Science.gov

Sample records for rectal sobre los

  1. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  2. Los ojos de la NASA sobre la Tierra

    NASA Video Gallery

    La NASA cuenta con más de una decena de satélites que estudian la Tierra. Conoce la información que recaban los satélites, junto con Gilberto Colón, asistente especial del subdirector del Centro de...

  3. Diazepam Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Diazepam rectal gel is used in emergency situations to stop cluster seizures (episodes of increased seizure activity) in people who are taking other medications to treat epilepsy (seizures). Diazepam is in ...

  4. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  5. Bisacodyl Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal bisacodyl is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation. It also is used to empty the bowels before surgery and certain medical procedures. Bisacodyl is in a class of medications called stimulant laxatives. It works by increasing activity of the intestines ...

  6. Bisacodyl Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal bisacodyl is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation. It also is used to empty the bowels before surgery and certain medical procedures. Bisacodyl is in a class of medications called stimulant laxatives. It works by increasing activity of the intestines to cause a bowel movement.

  7. Rectal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... the best treatment. How to Prepare for the Test The health care provider does a rectal exam and collects the ... vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your health care provider about the meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Mean Abnormal results may ...

  8. La utilizacion de los mapas conceptuales en la ensenanza de biologia y su efecto sobre el dominio del proceso de fotosintesis en los estudiantes universitarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Rivera, Maria M.

    Se investigo el efecto de los mapas conceptuales sobre el dominio del proceso de fotosintesis en estudiantes universitarios. La investigacion utilizo dos estrategias: mapas conceptuales individuales y mapas conceptuales colaborativos, con el fin de investigar si existen diferencias significativas en el dominio del proceso de fotosintesis. El analisis de los datos incluyo aspectos cualitativos y cuantitativos. Se desprende del estudio que el 80% de los estudiantes describen la utilizacion de los mapas conceptuales como una experiencia beneficiosa. El 70% de los estudiantes expreso que los mapas conceptuales son utiles en el aprendizaje del proceso de fotosintesis y el 61% indico que facilitan la comprension de los conceptos. Los hallazgos mas importantes del analisis cuantitativo indican que los estudiantes que utilizaron los mapas conceptuales mejoraron significativamente su desempeno en la posprueba global. Se utilizo la prueba Mann-Whitney para investigar si existian diferencias significativas en la posprueba y preprueba global, el valor de W = 1945.0, para un valor p de 0.00, lo cual establece diferencias significativas. Para determinar si existian diferencias significativas entre la posprueba y preprueba del grupo individual, se realizo la prueba nuevamente. El valor de W correspondio a 490.5, que es significativo, con un valor p de 0.00. Se concluye que existen diferencias significativas entre la ejecucion de la posprueba y preprueba del grupo individual. Los datos proveen suficiente evidencia para sostener que los estudiantes que utilizaron la estrategia de mapas conceptuales individuales mejoraron el dominio del proceso de fotosintesis significativamente. Se realizo nuevamente la prueba para los resultados de posprueba y preprueba del grupo colaborativo. El valor de W correspondio a 446 con un valor p de 0.00. Se concluyo que existen diferencias significativas entre la ejecucion de la posprueba y preprueba del grupo colaborativo. Finalmente, se efectuo una

  9. Informe del NCI y los CDC sobre el tabaco sin humo

    Cancer.gov

    El primer informe sobre el consumo mundial del tabaco sin humo y sus consecuencias en la salud pública reveló que más de 300 millones de personas en al menos 70 países usan estos productos dañinos.

  10. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or significant rectal bleeding. Laser or infrared coagulation and sclerotherapy (injection of medicine directly into the ... or if symptoms persist despite rubber band ligation, coagulation or sclerotherapy. What are anal fissures? Tears that ...

  11. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  12. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  13. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 99. Read More Colon cancer Prostate cancer Update Date 11/1/2015 Updated by: ... Health Topics Anal Disorders Enlarged Prostate (BPH) Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Prostate Diseases Rectal Disorders Browse the ...

  14. Rectal Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    The last few years have seen important progress in demonstrating the efficacy of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, vaginal microbicides, and treatment as prevention as effective strategies for reducing the risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV infection. There has also been significant progress in the development of rectal microbicides. Preclinical non-human primate studies have demonstrated that antiretroviral microbicides can provide significant protection from rectal challenge with SIV or SHIV. Recent Phase 1 rectal microbicide studies have characterized the safety, acceptability, compartmental pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmaco-dynamics (PD) of both UC781 and tenofovir gels. The tenofovir gel formulation used in vaginal studies was not well tolerated in the rectum and newer rectal-specific formulations have been developed and evaluated in Phase 1 studies. The PK/PD data generated in these Phase 1 studies may reduce the risk of advancing ineffective candidate rectal microbicides into late stage development. Tenofovir gel is currently poised to move into Phase 2 evaluation and it is possible that a Phase 2B/3 effectiveness study with this product could be initiated in the next 2–3 years. PMID:23612991

  15. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. Rectal prolapse repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... the anus. This is called rectal prolapse. Update Date 7/30/2014 Updated by: Jon A. Daller, MD, PhD, Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ...

  17. Postoperative rectal anastomotic complications.

    PubMed

    Polanecky, O; Adamek, S; Sedy, J; Skorepa, J; Hladik, P; Smejkal, M; Pafko, P; Lischke, R

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer represents the most common tumour of the gastrointestinal tract and the second most common tumour in men as well as women. The trend of increasing incidence of colorectal cancer is alerting. We undertook a retrospective study on 588 patients with rectal cancer and operated by rectal resection with anastomosis between the years 2002-2012. In our sample, we observed 54 (9.2 %) cases of anastomosis insufficiencies requiring reoperation. Out of 54 insufficient anastomoses, 36 (66 %) were in the lower two thirds of the rectum and only 18 (34 %) in the oral one. Although we have observed similar occurrences of anastomosis insufficiency in both groups - classical vs. staple suture (9.5 % and 9.0 %, respectively), the majority of stapler anastomoses (94 %) were made in the aboral part of the rectum. However, we can state that a majority of authors prefer the staple anastomosis as the one with lowest risk, mainly in the distal region of anastomosis. The high ligation of inferior mesenteric artery was performed in 182 (31 %) patients; out of these, we observed anastomosis insufficiency in 12 cases (22 %), which is exactly similar to that in the group of patients without high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery. We did not observe the use of antibiotics in therapeutical doses as a positive factor for anastomosis insufficiencies, and neither was oncological therapy observed as a risk factor. In our group of patients we agreed that age, level of anastomosis and corticosteroids are high-risk factors. The purpose of these reports, is for the sake of future to share and reference our experiences with cases of rectal and rectosigmoideal resection over the last 11 years. We consider it important to reference our results, especially the risk factors regarding the healing of rectal anastomosis, because anastomotic healing is a surgical problem with potentially deadly consequences for patients (Tab. 4, Ref. 24). PMID:25520228

  18. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  19. Proctoclysis: emergency rectal fluid infusion.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Vincent

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of proctoclysis (rectal fluid infusion) in providing fluid resuscitation in the absence of intravenous access in rural and remote environments. PMID:19856644

  20. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental. PMID:23584263

  1. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  2. Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  3. Estudio de la estructura logica utilizada en la ensenanza y el aprendizaje de los conceptos sobre el comportamiento de gases en el curso introductorio de quimica a nivel universitario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Diaz, Agnes

    El estudio que se presenta es de caracter cualitativo, un estudio multicasos donde se estudia la estructura logica utilizada por cuatro (4) profesores universitarios que ensenan el curso introductorio de quimica, en la planificacion, presentacion y evaluacion del tema sobre el comportamiento de los gases. Se utilizaron varias fuentes de informacion como: cuestionarios de profesores y estudiantes, entrevistas, grabaciones videomagnetofonicas, materiales didacticos y una prueba conceptual, entre otros. La informacion recopilada fue analizada de acuerdo al orden logico del contenido presentado, el estilo de ensenanza del profesor, las tecnicas y estrategias utilizadas para el desarrollo de destrezas de pensamiento, el ambiente fisico en el salon de clase y los instrumentos de evaluacion y avaluo. El estudio demuestra que lo que los profesores piensan y planifican para hacer sus presentaciones no necesariamente es lo que ocurre en el salon de clases. El desarrollo de destrezas de pensamiento, que constituye una prioridad de los profesores, no se elaboran efectivamente. El uso de las estrategias de resolucion de problemas numericos predomino. La participacion del estudiante en el salon de clases fue limitada y no se logro demostrar el desarrollo de las destrezas de pensamiento deseadas. Aunque los profesores tienen su propio estilo de ensenanza, el orden logico del contenido presentado en clase fue el mismo o siguio muy de cerca el orden establecido por el libro de texto. Los profesores utilizaron preferentemente la tiza y la pizarra para sus presentaciones y la dinamica en el salon de clases fue esencialmente tradicional. Los profesores hicieron su presentacion y los estudiantes copiaron pasivamente la informacion. Las evaluaciones de los estudiantes fueron esencialmente, pruebas escritas de seleccion multiple de acuerdo con el estilo en que se les enseno. El avaluo fue casi inexistente. La prueba conceptual administrada revela un aprendizaje pobre en los conceptos mas

  4. Comparison of rectal suction versus rectal tube insertion for reducing abdominal symptoms immediately after unsedated colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tso-Tsai; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Yu, Hao-Chun; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Abdominal discomfort and bloating are common symptoms after colonoscopy. We aimed to compare the effects of direct rectal suction with insertion of a rectal tube on reducing abdominal symptoms after unsedated colonoscopy. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy were randomized to have direct rectal suction or placement of a rectal tube immediately after colonoscopy. Post-procedure abdominal pain and bloating were measured with a 0 – 100 visual analogue scale. All participants ranked their satisfaction with either direct rectal suction or insertion of a rectal tube. Results: Abdominal pain and bloating were significantly reduced by direct rectal suction and placement of a rectal tube at 1 minute (both P < 0.05) and 3 minutes (both P < 0.05) after the colonoscopy. Direct rectal suction significantly reduced abdominal pain at 1 minute (P = 0.001) and 3 minutes (P = 0.005) after colonoscopy compared with rectal tube insertion. Bloating was significantly lower in patients with direct rectal suction compared to those with rectal tube insertion at 1 minute (P = 0.03) after colonoscopy. Greater satisfaction was found in patients with direct rectal suction compared to those with rectal tube insertion (P = 0.009). Conclusion: Direct rectal suction is more effective than rectal tube placement in reducing abdominal symptoms immediately after colonoscopy. Our study suggests that direct rectal suction is useful in providing relief of symptoms when patients are having difficulty expelling air or are experiencing abdominal symptoms following colonoscopy. PMID:27336061

  5. [Rectal resection with colo-anal anastomosis for ergotamine-induced rectal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Panis, Y; Valleur, P; Kleinmann, P; Willems, G; Hautefeuille, P

    1990-01-01

    Anorectal ulcers due to ergotamine suppositories are extremely rare. We report the first case of rectal stenosis following regular abuse of ergotamine suppositories which required rectal resection and coloanal anastomosis, despite stopping the intoxication 1 year previously. The rectal eversion during the perineal procedure allowed a low anastomosis to be performed, on the dentate line. One year later, the functional result was considered to be good, demonstrating the place of coloanal anastomosis in benign rectal pathology. PMID:2100123

  6. Optimizing Treatment for Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, Jennifer; Gurland, Brooke

    2016-09-01

    Rectal prolapse is associated with debilitating symptoms and leads to both functional impairment and anatomic distortion. Symptoms include rectal bulge, mucous drainage, bleeding, incontinence, constipation, tenesmus, as well as discomfort, pressure, and pain. The only cure is surgical. The optimal surgical repair is not yet defined though laparoscopic rectopexy with mesh is emerging as a more durable approach. The chosen approach should be individually tailored, taking into account factors such as presence of pelvic floor defects and coexistence of vaginal prolapse, severe constipation, surgical fitness, and whether the patient has had a previous prolapse procedure. Consideration of a multidisciplinary approach is critical in patients with concomitant vaginal prolapse. Surgeons must weigh their familiarity with each approach and should have in their armamentarium both perineal and abdominal approaches. Previous barriers to abdominal procedures, such as age and comorbidities, are waning as minimally invasive approaches have gained acceptance. Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is one such approach offering relatively low morbidity, low recurrence rates, and good functional improvement. However, proficiency with this procedure may require advanced training. Robotic rectopexy is another burgeoning approach which facilitates suturing in the pelvis. Successful rectal prolapse surgeries improve function and have low recurrence rates, though it is important to note that correcting the prolapse does not assure functional improvement. PMID:27582654

  7. Magnamosis: a novel technique for the management of rectal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Katie W; Rollins, Michael D; Feola, G Peter; Scaife, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of rectal atresia treated using magnets to create a rectal anastomosis. This minimally invasive technique is straightforward and effective for the treatment of rectal atresia in children. PMID:25096648

  8. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  9. Multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Doi, Momoko; Ikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Kawamura, Takuji; Katsura, Kanade

    2016-08-01

    We report multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins who, respectively, had 42 and 36 carcinoid tumors in the lower rectum. This is the first report about carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins. Both twins developed a similar number of rectal carcinoids with a similar distribution. Investigation of their genetic background may provide information about the origin of these tumors. PMID:27334481

  10. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  12. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Majdoub, Karim Ibn; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100 000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:26161211

  13. Rectal mucocoele following subtotal colectomy for colitis

    PubMed Central

    Day, N; Walsh, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a unique case of a rectal mucocoele affecting a patient several years after his subtotal colectomy for ulcerative colitis. This was secondary to both a benign anorectal stenosis and a benign mucus secreting rectal adenoma. This case highlights the importance of surveillance in such patients. PMID:25198962

  14. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  15. Treatment delay in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Law, C W; Roslani, A C; Ng, L L C

    2009-06-01

    Early diagnosis of rectal cancer is important for prompt treatment and better outcome. Little data exists for comparison or to set standards. The primary objective of this study is to identify factors resulting in delays in treatment of rectal cancer, the correlation between the disease stage and diagnosis waiting time, treatment waiting time and duration of symptoms. A five year retrospective audit was undertaken in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). There were 137 patients recruited and the median time to diagnosis was nine days after the first UMMC Surgical Unit consultation with a mean of 18.7 days. Some 11% had to wait more than four weeks for diagnosis. The median time from confirmation of diagnosis to surgery was 11 days with a mean of 18.6 days. Sixty-two percent of patients were operated upon within two weeks of diagnosis and more than 88% by four weeks. However, 10% of them had delayed surgery done four weeks after diagnosis. Long colonoscopy waiting time was the main cause for delay in diagnosis while delay in staging CTs were the main reason for treatment delays. PMID:20058579

  16. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  17. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  18. Rectal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Rectal Prolapse in a Toddler.

    PubMed

    Khushbakht, Samreen; ul Haq, Anwar

    2015-12-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. They constitute only 4% of the total gastrointestinal anomalies. They usually present in childhood. The common presenting symptoms are mass or pressure effects like constipation, tenesmus, urinary retention, local infection or bleeding due to presence of ectopic gastric mucosa. We are reporting a rare presenting symptom of rectal duplication cyst in a 4-year-old boy/toddler who presented with rectal prolapse. He also had bleeding per rectum. Rectal examination revealed a soft mass palpable in the posterior rectal wall. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the posterior wall of the rectum. It was excised trans-anally and the postoperative recovery was uneventful. Biopsy report showed rectal duplication cyst. PMID:26691370

  19. Rectal Cancer, Version 2.2015.

    PubMed

    Benson, Al B; Venook, Alan P; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chan, Emily; Chen, Yi-Jen; Cooper, Harry S; Engstrom, Paul F; Enzinger, Peter C; Fenton, Moon J; Fuchs, Charles S; Grem, Jean L; Grothey, Axel; Hochster, Howard S; Hunt, Steven; Kamel, Ahmed; Kirilcuk, Natalie; Leong, Lucille A; Lin, Edward; Messersmith, Wells A; Mulcahy, Mary F; Murphy, James D; Nurkin, Steven; Rohren, Eric; Ryan, David P; Saltz, Leonard; Sharma, Sunil; Shibata, David; Skibber, John M; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Stoffel, Elena M; Stotsky-Himelfarb, Eden; Willett, Christopher G; Gregory, Kristina M; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Rectal Cancer begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, posttreatment surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and survivorship. The NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant new data from publications and abstracts, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points from the 2015 NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were perioperative therapy options and surveillance for patients with stage I through III disease. PMID:26085388

  20. [Perianal and rectal impalement injuries].

    PubMed

    Joos, A K; Herold, A; Palma, P; Post, S

    2006-09-01

    Perianal impalement injuries with or without involvement of the anorectum are rare. Apart from a high variety of injury patterns, there is a multiplicity of diagnostic and therapeutic options. Causes of perianal impalement injury are gunshot, accidents, and medical treatment. The diagnostic work-up includes digital rectal examination followed by rectoscopy and flexible endoscopy under anaesthesia. We propose a new classification for primary extraperitoneal perianal impalement injuries in four stages in which the extension of sphincter and/or rectum injury is of crucial importance. Therapeutic aspects such as wound treatment, enterostomy, drains, and antibiotic treatment are discussed. The proposed classification encompasses recommendations for stage-adapted management and prognosis of these rare injuries. PMID:16896899

  1. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  2. How to Use Rectal Suppositories Properly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lubricate the suppository tip with a water-soluble lubricant such as K-Y Jelly, not petroleum jelly (Vaseline). If you do not have this lubricant, moisten your rectal area with cool tap water. ...

  3. Transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Suguru; Takahashi, Ryo; Hida, Koya; Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-06-01

    Although laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer has been gaining acceptance with the gradual accumulation of evidence, it remains a technically demanding procedure in patients with a narrow pelvis, bulky tumors, or obesity. To overcome the technical difficulties associated with laparoscopic rectal dissection and transection, transanal endoscopic rectal dissection, which is also referred to as transanal (reverse, bottom-up) total mesorectal excision (TME), has recently been introduced. Its potential advantages include the facilitation of the dissection of the anorectum, regardless of the patient body habitus, and a clearly defined safe distal margin and transanal extraction of the specimen. This literature review shows that this approach seems to be feasible with regard to the operative and short-term postoperative outcomes. In experienced hands, transanal TME is a promising method for the resection of mid- and low-rectal cancers. Further investigations are required to clarify the long-term oncological and functional outcomes. PMID:26055500

  4. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  5. Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma Presenting as a Rectal Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Erin; Chen, Lilian; Guelrud, Moises; Allison, Harmony; Zuo, Tao; Suarez, Yvelisse; Yoo, James

    2016-01-01

    Appendiceal adenocarcinoma typically presents as an incidentally noted appendiceal mass, or with symptoms of right lower quadrant pain that can mimic appendicitis, but local involvement of adjacent organs is uncommon, particularly as the presenting sign. We report on a case of a primary appendiceal cancer initially diagnosed as a rectal polyp based on its appearance in the rectal lumen. The management of the patient was in keeping with standard practice for a rectal polyp, and the diagnosis of appendiceal adenocarcinoma was made intraoperatively. The operative strategy had to be adjusted due to this unexpected finding. Although there are published cases of appendiceal adenocarcinoma inducing intussusception and thus mimicking a cecal polyp, there are no reports in the literature describing invasion of the appendix through the rectal wall and thus mimicking a rectal polyp. The patient is a 75-year-old female who presented with spontaneous hematochezia and, on colonoscopy, was noted to have a rectal polyp that appeared to be located within a diverticulum. When endoscopic mucosal resection was not successful, she was referred to colorectal surgery for a low anterior resection. Preoperative imaging was notable for an enlarged appendix adjacent to the rectum. Intraoperatively, the appendix was found to be densely adherent to the right lateral rectal wall. An en bloc resection of the distal sigmoid colon, proximal rectum and appendix was performed, with pathology demonstrating appendiceal adenocarcinoma that invaded through the rectal wall. The prognosis in this type of malignancy weighs heavily on whether or not perforation and spread throughout the peritoneal cavity have occurred. In this unusual presentation, an en bloc resection is required for a complete resection and to minimize the risk of peritoneal spread. Unusual appearing polyps do not always originate from the bowel wall. Abnormal radiographic findings adjacent to an area of gastrointestinal pathology may

  6. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  7. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-12-28

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  8. Predictive value of rectal bleeding in screening for rectal and sigmoid polyps.

    PubMed Central

    Chapuis, P H; Goulston, K J; Dent, O F; Tait, A D

    1985-01-01

    Overt rectal bleeding is a common symptom of colorectal cancer and polyps but also occurs in apparently healthy people. It is not known how often this represents bleeding from an undiagnosed rectal or sigmoid polyp or cancer. Three hundred and nineteen apparently healthy men aged over 50, selected by random sampling, were interviewed and underwent flexible sigmoidoscopy to at least 30 cm. Polyps of 10 mm or more in diameter were diagnosed in 12, one of whom also had an adenocarcinoma. Rectal bleeding during the previous six months was reported by 48, four of whom were found to have polyps; seven polyps and one cancer were diagnosed among the 271 who reported no rectal bleeding. Rectal bleeding had a specificity of 86%, a sensitivity of 33%, and a positive predictive value of 8% for rectal or sigmoid polyps or cancer. Restricting the analysis to those subjects who regularly inspected their stools did not improve the predictive value. Sigmoidoscopy in apparently healthy subjects with rectal bleeding will not result in the diagnosis of appreciable numbers of rectal and sigmoid polyps or cancers. PMID:3924158

  9. Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158339.html Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment: ... therapy for rectal cancer in the United States, only slightly more than half of patients receive it, ...

  10. A case of rectal neuroendocrine tumor presenting as polyp

    PubMed Central

    RAKICI, Halil; AKDOGAN, Remzi Adnan; YURDAKUL, Cüneyt; CANTURK, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is detected in the examination of polypectomy material, presenting as rectal polyp. Since this is a rare case, we aimed to summarize the approach to rectal NET’s. PMID:25625492

  11. The Great Pretender: Rectal Syphilis Mimic a Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisani Ceretti, Andrea; Virdis, Matteo; Maroni, Nirvana; Arena, Monica; Masci, Enzo; Magenta, Alberto; Opocher, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Rectal syphilis is a rare expression of the widely recognised sexual transmitted disease, also known as the great imitator for its peculiarity of being confused with mild anorectal diseases because of its vague symptoms or believed rectal malignancy, with the concrete risk of overtreatment. We present the case of a male patient with primary rectal syphilis, firstly diagnosed as rectal cancer; the medical, radiological, and endoscopic features are discussed below. PMID:26451271

  12. Management of rectal foreign bodies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Entrapped anorectal foreign bodies are being encountered more frequently in clinical practice. Although entrapped foreign bodies are most often related to sexual behavior, they can also result from ingestion or sexual assault. Methods Between 1999 and 2009, 15 patients with foreign bodies in the rectum were diagnosed and treated, at Izmir Training and Research Hospital, in Izmir. Information regarding the foreign body, clinical presentation, treatment strategies, and outcomes were documented. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these unusual patients. Results All patients were males, and their mean age was 48 years (range, 33–68 years). The objects in the rectum of these 15 patients were an impulse body spray can (4 patients), a bottle (4 patients), a dildo (2 patient), an eggplant (1 patient), a brush (1 patient), a tea glass (1 patient), a ball point pen (1 patient) and a wishbone (1 patient, after oral ingestion). Twelve objects were removed transanally by anal dilatation under general anesthesia. Three patients required laparotomy. Routine rectosigmoidoscopic examination was performed after removal. One patient had perforation of the rectosigmoid and 4 had lacerations of the mucosa. None of the patients died. Conclusions Foreign bodies in the rectum should be managed in a well-organized manner. The diagnosis is confirmed by plain abdominal radiographs and rectal examination. Manual extraction without anaesthesia is only possible for very low-lying objects. Patients with high- lying foreign bodies generally require general anaesthesia to achieve complete relaxation of the anal sphincters to facilitate extraction. Open surgery should be reserved only for patients with perforation, peritonitis, or impaction of the foreign body. PMID:23497492

  13. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  14. Ischemic fecal incontinence and rectal angina.

