients's care and subsequently in achieving optimal efficacy of treatment. PMID:21060741

  18. Nestin regulates proliferation and invasion of gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells by altering mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Cai, J; Huang, Y; Ke, Q; Wu, B; Wang, S; Han, X; Wang, T; Wang, Y; Li, W; Lao, C; Song, W; Xiang, A P

    2016-06-16

    Nestin is widely expressed in numerous tumors and has become a diagnostic and prognostic indicator. However, the exact mechanism by which nestin contributes to tumor malignancy remains poorly understood. Here, we found marked upregulation of nestin expression in highly proliferative and invasive gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) specimens. Nestin knockdown in GIST cells reduced the proliferative and invasive activity owing to a decrease of mitochondrial intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Furthermore, nestin was co-localized with mitochondria, and knockdown of nestin increased mitochondrial elongation and influenced the mitochondrial function, including oxygen consumption rates, ATP generation and mitochondrial membrane potential and so on. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we demonstrated nestin knockdown inhibited the mitochondrial recruitment of Dynamin-related protein1 and induced the change of mitochondrial dynamics. Thus, nestin may have an important role in GIST malignancy by regulating mitochondrial dynamics and altering intracellular ROS levels. The findings provide new clues to reveal mechanisms by which nestin mediates the proliferation and invasion of GISTs. PMID:26434586

  19. Brain Metastasis from Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Naoe, Hideaki; Kaku, Eisuke; Ido, Yumi; Gushima, Rika; Maki, Yoko; Saito, Hirokazu; Yokote, Seiichiro; Gushima, Ryosuke; Nonaka, Kouichi; Hoshida, Yohmei; Murao, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Tetsu; Yokomine, Kazunori; Tanaka, Hideki; Nagahama, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Kouichi; Tanaka, Motohiko; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Baba, Hideo; Sasaki, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) into the central nervous system is extremely rare. We report a patient with synchronous GIST and brain metastasis. At disease onset, there was left hemiplegia and ptosis of the right eyelids. Resection cytology of the brain tumor was reported as metastasis of GIST. After positron emission tomography examination, another tumor in the small bowel was discovered, which suggested a small bowel GIST associated with intracranial metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of the intestinal tumor specimen obtained by double balloon endoscopy showed a pattern similar to the brain tumor, with the tumors subsequently identified as intracranial metastases of jejunal GIST. After surgical resection of one brain tumor, the patient underwent whole brain radiation therapy followed by treatment with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec; Novartis Pharma, Basel, Switzerland). Mutational analysis of the original intestinal tumor revealed there were no gene alterations in KIT or PDGFRα. Since the results indicated the treatment had no apparent effect on either of the tumors, and because ileus developed due to an intestinal primary tumor, the patient underwent surgical resection of the intestinal lesion. However, the patient's condition gradually worsen and she subsequently died 4 months after the initial treatment. PMID:22110419

  20. Long-Term Outcomes after Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of gastric subepithelial tumors (SETs) has several advantages over biopsy techniques, such as superior diagnostic yield and definite diagnosis. Removal of gastric SETs and histopathologic confirmation should be considered whenever gastric SETs are highly suspected to have malignant potential such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) or neuroendocrine tumor. According to our clinical experience, we suggest that endoscopic resection of gastric SETs is feasible for GISTs less than 3.0 cm without positive endoscopic ultrasonography findings or for hypoechoic SETs less than 3.0 cm. However, serious complications such as macroperforation may occur during endoscopic resection, and this procedure is highly dependent on endoscopists’ skills. We recently reported the long-term clinical outcomes of endoscopic resection of gastric GIST, which showed a relatively low recurrence rate (2.2%) during long-term follow-up (46.0±28.5 months) despite the low R0 resection rate (25.0%). We suggest that endoscopic surveillance might be possible without additional surgical resection in completely resected GISTs without residual tumor confirmed to be lower risk, even if they show an R1 resection margin. PMID:27196737

  1. Robust linear regression model of Ki-67 for mitotic rate in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    KEMMERLING, RALF; WEYLAND, DENIS; KIESSLICH, TOBIAS; ILLIG, ROMANA; KLIESER, ECKHARD; JÄGER, TARKAN; DIETZE, OTTO; NEUREITER, DANIEL

    2014-01-01

    Risk stratification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) by tumor size, lymph node and metastasis status is crucially affected by mitotic activity. To date, no studies have quantitatively compared mitotic activity in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained tissue sections with immunohistochemical markers, such as phosphohistone H3 (PHH3) and Ki-67. According to the TNM guidelines, the mitotic count on H&E sections and immunohistochemical PHH3-stained slides has been assessed per 50 high-power fields of 154 specimens of clinically documented GIST cases. The Ki-67-associated proliferation rate was evaluated on three digitalized hot spots using image analysis. The H&E-based mitotic rate was found to correlate significantly better with Ki-67-assessed proliferation activity than with PHH3-assessed proliferation activity (r=0.780; P<0.01). A linear regression model (analysis of variance; P<0.001) allowed reliable predictions of the H&E-associated mitoses based on the Ki-67 expression alone. Additionally, the Ki-67-associated proliferation revealed a higher and significant impact on the recurrence and metastasis rate of the GIST cases than by the classical H&E-based mitotic rate. The results of the present study indicated that the mitotic rate may be reliably and time-efficiently estimated by immunohistochemistry of Ki-67 using only three hot spots. PMID:24527082

  2. The roles of serum CXCL16 in circulating Tregs and gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common sarcomas of the digestive system. Abnormal expression of CXCL16 and its sole receptor, CXCR6, has been demonstrated in many cancers. However, no studies have shown the relationship between CXCL16 or CXCR6 expression and GIST. In this study, we detected CXCL16 and CXCR6 expression in GIST patient samples by using immunohistochemistry analysis and Western blot analysis. Serum CXCL16 level was determined by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Circulating Tregs were isolated by using flow cytometry. MTT assay, cell cycle assay, and transwell assay were used to test the effects of recombinant CXCL16 on Tregs and GIST cells in vitro. The levels of CXCL16 and CXCR6 protein were higher in cancer tissues than in normal tissues. Serum CXCL16 level and circulating Tregs were higher in GIST patients than that in the healthy volunteers. CXCL16, CXCR6, serum CXCL16, and circulating Tregs were significantly associated with a decreased survival time of patients. Relative to control cells, high concentration recombinant CXCL16 treated Tregs and GIST cells exhibited lower proliferation and mobility rates as assessed by MTT assay and transwell assay, respectively. Taken together, CXCL16 was observed to mediate the inhibitory effects in Tregs and GIST cells, and these involved suppression of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27418838

  3. Beyond Standard Therapy: Drugs Under Investigation for The Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Alturkmani, Hani J; Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Godwin, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common non-epithelial malignancy of the GI tract. With the discovery of KIT and later PDGFRA gain-of-function mutations as factors in the pathogenesis of the disease, GIST was the quintessential model for targeted therapy. Despite the successful clinical use of imatinib mesylate, a selective receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor that targets KIT, PDGFRA and BCR-ABL, we still do not have treatment for the long-term control of advanced GIST. Areas covered This review summarizes the drugs that are under investigation or have been assessed in trials for GIST treatment. The article focuses on their mechanisms of actions, the preclinical evidence of efficacy, and the clinical trials concerning safety and efficacy in humans. Expert opinion It is known that KIT and PDGFRA mutations in GIST patients influence the response to treatment. This observation should be taken into consideration when investigating new drugs. RECIST was developed to help uniformly report efficacy trials in oncology. Despite the usefulness of this system, many questions are being addressed about its validity in evaluating the true efficacy of drugs knowing that new targeted therapies do not affect the tumor size as much as they halt progression and prolong survival. PMID:26098203

  4. Safety of Regular-Dose Imatinib Therapy in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Undergoing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Niikura, Ryota; Serizawa, Takako; Yamada, Atsuo; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Tanaka, Mariko; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The number of cancer patients undergoing dialysis has been increasing, and the number of these patients on chemotherapy is also increasing. Imatinib is an effective and safe therapy for KIT-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), but the efficacy and safety of imatinib in dialysis patients remain unclear. Because clinical trials have not been conducted in this population, more investigations are required. We report on a 75-year-old Japanese man undergoing dialysis who presented with massive tarry stool from a duodenal GIST. The duodenal GIST was 14 cm in diameter with multiple liver and bone metastases. The patient underwent an urgent pancreaticoduodenectomy to achieve hemostasis. After surgery, he was administered imatinib 400 mg/day. No severe adverse event including myelosuppression, congestive heart failure, liver functional impairment, intestinal pneumonia, or Steven-Johnson syndrome occurred, and the liver metastasis remained stable for 4 months. During chemotherapy, hemodialysis continued three times per week without adverse events. We suggest that regular-dose imatinib is an effective and safe treatment in patients with GIST undergoing dialysis. In addition, we present a literature review of the effectiveness and safety of imatinib treatment in dialysis patients. PMID:27403097

  5. Molecular and morphological correlation in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): an update and primer.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Runjan; Serra, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are a commonly encountered tumour in routine practice. In the main, the morphology of spindle, epithelioid or mixed are well recognised along with mutations of c-kit However, there are other genes that are mutated resulting in characteristic clinicopathological correlations. GISTs harbouring platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) gene mutations lead to a typical morphological constellation of findings: gastric and omental location, gross tumour that is cystic and haemorrhagic, composed of epithelioid, plasmacytoid cells exhibiting pleomorphism, low mitotic count and containing characteristic giant cells with peripherally placed nuclei. These cells are set in a myxoid stroma containing several mast cells. In addition, perivascular/intratumoural hyalinisation is often seen. These tumours are CD117 and DOG-1 positive. GISTs with SDH mutations are multinodular/bilobed/dumb-bell shape tumour masses with mucosal ulceration and histologically characterised by fibrous bands around and within nodules of epithelioid or mixed epithelioid/spindle cells. Lymphovascular invasion with lymph node metastases are usual. Immunohistochemically, the GISTs are CD117, DOG-1 positive, SDHA negative (if SDHA mutated), SDHA positive (if SDHA intact) and SDHB negative. BRAF and NF-1 mutated GISTs do not have any characteristic morphological features. PMID:27317811

  6. Targeting Human Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour Cells with a Quadruplex-binding Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratnam, Mekala; Beltran, Monica; Galesa, Katja; Haider, Shozeb M.; Reszka, Anthony P.; Cuenca, Francisco; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Neidle, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The majority of human gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are driven by activating mutations in the proto-oncogene KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Clinical treatment with imatinib targets the kinase domain of KIT, but tumour regrowth occurs as a result of the development of resistant mutations in the kinase active site. An alternative small-molecule approach to GIST therapy is described, in which the KIT gene is directly targeted, and thus kinase resistance may be circumvented. A naphthalene dimiide derivative has been used to demonstrate the concept of dual quadruplex targeting. This compound strongly stabilises both telomeric quadruplex DNA and quadruplex sites in the KIT promoter in vitro. It is shown here that the compound is a potent inducer of growth arrest in a patient-derived GIST cell line at a concentration (ca 1μM) that also results in effective inhibition of telomerase activity and almost complete suppression of KIT mRNA and KIT protein expression. Molecular modelling studies with a telomeric quadruplex have been used to rationalise aspects of the experimental quadruplex melting data. PMID:19469547

  7. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors as an incidental finding in patients with a presumptive diagnosis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Mario; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Echeverri, Carolina; Álvarez, Luis Guillermo; Palomino, Maria Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical presentation and oncologic outcomes of a series of patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass and were diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Methods Data were obtained on all patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass between September 2007 and June 2010 and who were ultimately diagnosed with a GIST. The patients' medical records were reviewed. A literature review was also conducted. Results Six patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. All six patients had a tumor in the intestinal tract arising from the small bowel. The mean tumor size was 12 cm (range, 6 to 22 cm). A complete resection was achieved in five of the six patients. There were no intraoperative complications; one patient had a postoperative complication. Two patients were treated with imatinib after surgery. The mean follow-up time was 32 months (range, 0.3 to 40 months). At the last follow-up, five of the six patients were without any evidence of disease. One patient died of an unrelated hepatic encephalopathy. The incidence in our institution is 3%. Conclusion GISTs are uncommon; however, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with an abdominal or pelvic mass. PMID:22355467

  8. Succinate dehydrogenase mutation underlies global epigenomic divergence in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Kim, Su Young; Miettinen, Markku; Smith, Carly; Merino, Maria; Tsokos, Maria; Quezado, Martha; Smith, William I; Jahromi, Mona S; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Walker, Robert L; Lasota, Jerzy; Raffeld, Mark; Klotzle, Brandy; Wang, Zengfeng; Jones, Laura; Zhu, Yuelin; Wang, Yonghong; Waterfall, Joshua J; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; Bibikova, Marina; Pacak, Karel; Stratakis, Constantine; Janeway, Katherine A; Schiffman, Joshua D; Fan, Jian-Bing; Helman, Lee; Meltzer, Paul S

    2013-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) harbor driver mutations of signal transduction kinases such as KIT, or, alternatively, manifest loss-of-function defects in the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex, a component of the Krebs cycle and electron transport chain. We have uncovered a striking divergence between the DNA methylation profiles of SDH-deficient GIST (n = 24) versus KIT tyrosine kinase pathway-mutated GIST (n = 39). Infinium 450K methylation array analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues disclosed an order of magnitude greater genomic hypermethylation relative to SDH-deficient GIST versus the KIT-mutant group (84.9 K vs. 8.4 K targets). Epigenomic divergence was further found among SDH-mutant paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma (n = 29), a developmentally distinct SDH-deficient tumor system. Comparison of SDH-mutant GIST with isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutant glioma, another Krebs cycle-defective tumor type, revealed comparable measures of global hypo- and hypermethylation. These data expose a vital connection between succinate metabolism and genomic DNA methylation during tumorigenesis, and generally implicate the mitochondrial Krebs cycle in nuclear epigenomic maintenance. PMID:23550148

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the duodenum: Surgical management and survival results

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiao; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Lin-Hua; Wang, Xian-Fa; Cai, Xiu-Jun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To provide long-term survival results of operable duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (DGISTs) in a tertiary center in China. METHODS: In this retrospective study, the pathological data of 28 patients with DGISTs who had been treated surgically at the Second Department of General Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital (SRRSH) from June 1998 to December 2006 were reviewed. All pathological slides were examined by a single pathologist to confirm the diagnosis. In patients whose diagnosis was not confirmed by immunohistochemistry at the time of resection, representative paraffin blocks were reassembled, and sections were studied using antibodies against CD117 (c-kit), CD34, smooth muscle actin (SMA), vimentin, S-100, actin (HHF35), and desmin. Operative procedures were classified as wedge resection (WR, local resection with pure closure, without duodenal transection or anastomosis), segmental resection [SR, duodenal transection with Roux-Y or Billroth II gastrojejunostomy (G-J), end-to-end duodenoduodenostomy (D-D), end-to-end or end-to-side duodenojejunostomy (D-J)], and pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, Whipple operation with pancreatojejunostomy). R0 resection was pursued in all cases, and at least R1 resection was achieved. Regional lymphadenectomy was not performed. Clinical manifestations, surgery, medical treatment and follow-up data were retrospectively analyzed. Related studies in the literature were reviewed. RESULTS: There were 12 males and 16 females patients, with a median age of 53 years (20-76 years). Their major complaints were “gastrointestinal bleeding” (57.2%) and “nonspecific discomfort” (32.1%). About 14.3%, 60.7%, 17.9%, and 7.1% of the tumors originated in the first to fourth portion, respectively, with a median size of 5.8 cm (1.6-20 cm). Treatment was by WR in 5 cases (17.9%), SR in 13 cases (46.4%), and by PD in 10 cases (35.7%). The morbidity and mortality rates were 35.7% and 3.6%, respectively. The median post-operative stay was

  10. Imaging features of primary anorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors with clinical and pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Koch, M.R.; Jagannathan, J.P.; Krajewski, K.M.; Raut, C.P.; Hornick, J.L.; Ramaiya, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the imaging features of anorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with clinical and histopathologic correlation. Materials and methods: In this Institutional Review Board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective study, 16 patients (12 men; mean age 66 years (30–89 years)) with pathologically proven anorectal GISTs seen at our institution from January 2001 to July 2011 were identified. Electronic medical records were reviewed to obtain clinical data. Pretreatment imaging studies (computed tomography (CT) in 16 patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 9 patients and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in 8 patients) were evaluated by 2 radiologists until consensus. The location, size and imaging features of the primary tumor and metastases at presentation, if any, were recorded, and correlated with clinical data and pathologic features (histologic type, presence of necrosis, mitotic activity, risk category, immunohistochemical profile). Results: The mean tumor size was 6.9 × 6.0 cm. Of the 16 tumors, 11 (68.7%) were infralevator, 4 (25%) supra and infralevator and 1 (6.3%) supralevator; 9 (56.2%) were exophytic, 6 (37.5%) both exophytic and intraluminal, and 1 (6.3%) was intraluminal. The tumors were iso- to minimally hypoattenuating to muscle on CT, iso- to minimally hypointense on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed variable enhancement. Necrosis was seen in 4 (25%), and hemorrhage and calcification in 2 (12.5%) patients each. The tumors were FDG avid with a mean maximum standardized uptake value of 11 (8.4–16.8). All tumors were positive for KIT and CD34. Distant metastasis to liver was seen in 1 patient (6.3%) at presentation. Conclusion: Anorectal GISTs are well-circumscribed, non-circumferential, predominantly infralevator, intramural or exophytic, FDG-avid, hypoattenuating masses, and present without

  11. Reversible sarcopenia in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor treated with imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Moryoussef, Frédérick; Dhooge, Marion; Volet, Julien; Barbe, Coralie; Brezault, Catherine; Hoeffel, Christine; Coriat, Romain; Bouché, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background Imatinib is a long-term, oral, targeted therapy for high-risk resected and advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST). It is known that sarcopenia affects prognosis and treatment tolerance in patients with various solid cancers. We analysed lumbar skeletal muscle index changes in imatinib-treated GIST patients. Imatinib tolerance was also assessed to evaluate the influence of pre-treatment sarcopenia. Methods Thirty-one patients with advanced (n = 16) or high-risk resected (n = 15) GIST treated with imatinib (400 mg/day) were analysed retrospectively. Lumbar skeletal muscle indexes were evaluated on computed tomography images obtained before starting imatinib for all patients and at 6 months for those initially sarcopenic. Sarcopenia was defined using consensual cutoffs. Imatinib-induced toxicities were assessed after 3 months of administration. Results Twelve (38.7%) of the 31 patients were sarcopenic, including one unassessable at 6 months. Seven (63.6%) of the 11 assessable sarcopenic patients became non-sarcopenic after 6 months of imatinib. Pre-treatment sarcopenia was not associated with grades 3–4 toxicities, but the mean number of all-grade toxicities per sarcopenic patient was significantly higher for those non-sarcopenic (4.1 vs. 1.7, respectively, p < 0.01) after 3 months of treatment. Grades 1–2 anaemia and grades 1–2 fatigue were more frequent for sarcopenic than non-sarcopenic patients (83% vs. 26%, P < 0.01 and 42% vs. 5%, P = 0.02, respectively). Conclusions Sarcopenia is reversible in some GIST patients treated with imatinib. Pre-imatinib sarcopenia is predictive of non-severe toxicities, particularly anaemia and fatigue. PMID:26673372

  12. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Sirohi, Bhawna; Barreto, Savio G; Chacko, Raju T; Parikh, Purvish M; Pautu, Jeremy; Arya, Supreeta; Patil, Prachi; Chilukuri, Srinivas C; Ganesh, B; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, Deepak; Rath, Goura Shankar

    2014-10-01

    This consensus statement was produced along with the gastric cancer discussions as stomach is the most common site for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The recommendations apply to treatment of GIST.Evaluation of a patient with newly diagnosed GIST should include essential tests: A standard white light endoscopy with 6-8 biopsies (c-KIT testing on immunohistochemistry) from the tumor for confirmation of the diagnosis, a computed tomography (CT) scan (multi-detector or helical) of the abdomen and pelvis for staging with a CT chest or chest X-ray, and complete blood counts, renal function tests and liver function tests. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/positron emission tomography (PET)-CT are not recommended for all patients.For localized and resectable disease, surgery is recommended. The need for adjuvant treatment with imatinib would be guided by the risk stratification on the histopathological analysis of the resected specimen.For localized but borderline resectable tumors, upfront surgery may be considered only if complications due to the tumor are present such as major bleeding or gastric outlet obstruction. In all other patients, neoadjuvant imatinib should be considered to downstage the disease followed by surgery (with a curative intent, if feasible) in those with stable or partial response. This may be followed by adjuvant imatinib. In those patients with a poor response, further imatinib with dose escalation or sunitinib may be considered.Patients with metastatic disease must be assessed for treatment with imatinib as first-line therapy followed by sunitinib as second-line therapy versus best supportive care on an individual basis. PMID:25538399

  13. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: report of an audit and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Biasco, Guido; Velo, Daniela; Angriman, Imerio; Astorino, Maria; Baldan, Anna; Baseggio, Matteo; Basso, Umberto; Battaglia, Giorgio; Bertin, Matteo; Bertorelle, Roberta; Bocus, Paolo; Brosolo, Piero; Bulzacchi, Andrea; Cannizzaro, Renato; Da Dalt, Gian Franco; Di Battista, Monica; Errante, Domenico; Fedrigo, Marny; Frustaci, Sergio; Lionetti, Ivana; Massani, Marco; Mencarelli, Roberto; Montesco, Maria Cristina; Norberto, Lorenzo; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza; Pasquali, Claudio; Pastorelli, Davide; Rossi, Carlo Remigio; Ruffolo, Cesare; Salvagno, Luigi; Saponara, Maria Stella; Vittadello, Fabrizio; Zaccaria, Francesco; Zovato, Stefania; Farinati, Fabio

    2009-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), tumors characterized by c-KIT mutations, are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. The stomach is the most commonly involved site. Localization, size and mitotic rate are reliable predictors of survival and the two milestones of GISTs treatment are surgery and imatinib. This article is aimed to report the data of an audit, carried out on the morphological and clinical aspects of the disease and to review the present knowledge on GISTs. A total of 172 patients with GISTs (M : F=1 : 1; mean age 65 years) were recruited. The stomach was the most frequently involved site. In 50% of the cases the tumor was smaller than 5 cm, whereas major symptoms were observed in 43% of the cases. Predictors of progressive disease were present only in a small percentage of cases but the disease was in the metastatic phase in over 25% of the cases at diagnosis. Familial aggregation was rare but a consistent share of the patients (21%) had other synchronous or metachronous cancers. The most frequent mutations were in-frame deletions and point mutations of c-KIT exon 11. This report confirms in part the available data on GIST in a consecutive series of patients recruited in Italy and shows that only large collaborative multicenter studies provide data sound enough to enable making reasonable clinical and therapeutic choices, and suggests that, as a measure of secondary prevention, a diagnostic definition should be obtained in all submucosal lesions of the GI tract and that GIST patients should be screened for second tumors. PMID:19337057

  14. Analysis of c-KIT exon 11 mutations in canine gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Takanosu, M; Amano, S; Kagawa, Y

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of c-KIT exon 11 mutations in canine gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) and investigate the association between the c-KIT mutation status and KIT immunohistochemical staining pattern. Mutations in exon 11 of c-KIT were examined in 46 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded canine GISTs using PCR of genomic DNA and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of cDNA. Exon 11 c-KIT mutations were detected in 15/46 (32.6%) cases by conventional PCR and 34/46 (73.9%) cases by RT-PCR; the mutation detection rate was significantly higher for RT-PCR (P = 0.004, Fisher's exact test). Ten different mutations, including deletion, internal tandem duplication and point mutations, were identified by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-KIT antibody; diffuse KIT staining was detected in the tumour cell cytoplasm in 32/46 (69.6%) cases and partial or stippled cytoplasmic staining of KIT was observed in 14/46 (30.4%) cases. Neither pattern was significantly associated with c-KIT exon 11 mutation status (P = 1.000, chi-square test). These data indicate that c-KIT exon 11 mutations occur frequently in canine GISTs, similar to human GISTs; however, there is no association between c-KIT mutations and the KIT expression pattern in canine GISTs. This study suggests that RT-PCR is more sensitive than conventional PCR for the detection of c-KIT mutations in canine GISTs. PMID:26631948

  15. Histopathological Features of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors and the Contribution of DOG1 Expression to the Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Beril; Özyılmaz, Filiz; Tokuç, Burcu; Can, Nuray; Taştekin, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) have KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) mutations affecting receptor tyrosine kinase activity and do not benefit from classic treatment regimens. Aims: The aim of this study was to review the algorithm that may be followed for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis in GISTs by investigating the histomorphological parameters and expression characteristics of classical immunohistochemical antibodies used in routine tests in addition to DOG1 expression. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: We reevaluated the histological and immunohistochemical parameters of 37 GISTs. The standard immunohistochemical diagnosis and differential diagnosis panel antibodies (CD117, PDGFRα, CD34, vimentin, desmin, SMA, S-100, and Ki67) were studied on the tumor sections. We also used the popular marker DOG1 antibody with accepted sensitivity for GISTs in recent years and the PDGFRα immune marker for which the benefit in routine practice is discussed. Results: Classification according to progressive disease risk groups of the 37 cases revealed that 54% were in the high risk, 19% in the moderate risk, 16% in the low risk, 8% in the very low risk and 8% in the no risk group. Cytological atypia, necrosis, mucosal invasion and the Ki67 index were found to be related to the progressive disease risk groups of the tumors (p<0.05). Positive immunoreaction was observed with CD117 and PDGFRα in all GISTs in the study (100%). Positivity with the DOG1 antibody was found in 33 (89%) cases. CD34 was positive in 62% (23) of the cases. Conclusion: The CD117 antibody still plays a key role in GIST diagnosis. However, the use of DOG1 and PDGFRα antibodies combined with CD117 as sensitive markers can be beneficial. PMID:26740899

  16. Positive cyclin T expression as a favorable prognostic factor in treating gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    LIN, LIEN-FU; JIN, JONG-SHIAW; CHEN, JUI-CHANG; HUANG, CHIA-CHI; SHEU, JENG-HORNG; CHEN, WENLUNG; TSAO, TANG-YI; HSU, CHIH-WEI

    2016-01-01

    Positive transcriptional elongation factor b (P-TEFb) contains the catalytic subunit cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9) and the regulatory subunit cyclin T. Cyclin T1 and Cdk9 are the key factors of the PTEFb pathways and are overexpressed in the human head and neck carcinoma cell line. However, there have been limited studies regarding the role of cyclin T1 and Cdk9 in gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of the present study was to assess the association between cyclin T1 and Cdk9 and their clinical significance in gastric GISTs. A total of 30 gastric GIST patients who underwent either laparoscopic or laparotomic partial gastrectomy were enrolled in the study. The surgical tissue slides were stained with Cdk9 and cyclin T1 antibodies, and the immunohistochemistry scores and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed. Ten patients were cyclin T1-positive, and 20 were negative. All 11 patients with recurrent tumors or distant metastases were cyclin T1-negative patients. Old age, large tumor size, a high Ki67 IHC staining score, high mitotic count and negative cyclin T1 staining revealed a worse clinical outcome in univariate analysis. By contrast, the Cdk9 score was not associated with clinical parameters. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve illustrated that the DFS rate of the patients with negative cyclin T1 staining was significantly lower than that of the patients with positive cyclin T1 staining. Positive expression of cyclin T1 was a good prognostic factor in patients with gastric GISTs. PMID:27284431

  17. Molecular basis for primary and secondary tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Mrinal M.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecule kinase inhibitors have irrevocably altered cancer treatment. March 2010 marks the 10th anniversary of using imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), a cardinal example of the utility of such targeted therapy in a solid tumor. Before imatinib, metastatic GIST was frustrating to treat due to its resistance to standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. Median survival for patients with metastatic GIST improved from 19 to 60 months with imatinib. In treating patients with GIST, two patterns of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance have been observed. In the first, ~9–14% of patients have progression within 3 months of starting imatinib. These patients are classified as having primary or early resistance. Median progression-free survival (PFS) on imatinib is approximately 24 months; patients with later progression are classified as having secondary or acquired resistance. Primary studies and a meta-analysis of studies of imatinib in GIST patients have identified prognostic features that contribute to treatment failure. One of the strongest predictors for success of therapy is KIT or PDGFRA mutational status. Patients with KIT exon 11 mutant GIST have better response rates, PFS, and overall survival compared to other mutations. A great deal has been learned in the last decade about sensitivity and resistance of GIST to imatinib; however, many unanswered questions remain about secondary resistance mechanisms and clinical management in the third- and fourth-line setting. This review will discuss the role of dose effects, and early and late resistance to imatinib and their clinical implications. Patients intolerant to imatinib (5%) and those who progress on imatinib are treated with sunitinib. The mechanism of resistance to sunitinib is unknown at this time but is also appears related to growth of clones with secondary mutations in KIT. Third- and fourth-line treatments of GIST and with future treatment strategies are also discussed. PMID:21116624

  18. Detection of Treatment-Induced Changes in Signaling Pathways in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors using Transcriptomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Michael F.; Rink, Lori; Tarn, Chi; Mburu, Sarah; Taguchi, Takahiro; Eisenberg, Burton; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Cell signaling plays a central role in the etiology of cancer. Numerous therapeutics in use or under development target signaling proteins, however off-target effects often limit assignment of positive clinical response to the intended target. As direct measurements of signaling protein activity are not generally feasible during treatment, there is a need for more powerful methods to determine if therapeutics inhibit their targets and when off-target effects occur. We have used the Bayesian Decomposition algorithm and data on transcriptional regulation to create a novel methodology, DESIDE (Differential Expression for SIgnaling DEtermination), for inferring signaling activity from microarray measurements. We applied DESIDE to deduce signaling activity in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell lines treated with the targeted therapeutic imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We detected the expected reduced activity in the KIT pathway, as well as unexpected changes in the P53 pathway. Pursuing these findings, we have determined that imatinib-induced DNA damage is responsible for the increased activity of P53, identifying a novel off-target activity for this drug. We then used DESIDE on data from resected, post-imatinib treatment tumor samples and identified a pattern in these tumors similar to that at late time points in the cell lines, and this pattern correlated with initial clinical response. The pattern showed increased activity of ELK1 and STAT3 transcription factors, which are associated with the growth of side population cells. DESIDE infers the global reprogramming of signaling networks during treatment, permitting treatment modification that leverages ongoing drug development efforts, which is crucial for personalized medicine. PMID:19903850

  19. High Density DNA Array Analysis Reveals Distinct Genomic Profiles in a Subset of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Belinsky, Martin G.; Skorobogatko, Yuliya V.; Rink, Lori; Pei, Jianming; Cai, Kathy Q.; Vanderveer, Lisa A.; Riddell, David; Merkel, Erin; Tarn, Chi; Eisenberg, Burton L.; von Mehren, Margaret; Testa, Joseph R.; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) generally harbor activating mutations in KIT or PDGFRA. Mutations in these receptor tyrosine kinases lead to dysregulation of downstream signaling pathways that contribute to GIST pathogenesis. GISTs with KIT or PDGFRA mutations also undergo secondary cytogenetic alterations that may indicate the involvement of additional genes important in tumor progression. Approximately 10–15% of adult and 85% of pediatric GISTs do not have mutations in KIT or in PDGFRA. Most mutant adult GISTs display large-scale genomic alterations, but little is know about the mutation-negative tumors. Using genome-wide DNA arrays, we investigated genomic imbalances in a set of 31 GISTs, including 10 KIT/PDGFRA mutation-negative tumors from 9 adults and 1 pediatric case and 21 mutant tumors. While all 21 mutant GISTs exhibited multiple copy number aberrations, notably losses, 8 of the 10 KIT/PDGFRA mutation-negative GISTs exhibited few or no genomic alterations. One KIT/PDGFRA mutation-negative tumor exhibiting numerous genomic changes was found to harbor an alternate activating mutation, in the serine-threonine kinase BRAF. The only other mutation-negative GIST with significant chromosomal imbalances was a recurrent metastatic tumor found to harbor a homozygous deletion in chromosome 9p. Similar findings in several KIT-mutant GISTs identified a minimal overlapping region of deletion of ~0.28 Mbp in 9p21.3 that includes only the CDKN2A/2B genes, which encode inhibitors of cell-cycle kinases. These results suggest that GISTs without activating kinase mutations, whether pediatric or adult, generally exhibit a much lower level of cytogenetic progression than that observed in mutant GISTs. PMID:19585585

  20. microRNA expression signatures of gastrointestinal stromal tumours: associations with imatinib resistance and patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Akçakaya, P; Caramuta, S; Åhlen, J; Ghaderi, M; Berglund, E; Östman, A; Bränström, R; Larsson, C; Lui, W-O

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is mainly initialised by receptor tyrosine kinase gene mutations. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate considerably improved the outcome of patients, imatinib resistance still remains a major therapeutic challenge in GIST therapy. Herein we evaluated the clinical impact of microRNAs in imatinib-treated GISTs. Methods: The expression levels of microRNAs were quantified using microarray and RT–qPCR in GIST specimens from patients treated with neoadjuvant imatinib. The functional roles of miR-125a-5p and PTPN18 were evaluated in GIST cells. PTPN18 expression was quantified by western blotting in GIST samples. Results: We showed that overexpression levels of miR-125a-5p and miR-107 were associated with imatinib resistance in GIST specimens. Functionally, miR-125a-5p expression modulated imatinib sensitivity in GIST882 cells with a homozygous KIT mutation but not in GIST48 cells with double KIT mutations. Overexpression of miR-125a-5p suppressed PTPN18 expression, and silencing of PTPN18 expression increased cell viability in GIST882 cells upon imatinib treatment. PTPN18 protein levels were significantly lower in the imatinib-resistant GISTs and inversely correlated with miR-125a-5p. Furthermore, several microRNAs were significantly associated with metastasis, KIT mutational status and survival. Conclusions: Our findings highlight a novel functional role of miR-125a-5p on imatinib response through PTPN18 regulation in GIST. PMID:25349971

  1. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Evaluation of a Pooled Case Series.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis.Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center.The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs.The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  2. Concurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor and digestive tract carcinoma: a single institution experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Deng, Rui; Xia, Zefeng; Shuai, Xiaoming; Chang, Weilong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin; Tao, Kaixiong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of patients with concurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and digestive tract carcinoma. Among 585 patients diagnosed with GIST from January 2005 to July 2014, 32 (5.5%) had synchronous digestive tract carcinoma, including 19 (59.4%) men and 13 (40.6%) women. The median age was 64 years (range, 43-84). GIST was located in the stomach (n=24), small intestine (n=6), duodenum (n=1) and retroperitoneum (n=1). GISTs were intra- or postoperatively discovered (n=28) or preoperatively identified (n=4). The tumor size was less than 10 mm (microGIST) in 23 (71.9%) GIST patients. The preoperatively identified GIST subgroup showed a significantly larger tumor size, more mitotic figures and a higher risk grade than the intra- or postoperatively identified GIST subgroup. Concurrent digestive tract carcinomas were most frequently located in the stomach (24 cases, 75%). The other involved sites were the esophagus (n=5), duodenum (n=2) and colon (n=1). With a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 9-80), 24 patients were alive without evidence of disease, 6 patients had died of carcinoma progression, 1 patient had died from an accident, and 1 patient experienced GIST metastasis to the liver. In summary, we discovered that 5.5% of GIST patients also developed a concurrent digestive tract carcinoma in a series of 585 GIST cases. The majority of GISTs are incidentally identified microGISTs. The concurrent carcinoma seems to have a greater unfavorable effect on prognosis than the GIST. However, for a GIST that is identified preoperatively with a high risk of progression, adjuvant therapy is warranted. PMID:26885079

  3. Pazopanib in metastatic multiply treated progressive gastrointestinal stromal tumors: feasible and efficacious

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Anant; Pande, Nikhil; Shetty, Omshree; Shetty, Nitin; Gupta, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    Background A median progression free survival (PFS) of 18–20 months and median overall survival (OS) of 51–57 months can be achieved with the use of imatinib, in metastatic or advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Sunitinib and regorafenib are approved options for patients progressing on imatinib, but with markedly decreased survival. pazopanib is a broad spectrum TKI targeting KIT, PDGFR and VEGFR receptors and has shown promising activity in phase 2 trials in GIST. Methods All patients who received pazopanib for GIST between March 2014 and September 2015 in our institution were reviewed. Patients were assessed for response with CT or PET CT scans. Patients continued pazopanib until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Survival was evaluated by Kaplan Meier product method. Results A total of 11 consecutive patients were included in our study. Median duration of follow up was seven months. The median lines of prior therapy was 2 [1-5]. Partial response (PR) was observed in seven patients and two had stable disease (SD). Two patients died within one month of start of pazopanib. Five of ten patients had progressed during the study with eight patients still alive. The median PFS was 11.9 months and the median OS was not reached. Common adverse events seen were hand-foot-syndrome (HFS) in four patients, anemia in four patients and fatigue in three patients. Grade 3/4 adverse events were uncommon. Three patients required dose modification of pazopanib. Conclusions Pazopanib is a reasonably efficacious well tolerated TKI and can be explored as a treatment option in advanced GIST that has progressed on imatinib. PMID:27563456

  4. Development of multiple myeloma in a patient with gastrointestinal stromal tumor treated with imatinib mesylate: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tzilves, D; Gatopoulou, A; Zervas, K; Katodritou, E; Patakiouta, F; Tarpagos, A; Katsos, I