    PubMed

    Devroede, G; Vobecky, S; Massé, S; Arhan, P; Léger, C; Duguay, C; Hémond, M

    1982-11-01

    In 36 patients who consulted for fecal incontinence or rectal pain, or both, there was grossly visible scarring of the rectum and biopsy revealed mucosal atrophy and fibrosis. A steal from the hemorrhoidal arteries to the iliac vessels was demonstrated in 3 subjects. Maximum tolerable volumes within a rectal balloon were smaller than in control subjects, both in men (192 vs. 273 ml) and in women (142 vs. 217 ml) (p less than 0.01). The rectoanal inhibitory reflex was abnormal in all but 1 patient. Specific abnormalities were a decreased amplitude or a prolonged duration of the reflex. It was totally absent in 2 patients. This study is compatible with the hypothesis that chronic ischemia of the rectum may cause fecal incontinence or rectal pain. PMID:7117809

  15. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  16. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  17. Rectal atresia: a rare cause of failure to pass meconium

    PubMed Central

    Laamrani, Fatima Zahrae; Dafiri, Rachida

    2014-01-01

    Rectal atresia or stenosis is an extremely rare anorectal malformation associating a normal anal canal with a stricture or a complete rectal atresia. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn female presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. PMID:25821541

  18. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer. PMID:14605930

  19. Rectal strictures following abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. M.; Bentley, P. G.

    2000-01-01

    Rectal stricture formation is a rare complication of aortic aneurysm repair. Two case are described here. A combination of hypotension, a compromised internal iliac circulation and poor collateral supply following inferior mesenteric artery ligation can result in acute ischaemic proctitis--an infrequently described clinical entity. Ulceration and necrosis are the sequelae of prolonged ischaemia and fibrous stricture formation may result. One patient responded to dilatation and posterior mid-rectal myotomy; the other failed to respond to conservative measures and eventually had an end colostomy fashioned following intractable symptoms. PMID:11103163

  20. Cyclical rectal bleeding in colorectal endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Levitt, M D; Hodby, K J; van Merwyk, A J; Glancy, R J

    1989-12-01

    Three case reports of cyclical rectal bleeding in endometriosis affecting rectum and sigmoid colon emphasize the close relationship between such cyclical bleeding and intestinal endometriosis. The cause of bleeding, however, is still unclear. The predilection of endometriotic deposits for the outer layers of the bowel wall suggests that mucosal involvement is not a prerequisite for rectal bleeding. The frequent absence of identifiable intramural haemorrhage casts doubt on the premise that intestinal endometriotic deposits 'menstruate'. The cause may simply be a transient tear in normal mucosa due to swelling of an underlying endometriotic deposit at the time of menstruation. PMID:2597100

  1. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for gangrenous rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Voulimeneas, Ioannis; Antonopoulos, Constantine; Alifierakis, Evangelos; Ioannides, Pavlos

    2010-06-01

    Incarceration rarely complicates the chronically progressive form of the full thickness rectal prolapse. Even more rarely, it becomes strangulated, necessitating emergency surgery. We describe an extremely rare case of incarcerated acute rectal prolapse, without a relevant previous history or symptoms of predisposing pathology. The patient underwent emergency perineal proctosigmoidectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy. The postoperative course was quite uneventful with an excellent final result after colostomy closure. The successful treatment of this patient illustrates the value of the Altemeier procedure in the difficult and unusual case scenario of bowel incarceration. PMID:20518093

  2. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. Recognition of Anterior Peritoneal Reflections and Their Relationship With Rectal Tumors Using Rectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yiqun, Sun; Tong, Tong; Fangqi, Liu; Sanjun, Cai; Chao, Xin; Yajia, Gu; Ye, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our goal was to explore the factors influencing the visualization of anterior peritoneal reflections (APRs) using rectal MRI. We evaluated the usefulness of rectal MRI in measuring the distance from the anal verge to the APR and determining the relationship between the APR and the rectal tumor. Clinical and imaging data from 319 patients who underwent surgery after MRI examination between October 2010 and December 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The distance from the anal verge to the APR and the relationship between the APR and the location of the rectal tumor was evaluated. analysis of variance, logistic regression, independent samples t tests, and Kappa tests were used for statistical analysis. The APR was visible in 283 of 319 cases using rectal MRI. The APR was more readily observed in patients who were older than 58 years (P = 0.046), in patients whose subcutaneous fat thicknesses were >22.2 mm (P = 0.004), in patients with nondistended bladders (P = 0.001), and in those with an anteversion of the uterus (P = 0.001). There was a significant difference between the distance from the anal verge to the APR between females (10.4 ± 1.1 cm) and males (10.0 ± 1.2 cm; P = 0.014). The accuracy in predicting tumor location with respect to the APR was 70%, 50%, 98.2%, respectively for patients with tumors located above, at, and below the APR (compared with the location determined during surgery). Most of the APRs were visible using rectal MRI, whereas certain internal factors influence visualization. Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the distance from the anal verge to the APR and relationship between rectal tumors and the APR. PMID:26945377

  4. Rectal ulcers induced by systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Alan Hoi Lun; Chu, Karen; Yang, Hui Min; Ko, Hin Hin

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with diarrhoea, haematochezia, tenesmus and rectal pain for 2 months. She was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) 8 years ago and remained on prednisone, azathioprine and hydroxychloroquine. Blood work revealed a positive ANA (antinuclear antibody test), anti-dsDNA 749 IU/mL (0–300 IU/mL), C3 0.22 g/L (0.65–1.65 g/L) and C4 0.05 g/L (0.16–0.60 g/L). Stool studies were unremarkable. MRI of the pelvis showed a rectum with eccentric wall thickening. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed severe proctitis with multiple deep ulcers and diffuse submucosal haemorrhage. Rectal biopsy revealed crypt architectural distortion and reactive fibrosis in the lamina propria. The patient was given mesalamine suppository for 2 weeks with minimal improvement. Repeat flexible sigmoidoscopy showed a coalesced 3×4 cm full-thickness rectal ulcer. Therefore, the patient was given intravenous methylprednisolone for 3 days, followed by intravenous cyclophosphamide for 2 weeks. Her symptoms resolved and repeat flexible sigmoidoscopy showed fibrotic healing of the rectal ulcers. PMID:25150239

  5. Severe rectal injury following radiation for prostatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.; Goldberg, H.; Goldman, H.; Lombardo, L.; Skaist, L.

    1984-04-01

    Between 1970 and 1981, 348 patients underwent definitive irradiation. Of these patients 6 (1.7 per cent) sustained severe rectal injury as manifest by major rectal bleeding, rectal stricture, rectal mucosal slough and rectal ulceration. Severe rectal injury was observed in 0 of 13 patients (0 per cent) treated with 125iodine, 3 of 329 (1 per cent) treated with 6,400 to 6,800 rad external irradiation, 2 of 39 (5 per cent) treated with 7,000 to 7,300 rad external irradiation, and 1 of 7 (14 per cent) treated with 198gold and external irradiation. The impact of radiation dose, radiation therapy technique and surgical trauma was assessed. Rectal injury was managed by supportive measures in 2 patients and by diverting colostomy in 3 with benefit. One patient underwent abdominoperineal resection. A small bowel fistula and an intra-abdominal abscess developed, and the patient died.

  6. Intramuscular and rectal therapies of acute seizures.

    PubMed

    Leppik, Ilo E; Patel, Sima I

    2015-08-01

    The intramuscular (IM) and rectal routes are alternative routes of delivery for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) when the intravenous route is not practical or possible. For treatment of acute seizures, the AED used should have a short time to maximum concentration (Tmax). Some AEDs have preparations that may be given intramuscularly. These include the benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam, and midazolam) and others (fosphenytoin, levetiracetam). Although phenytoin and valproate have parenteral preparations, these should not be given intramuscularly. A recent study of prehospital treatment of status epilepticus evaluated a midazolam (MDZ) autoinjector delivering IM drug compared to IV lorazepam (LZP). Seizures were absent on arrival to the emergency department in 73.4% of the IM MDZ compared to a 63.4% response in LZP-treated subjects (p < 0.001 for superiority). Almost all AEDs have been evaluated for rectal administration as solutions, gels, and suppositories. In a placebo-controlled study, diazepam (DZP) was administered at home by caregivers in doses that ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 mg/kg. Diazepam was superior to placebo in reduced seizure frequency in children (p < 0.001) and in adults (p = 0.02) and time to recurrent seizures after an initial treatment (p < 0.001). Thus, at this time, only MZD given intramuscularly and DZP given rectally appear to have the properties required for rapid enough absorption to be useful when intravenous routes are not possible. Some drugs cannot be administered rectally owing to factors such as poor absorption or poor solubility in aqueous solutions. The relative rectal bioavailability of gabapentin, oxcarbazepine, and phenytoin is so low that the current formulations are not considered to be suitable for administration by this route. When administered as a solution, diazepam is rapidly absorbed rectally, reaching the Tmax within 5-20 min in children. By contrast, rectal administration of lorazepam is relatively slow, with a Tmax of 1-2h

  7. [Rectal cancer and adjuvant chemotherapy: which conclusions?].

    PubMed

    Bachet, J-B; Rougier, P; de Gramont, A; André, T

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rectum represents about a third of cases of colorectal cancer, with an annual incidence of 12,000 cases in France. On the contrary of colon cancer, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer has not been definitively proved, more because this question was assessed in few recent studies than because negative results. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is now the reference treatment for mid and lower rectal cancers, and allow to increase the local control without improvement of progression free survival and overall survival. The data of the "historical studies" of adjuvant treatment in rectal cancer published before 1990, of the meta-analysis of adjuvant trials in rectal cancer and of the QUASAR study suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (intravenous or oral), in absence of pre-operative treatment, decrease the risk of metastatic relapse after curative surgery for a rectal cancer of stage II or III. This benefice seems similar to the one observed in colon cancer. In the EORTC radiotherapy group trial 22921, an adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low dose of leucovorin was not associated with a significantly improvement of overall survival but, despite the fact that only 42.9% of patients received all planed cycles, the progression free survival was increased (not significantly) in groups receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The French recommendations are to discuss the indication of adjuvant chemotherapy by fluoropyrimidines in cases of stage III rectal cancer on histopathologic reports and no chemotherapy in case of stade II. Despite the fact that none study have assessed a combination of fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin in adjuvant setting in rectal cancer, like in colon cancer, the Folfox4, modified Folfox6 or Xelox regimens are valid options in stage III (experts opinion). In cases of pathologic complete remission or in absence of involved nodes, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy is not assessed. In

  8. Rectal-specific microbicide applicator: evaluation and comparison with a vaginal applicator used rectally.

    PubMed

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Giguere, Rebecca; Dolezal, Curtis; Bauermeister, José; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Valladares, Juan; Rohan, Lisa C; Anton, Peter A; Cranston, Ross D; Febo, Irma; Mayer, Kenneth; McGowan, Ian

    2014-09-01

    An applicator designed for rectal delivery of microbicides was tested for acceptability by 95 young men who have sex with men, who self-administered 4 mL of placebo gel prior to receptive anal intercourse over 90 days. Subsequently, 24 of the participants self-administered rectally 4 mL of tenofovir or placebo gel over 7 days using a vaginal applicator, and compared both applicators on a Likert scale of 1-10, with 10 the highest rating. Participants reported high likelihood to use either applicator in the future (mean scores 9.3 and 8.8 respectively, p = ns). Those who tested both liked the vaginal applicator significantly more than the rectal applicator (7.8 vs. 5.2, p = 0.003). Improvements in portability, conspicuousness, aesthetics, tip comfort, product assembly and packaging were suggested for both. This rectal-specific applicator was not superior to a vaginal applicator. While likelihood of future use is reportedly high, factors that decrease acceptability may erode product use over time in clinical trials. Further attention is needed to develop user-friendly, quick-acting rectal microbicide delivery systems. PMID:24858481

  9. RECTAL-SPECIFIC MICROBICIDE APPLICATOR: EVALUATION AND COMPARISON WITH A VAGINAL APPLICATOR USED RECTALLY

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Giguere, Rebecca; Dolezal, Curtis; Bauermeister, José; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Valladares, Juan; Rohan, Lisa C.; Anton, Peter A.; Cranston, Ross D.; Febo, Irma; Mayer, Kenneth; McGowan, Ian

    2014-01-01

    An applicator designed for rectal delivery of microbicides was tested for acceptability by 95 young men who have sex with men, who self-administered 4mL of placebo gel prior to receptive anal intercourse over 90 days. Subsequently, 24 of the participants self-administered rectally 4mL of tenofovir or placebo gel over 7 days using a vaginal applicator, and compared both applicators on a Likert scale of 1–10, with 10 the highest rating. Participants reported high likelihood to use either applicator in the future (mean scores 9.3 and 8.8 respectively, p= ns). Those who tested both liked the vaginal applicator significantly more than the rectal applicator (7.8 vs. 5.2, p=0.003). Improvements in portability, conspicuousness, aesthetics, tip comfort, product assembly and packaging were suggested for both. This rectal-specific applicator was not superior to a vaginal applicator. While likelihood of future use is reportedly high, factors that decrease acceptability may erode product use over time in clinical trials. Further attention is needed to develop user-friendly, quick-acting rectal microbicide delivery systems. PMID:24858481

  10. Rectal ectasia associated with anorectal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Zia-ul-Miraj, M; Brereton, R J

    1997-04-01

    Rectal ectasia may be associated with anorectal anomalies. If not recognized at the time of surgical reconstruction it may lead to megarectosigmoid, resulting in severe constipation and overflow incontinence postoperatively. The authors treated four patients presenting with this condition. One patient born with a low anorectal anomaly and two with high anorectal anomalies experienced intractable constipation caused by megarectum despite otherwise adequate primary reconstructive procedures. A fourth patient had rectal stenosis in association with megarectosigmoid. The ectatic megarectum had to be resected in all the patients to achieve normal bowel actions. The authors feel that resection or tailoring of the ectatic segment should be an integral part of the primary reconstructive procedure. PMID:9126769

  11. Transanal Evisceration Caused by Rectal Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Torres Sánchez, María Teresa; Richart Aznar, Jose Manuel; Martí Martínez, Eva María; Martínez-Abad, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Transrectal evisceration caused by colorectal injury is an unusual entity. This pathology is more frequent in elderly patients and it is usually produced spontaneously. Rectal prolapse is the principal predisposing factor. An 81-year-old woman was taken to the hospital presenting exit of intestinal loops through the anus. After first reanimation measures, an urgent surgery was indicated. We observed the absence of almost every small intestine loop in the abdominal cavity; these had been moved to the pelvis. After doing the reduction, a 3 to 4 cm linear craniocaudal perforation in upper rectum was objectified, and Hartmann's procedure was performed. We investigated and knew that she frequently manipulate herself to extract her faeces. The fast preoperative management avoided a fatal conclusion or an extensive intestinal resection. Reasons that make us consider rectal self-injury as the etiologic factor are explained. PMID:24639971

  12. Quality of care indicators in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Demetter, P; Ceelen, W; Danse, E; Haustermans, K; Jouret-Mourin, A; Kartheuser, A; Laurent, S; Mollet, G; Nagy, N; Scalliet, P; Van Cutsem, E; Van Den Eynde, M; Van de Stadt, J; Van Eycken, E; Van Laethem, J L; Vindevoghel, K; Penninckx, F

    2011-09-01

    Quality of health care is a hot topic, especially with regard to cancer. Although rectal cancer is, in many aspects, a model oncologic entity, there seem to be substantial differences in quality of care between countries, hospitals and physicians. PROCARE, a Belgian multidisciplinary national project to improve outcome in all patients with rectum cancer, identified a set of quality of care indicators covering all aspects of the management of rectal cancer. This set should permit national and international benchmarking, i.e. comparing results from individual hospitals or teams with national and international performances with feedback to participating teams. Such comparison could indicate whether further improvement is possible and/or warranted. PMID:22103052

  13. Prostatic carcinoma: rectal bleeding after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, A.R.; Steckel, R.J.

    1981-06-01

    A 64-year-old man had a prostatic nodule on routine physical examination; per-rectal needle biopsies revealed a single focus of well differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient had no history of urinary obstruction or of bowel difficulties. Accordingly, this was clinical stage II carcinoma of the prostate. The patient chose to receive external radiation therapy and was given small-field rotational treatment to a dose of 7000 rad (70 Gy) at a rate of 800 rad (8 Gy) weekly. Late in treatment, he experienced transitory diarrhea with flatulence, but this cleared with completion of treatment. Twenty months later he began to note frequent soft bowel movements, occasionally with red blood. At sigmoidoscopy 24 months after completion of treatment, the rectal mucosa was noted to be friable with minimal bleeding, presumably the result of radiation proctitis.

  14. The Molecular Basis of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiller, Michelle; Boostrom, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The majority of rectal carcinomas are sporadic in nature, and relevant testing for driver mutations to guide therapy is important. A thorough family history is necessary and helpful in elucidating a potential hereditary predilection for a patient's carcinoma. The adequate diagnosis of a heritable tendency toward colorectal carcinoma alters the management of a patient disease and permits the implementation of various surveillance algorithms as preventive measures. PMID:25733974

  15. MicroRNA in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Gruber, Jens; Ghadimi, B Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide, the proper staging of the disease determines the subsequent therapy. For those with locally advanced rectal cancer, a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is recommended before any surgery. However, response to CRT ranges from complete response (responders) to complete resistance (non-responders). To date we are not able to separate in advance the first group from the second, due to the absence of a valid biomarker. Therefore all patients receive the same therapy regardless of whether they reap benefits. On the other hand almost all patients receive a surgical resection after the CRT, although a watch-and-wait procedure or an endoscopic resection might be sufficient for those who responded well to the CRT. Being highly conserved regulators of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) seem to be promising candidates for biomarkers. Many studies have been analyzing the miRNAs expressed in rectal cancer tissue to determine a specific miRNA profile for the ailment. Unfortunately, there is only a small overlap of identified miRNAs between different studies, posing the question as to whether different methods or differences in tissue storage may contribute to that fact or if the results simply are not reproducible, due to unknown factors with undetected influences on miRNA expression. Other studies sought to find miRNAs which correlate to clinical parameters (tumor grade, nodal stage, metastasis, survival) and therapy response. Although several miRNAs seem to have an impact on the response to CRT or might predict nodal stage, there is still only little overlap between different studies. We here aimed to summarize the current literature on rectal cancer and miRNA expression with respect to the different relevant clinical parameters. PMID:27190581

  16. Career Options in Colon and Rectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Karim; Madoff, Robert D.; Rothenberger, David A.

    2011-01-01

    As Colon and Rectal Surgery has grown and diversified, the practice opportunities available have greatly expanded. The wealth of choices, may be daunting and even paralyzing for the new graduate or practitioner looking for a career change. Prior to making a decision, candidates must first make an honest assessment of their goals, abilities, and priorities. In this article, the authors briefly outline some of these challenges and help lay the groundwork for a successful decision process. PMID:22654567

  17. Importance of surgical margins in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukkai Krishnamurty, Devi; Wise, Paul E

    2016-03-01

    Distal resection margin (DRM) and circumferential resection margin (CRM) are two important considerations in rectal cancer management. Although guidelines recommend a 2 cm DRM, studies have shown that a shorter DRM is adequate, especially in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Standardization of total mesorectal excision has greatly improved quality of CRM. Although more patients are undergoing sphincter-saving procedures, abdominoperineal resection is indicated for very distal tumors, and pelvic exenteration is often necessary for tumors involving pelvic organs. PMID:27094456

  18. [Catamenial rectal bleeding and sigmoid endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Kazadi Buanga, J; Alcazar, J L; Laparte, M C; Lopez Garcia, G

    1992-01-01

    We describe a case of menstrual rectal bleeding due to sigmoid endometriosis. The history led us to the diagnosis and since a small biopsy of the lesion and scanning could not help us to a conclusive diagnosis we carried out histological examination of a piece removed at operation. This case has led us to estimate the incidence, the difficulties of diagnosis and the present therapeutic measures. PMID:1469232

  19. Current status of laparoscopy for the treatment of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shussman, Noam; Wexner, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Surgery for rectal cancer in complex and entails many challenges. While the laparoscopic approach in general and specific to colon cancer has been long proven to have short term benefits and to be oncologically safe, it is still a debatable topic for rectal cancer. The attempt to benefit rectal cancer patients with the known advantages of the laparoscopic approach while not compromising their oncologic outcome has led to the conduction of many studies during the past decade. Herein we describe our technique for laparoscopic proctectomy and assess the current literature dealing with short term outcomes, immediate oncologic measures (such as lymph node yield and specimen quality) and long term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. We also briefly evaluate the evolving issues of robotic assisted rectal cancer surgery and the current innovations and trends in the minimally invasive approach to rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25386061

  20. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery in the management of rectal wall endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Banky, Balazs; Saleki, Mahsa; Gill, Talvinder S

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with known history of endometriosis was referred to colorectal outpatient clinic from gynaecology with a history of intermittent rectal bleeding and no associated bowel symptoms. Flexible sigmoidoscopy in concordance with pelvic MRI revealed a 3×2×2 cm sessile lesion in the anterior rectal wall. The lesion was also palpable as a firm mass on digital rectal examination. From the gynaecological point of view no intra-abdominal exploration was required; the sole rectal wall lesion was removed with the minimally invasive surgical technique of transanal endoscopic microsurgery. Full thickness rectal wall excision sample was reported to be histologically complete and confirmed endometriosis. No recurrence was detected at endoscopic follow-up at 6 months. The patient remained symptom free. Therefore, we demonstrated a case of minimally invasive removal of a rectal wall large endometriosis nodule in a fertile woman with a complete, symptomatic, uneventful recovery. PMID:27495176

  1. Irinotecan and radiosensitization in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Illum, Henrik

    2011-04-01

    Neoadjuvant radiation therapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is currently considered the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. Pathologically complete response is a desirable outcome and has been associated with increased disease-free survival. There is a need to improve on this approach given that only approximately 10% achieve a pathologically complete response. Irinotecan has an established role in the treatment of metastatic rectal cancer. Both in-vitro and in-vivo data have shown promising radiosensitization properties. This study provides an overview of the published clinical trials evaluating the role of irinotecan as a radiosensitizer in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Although early-phase clinical trials initially showed promising results, this did not translate into improved outcome in a larger randomized phase II trial. Increased topoisomerase I expression has recently been identified as a possible predictive marker for improved response to irinotecan-based radiosensitization. This finding could help identify a subset of patients more likely to benefit from the addition of irinotecan in future trials. PMID:21160419

  2. [Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for resectable lower rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takase, Shiro; Kamigaki, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishimura, Hideki; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2009-11-01

    To suppress local recurrence and preserve sphincter function, we performed preoperative chemoradiotherapy( CRT) of rectal cancer. Sixteen patients with lower advanced rectal cancer received tegafur/uracil/calcium folinate+RT followed by curative resection with lateral lymph node dissection 2-8 weeks later. The male/female ratio was found to be 11:5 (41-75 years old) and the CRT was feasible for all patients. There were 11-PR and 5-SD according to RECIST criteria, and lower isotope accumulation was observed for all primary tumors in FDG-PET study. After CRT, all patients received R0 curative resection (11 APR, 2 LAR, 1 Hartmann and 1 ISR). On pathological study, 3 patients showed complete response. Surgical complications including pelvic infection, delayed a wound healing and deep venous thrombosis, etc. In conclusion, preoperative CRT of advanced rectal cancer could potentially be useful for local control and sphincter saving, however, it is necessary to manage specific surgical complications due to radiation. PMID:20037306

  3. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  4. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic [correction of laparoscopis] anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Ignjatovic, D; Bergamaschi, R

    2002-01-01

    Anterior resection for the treatment of full thickness rectal prolapse has been around for over four decades. 1 However, its use has been limited due to fear of anastomotic leakage and related morbidity. It has been shown that high anterior resection is preferable to its low counterpart as the latter increases complication rates. 2 Although sparing the inferior mesenteric artery in sigmoid resection for diverticular disease has been shown to decrease leak rates in a randomized setting, 3 vascular division is current practice. We shall challenged this current practice of dividing the mesorectum in anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse developing a technique that allows the preservation of the superior rectal artery. PMID:12587465

  5. Rectal Diclofenac Versus Rectal Paracetamol: Comparison of Antipyretic Effectiveness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sarami, Golbahareh; Rangraz, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is the most common complaint in pediatric medicine and its treatment is recommended in some situations. Paracetamol is the most common antipyretic drug, which has serious side effects such as toxicity along with its positive effects. Diclofenac is one of the strongest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs, which has received little attention as an antipyretic drug. Objectives This study was designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of the rectal form of Paracetamol and Diclofenac. Patients and Methods This double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 children aged six months to six years old. One group was treated with rectal Paracetamol suppositories at 15 mg/kg dose and the other group received Diclofenac at 1 mg/kg by rectal administration (n = 40). Rectal temperature was measured before and one hour after the intervention. Temperature changes in the two groups were compared. Results The average rectal temperature in the Paracetamol group was 39.6 ± 1.13°C, and 39.82 ± 1.07°C in the Diclofenac group (P = 0.37). The average rectal temperature, one hour after the intervention, in the Paracetamol and the Diclofenac group was 38.39 ± 0.89°C and 38.95 ± 1.09°C, respectively (P = 0.02). Average temperature changes were 0.65 ± 0.17°C in the Paracetamol group and 1.73 ± 0.69°C in the Diclofenac group (P < 0.001). Conclusions In the first one hour, Diclofenac suppository is able to control the fever more efficient than Paracetamol suppositories. PMID:26889398

  6. Case report: Sigmoid strangulation from evisceration through a perforated rectal prolapse ulcer – An unusual complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer Z.; Kittmer, Tiffaney; Forbes, Shawn; Ruo, Leyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rectal prolapse occurs particularly in elder females and presentation can sometimes lead to complications such as strangulation and evisceration of other organs through the necrotic mucosa. Presentation of case This is a case of a 61 year-old female with rectal prolapse complicated by rectal perforation through which a segment of sigmoid colon eviscerated and became strangulated. This patient initially presented with sepsis requiring ICU admission, but fully recovered following a Hartmann’s procedure with a sacral rectopexy. Discussion Complications of rectal prolapse include incarceration, strangulation, and rarely, perforation with evisceration of other viscera requiring urgent operation. This report provides a brief overview of complications associated with rectal prolapse, reviews similar cases of transrectal evisceration, and discusses the management of chronic rectal prolapse. Conclusion Prompt surgical consult is warranted if any signs or symptoms suggestive of complications from prolapse are present. PMID:25680532

  7. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  8. ERAS protocol in laparoscopic surgery for colonic versus rectal carcinoma: are there differences in short-term outcomes?

    PubMed

    Pędziwiatr, Michał; Pisarska, Magdalena; Kisielewski, Michał; Major, Piotr; Mydlowska, Anna; Rubinkiewicz, Mateusz; Winiarski, Marek; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Most of the studies concerning enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols in colorectal surgery include heterogeneous groups of patients undergoing open or laparoscopic surgery, both due to colonic and rectal cancer, thus creating a potential bias. The data investigating the differences between patients operated for either colonic or rectal cancer are sparse. The aim of the study was to compare short-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for colonic and rectal cancer with ERAS protocol. The analysis included consecutive prospectively registered patients operated for a colorectal cancer between January 2012 and September 2015. Patients were divided into two groups (colon vs. rectum). The measured outcomes were: length of stay (LOS), complication rate, readmission rate, compliance with ERAS protocol elements and recovery parameters (tolerance of early oral diet, mobilization and time to first flatus). Group 1 (colon) consisted of 150 patients and Group 2 (rectum) of 82 patients. Patients in Group 1 (150 patients) were discharged home earlier than in Group 2 (82 patients)-median LOS 4 versus 5 days, respectively. There was no statistical difference in complication rate (27.3 vs. 36.6 %) and readmissions (7.3 vs. 6.1 %). Compliance with the protocol was 86.9 and 82.6 %, respectively. However, in Group 1, the following procedures were used less frequently: bowel preparation (24 vs. 78.3 %) and postoperative drainage (23.3 vs. 71.0 %). There were no differences in recovery parameters between the groups. Univariate logistic regression showed that the type of surgery, drainage and stoma creation significantly prolonged LOS. In a multivariate logistic regression model, only a bowel preparation and drainage were shown to be significant. Although functional recovery and high compliance with ERAS protocol are possible irrespective of the type of surgery, laparoscopic rectal resections are associated with a longer LOS. PMID:27154634

  9. Rectal impaction with epoxy resin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hemandas, Anil K; Muller, Guy W; Ahmed, Ibrahim

    2005-01-01

    We describe a unique case of a patient presenting with rectal impaction following self-administration of a liquid used as masonry adhesive for anal sexual gratification. The solidified matter required laparotomy for its removal. Strategies for removing rectal foreign bodies are discussed as well as other consequences of inserting foreign material per rectum. PMID:15862274

  10. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlquist, D.A.; Gostout, C.J.; Viggiano, T.R.; Pemberton, J.H.

    1986-12-01

    Four patients with chronic hematochezia and transfusion-dependent anemia from postradiation rectal vascular lesions were successfully managed by endoscopic laser coagulation. In all four patients, symptomatic, hematologic, and endoscopic improvement was evident. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding seems to be safe and efficacious and should be considered before surgical intervention.

  11. Rectal trauma: management based on anatomic distinctions.

    PubMed

    McGrath, V; Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Minard, G; Pritchard, F E

    1998-12-01

    Principles of rectal wound management, including routine diversion, injury repair, presacral drainage and distal washout, evolved from World War II and the Vietnam conflict and have been questioned in recent years. We believe significant confusion arises because of imprecise definition of injury location relative to retroperitoneal involvement. Our 5-year experience with penetrating rectal injuries at a Level I trauma center was analyzed. Injuries to the anterior and lateral surfaces of the upper two-thirds of the rectum were classified as intraperitoneal (IP, serosalized), and those of the posterior surface extraperitoneal (EP, no serosa); injuries to the lower one-third were EP. A total of 58 injuries were managed (92% gunshot wounds). Of these, 16 were IP, and 42 had some EP component. Ten patients underwent repair without diversion (6 IP, 4 EP); there were no leaks. Ten septic complications occurred in the remaining population: 2 necrotizing fasciitis, 5 abdominal abscess, and 3 presacral infections (PIs) (2 presacral abscesses and 1 wound tract infection). PI is the only complication that can be specifically associated with EP rectal injuries relative to management; as associated injury confounds interpretation of the other complications. The operative management in the 38 patients with diverted EP wounds with respect to presacral infection (PI) demonstrated the following: repair injury (n = 10), 0 PI versus no repair (n = 28), 3 PI (P = 0.55); washout (n = 33), 2 PI versus no washout (n = 5), 1 PI (P = 0.35); presacral drain (n = 30), 1 PI versus no drain (n = 8), 2 PI (P = 0.11). We conclude that most IP injuries can be managed with primary repair. EP wounds to the upper two-thirds of the rectum should usually be repaired. EP wounds to the lower one-third, which are explored and repaired, do not require drainage. EP wounds that are not explored should be managed with presacral drainage to minimize the incidence of presacral abscess. PMID:9843331

  12. Laparoscopic rectopexy in solitary rectal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Saeed; Salmanroughani, Hassan; Binesh, Fariba; Taghipoor, Shokoh; Kargar, Shady

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome (SRUS) come to a physician with passage of mucus and bloody liquid within defecation. The treatment for SRUS is depended to the severity of symptoms and the existance of rectal prolapse. This study is a report of the assessing of rectopexy as surgical modalities for 62 medical treatment resistant SRUS patients who were referred to the gastrointestinal department of Shahid Sadoughi Medical University and Mojibian hospital. The present non-randomized clinical trial was carried out in 62 SRUS patients from 1991 till 2005. In these patients SRUS was confirmed by histology. They were symptomatic after conservative therapy and referred for surgical intervention. All of them had been undergone abdominal rectopexy by two laparoscopic surgeons. In our study, rectal bleeding and history of digitalization had the highest and lowest frequency of symptoms and signs in our cases respectively. Abdominal rectopexy was done in 39 cases and complete recovery in our cases was 69.23%. Complete recovery rate in cases with dysplasia (63.8%) was significantly higher than cases without that (P=0.04). Complete recovery rate in cases that had finger defecation (85%) was significantly higher than cases without that (50%) (P=0.03). Laparoscopic rectopexy is one of the main surgical techniques for treatment of SRUS. This technique can present complete recovery for SRUS patients. Some of them include topical medications, behavior modification supplemented by fiber and biofeedback and surgery were more available and studied. But it seems that education of SRUS patient conservative treatment remain cornerstone in the SRUS management. PMID:22174170

  13. Why Rectal Douches May Be Acceptable Rectal-Microbicide Delivery Vehicles for MSM

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Bauermeister, José; Ventuneac, Ana; Dolezal, Curtis; Mayer, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Rationale To explore age of onset of rectal douching among men who have sex with men (MSM) and reasons leading to and maintaining douching behavior; and to consider whether rectal douches containing microbicidal agents might be acceptable for men at HIV risk. Methods In Stage 1, we used qualitative methods to explore douching behavior in a sample of 20 MSM. Subsequently, we developed a structured questionnaire that was administered in Stage 2 to 105 MSM. Results More than half of participants who completed Stage 1 douched during the trial despite having been advised not to do so. Of the 105 HIV uninfected participants in Stage 2, 51% reported using rectal douches in the prior six months; 47% douched before and 25% after anal intercourse. Most participants reported douching frequently or always. On average, men reported douching about two hours prior to or one hour following intercourse. Average age of onset was late 20s. Most men who douched wanted to be clean or were encouraged to douche by their partners. Some men thought douching after sex could prevent STIs. Conclusion Rectal douching appears to be a popular behavior among men who have RAI. It is necessary to identify harmless douches. If HIV/STI preventive douches can be developed, rectal douching prior to or following sexual intercourse could become an important additional prevention tool. To reshape an existing behavior to which some men strongly adhere, like douching, by suggesting use of one type of douche over another may be more successful than trying to convince MSM to engage in behaviors they never practiced before or those they resist (e.g., condom use). PMID:19959973

  14. Anorectal avulsion: an exceptional rectal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ibn Majdoub Hassani, Karim; Ait Laalim, Said; Benjelloun, El Bachir; Toughrai, Imane; Mazaz, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Anorectal avulsion is an exceptional rectal trauma in which the anus and sphincter no longer join the perineum and are pulled upward. As a result, they ventrally follow levator ani muscles. We present a rare case of a 29-years old patient who was admitted in a pelvic trauma context; presenting a complete complex anorectal avulsion. The treatment included a primary repair of the rectum and a diverting colostomy so as to prevent sepsis. Closure of the protective sigmoidostomy was performed seven months after the accident and the evolution was marked by an anal stenosis requiring iterative dilatations. PMID:24094142

  15. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  16. Virus-Host Mucosal Interactions During Early SIV Rectal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wuxun; Ma, Fangrui; Churbanov, Alexander; Wan, Yanmin; Li, Yue; Kang, Guobin; Yuan, Zhe; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Jianqing; Lewis, Mark; Li, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    To deepen our understanding of early rectal transmission of HIV-1, we studied virus-host interactions in the rectal mucosa using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-Indian rhesus macaque model and mRNA deep sequencing. We found that rectal mucosa actively responded to SIV as early as 3 days post-rectal inoculation (dpi) and mobilized more robust responses at 6 and 10 dpi. Our results suggests that the failure of the host to contain virus replication at the portal of entry is attributable to both a high-level expression of lymphocyte chemoattractant, proinflammatory and immune activation genes, which can recruit and activate viral susceptible target cells into mucosa; and a high-level expression of SIV accessory genes, which are known to be able to counter and evade host restriction factors and innate immune responses. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of rectal transmission. PMID:25128762

  17. Immunological Landscape and Clinical Management of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ruiz, Elísabeth; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of rectal cancer and colon cancer differs due to increased local relapses in rectal cancer. However, the current molecular classification does not differentiate rectal cancer and colon cancer as two different entities. In recent years, the impact of the specific immune microenvironment in cancer has attracted renewed interest and is currently recognized as one of the major determinants of clinical progression in a wide range of tumors. In colorectal cancer, the density of lymphocytic infiltration is associated with better overall survival. Due to the need for biomarkers of response to conventional treatment with chemoradiotherapy in rectal tumors, the immune status of rectal cancer emerges as a useful tool to improve the management of patients. PMID:26941741

  18. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  19. [Parenting Information: Teenagers. Informacion Para los Padres: Sobre los Jovenes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Steve

    These four booklets are devoted specifically to the concerns of parents and their teenage children and are part of a series of 22 booklets designed specifically to help parents understand their children and help them to learn. "Parents--Learn about Your Teenager" (booklet #6) explains the changes which occur during the teen years and the reasons…

  20. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Aravantinou, Meropi; Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26886938

  1. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26886938

  2. Evidence-based treatment of patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIANG; YANG, JIE; QIAN, QUN

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a worldwide disease whose incidence has increased significantly. Evidence-based medicine is a category of medicine that optimizes decision making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. Evidence-based medicine can be used to formulate a reasonable treatment plan for newly diagnosed rectal cancer patients. The current review focuses on the application of evidence-based treatment on patients with rectal cancer. The relationship between perioperative blood transfusion and recurrence of rectal cancer after surgery, the selection between minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and traditional laparotomy, choice of chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer prior to surgery, selection between stapled and hand-sewn methods for colorectal anastomosis during rectal cancer resection, and selection between temporary ileostomy and colostomy during the surgery were addressed. Laparoscopy is considered to have more advantages but is time-consuming and has high medical costs. In addition, laparoscopic rectal cancer radical resection is preferred to open surgery. In radical resection surgery, use of a stapling device for anastomosis can reduce postoperative anastomotic fistula, although patients should be informed of possible anastomotic stenosis. PMID:26998054

  3. Significance of Paneth Cells in Histologically Unremarkable Rectal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Pezhouh, Maryam K; Cheng, Edaire; Weinberg, Arthur G; Park, Jason Y

    2016-07-01

    Paneth cell metaplasia of the rectal epithelium is a common histologic finding in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. However, the clinical significance of isolated Paneth cells in otherwise unremarkable rectal mucosa has not been extensively examined. This study examined the frequency and clinical correlates of rectal Paneth cells in 245 biopsies obtained from patients between the ages of 2 weeks to 20 years in a pediatric tertiary care facility from 2010 to 2011. The specimens comprised 193 endoscopic pinch biopsies and 52 rectal suction biopsies. All 245 cases were endoscopically and histologically unremarkable with no prominence of eosinophils, no altered mucosal architecture, and no inflammation. Paneth cells were present in 42 cases (17.1%), which is higher than previous reports. Only 1 of 42 patients with rectal Paneth cells was subsequently diagnosed with Crohn disease. In our study population, the finding of Paneth cells was associated with young age, and the incidence of Paneth cell cases decreased with increasing age (χ=13.69, P=0.0002). Constipation was the most common presenting symptom in patients with rectal Paneth cells and was highly associated with the presence of Paneth cells (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval: 2.2-9.0). Paneth cells in otherwise unremarkable pediatric rectal biopsies are not rare and frequently occur in common conditions such as idiopathic constipation. PMID:26900817

  4. The solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: diagnosis with defecography.

    PubMed

    Goei, R; Baeten, C; Janevski, B; van Engelshoven, J

    1987-11-01

    The solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon entity consisting of a rectal abnormality caused by straining during defecation and characterized by specific histologic changes. Endoscopy may show single or multiple ulcers or a preulcerative phase consisting of mucosal thickening. Findings on barium enema may be normal or nonspecific, consisting of a thickened valve of Houston, nodularity, and rectal stricture. Pathologic changes consist of replacement of the lamina propria by fibroblasts and smooth muscle fibers with marked hypertrophy of the muscularis mucosae. In five patients with histologically proved solitary rectal ulcer syndrome, defecography was performed to evaluate the accompanying defecation disorder. Two patients showed the spastic pelvic floor syndrome, characterized by failure of relaxation of the pelvic floor musculature during straining. In the remaining three, defecography showed an infolding of the rectal wall toward the rectal lumen increasing gradually to form an intussusception. The results indicate that defecography is useful to show the underlying disorder of defecation in the solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. PMID:3499797

  5. Rectal Mechano-sensory Function in Patients with Carcinoid Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Brock, Christina; Haase, Anne-Mette; Laurberg, Søren; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Grønbæk, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In patients with neuroendocrine tumors, excessive production of serotonin and other amines may cause the carcinoid syndrome, which is mainly characterized by diarrhea and flushing. Little is known about the pathophysiology of carcinoid diarrhea. In several other groups of patients, diarrhea may be associated with rectal hypersensitivity and increased rectal tone. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare rectal sensitivity and compliance in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and in healthy subjects. Methods Twelve patients (6 males, aged 54–78 years, median 65 years), with carcinoid diarrhea and 19 healthy subjects (7 males, aged 50–78 years, median 61 years) were included. Rectal mechanical and heat stimulation was used for assessment of rectal mechano-sensory properties. Results Overall, 5.3% higher temperatures were needed to elicit sensory responses in patients with carcinoid diarrhea than in healthy subjects (P = 0.015). Posthoc analyses revealed that the sensory threshold to heat was 48.1 ± 3.1°C in patients vs 44.7 ± 4.7°C in healthy subjects (P = 0.041). In contrast, patients and healthy subjects showed no overall differences in rectal sensory response to mechanical distension (P = 0.731) or rectal compliance (P = 0.990). Conclusions Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have higher sensory thresholds to heat stimulation in comparison to healthy subjects, but normal rectal sensation to mechanical distension and normal compliance. Therefore, treatment of carcinoid diarrhea should aim at prolonging gastrointestinal transit and decreasing secretion, rather than modifying rectal mechano-sensory function. PMID:26690884

  6. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  7. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  8. Investigadores simulan los beneficios reales de los exámenes de detección

    Cancer.gov

    Artículo sobre los esfuerzos de la Red de Modelado de Intervención y Vigilancia del Cáncer (CISNET) del NCI para determinar los beneficios reales de los exámenes de detección del cáncer en la población general.

  9. [Integrated treatments of rectal carcinoma (review)].

    PubMed

    Gennari, Leandro; Doci, Roberto; Rossetti, Carlo; Bagnoli, Pietro; Eboli, Marco; Brocchi, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    We have reviewed the international literature regarding the treatment of rectal carcinoma. Over the last decades the evolution of treatment methods has led to a drastic fall in the incidence of local recurrences which has gone from a wide range (15-40%) to a much lower figure (10%). This favourable result has been reached also due to improvement in surgical techniques (total mesorectal excision) and to the use of an association of preoperative radio and chemotherapy. However, the drugs and dosage of these as well as of the RT still have to be defined. In our experience the integrated treatment has brought a downstaging of the T in 60% of cases and of the N in 15%. PMID:12613323

  10. Rectal Douching and Implications for Rectal Microbicides among Populations Vulnerable to HIV in South America: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Jerome T.; Kinsler, Janni J.; Imrie, John; Nureña, César R.; Sánchez, Jorge; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While gel-formulated Rectal Microbicides (RM) are the first to enter clinical trials, rectal douching in preparation for anal intercourse is a common practise, thus RMs formulated as douches may be a convenient alternative to gels. Nonetheless, little is known about potential users’ thoughts regarding douche-formulated RMs or rectal douching practises, data needed to inform the advancement of douche-based RMs. This qualitative study examined thoughts regarding douches, their use as a RM and current douching practises among men who have sex with men and transgender women. Methods Ten focus groups and 36 in-depth interviews were conducted (N=140) to examine the overall acceptability of RM, of which one component focused on rectal douching. Focus groups and interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded; text relating to rectal douching was extracted and analysed. Sociodemographic information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results Support for a douche-formulated RM centred on the possibility of combined pre-coital hygiene and HIV protection, and it was believed that a deeply-penetrating liquid douche would confer greater HIV protection than a gel. Drawbacks included rectal dryness; impracticality and portability issues; and, potential side effects. Non-commercial douching apparatus use was common and liquids used included detergents, vinegar, bleach, lemon juice and alcohol. Conclusions A douche-formulated RM while desirable and perceived as more effective than a gel-formulated RM also generated questions regarding practicality and side-effects. Of immediate concern were the non-commercial liquids already being used which likely damage rectal epithelia, potentially increasing HIV infection risk. Pre-coital rectal douching is common and a RM formulated as such is desirable, but education on rectal douching practices is needed now. PMID:23966338

  11. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gene-hyuk; Kim, Kyung Ah; Hwang, Seong Su; Park, Soo Youn; Kim, Hyun A.; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Ji Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI. Methods We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2) of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI) and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Results All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471), while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI) was marginally significant (p = 0.0534). Conclusion The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis. PMID:26348217

  12. Rectal wall sparing by dosimetric effect of rectal balloon used during Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Teh, Bin S.

    2005-03-31

    The use of an air-filled rectal balloon has been shown to decrease prostate motion during prostate radiotherapy. However, the perturbation of radiation dose near the air-tissue interfaces has raised clinical concerns of underdosing the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effects of an air-filled rectal balloon on the rectal wall/mucosa and prostate gland. Clinical rectal toxicity and dose-volume histogram (DVH) were also assessed to evaluate for any correlation. A film phantom was constructed to simulate the 4-cm diameter air cavity created by a rectal balloon. Kodak XV2 films were utilized to measure and compare dose distribution with and without air cavity. To study the effect in a typical clinical situation, the phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned on a Siemens DR CT scanner for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. A target object was drawn on the phantom CT images to simulate the treatment of prostate cancer. Because patients were treated in prone position, the air cavity was situated superiorly to the target. The treatment used a serial tomotherapy technique with the Multivane Intensity Modulating Collimator (MIMiC) in arc treatment mode. Rectal toxicity was assessed in 116 patients treated with IMRT to a mean dose of 76 Gy over 35 fractions (2.17-Gy fraction size). They were treated in the prone position, immobilized using a Vac-LokTM bag and carrier-box system. Rectal balloon inflated with 100 cc of air was used for prostate gland immobilization during daily treatment. Rectal toxicity was assessed using modifications of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and late effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT) scales systems. DVH of the rectum was also evaluated. From film dosimetry, there was a dose reduction at the distal air-tissue interface as much as 60% compared with the same geometry without the air cavity for 15-MV photon beam and 2 x 2-cm field size. The dose beyond the

  13. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  14. Adult rectosigmoid junction intussusception presenting with rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing Zeng; Teo, Li Tserng; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2015-05-01

    Most cases of intussusception in adults present with chronic and nonspecific symptoms, and can sometimes be challenging to diagnose. We herein report on a patient with the rare symptom of colonic intussusceptions presenting with rectal prolapse and review the existing literature of similar case reports to discuss how to reach an accurate diagnosis. A 75-year-old woman with dementia presented with per rectal bleeding, rectal prolapse and lower abdominal pain. An operation was scheduled and a large sigmoid intussusception with a polyp as a leading point was found intraoperatively. She subsequently recovered well and was discharged. As large sigmoid intussusceptions may present as rectal prolapse, intussusception should be considered as a differential diagnosis for immobile patients, especially when the leading point is a lesion. PMID:26034324

  15. [Rectal prolapse revealing a tumor: The role of abdominal ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Bequet, E; Stiennon, L; Lhomme, A; Piette, C; Hoyoux, C; Rausin, L; Guidi, O

    2016-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is rare in children and usually benign. However, there are various diseases that can be associated with it, such as cystic fibrosis or other causes of increased abdominal pressure. Here, we review the various underlying conditions that pediatricians or pediatric gastroenterologists should consider in the case of rectal prolapse. We report on three cases of children with a rectal prolapse and intra-abdominal tumors. Current recommendations and practice do not include a systematic check via abdominal imaging in cases of rectal prolapse. However, in some situations, imaging is indicated to detect a possible expansive process. Thus, in the presence of recurrent prolapse or of associated urinary or neurological signs, imaging is justified so as to allow for an early diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms. Given its lack of radiation exposure and good sensitivity in children, ultrasound imaging is the first choice. PMID:27265581

  16. Chronic utero-rectal fistula with menochezia and amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Pinto, P; Sharma, L; Kini, P

    1990-09-01

    Utero-intestinal fistulas are commonly acute in nature and usually follow malignancies of the intestines. Here we report a chronic uterorectal fistula with uncommon symptom of cyclical rectal bleeding (menochezia) and amenorrhea. PMID:1974538

  17. [Rectal tonsil or lymphoid follicular hyperplasia of the rectum].