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumors, which represent approximately 1% of the neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. These tumors rarely give extra-abdominal metastases. However, their clinical outcome is potentially adverse. In some rare cases, co-existance of GISTs with other malignancies has been reported. Here we present a case of a 74-year old male with GIST, which was managed by surgical resection. Fourteen months later, the patient presented with liver metastases and imatinib mesylated was administered. During treatment, the patient reported skeletal pain and plane X-rays revealed osteolytic bone lesions. Further investigation revealed the presence of multiple myeloma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the co-existence of multiple myeloma (MM) with GIST. PMID:17461509

  5. Development of multiple myeloma in a patient with gastrointestinal stromal tumor treated with imatinib mesylate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tzilves, D; Gatopoulou, A; Zervas, K; Katodritou, E; Patakiouta, F; Tarpagos, A; Katsos, I

    2007-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumors, which represent approximately 1% of the neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. These tumors rarely give extra-abdominal metastases. However, their clinical outcome is potentially adverse. In some rare cases, co-existance of GISTs with other malignancies has been reported. Here we present a case of a 74-year old male with GIST, which was managed by surgical resection. Fourteen months later, the patient presented with liver metastases and imatinib mesylated was administered. During treatment, the patient reported skeletal pain and plane X-rays revealed osteolytic bone lesions. Further investigation revealed the presence of multiple myeloma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the co-existence of multiple myeloma (MM) with GIST. PMID:17461509

  6. Generation of orthotopic patient-derived xenografts from gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common sarcoma and its treatment with imatinib has served as the paradigm for developing targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite this success, imatinib-resistance has emerged as a major problem and therefore, the clinical efficacy of other drugs has been investigated. Unfortunately, most clinical trials have failed to identify efficacious drugs despite promising in vitro data and pathological responses in subcutaneous xenografts. We hypothesized that it was feasible to develop orthotopic patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) from resected GIST that could recapitulate the genetic heterogeneity and biology of the human disease. Methods Fresh tumor tissue from three patients with pathologically confirmed GISTs was obtained immediately following tumor resection. Tumor fragments (4.2-mm3) were surgically xenografted into the liver, gastric wall, renal capsule, and pancreas of immunodeficient mice. Tumor growth was serially assessed with ultrasonography (US) every 3-4 weeks. Tumors were also evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET). Animals were sacrificed when they became moribund or their tumors reached a threshold size of 2500-mm3. Tumors were subsequently passaged, as well as immunohistochemically and histologically analyzed. Results Herein, we describe the first model for generating orthotopic GIST PDXs. We have successfully xenografted three unique KIT-mutated tumors into a total of 25 mice with an overall success rate of 84% (21/25). We serially followed tumor growth with US to describe the natural history of PDX growth. Successful PDXs resulted in 12 primary xenografts in NOD-scid gamma or NOD-scid mice while subsequent successful passages resulted in 9 tumors. At a median of 7.9 weeks (range 2.9-33.1 weeks), tumor size averaged 473±695-mm3 (median 199-mm3, range 12.6-2682.5-mm3) by US. Furthermore, tumor size on US within 14 days of death correlated with gross tumor size on necropsy. We also

  7. Analysis of mutation of the c-Kit gene and PDGFRA in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    XU, CHUN-WEI; LIN, SHAN; WANG, WU-LONG; GAO, WEN-BIN; LV, JIN-YAN; GAO, JING-SHAN; ZHANG, LI-YING; LI, YANG; WANG, LIN; ZHANG, YU-PING; TIAN, YU-WANG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate mutation status of the c-Kit gene (KIT) and PDGFRA in patients with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). In total, 93 patients with a GIST were included in the study, in which polymerase chain reaction amplification and gene sequencing were used to detect the sequences of exons 9, 11, 13 and 17 in KIT and exons 12 and 18 in PDGFRA. KIT mutations were detected in 64 cases (68.82%), of which exon 11 mutations were detected in 56 cases (60.22%), exon 13 mutations were detected in three cases (3.23%) and one case (1.08%) was shown to have a mutation in exon 17. The most common mutation in exon 11 was a deletion, which accounted for 55.36% (31/56) of the cases, followed by a point mutation observed in 26.79% (15/56) of the cases, while an insertion (tandem repeats) was identified in 14.29% (8/56) of the cases, and 3.57% (2/56) of the exon 11 mutations were deletions associated with a point mutation. The majority of the mutations were heterozygous, with only a few homozygous mutations. Mutational analysis revealed the mutations to be more concentrated in the classic hot zone at the 5′-end, followed by the tandem repeat frame at the 3′-end. In four cases, a mutation was detected in exon 18 of PDGFRA, of which one was associated with a mutation in KIT. The remaining three cases (10.34%, 3/29) were not associated with mutations in KIT and accounted for 37.5% (3/8) of the CD117-negative GIST cases. Therefore, the majority of the GIST cases were characterized by mutations in KIT or PDGFRA, which were directly associated with the disease. Pairs of different mutations in the same exon of KIT, or KIT mutations coupled with pairs of mutations in PDGFRA, were detected in a small number of patients. Imatinib is a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor and is the first line targeted treatment for GIST, resulting in markedly improved survival rates. Thus, gene mutation genotyping may provide inspiration and guidance for

  8. Severe paraneoplastic hypoglycemia secondary to a gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, K; Rao, R; Grammatopoulos, D K; Randeva, H S; Weickert, M O; Murthy, N

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report the case of a 70-year-old previously healthy female who presented acutely to the Accident and Emergency department with left-sided vasomotor symptoms including reduced muscle tone, weakness upon walking and slurred speech. Physical examination confirmed hemiparesis with VIIth nerve palsy and profound hepatomegaly. A random glucose was low at 1.7 mmol/l, which upon correction resolved her symptoms. In hindsight, the patient recalled having had similar episodes periodically over the past 3 months to which she did not give much attention. While hospitalized, she continued having episodes of symptomatic hypoglycaemia during most nights, requiring treatment with i.v. dextrose and/or glucagon. Blood tests including insulin and C-peptide were invariably suppressed, in correlation with low glucose. A Synacthen stimulation test was normal (Cort (0′) 390 nmol/l, Cort (30′) 773 nmol/l). A computed tomography scan showed multiple lobulated masses in the abdomen, liver and pelvis. An ultrasound guided biopsy of one of the pelvic masses was performed. Immunohistochemistry supported the diagnosis of a gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) positive for CD34 and CD117. A diagnosis of a non islet cell tumour hypoglycaemia (NICTH) secondary to an IGF2 secreting GIST was confirmed with further biochemical investigations (IGF2=96.5 nmol/l; IGF2:IGF1 ratio 18.9, ULN <10). Treatment with growth hormone resolved the patient's hypoglycaemic symptoms and subsequent targeted therapy with Imatinib was successful in controlling disease progression over an 8-year observation period. Learning points NICTH can be a rare complication of GISTs that may manifest with severe hypoglycaemia and neuroglucopenic symptoms. NICTH can masquerade as other pathologies thus causing diagnostic confusion. Histological confirmation of GIST induced NICTH and exclusion of other conditions causing hypoglycaemia is essential. Mutational analysis of GISTs should be carried out in all

  9. Increased Risk of Additional Cancers Among Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James D.; Ma, Grace L.; Baumgartner, Joel M.; Madlensky, Lisa; Burgoyne, Adam M.; Tang, Chih-Min; Martinez, Maria Elena; Sicklick, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered non-hereditary or sporadic. However, single-institution studies suggest that GIST patients develop additional malignancies with increased frequencies. We hypothesized that we could gain greater insight into possible associations between GIST and other malignancies using a national cancer database inquiry. Methods Patients diagnosed with GIST (2001–2011) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database were included. Standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to quantify cancer risks incurred by GIST patients before and after GIST diagnoses, respectively, when compared with the general U.S. population. Results Of 6,112 GIST patients, 1,047 (17.1%) had additional cancers. There were significant increases in overall cancer rates: 44% (SPR=1.44) before diagnosis and 66% (SIR=1.66) after GIST diagnoses. Malignancies with significantly increased occurrence both before/after diagnoses included other sarcomas (SPR=5.24/SIR=4.02), neuroendocrine-carcinoid tumors (SPR=3.56/SIR=4.79), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (SPR=1.69/SIR=1.76), and colorectal adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.51/SIR=2.16). Esophageal adenocarcinoma (SPR=12.0), bladder adenocarcinoma (SPR=7.51), melanoma (SPR=1.46), and prostate adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.20) were significantly more common only before GIST. Ovarian carcinoma (SIR=8.72), small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIR=5.89), papillary thyroid cancer (SIR=5.16), renal cell carcinoma (SIR=4.46), hepatobiliary adenocarcinomas (SIR=3.10), gastric adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.70), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.03), uterine adenocarcinoma (SIR=1.96), non-small cell lung cancer (SIR=1.74), and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (SIR=1.65) were significantly more common only after GIST. Conclusion This is the first population-based study to characterize the associations and temporal relationships between GIST and other cancers, both by site and

  10. A case for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with reference to its ultrastructure and 'gain-of-function' mutation.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Toshiyuki; Takayama, Ichiro; Zai, Hiroaki; Sekido, Yasutomo; Kijima, Hiroshi; Ogoshi, Kyoji; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu; Shirai, Takayuki; Mine, Tetsuya

    2003-07-01

    A case for primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is described with reference to its ultrastructural characteristics and mutation within the exon 11 of c-kit gene. A forty-seven years old woman complaining of dysphasia was examined by endoscopy, which depicted a submucosal tumor (70 mm in diameter) with ulcerations at the fundus of the stomach. Histopathologically, the tumor cells had large nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm and were frequently during mitosis phase. The tumor cells were immunopositive for KIT, CD 34 and vimentin, suggesting their fibroblast-like characteristics. In contrast, desmin and S-100, a smooth muscle and an enteroglial marker, were not immunopositive within the cells. At least 30 % of the tumor cells possessed MIB-I and 20 % of them possessed p53, which are compatible with fast development of the tumor. By electron microscopy, the tumor cells possessed large oval nuclei, abundant mitochondria, caveolae and smooth endoplasmic reticulums, while no gap junctions were seen on the cells: The tumor cells thus possessed interstitial cells-like characteristics at least in part. DNA mutation search for the tumor cells however realized no gain-of-function mutation within the exon 11 of the c-kit gene, suggesting existence of other mechanism for neoplasmic growth of the tumor cells classified as gastrointestinal stromal tumors. PMID:14714834

  11. Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  12. Expect the unexpected: Endometriosis mimicking a rectal carcinoma in a post-menopausal lady

    PubMed Central

    Jakhmola, C. K.; Kumar, Ameet; Sunita, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Altered bowels habits along with rectal mass in an elderly would point toward a rectal cancer. We report an unusual case of a post-menopausal lady who presented with these complaints. We had difficulties in establishing a pre-operative diagnosis. With a tentative diagnosis of a rectal cancer/gastrointestinal stromal tumor, she underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection. On histopathology, this turned out to be endometriosis. Bowel endometriosis is an uncommon occurrence. That it occurred in a post-menopausal lady was a very unusual finding. We discuss the case, its management, and the relevant literature. PMID:27073315

  13. Sunitinib for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumours: a critique of the submission from Pfizer.

    PubMed

    Bond, M; Hoyle, M; Moxham, T; Napier, M; Anderson, R

    2009-09-01

    The submission's evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of sunitinib for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) is based on a randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing sunitinib with placebo for people with unresectable and/or metastatic GIST after failure of imatinib and with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) progression status 0-1, and an ongoing, non-comparative cohort study of a similar population but with ECOG progression status 0-4. The searches are appropriate and include all relevant studies and the RCT is of high quality. In the RCT sunitinib arm overall survival was 73 median weeks [95% confidence interval (CI) 61 to 83] versus 75 median weeks (95% CI 68 to 84) for the cohort study. However, time to tumour progression in the cohort study was different from that in the RCT sunitinib arm [41 (95% CI 36 to 47) versus 29 (95% CI 22 to 41) median weeks respectively]. Median progression-free survival with sunitinib was 24.6 weeks (95% CI 12.1 to 28.4) versus 6.4 weeks (95% CI 4.4 to 10.0) on placebo (hazard ratio 0.333, 95% CI 0.238 to 0.467, p < 0.001). The manufacturer used a three-state Markov model to model the cost-effectiveness of sunitinib compared with best supportive care for GIST patients; the modelling approach and sources and justification of estimates are reasonable. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was 27,365 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) with the first cycle of sunitinib treatment not costed; when we included the cost of the first treatment cycle we estimated a base-case ICER of 32,636 pounds per QALY. Pfizer's sensitivity analysis produced a range of ICERs from 15,536 pounds per QALY to 59,002 pounds per QALY. Weaknesses of the manufacturer's submission include that the evidence is based on only one published RCT; that 84% of the RCT control population crossed over to the intervention group, giving rise to the use of unusual rank preserved structural

  14. Tumor markers in colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and gastrointestinal stromal cancers: European group on tumor markers 2014 guidelines update

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, MJ; Lamerz, R; Haglund, C; Nicolini, A; Kalousová, M; Holubec, L; Sturgeon, C

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and management of patients with several different types of gastrointestinal cancer, especially colorectal, gastric, gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) adenocarcinomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of this article is to provide updated and evidence-based guidelines for the use of biomarkers in the different gastrointestinal malignancies. Recommended biomarkers for colorectal cancer include an immunochemical-based fecal occult blood test in screening asymptomatic subjects ≥50 years of age for neoplasia, serial CEA levels in postoperative surveillance of stage II and III patients who may be candidates for surgical resection or systemic therapy in the event of distant metastasis occurring, K-RAS mutation status for identifying patients with advanced disease likely to benefit from anti-EGFR therapeutic antibodies and microsatellite instability testing as a first-line screen for subjects with Lynch syndrome. In advanced gastric or GOJ cancers, measurement of HER2 is recommended in selecting patients for treatment with trastuzumab. For patients with suspected GIST, determination of KIT protein should be used as a diagnostic aid, while KIT mutational analysis may be used for treatment planning in patients with diagnosed GISTs. PMID:23852704

  15. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Open vs. Laparoscopic Resection of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jean-Sebastien; Gill, Richdeep S; Gazala, Sayf; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2015-05-01

    Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract, and surgical resection is the primary treatment of early disease. Limited data exist concerning laparoscopic resections of these neoplasms. This systematic review was designed to evaluate the literature comparing laparoscopic and open surgical resection of gastric GISTs and to assess the effectiveness and safety of this minimally invasive technique. We performed a systematic search of MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar, the clinical trials database and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses as well as the past 3 years of conference abstracts from the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons Annual Meetings. Studies comparing the open and the laparoscopic approaches to the resection of gastric GISTs were included in this systematic review. Two reviewers independently performed the screen of titles and abstracts, the full manuscript review, the data extraction and the risk of bias assessment. A quantitative analysis was performed. Of the 189 studies identified, seven studies were included. The laparoscopic approach was associated with a significantly lower length of hospital stay (3.82 days (2.14 - 5.49)). There was no observed difference in operative time, adverse events, estimated blood loss, overall survival and recurrence rates. This study supports that laparoscopic resection is safe and effective for gastric GISTs and is associated with a significantly lower length of hospital stay. Further trials are needed for cost analysis and to rigorously assess oncologic outcomes. PMID:25780475

  16. The challenge of conducting pharmacoeconomic evaluations in oncology using crossover trials: the example of sunitinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Isabelle; LeLorier, Jacques; Blackstein, Martin E

    2008-05-01

    This paper examines the challenge of conducting economic evaluations to support patient access to cancer therapies when the cost-effectiveness estimation is hampered by crossover trial design. To demonstrate these limitations, we present the submission to the Canadian Drug Review (CDR) of a cost-effectiveness evaluation of sunitinib versus best supportive care (BSC) for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumour in patients intolerant or resistant to imatinib. The economic model generated an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for sunitinib versus BSC of dollars 79,884/quality-adjusted life-year gained. Eight months after initial submission, CDR granted a final recommendation to fund sunitinib following the manufacturer's appeal against their first recommendation. Although cost-effectiveness is an important consideration in reimbursement decisions, there is a need for improved decision-making processes for cancer drugs, as well as a better understanding of the limitations of clinical trial design. PMID:18372169

  17. A Pleural Solitary Fibrous Tumor, Multiple Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Moyamoya Disease, and Hyperparathyroidism in a Patient Associated with NF1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Kodama, Ken; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Takeda, Masashi; Michishita, Shintaro

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also called von Recklinghausen's disease, is a multisystemic disease caused by an alteration of the NF1 gene, a tumor suppressor located on the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q11.2). Loss of the gene function, due to a point mutation, leads to an increase in cell proliferation and the development of several tumors. We report a 60-year-old female patient manifesting hypercalcemia due to hyperparathyroidism, a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pleura, multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and moyamoya disease associated with NF1. The SFT and GISTs were removed by staged operations. Then, hypercalcemia was successfully controlled after resection of the parathyroid adenoma. Based on a literature review, these combinations have never been reported, and the relevant literature is briefly discussed. PMID:26442164

  18. Dysphagia, melanosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumors and a germinal mutation of the KIT gene in an Argentine family.