    PubMed

    Trillo Fandiño, L; Arias González, M; Iglesias Castañón, A; Fernández Eire, M P

    2014-01-01

    The rectal tonsil is a reactive proliferation of lymphoid tissue located in the rectum. The morphology of the lymphoid proliferation of the colon is usually polypoid or, less commonly, nodular. Only in exceptional cases does lymphoid proliferation of the colon present as a mass in the rectum (rectal tonsil), although this is the most common presentation in middle-aged patients. It is important to be familiar with the rectal tonsil because in cases of exuberant growth it can be difficult to distinguish it from other types of masses. We present the case of rectal tonsil in a four-year-old girl. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings and review the literature. PMID:22112591

  18. Successful hemostasis of intractable rectal variceal bleeding using variceal embolization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Seung Up

    2015-02-28

    Portal hypertension causes portosystemic shunting along the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in gastrointestinal varices. Rectal varices and their bleeding is a rare complication, but it can be fatal without appropriate treatment. However, because of its rarity, no established treatment strategy is yet available. In the setting of intractable rectal variceal bleeding, a transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt can be a treatment of choice to enable portal decompression and thus achieve hemostasis. However, in the case of recurrent rectal variceal bleeding despite successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt, alternative measures to control bleeding are required. Here, we report on a patient with liver cirrhosis who experienced recurrent rectal variceal bleeding even after successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt and was successfully treated with variceal embolization. PMID:25741168

  19. Geometric modeling, functional parameter calculation, and visualization of the in-vivo distended rectal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Manduca, Armando; Camp, Jon J.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Robb, Richard A.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2006-03-01

    The rectum can distend to accommodate stool, and contracts in response to distention during defecation. Rectal motor dysfunctions are implicated in the pathophysiology of functional defecation disorders and fecal incontinence. These rectal motor functions can be studied by intra-luminal measurements of pressure by manometry, or combined with volume during rectal balloon distention. Pressure-volume (p-v) relationships provide a global index of rectal mechanical properties. However, balloon distention alone does not measure luminal radius or wall thickness, which are necessary to compute wall tension and stress respectively. It has been suggested that the elastic modulus, which is the linear slope of the stress-strain relationship, is a more accurate measure of wall stiffness. Also, measurements of compliance may not reflect differences in rectal diameter between subjects prior to inflation, and imaging is necessary to determine if, as has been suggested, rectal pressure-volume relationships are affected by extra-rectal structures. We have developed a technique to measure rectal stress:strain relationships in humans, by simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during rectal balloon distention. After a conditioning distention, a rectal balloon was distended with water from 0 to 400 ml in 50 ml steps, and imaged at each step with MRI. The fluid filled balloon was segmented from each volume, the phase-ordered binary volumes were transformed into a geometric characterization of the inflated rectal surface. Taken together with measurements of balloon pressure and of rectal wall thickness, this model of the rectal surface was used to calculate regional values of curvature, tension, strain, and stress for the rectum. In summary, this technique has the unique ability to non-invasively measure the rectal stress:strain relationship and also determine if rectal expansion is limited by extra-rectal structures. This functional information allows the direct clinical analysis

  20. Los NIH anuncian el lanzamiento de los estudios ALCHEMIST

    Cancer.gov

    Los Estudios sobre la Secuenciación e Identificación de Marcadores para el Mejoramiento de la Terapia Adjuvante para el Cáncer de Pulmón, ALCHEMIST, identificarán a pacientes con cáncer de pulmón en estadio inicial cuyos tumores tienen cambios genéticos.

  1. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic sigmoid resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, R; Lovvik, K; Marvik, R

    2004-01-01

    Sigmoid resection is indicated in the treatment of complete rectal prolapse (CRP) in patients with prolonged colorectal transit time (CTT). Its use however has been limited due to fear of anastomotic leakage. This study challenges the current practice of dividing the mesorectum by prospectively evaluating the impact of sparing the superior rectal artery (SRA) on leak rates after laparoscopic sigmoid resection (LSR) for CRP. During 30 months data on 33 selected patients with CRP were prospectively collected. Three patients were withdrawn from the analysis, as they had neither resection nor anastomosis. Twenty-nine women and one man (median age 55 range 21-83 years) underwent LSR with preservation of SRA for a median CRP of 8 (3-15) cm. There were 20 ASA I and 10 ASA II patients. Ten patients had undergone previous surgery. Four patients complained of dyschezia, whereas incontinence was present in 26 patients. Anal ultrasound showed isolated internal sphincter defects in two patients. Four young adults (21-32 years) had normal CTT, whereas 26 older patients had a median CTT of 5 (4-6) days. Defecography demonstrated 10 enteroceles, two sigmoidoceles, and one rectal hernia through the levator ani muscle. Mortality was nil. Median operating room time was 180 (120-330) min, suprapubic incision length 5 (3-7) cm, estimated blood loss 150 (50-500) ml, specimen length 20 (12-45) cm, solid food resumption 3 (1-6) days, and length of stay 4.5 (2-7) days. Thirty-day complications were not related to anastomosing and occurred in 20% of the patients. Although the evidence provided by the present study suggests that sparing SRA has a favorable impact on anastomotic leak rates, these nonrandomized results need further evaluation. The division of the mesorectum at the rectosigmoid junction seems not necessary, and its sparing should therefore be considered as it may contain anastomotic leak rates. PMID:15771289

  2. Rectal microbicides: clinically relevant approach to the design of rectal specific placebo formulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to identify the critical formulation parameters controlling distribution and function for the rectal administration of microbicides in humans. Four placebo formulations were designed with a wide range of hydrophilic characteristics (aqueous to lipid) and rheological properties (Newtonian, shear thinning, thermal sensitive and thixotropic). Aqueous formulations using typical polymers to control viscosity were iso-osmotic and buffered to pH 7. Lipid formulations were developed from lipid solvent/lipid gelling agent binary mixtures. Testing included pharmaceutical function and stability as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity. Results The aqueous fluid placebo, based on poloxamer, was fluid at room temperature, thickened and became shear thinning at 37°C. The aqueous gel placebo used carbopol as the gelling agent, was shear thinning at room temperature and showed a typical decrease in viscosity with an increase in temperature. The lipid fluid placebo, myristyl myristate in isopropyl myristate, was relatively thin and temperature independent. The lipid gel placebo, glyceryl stearate and PEG-75 stearate in caprylic/capric triglycerides, was also shear thinning at both room temperature and 37°C but with significant time dependency or thixotropy. All formulations showed no rectal irritation in rabbits and were non-toxic using an ex vivo rectal explant model. Conclusions Four placebo formulations ranging from fluid to gel in aqueous and lipid formats with a range of rheological properties were developed, tested, scaled-up, manufactured under cGMP conditions and enrolled in a formal stability program. Clinical testing of these formulations as placebos will serve as the basis for further microbicide formulation development with drug-containing products. PMID:21385339

  3. Capacitación del personal y de los pacientes en torno a los cuidados terminales

    Cancer.gov

    Artículo sobre programas innovadores de base científica para ayudar a médicos y pacientes a hablar sobre la transición de un tratamiento activo para el cáncer a los cuidados en la etapa final de la vida.

  4. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards. PMID:1681170

  5. Surgical strategy for low rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Dumont, F; Mariani, A; Elias, D; Goéré, D

    2015-02-01

    The two goals of surgery for lower rectal cancer surgery are to obtain clear "curative" margins and to limit post-surgical functional disorders. The question of whether or not to preserve the anal sphincter lies at the center of the therapeutic choice. Histologically, tumor-free distal and circumferential margins of>1mm allow a favorable oncologic outcome. Whether such margins can be obtained depends of TNM staging, tumor location, response to chemoradiotherapy and type of surgical procedure. The technique of intersphincteric resection relies on these narrow margins to spare the sphincter. This procedure provides satisfactory oncologic outcome with a rate of circumferential margin involvement ranging from 5% to 11%, while good continence is maintained in half of the patients. The extralevator abdominoperineal resection provides good oncologic results, however this procedure requires a permanent colostomy. A permanent colostomy alters several domains of quality of life when located at the classical abdominal site but not when brought out at the perineal site as a perineal colostomy. PMID:25455959

  6. Recent advances in robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Soichiro; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Robotic technology, which has recently been introduced to the field of surgery, is expected to be useful, particularly in treating rectal cancer where precise manipulation is necessary in the confined pelvic cavity. Robotic surgery overcomes the technical drawbacks inherent to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer through the use of multi-articulated flexible tools, three-dimensional stable camera platforms, tremor filtering and motion scaling functions, and greater ergonomic and intuitive device manipulation. Assessments of the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have reported similar operation times, blood loss during surgery, rates of postoperative morbidity, and circumferential resection margin involvement when compared with laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, rates of conversion to open surgery are reportedly lower with increased urinary and male sexual functions in the early postoperative period compared with laparoscopic surgery, demonstrating the technical advantages of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. However, long-term outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have not been fully evaluated yet; therefore, large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology. PMID:26059248

  7. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  8. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  9. Toward Restored Bowel Health in Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Steineck, Gunnar; Schmidt, Heike; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Sjöberg, Fei; Bull, Cecilia Magdalena; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    As technology gets better and better, and as clinical research provides more and more knowledge, we can extend our ambition to cure patients from cancer with restored physical health among the survivors. This increased ambition requires attention to grade 1 toxicity that decreases quality of life. It forces us to document the details of grade 1 toxicity and improve our understanding of the mechanisms. Long-term toxicity scores, or adverse events as documented during clinical trials, may be regarded as symptoms or signs of underlying survivorship diseases. However, we lack a survivorship nosology for rectal cancer survivors. Primarily focusing on radiation-induced side effects, we highlight some important observations concerning late toxicity among rectal cancer survivors. With that and other data, we searched for a preliminary survivorship-disease nosology for rectal cancer survivors. We disentangled the following survivorship diseases among rectal cancer survivors: low anterior resection syndrome, radiation-induced anal sphincter dysfunction, gut wall inflammation and fibrosis, blood discharge, excessive gas discharge, excessive mucus discharge, constipation, bacterial overgrowth, and aberrant anatomical structures. The suggested survivorship nosology may form the basis for new instruments capturing long-term symptoms (patient-reported outcomes) and professional-reported signs. For some of the diseases, we can search for animal models. As an end result, the suggested survivorship nosology may accelerate our understanding on how to prevent, ameliorate, or eliminate manifestations of treatment-induced diseases among rectal cancer survivors. PMID:27238476

  10. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  11. Voiding Dysfunction after Total Mesorectal Excision in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Noh, Tae Il; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Gu; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the voiding dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods This was part of a prospective study done in the rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with TME between November 2006 and June 2008. Consecutive uroflowmetry, post-voided residual volume, and a voiding questionnaire were performed at preoperatively and postoperatively. Results A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study, including 28 male and 22 female. In the comparison of the preoperative data with the postoperative 3-month data, a significant decrease in mean maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume were found. In the comparison with the postoperative 6-month data, however only the maximal flow rate was decreased with statistical significance (P=0.02). In the comparison between surgical methods, abdominoperineal resection patients showed delayed recovery of maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume. There was no significant difference in uroflowmetry parameters with advances in rectal cancer stage. Conclusions Voiding dysfunction is common after rectal cancer surgery but can be recovered in 6 months after surgery or earlier. Abdominoperineal resection was shown to be an unfavorable factor for postoperative voiding. Larger prospective study is needed to determine the long-term effect of rectal cancer surgery in relation to male and female baseline voiding condition. PMID:22087426

  12. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  13. Rectal atresia-operative management with endoscopy and transanal approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stenström, Pernilla; Clementson Kockum, Christina; Arnbjörnsson, Einar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the technique and outcome of the management of a newborn child with rectal atresia. A girl born with rectal atresia was diagnosed during physical examination and confirmed with X-ray. The anatomic appearance of the external anus, and lower pelvis was normal. The rectal ending was located 2 cm cranial from the anus and the distance between the rectal endings was 2 cm. A colostomy was established. At the age of five months the child was operated on with a rectal anastomosis using the endoscopic and transanal approach. Closure of the colostomy was performed at the age of ten months. The rectal anastomosis was treated with rectal dilatation weekly in order to avoid stricture. The patient was faecally continent at followup one and three months postoperatively. In conclusion, the endoscopic and transanal approach is an alternative to other surgical techniques in the management of rectal atresia. PMID:22091364

  14. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  15. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  16. Concurrent Occurrence of Uterovaginal and Rectal Prolapse: An Uncommon Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Umeh, UA; Ugwu, EO; Obi, SN; Nnagbo, JE

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant uterovaginal and rectal prolapse is an uncommon occurrence. Where laparoscopic equipment and skills are lacking, sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy can be accomplished by laparotomy, especially in women who desire to retain their uterus for either biological or psychological reasons. A 40-year-old primipara with a history of concomitant mass protruding from both her vagina and anus following a spontaneous unsupervised delivery at home. Following pelvic examination, a diagnosis of uterovaginal and rectal prolapse was made. In view of her parity and desire to retain her reproductive function, she was offered abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy with satisfactory postoperative recovery. In resource-limited settings with concomitant uterine and rectal prolapse, open abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy is an effective and safe alternative to Manchester operation in the absence of laparoscopic equipment and skills. PMID:26500795

  17. Concurrent Occurrence of Uterovaginal and Rectal Prolapse: An Uncommon Presentation.

    PubMed

    Umeh, U A; Ugwu, E O; Obi, S N; Nnagbo, J E

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant uterovaginal and rectal prolapse is an uncommon occurrence. Where laparoscopic equipment and skills are lacking, sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy can be accomplished by laparotomy, especially in women who desire to retain their uterus for either biological or psychological reasons. A 40-year-old primipara with a history of concomitant mass protruding from both her vagina and anus following a spontaneous unsupervised delivery at home. Following pelvic examination, a diagnosis of uterovaginal and rectal prolapse was made. In view of her parity and desire to retain her reproductive function, she was offered abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy with satisfactory postoperative recovery. In resource-limited settings with concomitant uterine and rectal prolapse, open abdominal sacrohysteropexy with synthetic mesh and rectopexy is an effective and safe alternative to Manchester operation in the absence of laparoscopic equipment and skills. PMID:26500795

  18. [Robot-assisted rectal surgery: hype or progress?].

    PubMed

    Becker, T; Egberts, J E; Schafmayer, C; Aselmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer has undergone a significant evolution during the last decades and has become the standard approach in specialized centers with better short-term and comparable oncological outcome to open surgery. The laparoscopic approach remains challenging and has various inherent technical challenges particularly associated with rectal cancer resection. Robotic colorectal surgery using the da Vinci® surgical system has been successfully introduced into clinical practice during recent years and provides specific technical advantages. Studies have shown that the robotic approach in colorectal surgery is safe and feasible with comparable results. It is associated with low conversion rates, more R0 situations for low rectal cancer with larger tumors and more neoadjuvant treatment compared to standard laparoscopy. Robot-assisted surgery is an attractive development of minimally invasive surgery and should also be further evaluated with mandatory monitoring of outcome parameters in registries in Germany. PMID:27334630

  19. [Prospect of transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal neoplasm].

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhanlong; Ye, Yingjiang; Xie, Qiwei; Jiang, Kewei; Wang, Shan

    2015-05-01

    Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) is a kind of minimally invasive surgery that local resection or total mesorectal excision for rectal neoplasm is performed through the use of multichannel port(single port) transanally. Compared to transanal endoscopic microsurgery(TEM) approach, TAMIS offers an alternative to TEM for rectal neoplasm, and shows the advantage of lower cost and shorter learning curve. TAMIS approach has been used not only in the local resection of rectal neoplasm but also in transanal total mesorectal excision (transanal TME), which is also called TAMIS-TME, in recent four years. The safety and efficacy of TAMIS approach has been shown in the currently published literatures. However, TAMIS approach has to wait for more evidence-based data with larger-scale and longer follow-up to get its validation. PMID:26013854

  20. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic sigmoid resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, Roberto; Lovvik, Kari; Marvik, Ronald

    2003-12-01

    Sigmoid resection is indicated in the treatment of complete rectal prolapse (CRP) in patients with prolonged colorectal transit time (CTT). Its use, however, has been limited because of fear of anastomotic leakage. This study challenges the current practice of dividing the mesorectum by prospectively evaluating the impact of sparing the superior rectal artery (SRA) on leak rates after laparoscopic sigmoid resection (LSR) for CRP. During a 30-month period, data on 33 selected patients with CRP were prospectively collected. Three patients were withdrawn from the analysis, as they had neither resection nor anastomosis. Twenty-nine women and 1 man (median age 55 range 21-83 years) underwent LSR with preservation of SRA for a median CRP of 8 (3-15) cm. There were 20 ASA I and 10 ASA II patients. Ten patients had undergone previous surgery. Four patients complained of dyschezia, whereas incontinence was present in 26 patients. Anal ultrasound showed isolated internal sphincter defects in 2 patients. Four young adults (21-32 years) had normal CTT, whereas 26 older patients had a median CTT of 5(4-6) days. Defecography demonstrated 10 enteroceles, two sigmoidoceles, and one rectal hernia through the levator ani muscle. Mortality was nil. Median operating room time was 180 (120-330) min, suprapubic incision length 5(3-7) cm, estimated blood loss 150 (50-500) mL, specimen length 20 (12-45) cm, solid food resumption 3(1-6) days, and length of stay 4.5(2-7) days. Thirty-day complications were not related to anastomosing and occurred in 20% of the patients. Median follow-up was 34.1 (18-48) months. One patient had a recurrence. Although the evidence provided by the present study suggests that sparing SRA has a favorable impact on anastomotic leak rates, these nonrandomized results need further evaluation. The division of the mesorectum at the rectosigmoid junction seems not necessary, and its sparing should therefore be considered as it may contain anastomotic leak rates. PMID

  1. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  2. Human Collagen Injections to Reduce Rectal Dose During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, William R.; Hosford, Charles C.; Schultz, Steven E.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. Methods: This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. Conclusions: The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities.

  3. Robotic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: An Update in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jung Myun; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, robotic surgery for rectal cancer has rapidly gained acceptance among colorectal surgeons worldwide, with well-established safety and feasibility. The lower conversion rate and better surgical specimen quality of robotic compared with laparoscopic surgery potentially improves survival. Earlier recovery of voiding and sexual function after robotic total mesorectal excision is another favorable outcome. Long-term survival data are sparse with no evidence that robotic surgery offers major benefits in oncological outcomes. Although initial reports are promising, more rigorous scientific evaluation in multicenter, randomized clinical trials should be performed to definitely determine the advantages of robotic rectal cancer surgery. PMID:26875201

  4. Minimally invasive surgery for rectal cancer: Are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Bradley J; Makhija, Rohit

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic colon surgery for select cancers is slowly evolving as the standard of care but minimally invasive approaches for rectal cancer have been viewed with significant skepticism. This procedure has been performed by select surgeons at specialized centers and concerns over local recurrence, sexual dysfunction and appropriate training measures have further hindered widespread acceptance. Data for laparoscopic rectal resection now supports its continued implementation and widespread usage by expeienced surgeons for select patients. The current controversies regarding technical approaches have created ambiguity amongst opinion leaders and are also addressed in this review. PMID:21412496

  5. Current Status of Minimally Invasive Surgery for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleshman, James

    2016-05-01

    Recent randomized controlled data have shown possible limitations to laparoscopic treatment of rectal cancer. The retrospective data, used as the basis for designing the trials, and which showed no problems with the technique, are discussed. The design of the randomized trials is discussed relative to the future meta-analysis of the recent data. The implications of the current findings on practice are discussed as surgeons try to adjust their practice to the new findings. The possible next steps for clinical and research innovations are put into perspective as new technology is considered to compensate for newly identified limitations in the laparoscopic treatment of rectal cancer. PMID:26831061

  6. Orbital metastasis as the inaugural presentation of occult rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cherif, Eya; Ben Hassine, Lamia; Azzabi, Samira; Khalfallah, Narjess

    2014-01-01

    Orbital metastasis is uncommon and occurs in 2–3% of patients with cancer. It is rarely the initial manifestation of a systemic malignancy. It usually indicates extensive haematogenous dissemination of a primary cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. Breast, lungs and prostate cancers are the most common primary cancers leading to orbital metastasis. However, orbital tumour revealing a rectal adenocarcinoma is exceptional. We describe a case of orbital tumour in a 67-year-old man with no history of systemic cancer while presenting with ophthalmic symptoms. Investigations revealed rectal adenocarcinoma as the primary malignant tumour. PMID:24481014

  7. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for incarcerated rectal prolapse (Altemeier’s procedure)

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Arslan, Ergin; Börekçi, Hasan; Aytekin, Faruk Önder; Külah, Bahadır; Banlı, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Perineal procedures have higher recurrence and lower mortality rates than abdominal alternatives for the treatment of rectal prolapse. Presence of incarceration and strangulation also influences treatment choice. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy is one of the treatment options in patients with incarceration and strangulation, with low mortality and acceptable recurrence rates. This operation can be performed especially to avoid general anesthesia in old patients with co-morbidities. We aimed to present perineal rectosigmoidectomy and diverting loop colostomy in a patient with neurological disability due to spinal trauma and incarcerated rectal prolapse. PMID:27528816

  8. Rectal foreign bodies: imaging assessment and medicolegal aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Antonio; Miele, Vittorio; Pinto, Fabio; Mizio, Veronica Di; Panico, Maria Rita; Muzj, Carlo; Romano, Luigia

    2015-02-01

    The amount of patients presenting at the emergency hospitals with retained rectal foreign bodies appears recently to have increased. Foreign objects retained in the rectum may result from direct introduction through the anus (more common) or from ingestion. Affected individuals often make ineffective attempts to extract the object themselves, resulting in additional delay of medical care and potentially increasing the risk of complications. The goals of radiological patient assessment are to identify the type of object retained, its location, and the presence of associated complications. Plain film radiographs still play an important role in the assessment of retained rectal foreign bodies. PMID:25639182