    PubMed

    Adela Avila, Silvia; Peñaloza, José; González, Flavia; Abdo, Ivana; Rainville, Irene; Root, Elizabeth; Carrero Valenzuela, Roque Daniel; Garber, Judy

    2014-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymatous neoplasms of the human digestive tract. They locate preferentially in stomach, duodenum or small bowel. Usually sporadic, familial cases unrelated to neurofibromatosis may be due to germline mutations in KIT or PDGFRA. We describe the first Argentine family with GIST in which we found, diffuse cutaneous melanosis, lentiginosis, and dysphagia. Dysphagia was not observed in the four families previously described with the same mutation. Histopathology resulted consistent with GIST, and tumor immunohistochemistry was likewise positive for DOG-1, CD117 (KIT) and CD34. The search for germline mutations identified the KIT c.1697T > C (p.559V > A) substitution in exon 11. Treatment with imatinib is furnishing positive results. PMID:24847623

  19. The emerging role of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1r) in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) in medical oncology. Interesting data have been reported also on IGF1r in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) especially in children and in young adult patients whose disease does not harbour mutations on KIT and PDGFRA and are poorly responsive to conventional therapies. However, it is too early to reach conclusions on IGF1R as a novel therapeutic target in GIST because the receptor's biological role is still to be defined and the clinical significance in patients needs to be studied in larger studies. We update and comment the current literature on IGF1R in GISTs and discuss the future perspectives in this promising field. PMID:21078151

  20. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for a Small-Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Makoto; Wada, Wataru; Kimura, Shintaro; Okada, Akiko; Hirakata, Tomoko; Onozato, Ryoichi; Saito, Kana; Morohara, Koji; Osawa, Hidenobu; Katayama, Kazuhisa; Yasuda, Naokuni; Tanaka, Shigebumi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Our report concerns a 64-year-old man with a small-intestinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), which was successfully treated with single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS). Small-bowel endoscopy detected a submucosal tumor located approximately 10 cm from the ligament of Treitz in the wall of the proximal jejunum. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a tumor (diameter, 4 cm) containing high- and low-density areas in the proximal jejunum. On 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET), the tumor demonstrated intense FDG uptake (maximum standard uptake value, 3.82), whereas it displayed high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images. No metastatic lesions were observed. The patient was diagnosed with a jejunal GIST. Wedge resection of the jejunum was performed using the SILS procedure. The tumor was histopathologically diagnosed as a low-grade malignant GIST. SILS is a useful resection technique for small-intestinal GIST. PMID:25058785

  1. The role of surgery in the management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in the era of imatinib mesylate effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kosmadakis, Nikolaos; Visvardis, Evangelos-Efstathios; Kartsaklis, Panagiotis; Tsimara, Maria; Chatziantoniou, Alexandros; Panopoulos, Ioannis; Erato, Palli; Capsambelis, Paul

    2005-08-01

    Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for the gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). In the literature, the 5-year patient survival after surgical resection, ranged from 48 to 80%, before the era of imatinib mesylate and the exploration of the prognostication criteria. Imatinib mesylate targets an intracellular signaling molecule of the natural history and malignant development of GISTs, and increased the 5-year survival rate, after the resection of primary low-risk GISTs, to similar values to the normal population. For high-risk GISTs, current knowledge which is still under expansion, show major improvement at the 1-year survival rate of more than 90% versus less than 50% before imatinib era. After surgical resection, for both low and high malignant potential GISTs, a closed control directed to the early identification of confined resectable recurrences, is required. This paper assesses the current knowledge of GIST management, motivated by a case of patient with intermediate risk GIST. PMID:15993051

  2. A Case of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor That Underwent Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration with a 25-Gauge Biopsy Needle

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is performed to obtain specimens for pathological analysis. For this procedure, 19-gauge (19G), 22-guage (22G), and 25-guage (25G) needles are available. The needles are classified into aspiration type and biopsy type. A 56-year-old woman underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that showed a 38-mm-diameter submucosal tumor. The elevated lesion was diagnosed as a submucosal tumor of the stomach. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density area on the luminal surface of the gastric wall, which was covered with a thin layer of gastric mucosa. EUS showed a hypoechoic lesion in the submucosal layer. Color Doppler image showed a pulsating vascular signal extending into the center of the hypoechoic lesion from the periphery. EUS-FNA was performed with a 25G biopsy needle. The specimen tissue consisted of spindle-shaped cells. The cells were positive for CD117 and CD34. The submucosal tumor was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  3. Giant and high-risk gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the abdomino-pelvic cavity: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUJIAO; PENG, JIE; HUANG, JINBAI

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are benign mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical presentations of patients with GIST are variable and may be non-specific. The current study reports the case of a 66-year-old man that presented with a gradual enlargement of the abdomen, emaciation, hyperhidrosis and frequent and urgent micturition. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed a large, heterogeneous, low density mass that occupied the entire abdomino-pelvic cavity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified a high signal intensity on the T2 weighted image and an intermediate signal intensity on the T1 weighted image. A contrast enhanced CT scan and MRI demonstrated the uptake of contrast material. A biopsy revealed that the tumor was composed of spindle cells, and immunohistochemical analysis identified the presence of mast/stem cell growth factor receptors. Together, these results lead to a diagnosis of GIST. The clinical findings, imaging modalities and pathological studies suggested that the GIST was a large and high-risk tumor located in the abdomino-pelvic cavity. The final surgical results confirmed these findings. Following conservative treatment with imatnib (400 mg, daily) for 6 months, the tumor became smaller and was suitable for surgery, which the patient received in December 2014. The final surgery confirmed the high-risk GIST. Subsequent to the surgery, the patient was recommended to continue the use of imatnib with regular CT or MRI reexaminations every 3 months, which are planned to continue for 3 years. PMID:26998117

  4. Relationship between gene mutations and protein expressions of PDGFR α and C-kit in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Yi; Tong, HX; Zhang, Y; Wang, JY; Shao, YB; Zhu, J; Lu, Wei-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between gene mutations and protein expressions of PDGFR α and C-kit in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and its significance in tumorigenesis. Methods: Single strand conformation polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (PCR-SSCP), immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the gene mutations in PDGFR α and C-kit and their protein expressions in 105 cases of GIST specimens. Results: In 105 cases of GIST, PDGFR α gene mutation was found in 12 cases (11.4%), which was common in the stomach- derived spindle cell GIST. C-kit gene mutation was found in 58 cases (55.2%), which was common in the small intestine. Mutations of PDGFR α is in 12 cases of GIST were stronger than the C-kit mutations in GIST, normal gastrointestinal tissues and schwannomas. No significant correlation was found between mutations and C-kit protein expression (P>0.05), while the protein expression of PDGFR α was significantly correlated with mutations (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Mutations of PDGFR α and C-kit plays an important role in part of GIST tumorigenesis. Mutation sites were related with original sites and histological types. Most protein expressions were closely related to their gene mutations in GIST. PMID:26221304

  5. Synchronous occurrence of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and acute myeloid leukemia: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    GAO, NA; GUO, NONG-JIAN; YU, WEN-ZHENG; WANG, XUE-XIA; SUN, JIAN-RONG; YU, NING; LIU, REN-TONG; LIU, XIAO-DAN; LIU, ZENG-YAN; FENG, RUI

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) originate from the mesenchymal tissue of the gastrointestinal tract. The pathogenesis of GIST is associated with the mutational activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase cluster of differentiation (CD)117 or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α. Overall, ~60% of GISTs occur in the stomach. Clinically, GISTs may coexist with various types of cancer, including liver cancer, pancreatic tumors and lymphoma, either synchronously or metachronously. The present study reports the case of a patient with the synchronous occurrence of a CD117-positive GIST and acute myeloid leukemia. A 69-year-old man was hospitalized for heart palpitations and dizziness, and was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by bone marrow aspiration and flow cytometry analysis. An abdominal computed tomograpy and gastroscopy revealed the presence of GIST. The patient received chemotherapy in combination with imatinib (400 mg/day), and the mass was removed 2 months later. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first reported case of the synchronous development of a CD117-positive GIST and AML. Additional studies are required in order to understand the association between GIST and hematological malignancies. PMID:27123049

  6. Effects of Chili Treatment on Gastrointestinal and Rectal Sensation in Diarrhea-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-blinded, Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Aniwan, Satimai; Gonlachanvit, Sutep

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Whether, chronic chili ingestion can desensitize transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptors in gastrointestinal (GI) tract leading to decrease GI symptoms and sensation in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) patients has not been well explored. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 6-week chili treatment on postprandial GI symptoms and rectal sensation in response to balloon distention in IBS-D patients. Methods Sixteen IBS-D patients received placebo or chili capsules before meals 3 times/day for 6 weeks in a randomized, double-blinded, crossover fashion with 4-week washout period. Postprandial GI symptoms were evaluated. All patients underwent a rectal barostat study to evaluate rectal sensory threshold at the end of each treatment. Results The maximum postprandial abdominal burning scores were similar between both treatments at baseline (1.4 [0.0–2.0] vs. 1.1 [0.0–2.8], P > 0.05) but were significantly decreased after chili (0.0 [0.0–0.5] vs. 0.3 [0.0–1.6], P < 0.05) at the end of treatment. The chili treatment significantly increased sensory threshold for the first rectal sensation (median [interquartile range]:16 [12–16] mmHg vs. 8 [8–16] mmHg, P < 0.05) however, there was no significant effect on rectal compliance (7.3 ± 1.0 vs. 7.1 ± 1.8 mL/mmHg). Other postprandial GI symptoms did not vary significantly between both treatments at baseline and the end of treatment. Conclusions In IBS-D patients, 6-week chili ingestion significantly decreased postprandial abdominal burning and increased the rectal sensory threshold. These findings suggest a desensitization effect of chili ingestion on transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptors in the proximal gut and rectum. PMID:24867591

  7. Molecular alterations and expression of succinate dehydrogenase complex in wild-type KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Celestino, Ricardo; Lima, Jorge; Faustino, Alexandra; Vinagre, João; Máximo, Valdemar; Gouveia, António; Soares, Paula; Lopes, José Manuel

    2013-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, disclosing somatic KIT, PDGFRA and BRAF mutations. Loss of function of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex is an alternative molecular mechanism in GISTs, namely in carriers of germline mutations of the SDH complex that develop Carney-Stratakis dyad characterized by multifocal GISTs and multicentric paragangliomas (PGLs). We studied a series of 25 apparently sporadic primary wild-type (WT) KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs occurring in patients without personal or familial history of PGLs, re-evaluated clinicopathological features and analyzed molecular alterations and immunohistochemistry expression of SDH complex. As control, we used a series of well characterized 49 KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. SDHB expression was absent in 20% and SDHB germline mutations were detected in 12% of WT GISTs. Germline SDHB mutations were significantly associated to younger age at diagnosis. A significant reduction in SDHB expression in WT GISTs was found when compared with KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. No significant differences were found when comparing DOG-1 and c-KIT expression in WT, SDHB-mutated and KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. Our results confirm the occurrence of germline SDH genes mutations in isolated, apparently sporadic WT GISTs. WT KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs without SDHB or SDHA/SDHB expression may correspond to Carney-Stratakis dyad or Carney triad. Most importantly, the possibility of PGLs (Carney-Stratakis dyad) and/or pulmonary chondroma (Carney triad) should be addressed in these patients and their kindred. PMID:22948025

  8. A novel germline mutation in SDHA identified in a rare case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor complicated with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quan; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Hou, Ying-Yong; Wang, Jiong-Yuan; Li, Jing-Lei; Li, Ming; Tong, Han-Xing; Lu, Wei-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is located on the mitochondrial inner membrane, is essential to the Krebs cycle. Mutations of the SDH gene are associated with many tumors, such as renal cell carcinoma, wild type gastrointestinal stromal tumors (WT GISTs) and hereditary paragangliomas/pheochromocytomas. Herein we present a rare case diagnosed as a WT GIST complicated with a renal chromophobe cell tumor and detected a novel germline heterozygous mutation (c.2T>C: p.M1T) in the initiation codon of the SDHA gene. We also conduct a preliminary exploration for the mechanism of reduced expression of SDHB without mutation of SDHB gene. Our case enriches the mutation spectrum of the SDH gene. After reviewing previous studies, we found it to be the first case diagnosed as a WT GIST complicated with a synchronous renal chromophobe cell tumor and identified a novel germline heterozygous mutation. It was also the second reported case of a renal cell carcinoma associated with an SDHA mutation. PMID:26722403

  9. Prognosis and management of adult wild type gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): A pooled analysis and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, N R; Collins, D; Crotty, P; Ridgway, P F

    2016-09-01

    A pooled review was performed to determine survival in adult WT GIST (Wild Type GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours) and compare the same with pediatric WT GISTs. Electronic databases were searched using the terms "Wild type" AND "GIST". Eighty-two adult patients from 14 studies were included in the pooled analysis. Cumulative survival was greater than 50% in both age groups, hence medial survival could not be computed. Mean survival in adults was 15.7 years ± 0.78 and in children was 18.8 years ± 1.3 (p = 0.241). Median disease free survival in adults was 10 years while 5-year overall survival was 88%. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival between the two groups (p = 0.241). Overall survival in adults with WT GISTs is favourable compared to other adult GIST subtypes likely reflects a common molecular pathway similar to pediatric GIST. PMID:27566016

  10. Sporadic diffuse segmental interstitial cell of Cajal hyperplasia harbouring two gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) mimicking hereditary GIST syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Mafalda Costa; Stamp, Gordon; Mudan, Satvinder

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are thought to derive from or differentiate towards the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) as most demonstrate a similar immunoprofile: CD117+, CD34+ and DOG1+. ICC hyperplasia refers to KIT-expressing microscopic spindle cell proliferations involving the myenteric plexus. Case report 74 year-old male presented with a 5-year history of heartburn and dysphagia. Imaging revealed a 4 cm GIST in the gastric fundus. Pathology of the resected specimen revealed diffuse segmental ICC hyperplasia harbouring two macroscopic GISTs and a ‘tumorlet’. A mutation in c-KIT exon 11 was detected in both the solid and the diffuse components. Discussion ICC hyperplasia can occur either as a sporadic focal lesion or in a syndromic setting, known to predispose to multiple GIST tumours at different sites. The majority of cases of sporadic ICC hyperplasia previously reported were of localised type. The hereditary form is mostly caused by germline mutations in c-KIT and PDGFRA or in patients with NF-1 andpresents as a diffuse hyperplasia, usually with a confluent, nodular or multifocal growth pattern. Conclusion We describe a diffuse form of sporadic ICC hyperplasia harbouring multifocal GISTs, mimicking diffuse ICC hyperplasia in hereditary GIST syndromes. Detection of somatic c-KIT exon 11 mutation ruled out a hereditary disorder. PMID:26521201

  11. c-kit mutation-positive advanced thymic carcinoma successfully treated as a mediastinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HIRAI, FUMIHIKO; EDAGAWA, MAKOTO; SHIMAMATSU, SHINICHIRO; TOYOZAWA, RYO; TOYOKAWA, GOUJI; NOSAKI, KANAME; YAMAGUCHI, MASAFUMI; SETO, TAKASHI; TWAKENOYAMA, MITSUHIRO; ICHINOSE, YUKITO

    2016-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is an exceptionally rare tumor, which has a very poor prognosis, differing from thymoma. Although cytotoxic chemotherapy is commonly used to treat advanced thymic carcinoma, its effectiveness has not been found to be sufficient. There are several reports that thymic carcinoma also harbors an oncogenic driver mutation, similar to lung cancer. A patient with a c-kit mutation-positive thymic carcinoma received imatinib followed by sunitinib consecutively, which are both c-Kit inhibitors. Although the patient had achieved long-term disease control for 21 months, the primary lesion and pulmonary metastases had increased in size by November, 2014. Following failure of imatinib treatment, the patient received sunitinib, a multiple kinase inhibitor, initiated in December, 2014. Following administration of sunitinib, a computed tomography scan revealed a partial response and the disease was effectively controlled with continued sunitinib treatment for 6 months, up to June, 2015. The patient achieved long-term disease control (~27 months) with imatinib followed by sunitinib. The efficacy of consecutive molecular-targeted therapy for thymic carcinoma was demonstrated in this case. Therefore, thymic carcinoma with oncogenic driver mutations should be treated with molecular-targeted agents rather than with cytotoxic drugs, and it may be suitable to treat c-kit mutation-positive thymic carcinoma as a mediastinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:27073655

  12. Clinicopathological significance of c-KIT mutation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin; Zou, Lei; Zhao, Wenhua; Wang, Yansen; Liu, Bo; Yao, Hongliang; Yu, Haihua

    2015-01-01

    Many types of KIT mutations have been observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), but their prognostic and predictive significance are still unclear. A meta-analysis and literature review were conducted to estimate the contribution of KIT mutations in prognostic parameters and clinic-pathological significance of GISTs. A total of 18 relevant articles from PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were included in this study. The frequency of KIT mutation was significantly increased in the GIST patients with higher mitosis (≥5/50 high-power fields (HPFs) and larger size (≥5 cm) of tumors than in those with lower MI (≤5/50HPFs) and smaller size (≤5 cm) of GISTs respectively. The rate of KIT mutation was not significantly changed between GISTs in stomachs and in small intestines. KIT mutational status has prognostic significance for patients’ outcome. GIST patients with KIT exon 9 mutations have higher risk of progression than those with exon 11 mutations. 5 year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was significantly higher in patients with KIT exon 11 deletion than in those with other type of KIT exon 11 mutations. The deletion involving KIT exon 11, particularly codons 557–558, is a valuable predictor of prognosis for patients with GISTs. PMID:26349547

  13. The diagnostic value of endoscopic ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanchao; Qian, Linxue; Li, Peng; Zhang, Shutian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and contrast-enhanced harmonic (CEH) EUS in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Patients and Methods: About 19 patients with suspected GISTs underwent EUS and CEH-EUS before tumor resection. The malignant potential was assessed according to the modified Fletcher classification system. Patients were divided into lower (Group I) and higher (Group II) malignant potential group. The clinical characteristics and EUS/CEH-EUS features were compared between two groups. Results: The tumor size in Group II was significantly larger than that in Group I (14.6 ± 5.8 mm vs. 32.1 ± 8.4 mm, P < 0.05). Heterogeneous echogenicity was observed in 4 (4/8) cases in Group II and none in Group I (P < 0.05). Irregular intratumoral vessels were detected in 6 cases in Group II and none in Group I (P < 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of irregular vessel detection for discriminating higher from lower malignant potential GISTs were 75% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value of detection of irregular vessels to high malignant potential GISTs were 33% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Detection of irregular intratumoral vessels can predict higher malignant potential before tumor resection. The tumor size and echogenicity are assistant factors for malignant potential assessment. Endoscopic resection is an efficacious treatment with good security for appropriate patients. PMID:27080610

  14. STRONG EXPRESSION OF IGF1R IN PEDIATRIC GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS WITHOUT IGF1R GENOMIC AMPLIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Janeway, Katherine A.; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Barretina, Jordi; Perez-Atayde, Antonio; Demetri, George D.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Wildtype (WT) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), lacking mutations in KIT or PDGFRA, represent 85% of GISTs in pediatric patients. Treatment options for pediatric WT GIST are limited. Recently, expression profiling of a limited number of pediatric and adult WT GISTs and more in depth study of a single pediatric WT GIST implicated the insulin like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) as a potential therapeutic target in pediatric WT GIST. We performed immunoblotting, SNP and FISH studies to determine the extent of expression, biochemical activation and genomic amplification of IGF1R in a larger number of pediatric WT GISTs. Pediatric WT GISTs expressed IGF1R strongly, whereas typical adult KIT mutant GISTs did not. IGF1R gene amplification was not detected in pediatric WT GISTs, and some KIT-mutant GISTs had IGF1R gene deletion due to monosomy 15. Despite the absence of apparent genomic activation mechanisms accounting for overexpression, clinical study of IGF1R-directed therapies in pediatric WT GIST is warranted. PMID:20162573

  15. Synchronous Large Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor and Adenocarcinoma in the Stomach Treated with Imatinib Mesylate Followed by Total Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Munekage, Eri; Munekage, Masaya; Maeda, Michihiro; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Kouichi; Obatake, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Herein we report on a case of synchronous large gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and adenocarcinoma of the stomach treated with radical surgery following neoadjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate. A 58-year-old man was referred to our hospital with a large mass in the peritoneal cavity. Abdominal computed tomography showed a large mass measuring 21×20×14 cm in the left upper peritoneal cavity. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a large elevated lesion in the upper body and a depressed lesion in the lower gastric body near the lesser curvature. Biopsy specimens revealed GIST in the large elevated lesion and signet-ring cell carcinoma in the depressed lesion. Because of the large size of the GIST, the patient was treated with neoadjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate (400 mg/day) for 5 months. After confirmation of a marked decrease in tumor size following imatinib mesylate therapy, the patient underwent total gastrectomy and regional lymph-node dissection with distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of high-risk GIST and signet-ring cell carcinoma invading the muscularis propria with one lymph-node metastasis. At the time of writing, the patient was receiving postoperative chemotherapy using oral fluoropyrimidine (S-1) without evidence of disease recurrence for 4 months after surgery. In addition to the present case, we provide a retrospective review of another 15 patients who were diagnosed with synchronous GIST in the stomach and primary gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27069170

  16. Adjuvant imatinib treatment in gastrointestinal stromal tumor: which risk stratification criteria and for how long? A case report.

    PubMed

    Blay, Jean-Yves; Levard, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is approved for the adjuvant treatment of KIT-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) following surgical resection. However, uncertainty remains in terms of patient eligibility for adjuvant treatment and the optimal duration of treatment. Here, we present two challenging patient cases encountered in clinical practice that highlight the ambiguity in the current recommendations for adjuvant imatinib in GIST and discuss our approaches and rationales for treatment. The first case involves a 36-year-old man with a 7 cm duodenal GIST and possible tumor rupture during surgical resection. This patient's risk of GIST recurrence was either intermediate or high depending on which risk stratification criteria were used. The patient was treated with adjuvant imatinib for 3 years and experienced disease recurrence 14 months after the completion of treatment. Imatinib treatment was reintroduced, and the patient is in partial response 17 months later. The second case involves a 46-year-old woman at high risk of recurrence following surgical resection. Adjuvant treatment with imatinib was initiated. After considering the patient's initial high risk and good side-effect profile, the decision was made to continue adjuvant imatinib treatment for 5 years. As of May 2013, the patient has been receiving continuous imatinib treatment for 52 months, with no sign of progression. These reports exemplify the challenges faced in clinical practice because of uncertainties in optimal risk stratification criteria and duration of treatment. They stress the importance of individualized treatment and shared decision making between the physician and the patient. PMID:26457546

  17. Intra-abdominal textiloma. A retained surgical sponge mimicking a gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Noriyuki; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Uemura, Mamoru; Nishitani, Akiko; Souma, Yoshihito; Nishida, Toshirou

    2008-01-01

    We describe a unique case of intra-abdominal textiloma (granuloma due to a retained foreign body), which mimicked a gastric tumor on preoperative imaging studies. A 78-year-old asymptomatic patient with a past history of a gastrectomy was referred for evaluation of an intra-abdominal mass lesion, which was incidentally observed on a computed tomography (CT) scan. Repeated CT with a higher resolution demonstrated a 5-cm heterogeneously enhanced mass with a distinct feeding artery. These findings were all compatible with a tumorous lesion originating in the gastric remnant, most likely gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor. A diagnosis of textiloma was immediately made during surgery, and it was confirmed pathologically postoperatively. The feeding artery that appeared on CT images, which was a major reason for the false diagnosis, was considered to have resulted from a slow but continuous inflammation reaction around the retained surgical sponge. Surgeons should therefore always take the possibility of textilomas into consideration even with typical tumorous characteristics on preoperative imaging studies, especially in patients with a history of prior abdominal surgery. PMID:18516538

  18. Gene expression of the IGF pathway family distinguishes subsets of gastrointestinal stromal tumors wild type for KIT and PDGFRA

    PubMed Central

    Beadling, Carol; Patterson, Janice; Justusson, Emily; Nelson, Dylan; Pantaleo, Maria A.; Hornick, Jason L.; Chacón, Matias; Corless, Christopher L.; Heinrich, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) arise from the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. While the majority of GISTs harbor activating mutations in either the v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) tyrosine kinases, approximately 10–15% of adult GISTs and 85% of pediatric GISTs lack such mutations. These “wild-type” GISTs have been reported to express high levels of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), and IGF1R-targeted therapy of wild-type GISTs is being evaluated in clinical trials. However, it is not clear that all wild-type GISTs express IGF1R, because studies to date have predominantly focused on a particular subtype of gastric wild-type GIST that is deficient in the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex. This study of a series of 136 GISTs, including 72 wild-type specimens, was therefore undertaken to further characterize wild-type GIST subtypes based on the relative expression of transcripts encoding IGF1R. Additional transcripts relevant to GIST biology were also evaluated, including members of the IGF-signaling pathway (IGF1, IGF2, and insulin receptor [INSR]), neural markers (CDH2[CDH: Cadherin], neurofilament, light polypeptide, LHX2 [LHX: LIM homeobox], and KIRREL3 [KIRREL: kin of IRRE like]), KIT, PDGFRA, CD34, and HIF1A. Succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit B protein expression was also assessed as a measure of SDH complex integrity. In addition to the previously described SDH-deficient, IGF1Rhigh wild-type GISTs, other SDH-intact wild-type subpopulations were defined by high relative expression of IGF1R, neural markers, IGF1 and INSR, or low IGF1R coupled with high IGF2. These results underscore the complexity and heterogeneity of wild-type GISTs that will need to be factored into molecularly-targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:24133624

  19. Gene expression of the IGF pathway family distinguishes subsets of gastrointestinal stromal tumors wild type for KIT and PDGFRA.

    PubMed

    Beadling, Carol; Patterson, Janice; Justusson, Emily; Nelson, Dylan; Pantaleo, Maria A; Hornick, Jason L; Chacón, Matias; Corless, Christopher L; Heinrich, Michael C

    2013-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) arise from the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. While the majority of GISTs harbor activating mutations in either the v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) tyrosine kinases, approximately 10-15% of adult GISTs and 85% of pediatric GISTs lack such mutations. These "wild-type" GISTs have been reported to express high levels of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), and IGF1R-targeted therapy of wild-type GISTs is being evaluated in clinical trials. However, it is not clear that all wild-type GISTs express IGF1R, because studies to date have predominantly focused on a particular subtype of gastric wild-type GIST that is deficient in the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex. This study of a series of 136 GISTs, including 72 wild-type specimens, was therefore undertaken to further characterize wild-type GIST subtypes based on the relative expression of transcripts encoding IGF1R. Additional transcripts relevant to GIST biology were also evaluated, including members of the IGF-signaling pathway (IGF1, IGF2, and insulin receptor [INSR]), neural markers (CDH2[CDH: Cadherin], neurofilament, light polypeptide, LHX2 [LHX: LIM homeobox], and KIRREL3 [KIRREL: kin of IRRE like]), KIT, PDGFRA, CD34, and HIF1A. Succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit B protein expression was also assessed as a measure of SDH complex integrity. In addition to the previously described SDH-deficient, IGF1R(high) wild-type GISTs, other SDH-intact wild-type subpopulations were defined by high relative expression of IGF1R, neural markers, IGF1 and INSR, or low IGF1R coupled with high IGF2. These results underscore the complexity and heterogeneity of wild-type GISTs that will need to be factored into molecularly-targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:24133624

  20. Fluid Retention Associated with Imatinib Treatment in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Quantitative Radiologic Assessment and Implications for Management

    PubMed Central

    Shinagare, Atul B.; Krajewski, Katherine M.; Pyo, Junhee; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe radiologic signs and time-course of imatinib-associated fluid retention (FR) in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and its implications for management. Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved, retrospective study of 403 patients with GIST treated with imatinib, 15 patients with imaging findings of FR were identified by screening radiology reports, followed by manual confirmation. Subcutaneous edema, ascites, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion were graded on a four-point scale on CT scans; total score was the sum of these four scores. Results The most common radiologic sign of FR was subcutaneous edema (15/15, 100%), followed by ascites (12/15, 80%), pleural effusion (11/15, 73%), and pericardial effusion (6/15, 40%) at the time of maximum FR. Two distinct types of FR were observed: 1) acute/progressive FR, characterized by acute aggravation of FR and rapid improvement after management, 2) intermittent/steady FR, characterized by occasional or persistent mild FR. Acute/progressive FR always occurred early after drug initiation/dose escalation (median 1.9 month, range 0.3-4.0 months), while intermittent/steady FR occurred at any time. Compared to intermittent/steady FR, acute/progressive FR was severe (median score, 5 vs. 2.5, p = 0.002), and often required drug-cessation/dose-reduction. Conclusion Two distinct types (acute/progressive and intermittent/steady FR) of imatinib-associated FR are observed and each type requires different management. PMID:25741192

  1. Expression of L1 protein correlates with cluster of differentiation 24 and integrin β1 expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    DU, YUE; ZHANG, HAIHONG; JIANG, ZHONGMIN; HUANG, GUOWEI; LU, WENLI; WANG, HESHENG

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined 66 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), 20 cases of smooth muscle tumors, 20 cases of schwannomas and 20 cases of normal gastric tissues in order to analyze the expression of L1, cluster of differentiation (CD)24 and integrin β1 by immunohistochemical staining. Patients were subjected to follow-up, and survival data were evaluated. L1 expression was detected in 57.6% of GIST cases; this was a significantly higher percentage compared with that found in the smooth muscle tumor cases or the normal control group. CD24 and integrin β1 were also expressed at significantly higher levels in the GIST cases than in the normal control group, although no significant difference was found in the expression levels of these proteins in smooth muscle tumor or schwannoma cases. These higher levels of L1 and integrin β1 expression were associated with an increased risk of invasive GIST, and were significantly positively correlated with Ki-67 expression. CD24 expression was not associated with the risk of GIST invasion or Ki-67 expression. There were positive correlations between L1, CD24 and integrin β1 expression; however, these had no significant association with patient survival. Therefore, L1 alone or in conjunction with CD24 (L1 + CD24), or integrin β1 (L1 + integrin β1) can be considered a valuable indicator for the differential diagnosis of GIST. Furthermore, L1 and integrin β1 can be used alone or in combination to evaluate the biological behavior of GISTs. Future studies are required to evaluate the prognostic value of these markers. PMID:26137113

  2. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Greater Omentum, Mimicking Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Small Intestine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Urabe, Masayuki; Yamagata, Yukinori; Aikou, Susumu; Mori, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Nomura, Sachiyo; Shibahara, Junji; Fukayama, Masashi; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is one of the mesenchymal tumors, which rarely arises in the abdominal space. We report a very rare case of abdominal SFT, mimicking another mesenchymal tumor. A 52-year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital for further evaluation and treatment of gallbladder polyp. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed an enhanced nodule within the gallbladder, and incidentally, also showed a well-circumscribed mass adjacent to the small intestine. The mass was depicted as slightly high density in plain CT, and with contrast-enhancement, the mass was partially stained in early phase and the stained area spread heterogeneously in delayed phase. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the abdominal mass was depicted as slightly high intensity on T2-weighted imaging and low intensity on T1-weighted imaging. With double-balloon endoscopy and capsule endoscopy, we did not find any tumor inside the small intestine. These visual findings lead us to diagnose it as gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine with extraluminal growth. We planned to resect both the gallbladder polyp and the intraperitoneal tumor at the same time for pathologic diagnosis and treatment. When the operation was performed, we found a milk-white lobulated tumor on the greater omentum and the tumor was entirely resected. Microscopically, the gallbladder polyp was diagnosed as tubular adenoma, and the omental tumor was diagnosed as SFT. It is important to bear in mind that omental SFTs sometimes mimic other mesenchymal tumors and should be included in the differential diagnosis of abdominal tumor not revealed by endoscopy. PMID:26011203

  3. GSTT1 Copy Number Gain and ZNF Overexpression Are Predictors of Poor Response to Imatinib in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shin Woo; Jang, Kee-Taek; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Cheol Keun; Sohn, Tae Sung; Kim, Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) predict prognosis and therapeutic responses to imatinib. In wild-type GISTs, the tumor-initiating events are still unknown, and wild-type GISTs are resistant to imatinib therapy. We performed an association study between copy number alterations (CNAs) identified from array CGH and gene expression analyses results for four wild-type GISTs and an imatinib-resistant PDGFRA D842V mutant GIST, and compared the results to those obtained from 27 GISTs with KIT mutations. All wild-type GISTs had multiple CNAs, and CNAs in 1p and 22q that harbor the SDHB and GSTT1 genes, respectively, correlated well with expression levels of these genes. mRNA expression levels of all SDH gene subunits were significantly lower (P≤0.041), whereas mRNA expression levels of VEGF (P=0.025), IGF1R (P=0.026), and ZNFs (P<0.05) were significantly higher in GISTs with wild-type/PDGFRA D842V mutations than GISTs with KIT mutations. qRT-PCR validation of the GSTT1 results in this cohort and 11 additional malignant GISTs showed a significant increase in the frequency of GSTT1 CN gain and increased mRNA expression of GSTT1 in wild-type/PDGFRA D842V GISTs than KIT-mutant GISTs (P=0.033). Surprisingly, all four malignant GISTs with KIT exon 11 deletion mutations with primary resistance to imatinib had an increased GSTT1 CN and mRNA expression level of GSTT1. Increased mRNA expression of GSTT1 and ZNF could be predictors of a poor response to imatinib. Our integrative approach reveals that for patients with wild-type (or imatinib-resistant) GISTs, attempts to target VEGFRs and IGF1R may be reasonable options. PMID:24124608

  4. Involvement of c-KIT mutation in the development of gastrointestinal stromal tumors through proliferation promotion and apoptosis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Yu, Sheng; He, Xu-Jun; Xu, Yuan; Wu, Fang; Xia, Ying-Jie; Guo, Kun; Wang, Hui-Ju; Ye, Zai-Yuan; Zhang, Wei; Tao, Hou-Quan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discuss the role of c-KIT mutation in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and analyze its correlation with proliferation and apoptosis. c-KIT and PDGFRA genotypes were examined by deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression levels of Kit, Ki-67 (proliferation marker), and apoptotic protease-activating factor (APAF)-1 (apoptosis marker) and the relationship between their three genes. In the 68 cases examined, 44 cases (64.7%) showed mutations in one of the four exons of c-KIT. The mutations were most frequently found in exon 11 (30 cases [44.1%]), followed by exon 9 (ten cases [14.7%]) and exon 13 (four cases [5.9%]). c-KIT mutation showed no association with prognostic factors using the classification of risk of aggressive behavior in GIST proposed by Fletcher et al. No cases had mutated exon 17 of c-KIT, and neither did exon 12, 14, or 18 of PDGFRA in our present study. There was a positive correlation between the expression level of Kit and Ki-67 (R=0.282, P=0.020). Conversely, a negative correlation was found between the expression levels of Kit and APAF1 (R=−0.243, P=0.046). In conclusion, most GISTs with Kit expression showed c-KIT mutation. Kit expression has a positive correlation with Ki-67 and a negative correlation with APAF1, showing that c-KIT is involved in GIST occurrence and development through proliferation promotion and apoptosis inhibition. PMID:24833907

  5. Immunostaining of phospho-histone H3 and Ki-67 improves reproducibility of recurrence risk assessment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Uguen, Arnaud; Conq, Gwenaël; Doucet, Laurent; Talagas, Matthieu; Costa, Sebastian; De Braekeleer, Marc; Marcorelles, Pascale

    2015-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common non-epithelial tumors in the digestive tract. Beyond surgery, therapeutic management depends on risk of recurrence. Risk evaluation of GIST takes into account location and size of the tumor, whether or not the tumor was intact or ruptured and mitotic index. The mitotic index lacks in intra- and interobserver reproducibility. In this study, we evaluated on 61 GISTs, the reproducibility of mitotic counting using classical hematoxylin-eosin-saffron (HES) staining, and its correlation with the mitotic count obtained through immunohistochemical staining for phospho-histone H3 (PHH3) and the proliferation index based upon Ki-67 immunostaining. Mitotic counts by HES and PHH3 staining and Ki-67 proliferation index were evaluated twice by three independent observers taking into account interpretation times per tumor for each technique. HES-based and PHH3-based mitotic counts and Ki-67 proliferation index correlated well and presented good intra- and interobserver reproducibility. PHH3 staining resulted in a slight but statistically significant difference of about two more mitotic figures per 5 mm(2) than the HES-based count, which might have put some borderline tumors in a different risk category. Immunohistochemical staining for PHH3 and Ki-67 allowed more rapid interpretation than mitotic counts based upon HES staining, but only PHH3 staining allows counting of mitoses. Immunostaining using anti-PHH3 and anti-Ki-67 antibodies will eventually provide improved recurrence risk stratification of GIST and may become effective ancillary tools in deciding on optimal therapeutic management. PMID:25823616

  6. Successful establishment of patient-derived tumor xenografts from gastrointestinal stromal tumor-a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Quan; Tong, Han-Xing; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Ying-Yong; Li, Jing-Lei; Wang, Jiong-Yuan; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Lu, Wei-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX) generally represent a kind of more reliable model of human disease, by which a potential drugs’ preclinical efficacy could be evaluated. To date, no stable gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) PDTX models have been reported. In this study, we aimed to establish stable GIST PDTX models and to evaluate whether these models accurately reflected the histological feature of the corresponding patient tumors and create a reliable GIST PDTX models for our future experiment. By engrafting fresh patient GIST tissues into immune-compromised mice (BALB/c athymic mice), 4 PDTX models were established. Histological features were assessed by a qualified pathologist based on H&E staining, CD117 and DOG-1. We also conduct whole exome sequencing(WES) for the 4 established GIST PDTX models to test if the model still harbored the same mutation detected in corresponding patient tumors and get a more intensive vision for the genetic profile of the models we have established, which will help a lot for our future experiment. To explore the tumorigenesis mechanism for GIST, we also have a statistical analysis for the genes detected as nonsynchronous-mutated simultaneously in 4 samples. All 4 GIST PDTX models retained the histological features of the corresponding human tumors, with original morphology type and positive stains for CD117 and DOG-1. Between the GIST PDTX models and their parental tumors, a same mutation site was detected, which confirmed the genetic consistency. The stability of molecular profiles observed within the GIST PDTX models provides confidence in the utility and translational significance of these models for in vivo testing of personalized therapies. To date, we conducted the first study to successfully establish a GIST PDTX model whose genetic profiles were revealed by whole exome sequencing. Our experience could be of great use. PMID:27186422