  9. Which Patients With Rectal Cancer Do Not Need Radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Joye, Ines; Haustermans, Karin

    2016-07-01

    According to current guidelines, the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer patients is preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Improvements in surgical techniques, imaging modalities, chemotherapy regimens, and radiotherapy delivery have reduced local recurrence rates to less than 10%. The current challenge in rectal cancer treatment lies in the prevention of distant metastases, which still occur in more than 25% of the patients. The decrease in local recurrence rates, the need for more effective systemic treatments, and the increased awareness of treatment-induced toxicity raise the question as to whether a more selective use of radiotherapy is advocated. PMID:27238471

  10. Rectal fist insertion. An unusual form of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Shook, L L; Whittle, R; Rose, E F

    1985-12-01

    Rectal fist insertion (fist fucking) is an uncommon and potentially dangerous sexual practice. This is usually a homosexual activity, but can also be a heterosexual or an autoerotic practice. One known death has been reported associated with rectal fist insertion, in which the complications of anal and colonic tears and bleeding had occurred (see Editor's note). The possibility of drug overdose is also probable, as drugs and alcohol are commonly introduced into the rectum to promote sphincter relaxation and to ease the discomfort of anal dilatation. PMID:4072987

  11. Surgical Correction of Rectal Prolapse in Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Mayu; Wilding, Laura A; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is a common clinical problem in laboratory mice. This condition may occur spontaneously, develop after genetic manipulations, result from infections with pathogens such as Citrobacter species, or arise secondary to experimental design such as colitis models. The current standard of care at our institution is limited to monitoring mice until tissue becomes ulcerated or necrotic; this strategy often leads to premature euthanasia of valuable animals prior to the study endpoint. Surgical correction of rectal prolapse is performed routinely and with minimal complications in larger species by using manual reduction with placement of a pursestring suture. In this report, we investigated whether the use of a pursestring suture was an effective treatment for mice with rectal prolapse. The procedure includes anesthetizing mice with isoflurane, manually reducing prolapsed tissue, and placing a pursestring suture of 4-0 polydioxanone. We have performed this procedure successfully in 12 mice. Complications included self-trauma, fecal impaction due to lack of defecation, and mutilation of the surgical site by cage mates. Singly housing mice for 7 d postoperatively, applying multimodal analgesia, and releasing the pursestring when indicated eliminated these complications. The surgical repair of rectal prolapses in mice is a minimally invasive procedure that resolves the clinical symptoms of affected animals and reduces the number of mice that are euthanized prematurely prior to the study endpoint. PMID:26442289

  12. Synchronous rectal adenocarcinoma and splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Srikumar, T; Markow, M; Centeno, B; Hoffe, S; Tao, J; Fernandez, H; Strosberg, J; Shibata, D

    2016-02-01

    Synchronous cancers of different primary origin are rare. Here, we describe the case of a patient with concomitant diagnoses of rectal adenocarcinoma and splenic marginal zone lymphoma (smzl). A 57-year-old woman initially presented with abdominal pain. Physical examination and computed tomography demonstrated massive splenomegaly, and a complete blood count revealed microcytic anemia and lymphopenia. During the subsequent evaluation, she presented with hematochezia, melena, and constipation, which prompted gastroenterology referral. Subsequent endoscopic rectal ultrasonography revealed a T3N1 moderately differentiated rectal adenocarcinoma, with computed tomography imaging of chest, abdomen, and pelvis confirming no metastasis. Thus, the cancer was classified as clinical stage T3N1M0, stage iii. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed co-existing marginal zone lymphoma, and with the clinical presentation of massive splenomegaly, a diagnosis of smzl was made. The patient's management was individually tailored for simultaneous optimal treatment of both conditions. Concurrent treatment with neoadjuvant rituximab and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy, with external-beam radiation therapy to the pelvis, was administered, followed by surgery consisting of en bloc splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy, and low anterior resection. The patient completed a standard course of adjuvant folfox (fluorouracil-leucovorin-oxaliplatin) chemotherapy and has remained disease-free for 7 years. To our knowledge, this report is the first to specifically describe simultaneous diagnoses of locally advanced rectal cancer and smzl. We also describe the successful combined neoadjuvant treatment combination of 5-fluorouracil, rituximab, and pelvic radiation. PMID:26966416

  13. Surgical Correction of Rectal Prolapse in Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    Uchihashi, Mayu; Wilding, Laura A; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-01-01

    Rectal prolapse is a common clinical problem in laboratory mice. This condition may occur spontaneously, develop after genetic manipulations, result from infections with pathogens such as Citrobacter species, or arise secondary to experimental design such as colitis models. The current standard of care at our institution is limited to monitoring mice until tissue becomes ulcerated or necrotic; this strategy often leads to premature euthanasia of valuable animals prior to the study endpoint. Surgical correction of rectal prolapse is performed routinely and with minimal complications in larger species by using manual reduction with placement of a pursestring suture. In this report, we investigated whether the use of a pursestring suture was an effective treatment for mice with rectal prolapse. The procedure includes anesthetizing mice with isoflurane, manually reducing prolapsed tissue, and placing a pursestring suture of 4-0 polydioxanone. We have performed this procedure successfully in 12 mice. Complications included self-trauma, fecal impaction due to lack of defecation, and mutilation of the surgical site by cage mates. Singly housing mice for 7 d postoperatively, applying multimodal analgesia, and releasing the pursestring when indicated eliminated these complications. The surgical repair of rectal prolapses in mice is a minimally invasive procedure that resolves the clinical symptoms of affected animals and reduces the number of mice that are euthanized prematurely prior to the study endpoint. PMID:26442289

  14. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome in children: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Malekpour, Abdorrasoul; Haghighat, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a benign and chronic disorder well known in young adults and less in children. It is often related to prolonged excessive straining or abnormal defecation and clinically presents as rectal bleeding, copious mucus discharge, feeling of incomplete defecation, and rarely rectal prolapse. SRUS is diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and endoscopic and histological findings. The current treatments are suboptimal, and despite correct diagnosis, outcomes can be unsatisfactory. Some treatment protocols for SRUS include conservative management such as family reassurance, regulation of toilet habits, avoidance of straining, encouragement of a high-fiber diet, topical treatments with salicylate, sulfasalazine, steroids and sucralfate, and surgery. In children, SRUS is relatively uncommon but troublesome and easily misdiagnosed with other common diseases, however, it is being reported more than in the past. This condition in children is benign; however, morbidity is an important problem as reflected by persistence of symptoms, especially rectal bleeding. In this review, we discuss current diagnosis and treatment for SRUS. PMID:23236227

  15. Rectal Foreign Bodies: What Is the Current Standard?

    PubMed Central

    Cologne, Kyle G.; Ault, Glenn T.

    2012-01-01

    Rectal foreign bodies represent a challenging and unique field of colorectal trauma. The approach includes a careful history and physical examination, a high index of suspicion for any evidence of perforation, a creative approach to nonoperative removal, and appropriate short-term follow-up to detect any delayed perforation. PMID:24294123

  16. Visual diagnosis: Rectal foreign body: A primer for emergency physicians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present a case that is occasionally seen within emergency departments, namely a rectal foreign body. After presentation of the case, a discussion concerning this entity is given, with practical information on necessity of an accurate and thorough history and removal of the object for clinicians. PMID:22152071

  17. Genomic evaluation of rectal temperature in Holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress negatively impacts the production, fertility, and health of dairy cattle. Rectal temperature (RT) has unfavorable genetic correlations with production, longevity, economic merit, and somatic cell score in Holstein cows. The objectives of the current study were to perform a genome-wide as...

  18. Priapism secondary to penile metastasis of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Chan; Lee, Wook Hyun; Kang, Min Kyu; Park, Suk Young

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic penile carcinoma is rare and usually originates from genitourinary tumors. The presenting symptoms or signs have been described as nonspecific except for priapism. Rectal adenocarcinoma is a very unusual source of metastatic penile carcinoma. We report a case of metastatic penile carcinoma that originated from the rectum. Symptomatic improvement occurred with palliative radiotherapy. PMID:19725161

  19. Synchronous rectal adenocarcinoma and splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Srikumar, T.; Markow, M.; Centeno, B.; Hoffe, S.; Tao, J.; Fernandez, H.; Strosberg, J.; Shibata, D.

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous cancers of different primary origin are rare. Here, we describe the case of a patient with concomitant diagnoses of rectal adenocarcinoma and splenic marginal zone lymphoma (smzl). A 57-year-old woman initially presented with abdominal pain. Physical examination and computed tomography demonstrated massive splenomegaly, and a complete blood count revealed microcytic anemia and lymphopenia. During the subsequent evaluation, she presented with hematochezia, melena, and constipation, which prompted gastroenterology referral. Subsequent endoscopic rectal ultrasonography revealed a T3N1 moderately differentiated rectal adenocarcinoma, with computed tomography imaging of chest, abdomen, and pelvis confirming no metastasis. Thus, the cancer was classified as clinical stage T3N1M0, stage iii. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed co-existing marginal zone lymphoma, and with the clinical presentation of massive splenomegaly, a diagnosis of smzl was made. The patient’s management was individually tailored for simultaneous optimal treatment of both conditions. Concurrent treatment with neoadjuvant rituximab and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy, with external-beam radiation therapy to the pelvis, was administered, followed by surgery consisting of en bloc splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy, and low anterior resection. The patient completed a standard course of adjuvant folfox (fluorouracil–leucovorin–oxaliplatin) chemotherapy and has remained disease-free for 7 years. To our knowledge, this report is the first to specifically describe simultaneous diagnoses of locally advanced rectal cancer and smzl. We also describe the successful combined neoadjuvant treatment combination of 5-fluorouracil, rituximab, and pelvic radiation. PMID:26966416

  20. Ruptured rectal duplication with urogenital abnormality: Unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Rectal duplication (RD) accounts for 5% of alimentary tract duplication. A varied presentation and associated anomalies have been described in the literature. Antenatal rupture of the RD is very rare. We present an unusual case of a ruptured RD associated with urogenital abnormalities in newborn male. We are discussing diagnosis, embryology, management and literature review of ruptured RD. PMID:25552833

  1. TAMIS for rectal tumors: advancements of a new approach.

    PubMed

    Rega, Daniela; Pace, Ugo; Niglio, Antonello; Scala, Dario; Sassaroli, Cinzia; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    TAMIS allows transanal excision of rectal lesions by the means of a single-incision access port and traditional laparoscopic instruments. This technique represents a promising treatment of rectal neoplasms since it guarantees precise dissection and reproducible approaches. From May 2010 to September 2015, we performed excisions of rectal lesions in 55 patients using a SILS port. The pre-operative diagnosis was 26 tumours, 26 low and high grade displasias and 3 other benign neoplasias. 11 patients had a neoadjuvant treatment. Pneumorectum was established at a pressure of 15-20 mmHg CO2 with continuous insufflation, and ordinary laparoscopic instruments were used to perform full thickness resection of rectal neoplasm with a conventional 5-mm 30° laparoscopic camera. The average operative time was 78 min. Postoperative recovery was uneventful in 53 cases: in one case a Hartmann procedure was necessary at two postoperative days due to an intraoperative intraperitoneal perforation; in another case, a diverting colostomy was required at the five postoperative days due to an intraoperative perforation of the vaginal wall. Unclear resection margins were detected in six patients: thereafter five patients underwent radical surgery; the other patient was unfit for radical surgery, but is actually alive and well. Patients were discharged after a median of 3 days. Transanal minimally invasive surgery is an advanced transanal platform that provides a safe and effective method for low rectal tumors. The feasibility of TAMIS also for malignant lesions treated in a neoadjuvant setting could be cautiously evaluated in the future. PMID:27052544

  2. Factors affecting rectal temperature measurement using commonly available digital thermometers.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jonathan M; Streeter, Renee M; Torgerson, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Rectal temperature measurement is an essential part of physical examination of cattle and some physiological experiments. Modern digital thermometers are often used to measure rectal temperatures by students; this study describes their reliability and appropriate use. Students measured rectal temperature on 53 occasions using their personal digital thermometer and techniques gained from previous instruction, rectal temperature was also measured by an experienced person using a Cornell mercury thermometer completely inserted in the rectum. Cornell mercury thermometers values were 38.95±0.05°C (mean±1 SE, n=53). Student rectal temperature measurements using their initial technique were nearly 0.5°C lower, 38.46±0.07°C. After receiving instruction to insert the digital thermometer to the window, student obtained values were 38.77±0.06°C; these are significantly higher than with the student's initial technique and closer to those obtained with a Cornell thermometer. In a series of 53 water bath tests, student owned thermometers recorded similar mean values to those of a traceable (reference) digital thermometer, Cornell mercury thermometer readings were 0.2°C higher. 10 individual digital thermometers were repeatedly tested against a traceable thermometer in a water bath, one was inaccurate. In a separate experiment a trained clinician tested the effect of angle of insertion of a digital thermometer on temperature readings and the affect was <0.1°C. We conclude that accurate temperature measurements using digital thermometers are only likely if the thermometer is inserted to the beginning of the window and the thermometer's accuracy is checked periodically. PMID:21147490

  3. The Meanings of Astronomical Observation: An Analysis on the Basis of Relationship with Knowledge. (Spanish Title: Los Sentidos de la Observación Astronómica: un Análisis sobre la Base de la Relación con el Saber.) Os Sentidos da Observação Astronômica: Uma Análise com Base na Relação com o Saber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Alberto Eduardo; de Mello Arruda, Sergio; Meneghello Passos, Marinez; Vinicius Domenes Zapparoli, Ferdinando

    2010-12-01

    This article presents results of a research which aimed to understand the meanings that people construct for astronomical observation. The subjects, students and school teachers, initially received some instruction on how to view astronomical objects through the telescope. After the observation was realized, they were interviewed. The data analysis allowed the creation of 12 categories, later interpreted on the basis of relationship with knowledge (relation to the world, with himself and with others), as presented by Bernard Charlot. Este artículo presenta los resultados de una investigación que tuvo como objetivo comprender los sentidos que las personas construyen para la observación astronómica. Los sujetos, los estudiantes y maestros de escuela, recibieron inicialmente algunas instrucciones sobre cómo ver los objetos astronómicos a través del telescopio. Al término de la observación, fueron entrevistados. El análisis de datos permitió la creación de 12 categorías que más tarde fueron interpretadas sobre la base de la relación con el conocimiento (relación con el mundo, consigo mismo y con los demás), tal como presentado por Bernard Charlot. Este artigo apresenta resultados de uma pesquisa que objetivou entender quais os sentidos que as pessoas constroem para a observação astronômica. Os sujeitos da pesquisa, estudantes e professores do ensino médio, receberam inicialmente alguma instrução sobre como visualizar os objetos astronômicos através do telescópio. Após a realização da observação, eles foram entrevistados. A análise dos dados permitiu a elaboração de 12 categorias que foram posteriormente interpretadas com base nas relações com o saber (relação com o mundo, consigo mesmo e com o outro), conforme apresentadas por Bernard Charlot.

  4. The slippery slope: Lubricant Use and Rectal Sexually Transmitted Infections: a newly identified risk

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Pamina M.; Weiss, Robert E.; Fuchs, Edward; Jeffries, Robin A.; Hezerah, Marjan; Brown, Stephen; Voskanian, Alen; Robbie, Edward; Anton, Peter; Cranston, Ross D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of lubricant products is extremely common during receptive anal intercourse (RAI) yet has not been assessed as a risk for acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Methods From 2006–2008 a rectal health and behavior study was conducted in Baltimore and Los Angeles as part of the UCLA Microbicide Development Program (NIAID IPCP# #0606414). Participants completed questionnaires and rectal swabs were tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis with the Aptima Combo 2 assay and blood was tested for syphilis (for RPR and TPHA with titer) and HIV. Of those reporting lubricant use and RAI, STI results were available for 380 participants. Univariate and multivariate regressions assessed associations of lubricant use in the past month during RAI with prevalent STIs. Results Consistent lubricant use during RAI in the past month was reported by 36% (137/380) of participants. Consistent past month lubricant users had a higher prevalence of STI than inconsistent users (9.5% vs. 2.9%; p=0.006). In a multivariable logistic regression model testing positive for STI was associated with consistent use of lubricant during RAI in the past month (adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 2.98 (95%CI 1.09, 8.15) after controlling for age, gender, study location, HIV status, and numbers of RAI partners in the past month. Conclusions Findings suggest some lubricant products may increase vulnerability to STIs. Because of wide use of lubricants and their potential as carrier vehicles for microbicides, further research is essential to clarify if lubricant use poses a public health risk. PMID:22183849

  5. Morphology of the middle rectal arteries. A study of 30 cadaveric dissections.

    PubMed

    DiDio, L J; Diaz-Franco, C; Schemainda, R; Bezerra, A J

    1986-01-01

    The middle rectal arteries were studied in 30 cadavers of adult and older individuals (29 Caucasians and one Negro) of both sexes (15 males and 15 females). The middle rectal artery was present in 56.7% of the cases, bilaterally (36.7%) or unilaterally (20%), originating from the internal pudendal (40%), inferior gluteal (26.7%), internal iliac (16.8%), and less frequently from other pelvic branches. The average external diameter of the middle rectal artery was found to be 1.7 mm, its average length about 7 cm, and the point of penetration in the rectal wall about 6 cm (average) superior to the anus. The most frequent sites of the rectal wall pierced by the middle rectal arteries were the anterior (50% of the cases) and posterior (45%) quadrants of the rectum, whether isolated or combined (43.3%). These anatomical features justify, when needed and possible, the preservation of the middle rectal artery in surgical interventions on related organs. The term middle rectal arteries in Nomina Anatomica should be changed to inferior rectal arteries and indented under internal pudendal artery; the current term inferior rectal arteries should be changed to anal arteries to follow the already adopted division of the terminal intestine into rectum and anal canal. PMID:3107146

  6. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status. PMID:27097629

  7. Rectal toxicity profile after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy: Use of a comprehensive toxicity scoring system and identification of rectal dosimetric toxicity predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jinesh N.; Ennis, Ronald D. . E-mail: rennis@chpnet.org

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To better understand rectal toxicity after prostate brachytherapy, we employed the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0), a comprehensive system with distinct and separately reported gastrointestinal adverse event items (unlike Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring), to evaluate item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 135 patients treated with brachytherapy {+-} hormonal therapy, using CTCAE v3.0 to score acute/late rectal toxicities (median follow-up, 41 months). Dosimetric parameters were evaluated for ability to predict toxicities. Results: Use of CTCAE yielded a novel rectal toxicity profile consisting of diarrhea, incontinence, urgency, proctitis, pain, spasms, and hemorrhage event rates. No item had a <5% Grade 1-2 acute toxicity rate (except spasms). Rectal dosimetry predicted late toxicities: for diarrhea, 5% Grade 1 toxicity rate for %V{sub 25} (percent of rectal volume receiving 25% of prescribed prostate dose) {<=} 25% vs. 60% for %V{sub 25} > 25% (p < 0.001); for maximum toxicity, 10% Grade 1 toxicity rate for %V{sub 1} {<=} 40% vs. 44% for %V{sub 1} > 40% (p = 0.007). Conclusions: A comprehensive understanding of item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities was obtained using CTCAE. Rectal %V{sub 25} > 25% and %V{sub 1} > 40% predicted worse late diarrhea and maximum toxicity, respectively.

  8. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yasuyuki Kariya, Shuji Nakatani, Miyuki Yoshida, Rie Kono, Yumiko Kan, Naoki Ueno, Yutaka Komemushi, Atsushi Tanigawa, Noboru

    2015-10-15

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization.

  9. Anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh for rectal prolapse and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Sainio, A P; Halme, L E; Husa, A I

    1991-10-01

    Seventeen selected patients (mean age, 74 years)--14 with rectal prolapse and 3 with persisting anal incontinence after previous operations--underwent high anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh. There was no operative mortality. Prolapse recurred in 2 (15 percent) of the 13 patients followed up for 6 months or more (mean, 3.5 years). Three (27 percent) of the 11 patients with associated anal incontinence improved functionally, as did the three operated on for persisting incontinence, but only one patient regained normal continence. No breakage, cutting out, or infection related to the mesh was observed. Because of the risk of fecal impaction encountered in three of our patients, the procedure is not advocated for severely constipated patients. Despite the somewhat disappointing results regarding restoration of continence, we find this method useful in patients with rectal prolapse who are unfit for more extensive surgery, in controlling the prolapse to an acceptable degree. PMID:1914725

  10. Fatal rectal perforation following boar-to-boar mounting.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, R; Philipp, U; Buck, B C; Distl, O; Beineke, A

    2012-11-01

    Although abnormal sexual behavior, including boar-to-boar mounting with anal penetration, is recognized in pubescent pigs, reports of the pathologic consequences are scarce. A 7-month-old male minipig, housed with age-matched males, died within 1 day of the onset of lethargy and reluctance to rise. At necropsy, 2 rectal tears were identified as the cause for fibrinous peritonitis, and spermatozoa were identified in the pelvic and peritoneal cavity by light and transmission electron microscopy. According to DNA typing results, using 11 porcine microsatellites, the intraperitoneal semen was from at least 2 pen mates. The prohibition of castration of fattening pigs, implemented or planned in multiple European countries, could increase the risk of rectal perforation in co-housed pigs. PMID:22390881

  11. Wild Banana Seed Phytobezoar Rectal Impaction Causing Intestinal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chai, Feng Yih; Heng, Sophia Si Ling; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Adila, Irene Nur Ibrahim; Tan, Yew Eng; Chong, Hock Chin

    2016-08-01

    Wild banana (Musa acuminata subsp. microcarpa) seed phytobezoar rectal impaction in adult is a rare entity. Here, we report a 75-year-old male with dementia who presented with lower abdominal pain, per-rectal bleeding and overflow faecal incontinence. Our investigation discovered a large wild banana seed phytobezoar impacted in the rectum causing intestinal obstruction, stercoral ulcer and faecal overflow incontinence. In this article, we discuss the patient's clinical findings, imaging and management. The culprit plant was identified and depicted. This may be the first report of its kind. Public consumption of these wild bananas should be curtailed. It is hoped that this report would increase the awareness of such condition and its identification. PMID:27574355

  12. [Novel techniques in the treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Rautio, Tero; Kairaluoma, Matti; Sand, Juhani

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the eighth and tenth most common kind of cancer in men and women, respectively, with an increasing frequency of occurrence. Together with cancer of the large intestine it forms the third most common cancer entity. Surgical therapy is the most important form of treatment of rectal cancer; in combination with adjuvant therapy it will cure a significant proportion of the patients and provide relief for tumor-induced hemorrhagic and obstructive symptoms. The operation has usually been conducted as an open surgery with the use of simple instruments. In recent times, the operative techniques have become more versatile, and mini-invasive techniques have resulted in quicker recovery of the patients from the operation. PMID:27483632

  13. Rectal drug administration in adults: how, when, why.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael

    Administering medication per rectum can be the most appropriate route for some patients may not always be considered by health professionals. Cultural sensitivities, as well as misinformation regarding insertion methods, may be barriers to the practice. This article explains how the rectal route functions in drug absorption, clarifies when this route is appropriate to use and outlines the steps nurses should follow to prepare patients adequately and safely to carry out the procedure. PMID:27071237

  14. Novel chronotherapeutic rectal aminophylline delivery system for therapy of asthma.

    PubMed

    Shiohira, Hideo; Fujii, Makiko; Koizumi, Naoya; Kondoh, Masuo; Watanabe, Yoshiteru