  7. Elevated preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is associated with poor prognosis in gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chang; Hu, Wan-Ming; Liao, Fang-Xin; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ping; Rong, Yu-Ming; Guo, Gui-Fang; Yin, Chen-Xi; Zhang, Bei; He, Wen-Zhuo; Xia, Liang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic relevance of preoperative peripheral neutrophil- to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients. Materials and methods We enrolled 129 consecutive GIST patients who underwent initial curative surgical resection with or without adjuvant/palliative imatinib treatment in our study. Blood NLR was calculated as neutrophil count (number of neutrophils ×109/L) divided by lymphocyte count (number of lymphocytes ×109/L). Survival curves were constructed by using the Kaplan–Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were performed to identify associations with outcome variable. All tests were two-sided, and P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The optimal cut-off value of NLR was 2.07 in the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The median overall survival (OS) of high NLR group was 113.0 months, whereas that of the low NLR group had not reached the median OS both in the general (P<0.001) and subgroup analyses. The elevated NLR suggested shorter OS in the high malignant potential groups (P=0.01) and the combined low and moderate groups (P=0.02). Increased NLR indicated poor OS in patients regardless of whether if received imatinib treatment or not (P=0.005, and P=0.032, respectively). High NLR indicated poor OS of patients in stage I and II disease (P=0.005) and a clear tendency that increased level of NLR is inimical to OS. Conclusion Elevated NLR was detected as an independent adverse prognostic factor. Elevated preoperative NLR predicts poor clinical outcome in GIST patients and may serve as a cost-effective and broadly available independent prognostic biomarker. PMID:26966375

  8. Antitumor Effect of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Nilotinib on Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) and Imatinib-Resistant GIST Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Rieko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Wada, Norihito; Kawakubo, Hirohumi; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Ohmori, Tai; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Despite the benefits of imatinib for treating gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), the prognosis for high risk GIST and imatinib-resistant (IR) GIST remains poor. The mechanisms of imatinib resistance have not yet been fully clarified. The aim of the study was to establish imatinib-resistant cell lines and investigate nilotinib, a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in preclinical models of GIST and imatinib-resistant GIST. For a model of imatinib-resistant GIST, we generated resistant cells from GK1C and GK3C cell lines by exposing them to imatinib for 6 months. The parent cell lines GK1C and GK3C showed imatinib sensitivity with IC50 of 4.59±0.97 µM and 11.15±1.48 µM, respectively. The imatinib-resistant cell lines GK1C-IR and GK3C-IR showed imatinib resistance with IC50 values of 11.74±0.17 µM (P<0.001) and 41.37±1.07 µM (P<0.001), respectively. The phosphorylation status of key cell signaling pathways, receptor tyrosine kinase KIT (CD117), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) and downstream signaling kinases: serine-threonine kinase Akt (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) or the non-receptor tyrosine kinase: proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (SRC), was analyzed in established cell lines and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was found to be increased compared to the parental cells. Nilotinib demonstrated significant antitumor efficacy against GIST xenograft lines and imatinib-resistant GIST cell lines. Thus, nilotinib may have clinical potential for patients with GIST or imatinib-resistant GIST. PMID:25221952

  9. Folate-related polymorphisms in gastrointestinal stromal tumours: susceptibility and correlation with tumour characteristics and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Sabrina; Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Musti, Muriel; Pantaleo, Maria A; Fumagalli, Elena; Venturoli, Nicola; Palassini, Elena; Consolini, Nicola; Casali, Paolo G; Biasco, Guido; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    The folate metabolism pathway has a crucial role in tumorigenesis as it supports numerous critical intracellular reactions, including DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. Despite its importance, little is known about the influence of the folate pathway on gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), a rare tumour with an incidence ranging between 6 and 19.6 cases per million worldwide. The importance of folate metabolism led us to investigate the influence of polymorphisms in the genes coding folate-metabolising enzymes on GIST susceptibility, tumour characteristics and clinical outcome. We investigated a panel of 13 polymorphisms in 8 genes in 60 cases and 153 controls. The TS 6-bp deletion allele (formerly rs34489327, delTInsTTAAAG) was associated with reduced risk of GIST (OR=0.20, 95% CI 0.05-0.67, P=0.0032). Selected polymorphisms in patients stratified by age, gender, and other main molecular and clinical characteristics showed that few genotypes may show a likely correlation. We also observed a significant association between the RFC AA/AG genotype and time to progression (HR=0.107, 95% CI 0.014-0.82; P=0.032). Furthermore, we observed a tendency towards an association between the SHMT1 variant allele (TT, rs1979277) and early death (HR=4.53, 95% CI 0.77-26.58, P=0.087). Aware of the strengths and limitations of the study, these results suggest that polymorphisms may modify the risk of GIST and clinical outcome, pointing to the necessity for further investigations with information on folate plasma levels and a larger study population. PMID:25227144

  10. Folate-related polymorphisms in gastrointestinal stromal tumours: susceptibility and correlation with tumour characteristics and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Sabrina; Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Musti, Muriel; Pantaleo, Maria A; Fumagalli, Elena; Venturoli, Nicola; Palassini, Elena; Consolini, Nicola; Casali, Paolo G; Biasco, Guido; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The folate metabolism pathway has a crucial role in tumorigenesis as it supports numerous critical intracellular reactions, including DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. Despite its importance, little is known about the influence of the folate pathway on gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), a rare tumour with an incidence ranging between 6 and 19.6 cases per million worldwide. The importance of folate metabolism led us to investigate the influence of polymorphisms in the genes coding folate-metabolising enzymes on GIST susceptibility, tumour characteristics and clinical outcome. We investigated a panel of 13 polymorphisms in 8 genes in 60 cases and 153 controls. The TS 6-bp deletion allele (formerly rs34489327, delTInsTTAAAG) was associated with reduced risk of GIST (OR=0.20, 95% CI 0.05–0.67, P=0.0032). Selected polymorphisms in patients stratified by age, gender, and other main molecular and clinical characteristics showed that few genotypes may show a likely correlation. We also observed a significant association between the RFC AA/AG genotype and time to progression (HR=0.107, 95% CI 0.014–0.82; P=0.032). Furthermore, we observed a tendency towards an association between the SHMT1 variant allele (TT, rs1979277) and early death (HR=4.53, 95% CI 0.77–26.58, P=0.087). Aware of the strengths and limitations of the study, these results suggest that polymorphisms may modify the risk of GIST and clinical outcome, pointing to the necessity for further investigations with information on folate plasma levels and a larger study population. PMID:25227144

  11. Expression of CD117, DOG-1, and IGF-1R in gastrointestinal stromal tumours – an analysis of 70 cases from 2004 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Kemona, Andrzej; Guzińska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna; Żurawska, Joanna; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Determination of the type of mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) plays a major role in assessing the risk of progression of the disease, and also allows determination of the clinical management and treatment. More accurate GIST diagnosis is possible by using simultaneously various types of antibodies to immunohistochemistry methods in routine procedures. Aim To evaluate the expression of CD117, DOG-1, and IGF-1R in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours, and analysis of the impact of the examined protein expression on patient survival with emphasis on specific recognition and prognostication of these tumours. Material and methods The protein expression was analyzed in 70 patients who had undergone surgical treatment for mesenchymal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, using the immunohistochemical method. Results Positive expression of CD117, DOG-1, and IGF1R included 95.71%, 88.57% and 11.43% of study GISTs, respectively. Statistical analysis showed positive significant correlation between DOG-1 expression and histological type of tumour (p = 0.024). Analysis of overall survival curves of 70 GIST patients according to expression of CD117, DOG-1, and IGF1R did not show a tendency towards longer survival of patients with positive expression (p > 0.05). Conclusions Predictive factors determining the survival time of patients are strongly associated with morphological features of tumours. A thorough analysis of each case plays a key role in predicting survival time of patients and may be a clue in targeting the therapeutic procedure. PMID:27350839

  12. [New challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: thinking and practice from evidence-based medicine to precision medicine].

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    With the development of tumor molecular diagnosis and the administration of targeted drugs, cancer treatment has gradually entered a new era of precision medicine. The diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a full embodiment of the concept of precision medicine, but there are still many problems needed to be solved in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of GIST (such as the correlation between the gene mutation and prognosis, the treatment strategy of wild type GIST and the drug resistance phenomenon). PMID:26797831

  13. [A case of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the rectum effectively treated with continuously-administered regorafenib after failure of imatinib and sunitinib].

    PubMed

    Kajiura, Shinya; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Nanjyo, Sohachi; Nakada, Naokatsu; Ando, Takayuki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Regorafenib is recommended as a third-line treatment for unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). It is usually administered in a repeating cycle of three-weeks on and one-week off. We describe a patient with an unresectable GIST in the pelvic cavity who complained of pelvic pain while taking the one-week break from regorafenib administration. Subsequently, we reduced the dosage to one level and regorafenib was continuously administered. As a result, the adverse events were improved and the antitumor effect against the GIST was retained. The continuous administration of reduced-dose regorafenib could be considered a viable dosage adjustment in specific situations. PMID:27052395

  14. Hypoglycemia Associated with a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Producing High-molecular-weight Insulin Growth Factor II: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Ogata, Emi; Ohki, Shinji; Fukuda, Izumi; Tanaka, Mizuko; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman with multiple metastatic and unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was referred for investigation of refractory hypoglycemia that developed four months before this hospitalization. On admission, her fasting plasma glucose was 38 mg/dL despite 10% glucose infusion. Investigations revealed that her serum C-peptide, insulin and growth hormone levels were suppressed, and big insulin-like growth factor II was observed. She was diagnosed with non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia, which resolved after glucocorticoid treatment. Clinicians should thus be vigilant to identify hypoglycemia in patients with large metastatic GISTs because glucocorticoid therapy is useful even if the GIST is inoperable. PMID:27181538

  15. Epithelial and Stromal Cell Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Expression Differentially Correlates with Survival in Rectal Cancer Stages B and C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seong Beom; Chan, Charles; Dent, Owen F.; Mohamedali, Abidali; Kwun, Sun Young; Clarke, Candice; Fletcher, Julie; Chapuis, Pierre H.; Nice, Edouard C.; Baker, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been proposed as a potential prognostic factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival. However, CRC uPAR expression remains controversial, especially regarding cell types where uPAR is overexpressed (e.g., epithelium (uPARE) or stroma-associated cells (uPARS)) and associated prognostic relevance. In this study, two epitope-specific anti-uPAR monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) could discriminate expression of uPARE from uPARS and were used to examine this association with survival of stages B and C rectal cancer (RC) patients. Using immunohistochemistry, MAbs #3937 and R4 were used to discriminate uPARE from uPARS respectively in the central and invasive frontal regions of 170 stage B and 179 stage C RC specimens. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to determine association with survival. uPAR expression occurred in both epithelial and stromal compartments with differential expression observed in many cases, indicating uPARE and uPARS have different cellular roles. In the central and invasive frontal regions, uPARE was adversely associated with overall stage B survival (HR = 1.9; p = 0.014 and HR = 1.5; p = 0.031, respectively) reproducing results from previous studies. uPARS at the invasive front was associated with longer stage C survival (HR = 0.6; p = 0.007), reflecting studies demonstrating that macrophage peritumoural accumulation is associated with longer survival. This study demonstrates that different uPAR epitopes should be considered as being expressed on different cell types during tumour progression and at different stages in RC. Understanding how uPARE and uPARS expression affects survival is anticipated to be a useful clinical prognostic marker of stages B and C RC. PMID:25692297

  16. A duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor with a large central area of fluid and gas due to fistulization into the duodenal lumen, mimicking a large duodenal diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Amin, Hoda Mahmoud; Al-Shazli, Mostafa; Nabil, Ahmed; Hussein, Hossam; Ezzat, Reem

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract especially the stomach and upper small bowel. They are usually solid, but cystic degeneration, necrosis, and focal hemorrhage have been described in larger tumors leading to central necrotic cavitation. The most sensitive marker of GIST is CD117 (c-kit). In computed tomography (CT) scan, it is often difficult to decide the origin of the primary tumor, especially in large GISTs. We report an incidental case of a large duodenal GIST fistulizing into the second part of the duodenum with a large amount of fluid and gas inside, mistaken for a cystic pancreatic neoplasm by CT and mistaken for a duodenal diverticulum by endoscopic ultrasound. PMID:26374586

  17. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  18. Beginning of personalized medicine in Panama: Molecular and pathological characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumors from archival paraffin-embedded tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Singh, Carlos; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Fonseca, Evelise; Smith, Rebecca; Pascale, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study from Central America to analyze genetic mutations and histopathological features associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Mutations found in the tyrosine kinase membrane receptors c-kit and pdgfra are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of GIST. New drugs that inhibit the expression of these oncogenes at the molecular level substantially improve the quality of life for patients with this tumor. It is therefore essential for patient care in Panama that genetic analysis of GIST tumors continues to develop from the pilot study presented herein into routine clinical use. This study evaluated 39 cases of GIST in Panama, using samples archived at the Instituto Oncológico Nacional from 1994 to 2004. DNA from paraffin‑embedded tumor tissues was isolated and amplified for the exons of c-kit and pdgfra associated with a high frequency of mutations. Direct PCR sequencing of specific exons was performed, and those with different alleles were cloned and re-sequenced. Amino acid sequences were inferred from DNA and aligned to Genbank reference sequences to determine the position and type of mutation. The highest frequency of mutations was found in exon 11 of the c-kit gene (70%). Mutations found in this exon were heterogeneous, while only one type of mutation (p.A502_Y503dup) was observed in c-kit exon 9. Mutations in the pdgfra gene constituted several substitutions, with the deletion p.D842V being observed most frequently. The observed GIST-associated mutations were previously described. Four patients with mutations associated with familial GIST were also found. The majority (66%) of patients with mutations in exon 11 (residues 550-591) were considered to be at high risk and 75% of patients with mutations specifically within residues 556-560 (exon 11) were considered to have high-risk GIST. This is the first molecular study of GIST in Central America. It was performed to gain a better understanding of the cancer

  19. Combination of PLR, MLR, MWR, and Tumor Size Could Significantly Increase the Prognostic Value for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    Systemic inflammation and immune response were associated with prognosis of tumors. However, data was limited due to the relatively low incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of preoperative peripheral blood cells in prognosis of GISTs.From September 2008 to July 2015, a total of 274 GIST patients in our department were enrolled in the present study. Clinicopathological features of GISTs were recorded. The association between preoperative peripheral blood cells and prognosis of GISTs were analyzed.Tumor location, tumor size, mitotic index, intratumoral necrosis, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) risk category were associated with prognosis of GISTs. High neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio (MLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), neutrophil-to-white blood cell ratio (NWR), monocyte-to-white blood cell ratio (MWR) and low lymphocyte-to-white blood cell ratio (LWR) was associated with poor prognosis of GISTs (76.2% vs 83.7%, P = 0.010. 70.5% vs 98.7%, P = 0.000. 65.7% vs 96.4%, P = 0.004. 78.5% vs 82.5%, P = 0.044. 73.5% vs 97.8%, P = 0.004. 76.6% vs 83.6%, P = 0.012, respectively). However, tumor size was the only independent risk factor for prognosis according to multivariate analysis (P = 0.006). Tumor location, tumor size, mitotic index, and NIH risk category were significantly correlated with the above-mentioned parameters (all P < 0.05). The prognosis of GISTs with tumor size >5 cm, high MLR, high PLR, and high MWR was significantly lower than the remnant patients (P = 0.010).The peripheral blood routine test is convenient, reproducible, and inexpensive. High NLR, MLR, PLR, NWR, MWR, and low LWR were associated with poor prognosis of GISTs. The association between the above parameters and prognosis of GISTs may be attributed to their correlation with tumor size, mitotic index, and NIH risk category. The

  20. Evaluation of Multiple Methods for Detection of Gastrointestinal Colonization of Carbapenem-Resistant Organisms from Rectal Swabs.

    PubMed

    Simner, Patricia J; Martin, Isabella; Opene, Belita; Tamma, Pranita D; Carroll, Karen C; Milstone, Aaron M

    2016-06-01

    Rectal swabs from high-risk patients were screened for carbapenem-resistant organisms (CROs) using several methods. The direct MacConkey plate method was the most sensitive for CROs (95%), while chromID CARBA and the Check-Direct CPE screen assay were the most sensitive for the detection of carbapenemase-producing organisms (CPOs) (100%; all blaKPC). All methods had a specificity of >90% for CROs, and for CPOs, the specificity ranged from 85 to 98%. Broth enrichment methods performed poorly compared to direct inoculation methods, negating the need for the broth enrichment step. PMID:27053674

  1. An innovative procedure of laparoscope combined with endoscopy for gastrointestinal stromal tumor resection and cholecystectomy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    YAN, YE; LI, FENG; GAI, YONG-HAO; LIU, QING-WEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a novel approach to laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery for gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) resection and cholecystectomy, and conducts a review of the associated literature. The novel surgical procedure was performed on one patient who was diagnosed with a GIST and cholecystic polypus. The GIST was resected using an insulation-tipped diathermic electrosurgical knife under the guide of an endoscope. Subsequently, a cholecystectomy was performed by inserting two more 5-mm trocars and instruments transumbilically, guided using an endoscope. The tumor and the gallbladder were exteriorized using a peroral approach and the incision lining of the stomach was sutured laparoscopically. The procedure was successfully performed and the patient experienced no discomfort during the 5-year follow-up. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery is feasible and would be an ideal choice for invisible abdominal scar surgery, in particular for multi-visceral resection. PMID:27073455

  2. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT and contrast enhanced CT in differential diagnosis between leiomyoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yasumitus; Kaida, Hayato; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kurata, Seiji; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Abe, Toshi

    2015-01-01

    In a 49 years old woman a large abdominal tumor was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasound. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) showed a large tumor with minute calcification and poor contrast enhancement in the left abdominal cavity. The fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT) scan showed low ¹⁸F-FDG uptake in the tumor. The SUV max (early image) was 1.90, and that of the delayed image was 2.86. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was suspected. Tumor resection revealed that it was a leiomyoma originating in the major curvature of the stomach. In conclusion, the findings of low ¹⁸F-FDG uptake on ¹⁸F-FDG PET and poor contrast enhancement on CECT in a gastric submucosal tumor suggested of a gastric leiomyoma rather than GIST. PMID:26574696

  3. Successful treatment of bleeding large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour in a patient under dual antiplatelet therapy after recent drug-eluting coronary stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Keita; Fujikawa, Takahisa; Kuramitsu, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old man who started dual antiplatelet therapy (APT) with aspirin and clopidogrel after recent implantation of drug-eluting coronary stent and developed massive bleeding due to large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). Following endoscopic haemostasis and discontinuation of dual APT, neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib was started under continuation of ‘single’ APT with aspirin. A good chemotherapeutic response was achieved without recurrence of bleeding, and subsequent less invasive surgical resection of the tumour was performed, while preoperative single APT was continued for prevention of stent thrombosis. The patient recovered well without any thromboembolic or bleeding events. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy and subsequent less invasive surgery under continuation of APT is one of the preferred approaches for patients with duodenal GIST with severe thromboembolic comorbidities, as in the current case. PMID:24777088

  4. PK-PD modeling of individual lesion FDG-PET response to predict overall survival in patients with sunitinib-treated gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Schindler, E; Amantea, M A; Karlsson, M O; Friberg, L E