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new chronotherapeutic pharmaceutical preparation as a sustained-release suppository for prevention and therapeutic use against bronchial asthma in the early morning. Sustained-release hollow-type (SR-HT) suppositories using sodium alginate (Alg-Na), sodium polyacrylate (PANa) or polyacrylate-PANa co-polymer (PA-PANa) as gelling polymers (gel agent) were prepared and pharmaceutical characteristics of these suppositories were investigated. Type A SR-HT suppositories comprised a suppository shell prepared with oleaginous base and containing aminophylline only or aminophylline with Alg-Na or PANa in the cavity (hollow space). Type B SR-HT suppositories comprised a suppository shell prepared with oleaginous base and gel agent (30%), with aminophylline in the hollow space. In drug-release studies, the acrylate polymer-containing suppositories showed linearity of delayed release rate, providing significantly decreased the highest concentration of theophylline in plasma (C(max)) and delayed the time required to reach C(max) (t(max)) and the mean residence time (MRT) after rectal administrated in rabbits. In particular, suppositories containing PA-PANa maintained significantly higher theophylline concentrations than control suppositories at 12h after rectal administration. Furthermore, histopathological examination indicated that these suppositories using acrylate polymers did not result in rectal lesions. The SR-HT suppository, particularly using PA-PANa as a gel agent, may thus be useful against nocturnal symptoms of asthma. In this study, we confirmed new formulation of sustained-release suppository for chronotherapy of theophylline using oily base material in combination with polymer such as PA-PANa. The hollow-type suppository containing oleaginous base and hydrophilic polymer in the shell could be useful device for rectal administration of various drugs with prolongation of plasma concentration. PMID:19555748

  15. Efficacy of rectal misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mirteimouri, Masoumeh; Tara, Fatemeh; Teimouri, Batool; Sakhavar, Nahid; Vaezi, Afsaneh

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality after delivery. Active management of postpartum hemorrhage by an uterotonic drug decreases the rate of postpartum hemorrhage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of rectal misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. This double blind randomized clinical trial was performed on full term pregnant women candidate for vaginal delivery, referred to Zahedan Imam Ali Hospital during 2008-2009. They were randomly divided into two groups of rectal misoprostol and oxytocin. The women in misoprostol group received 400 μg rectal misoprostol after delivery and the women in oxytocin group received 3 IU oxytocin in 1 L ringer serum, intravenously. Rate of bleeding, need to any surgery interventions, rate of transfusion and changes in hemoglobin and hematocrite were compared between two groups. A total of 400 patients (200 cases in misoprostol group and 200 in oxytocin group) entered to the study. Rate of bleeding > 500 cc was significantly higher in oxytocin group than misoprostol group (33% vs. 19%) (p = 0.005). Also, need to excessive oxytocin for management of postpartum hemorrhage was significantly lower in misoprostol group than oxytocin group (18% vs. 30%) (p = 0.003). Decrease in hematocrite was significantly more observed in oxytocin group than misoprostol group (mean decrease of hematocrite was 1.3 ± 1.6 in misoprostol group and 1.6 ± 2.2 in oxytocin group). Two groups were similar in terms of side-effects. Rectal misoprostol as an uterotonic drug can decrease postpartum hemorrhage and also can prevent from decrease of hemoglobin as compared to oxytocin. PMID:24250623

  16. Palpable Penile Metastases: A Bizarre Presentation of Rectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cholin, Liza; Perz, Sarah; Mahmood, Furman; Zafar, Saleem

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis to the penis is an uncommon occurrence, with only about 370 cases reported in the literature to date. The majority of the primary tumors are genitourinary in origin. We report on a patient with undiagnosed disseminated rectal adenocarcinoma, who first presented with lesions of the corporal bodies. A review of the literature indicates that corporeal metastasis as an initial presentation of malignancy is an extremely rare occurrence and carries a very poor prognosis. PMID:26435874

  17. Comparison of Digital Rectal and Microchip Transponder Thermometry in Ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Branden M; Brunell, Marla K; Olsen, Cara H; Bentzel, David E

    2016-01-01

    Body temperature is a common physiologic parameter measured in both clinical and research settings, with rectal thermometry being implied as the 'gold standard.' However, rectal thermometry usually requires physical or chemical restraint, potentially causing falsely elevated readings due to animal stress. A less stressful method may eliminate this confounding variable. The current study compared 2 types of digital rectal thermometers-a calibrated digital thermometer and a common digital thermometer-with an implantable subcutaneous transponder microchip. Microchips were implanted subcutaneously between the shoulder blades of 16 ferrets (8 male, 8 female), and temperatures were measured twice from the microchip reader and once from each of the rectal thermometers. Results demonstrated the microchip temperature readings had very good to good correlation and agreement to those from both of the rectal thermometers. This study indicates that implantable temperature-sensing microchips are a reliable alternative to rectal thermometry for monitoring body temperature in ferrets. PMID:27177569

  18. Advances and Challenges in Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Joshua; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer have occurred over the past 30 years. Advances in surgical pathology, refinements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, new imaging modalities, and the widespread use of neoadjuvant therapy have all contributed to these improvements. Several questions emerge as we learn of the benefits or lack thereof for components of the current multimodality treatment in subgroups of patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). What is the optimal surgical technique for distal rectal cancers? Do all patients need postoperative chemotherapy? Do all patients need radiation? Do all patients need surgery, or is a nonoperative, organ-preserving approach warranted in selected patients? Answering these questions will lead to more precise treatment regimens, based on patient and tumor characteristics, that will improve outcomes while preserving quality of life. However, the idea of shifting the treatment paradigm (chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant therapy) currently applied to all patients with LARC to a more individually tailored approach is controversial. The paradigm shift toward organ preservation in highly selected patients whose tumors demonstrate clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment is also controversial. Herein, we highlight many of the advances and resultant controversies that are likely to dominate the research agenda for LARC in the modern era. PMID:25918296

  19. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  20. Rectal Swabs for Analysis of the Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Budding, Andries E.; Grasman, Matthijs E.; Eck, Anat; Bogaards, Johannes A.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the gut microbiota is associated with various disease states, most notably inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and malnutrition. This underlines that analysis of intestinal microbiota is potentially an interesting target for clinical diagnostics. Currently, the most commonly used sample types are feces and mucosal biopsy specimens. Because sampling method, storage and processing of samples impact microbiota analysis, each sample type has its own limitations. An ideal sample type for use in routine diagnostics should be easy to obtain in a standardized fashion without perturbation of the microbiota. Rectal swabs may satisfy these criteria, but little is known about microbiota analysis on these sample types. In this study we investigated the characteristics and applicability of rectal swabs for gut microbiota profiling in a clinical routine setting in patients presenting with various gastro-intestinal disorders. We found that rectal swabs appeared to be a convenient means of sampling the human gut microbiota. Swabs can be performed on demand, whenever a patient presents; swab-derived microbiota profiles are reproducible, whether they are gathered at home by patients or by medical professionals in an outpatient setting and may be ideally suited for clinical diagnostics and large-scale studies. PMID:25020051

  1. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic vs open rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Winson Jianhong; Chew, Min Hoe; Dharmawan, Angela Renayanti; Singh, Manraj; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Loi, Carol Tien Tau; Tang, Choong Leong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term clinical and oncological outcomes of laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR) and the impact of conversion in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: An analysis was performed on a prospective database of 633 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection. Patients were compared in three groups: Open surgery (OP), laparoscopic surgery, and converted laparoscopic surgery. Short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and survival analysis were compared. RESULTS: Among 633 patients studied, 200 patients had successful laparoscopic resections with a conversion rate of 11.1% (25 out of 225). Factors predictive of survival on univariate analysis include the laparoscopic approach (P = 0.016), together with factors such as age, ASA status, stage of disease, tumor grade, presence of perineural invasion and vascular emboli, circumferential resection margin < 2 mm, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. The survival benefit of laparoscopic surgery was no longer significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.148). Neither 5-year overall survival (70.5% vs 61.8%, P = 0.217) nor 5-year cancer free survival (64.3% vs 66.6%, P = 0.854) were significantly different between the laparoscopic group and the converted group. CONCLUSION: LRR has equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes when compared to OP. Laparoscopic conversion does not confer a worse prognosis. PMID:27358678

  2. Estudio muestra importancia de conversaciones tempranas sobre el cuidado en etapa final de la vida

    Cancer.gov

    Artículo sobre la importancia de hablar en forma temprana sobre el cuidado paliativo para asegurar que la atención prestada en la etapa final de la vida sea más acorde con las preferencias de los pacientes.

  3. Embolization of Rectal Arteries: An Alternative Treatment for Hemorrhagic Shock Induced by Traumatic Intrarectal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, Nicolas E-mail: nicolas.pichon@chu-limoges.fr; Francois, Bruno; Pichon-Lefievre, Florence; Mathonnet, Murielle; Maubon, Antoine; Vignon, Philippe

    2005-05-15

    Rectal injuries caused by foreign bodies or iatrogenic insertions may lead to severe complications whose therapeutic management remains controversial. At times, both the rapid identification and treatment of subsequent active rectal bleeding may be challenging, especially when endoscopy fails to locate and control the arterial hemorrhage. We present the first two successful cases of middle rectal artery embolization in patients presenting with sustained bleeding and hemorrhagic shock.

  4. Rectal corticosteroids versus alternative treatments in ulcerative colitis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, J K; Irvine, E J

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clear strategies to optimise the use of corticosteroids in ulcerative colitis are lacking. AIM: A meta-analysis was undertaken to examine critically the role of rectal corticosteroids in the management of active distal ulcerative colitis. METHODS: All reported randomised controlled trials were retrieved by searching the Medline and EMBASE databases and the bibliographies of relevant studies. Trials which met inclusion criteria were assessed for scientific rigour. Data were extracted by two independent observers according to predetermined criteria. RESULTS: Of 83 trials retrieved, 33 met inclusion criteria. Pooled odds ratios (POR) showed conventional rectal corticosteroids and rectal budesonide to be clearly superior to placebo. In seven trials, rectal 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) was significantly better than conventional rectal corticosteroids for inducing remission of symptoms, endoscopy, and histology with POR of 2.42 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.72-3.41), 1.89 (95% CI 1.29-2.76), and 2.03 (95% CI 1.28-3.20), respectively. Rectal budesonide was of comparable efficacy to conventional corticosteroids but produced less endogenous cortisol suppression. Side effects, although inconsistently reported, were generally minor. A cost comparison of rectal preparations showed 5-ASA to be less expensive than corticosteroids. CONCLUSIONS: Rectal 5-ASA is superior to rectal corticosteroids in the management of distal ulcerative colitis. PMID:9245932

  5. Rectal Lymphogranuloma Venereum in HIV-infected Patients Can Mimic Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Crickx, Etienne; Meignin, Véronique; Gérard, Laurence; Plantier-Colcher, Isabelle; Walker-Combrouze, Francine; Boutboul, David; Galicier, Lionel; Fieschi, Claire; Oksenhendler, Eric

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of rectal lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) has been reported since 2003 in men who have sex with men, most of them being infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In these patients, unusual clinical presentations such as rectal tumor or intense lymphoproliferation on rectal biopsies may lead to an erroneous diagnosis of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Three patients were referred to our center for the management of rectal B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma on the basis of a rectal pathologic specimen showing intense lymphoproliferation, the very suspect of lymphoma. Because of anamnesis of anal intercourses and venereal diseases, additional study revealed that all 3 had a positive Chlamydia trachomatis polymerase chain reaction on the rectal biopsy specimen. Rectal LGV was therefore considered and successfully treated with antibiotics. We propose that all patients presenting with a suspected rectal lymphoma should have a careful anamnesis of sexual behavior and a specific detection of C. trachomatis using polymerase chain reaction analysis on biopsy specimen to rule out the possibility of rectal LGV. PMID:26166139

  6. Which endoscopic treatment is the best for small rectal carcinoid tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Kim, Jin Su; Cheung, Dae Young; Cho, Young-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of rectal carcinoids is rising because of the widespread use of screening colonoscopy. Rectal carcinoids detected incidentally are usually in earlier stages at diagnosis. Rectal carcinoids estimated endoscopically as < 10 mm in diameter without atypical features and confined to the submucosal layer can be removed endoscopically. Here, we review the efficacy and safety of various endoscopic treatments for small rectal carcinoid tumors, including conventional polypectomy, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), cap-assisted EMR (or aspiration lumpectomy), endoscopic submucosal resection with ligating device, endoscopic submucosal dissection, and transanal endoscopic microsurgery. It is necessary to carefully choose an effective and safe primary resection method for complete histological resection. PMID:24147192

  7. Correlation of Chromosomal Instability, Telomere Length and Telomere Maintenance in Microsatellite Stable Rectal Cancer: A Molecular Subclass of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Lisa A.; Johnson, Ruth A.; Viker, Kimberly B.; Hafner, Kari A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Litzelman, Kristin; Seo, Songwon; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Engelman, Corinne D.; Rider, David N.; Vanderboom, Russell J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Skinner, Halcyon G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer (CRC) tumor DNA is characterized by chromosomal damage termed chromosomal instability (CIN) and excessively shortened telomeres. Up to 80% of CRC is microsatellite stable (MSS) and is historically considered to be chromosomally unstable (CIN+). However, tumor phenotyping depicts some MSS CRC with little or no genetic changes, thus being chromosomally stable (CIN-). MSS CIN- tumors have not been assessed for telomere attrition. Experimental Design MSS rectal cancers from patients ≤50 years old with Stage II (B2 or higher) or Stage III disease were assessed for CIN, telomere length and telomere maintenance mechanism (telomerase activation [TA]; alternative lengthening of telomeres [ALT]). Relative telomere length was measured by qPCR in somatic epithelial and cancer DNA. TA was measured with the TRAPeze assay, and tumors were evaluated for the presence of C-circles indicative of ALT. p53 mutation status was assessed in all available samples. DNA copy number changes were evaluated with Spectral Genomics aCGH. Results Tumors were classified as chromosomally stable (CIN-) and chromosomally instable (CIN+) by degree of DNA copy number changes. CIN- tumors (35%; n=6) had fewer copy number changes (<17% of their clones with DNA copy number changes) than CIN+ tumors (65%; n=13) which had high levels of copy number changes in 20% to 49% of clones. Telomere lengths were longer in CIN- compared to CIN+ tumors (p=0.0066) and in those in which telomerase was not activated (p=0.004). Tumors exhibiting activation of telomerase had shorter tumor telomeres (p=0.0040); and tended to be CIN+ (p=0.0949). Conclusions MSS rectal cancer appears to represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that may be categorized both on the basis of CIN status and telomere maintenance mechanism. MSS CIN- rectal cancers appear to have longer telomeres than those of MSS CIN+ rectal cancers and to utilize ALT rather than activation of telomerase. PMID:24278232

  8. In vivo trans-rectal ultrasound coupled trans-rectal near-infrared optical tomography of canine prostate bearing transmissible venereal tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Holyoak, G. Reed; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Xu, Guan; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Piao, Daqing

    2009-02-01

    In vivo trans-rectal near-infrared (NIR) optical tomography is conducted on a tumor-bearing canine prostate with the assistance of trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS). The canine prostate tumor model is made possible by a unique round cell neoplasm of dogs, transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) that can be transferred from dog to dog regardless of histocompatibility. A characterized TVT cell line was homogenized and passed twice in subcutaneous tissue of NOD/SCID mice. Following the second passage, the tumor was recovered, homogenized and then inoculated by ultrasound guidance into the prostate gland of a healthy dog. The dog was then imaged with a combined trans-rectal NIR and TRUS imager using an integrated trans-rectal NIR/US applicator. The image was taken by NIR and US modalities concurrently, both in sagittal view. The trans-rectal NIR imager is a continuous-wave system that illuminates 7 source channels sequentially by a fiber switch to deliver sufficient light power to the relatively more absorbing prostate tissue and samples 7 detection channels simultaneously by a gated intensified high-resolution CCD camera. This work tests the feasibility of detecting prostate tumor by trans-rectal NIR optical tomography and the benefit of augmenting TRUS with trans-rectal NIR imaging.

  9. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Park, H; Lee, J; Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T; Lee, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  10. Secondary Cancers After Radiation Therapy for Primary Prostate or Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yen-Chien; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Li, Chung-Yi; Chuang, Jen-Pin; Lee, Jenq-Chang

    2016-04-01

    Literature about the risk of secondary cancer after radiation therapy (RT) of prostate and rectal cancer reveals contradictory results. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine whether the RT induces secondary rectal or prostate cancer in patients, respectively, with prostate or rectal cancer. All studies published in Medline or Pubmed up to March 3, 2015, containing RT of primary rectal or prostate cancer, and providing risk estimates of secondary prostate or rectal cancer were considered as eligible. Relative risk (RR) and standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated using the random-effects model. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. 12 of them were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. For prostate cancer patients, pooled adjusted RRs or SIRs did not show an effect on the risk of secondary rectal cancer. However, notwithstanding the limitations of SEER-based studies, the subgroup of prostate cancer patients receiving external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) showed an increased risk of rectal cancer. For rectal cancer patients, pooled adjusted RR of prostate cancer was 1.12 (95 % CI, 0.44-2.8) and SIR was 0.40 (95 % CI, 0.29-0.55). All studies included in the SIR analysis of rectal cancer were derived from the SEER data source. Based on current evidence, RT for prostate cancer patients had no effect on rectal cancer incidence, except for patients who received EBRT therapy. However, compared with the general population, RT for rectal cancer is associated with a decreased prostate cancer risk as found in SEER-based studies. PMID:26711638

  11. Rectal sensorimotor dysfunction in patients with urge faecal incontinence: evidence from prolonged manometric studies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C L H; Lunniss, P J; Wang, D; Williams, N S; Scott, S M

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Although external anal sphincter dysfunction is the major cause of urge faecal incontinence, approximately 50% of such patients have evidence of rectal hypersensitivity and report exaggerated stool frequency and urgency. The contribution of rectosigmoid contractile activity to the pathophysiology of this condition is unclear, and thus the relations between symptoms, rectal sensation, and rectosigmoid motor function were investigated. Methods: Fifty two consecutive patients with urge faecal incontinence, referred to a tertiary surgical centre, and 24 volunteers, underwent comprehensive anorectal physiological investigation, including prolonged rectosigmoid manometry. Patients were classified on the basis of balloon distension thresholds into those with rectal hypersensitivity (n = 27) and those with normal rectal sensation (n = 25). Automated quantitative analysis of overall rectosigmoid contractile activities and, specifically, high amplitude contractions and rectal motor complex activity was performed. Results: External anal sphincter dysfunction was similar in both patient groups. Overall, phasic activity and high amplitude contraction frequency were greater, and rectal motor complex variables significantly altered, in those with rectal hypersensitivity. Symptoms, more prevalent in the rectal hypersensitivity group, were also more often associated with rectosigmoid contractile events. For individuals, reduced compliance and increased rectal motor complex frequency were only observed in patients with rectal hypersensitivity. Conclusions: We have identified a subset of patients with urge faecal incontinence—namely, those with rectal hypersensitivity—who demonstrated increased symptoms, enhanced perception, reduced compliance, and exaggerated rectosigmoid motor activity. Comprehensive assessment of rectosigmoid sensorimotor function, in addition to evaluation of anal function, should be considered in the investigation of patients

  12. Informe Anual a la Nación sobre el Estado del Cáncer, 1975 a 2012

    Cancer.gov

    El Informe Anual a la Nación sobre el Estado del Cáncer, 1975 a 2012, es una actualización de los índices de casos nuevos, muertes y tendencias de los cánceres más comunes en los Estados Unidos.

  13. A conservative approach in a child with haematuria after accidental rectal impalement trauma

    PubMed Central

    Schijns, Josephine; Plötz, Frans Berend

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an 11-year-old boy with haematuria after traumatic rectal insertion of a sharp metal stick. It demonstrates that an expectative management with close observation can be considered in patients with rectal impalement trauma presenting with haematuria and stable vital parameters without significant injury on abdominal ultrasound. PMID:26612125

  14. Rectal chlamydia infection in women at high risk of chlamydia attending Canberra Sexual Health Centre.

    PubMed

    Musil, Kate; Currie, Marian; Sherley, Miranda; Martin, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    Chlamydia is the most commonly notified sexually transmitted infection in Australia. Australian guidelines recommend urogenital screening in asymptomatic men and women, and rectal screening in men who have sex with men or women reporting anal sex/symptoms. International studies describe a rectal chlamydia prevalence in women of 5% to 21%. We found that in women at high risk of chlamydia, 57% (32/56) tested positive for rectal chlamydia. Of these, 97% (31/32) had concurrent urogenital chlamydia. Women with urogenital chlamydia were significantly more likely to have a positive rectal result (χ(2), p = 0.000). Neither anal symptoms nor reported anal sex were associated with a positive rectal chlamydia test. The recommended treatment of rectal chlamydia differs substantially from that of urogenital chlamydia, raising the possibility that Australian women are being regularly undertreated due to a lack of rectal testing. Untreated rectal chlamydia may increase the risk of persistent infection, reproductive tract reinfection, complications and transmission. Further work is needed to determine the optimal management of chlamydia in women. PMID:25957326

  15. Successful treatment of rectal cancer with perineal invasion: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    KITAHARA, TOMOHIRO; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; SHINGAI, TATSUSHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer occasionally invades adjacent organs. However, rectal cancer with perineal invasion is uncommon and difficult to treat. Locally advanced colorectal cancer may be clinically treated with neoadjuvant therapy, followed by en bloc resection. Skin invasion may lead to tumor dissemination via cutaneous blood flow and lymphatic routes. There is currently no firm evidence regarding the treatment of these significantly advanced rectal cancers. In this study, we report 3 cases of rectal cancer with perineal invasion, successfully managed by multimodality treatment. Case 1 is a 52-year-old man with rectal cancer that had invaded the perineum; case 2 is a 38-year-old man with rectal cancer infiltrating the perineal skin and liver metastasis; and case 3 is a 50-year-old woman with rectal cancer and perineal invasion. All the cases were treated with radical excision. No severe complications were observed in the perioperative period. Case 2, in particular, was confirmed to remain alive 5 years after the surgery. Our experience suggests that multimodality treatment, including extended radical surgery, may be a feasible approach to the treatment of rectal cancer with perineal skin invasion. PMID:24940483

  16. SwiftLase: a new technology for char-free ablation in rectal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, David A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe layer-by-layer char-free ablation of hemorrhoids and other rectal lesions at very low CO2 laser power levels with a miniature `SwiftLaser' optomechanical flashscanner. Increased speed with excellent control, very shallow thermal damage, and less postoperative pain are the main advantages of the flashscan technology in rectal surgery.

  17. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  18. Rectal ulcer with an elusive diagnosis: all that ulcers is not Crohn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single rectal ulcer is an uncommon finding in children with gastrointestinal disease. Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is foremost among the differential diagnoses, a primary immunological defect should not be forgotten. Because of the paucity of literature on the association of rectal ul...

  19. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A.

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma: Which are strong prognostic factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier . E-mail: ochapet@med.umich.edu; Romestaing, Pascale; Mornex, Francoise; Souquet, Jean-Christophe; Favrel, Veronique; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; D'Hombres, Anne; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: This retrospective 12-year study evaluated the prognostic value of initial and postoperative staging of rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1996, 297 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (39 Gy in 13 fractions) and surgery for Stage T2-T4N0-N1M0 rectal adenocarcinoma. Pretreatment staging included a clinical examination and endorectal ultrasonography (EUS) since 1988. Clinical staging was performed by digital rectal examination and rigid proctoscopy. EUS was performed in 236 patients. Postoperative staging was performed by examination of the pathologic specimen. Results: The median follow-up was 49 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 67%, with a local failure rate of 9%. The rate of sphincter preservation was 65%. The clinical examination findings were strong prognostic factor for both cT stage (p < 0.001) and cN stage (p < 0.006) but had poor specificity for cN stage (only 25 lymph nodes detected). In both univariate and multivariate analyses, EUS had a statistically significant prognostic value for uT (p < 0.014) but not for uN (p < 0.47) stage. In contrast, pT and pN stages were strong prognostic factors (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Pretreatment staging, including clinical examination and EUS, seemed accurate enough to present a high prognostic value for the T stage. EUS was insufficient to stage lymph node involvement. Owing to its lack of specificity, uN stage was not a reliable prognostic factor. An improvement in N staging is necessary and essential. Despite downstaging, postoperative staging remained a very strong prognostic factor for both T and N stages.

  1. Luminal and humoral influences on human rectal epithelial cytokinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    Multiple genetic and environmental steps may underpin the development of human colorectal neoplasia, and experimental evidence suggests that promoters of colorectal cancer also induce colorectal epithelial cell hyperplasia. In vitro crypt cell production rate (CCPR) was measured to determine the effect of calcium, epidermal growth factor (EGF), vitamin D3 metabolites and synthetic analogues on human rectal epithelial cell proliferation. In a double-blind trial of oral calcium supplementation, CCPR was reduced by 49% in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), but there was no effect on established neoplasia. In control tissue, the active form of vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) reduced rectal CCPR by 57% at 1 microM, 55% at 10 nM and 45% at 100 pM. Likewise, in tissue taken from patients with FAP, 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced CCPR by 52%. Vitamin D3 has profound effects on calcium metabolism, but synthetic analogues can avoid these. The effects of a synthetic analogue (MC-903) on human rectal CCPR were therefore studied. MC-903 (10(-7) M) reduced CCPR in control tissue by 51%, and in FAP tissue by 52% at 10(-6) M and 51% at 10(-7) M. In addition, MC-903 and a related analogue, EB 1089, produced a clear-cut dose-dependent inhibition of both HT-29 and Caco2 colorectal cancer cells maintained in culture. Hence, vitamin D3 and its analogues can reduce the rate of cell proliferation in normal, premalignant and malignant colorectal epithelial cells and might therefore have future therapeutic uses as chemoprotective or chemotherapeutic agents. Lastly, EGF increases CCPR by 102% in FAP tissue that expresses the EGF receptor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7793821

  2. Generic Planning Target Margin for Rectal Cancer Treatment Setup Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M. Campbell, Jonathon P.; Yan Di

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To calculate the generic planning target margin (GPTM) for patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for rectal cancer placed in a prone position with a customized cradle for small-bowel exclusion. Methods and Materials: A total of 25 consecutive rectal cancer patients were treated for 25 or 28 fractions in a prone position using a cradle to maximize small bowel exclusion. Treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans were used to create orthogonally digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for portal image registration, which were compared with daily portal images from an electronic portal-imaging device (EPID). Translation values needed to align the DRRs and EPIDs were recorded for the superior to inferior (SI), right to left (RL), and anterior to posterior (AP) directions, and used to calculate the GPTM using the four-parameter model. Age, weight, and body mass index were tested compared with the setup variation using a Pearson correlation and a t test for significance. Gender versus setup variation was compared with a t test. Results: A total of 1,723 EPID images were reviewed. The GPTM was 10 mm superior, 8 mm inferior, 7 mm RL and 10 mm AP. Age and gender were unrelated to setup variation. Weight was significantly associated with systematic AP variation (p < 0.05). BMI was significantly associated with systematic SI (p < 0.05) and AP (p < 0.01) variation and random RL variation (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The GPTM for rectal cancer is asymmetric with a maximum of 10 mm in the superior, anterior and posterior dimensions. Body mass index may effect setup variation. Research using advanced treatment planning should include these margins in the planning target volume definition.

  3. New approach to adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, M.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Kramer, S.

    1980-02-01

    A sandwich technique of adjuvant radiotherapy was used to treat twenty-three patients with rectal cancer. In this technique, low dose preoperative irradiation (500 rad in one treatment) was given to all patients followed by immediate surgery (usually an A-P resection); on the basis of histopathological findings, patients with stage B/sub 2/ and C rectal cancer were selectively given 4500 rad post-operative irradiation in 5 weeks. Nine patients had early lesions (stage A and B/sub 1/) and did not receive postoperative irradiation. Thirteen patients had stage B/sub 2/ and C disease and hence received the full course of postoperative irradiation. One patient was found to have liver metastasis at the time of surgery, and hence received only palliative therapy. Follow-up of these twenty-three patients ranges from 10 months to 24 months with a median follow-up of 15 months. Treatment was well-tolerated with few side effects. Only two of the twenty-two patients who were treated for cure have failed to date. Both patients had stage C/sub 2/ disease; one patient developed an anterior abdominal wall recurrence in the surgical scar 3 months post-treatment and the second patient developed brain and bone metastases. No patients have failed in the pelvis. We feel this technique of adjuvant therapy is a logical approach to the treatment of rectal cancer and has potential for improving survival. The rationale for this approach to adjuvant radiotherapy is discussed together with implications for survival.

  4. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  5. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  6. Causes and outcomes of emergency presentation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Comber, Harry; Sharp, Linda; de Camargo Cancela, Marianna; Haase, Trutz; Johnson, Howard; Pratschke, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Emergency presentation of rectal cancer carries a relatively poor prognosis, but the roles and interactions of causative factors remain unclear. We describe an innovative statistical approach which distinguishes between direct and indirect effects of a number of contextual, patient and tumour factors on emergency presentation and outcome of rectal cancer. All patients diagnosed with rectal cancer in Ireland 2004-2008 were included. Registry information, linked to hospital discharge data, provided data on patient demographics, comorbidity and health insurance; population density and deprivation of area of residence; tumour type, site, grade and stage; treatment type and optimality; and emergency presentation and hospital caseload. Data were modelled using a structural equation model with a discrete-time survival outcome, allowing us to estimate direct and mediated effects of the above factors on hazard, and their inter-relationships. Two thousand seven hundred and fifty patients were included in the analysis. Around 12% had emergency presentations, which increased hazard by 80%. Affluence, private patient status and being married reduced hazard indirectly by reducing emergency presentation. Older patients had more emergency presentations, while married patients, private patients or those living in less deprived areas had fewer than expected. Patients presenting as an emergency were less likely to receive optimal treatment or to have this in a high caseload hospital. Apart from stage, emergency admission was the strongest determinant of poor survival. The factors contributing to emergency admission in this study are similar to those associated with diagnostic delay. The socio-economic gradient found suggests that patient education and earlier access to endoscopic investigation for public patients could reduce emergency presentation. PMID:27087482

  7. Tumeur stromale rectale: à propos d'une observation

    PubMed Central

    Rejab, Haitham; Kridis, Wala Ben; Ben Ameur, Hazem; Feki, Jihene; Frikha, Mounir; Beyrouti, Mohamed Issam

    2014-01-01

    Les tumeurs stromales gastro-intestinales sont des tumeurs mésenchymateuses peu fréquentes. Elles sont localisées préférentiellement eu niveau de l'estomac. La localisation rectale reste rare. A un nouveau cas de tumeur stromale du rectum ainsi qu'une bref revue de la littérature, on se propose d’étudier les particularités cliniques, radiologiques et thérapeutiques de cette entité rare. PMID:25120863

  8. [Laparoscopic Resection Rectopexy for the Treatment of External Rectal Prolapse].

    PubMed

    Axt, S; Falch, C; Müller, S; Kirschniak, A; Glatzle, J

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic resection rectopexy is one of the surgical options for the treatment of external rectal prolapse. A standardised and reproducible procedure for this operation is a decisive advantage for such cases. The operation can be divided in 11 substeps, so-called nodal points, which must be reached before further progress can be made and simplify the operation by dividing the procedure into substeps. This manuscript and the accompanying film demonstrate the standardised laparoscopic resection rectopexy as taught in the "Surgical Training Center Tübingen," and performed at the University Hospital of Tübingen. PMID:26114633

  9. Rectovaginal fistula: a new approach by stapled transanal rectal resection.

    PubMed

    Li Destri, Giovanni; Scilletta, Beniamino; Tomaselli, Tiziana Grazia; Zarbo, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Many surgical procedures have been developed to repair rectovaginal fistulas even if no "procedure of choice" is reported. The authors report a case of relatively uncommon, complex, medium-high post-obstetric rectovaginal fistula without sphincteral lesions and treated with a novel tailored technique. Our innovative surgical management consisted of preparing the neck of the fistula inside the vagina and folding it into the rectum so as to enclose the fistula within two semicontinuous sutures (stapled transanal rectal resection); no fecal diversion was performed. Postoperative follow-up at 9 months showed no recurrence of the fistula. PMID:17899300

  10. Rectal drainage: unusual evolution of a psoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, V; Gutierrez, C; Barrios, J E; Lluna, J; Fernandez, M S; Lopez, A; Vila, J J; Roca, A; Garcia-Sala, C

    1998-04-01

    We report two cases of primary psoas abscess in two patients of 15 months and 4 years of age. As the first case showed the natural history of this process the second one was large enough to produce a huge ureterohydronephrosis and to drain through the rectal wall to the rectum spontaneously, although this natural way did not achieve complete drainage. Both were treated by open drainage and systemic antibiotics with good response. They were discharged at the 7th and 12th postoperative day. 5 months later no complication has come up. Etiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of this unusual pathology are reviewed. PMID:9617614

  11. A case of rectal Dieulafoy's ulcer and successful endoscopic sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, J; Taniai, K; Kojima, K; Kenmotsu, M; Takai, K; Okabe, T; Tanaka, N

    2000-12-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented a massive hematochezia 7 days after sigmoidectomy. Repeated colonoscopy and angiography failed to locate the site of bleeding and Hartman's operation was performed. Rebleeding from the rectum on the day of operation occurred and pulsate arterial bleeding with minimal surrounding ulcer 1 cm above the pectinate line was observed. Screlotherapy with ethanol and electro coagulation was successfully performed to achieve permanent hemostasis. The importance of detailed rectal examination and an awareness of this clinical entity in life-threatening lower intestinal bleeding is discussed. PMID:11132922

  12. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  13. Rectal Carriage of Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Hospitalized Patients: Selective Preenrichment Increases Yield of Screening

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, C.; Willemsen, L. E.; Verkade, E.; Bonten, M. J. M.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the added value of selective preenrichment for the detection of rectal carriage of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E). ESBL-E rectal carriage was identified in 4.8% of hospitalized patients, and 25.9% of ESBL-E rectal carriers were identified with selective preenrichment only. PMID:25994164

  14. Identification and genotyping of bacteria from paired vaginal and rectal samples from pregnant women indicates similarity between vaginal and rectal microflora

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The vaginal microflora is important for maintaining vaginal health and preventing infections of the reproductive tract. The rectum has been suggested as the major source for the colonisation of the vaginal econiche. Methods To establish whether the rectum can serve as a possible bacterial reservoir for colonisation of the vaginal econiche, we cultured vaginal and rectal specimens from pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation, identified the isolates to the species level with tRNA intergenic length polymorphism analysis (tDNA-PCR) and genotyped the isolates for those subjects from which the same species was isolated simultaneously vaginally and rectally, by RAPD-analysis. One vaginal and one rectal swab were collected from a total of each of 132 pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation. Swabs were cultured on Columbia CNA agar and MRS agar. For each subject 4 colonies were selected for each of both sites, i.e. 8 colonies in total. Results Among the 844 isolates that could be identified by tDNA-PCR, a total of 63 bacterial species were present, 9 (14%) only vaginally, 26 (41%) only rectally, and 28 (44%) in both vagina and rectum. A total of 121 (91.6%) of 132 vaginal samples and 51 (38.6%) of 132 rectal samples were positive for lactobacilli. L. crispatus was the most frequently isolated Lactobacillus species from the vagina (40% of the subjects were positive), followed by L. jensenii (32%), L. gasseri (30%) and L. iners (11%). L. gasseri was the most frequently isolated Lactobacillus species from the rectum (15%), followed by L. jensenii (12%), L. crispatus (11%) and L. iners (2%). A total of 47 pregnant women carried the same species vaginally and rectally. This resulted in 50 vaginal/rectal pairs of the same species, for a total of eight different species. For 34 of the 50 species pairs (68%), isolates with the same genotype were present vaginally and rectally and a high level of genotypic diversity within species per subject was also established

  15. Local excision for early rectal cancer: transanal endoscopic microsurgery and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of treatment for early stage rectal cancer is to optimize oncologic control while minimizing the long-term impact of treatment on quality of life. The standard of care treatment for most stage I and II rectal cancers is radical surgery alone, specifically total mesorectal excision (TME). For early rectal cancers, this procedure is usually curative but can have a substantial impact on quality of life, including the possibility of permanent colostomy and the potential for short and long-term bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction. Given the morbidity associated with radical surgery, alternative approaches to management of early rectal cancer have been explored, including local excision (LE) via transanal excision (TAE) or transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS). Compared to the gold standard of radical surgery, local procedures for strictly selected early rectal cancers should lead to identical oncological results and even better outcomes regarding morbidity, mortality, and quality of life. PMID:26029457

  16. Rectal arteriovenous fistula resected laparoscopically after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ushigome, Hajime; Hayakawa, Tetsushi; Morimoto, Mamoru; Kitagami, Hidehiko; Tanaka, Moritsugu

    2014-01-01

    We report a very rare case of rectal arteriovenous fistula following sigmoidectomy and discuss this case in the context of the existing literature. In April 2011, the patient, a man in his 60s, underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with lymph node dissection for sigmoid colon cancer. Beginning in February 2012, he experienced frequent diarrhea. Abdominal contrast-enhanced CT revealed local thickening of the rectal wall and rectal arteriovenous fistula near the anastomosis site. Rectitis from the rectal arteriovenous fistula was diagnosed. No improvement was seen with conservative treatment. Therefore, surgical resection was performed laparoscopically and the site of the lesion was confirmed by intraoperative angiography. The arteriovenous fistula was identified and resected. Postoperatively, diarrhea symptoms resolved, and improvement in rectal wall thickening was seen on abdominal CT. No recurrence has been seen as of 1 year postoperatively. PMID:24450345

  17. Cutaneous Metastasis of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Dehal, Ahmed; Patel, Sunal; Kim, Sean; Shapera, Emanuel; Hussain, Farabi

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis of rectal cancer is rare. It typically indicates widespread disease and poor prognosis. We report an exceedingly rare case of rectal cancer with metastasis to the skin and review the literature on cutaneous metastasis of rectal cancer. A 47-year-old man presented with stage IV unresectable adenocarcinoma of the rectum and received palliative chemoradiation for local pain control. About a year later he developed extensive skin lesions involving the genital area, bilateral groin, and perineum. Biopsy specimen showed mucinous adenocarcinoma compatible with rectal origin. Palliative treatment with radiation therapy was initiated. The patient responded well to treatment and is still alive more than a year after diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis. Surgeons should maintain strong suspicion of cutaneous metastases when patients with rectal cancer have new or evolving skin lesions. PMID:26824966

  18. Visual diagnosis: 12-year-old girl with constipation and rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Srinath, Arvind; Wendel, Danielle; Bond, Geoffrey; Lowe, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare, thought to be due to defects in embryologic development, and often associated with other structural abnormalities. Clues to the existence of a rectal cyst are mainly due to bowel compression and presence of ectopic gastric mucosa within the cyst, leading to rectal bleeding. The diagnosis of a rectal duplication cyst requires a high index of suspicion. Confirming the diagnosis can be difficult based on the location of the cyst. Efforts to confirm the diagnosis include digital rectal examination, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and Meckel scan. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice, especially because of the cyst’s potential for malignant transformation. Because of the cyst’s proximal location to the nerves innervating the anal canal and sphincters, surgical resection can lead to fecal incontinence. PMID:24488834

  19. The Implementation of a Standardized Approach to Laparoscopic Rectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aslak, Katrine Kanstrup

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to audit our results after implementation of a standardized operative approach to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer within a fast-track recovery program. Methods: From January 2009 to February 2011, 100 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic surgery on an intention-to-treat basis for rectal cancer. The results were retrospectively reviewed from a prospectively collected database. Operative steps and instrumentation for the procedure were standardized. A standard perioperative care plan was used. Results: The following procedures were performed: low anterior resection (n=26), low anterior resection with loop-ileostomy (n=39), Hartmann's operation (n=14), and abdominoperineal resection (n=21). The median length of hospital stay was 7 days; 9 patients were readmitted. There were 9 cases of conversion to open surgery. The overall complication rate was 35%, including 6 cases (9%) of anastomotic leakages requiring reoperation. The 30-day mortality was 5%. The median number of harvested lymph nodes was 15 (range, 2 to 48). There were 6 cases of positive circumferential resection margins. The median follow-up was 9 (range, 1 to 27) months. One patient with disseminated cancer developed port-site metastasis. Conclusions: The results confirm the safety of a standardized approach, and the oncological outcomes are comparable to those of similar studies. PMID:23477176

  20. Formulation and Evaluation of Irinotecan Suppository for Rectal Administration

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Haiyang; Zhu, Yuping; Li, Dechuan

    2014-01-01

    Irinotecan suppository was prepared using the moulding method with a homogeneous blend. A sensitive and specific fluorescence method was developed and validated for the determination of irinotecan in plasma using HPLC. The pharmacokinetics of intravenous administered and rectal administered in rabbits was investigated. Following a single intravenous dose of irinotecan (50 mg/kg), the plasma irinotecan concentration demonstrated a bi-exponential decay, with a rapid decline over 15 min. Cmax, t1/2, AUC0–30h and AUC0-∞ were 16.1 ± 2.7 g/ml, 7.6 ± 1.2 h, 71.3 ± 8.8 μg·h/ml and 82.3 ± 9.5 μg·h/ml, respectively. Following rectal administration of 100 mg/kg irinotecan, the plasma irinotecan concentration reached a peak of 5.3 ± 2.5 μg/ml at 4 h. The AUC0–30h and AUC0-∞ were 32.2 ± 6.2 μg·h/ml and 41.6 ± 7.2 μg·h/ml, respectively. It representing ∼50.6% of the absolute bioavailability. PMID:24596626

  1. Early and late toxicity of radiotherapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Joye, Ines; Haustermans, Karin

    2014-01-01

    With the implementation of total mesorectal excision surgery and neoadjuvant (chemo) radiotherapy, the outcome of rectal cancer patients has improved and a substantial proportion of them have become long-term survivors. These advances come at the expense of radiation- and chemotherapy-related toxicity which remains an underestimated problem. Radiation-induced early toxicity in rectal cancer treatment mainly includes diarrhea, cystitis, and perineal dermatitis, while bowel dysfunction, fecal incontinence, bleeding, and perforation, genitourinary dysfunction, and pelvic fractures constitute the majority of late toxicity. It is now generally accepted that short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and immediate surgery is associated with less early toxicity compared to conventionally fractionated chemoradiotherapy with delayed surgery. There are no significant differences in late toxicity between both treatment regimens. While there is hardly an increase in early toxicity after preoperative SCRT with immediate surgery, late toxicity is substantial compared to surgery alone. Early toxicity is more frequent when a longer interval between SCRT and surgery is used and is comparable to the toxicity observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy except that it occurs after the end of the radiotherapy. So far, randomized phase III trials failed to demonstrate a substantial gain in tumoural response when oxaliplatin or molecular agents are added to the multimodality treatment. Moreover, the addition of these drugs increases toxicity and remains therefore experimental. PMID:25103006

  2. Watch and wait approach to rectal cancer: A review.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Marcos E; Fang, Sandy H

    2015-11-27

    In 2014, there were an estimated 136800 new cases of colorectal cancer, making it the most common gastrointestinal malignancy. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and over one-third of newly diagnosed patients have stage III (node-positive) disease. For stage II and III colorectal cancer patients, the mainstay of curative therapy is neoadjuvant therapy, followed by radical surgical resection of the rectum. However, the consequences of a proctectomy, either by low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection, can lead to very extensive comorbidities, such as the need for a permanent colostomy, fecal incontinence, sexual and urinary dysfunction, and even mortality. Recently, trends of complete regression of the rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy have been confirmed by clinical and radiographic evaluation-this is known as complete clinical response (cCR). The "watch and wait" approach was first proposed by Dr. Angelita Habr-Gama in Brazil in 2009. Those patients with cCR are followed with close surveillance physical examinations, endoscopy, and imaging. Here, we review management of rectal cancer, the development of the "watch and wait" approach and its outcomes. PMID:26649153

  3. Pilot Study of a Clinical Pathway Implementation in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uña, Esther; López-Lara, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer is a highly prevalent disease which needs a multidisciplinary approach to be treated. The absence of specific protocols implies a significant and unjustifiable variability among the different professionals involved in this disease. The purpose is to develop a clinical pathway based on the analysis process and aims to reduce this variability and to reduce unnecessary costs. Methods: We created a multidisciplinary team with contributors from every clinical area involved in the diagnosis and treatment in this disease. We held periodic meetings to agree on a protocol based on the best available clinical practice guidelines. Once we had agreed on the protocol, we implemented its use as a standard in our institution. Every patient older than 18 years who was diagnosed with rectal cancer was considered a candidate to be treated via the pathway. Results: We evaluated 48 patients during the course of this study. Every parameter measured was improved after the implementation of the pathway, except the proportion of patients with 12 nodes or more analysed. The perception that our patients had about this project was very good. Conclusions: Clinical pathways are needed to improve the quality of health care. This kind of project helps reduce hospital costs and optimizes the use of limited resources. On the other hand, unexplained variability is also reduced, with consequent benefits for the patients. PMID:21151842

  4. Effect of nicotine on rectal mucus and mucosal eicosanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Zijlstra, F J; Srivastava, E D; Rhodes, M; van Dijk, A P; Fogg, F; Samson, H J; Copeman, M; Russell, M A; Feyerabend, C; Williams, G T

    1994-01-01

    Because ulcerative colitis is largely a disease of non-smokers and nicotine may have a beneficial effect on the disease, the effect of nicotine on rectal mucosa in rabbits was examined. Nicotine was given subcutaneously by an Alzet mini-pump in doses of 0.5, 1.25, and 2 mg/kg/day for 14 days to three groups of eight animals and compared with eight controls. Mean (SD) serum nicotine concentrations (ng/ml) were 3.5 (1.1), 8.8 (2.3), and 16.2 (5.2) respectively in the treated groups. The thickness of adherent mucus on rectal mucosa in controls (median 36 microns) was significantly reduced by low dose (22 microns, p = 0.0011), and increased by high dose nicotine (48 microns, p = 0.035). Incorporation of radioactive glucosamine into papain resistant glycoconjugates was unchanged, indicating that mucin synthesis was unaltered. Prostaglandins (PG) were reduced, in some cases significantly (6-keto PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha, and hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid), by nicotine, which showed an inverse dose dependence--with greatest inhibition in relation to the lowest dose. Nicotine, and possibly smoking, may affect colitis by an action on mucosal eicosanoids and on adherent surface mucus secretion in the rectum and large bowel. PMID:8307477

  5. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Resection for Mid and Low Rectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Bulent; Yuksel, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The current study was conducted to determine whether robotic low anterior resection (RLAR) has real benefit over laparoscopic low anterior resection (LLAR) in terms of surgical and early oncologic outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 35 RLARs and 28 LLARs, performed for mid and low rectal cancers, from January 2013 through June 2015. Results: A total of 63 patients were included in the study. All surgeries were performed successfully. The clinicopathologic characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Compared with the laparoscopic group, the robotic group had less intraoperative blood loss (165 vs. 120 mL; P < .05) and higher mean operative time (252 vs. 208 min; P < .05). No significant differences were observed in the time to flatus passage, length of hospital stay, and postoperative morbidity. Pathological examination of total mesorectal excision (TME) specimens showed that both circumferential resection margin and transverse (proximal and distal) margins were negative in the RLAR group. However, 1 patient each had positive circumferential resection margin and positive distal transverse margin in the LLAR group. The mean number of harvested lymph nodes was 27 in the RLAR group and 23 in the LLAR group. Conclusions: In our study, short-term outcomes of robotic surgery for mid and low rectal cancers were similar to those of laparoscopic surgery. The quality of TME specimens was better in the patients who underwent robotic surgery. However, the longer operative time was a limitation of robotic surgery. PMID:27081292

  6. Current treatment of rectal cancer adapted to the individual patient

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, Laura; Ciria, Juan Pablo; Arbea, Leire; Liñán, Olga; Cafiero, Sergio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative radiochemotherapy and total mesorectal excision surgery is a recommended standard therapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. However, some subgroups of patients benefit more than others from this approach. In order to avoid long-term complications of radiation and chemotherapy, efforts are being made to subdivide T3N0 stage using advanced imaging techniques, and to analyze prognostic factors that help to define subgroup risk patients. Long-course radiochemotherapy has the potential of downsizing the tumor before surgery and may increase the chance of sphincter preservation in some patients. Short-course radiotherapy (SCRT), on the other hand, is a practical schedule that better suits patients with intermediated risk tumors, located far from the anal margin. SCRT is also increasingly being used among patients with disseminated disease, before resection of the rectal tumor. Improvements in radiation technique, such as keeping the irradiation target below S2/S3 junction, and the use of IMRT, can reduce the toxicity associated with radiation, specially long-term small bowel toxicity. PMID:24416579

  7. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer. PMID:26758900

  8. Massive rectal bleeding distant from a blunt car trauma.

    PubMed

    Gruden, E; Ragot, E; Arienzo, R; Revaux, A; Magri, M; Grossin, M; Leroy, C; Msika, S; Kianmanesh, R

    2010-09-01

    Mesenteric trauma is one of the possible injuries caused by the use of seat belts in case of motor vehicle crash. We report here a rare case of rectal bleeding by rupture of a mesosigmoid haematoma. An emergent laparotomy revealed a mesosigmoid haematoma with a centimetric rectal perforation. The wearing of safety belts added some specific blunt abdominal trauma, which directly depends on lap-and-sash belts. Mesenteric injuries are found out up to 5% of blunt abdominal traumas. "Seat belt mark" leads the surgical team to strongly suspect an intra-abdominal trauma. When "seat belt mark" sign is found, in patients with mild to severe blunt car injuries, CT-scan has to be realised to eliminate intra-abdominal complications, including mesenteric and mesosigmoid ones. In case of proved mesenteric haematoma associated to intestinal bleeding, a surgical treatment must be considered as first choice. Conservative approach remains possible in stable patients but surgical exploration remains necessary in unstable patients with active bleeding. PMID:20638207

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of rectal cancer: staging and restaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Courtney C; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kalb, Bobby T; Tipton, Russell G; Hanley, Krisztina Z; Kitajima, Hiroumi D; Dixon, W Thomas; Votaw, John R; Oshinski, John N; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is used to non-invasively stage and restage rectal adenocarcinomas. Accurate staging is important as the depth of tumor extension and the presence or absence of lymph node metastases determines if an individual will undergo preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Accurate description of tumor location is important for presurgical planning. The relationship of the tumor to the anal sphincter in addition to the depth of local invasion determines the surgical approach used for resection. High-resolution T2-weighted imaging is the primary sequence used for initial staging. The addition of diffusion-weighted imaging improves accuracy in the assessment of treatment response on restaging scans. Approximately 10%-30% of individuals will experience a complete pathologic response following chemoradiation with no residual viable tumor found in the resected specimen at histopathologic assessment. In some centers, individuals with no residual tumor visible on restaging MR who are thought to be at high operative risk are monitored with serial imaging and a "watch and wait" approach in lieu of resection. Normal rectal anatomy, MR technique utilized for staging and restaging scans, and TMN staging are reviewed. An overview of surgical techniques used for resection including newer, minimally invasive endoluminal techniques is included. PMID:25759246

  10. [Palliative Care for Rectal Cancer Complicated with Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kei; Muto, Takaaki

    2015-11-01

    Medical advancements have led to an increase in the number of elderly people. However, standard treatments may sometimes be difficult to use in elderly people. Here, we report the case of an elderly patient with rectal and gastric cancer who refused radical surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who had type-2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperuricemia, mitral valve regurgitation, and mild dementia. Furthermore, he was blind in both eyes owing to glaucoma. He first visited our hospital in 2005. In 2010, he was diagnosed with anemia, but he refused a thorough examination; however, he did consent to take iron supplements. In July 2011, he consulted our hospital for symptoms of frequent diarrhea, and agreed to an examination. After colonoscopy, he was diagnosed with rectal cancer that was becoming obstructive. There were no metastases to other organs, but he was also diagnosed with gastric cancer. As he and his family refused radical surgery, a stoma was constructed. After the operation, he received palliative care but died in September 2013. PMID:26805335

  11. Synchronous collision neuroendocrine tumor and rectal adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie-Gao; Zhang, Zhong-Tao; Wu, Guo-Cong; Han, Wei; Wang, Kang-Li

    2015-04-01

    Collision tumors are thought to arise from the accidental meeting of two independent tumors. Adenocarcinoma is the most common malignant rectal tumor, while neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is relatively rare. Due to the endoscopy and reporting, the overall incidence of NETs was increasing recently but still less than 1 per 100,000. This means that a combination of an adenocarcinoma and NET is a very rare finding and an actual collision of these tumors even more so. We report here a highly unusual case of a 64-year-old woman who had collision tumors composed of a primary rectal adenocarcinoma and NET showing a "side by side" pattern. Resection margins are free of both the tumors. The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient underwent a protocol CT scan at 3 months after surgery, which did not show any recurrence. Both the malignant adenocarcinoma and the NET would make a great influence in the rest lifetime and a follow up will be continued, although the CT did not show any recurrence until now. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of such an occurrence. PMID:25972691

  12. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating gamma delta T cells in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Liang; Li, Ke; Li, Rui; Liu, Hui-Min; Sun, Rui; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the regulatory effect of Vδ1 T cells and the antitumor activity of Vδ2 T cells in rectal cancer. METHODS: Peripheral blood, tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues from 20 rectal cancer patients were collected. Naïve CD4 T cells from the peripheral blood of rectal cancer patients were purified by negative selection using a Naive CD4+ T Cell Isolation Kit II (Miltenyi Biotec). Tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues were minced into small pieces and digested in a triple enzyme mixture containing collagenase type IV, hyaluronidase, and deoxyribonuclease for 2 h at room temperature. After digestion, the cells were washed twice in RPMI1640 and cultured in RPMI1640 containing 10% human serum supplemented with L-glutamine and 2-mercaptoethanol and 1000 U/mL of IL-2 for the generation of T cells. Vδ1 T cells and Vδ2 T cells from tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues were expanded by anti-TCR γδ antibodies. The inhibitory effects of Vδ1 T cells on naïve CD4 T cells were analyzed using the CFSE method. The cytotoxicity of Vδ2 T cells on rectal cancer lines was determined by the LDH method. RESULTS: The percentage of Vδ1 T cells in rectal tumor tissues from rectal cancer patients was significantly increased, and positively correlated with the T stage. The percentage of Vδ2 T cells in rectal tumor tissues from rectal cancer patients was significantly decreased, and negatively correlated with the T stage. After culture for 14 d with 1 μg/mL anti-TCR γδ antibodies, the percentage of Vδ1 T cells from para-carcinoma tissues was 21.45% ± 4.64%, and the percentage of Vδ2 T cells was 38.64% ± 8.05%. After culture for 14 d, the percentage of Vδ1 T cells from rectal cancer tissues was 67.45% ± 11.75% and the percentage of Vδ2 T cells was 8.94% ± 2.85%. Tumor-infiltrating Vδ1 T cells had strong inhibitory effects, and tumor-infiltrating Vδ2 T cells showed strong cytolytic activity. The inhibitory effects of Vδ1 T cells from para

  13. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  14. Radiation-induced proctosigmoiditis. Prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial of oral sulfasalazine plus rectal steroids versus rectal sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Kochhar, R.; Patel, F.; Dhar, A.; Sharma, S.C.; Ayyagari, S.; Aggarwal, R.; Goenka, M.K.; Gupta, B.D.; Mehta, S.K. )

    1991-01-01

    In a prospective study, 37 consecutive patients with radiation-induced proctosigmoiditis were randomized to receive a four-week course of either 3.0 g oral sulfasalazine plus 20 mg twice daily rectal prednisolone enemas (group I, N = 18) or 2.0 g twice daily rectal sucralfate enemas plus oral placebo (group II, N = 19). The two groups were comparable with respect to demographic features, duration of symptoms, and clinical and endoscopic staging of the disease. Fifteen patients in group I and 17 in group II completed the trial. At four weeks, both groups showed significant clinical improvement (P less than 0.01 for group I and P less than 0.001 for group II) and endoscopic healing (P less than 0.01 for group I and P less than 0.001 for group II). When the two groups were compared, sucralfate enemas showed a significantly better response as assessed clinically (P less than 0.05), although endoscopically the response was not statistically different (P greater than 0.05). We conclude that both treatment regimens are effective in the management of radiation proctitis. Sucralfate enemas give a better clinical response, are tolerated better, and because of the lower cost should be the preferred mode of short-term treatment.

  15. Preliminary experience of a predictive model to define rectal volume and rectal dose during the treatment of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Falco, M D; D'Andrea, M; Fedele, D; Barbarino, R; Benassi, M; Giudice, E; Hamoud, E; Ingrosso, G; Ladogana, P; Santarelli, F; Tortorelli, G; Santoni, R

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to define a method to evaluate the total dose delivered to the rectum during the whole treatment course in six patients undergoing irradiation for prostate cancer using an offline definition of organ motion with images from a cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner available on a commercial linear accelerator. Methods Patient set-up was verified using a volumetric three-dimensional CBCT scanner; 9–14 CBCT scans were obtained for each patient. Images were transferred to a commercial treatment planning system for offline organ motion analysis. The shape of the rectums were used to obtain a mean dose–volume histogram (), which was the average of the DVHs of the rectums as they appeared in each verification CBCT. A geometric model of an average rectum (AR) was produced using the rectal contours delineated on the CBCT scans (DVHAR). To check whether the first week of treatment was representative of the whole treatment course, we evaluated the DVHs related to only the first five CBCT scans ( and DVHAR5). Finally, the influence of a dietary protocol on the goodness of our results was considered. Results In all six patients the original rectal DVH for the planning CT scan showed higher values than all DVHs. Conclusion Although the application of the model to a larger set of patients is necessary to confirm this trend, reconstruction of a representative volume of the rectum throughout the entire treatment course seems feasible. PMID:21849366

  16. Prostatic irradiation is not associated with any measurable increase in the risk of subsequent rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kendal, Wayne S. . E-mail: wkendal@ottawahospital.on.ca; Eapen, Libni; MacRae, Robert; Malone, Shawn; Nicholas, Garth

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate a putative increased risk of rectal cancer subsequent to prostatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In an analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry, we compared men who had radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma with those treated surgically and those treated with neither modality. Kaplan-Meier analyses for the time to failure from rectal cancer were performed between age-matched subgroups of the three cohorts. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to ascertain what influences might affect the incidence of subsequent rectal cancer. Results: In all, 33,831 men were irradiated, 167,607 were treated surgically, and 36,335 received neither modality. Rectal cancers developed in 243 (0.7%) of those irradiated (mean age, 70.7 years), 578 (0.3%) of those treated surgically (68.7 years), and 227 (0.8%) of those treated with neither modality (74.2 years). When age effects and the differences between the surgical and untreated cohorts were controlled for, we were unable to demonstrate any significant increased incidence of rectal cancer in men irradiated for prostatic cancer. Conclusions: An increased frequency of rectal cancer after prostatic irradiation, apparent on crude analysis, could be attributed to age confounding and other unmeasured confounders associated with prostate cancer treatment and rectal cancer risk.

  17. Penetrating Bladder Trauma: A High Risk Factor for Associated Rectal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, B. M.; Reis, L. O.; Calderan, T. R.; de Campos, C. C.; Fraga, G. P.

    2014-01-01

    Demographics and mechanisms were analyzed in prospectively maintained level one trauma center database 1990–2012. Among 2,693 trauma laparotomies, 113 (4.1%) presented bladder lesions; 51.3% with penetrating injuries (n = 58); 41.3% (n = 24) with rectal injuries, males corresponding to 95.8%, mean age 29.8 years; 79.1% with gunshot wounds and 20.9% with impalement; 91.6% arriving the emergence room awake (Glasgow 14-15), hemodynamically stable (average systolic blood pressure 119.5 mmHg); 95.8% with macroscopic hematuria; and 100% with penetrating stigmata. Physical exam was not sensitive for rectal injuries, showing only 25% positivity in patients. While 60% of intraperitoneal bladder injuries were surgically repaired, extraperitoneal ones were mainly repaired using Foley catheter alone (87.6%). Rectal injuries, intraperitoneal in 66.6% of the cases and AAST-OIS grade II in 45.8%, were treated with primary suture plus protective colostomy; 8.3% were sigmoid injuries, and 70.8% of all injuries had a minimum stool spillage. Mean injury severity score was 19; mean length of stay 10 days; 20% of complications with no death. Concomitant rectal injuries were not a determinant prognosis factor. Penetrating bladder injuries are highly associated with rectal injuries (41.3%). Heme-negative rectal examination should not preclude proctoscopy and eventually rectal surgical exploration (only 25% sensitivity). PMID:24527030

  18. Advantages of the robotic approach to deep infiltrating rectal endometriosis: because less is more.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Marques, Renato Moretti; Gomes, Mariano Tamura Vieira

    2016-06-01

    For symptomatic deep infiltrating endometriosis, surgery is often required to achieve symptom relief and restore fertility. A minimally invasive approach using laparoscopy is considered the gold standard. However, specific limitations of the laparoscopic approach deep in the pelvis keep challenging even surgeons with a solid experience with minimally invasive techniques. Robotic surgery has the potential to compensate for technical drawbacks inherent in conventional laparoscopic surgery, such as limited degree of freedom, two-dimensional vision, and the fulcrum effect. In the present report, we aim at demonstrating the central role of robotic surgery for deep infiltrating endometriosis, with special emphasis in the ability to practice organ (rectal) preservation. A 45-year-old white female with a 4-month history of chronic pelvic pain, dyschezia, and dysmenorrhea, refractory to hormonal therapy was referred to our unit. MRI findings were diagnostic of deep infiltrating endometriosis (retrocervical and rectovaginal) extending to the anterior rectal serosal layer (partial-thickness rectal invasion). Using a fully robotic approach, appropriate dissection of the rectovaginal septum and of the extraperitoneal rectum followed by complete excision of the endometriotic rectal nodule with organ (rectal) preservation was undertaken. It is our belief that using a robotic approach, the potential to boost rectal preservation might be established. Moreover, it is possible that in many cases, a robotic operation may allow the surgeon to perform the intervention with greater accuracy and comfort. As a result, more patients with deep infiltrating endometriosis may benefit from rectal sparing procedures. PMID:27072152

  19. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  20. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Jeremy G.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  1. Rectal-wall dose dependence on postplan timing after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel; Yeung, Ivan; Williams, Theresa; Pearson, Shannon; McLean, Michael; Pond, Gregory; Crook, Juanita . E-mail: Juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: Dose to rectal wall after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy is dependent on distance between posterior prostatic seeds and anterior rectal wall and is influenced by postimplant periprostatic edema. We analyzed the effect of postplan timing on anterior rectal-wall dose. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received permanent seed {sup 125}I brachytherapy as monotherapy (145 Gy). Implants were preplanned by use of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and carried out by use of preloaded needles. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated by use of magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion on Days 1, 8, and 30. The anterior rectal-wall dose is reported as the isodose enclosing 1.0 or 2.0 cc of rectal wall and as the RV100 in cc. Results: The dose to rectal wall increased progressively over time. The median increase in dose to 1.0 cc of rectal wall (RD [1 cc]) from Day 1 to 30 was 39.2 Gy (p < 0.001). RV100 increased from a median of 0.07 cc on Day 1 to 0.67 cc on Day 30. The most significant predictor of rectal-wall dose (RD [1 cc], RD [2 cc], or RV100) was the time of evaluation (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Although periprostatic edema cannot be quantified by postimplant imaging, the dose to the anterior rectal wall increases significantly over time as prostatic and periprostatic edema resolve. Critical-organ dose reporting and guidelines for minimizing toxicity must take into account the time of the assessment.

  2. Estabilidad de los modelos de Heggie y Ramamani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzzio, J. C.; Vergne, M. M.; Wachlin, F. C.; Carpintero, D. D.

    Los modelos de Heggie y Ramamani de satélites galácticos en órbitas circulares se basan en una teoría aproximada, por lo que es importante verificar su estabilidad mediante simulaciones numéricas. En esta forma, hemos logrado mostrar que son estables sobre intervalos de tiempo mucho mayores que los que lograron los propios autores de los modelos. Por otra parte, dado que hemos mostrado que el caos es significativo en estos modelos, son un sistema ideal para investigar si, pese a ello, se mantienen estacionarios. Nuestras simulaciones numéricas muestran que, pese al caos, la estacionariedad se mantiene sobre intervalos de centenares de tiempos de cruce del sistema, mucho mayores que los tiempos de Liapunov característicos de sus movimientos caóticos.

  3. Heterogeneity of KRAS Mutation Status in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Peter; König, Alexander; Schirmer, Markus; Kitz, Julia; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Azizian, Azadeh; Bernhardt, Markus; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Grade, Marian; Ghadimi, Michael; Ströbel, Philipp; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anti-EGFR targeted therapy is of increasing importance in advanced colorectal cancer and prior KRAS mutation testing is mandatory for therapy. However, at which occasions this should be performed is still under debate. We aimed to assess in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer whether there is intra-specimen KRAS heterogeneity prior to and upon preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and if there are any changes in KRAS mutation status due to this intervention. Materials and Methods KRAS mutation status analyses were performed in 199 tumor samples from 47 patients with rectal cancer. To evaluate the heterogeneity between different tumor areas within the same tumor prior to preoperative CRT, 114 biopsies from 34 patients (mean 3 biopsies per patient) were analyzed (pre-therapeutic intratumoral heterogeneity). For the assessment of heterogeneity after CRT residual tumor tissue (85 samples) from 12 patients (mean 4.2 tissue samples per patient) were analyzed (post-therapeutic intratumoral heterogeneity) and assessment of heterogeneity before and after CRT was evaluated in corresponding patient samples (interventional heterogeneity). Primer extension method (SNaPshot™) was used for initial KRAS mutation status testing for Codon 12, 13, 61, and 146. Discordant results by this method were reevaluated by using the FDA-approved KRAS Pyro Kit 24, V1 and the RAS Extension Pyro Kit 24, V1 Kit (therascreen® KRAS test). Results For 20 (43%) out of the 47 patients, a KRAS mutation was detected. With 12 out of 20, the majority of these mutations affected codon 35. We did not obtained evidence that CRT results in changes of the KRAS mutation pattern. In addition, no intratumoral heterogeneity in the KRAS mutational status could be proven. This was true for both the biopsies prior to CRT and the resection specimens thereafter. The discrepancy observed in some samples when using the SNaPshot™ assay was due to insufficient sensitivity of this technique upon

  4. Expect the unexpected: Endometriosis mimicking a rectal carcinoma in a post-menopausal lady

    PubMed Central

    Jakhmola, C. K.; Kumar, Ameet; Sunita, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Altered bowels habits along with rectal mass in an elderly would point toward a rectal cancer. We report an unusual case of a post-menopausal lady who presented with these complaints. We had difficulties in establishing a pre-operative diagnosis. With a tentative diagnosis of a rectal cancer/gastrointestinal stromal tumor, she underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection. On histopathology, this turned out to be endometriosis. Bowel endometriosis is an uncommon occurrence. That it occurred in a post-menopausal lady was a very unusual finding. We discuss the case, its management, and the relevant literature. PMID:27073315

  5. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery: The first attempt in treatment of rectal amyloidoma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Richa; George, Virgilio V

    2015-01-01

    Localized amyloidosis is characterized by amyloid protein deposition restricted to one organ or tissue without systemic involvement. Gastrointestinal manifestations of localized amyloidoma are unusual, which makes amyloidoma restricted to the rectum a very rare diagnosis requiring a high index of suspicion. We present a rare account for rectal amyloidoma with an unusual presentation of obstructive symptoms and its treatment using a sophisticated surgical modality, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), which resulted in complete excision of the lesion without hospitalization and complications. The successful treatment for this rectal amyloidoma using TEM emphasizes the need to broaden its application in the treatment of various rectal lesions while preserving organ function and decreasing recurrence. PMID:25632208

  6. Proteomic analysis of colon and rectal carcinoma using standard and customized databases

    PubMed Central

    Slebos, Robbert J.C.; Wang, Xia; Wang, Xaojing; Zhang, Bing; Tabb, David L.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding proteomic differences underlying the different phenotypic classes of colon and rectal carcinoma is important and may eventually lead to a better assessment of clinical behavior of these cancers. We here present a comprehensive description of the proteomic data obtained from 90 colon and rectal carcinomas previously subjected to genomic analysis by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Here, the primary instrument files and derived secondary data files are compiled and presented in forms that will allow further analyses of the biology of colon and rectal carcinoma. We also discuss new challenges in processing these large proteomic datasets for relevant proteins and protein variants. PMID:26110064

  7. Rectal neuroendocrine tumor with uncommon metastatic spread: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Galanopoulos, Michail; Tolia, Maria; Kiakou, Maria; Nakos, Georgios; Papakostidi, Aristoula; Koumakis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare neoplasms. Rectal neuroendocrine tumors consist approximately the 5%-14% of all neuroendocrine neoplasms in Europe. These tumors are diagnosed in relatively young patients, with a mean age at diagnosis of 56 years. Distant metastases from rectal neuroendocrine tumors are not very common. Herein we describe a case of a rectal neuroendocrine tumor which metastasized to the lung, mediastinum and orbit. This case underscores the importance of early identification and optimal management to improve patient’s prognosis. Therefore, the clinical significance of this case is the necessity of physicians’ awareness and education regarding neuroendocrine tumors’ diagnosis and management. PMID:26909138

  8. [Parenting Information: Drugs. Informacion Para los Padres: Sobre las Drojas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Steve

    These two booklets provide basic information about drugs and drug abuse and are part of a series of 22 booklets, designed specifically to help parents understand their children and help them to learn. "Let's Talk about Drug Abuse," (booklet #18), reviews foreign substances or drugs young people are often exposed to (i.e., tobacco, alcohol,…

  9. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    PubMed Central

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  10. Advancing Techniques of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sagar A; Wo, Jennifer Y; Hong, Theodore S

    2016-07-01

    Since the advent of radiation therapy for rectal cancer, there has been continual investigation of advancing technologies and techniques that allow for improved dose conformality to target structures while limiting irradiation of surrounding normal tissue. For locally advanced disease, intensity modulated and proton beam radiation therapy both provide more highly conformal treatment volumes that reduce dose to organs at risk, though the clinical benefit in terms of toxicity reduction is unclear. For early stage disease, endorectal contact therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy may be a definitive treatment option for patients who are poor operative candidates or those with low-lying tumors that desire sphincter-preservation. Finally, there has been growing evidence that supports stereotactic body radiotherapy as a safe and effective salvage treatment for the minority of patients that locally recur following trimodality therapy for locally advanced disease. This review addresses these topics that remain areas of active clinical investigation. PMID:27238474