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacometric models were developed to characterize the relationships between lesion-level tumor metabolic activity, as assessed by the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) obtained on [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), tumor size, and overall survival (OS) in 66 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) treated with intermittent sunitinib. An indirect response model in which sunitinib stimulates tumor loss best described the typically rapid decrease in SUVmax during on-treatment periods and the recovery during off-treatment periods. Substantial interindividual and interlesion variability were identified in SUVmax baseline and drug sensitivity. A parametric time-to-event model identified the relative change in SUVmax at one week for the lesion with the most pronounced response as a better predictor of OS than tumor size. Based on the proposed modeling framework, early changes in FDG-PET response may serve as predictor for long-term outcome in sunitinib-treated GIST. PMID:27299707

  5. Fibromatosis of the Sigmoid Colon With CTNNB1 (β-Catenin) Gene Mutation, Arising at the Site of Ileocolic Anastomosis for Resection of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Thway, Khin; Abou Sherif, Sara; Riddell, Angela M; Mudan, Satvinder

    2016-05-01

    We describe a case of intra-abdominal fibromatosis, which occurred in a 44-year-old woman who had a previous history of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the sigmoid mesocolon, which was treated with imatinib and resection. A mass was detected at the site of ileocolic anastomosis of the previous small bowel resection and sigmoid colectomy, nearly 3 years later. Clinically, this was suspected to represent recurrent GIST and was excised, but histology and mutational analysis showed desmoid-type fibromatosis with a mutation in codon 41 of exon 3 of the CTNNB1 (β-catenin) gene. The occurrence of fibromatosis at the site of excision of GIST is very rare, but its recognition is important as the treatment of the two neoplasms differs significantly. As imaging cannot reliably distinguish between these 2 entities, histological diagnosis is crucial for correct clinical management. PMID:26721303

  6. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  7. CTHRC1 Acts as a Prognostic Factor and Promotes Invasiveness of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors by Activating Wnt/PCP-Rho Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming-Ze; Zhuang, Chun; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Wen-Ming; You, Haiyan; Qin, Wenxin; Gu, Jianren; Yang, Shengli; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the major gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors with a variable malignancy ranging from a curable disorder to highly malignant sarcomas. Metastasis and recurrence are the main causes of death in GIST patients. To further explore the mechanism of metastasis and to more accurately estimate the recurrence risk of GISTs after surgery, the clinical significance and functional role of collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (CTHRC1) in GIST were investigated. We found that CTHRC1 expression was gradually elevated as the risk grade of NIH classification increased, and was closely correlated with disease-free survival and overall survival in 412 GIST patients. In vitro experiments showed that recombinant CTHRC1 protein promoted the migration and invasion capacities of primary GIST cells. A luciferase reporter assay and pull down assay demonstrated that recombinant CTHRC1 protein activated noncanonical Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling but inhibited canonical Wnt signaling. The pro-motility effect of CTHRC1 on GIST cells was reversed by using a Wnt5a neutralizing antibody and inhibitors of Rac1 or ROCK. Taken together, these data indicate that CTHRC1 may serve as a new predictor of recurrence risk and prognosis in post-operative GIST patients and may play an important role in facilitating GIST progression. Furthermore, CTHRC1 promotes GIST cell migration and invasion by activating Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling, suggesting that the CTHRC1-Wnt/PCP-Rho axis may be a new therapeutic target for interventions against GIST invasion and metastasis. PMID:24726140

  8. Capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the small intestine of a young adult woman: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XU, XIAOLING; CAO, ZHENGLONG; ZHU, HAIHANG

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumors that mainly arise in the gastrointestinal tract. They are usually asymptomatic and are incidentally discovered during endoscopy or surgery. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological examination of the specimen. This is the case report of an asymptomatic GIST of the small intestine diagnosed by wireless capsule endoscopy. The tumor was initially suspected to be a leiomyoma, as GISTs in young adults are rare and are mainly discovered incidentally during colorectal cancer screening. The patient was a 35-year-old woman with occult gastrointestinal bleeding, with a normal medical history. An endoscopic assessment of the upper and lower GI tract (gastroscopy and colonoscopy) was performed, but did not reveal any abnormalities. Subsequently, an exophytic tumor initially suspected as leiomyoma or external pressure was detected in the small intestine by capsule endoscopy. A computed tomography scan was suggestive of a soft tissue tumor arising from the small intestine. A surgical specimen was obtained and the immunohistochemical examination revealed that the tumor was positive for CD117 and discovered on GIST-1 markers, while the markers of carcinoma, melanoma and lymphoma were negative, which was consistent with a diagnosis of a low-risk GIST with a mitotic count of <5/50 high-power fields. In this study, we aimed to present in detail the capsule endoscopic and radiological characteristics, as well as the findings of the histological examination of the surgical specimen. In conclusion, when occult blood is detected in the stool, even when gastroscopy and colonoscopy reveal no abnormal findings, small intestinal lesions should be suspected. Exophytic small intestinal GISTs, although rare, particularly in younger patients, they should be considered by physicians in the differential diagnosis of obscure GI bleeding of unknown origin, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. Capsule endoscopy may be considered to

  9. Second St. Gallen European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference: consensus recommendations on controversial issues in the primary treatment of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Manfred P; Zalcberg, John R; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Ruers, Theo; Ducreux, Michel; Arnold, Dirk; Aust, Daniela; Brown, Gina; Bujko, Krzysztof; Cunningham, Christopher; Evrard, Serge; Folprecht, Gunnar; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Haustermans, Karin; Holm, Torbjörn; Kuhlmann, Koert F; Lordick, Florian; Mentha, Gilles; Moehler, Markus; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Puciarelli, Salvatore; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sorbye, Halfdan; Van Cutsem, Eric; Weitz, Jürgen; Otto, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Primary treatment of rectal cancer was the focus of the second St. Gallen European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference. In the context of the conference, a multidisciplinary international expert panel discussed and voted on controversial issues which could not be easily answered using published evidence. Main topics included optimal pretherapeutic imaging, indication and type of neoadjuvant treatment, and the treatment strategies in advanced tumours. Here we report the key recommendations and summarise the related evidence. The treatment strategy for localised rectal cancer varies from local excision in early tumours to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT) in combination with extended surgery in locally advanced disease. Optimal pretherapeutic staging is a key to any treatment decision. The panel recommended magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or MRI + endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) as mandatory staging modalities, except for early T1 cancers with an option for local excision, where EUS in addition to MRI was considered to be most important because of its superior near-field resolution. Primary surgery with total mesorectal excision was recommended by most panellists for some early tumours with limited risk of recurrence (i.e. cT1-2 or cT3a N0 with clear mesorectal fascia on MRI and clearly above the levator muscles), whereas all other stages were considered for multimodal treatment. The consensus panel recommended long-course RCT over short-course radiotherapy for most clinical situations where neoadjuvant treatment is indicated, with the exception of T3a/b N0 tumours where short-course radiotherapy or even no neoadjuvant therapy were regarded to be an option. In patients with potentially resectable tumours and synchronous liver metastases, most panel members did not see an indication to start with classical fluoropyrimidine-based RCT but rather favoured preoperative short-course radiotherapy with systemic

  10. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  11. Genetic alteration and mutation profiling of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) for diagnosis and targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weixin; Zhang, Aiguo; Powell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have been recognized as a biologically distinctive type of tumor, different from smooth muscle and neural tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The identification of genetic aberrations in proto-oncogenes that drive the growth of GISTs is critical for improving the efficacy of cancer therapy by matching targeted drugs to specific mutations. Research into the oncogenic mechanisms of GISTs has found that these tumors frequently contain activating gene mutations in either platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) or a receptor tyrosine protein associated with a mast cell growth factor receptor encoded by the KIT gene. Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to disrupt durable patient responses to molecularly targeted therapy for GISTs, yet the prevalence and size of subpopulations remain largely unexplored. Detection of the cancer subpopulations that harbor low-frequency mutant alleles of target proto-oncogenes through the use of molecular genetic methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) target amplification technology, is hampered by the high abundance of wild-type alleles, which limit the sensitivity of detection of these minor mutant alleles. This is especially true in the case of mutant tumor DNA derived "driver" and "drug-resistant" alleles that are present in the circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) in the peripheral blood circulation of GIST patients. So-called "liquid biopsy" allows for the dynamic monitoring of the patients' tumor status during treatment using minimally invasive sampling. New methodologies, such as a technology that employs a xenonucleic acid (XNA) clamping probe to block the PCR amplification of wild-type templates, have allowed improved molecular detection of these low-frequency alleles both in tissue biopsy samples and in cfDNA. These new methodologies could be widely applied for minimally invasive molecular testing in the therapeutic management of GISTs. PMID:27443349

  12. Test-positive rate at CT colonography is increased by rectal bleeding and/or unexplained weight loss, unlike other common gastrointestinal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hock, D.; Materne, R.; Ouhadi, R.; Mancini, I.; Aouachria, S.A.; Nchimi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the rate of significant colonic and extra-colonic abnormalities at computed tomography colonography (CTC), according to symptoms and age. Materials and methods We retrospectively evaluated 7361 consecutive average-risk subjects (3073 males, average age: 60.3 ± 13.9; range 18–96 years) for colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent CTC. They were divided into three groups according to clinical symptoms: 1343 asymptomatic individuals (group A), 899 patients with at least one “alarm” symptom for CRC, including rectal bleeding and unexplained weight loss (group C), and 5119 subjects with other gastrointestinal symptoms (group B). Diagnostic and test-positive rates of CTC were established using optical colonoscopy (OC) and/or surgery as reference standard. In addition, clinically significant extra-colonic findings were noted. Results 903 out of 7361 (12%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11–0.13) subjects had at least one clinically significant colonic finding at CTC. CTC true positive fraction and false positive fraction were respectively 637/642 (99.2%, 95%CI 0.98–0.99) and 55/692 (7.95%, 95%CI 0.05–0.09). The pooled test-positive rate in group C (138/689, 20.0%, 95%CI 0.17–0.23) was significantly higher than in both groups A (79/1343, 5.9%, 95%CI 0.04–0.07) and B (420/5329, 7.5%, 95%CI 0.07–0.08) (p < 0.001). Aging and male gender were associated to a higher test positive rate. The rate of clinically significant extra-colonic findings was significantly higher in group C (44/689, 6.4%, 95%CI 0.04–0.08) versus groups A (26/1343, 1.9%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) and B (64/5329, 1.2%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) (p < 0.001). Conclusion Both test-positive and significant extra-colonic finding rates at CTC are significantly increased in the presence of “alarm” gastrointestinal symptoms especially in older patients. PMID:26937433

  13. Epidemiology and molecular biology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): a population-based study in the South of Switzerland, 1999-2005.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Paola; Spitale, Alessandra; Banfi, Sara; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Frattini, Milo; Bordoni, Andrea

    2008-11-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized at the molecular level by c-kit or PDGFRA oncogene mutations. Although GISTs raised major interest in past decades, population-based studies are still rare. Materials and Methods. All GISTs diagnosed in Southern Switzerland (1999-2005) were identified using Ticino Cancer Registry and analysed for c-kit and PDGFRA mutations. Clinical and molecular features were studied. Results. Annual incidence of GISTs was 1.47 cases/100,000 inhabitants (median age: 64 years; median size: 6.0 cm). Most GISTs arose in the stomach (60.5%). The malignancy risk was very-low/low in 47% of patients. DNA sequences showed a gene alteration in either c-kit or PDGFRA genes in 72.5% of patients. Mutations occurred mostly in c-kit exon 11 (60%). No mutations in c-kit exons 13 or 17 were found. An equal number of alterations in exons 12 and 18, and no mutations in exon 14 were observed in the PDGFRA gene. Discussion. This is the first comprehensive population-based study of GISTs incidence and molecular biology characterization in Central Europe. Our incidence data showed higher age-standardized rates compared to other European countries. The gene mutation spectrum differed when compared to the literature. This is relevant to improve the molecular profile knowledge based on Cancer Registry data. PMID:18785120

  14. Chemical modifications in the seed region of miRNAs 221/222 increase the silencing performances in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Durso, Montano; Gaglione, Maria; Piras, Linda; Mercurio, Maria Emilia; Terreri, Sara; Olivieri, Michele; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Grieco, Paolo; Orsini, Gaetano; Tonon, Giancarlo; Messere, Anna; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-03-23

    Most GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT gene overexpression, which in turn is regulated by levels of microRNA 221 and microRNA 222. GISTs can also be distinguished by their miRNAs expression profile in which miRNAs 221/222 result reduced in comparison with GI normal tissues. In this paper, to restore normal miRNAs levels and to improve the silencing performances of miRNAs 221/222, new miRNA mimics in which guide strands are modified by Phosphorothioate (PS) and/or 2'-O-methyl RNA (2'-OMe) inside and outside the seed region, were synthesized and tested in GIST48 cells. We evaluated the positional effect of the chemical modifications on the miRNAs silencing activity, compared to natural and several commercial miRNA mimics. Our results show that chemically modified miRNAs 221/222 with alternating 2'-OMe-PS and natural nucleotides in the seed region are effective inhibitors of KIT gene expression and exhibit increased stability in rat plasma. Besides, their transfection in GIST 48 cells showed significant effects on different cellular processes in which KIT plays a functional role for tumor development (such as migration, cell proliferation, and apoptosis). Therefore, modified miRNAs 221/222 may provide an alternative therapeutic option for GIST treatment also aimed to overcome drug resistance concerns. PMID:26854374

  15. Treatment of non-resectable and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors: experience with the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a third level hospital in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel Renteria, Alberto; Pluma Jiménez, Miguel; Pérez Martínez, Mario; Martínez Martínez, Gloria; Rivera Rivera, Samuel; Grajales Álvarez, Rocío; Bautista Aragón, Yolanda; Quintana Quintana, Miguel; Alejandro Silva, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Stromal tumors of the digestive tract are uncommon malignant diseases, are subclassified as leiomyosarcomas and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) depending on the molecular expression of tyrosine kinase receptor KIT (CD117). GISTs represent 1% of malignant tumors affecting this anatomical site. Localized tumours diseases are reasonably well controlled by surgical resection and several criteria define the need for adjuvant therapy. In the case of metastatic disease a poor prognosis has been reported with systemic treatment based on chemotherapy. Recently, significant advances have been shown since tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were introduced, with median overall survival close to 5 years. Unfortunately in Mexico, even though the therapy has been long used there are no published data of the experience in the treatment of these tumors. Methods We used an electronic data base to obtain clinical, radiological and histological data of patients diagnosed with GIST and treated in the oncological center of the Mexican Institute of Social Security, patients were subclassified by stage, symptoms at diagnosis as well as the initial and subsequent systemic treatment. Finally we made an analysis for progression free survival and overall survival identifying prognostic factors. Results We obtained information of 71 patients with metastatic, non-resectable or recurrent GIST, treated with a TKI, we observed a predominant relation for women (60.4%) with median age of 58 years. Stage at diagnosis was predominantly metastatic (46.5%), most frequently affected sites were lung, liver and retroperitoneum. Median progression free survival was 30.6 months and overall survival was 81.3 months. All patients were initially treated with imatinib at a dose of 400 mg per day. Treatment was well-tolerated in most cases. Conclusions Metastatic GIST evaluated in our center shows a different affection in gender and age, and our population shows a different response to TKIs

  16. S0502: A SWOG Phase III Randomized Study of Imatinib, With or Without Bevacizumab, in Patients With Untreated Metastatic or Unresectable Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Cathy; Corless, Christopher; Eary, Janet F.; Mulder, Karen; Okuno, Scott H.; George, Suzanne; Heinrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lessons Learned Despite having significant rationale, S0502 failed to accrue for a number of reasons. Vetting a trial first, with scientific experts and funding agencies, does not guarantee success, especially when dealing with a rare tumor and/or one with an existing highly effective therapy. In the present case, adding an intravenous drug to an oral medication as part of a regimen expected to be continued for many years likely decreased patient (and physician) convenience and, thus, interest in the study. Background. Imatinib mesylate, a potent inhibitor of the KIT and PDGFR tyrosine kinases, is highly effective in the treatment of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). However, most imatinib-treated tumors eventually become resistant, accounting for a median progression-free survival of 19–23 months. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) correlates with poor prognosis in GIST; bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, is effective in a variety of solid tumors. We postulated combination therapy with imatinib plus bevacizumab would benefit patients with advanced GIST, particularly those reliant on VEGFA-dependent angiogenesis. Methods. Patients with metastatic or surgically unresectable GIST were eligible for this phase III open-label clinical trial, S0502. At registration, patients were randomly assigned to either imatinib 400 mg (standard) or 800 mg (patients with exon 9 KIT mutations), or imatinib plus bevacizumab, 7.5 mg/kg i.v. every 3 weeks. Patients were treated to progression, symptomatic deterioration, unacceptable toxicity, treatment delay greater than 4 weeks, or patient choice to withdraw from the study. The primary objective was to determine whether the addition of bevacizumab to imatinib would improve progression-free survival (PFS) in first-line treatment of incurable GIST. Results. S0502 opened on April 15, 2008. As of fall 2009, only 12 patients from at least 178 eligible SWOG centers plus those participating

  17. Long-term results of adjuvant imatinib mesylate in localized, high-risk, primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST): ACOSOG Z9000 (Alliance) intergroup phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Ballman, Karla V.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Corless, Christopher; Kolesnikova, Violetta; von Mehren, Margaret; McCarter, Martin D.; Norton, Jeffrey; Maki, Robert G.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Demetri, George D.; Brennan, Murray F.; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Objective To conduct the first adjuvant trial of imatinib mesylate for treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Summary Background Data GIST is the most common sarcoma. While surgical resection has been the mainstay of therapy for localized, primary GIST, postoperative tumor recurrence is common. The KIT proto-oncogene or, less frequently, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) is mutated in GIST; the gene products of both are inhibited by imatinib mesylate. Methods This was a phase II, intergroup trial led by the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG), registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00025246. From 09/2001 to 09/2003, we accrued 106 patients who had undergone complete gross tumor removal but were deemed at high risk for recurrence. Patients were prescribed imatinib 400 mg/day for 1 year and followed with serial radiologic evaluation. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Results After a median follow-up of 7.7 years, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rate was 99, 97, and 83%, which compared favorably with a historical 5 year OS rate of 35%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year RFS rate was 96, 60, and 40%. On univariable analysis, age and mitotic rate were associated with OS. On multivariable analysis, the RFS rate was lower with increasing tumor size, small bowel site, KIT exon 9 mutation, high mitotic rate, and older age. Conclusion Adjuvant imatinib in patients with primary GIST who are at high risk of recurrence prolongs OS compared to that of historical controls. Optimal duration of adjuvant therapy remains undefined. (NCT00025246) PMID:23860199

  18. Safety, efficacy and prognostic analyses of sunitinib in the post-marketing surveillance study of Japanese patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yoshito; Ohki, Emiko; Ueno, Naomi; Yoshida, Ai; Toyoshima, Yasuharu; Ueda, Eiji; Houzawa, Hiroyuki; Togo, Kanae; Nishida, Toshirou

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to expand the sunitinib safety database in Japanese imatinib-resistant/-intolerant gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients. Retrospective analyses investigated common adverse events as potential prognostic markers. Methods Four hundred and seventy patients who received sunitinib between June 2008 and November 2009 were analyzed for safety, progression-free survival and overall survival; 386 for objective response rate; 88% received sunitinib on Schedule 4/2 starting at 50 mg/day. Results No unexpected safety issues occurred. Grade ≥ 3 adverse events occurred in 70%, most commonly thrombocytopenia (33%), neutropenia (22%) and leukopenia (15%). Objective response rate was 20% (95% confidence interval 16–24). Median progression-free survival was 22.4 weeks (95% confidence interval, 21.7–24.0). The overall survival rate at 24 weeks was 91% (95% confidence interval, 88–94). Higher relative dose intensity (≥70 vs. <70%) during the first 6 weeks and better Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0 vs. ≥1) were associated with longer progression-free survival (24.0 vs. 20.1 weeks; P = 0.011; and 24.1 vs. 16.9 weeks; P < 0.001) and higher 24-week overall survival rate (94 vs. 83%; P < 0.001; and 96 vs. 83%; P < 0.001). Increased progression-free survival and overall survival rates were associated with specific adverse events. Cox proportional hazard modeling adjusted for relative dose intensity and performance status established hand–foot syndrome (hazard ratio = 0.636; 95% confidence interval, 0.456–0.888) and leukopenia (hazard ratio = 0.683; 95% confidence interval, 0.492–0.948) occurring within 12 weeks were significantly correlated with increased progression-free survival. Conclusion Sunitinib showed good efficacy and tolerable safety. Factors associated with greater efficacy were relative dose intensity, performance status and specific early adverse events. PMID:26373318

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Safety and Efficacy in a Worldwide Treatment-use Trial of Sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Peter; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Rutkowski, Piotr; Schuette, Jochen; Rosen, Lee S; Seddon, Beatrice; Yalcin, Suayib; Gelderblom, Hans; Williams, Charles C; Fumagalli, Elena; Biasco, Guido; Hurwitz, Herbert I; Kaiser, Pamela E; Fly, Kolette; Matczak, Ewa; Chen, Liang; Lechuga, Maria José; Demetri, George D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To provide sunitinib to patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who were otherwise unable to obtain sunitinib; to obtain broad safety and efficacy data from a large population of patients with advanced GIST after imatinib failure. METHODS Imatinib-resistant/intolerant patients with advanced GIST received sunitinib on an initial dosing schedule (IDS) of 50 mg/day in 6-week cycles (4 weeks on treatment, 2 weeks off). Tumor assessment frequency was per local practice, with response assessed by investigators per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.0. Overall survival (OS) and safety were assessed regularly. Post-hoc analyses evaluated different patterns of treatment management. RESULTS At final data cutoff, 1124 patients comprised the intent-to-treat population; 15% had a baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2. Median treatment duration was 7.0 months. Median time to tumor progression was 8.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.0–9.4), and median OS was 16.6 months (95% CI, 14.9–18.0) with 36% of patients alive at the time of analysis. Patients in whom the IDS was modified exhibited longer median OS (23.5 months) than those treated strictly per the IDS (11.1 months). The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) were hand-foot syndrome (11%), fatigue (9%), neutropenia (8%), hypertension (7%), and thrombocytopenia (6%). Treatment-related AEs associated with cardiac function (eg, congestive heart failure and myocardial infarction) were reported at frequencies of ≤1% each. CONCLUSIONS This treatment-use study confirms the long-term safety and efficacy of sunitinib in a large international population of patients with advanced GIST after imatinib failure. PMID:25641662

  20. Functional role of the Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel DOG1/TMEM16A in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, Erik; Akcakaya, Pinar; Berglund, David; Karlsson, Fredrik; Vukojević, Vladana; Lee, Linkiat; Bogdanović, Darko; Lui, Weng-Onn; Larsson, Catharina; Zedenius, Jan; Fröbom, Robin; Bränström, Robert

    2014-08-15

    DOG1, a Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel (CaCC), was identified in 2004 to be robustly expressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). It was rapidly included as a tumor marker in routine diagnostics, but the functional role remained unknown. CaCCs are important regulators of normal physiological functions, but also implicated in tumorigenesis, cancer progression, metastasis, cell migration, apoptosis, proliferation and viability in several malignancies. We therefore investigated whether DOG1 plays a role in the three latter in GIST by utilizing in vitro cell model systems. Confocal microscopy identified different subcellular localizations of DOG1 in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant cells. Electrophysiological studies confirmed that DOG1-specific pharmacological agents possess potent activating and inhibiting properties. Proliferation assays showed small effects up to 72 h, and flow cytometric analysis of adherent cells with 7-AAD/Annexin V detected no pharmacological effects on viable GIST cells. However, inhibition of DOG1 conveyed pro-apoptotic effects among early apoptotic imatinib-resistant cells. In conclusion, DOG1 generates Cl{sup −} currents in GIST that can be regulated pharmacologically, with small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. Inhibition of DOG1 might act pro-apoptotic on some early apoptotic GIST cell populations. Further studies are warranted to fully illuminate the function of DOG1 and its potential as therapeutic target. - Highlights: • Subcellular DOG1 localization varies between GIST cells. • DOG1 in GIST is voltage- and Ca{sup 2+}-activated. • Known TMEM16A modulators, like A01 and Eact, modulate DOG1. • DOG1 has small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. • DOG1 impact early apoptotic GIST cells to undergo late apoptosis.

  1. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  2. The diagnosis and management of rectal cancer: expert discussion and recommendations derived from the 9th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, Barcelona, 2007.

    PubMed

    Van Cutsem, E; Dicato, M; Haustermans, K; Arber, N; Bosset, J-F; Cunningham, D; De Gramont, A; Diaz-Rubio, E; Ducreux, M; Goldberg, R; Glynne-Jones, R; Haller, D; Kang, Y-K; Kerr, D; Labianca, R; Minsky, B D; Moore, M; Nordlinger, B; Rougier, P; Scheithauer, W; Schmoll, H-J; Sobrero, A; Tabernero, J; Tempero, M; Van de Velde, C; Zalcberg, J

    2008-06-01

    Knowledge of the biology and management of rectal cancer continues to improve. A multidisciplinary approach to a patient with rectal cancer by an experienced expert team is mandatory, to assure optimal diagnosis and staging, surgery, selection of the appropriate neo-adjuvant and adjuvant strategy and chemotherapeutic management. Moreover, optimal symptom management also requires a dedicated team of health care professionals. The introduction of total mesorectal excision has been associated with a decrease in the rate of local failure after surgery. High quality surgery and the achievement of pathological measures of quality are a prerequisite to adequate locoregional control. There are now randomized data in favour of chemoradiotherapy or short course radiotherapy in the preoperative setting. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is more beneficial and has less toxicity for patients with resectable rectal cancer than postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Furthermore chemoradiotherapy leads also to downsizing of locally advanced rectal cancer. New strategies that decrease the likelihood of distant metastases after initial treatment need be developed with high priority. Those involved in the care for patients with rectal cancer should be encouraged to participate in well-designed clinical trials, to increase the evidence-based knowledge and to make further progress. Health care workers involved in the care of rectal cancer patients should be encouraged to adopt quality control processes leading to increased expertise. PMID:18539618

  3. Efficacy and safety of regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours after failure of imatinib and sunitinib: an international, multicentre, prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial (GRID)

    PubMed Central

    Demetri, George D; Reichardt, Peter; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rutkowski, Piotr; Gelderblom, Hans; Hohenberger, Peter; Leahy, Michael; von Mehren, Margaret; Joensuu, Heikki; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Blackstein, Martin; Cesne, Axel Le; Schöffski, Patrick; Maki, Robert G; Bauer, Sebastian; Nguyen, Binh Bui; Xu, Jianming; Nishida, Toshirou; Chung, John; Kappeler, Christian; Kuss, Iris; Laurent, Dirk; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background To date, only two agents, imatinib and sunitinib, have shown clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), but almost all metastatic GISTs eventually develop resistance to these agents, resulting in fatal disease progression. This phase 3 trial assessed efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with metastatic and/or unresectable GIST progressing after failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib. Methods Patients were randomised 2:1 to receive either regorafenib 160 mg orally daily or placebo, plus best supportive care in both arms, for the first 3 weeks of each 4-week cycle. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Upon disease progression, patients on placebo could cross over to regorafenib. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), objective response rate, disease control rate (DCR: rate of durable stable disease lasting for ≥12 weeks plus complete or partial responses), and safety. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01271712). Results From January to August 2011, 240 patients were screened at 57 centres in 17 countries, and 199 patients were randomised to receive regorafenib (n=133) or matching placebo (n=66). Median PFS per independent blinded central review was 4·8 months and 0·9 months, respectively (hazard ratio [HR] 0·27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0·19–0·39; p<0·0001). Following progression, 56/66 patients (84·8%) on placebo crossed over to regorafenib, resulting in no significant difference in OS between study arms (HR 0·77, 95% CI 0·42–1·41; p=0·199). A best response of partial response or stable disease was observed in 101/133 patients (75·9%) on regorafenib and 23/66 patients (34·8%) on placebo. DCR was 52·6% (70/133 patients) and 9·1% (6/66 patients), respectively. Drug-related adverse events were reported in 130 (98·5%) of 132 regorafenib patients and 45 (68·2%) of 66 placebo patients. The most common grade ≥3 regorafenib

  4. Characterization of various types of mast cells derived from model mice of familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors with KIT-Asp818Tyr mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Noriko; Nakai, Norihiro; Ohkouchi, Mizuka; Hashikura, Yuka; Liu-Kimura, Ning-Ning; Isozaki, Koji; Hirota, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic mast cell neoplasms and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) often have various types of somatic gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, KIT. Several types of germline gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene have been detected in families with multiple GISTs. All three types of model mice for the familial GISTs with germline c-kit gene mutations at exon 11, 13 or 17 show development of GIST, while they are different from each other in skin mast cell number. Skin mast cell number in the model mice with exon 17 mutation was unchanged compared to the corresponding wild-type mice. In the present study, we characterized various types of mast cells derived from the model mice with exon 17 mutation (KIT-Asp818Tyr) corresponding to human familial GIST case with human KIT-Asp820Tyr to clarify the role of the c-kit gene mutation in mast cells. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs) derived from wild-type mice, heterozygotes and homozygotes were used for the experiments. Immortalized BMMCs, designated as IMC-G4 cells, derived from BMMCs of a homozygote during long-term culture were also used. Ultrastructure, histamine contents, proliferation profiles and phosphorylation of various signaling molecules in those cells were examined. In IMC-G4 cells, presence of additional mutation(s) of the c-kit gene and effect of KIT inhibitors on both KIT autophosphorylation and cell proliferation were also analyzed. We demonstrated that KIT-Asp818Tyr did not affect ultrastructure and proliferation profiles but did histamine contents in BMMCs. IMC-G4 cells had an additional novel c-kit gene mutation of KIT-Tyr421Cys which is considered to induce neoplastic transformation of mouse mast cells and the mutation appeared to be resistant to a KIT inhibitor of imatinib but sensitive to another KIT inhibitor of nilotinib. IMC-G4 cells might be a useful mast cell line to investigate mast cell biology. PMID:26722383

  5. Clinical efficacy of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in imatinib-resistant gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a meta-analysis of recent clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lile; Zhang, Zhongqiang; Yao, Hongliang; Liu, Kuijie; Wen, Yu; Xiong, Li

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary and secondary resistance to imatinib, a selective receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), is a serious clinical problem in the control of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we report on a meta-analysis we performed to evaluate the efficacy of second-generation TKIs in the treatment of patients with imatinib-resistant GIST. Methods Randomized controlled trials evaluating the clinical efficacy of second-generation TKIs were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE from 2000 to February 2014. Outcomes subjected to analysis were progression-free survival and overall survival. Statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager version 5.1.0 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). Weighted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the outcomes. Fixed-effects or random-effects models were used, depending on the degree of heterogeneity across the selected studies. Results Three randomized controlled trials were selected for meta-analysis. Among imatinib-resistant or imatinib-intolerant patients, 541 received second-generation TKIs (sunitinib, nilotinib, or regorafenib) and 267 controls received placebo or best supportive care. Progression-free survival was significantly improved in the TKI-treated group (HR 0.38; 95% CI 0.24–0.59; P<0.0001). No statistically significant difference was detected in overall survival between the treatment group and the control group (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.71–1.03; P=0.09). In the subgroup of patients who were resistant or intolerant to both imatinib and sunitinib, TKI therapy (nilotinib or regorafenib) improved progression-free survival (HR 0.40; 95% CI 0.19–0.84; P=0.02) but not overall survival (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.63–1.08; P=0.17). Regorafenib was shown to be effective in terms of progression-free survival across different subpopulations of patients who were resistant to both imatinib and sunitinib. Conclusion Second-generation TKIs (sunitinib, nilotinib, and

  6. Nilotinib vs imatinib as first-line therapy for patients with unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumours: randomised phase 3 trial results and subgroup analysis of molecular subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Blay, Jean-Yves; Shen, Lin; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Rutkowski, Piotr; Qin, Shukui; Nosov, Dmitry; Wan, Desen; Trent, Jonathan; Srimuninnimit, Vichien; Pápai, Zsuzsanna; Le Cesne, Axel; Novick, Steven; Taningco, Lilia; Mo, Shuyuan; Green, Steven; Reichardt, Peter; Demetri, George D

    2015-01-01

    Background Nilotinib inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of ABL1/BCR-ABL1, as well as KIT, platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs), and the discoidin domain receptor. Gain-of-function mutations in KIT or PDGFRα are key drivers in most gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). This trial was designed to test the efficacy and safety of nilotinib vs imatinib as first-line therapy for patients with advanced GISTs. Methods This randomised, open-label, multicentre phase 3 trial included 647 adult patients with previously untreated, histologically confirmed, metastatic and/or unresectable GISTs. Patients were stratified by prior adjuvant therapy and randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive oral imatinib 400 mg once daily or oral nilotinib 400 mg twice daily. Centrally reviewed progression-free survival (PFS) was the primary endpoint. Response rates, toxicity, and overall survival were also analysed for the overall population and for mutation-defined subsets. Efficacy endpoints used the intention to treat principle. Here, the final results are reported. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00785785. Findings Because the futility boundary was crossed at a preplanned interim analysis, trial accrual terminated in April 2011. At final analysis of the core study (data cutoff, October 2012), PFS was higher with imatinib overall (hazard ratio [HR] 1.47) and in the KIT exon 9 subgroup (HR 32.46) but roughly similar between arms in the KIT exon 11 subgroup (HR 1.12). Sensitivity analyses suggested that informative censoring may have contributed, because of the high proportion of premature nilotinib progressions declared by local investigators and the design changes implemented following the interim analysis, potentially biasing PFS data in favour of the nilotinib arm. The most common adverse events were nausea, diarrhoea, and peripheral oedema in the imatinib arm and rash, nausea, and abdominal pain in the nilotinib arm. The most common serious

  7. Comprehensive site-specific whole genome profiling of stromal and epithelial colonic gene signatures in human sigmoid colon and rectal tissue.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jason M; Kim, Eunji; Ivanov, Ivan; Davidson, Laurie A; Goldsby, Jennifer S; Hullar, Meredith A J; Randolph, Timothy W; Kaz, Andrew M; Levy, Lisa; Lampe, Johanna W; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    The strength of associations between various exposures (e.g., diet, tobacco, chemopreventive agents) and colorectal cancer risk may partially depend on the complex interaction between epithelium and stroma across anatomic subsites. Currently, baseline data describing genome-wide coding and long noncoding gene expression profiles in the healthy colon specific to tissue type and location are lacking. Therefore, colonic mucosal biopsies from 10 healthy participants who were enrolled in a clinical study to evaluate effects of lignan supplementation on gut resiliency were used to characterize the site-specific global gene expression signatures associated with stromal vs. epithelial cells in the sigmoid colon and rectum. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that tissue type and location patterns of gene expression and upstream regulatory pathways are distinct. For example, consistent with a key role of stroma in the crypt niche, mRNAs associated with immunoregulatory and inflammatory processes (i.e., CXCL14, ANTXR1), smooth muscle contraction (CALD1), proliferation and apoptosis (GLP2R, IGFBP3), and modulation of extracellular matrix (MMP2, COL3A1, MFAP4) were all highly expressed in the stroma. In comparison, HOX genes (HOXA3, HOXD9, HOXD10, HOXD11, and HOXD-AS2, a HOXD cluster antisense RNA 2), and WNT5B expression were also significantly higher in sigmoid colon compared with the rectum. These findings provide strong impetus for considering colorectal tissue subtypes and location in future observational studies and clinical trials designed to evaluate the effects of exposures on colonic health. PMID:27401218

  8. Isoosmolar Enemas Demonstrate Preferential Gastrointestinal Distribution, Safety, and Acceptability Compared with Hyperosmolar and Hypoosmolar Enemas as a Potential Delivery Vehicle for Rectal Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Leyva, Francisco J.; Bakshi, Rahul P.; Fuchs, Edward J.; Li, Liye; Caffo, Brian S.; Goldsmith, Arthur J.; Ventuneac, Ana; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Du, Yong; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Lee, Linda A.; Torbenson, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Rectally applied antiretroviral microbicides for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) of HIV infection are currently in development. Since enemas (rectal douches) are commonly used by men who have sex with men prior to receptive anal intercourse, a microbicide enema could enhance PrEP adherence by fitting seamlessly within the usual sexual practices. We assessed the distribution, safety, and acceptability of three enema types—hyperosmolar (Fleet), hypoosmolar (distilled water), and isoosmolar (Normosol-R)—in a crossover design. Nine men received each enema type in random order. Enemas were radiolabeled [99mTc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)] to assess enema distribution in the colon using single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. Plasma 99mTc-DTPA indicated mucosal permeability. Sigmoidoscopic colon tissue biopsies were taken to assess injury as well as tissue penetration of the 99mTc-DTPA. Acceptability was assessed after each product use and at the end of the study. SPECT/CT imaging showed that the isoosmolar enema had greater proximal colonic distribution (up to the splenic flexure) and greater luminal and colon tissue concentrations of 99mTc-DTPA when compared to the other enemas (p<0.01). Colon biopsies also showed that only the hyperosmolar enema caused sloughing of the colonic epithelium (p<0.05). In permeability testing, the hypoosmolar enema had higher plasma 99mTc-DTPA 24-h area under the concentration-time curve and peak concentration compared to the hyperosmolar and isoosmolar enemas, respectively. Acceptability was generally good with no clear preferences among the three enema types. The isoosmolar enema was superior or similar to the other enemas in all categories and is a good candidate for further development as a rectal microbicide vehicle. PMID:23885722

  9. Diazepam Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Diazepam rectal gel is used in emergency situations to stop cluster seizures (episodes of increased seizure activity) in people who are taking other medications to treat epilepsy (seizures). Diazepam is in ...

  10. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer