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Sample records for rectangular chamber study

  1. Turbulent particle deposition in a rectangular chamber: Study of the effect of particle size and ventilation regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Yoshio

    1996-04-01

    The interaction of aerosol particles with wall surfaces is important in modeling their behavior. This interaction is usually represented in theoretical models as a loss term. The loss rate is the rate at which particles deposit or react with the surfaces. This loss term is important in many branches of aerosol science including human health and indoor air quality. Increased surface deposition usually means lower concentrations of airborne particles and hence, lower exposure to the inhabitants. If the efficiency of the particle deposition is influenced by factors other than the particle size, such as a natural convection of the air, this has to be taken into account to evaluate the results. In this research, test aerosol sized from 15 nm to 3 {micro}m are produced by several different aerosol generators; the gas burner, the Collison nebulizer, the condensation aerosol generator, the orifice atomizer and the Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG). A rectangular chamber whose dimensions are 75 x 75 x 180 cm{sup 3} was used in this study. The particles were injected into the chamber, with a known ventilation and the concentration decay was monitored by the Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (UCPC) and Optical Particle Counter (OPC). During the measurement, the air inside the chamber is moved by natural convection and ventilation effect. The results shows that the particle loss rate under the higher air exchange rate is larger and this is not only due to air exchange itself but also the wall deposition. The theoretical model presented by Benes and Holub (1996) agree with the experimental data better than the Crump and Seinfield (1981) model with the hypothesis of Plandtl`s mixing length. 118 refs.

  2. Rectangular subsonic jet flowfield study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Tatterson, Gary B.; Swan, David H.

    1987-01-01

    The flowfield of a rectangular jet with 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at an axial Reynolds number of 127,000, using a three-dimensional laser anemometer. The flowfield surveys resulted in mean velocity vector field plots and contour plots of the Reynolds stress tensor components for the major and minor axes. These data contribute substantially to currently available data of jet flowfields.

  3. Theoretical prediction of stationary positions in the rectangular chamber during asymmetric electroosmotic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Most microscopic cell electrophoretic work depends on the theortical prediction of stationary positions by Smoluchowski and Komagata. Their theoretical solutions are based on the assumption that the electroosmotic flow in a chamber is symmetric. Because experiences with the rectangular chamber indicate that symmetric flow occurs during less than 8% of the experiments, the existing theory for stationary position determination is expanded to include the more general case of asymmetric flow. Smoluchowski's equation for symmetric electroosmotic flow in a rectangular chamber having a width much smaller than its height or length is examined. Smoluchowski's approach is used to approximate stationary positions in rectangular chambers with height/width ratios greater than 40. Support for the theoretical prediction of stationary positions using is given by three types of experimental evidence.

  4. CSR IMPEDANCE DUE TO A BEND MAGNET OF FINITE LENGTH WITH A VACUUM CHAMBER OF RECTANGULAR CROSS SECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Kotelnikov, I.A.; /Novosibirsk State U.

    2009-06-05

    We study the impedance due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by a short bunch of charged particles passing through a dipole magnet of finite length in a vacuum chamber of a given cross section. Our method represents a further development of the previous studies: we decompose the electromagnetic field of the beam over the eigenmodes of the toroidal chamber and derive a system of equations for the expansion coefficients in the series. We illustrate our general method by calculating the CSR impedance of a beam moving in a toroidal vacuum chamber of rectangular cross section.

  5. Effects of coating rectangular microscopic electrophoresis chamber with methylcellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    One of the biggest problems in obtaining high accuracy in microscopic electrophoresis is the parabolic flow of liquid in the chamber due to electroosmotic backflow during application of the electric field. In chambers with glass walls the source of polarization leading to electroosmosis is the negative charge of the silicare and other ions that form the wall structure. It was found by Hjerten, who used a rotating 3.0 mm capillary tube for free zone electrophoresis, that precisely neutralizing this charge was extremely difficult, but if a neutral polymer matrix (formaldehyde fixed methylcellulose) was formed over the glass (quartz) wall the double layer was displaced and the viscosity at the shear plane increased so that electroosmotic flow could be eliminated. Experiments were designed to determine the reliability with which methylcellulose coating of the Zeiss Cytopherometer chamber reduced electroosmotic backflow and the effect of coating on the accuracy of cell electrophoretic mobility (EPN) determinations. Fixed rat erythrocytes (RBC) were used as test particles.

  6. Particle manipulation affected by streaming flows in vertically actuated open rectangular chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Prashant; Gandhi, Prasanna S.; Neild, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Particle movement in vibration assisted microfluidic systems is significantly affected by time-averaged streaming flows. These flows can demonstrate either particle collection or dispersion characteristics, depending on the parameters used and system specifics. Here we investigate particle collection within streaming flows in vertically actuated open rectangular chambers at frequencies in the range of 100 Hz. Capillary waves, created at the water-air interface under the action of low frequency vibration, generate streaming fields in the liquid bulk. In addition, the spatial variation in the flow field gives rise to particle collection due to inertial effects. In order to understand the interplay between these effects, 2D simulations are employed to understand the first order field induced particle collection, while an experimental study is performed to investigate the effect of the 3D streaming fields on particle motion. By altering the chamber dimensions, two observations are presented: first by taking measures to reduce the strength of the streaming field, particles as small as 50 nm in diameter can be collected. Second, the streaming fields themselves can be used to trap particles, which in conjunction with the collection forces can cause particle separation.

  7. Asymmetric electroosmotic flow and mobility measurements at nonstationary positions in the rectangular chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of a cell in solution is defined by its velocity divided by the electric field strength it experiences. An obvious way to measure the mobility of cells is to apply a constant electric field to a suspension of cells in a glass chamber and clock the velocities of individual cells through a microscope. This microscope method is the classic technique in cell electrophoresis and it has been used for the bulk of research in this field. Two aspects of the microscope method can critically affect the accuracy and consistency of its cell mobility measurements: (1) the electroosmotic fluctuations in the chamber from measurement to measurement; and (2) the number of cells which can be practically measured for statistically meaningful results. A new method of analyzing microelectrophoretic data using a computer program has been developed which addresses both of these aspects. It makes possible the mobility measurements of individual cells as positions throughout the rectangular chamber depth during asymmetric electroosmotic flow.

  8. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  9. Use of Rectangular Capillary Chambers for Nondestructive Microscopic Observation of Biofilm on Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, N.; Dragila, M.; Parke, J.

    2005-12-01

    Slow sand filter removal of bacterial and fungal pathogens from water has been shown to depend on development of biofilms on sand near the filter surface. Over time, hydraulic conductivity of slow sand filters is considerably reduced, presumably due to excessive biofilm development or plugging of surface pores by particulate matter. Microscopic observation of biofilms in porous media typically requires destructive sampling of media or use of micromodels to simulate pore systems. We are developing a flow-thru chamber consisting of a thin-walled rectangular capillary attached to a mount that can be manipulated with a conventional microscope stage. Capillaries are easily packed with granular media and allow continuous, non-destructive observation of pore systems over time. Initial trials using epi-fluorescence microscopy demonstrate the potential to monitor biofilm development on pore faces or adsorption of particulate matter at the water-solid or air-water interface.

  10. Numerical study on rectangular microhollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    He Shoujie; Ouyang Jiting; He Feng; Li Shang

    2011-03-15

    Rectangular microhollow cathode discharge in argon is investigated by using two-dimensional time-dependent self-consistent fluid model. The electric potential, electric field, particle density, and mean electron energy are calculated. The results show that hollow cathode effect can be onset in the present configuration, with strong electric field and high mean electron energy in the cathode fall while high density and quasineutral plasma in the negative glow. The potential well and electric filed reversal are formed in the negative glow region. It is suggested that the presence of large electron diffusion flux necessitates the field reversal and potential well.

  11. A computer program for determining the electrophoretic mobility of cells in a rectangular chamber during asymmetric electroosmotic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In the field of cell electrophoresis, computer programs have been used for the estimation of zeta potential and surface charge density of specific charged chemical species from electrophoretic mobility data. The union of computer and microscope cell electrophoresis in the laboratory has yielded several satisfying results. The method organizes and error checks these data and stores them on permanent file for future reference or reanalysis. This computer analysis, accomplished in two steps by two main programs and a major subroutine, provides a quick, useful and realistic presentation of mobility data in histogram form, and is appropriate for any microelectrophoretic work using rectangular chambers. Computer program 1 is the first step of two in the analysis of mobility data. Program 2 consists of the main program, POLY2, which fits a least squares parabola to the apparent mobility data generated by Program 1, and the subroutine EXTRA which determines actual cell mobilities using the regression curve equation.

  12. Bandwidth Study of the Microwave Reflectors with Rectangular Corrugations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; He, Wenlong; Donaldson, Craig R.; Cross, Adrian W.

    2016-09-01

    The mode-selective microwave reflector with periodic rectangular corrugations in the inner surface of a circular metallic waveguide is studied in this paper. The relations between the bandwidth and reflection coefficient for different numbers of corrugation sections were studied through a global optimization method. Two types of reflectors were investigated. One does not consider the phase response and the other does. Both types of broadband reflectors operating at W-band were machined and measured to verify the numerical simulations.

  13. A multiple-cathode, high-power, rectangular ion thruster discharge chamber of increasing thruster lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovey, Joshua Lucas

    Ion thrusters are high-efficiency, high-specific impulse space propulsion systems proposed for deep space missions requiring thruster operational lifetimes of 7--14 years. One of the primary ion thruster components is the discharge cathode assembly (DCA). The DCA initiates and sustains ion thruster operation. Contemporary ion thrusters utilize one molybdenum keeper DCA that lasts only ˜30,000 hours (˜3 years), so single-DCA ion thrusters are incapable of satisfying the mission requirements. The aim of this work is to develop an ion thruster that sequentially operates multiple DCAs to increase thruster lifetime. If a single-DCA ion thruster can operate 3 years, then perhaps a triple-DCA thruster can operate 9 years. Initially, a multiple-cathode discharge chamber (MCDC) is designed and fabricated. Performance curves and grid-plane current uniformity indicate operation similar to other thrusters. Specifically, the configuration that balances both performance and uniformity provides a production cost of 194 W/A at 89% propellant efficiency with a flatness parameter of 0.55. One of the primary MCDC concerns is the effect an operating DCA has on the two dormant cathodes. Multiple experiments are conducted to determine plasma properties throughout the MCDC and near the dormant cathodes, including using "dummy" cathodes outfitted with plasma diagnostics and internal plasma property mapping. Results are utilized in an erosion analysis that suggests dormant cathodes suffer a maximum pre-operation erosion rate of 5--15 mum/khr (active DCA maximum erosion is 70 mum/khr). Lifetime predictions indicate that triple-DCA MCDC lifetime is approximately 2.5 times longer than a single-DCA thruster. Also, utilization of new keeper materials, such as carbon graphite, may significantly decrease both active and dormant cathode erosion, leading to a further increase in thruster lifetime. Finally, a theory based on the near-DCA plasma potential structure and propellant flow rate effects

  14. 3-D LDA study of a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Tatterson, Gary B.; Swan, David H.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at an axial Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry. The flow field survey resulted in mean velocity vector field plots and contour plots of the Reynolds stress tensor components. This paper presents contour plots in the planes of the jet minor and major axes at different axial locations. These data contribute substantially to currently available data of jet flow fields and will provide a valuable database for three-dimensional modeling.

  15. Studies with the Arapahoe smoke chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Samples of polymethyl methacrylate, polyvinyl chloride, polyester, and polystyrene were evaluated using the Arapahoe smoke chamber. These same materials had been previously evaluated using the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) smoke chamber. The percent smoke based on initial weight as determined using the Arapahoe smoke chamber appeared to correlate with the maximum specific optical density under flaming conditions as determined using the NBS smoke chamber. In addition, the percent smoke based on weight loss as determined using the Arapahoe smoke chamber appeared to correlate with the maximum specific optical density under nonflaming conditions as determined using the NBS smoke chamber. The Arapahoe smoke chamber also offers the advantage of high sample throughput and the possibility of related studies of smoke particulates.

  16. Tubular copper thrust chamber design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The use of copper tubular thrust chambers is particularly important in high performance expander cycle space engines. Tubular chambers have more surface area than flat wall chambers, and this extra surface area provides enhanced heat transfer for additional energy to power the cycle. This paper was divided into two sections: (1) a thermal analysis and sensitivity study; and (2) a preliminary design of a selected thrust chamber configuration. The thermal analysis consisted of a statistical optimization to determine the optimum tube geometry, tube booking, thrust chamber geometry, and cooling routing to achieve the maximum upper limit chamber pressure for a 25,000 pound thrust engine. The preliminary design effort produced a layout drawing of a tubular thrust chamber that is three inches shorter than the Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) milled channel chamber but is predicted to provide a five percent increase in heat transfer. Testing this chamber in the AETB would confirm the inherent advantages of tubular chamber construction and heat transfer.

  17. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzuto, D.

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an R{Phi} tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against {gamma} {yields} e {sup +} e{sup {minus}} events.

  18. Studying Phototropism Using a Small Growth Chamber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maryanna, F.; Llewellyn, Gerald C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive way to construct two small growth chambers for studying phototropism in the science classroom. One chamber is designed to illustrate how plants grow around obstacles to reach light and the other to illustrate directional light responses. (HM)

  19. Experimental study on mixing efficiency in water supply rectangular tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, A.; Medina, V.; Mujal, A.

    2009-04-01

    Phenomenon of mixing in drinking water storage tanks and reservoirs has a direct effect on the quality of water. Creation of poor mixing zones and volume stratification can have negative effects in public health. The design of a storage tank must consider the conditions of the inlet and outlets, and also their orientation (vertical or horizontal) to prevent the formation of these zones. Experiments done in a reduced scaled-model with a rectangular base and three different inlets (two waterfalls and a pipe inlet) had the objective to decide which of these inlets achieved the best mixing efficiency. Four situations were considered while three entrances, two unsteady: filling and drawing, and two steady with different outlets. Moreover the effects of columns that support the roof of the tank were studied by running the three entrances with and without columns in the four situations. Neglecting the viscous scale effects, the time taken to mix the volume stored depends on the distance between the inlet and the opposite wall as though as its orientation. Taking into account the whole tank columns have a negative effect on mixing efficiency although they divide the flux and create local zones of turbulence around them, increasing local mixing. Using a digital treating image technique the results are found in a quantitative way.

  20. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard J.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio and number of control surfaces. A doublet lattice approach is taken to compute generalized forces. A rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. Although, all parameters can be easily modified if desired.The focus of this paper is on tool presentation, verification and validation. This process is carried out in stages throughout the paper. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool. Therefore the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using V-g and V-f analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind tunnel results for the same structure. Finally a case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to V-g and V-f analysis. This also includes the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  1. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard J.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing-edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio, and number of control surfaces. Using this information, the generalized forces are computed using the doublet-lattice method. Using Roger's approximation, a rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. All parameters can be easily modified if desired. The focus of this paper is on tool presentation, verification, and validation. These processes are carried out in stages throughout the paper. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool, therefore, the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind-tunnel results for the same structure. A case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis, including the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  2. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard Jason; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2015-01-01

    This report introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing-edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio, and number of control surfaces. Using this information, the generalized forces are computed using the doublet-lattice method. Using Roger's approximation, a rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. All parameters can be easily modified if desired. The focus of this report is on tool presentation, verification, and validation. These processes are carried out in stages throughout the report. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool, therefore, the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind-tunnel results for the same structure. A case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis, including the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  3. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A; Peterson, P F; Scott, J M

    1998-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the fina optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 A) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change-outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. The work or portions of the work completed this year have been published in several papers and a dissertation [l-5].

  4. Quantitative study of rectangular waveguide behavior in the THz.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowen, Adam M.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement

    2009-10-01

    This report describes our efforts to quantify the behavior of micro-fabricated THz rectangular waveguides on a configurable, robust semiconductor-based platform. These waveguides are an enabling technology for coupling THz radiation directly from or to lasers, mixers, detectors, antennas, and other devices. Traditional waveguides fabricated on semiconductor platforms such as dielectric guides in the infrared or co-planar waveguides in the microwave regions, suffer high absorption and radiative losses in the THz. The former leads to very short propagation lengths, while the latter will lead to unwanted radiation modes and/or crosstalk in integrated devices. This project exploited the initial developments of THz micro-machined rectangular waveguides developed under the THz Grand Challenge Program, but instead of focusing on THz transceiver integration, this project focused on exploring the propagation loss and far-field radiation patterns of the waveguides. During the 9 month duration of this project we were able to reproduce the waveguide loss per unit of length in the waveguides and started to explore how the loss depended on wavelength. We also explored the far-field beam patterns emitted by H-plane horn antennas attached to the waveguides. In the process we learned that the method of measuring the beam patterns has a significant impact on what is actually measured, and this may have an effect on most of the beam patterns of THz that have been reported to date. The beam pattern measurements improved significantly throughout the project, but more refinements of the measurement are required before a definitive determination of the beam-pattern can be made.

  5. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  6. Experimental study of hollow rectangular bridge column performance under vertical and cyclically bilateral loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qiang; Du, Xiuli; Zhou, Yihui; Lee, George C.

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the seismic performance of hollow reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns of rectangular cross section under constant axial load and cyclically biaxial bending, five specimens were tested. A parametric study is carried out for different axial load ratios, longitudinal reinforcement ratios and lateral reinforcement ratios. The experimental results showed that all tested specimens failed in the flexural failure mode and their ultimate performance was dominated by flexural capacity, which is represented by the rupture/buckling of tensile longitudinal rebars at the bottom of the bridge columns. Biaxial force and displacement hysteresis loops showed significant stiffness and strength degradations, and the pinching effect and coupling interaction effect of both directions severely decrease the structural seismic resistance. However, the measured ductility coefficient varying from 3.5 to 5.7 and the equivalent viscous damping ratio varying from 0.19 and 0.26 can meet the requirements of the seismic design. The hollow RC rectangular bridge columns with configurations of lateral reinforcement in this study have excellent performance under bidirectional earthquake excitations, and may be considered as a substitute for current hollow RC rectangular section configurations described in the Guideline for Seismic Design of Highway Bridges (JTG/T B02-01-2008). The length of the plastic hinge region was found to approach one sixth of the hollow RC rectangular bridge column height for all specimen columns, and it was much less than those specified in the current JTG/T. Thus, the length of the plastic hinge region is more concentrated for RC rectangular hollow bridge columns.

  7. Streamer studies in Resistive Plate Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denni, U.; Felici, G.; Frani, M. A.; Mengucci, A.; Papalino, G.; Spinetti, M.; Paoloni, A.

    2011-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are widely used in high energy physics. While avalanche mode operation is mandatory in high rate environments (ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC), streamer mode operation is often preferred in low rate applications because of the high signal amplitude. Typical mixtures for streamer operation are composed of Argon, Tetrafluoroethane and Isobutane, with additions of SF 6 below 1% to reduce the charge delivered in the gas. In this paper, results about the streamer properties observed with different mixtures are presented.

  8. Numerical and experimental study of shock waves emanating from an open-ended rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroteeva, E. Yu.; Znamenskaya, I. A.; Glazyrin, F. N.; Sysoev, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    We examine the dynamics of a high-speed shock-induced flow near the open end of a shock tube using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and the background oriented schlieren (BOS) methods along with two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations. In experiments, planar shock waves (M=1.3 -1.6) are discharged from a rectangular (24 mm × 48 mm ) low-pressure section of a shock tube open to the atmosphere. Due to the rectangular exit geometry, the resulting flow is highly three-dimensional and, thus, more complicated, compared to well-studied circular/axisymmetric geometries. The study focuses on the spatio-temporal flow structure up to 1 ms after the shock wave diffraction. PIV and BOS visualization techniques share the same post-processing principle, and the iterative multi-step cross-correlation algorithm applied in the PIV software is adapted here for the calculation of background pattern displacement on the BOS images. Particular attention is given to the resolution of flow regions where sharp gradients are present, such as a diffracted shock front or embedded shocks. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the problem are also conducted to validate the experimental results and methods and to gain more insight into the three-dimensional flow dynamics. PIV and BOS images are found to be consistent with the corresponding numerical flow visualizations.

  9. Numerical and experimental study of shock waves emanating from an open-ended rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroteeva, E. Yu.; Znamenskaya, I. A.; Glazyrin, F. N.; Sysoev, N. N.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the dynamics of a high-speed shock-induced flow near the open end of a shock tube using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and the background oriented schlieren (BOS) methods along with two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations. In experiments, planar shock waves (M=1.3-1.6) are discharged from a rectangular (24 mm × 48 mm) low-pressure section of a shock tube open to the atmosphere. Due to the rectangular exit geometry, the resulting flow is highly three-dimensional and, thus, more complicated, compared to well-studied circular/axisymmetric geometries. The study focuses on the spatio-temporal flow structure up to 1 ms after the shock wave diffraction. PIV and BOS visualization techniques share the same post-processing principle, and the iterative multi-step cross-correlation algorithm applied in the PIV software is adapted here for the calculation of background pattern displacement on the BOS images. Particular attention is given to the resolution of flow regions where sharp gradients are present, such as a diffracted shock front or embedded shocks. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the problem are also conducted to validate the experimental results and methods and to gain more insight into the three-dimensional flow dynamics. PIV and BOS images are found to be consistent with the corresponding numerical flow visualizations.

  10. Collective Interaction in a Linear Array of Supersonic Rectangular Jets: A Linear Spatial Instability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1999-01-01

    A linear spatial instability model for multiple spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets is solved using Floquet-Bloch theory. It is assumed that in the region of interest a coherent wave can propagate. For the case studied large spatial growth rates are found. This work is motivated by an increase in mixing found in experimental measurements of spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets with phase-locked screech and edge tone feedback locked subsonic jets. The results obtained in this paper suggests that phase-locked screech or edge tones may produce correlated spatially periodic jet flow downstream of the nozzles which creates a large span wise multi-nozzle region where a coherent wave can propagate. The large spatial growth rates for eddies obtained by model calculation herein are related to the increased mixing since eddies are the primary mechanism that transfer energy from the mean flow to the large turbulent structures. Calculations of spacial growth rates will be presented for a set of relative Mach numbers and spacings for which experimental measurements have been made. Calculations of spatial growth rates are presented for relative Mach numbers from 1.25 to 1.75 with ratios of nozzle spacing to nozzle width ratios from s/w(sub N) = 4 to s/w(sub N) = 13.7. The model may be of significant scientific and engineering value in the quest to understand and construct supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles which provide increased mixing and reduced noise.

  11. Experimental study on the flame behaviors of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongliang; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Sining; Liu, Yi; Chu, Guanquan

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the flame propagation characteristics and tulip flame formation mechanism of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts, the techniques of Schlieren and high-speed video camera are used to study the flame behaviors of the premixed gases in a closed duct and opened one respectively, and the propagation characteristics in both cases and the formation mechanism of the tulip flame are analyzed. The results show that, the propagation flame in a closed duct is prior to form a tulip flame structure than that in an opened duct, and the tulip flame structure formation in a closed duct is related to the flame propagation velocity decrease. The sharp decrease of the flame propagation velocity is one of the reasons to the tulip flame formation, and the decrease of the flame propagation velocity is due to the decrease of the burned product flow velocity mainly.

  12. Study of compressible flow through a rectangular-to-semiannular transition duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Jeffry; Okiishi, Theodore H.; Wendt, Bruce J.; Reichert, Bruce A.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed flow field measurements are presented for compressible flow through a diffusing rectangular-to-semiannular transition duct. Comparisons are made with published computational results for flow through the duct. Three-dimensional velocity vectors and total pressures were measured at the exit plane of the diffuser model. The inlet flow was also measured. These measurements are made using calibrated five-hole probes. Surface oil flow visualization and surface static pressure data were also taken. The study was conducted with an inlet Mach number of 0.786. The diffuser Reynolds based on the inlet centerline velocity and the exit diameter of the diffuser was 3,200,000. Comparison of the measured data with previously published computational results are made. Data demonstrating the ability of vortex generators to reduce flow separation and circumferential distortion is also presented.

  13. Feasibility study of a Ka-/Ka-band dichroic plate with stepped rectangular apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    For the Cassini spacecraft mission, a dichroic plate is needed to pass Ka-band uplink (34.2 to 34.7 GHz) and to reflect Ka-band downlink (31.8 to 32.3 GHz) for dual-frequency operation in the Deep Space Network. The special characteristic of the Ka-/Ka-band dichroic plate is that the pass band and the reflective band are only 1.9 GHz (5.7 percent) apart. A thick dichroic plate with stepped rectangular apertures that function as resonator filters was chosen for the Ka-/Ka-band dichroic plate design. The results of the feasibility study are presented in this article.

  14. Experimental Study of Large-Amplitude Faraday Waves in Rectangular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Alexander, Iwan J.; Tin, Padetha; Adamovsky, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Experiment on single-mode Faraday waves having two, thee, and four wavelengths across a rectangular cylinder of high aspect ratio is the subject of discussion. Previous experiments recently done by Henderson & Miles (1989) and by Lei Jiang et. a1 (1996) focused on Faraday waves with one and two wavelengths across rectangular cylinders. In this experimental study the waves steepness ranges from small at threshold levels to a large amplitude which according to Penny & Price theory (1952) approaches the maximum sustainable amplitude for a standing wave. The waves characteristics for small amplitudes are evaluated against an existing well known linear theory by Benjamin & Ursell (l954) and against a weakly nonlinear theory by J. Miles (1984) which includes the effect of viscous damping. The evaluation includes the wave neutral stability and damping rate. In addition, a wave amplitude differential equation of a linear theory including viscous effect by Cerda & Tirapegui (1998) is solved numerically to yield prediction of temporal profiles of both wave damping and wave formation at the threshold. An interesting finding from this exercise is that the fluid kinematic viscosity needs to increase ten times in order to obtain good agreement between the theoretical prediction and the experimental data for both wave damping and wave starting. For large amplitude waves, the experimental data are evaluated against the theory of Penny & Price which predicts wave characteristics of any amplitude up to the point at which the wave reaches its maximum amplitude attainable for a standing wave. The theory yields two criteria to show the maximum wave steepness, the vertical acceleration at the wave crest of half the earth gravity field acceleration and the including angle at the crest of 90 degrees. Comparison with experimental data shows close agreement for the wave crest acceleration but a large discrepancy for the including angle. Additional information is included in the original

  15. A guide to Ussing chamber studies of mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Lane L.

    2009-01-01

    The Ussing chamber provides a physiological system to measure the transport of ions, nutrients, and drugs across various epithelial tissues. One of the most studied epithelia is the intestine, which has provided several landmark discoveries regarding the mechanisms of ion transport processes. Adaptation of this method to mouse intestine adds the dimension of investigating genetic loss or gain of function as a means to identify proteins or processes affecting transepithelial transport. In this review, the principles underlying the use of Ussing chambers are outlined including limitations and advantages of the technique. With an emphasis on mouse intestinal preparations, the review covers chamber design, commercial equipment sources, tissue preparation, step-by-step instruction for operation, troubleshooting, and examples of interpretation difficulties. Specialized uses of the Ussing chamber such as the pH stat technique to measure transepithelial bicarbonate secretion and isotopic flux methods to measure net secretion or absorption of substrates are discussed in detail, and examples are given for the adaptation of Ussing chamber principles to other measurement systems. The purpose of the review is to provide a practical guide for investigators who are new to the Ussing chamber method. PMID:19342508

  16. The study and development of the empirical correlations equation of natural convection heat transfer on vertical rectangular sub-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, Ketut; Umar, Efrizon; Sudjatmi, K. S.

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on natural convection heat transfer using a vertical rectangular sub-channel and water as the coolant fluid. To conduct this study has been made pipe heaters are equipped with thermocouples. Each heater is equipped with five thermocouples along the heating pipes. The diameter of each heater is 2.54 cm and 45 cm in length. The distance between the central heating and the pitch is 29.5 cm. Test equipment is equipped with a primary cooling system, a secondary cooling system and a heat exchanger. The purpose of this study is to obtain new empirical correlations equations of the vertical rectangular sub-channel, especially for the natural convection heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders rectangular arrangement sub-channels. The empirical correlation equation can support the thermo-hydraulic analysis of research nuclear reactors that utilize cylindrical fuel rods, and also can be used in designing of baffle-free vertical shell and tube heat exchangers. The results of this study that the empirical correlation equations of natural convection heat transfer coefficients with rectangular arrangement is Nu = 6.3357 (Ra.Dh/x)0.0740.

  17. Photochemistry of Glyoxal in Wet Aerosols: Smog Chamber Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Kim, H.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous chemistry is an important pathway for the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Reaction vessel studies provide evidence that in the aqueous phase photooxidation of water soluble organic compounds (e.g., glyoxal, methylglyoxal) form multifunctional organic products and oligomers. In this work, we extend this bulk-phase chemistry to the condensed-phase chemistry that occurs in/on aerosols by conducting smog chamber experiments — photooxidation of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols containing glyoxal and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of NOx under dry/humid conditions. Particles were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). In the irradiated chamber, photooxidation products of glyoxal as seen in reaction vessel experiments (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids) were also formed in both ammonium sulfate aerosols and sulfuric acid aerosols at humid and even dry conditions. However, the major products were organosulfurs (CHOS), organonitrogens (CHON), and nitrooxy-organosulfates (CHONS), which were also dominantly formed in the dark chamber. These products were formed via non-radical reactions, which depend on acidity and humidity. However, the real-time profiles in the dark chamber and the irradiated chamber were very different, suggesting photochemistry substantially affects non-radical formation in the condensed phase.

  18. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.; Buksa, J.J.; Creedson, R.L.; Erlandson, O.D.; Levine, H.E.; Roelant, D.F.; Sanchez, H.W.; Schrader, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li/sub 2/O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li/sub 2/O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li/sub 2/O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive.

  19. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Results show that the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid and that the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline. Moreover, the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  20. Supersonic jets from bevelled rectangular nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Raman, Ganesh

    1993-01-01

    The influence of nozzle exit geometry on jet mixing and noise production was studied experimentally for a series of rectangular nozzles operating at supersonic jet velocities. Both converging (C) and converging-diverging (C-D) nozzles were built with asymmetrical (single bevel) and symmetrical (double bevel) exit chambers and with conventional straight exits for comparison. About a four decibel reduction of peak mixing noise was observed for the double bevelled C-D nozzle operated at design pressure ratio. All bevelled geometries provided screech noise reduction for under-expanded jets and an upstream mixing noise directivity shift which would be beneficial for improved acoustic treatment performance of a shrouded system.

  1. Parametric experimental studies on mixing characteristics within a low area ratio rectangular supersonic gaseous ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, S. K.; Rao, Srisha M. V.; Jagadeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2016-07-01

    We use the rectangular gaseous supersonic ejector as a platform to study the mixing characteristics of a confined supersonic jet. The entrainment ratio (ER) of the ejector, the non-mixed length (LNM), and potential core length (LPC) of the primary supersonic jet are measures to characterize mixing within the supersonic ejector. Experiments are carried out on a low area ratio rectangular supersonic ejector with air as the working fluid in both primary and secondary flows. The design Mach number of the nozzle (MPD = 1.5-3.0) and primary flow stagnation pressure (Pop = 4.89-9.89 bars) are the parameters that are varied during experimentation. Wall static pressure measurements are carried out to understand the performance of the ejector as well as to estimate the LNM (the spatial resolution is limited by the placement of pressure transducers). Well-resolved flow images (with a spatial resolution of 50 μm/pixel and temporal resolution of 1.25 ms) obtained through Planar Laser Mie Scattering (PLMS) show the flow dynamics within the ejector with clarity. The primary flow and secondary flow are seeded separately with acetone that makes the LNM and LPC clearly visible in the flow images. These parameters are extracted from the flow images using in-house image processing routines. A significant development in this work is the definition of new scaling parameters within the ejector. LNM, non-dimensionalized with respect to the fully expanded jet height hJ, is found to be a linear function of the Mach number ratio (Mach number ratio is defined as the ratio of design Mach number (MPD) and fully expanded Mach number (MPJ) of the primary jet). This definition also provides a clear demarcation of under-expanded and over-expanded regimes of operation according to [MPD/MPJ] > 1 and [MPD/MPJ] < 1, respectively. It is observed that the ER increased in over-expanded mode (to 120%) and decreased in under-expanded mode (to 68%). Similarly, LNM decreased (to 21.8%) in over-expanded mode

  2. An experimental study of convective heat transfer in radially rotating rectangular ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, C.Y.; Lin, S.T.; Hwang, G.J. )

    1991-08-01

    The paper presents an experimental study of convective heat transfer in radially rotating isothermal rectangular ducts with various height and width aspect ratios. The convective heat transfer is affected by secondary flows resulting from Coriolis force and the buoyancy flow, which is in turn due to the centrifugal force in the duct. The growth and strength of the secondary flow depend on the rotational Rayleigh number. The aspect ratio of the duct may affect the secondary flow and the buoyancy flow, and therefore is also a critical parameter in the heat transfer mechanism. In the present work the effects of the main flow, the rotational speed, and the aspect ratio {gamma} on heat transfer are subjects of major interest. Ducts of aspect ratios {gamma} = 5, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.2 at rotational speed up to 3,000 rpm are studied. The main flow Reynolds number ranges from 700 to 20,000 to cover the laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes in the duct flow. Thest data and discussion are presented.

  3. Experimental study of an upward sub-cooled forced convection in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouidri, A.; Madani, B.; Roubi, B.; Hamadouche, A.

    2016-07-01

    The upward sub-cooled forced convection in a rectangular channel is investigated experimentally. The aim of the present work is the studying of the local heat transfer phenomena. Concerning the experimentation: the n-pentane is used as a working fluid, the independent variables are: the velocity in the range from 0.04 to 0.086 m/s and heat flux density with values between 1.8 and 7.36 W/cm2. The results show that the local Nusselt number distribution is not uniform along the channel; however, uniformity is observed in the mean Nusselt number for Reynolds under 1600. On the other hand, a new correlation to predict the local fluid temperature is established as a function of local wall temperature. The wall's heat is dissipated under the common effect of the sub-cooled regime; therefore, the local heat transfer coefficient is increased. The study of the thermal equilibrium showed that for Reynolds less than 1500; almost all of the heat flux generated by the heater cartridges is absorbed by the fluid.

  4. Studying gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherdantsev, Andrey; Hann, David; Azzopardi, Barry

    2013-11-01

    High-speed LIF-technique is applied to study gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with 161 mm width. Instantaneous distributions of film thickness resolved in both longitudinal and transverse coordinates were obtained with a frequency of 10 kHz and spatial resolution from 0.125 mm to 0.04 mm. Processes of generation of fast and slow ripples by disturbance waves are the same as described in literature for downwards annular pipe flow. Disturbance waves are often localized by transverse coordinate and may have curved or slanted fronts. Fast ripples, covering disturbance waves, are typically horseshoe-shaped and placed in staggered order. Their characteristic transverse size is of order 1 cm and it decreases with gas velocity. Entrainment of liquid from film surface can also be visualized. Mechanisms of ripple disruption, known as ``bag break-up'' and ``ligament break-up,'' were observed. Both mechanisms may occur on the same disturbance waves. Various scenarios of droplet deposition on the liquid film are observed, including the impact, slow sinking and bouncing, characterized by different outcome of secondary droplets or entrapped bubbles. Number and size of bubbles increase greatly inside the disturbance waves. Both quantities increase with gas and liquid flow rates. EPSRC Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1), and Roll-Royce UTC (Nottingham, for access to flow facility).

  5. Nanoindentation experiments for single-layer rectangular graphene films: a molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A molecular dynamics study on nanoindentation experiments is carried out for some single-layer rectangular graphene films with four edges clamped. Typical load–displacement curves are obtained, and the effects of various factors including indenter radii, loading speeds, and aspect ratios of the graphene film on the simulation results are discussed. A formula describing the relationship between the load and indentation depth is obtained according to the molecular dynamics simulation results. Young’s modulus and the strength of the single-layer graphene film are measured as about 1.0 TPa and 200 GPa, respectively. It is found that the graphene film ruptured in the central point at a critical indentation depth. The deformation mechanisms and dislocation activities are discussed in detail during the loading-unloading-reloading process. It is observed from the simulation results that once the loading speed is larger than the critical loading speed, the maximum force exerted on the graphene film increases and the critical indentation depth decreases with the increase of the loading speed. PMID:24447765

  6. Design and experiment study of compact circular-rectangular waveguide mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuhao; Yuan, Chengwei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Lishan

    2016-07-01

    A compact mode converter that transforms TM01 circular waveguide mode to TE10 rectangular waveguide mode is investigated. It consists of a circular waveguide with a short circuit terminal and a rectangular waveguide which is perpendicular to the circular waveguide. Simulation results show that conversion efficiency of the mode converter is about 99.8% at central frequency of 1.75 GHz, and the total return loss is approximately -30 dB. The experimental results are well consistent with the computer simulation, which demonstrates the feasibility and high power handling capacity of the mode converter.

  7. A chamber for laboratory studies of atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narus, M. L.; Schoenfelder, N. C.; Na, Y.; Chavasse, L. A.; Disselkamp, R. S.

    1996-12-01

    A stainless-steel chamber has been constructed and interfaced to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for the purpose of studying laboratory simulated atmospheric aerosols and clouds. The chamber is cylindrical in design and is comprised of a double-walled inner assembly that resides within an outer vacuum jacket. The volume of the aerosol sample region is 28 L. By circulating refrigerated methanol between the double walls of the inner assembly, constant temperature control of the sample region can be maintained between 187 and 300 K. A study of temperature uniformity within the chamber at 291, 240, and 187 K revealed a standard deviation in temperature of 1.6 K as determined from measurements made using five copper-constantan thermocouples. Good agreement is obtained between thermocouple measured temperatures and rotational temperatures computed from infrared absorption spectra of methane gas. The chamber described here has been used to examine heterogeneous chemistry of solid powder samples. A technique of generating an aerosol sample by rapidly dispersing a solid powder in a gas is presented. The half-life of a γ-alumina aerosol sample was measured to be 25 min.

  8. Theoretical and numerical studies of plume flows in vacuum chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chunpei

    This thesis consists of three parts: a study of facility effects on the background flow in large vacuum chambers; an analytical study of free molecular flows out of exits with different shape representing thruster plumes; and particle simulations of plasma plume flows from a cluster of Hall thrusters. The first part of this thesis discusses the facility effects on large vacuum chambers, which is quite important to the Electric Propulsion (EP) community. Based on the fact that the background flows in large vacuum chambers equipped with cryogenic pumps are free molecular, five models are proposed to study the average background pressure and flow velocity and their relation to several facility effects, such as pump sticking coefficient, pump size, wall and pump temperatures, and chamber sidewall length. The analysis are based on the mass flow rates into and out of the chamber, the fluxes along two directions and various number density relations at various stations such as chamber ends and vacuum pumps. The second part of the thesis develops several sets of analytical solutions to free molecular flows out of exits with different shapes. It is demonstrated that the plasma plume flows expanding into vacuum can be studied analytically as a combination of several free molecular flows, if the electric field and collision effects are omitted. There exists a unique relation of velocity and positions. The last part of the thesis presents several three-dimensional particle simulations of plasma plume flows from a cluster of Hall thrusters. A detailed electron fluid model is used to solve important electron properties such as plasma potential and electron temperature. A finite element solver is developed to solve the equations of the electron properties on unstructured meshes. Several important implementation issues are discussed and one significant finding is that the class of particle-to-node weighting schemes based on areas or volumes on an unstructured mesh is inaccurate

  9. Chamber for dielectric studies at temperatures to 2100K

    SciTech Connect

    Bozhko, I.V.

    1985-08-01

    A cylindrical chamber of aluminum oxide for electrophysical studies of gaseous and solid dielectrics at high temperatures is described. The gas pressure in the chamber is atmospheric. An easily ionized admixture in the form of vapor of an alkali metal (K or Na) can be introduced into the gas. A high temperature is produced by an electric resistance furnace that allows heating to 2100 degrees K in an oxidizing medium without special shielding means. The use of materials such as A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and PtRh alloys makes it possible to conduct research that minimizes the level of contamination of the medium under study by vapors of the elements of the apparatus.

  10. Biomass production chamber air analysis of wheat study (BWT931)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, J. H.; Peterson, B. V.; Berdis, E.; Wheeler, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) biomass production chamber at John F. Kennedy Space Center provides a test bed for bioregenerative studies using plants to provide food, oxygen, carbon dioxide removal, and potable water to humans during long term space travel. Growing plants in enclosed environments has brought about concerns regarding the level of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) emitted from plants and the construction materials that make up the plant growth chambers. In such closed systems, the potential exists for some VOC's to reach toxic levels and lead to poor plant growth, plant death, or health problems for human inhabitants. This study characterized the air in an enclosed environment in which wheat cv. Yocora Rojo was grown. Ninty-four whole air samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry throughout the eighty-four day planting. VOC emissions from plants and materials were characterized and quantified.

  11. Study of Daedalus Interstellar Spacecraft Reaction Chamber and Thrust Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. K.; Benaroya, H.

    Project Daedalus was the 1978 trade study that proved the feasibility of space travel utilizing fusion-based propulsion (Inertial Confinement Fusion). This paper analyzes some of the key structural aspects of the Daedalus spacecraft, in particular, the reaction chamber and thrust structure that is integral to the Daedalus spacecraft, which supports the loads resulting from the fusion reactions. First, the reaction chamber is studied computationally in terms of static loading and vibrational characteristics utilizing the finite element method. Next, a proposed bracing system is integrated into the reaction chamber and the effects are studied. Lastly, the field coils with their supporting truss structure are added to the assembly. Concepts are introduced for actuators and course-correction mechanisms that ensure the spacecraft maintains the required trajectory to rendezvous with the target system. Present-day materials and manufacturing considerations are explored based on the assumptions made in the Daedalus study. Testing, qualification, and assembly of the spacecraft are also discussed. This paper is a summary of the first author's Master's Thesis at Rutgers University.

  12. Environmental chamber studies of atmospheric reactivities of volatile organic compounds: Effects of varying chamber and light source

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.; Luo, D.; Malkina, I.; Pierce, J.

    1995-05-01

    Photochemical oxidant models are essential tools for assessing effects of emissions changes on ground-level ozone formation. Such models are needed for predicting the ozone impacts of increased alternative fuel use. The gas-phase photochemical mechanism is an important component of these models because ozone is not emitted directly, but is formed from the gas-phase photochemical reactions of the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in air. The chemistry of ground level ozone formation is complex; hundreds of types of VOCs being emitted into the atmosphere, and most of their atmospheric reactions are not completely understood. Because of this, no chemical model can be relied upon to give even approximately accurate predictions unless it has been evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data. Therefore an experimental and modeling study was conducted to assess how chemical mechanism evaluations using environmental chamber data are affected by the light source and other chamber characteristics. Xenon arc lights appear to give the best artificial representation of sunlight currently available, and experiments were conducted in a new Teflon chamber constructed using such a light source. Experiments were also conducted in an outdoor Teflon Chamber using new procedures to improve the light characterization, and in Teflon chambers using blacklights. These results, and results of previous runs other chambers, were compared with model predictions using an updated detailed chemical mechanism. The magnitude of the chamber radical source assumed when modeling the previous runs were found to be too high; this has implications in previous mechanism evaluations. Temperature dependencies of chamber effects can explain temperature dependencies in chamber experiments when Ta-300{degree}K, but not at temperatures below that.

  13. A new chamber for studying the behavior of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jasper C; Dickinson, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Methods available for quickly and objectively quantifying the behavioral phenotypes of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, lag behind in sophistication the tools developed for manipulating their genotypes. We have developed a simple, easy-to-replicate, general-purpose experimental chamber for studying the ground-based behaviors of fruit flies. The major innovative feature of our design is that it restricts flies to a shallow volume of space, forcing all behavioral interactions to take place within a monolayer of individuals. The design lessens the frequency that flies occlude or obscure each other, limits the variability in their appearance, and promotes a greater number of flies to move throughout the center of the chamber, thereby increasing the frequency of their interactions. The new chamber design improves the quality of data collected by digital video and was conceived and designed to complement automated machine vision methodologies for studying behavior. Novel and improved methodologies for better quantifying the complex behavioral phenotypes of Drosophila will facilitate studies related to human disease and fundamental questions of behavioral neuroscience. PMID:20111707

  14. Aeroelastic Studies of a Rectangular Wing with a Hole: Correlation of Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conyers, Howard J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    Two rectangular wing models with a hole have been designed and tested in the Duke University wind tunnel to better understand the effects of damage. A rectangular hole is used to simulate damage. The wing with a hole is modeled structurally as a thin elastic plate using the finite element method. The unsteady aerodynamics of the plate-like wing with a hole is modeled using the doublet lattice method. The aeroelastic equations of motion are derived using Lagrange's equation. The flutter boundary is found using the V-g method. The hole's location effects the wing's mass, stiffness, aerodynamics and therefore the aeroelastic behavior. Linear theoretical models were shown to be capable of predicting the critical flutter velocity and frequency as verified by wind tunnel tests.

  15. Experimental Study of RC Rectangular Liquid Containing Structures Retrofitted with GFRP Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, R.; Ziari, A.; Kianoush, M. R.

    2010-04-01

    The continual functioning of Liquid Containing Structures “LCS” is necessary for the well being of a society. These structures are designed based on serviceability criteria such as cracking that leads to leakage. Cracks form in liquid containing structures (LCS) for different reasons such as restrained thermal and shrinkage deformations, applied external loads such as earthquake loads, etc. These cracks can create exposure condition to initiate the corrosion process in reinforcement. The effectiveness of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites in recovering the structural strength of damaged members is widely recognized by engineers. However, the effectiveness on the use of GFRP composites as a protecting layer to prevent the passage of liquid through the cracks has not yet been reported in the literature. This concept inspires the main purpose of the investigation in this experimental study. Cracked reinforced concrete specimens subjected to different conditions of loading such as direct tension and cyclic flexure are repaired externally using GFRP sheets. The specimens are then subjected to hydrostatic pressure using a water pressure chamber at the crack location. This study shows that the application of GFRP composites for crack remediation in liquid containing structures could be very effective under monotonic loading. However, the effectiveness under cyclic flexure especially under higher load levels is questionable.

  16. Experimental study of cross flow mixing in cylindrical and rectangular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; Vranos, A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of non-reacting cross flow jet injection and mixing in cylindrical and rectangular ducts has been conducted with application to a low emissions combustor. Quantitative measurement of injectant concentration distributions perpendicular to the duct axis were obtained by planar digital imaging of the Mie-scattered light from an aerosol seed mixed with the injectant. The flowfield unmixedness was evaluated using (1) a mixing parameter derived from the ratio of the jet concentration fluctuations to the fully mixed concentration, and (2) probability density functions of the concentration distributions. Mixing rate was measured for 45 degree slant slot and round orifice injectors.

  17. Heat transfer studies on a rectangular channel with offset plate fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jeffrey M.

    1993-12-01

    Convective heat transfer characteristics of a liquid cooled rectangular channel, containing offset plate fins, were investigated experimentally. The selected geometry was a 10x model of the fluid circulation passages in the commercially available SEM-E type electronic cooling modules. The test surface containing fins was made of aluminum and was heated at its base by a thermofoil heater. The Reynolds numbers were varied between 100-800, with water as the cooling fluid. Surface temperature measurements on the heated surface were used to determine the Colburn j factor. The effects of natural convection were also investigated.

  18. Experimental study of the water jet induced by underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koita, T.; Zhu, Y.; Sun, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation on the effects of explosion depth and tube width on the water jet induced by an underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube. The water jet formation and bubble structure were evaluated from the images recorded by a high-speed video camera. Two typical patterns of jet formation and four general patterns of bubble implosion were observed, depending on the explosion depth and tube width. The velocity of the water jet was calculated from the recorded images. The jet velocity was observed to depend on not only the explosion depth and energy, but also on the tube width. We proposed an empirical formula defining the water jet velocity in the tube as a function of the tube width and explosion depth and energy.

  19. Study of the far wake vortex field generated by a rectangular airfoil in a water tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lezius, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    Underwater towing experiments were carried out with a rectangular airfoil of aspect ratio 5.3 at 4 and 8 deg angles of attack and at chord-based Reynolds numbers between 2 x 100,000 and 7.5 x 100,000. Quantitative measurements by means of the hydrogen bubble technique indicated lower peak swirl velocities in the range of 100 to 1000 lenghts downstream than have been measured in wind tunnel of flight tests. The maximum circumferential velocity decayed whereas the turbulent eddy viscosity increased. This behavior and other known rates of vortex decay are explained in terms of an analytical solution for the vortex problem with time varying eddy viscosity. It is shown that this case corresponds to nonequilibrium turbulent vortex flow.

  20. Airflow studies in a forced ventilated chamber with low partitions

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.K.; Tsui, K.F.

    1995-12-31

    A climate chamber was used to study experimentally the airflow characteristics in a ventilated space with low partitions. Two types of commonly used air distribution devices were selected for the study--a ceiling diffuser and side grille systems. A total of 16 tests were performed using the two diffusers with partition heights varying up to 1.8 m (5.91 ft) above floor level. From the measured results, the thermal comfort indices were assessed. A stabilization effect of airflow was found when the partition height reached 1.8 m (5.91 ft). Local draft risk was located in the occupied zone. Also, the modified Archimedes number proposed by Jackman (1990) was used to describe the indoor airflow in the absence of a workable design guide for partitioned spaces.

  1. Potassium Rankine cycle vapor chamber (heat pipe) radiator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrels, E. E.; Killen, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    A structurally integrated vapor chamber fin (heat pipe) radiator is defined and evaluated as a potential candidate for rejecting waste heat from the potassium Rankine cycle powerplant. Several vapor chamber fin geometries, using stainless steel construction, are evaluated and an optimum is selected. A comparison is made with an operationally equivalent conduction fin radiator. Both radiators employ NaK-78 in the primary coolant loop. In addition, the Vapor Chamber Fin (VCF) radiator utilizes sodium in the vapor chambers. Preliminary designs are developed for the conduction fin and VCF concepts. Performance tests on a single vapor chamber were conducted to verify the VCF design. A comparison shows the conduction fin radiator easier to fabricate, but heavier in weight, particularly as meteoroid protection requirements become more stringent. While the analysis was performed assuming the potassium Rankine cycle powerplant, the results are equally applicable to any system radiating heat to space in the 900 to 1400 F temperature range.

  2. Resonant Interaction of a Linear Array of Supersonic Rectangular Jets: an Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Taghavi, Ray

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines a supersonic multi jet interaction problem that we believe is likely to be important for mixing enhancement and noise reduction in supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles. We demonstrate that it is possible to synchronize the screech instability of four rectangular jets by precisely adjusting the inter jet spacing. Our experimental data agrees with a theory that assumes that the phase-locking of adjacent jets occurs through a coupling at the jet lip. Although the synchronization does not change the frequency of the screech tone, its amplitude is augmented by 10 dB. The synchronized multi jets exhibit higher spreading than the unsynchronized jets, with the single jet spreading the least. We compare the nearfield noise of the four jets with synchronized screech to the noise of the sum of four jets operated individually. Our noise measurements reveal that the more rapid mixing of the synchronized multi jets causes the peak jet noise source to move up stream and to radiate noise at larger angles to the flow direction. Based on our results, we believe that screech synchronization is advantageous for noise reduction internal to a mixer-ejector nozzle, since the noise can now be suppressed by a shorter acoustically lined ejector.

  3. A computational study of laminar and turbulent flows in rotating rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asan, Habip

    This work is concerned with fully developed incompressible laminar and turbulent flows through rectangular straight ducts rotating in an orthogonal mode. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method for low to high rotation rates. Solutions are obtained for aspect ratios 1, 2, and 3. For laminar flow, predictions have been performed for Reynolds number of 2000 and for turbulent flow the computations were carried out for a Reynolds number of 20000. The standard k-epsilon model is used to model the turbulence. Low rotational speeds cause the formation of a pair of symmetric vortices on the cross-section. At higher rotational speeds, a more complex four-vortex structure develops. The transition point depends on the cross-sectional geometry. Moreover, over a range of Rossby numbers, either two- or four-vortex solutions are possible. The rotation leads to significant differences between the values of friction factor and Nusselt number on the suction and pressure sides of the duct.

  4. A high resolution streamer chamber for use in heavy quark studies

    SciTech Connect

    Majka, R.D.; Disco, A.A.; Hissong, J.G.; Rotondo, F.S.; Sandweiss, J.; Slaughter, A.J.; Wolin, E.J.

    1989-02-01

    For several years the authors have been developing the diffusion suppressed streamer chamber for use as a triggerable vertex detector in heavy quark studies. This streamer chamber makes use of a novel technique the author's have developed to substantially improve the resolution of a high pressure streamer chamber. Conventional streamer chambers which operate at one atmosphere have streamers with 1 - 2mm diameters. This size can be reduced by operating the chamber at high pressure. The streamer diameter will be reduced by about 1/p (p = pressure in atm.).

  5. A perfusion chamber for physiological studies with acutely dissociated neurons.

    PubMed

    Wonderlin, W F; Weinreich, D

    1987-11-01

    We describe a recording chamber that immobilizes acutely dissociated neurons on an ultra-fine mesh grid positioned above a moving stream of perfusate. This chamber is easily fabricated and has two attributes for single-electrode voltage-clamp or patch-clamp recording: (1) shallow immersion (less than 20 micron) of the neurons, and (2) stable recording with rapid perfusion rates. PMID:3695568

  6. Numerical Study Of The Heat Transfer Phenomenon Of A Rectangular Plate Including Void, Notch Using Finite Difference Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb Nath, S. K.; Peyada, N. K.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we have developed a code using Matlab software for solving a rectangular aluminum plate having void, notch, at different boundary conditions discretizing a two dimensional (2D) heat conduction equation by the finite difference technique. We have solved a 2D mixed boundary heat conduction problem analytically using Fourier integrals (Deb Nath et al., 2006; 2007; 2007; Deb Nath and Ahmed, 2008; Deb Nath, 2008; Deb Nath and Afsar, 2009; Deb Nath and Ahmed, 2009; 2009; Deb Nath et al., 2010; Deb Nath, 2013) and the same problem is also solved using the present code developed by the finite difference technique (Ahmed et al., 2005; Deb Nath, 2002; Deb Nath et al., 2008; Ahmed and Deb Nath, 2009; Deb Nath et al., 2011; Mohiuddin et al., 2012). To verify the soundness of the present heat conduction code results using the finite difference method, the distribution of temperature at some sections of a 2D heated plate obtained by the analytical method is compared with those of the plate obtained by the present finite difference method. Interpolation technique is used as an example when the boundary of the plate does not pass through the discretized grid points of the plate. Sometimes hot and cold fluids are passed through rectangular channels in industries and many types of technical equipment. The distribution of temperature of plates including notches, slots with different temperature boundary conditions are studied. Transient heat transfer in several pure metallic plates is also studied to find out the required time to reach equilibrium temperature. So, this study will help find design parameters of such structures.

  7. Theoretical study of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Meng, Dan; He, Yuehong; Wang, Heyi

    2013-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers has been theoretically studied for tritium measurements in gaseous form. A one-dimension model is introduced to establish the quantitative relationship between energy deposition rate and many factors, including carrier gas, gas pressure, wall material, chamber size, and gas temperature. Energy deposition rate has been calculated at pressure varying from 5 kPa to 500 kPa based on some approximations. It is found that energy deposition rate varies greatly for different parameters, especially at low gas pressure. For the same chamber, energy deposition rate in argon is much higher than in deuterium, as much as 70.7% higher at 5 kPa. Gold plated chamber gives highest energy deposition rate in the calculations while aluminum chamber results in the lowest. As chamber size gets smaller, β ray emitted by tritium will deposit less energy in the sensitive region of the chamber. For chambers flowing through with the same gas, energy deposition rate in a 10 L chamber is 23.9% higher than in a 0.05 L chamber at 5 kPa. Gas temperature also places slight influence on energy deposition rate, and 373 K will lead to 6.7% lower deposition rate than 233 K at 5 kPa. In addition, experiments have been performed to obtain energy deposition rate in a gold plated chamber, which show good accordance with theoretical calculations.

  8. Theoretical study of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Meng, Dan; He, Yuehong; Wang, Heyi

    2013-10-15

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers has been theoretically studied for tritium measurements in gaseous form. A one-dimension model is introduced to establish the quantitative relationship between energy deposition rate and many factors, including carrier gas, gas pressure, wall material, chamber size, and gas temperature. Energy deposition rate has been calculated at pressure varying from 5 kPa to 500 kPa based on some approximations. It is found that energy deposition rate varies greatly for different parameters, especially at low gas pressure. For the same chamber, energy deposition rate in argon is much higher than in deuterium, as much as 70.7% higher at 5 kPa. Gold plated chamber gives highest energy deposition rate in the calculations while aluminum chamber results in the lowest. As chamber size gets smaller, β ray emitted by tritium will deposit less energy in the sensitive region of the chamber. For chambers flowing through with the same gas, energy deposition rate in a 10 L chamber is 23.9% higher than in a 0.05 L chamber at 5 kPa. Gas temperature also places slight influence on energy deposition rate, and 373 K will lead to 6.7% lower deposition rate than 233 K at 5 kPa. In addition, experiments have been performed to obtain energy deposition rate in a gold plated chamber, which show good accordance with theoretical calculations.

  9. A plant chamber system with downstream reaction chamber to study the effects of pollution on biogenic emissions.

    PubMed

    Timkovsky, J; Gankema, P; Pierik, R; Holzinger, R

    2014-01-01

    A system of two plant chambers and a downstream reaction chamber has been set up to investigate the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and possible effects of pollutants such as ozone. The system can be used to compare BVOC emissions from two sets of differently treated plants, or to study the photochemistry of real plant emissions under polluted conditions without exposing the plants to pollutants. The main analytical tool is a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) which allows online monitoring of biogenic emissions and chemical degradation products. The identification of BVOCs and their oxidation products is aided by cryogenic trapping and subsequent in situ gas chromatographic analysis. PMID:25068256

  10. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazines: Environmental chamber studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of fuel hydrazines were studied in a 6500-liter fluorocarbon-film chamber at 80 to 100 ppm concentrations. First-order rate constants for the reactions catalyzed by aluminum, water-damaged aluminum (Al/Al2O3), stainless steel 304L, galvanized steel and titanium plates with surface areas of 2 to 24 sq m were determined. With 23.8 sq m of Al/Al2O3 the surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazine had a half-life of 2 hours, diimide (N2H2) was observed as an intermediate and traces of ammonia were present in the final product mixture. The Al/Al2O3 catalyzed oxidation of monomethylhydrazine yielded methyldiazine (HN = NCH3) as an intermediate and traces of methanol. Unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine gave no detectable products. The relative reactivities of hydrazine, MMH and UDMH were 130 : 7.3 : 1.0, respectively. The rate constants for Al/Al2O3-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and MMH were proportional to the square of the surface area of the plates. Mechanisms for the surface-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and diimide and the formation of ammonia are proposed.

  11. Experimental study of columnar recombination in fission chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliatre, P.; Lamirand, V.; Geslot, B.; Jammes, C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present experimental saturation curves of a small gap miniature fission chamber obtained in the MINERVE reactor. The chamber is filled with argon at various pressures, and the fissile material can be coated on the anode, cathode, or both. For analyzing the recombination regime, we consider a model of columnar recombination and discuss its applicability to our chamber. By applying this model to the data, it is possible to estimate the ratio between the recombination coefficient k and an effective column radius b, appearing in the model, to be k / b =(2.5 ± 0.9) ×10-6m2 / s for argon. From these results, a routine measurement of the recombination regime is proposed in order to detect gas leakage. This online diagnosis would be beneficial in terms of lifetime and reliability of the neutron instrumentation of nuclear reactors.

  12. A Survey of Environmental Microbial Flora During Closed Chamber Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Groves, Theron O.; Bell-Robinson, Denetia; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Services, Inc. and NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX As NASA prepares for long-term missions aboard the International Space Station and the eventual exploration of Mars, closed-environment chambers on Earth have become important test beds for systems evaluations. During 2 separate studies of a selfcontained ecosystem containing 4 crewmembers, microbial surveys of samples from 13 surface and 3 air sites were performed. Microbial concentration of samples from surface sites with frequent water contact (e.g., urinal, sink) did not indicate significantly higher levels of contamination than drier areas, though surface cleaning by the crew may have influenced this conclusion. Changes in bacterial diversity on surface sites implied that the number of transient species was high, suggesting movement by crew activities, aerosols, or both. A non-linear relationship between bacterial diversity and enumeration from surface samples indicated that a rapid increase occurred in the number of species as cell concentration increased to 5 CFU/sq cm. Above this concentration, the number of different bacterial species varied between 11 and 16. Airborne bacteria and fungi averaged only 160 and 1 CFU/m3, respectively. Microbial contamination of the potable water system primarily consisted of 3 species of Gram negative bacteria; however, after 60 days during one study, several species of Bacillus became the dominant flora. This study suggests that under these conditions, microbial contamination in the air and water was suppressed by the life-support systems, though contamination was possible. Conversely, the crew and their activities controlled microbial levels on surfaces. Understanding the factors that affect microbial control will improve the design of microbial testing both during space flight and in analogous Earth-based environments.

  13. Synchronizability of random rectangular graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, Ernesto Chen, Guanrong

    2015-08-15

    Random rectangular graphs (RRGs) represent a generalization of the random geometric graphs in which the nodes are embedded into hyperrectangles instead of on hypercubes. The synchronizability of RRG model is studied. Both upper and lower bounds of the eigenratio of the network Laplacian matrix are determined analytically. It is proven that as the rectangular network is more elongated, the network becomes harder to synchronize. The synchronization processing behavior of a RRG network of chaotic Lorenz system nodes is numerically investigated, showing complete consistence with the theoretical results.

  14. EFFECTS OF ACIDIC DEPOSITION PAINTS: A CHAMBER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exterior acrylic latex and alkyd architectural coatings were exposed to different conditions in a chamber exposure system involving simulated sunlight, dew, and photochemical smog-containing sulfur dioxide (SO2). imulated sunlight exposure of the coating films in the presence of ...

  15. Hypobaric chamber for the study of oral health problems in a simulated spacecraft environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    A hypobaric chamber was constructed to house two marmo-sets simultaneously in a space-simulated environment for periods of 14, 28 and 56 days which coincided with the anticipated Skylab missions. This report details the fabrication, operation, and performance of the chamber and very briefly reviews the scientific data from nine chamber trials involving 18 animals. The possible application of this model system to studies unrelated to oral health or space missions is discussed.

  16. Study of avalanche mode operation of resistive plate chambers with different gas gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammosov, V. V.; Gapienko, V. A.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Zaets, V. G.

    2000-03-01

    The operation of narrow gap, wide gap and multigap resistive plate chambers in an avalanche mode was studied. No advantage in avalanche-streamer separation was found for the wide gap and multigap chambers operating with Ar-based mixture as compared with the narrow gap chamber. For dense tetrafluoroethane-based mixture, proportionality was observed between streamer-free plateau width and total gas thickness, in rough agreement with corresponding shift of the maximum of avalanche charge distributions from zero. The best result was obtained for double-gap chamber with the read-out electrode located between two subgaps.

  17. study on trace contaminants control assembly for sealed environment chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, L. P.; Wang, J.; Liu, L. K.; Liu, H.

    The biological and Physicochemical P C life support technologies are all important parts to establish a human Closed Ecological Life Support System CELSS for long-duration mission The latter has the advantages of lower power consumption lower mass and higher efficiency therefore researchers often incorporate the use of biological systems with P C life support technologies to continuously recycle air water and part of the solid waste stream generated such as the Russian BLSS and the NASA-sponsored Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project LMLSTP In short these tests were very successful in integrating biological and P C life support technologies for long-duration life support Therefore we should use a combination of integrated biological with P C life support technologies in a human CELSS Human construction materials plants animals and soils release much trace toxic gases in a CELSS and they will inhibit plant growth and badly affect human health when their concentrations rise over their threshold levels The effect of biological trace contaminant control technologies is slower especially for a human sealed chamber because human produce much more methane and other contaminants A regenerative Trace Contaminant Control Subsystem TCCS with P C technology is a more important part in this case to control quickly the airborne contaminants levels and assure human in good condition in a sealed chamber This paper describes a trace contaminant control test facility incorporated a 8 m3 sealed environment chamber a regenerative TCCS with P C

  18. Studies of particle interactions in bubble chamber, spark chambers and counter experiments. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A. Jr.; Simmons, R.O.

    1983-07-01

    During the past six years we have carried out and planned experiments which predominantly studied the production and decay of particles containing charmed quarks. A series of photoproduction and neutron production experiments started with the very early observation of the production of J/psi by neutrons and by photons at Fermilab. From subsequent experiments using these neutral beams and the basic detecting system, we have reported results on the photoproduction of the ..lambda../sub c/ charmed baryon and the D and D* charmed mesons. More recent runs are studying the high energy photoproduction of vector mesons including the psi'. The present experiment in this sequence is using neutrons to produce a large number of D mesons. Another series of experiments at Fermilab set out to study the hadronic production of charmed mesons. The Chicago Cyclotron facility was modified with a detector sensitive to various possible production mechanisms. The experiments were a success; clean signals of D mesons were observed to be produced by pions, and also the production of chi/sub c/ with the subsequent decay via a ..gamma..-ray to psi was observed. The charmonium experiments run this year have better photon resolution for measuring the decays of chi/sub c/ to psi. We are part of a collaboration which is working on the Collider Detector Facility for Fermilab. The CDF at Fermilab is a possible source of (weak) intermediate vector bosons from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Our responsibilities in the CDF include both the construction of the muon detector and the designing, planning, and testing of the FASTBUS electronics. The second part of our weak interaction program is the Neutrino Oscillation experiment which is now under construction at Brookhaven.

  19. A DUST-SETTLING CHAMBER FOR SAMPLING-INSTRUMENT COMPARISON STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Few methods exist that can evenly and reproducibly deposit dusts onto surfaces for surface-sampling methodological studies. A dust-deposition chamber was designed for that purpose.

    Methods: A 1-m3 Rochester-type chamber was modified to produce high airborne d...

  20. PLANT EXPOSURE CHAMBERS FOR STUDY OF TOXIC CHEMICAL-PLANT INTERACTIONS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chambers for the study of plant uptake and phytotoxicity of toxic, radio-labeled chemicals are described. The chambers are designed to meet the criteria of continuously stirred tank reactors while providing containment for toxic chemical. They are computer managed and operated wi...

  1. Numerical study of mixed convection heat transfer in an inclined rectangular channel with extruding discrete multiple heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafi, Araf Al; Tonmoy, Md. Tanvir Akhtar; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim

    2016-07-01

    A numerical investigation ofsteady two dimensional laminar mixed convection heat transfer phenomena in an inclined rectangular channel has been performed in the present study. The upper wall of the channel under consideration is maintained at constant low temperature while the lower wall is being provided with three extruding discrete heaters. The heaters are connected with adiabatic segments and the heater surfaces are assumed to operate at constant heat flux. At inlet, a uniform fluid flow with constant low temperature has been induced. In this study, air has been considered as working fluid. Results have been presented to show how various system parameters such as: Reynolds number, Grashof number, and channel inclination angle affect the resulting flow and thermal field inside the channel as well as the heat transfer performance of individual heater. It has been found that for the pure mixed convection case (Richardson number being equal to 1.0), the better cooling performance can be acheived with increasing the Reynold number forchannel inclination angle in range of 45°-90°.

  2. Studying gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with LIF technique: droplets deposition and bubbles entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherdantsev, Andrey; Hann, David; Azzopardi, Barry

    2014-11-01

    High-speed laser-induced fluorescence technique is applied to study gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct (width 161 mm). Instantaneous distributions of film thickness over an area of 50*20 mm are obtained with frequency 10 kHz and spatial resolution 40 μm. The technique is also able to detect droplets entrained from film surface and gas bubbles entrapped by the liquid film. We focus on deposition of droplets onto film surface and dynamics of bubbles. Three scenarios of droplet impact are observed: 1) formation of a cavern, which is similar to well-known process of normal droplet impact onto still liquid surface; 2) ``ploughing,'' when droplet is sinking over long distance; 3) ``bouncing,'' when droplet survives the impact. The first scenario is often accompanied by entrainment of secondary droplets; the second by entrapment of air bubbles. Numerous impact events are quantitatively analyzed. Parameters of the impacting droplet, the film surface before the impact, the evolution of surface perturbation due to impact and the outcome of the impact (droplets or bubbles) are measured. Space-time trajectories of individual bubbles have also been obtained, including velocity, size and concentration inside the disturbance waves and in the base film region. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  3. An aging study of wire chambers with dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Jibaly, M.; Chrusch, P. Jr.; Hilgenberg, G.; Majewski, S.; Wojcik, R.; Sauli, F.; Gaudaen, J.

    1989-02-01

    The authors report results on the aging of different types of resistive and non-resistive wires in wire chambers filled with dimethyl ether (DME) of varying degrees of purity. Among the Freon impurities detected in our DME batches, only Freon-11 was found to contribute to the aging process. Of the resistive wires, Nicotin and Stablohm produced fast aging, whereas stainless steel withstood extended irradiation in purified DME (up to 1 C/cm) without any apparent damage. Gold-plated tungsten and molybdenum wires produced results comparable to those of the stainless steel.

  4. Sensitivity Study of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) for Rectangular Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eric L.; Everhart, Joel L.; Iyer, Venkit

    2001-01-01

    An off-line version of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) has been implemented for the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility. The correction capability is currently restricted to corrections for solid wall interference in the model pitch plane for Mach numbers less than 0.45 due to a limitation in tunnel calibration data. A study to assess output sensitivity to measurement uncertainty was conducted to determine standard operational procedures and guidelines to ensure data quality during the testing process. Changes to the current facility setup and design recommendations for installing the WICS code into a new facility are reported.

  5. Developing a fast ionization chamber for transfer reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Bardayan, D. W.; Smith, M. S.; Schmitt, K. T.; Ahn, S. H.; Peters, W. A.; Strauss, S.

    2011-10-01

    Detection of beam and beam like recoils at far forward angles is often critical for radioactive beam measurements in inverse kinematics. Gas-filled ionization chambers are well suited for these applications, since they have moderately good energy resolution and can take prolonged exposure to beam compared to fragile semiconductor detectors. Conventional ion counters using a Frisch grid, however, have slow response times because the ionized electrons must travel long distances to the anodes. To reduce response times, a fast ion counter using a tilted window and tilted electrodes was developed and tested at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, modified from an original design by Kimura et al.. The maximum counting rate and energy resolution, along with future plans for using the new ion counter, will be presented. This work was sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Physics, U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Effects of acidic deposition on paint: A chamber study

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, J.W.; Lemmons, T.J.; Hou, Y.; Schadt, R.J.; Fornes, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    Exterior acrylic latex and alkyd architectural coatings were exposed to different conditions in a chamber exposure system involving simulated sunlight, dew, and photochemical smog-containing sulfur dioxide (SO2). A simulated sunlight exposure of the coating films in the presence of clean air was also incorporated into the experimental design. Changes in surface features after 1,370 hours of exposure were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of x-rays (EDAX). Gaseous species that deposited to the films were determined by ion chromatography of the dew collections. Color-change measurements of the exposed films were recorded as Delta E values. Latex and alkyd films that were formulated with calcium carbonate (CACO3) as an extender pigment were found to undergo the most change in surface features, composition, and color.

  7. Study of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jinchan; Zhang Xiaobing; Mao Fuming; Xiao Mei; Cui Yunkang; Engelsen, Daniel den; Lei Wei

    2008-03-15

    The design of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer (MCQMS) having a small total volume of only 20 cm{sup 3}, including Faraday cup ion detector and ion source, is described. This MCQMS can resist a vacuum baking temperature of 400-500 deg. C. The quadrupole elements with a hyperbolic surface are made of a ceramic material and coated with a thin metal layer. The quadrupole mass filter has a field radius of 3 mm and a length of 100 mm. Prototypes of this new MCQMS can detect a minimum partial pressure of 10{sup -8} Pa, have a peak width of {delta}M=1 at 10% peak height from mass number 1 to 60, and show an excellent long-term stability. The new MCQMS is intended to be used in residual gas analyses of electron devices during a mutual pumping and baking process.

  8. Gas mixture studies for streamer operated Resistive Plate Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoloni, A.; Longhin, A.; Mengucci, A.; Pupilli, F.; Ventura, M.

    2016-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers operated in streamer mode are interesting detectors in neutrino and astro-particle physics applications (like OPERA and ARGO experiments). Such experiments are typically characterized by large area apparatuses with no stringent requirements on detector aging and rate capabilities. In this paper, results of cosmic ray tests performed on a RPC prototype using different gas mixtures are presented, the principal aim being the optimization of the TetraFluoroPropene concentration in Argon-based mixtures. The introduction of TetraFluoroPropene, besides its low Global Warming Power, is helpful because it simplifies safety requirements allowing to remove also isobutane from the mixture. Results obtained with mixtures containing SF6, CF4, CO2, N2 and He are also shown, presented both in terms of detectors properties (efficiency, multiple-streamer probability and time resolution) and in terms of streamer characteristics.

  9. Study of instabilities and quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in volumetrically heated magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetcha, N.; Smolentsev, S.; Abdou, M.; Moreau, R.

    2013-02-01

    We consider magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) rectangular duct flows with volumetric heating. The flows are upward, subject to a strong transverse magnetic field perpendicular to the temperature gradient, such that the flow dynamics is quasi-two-dimensional. The internal volumetric heating imitates conditions of a blanket of a fusion power reactor, where a buoyancy-driven flow is imposed on the forced flow. Studies of this mixed-convection flow include analysis for the basic flow, linear stability analysis and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS)-type computations. The parameter range covers the Hartmann number (Ha) up to 500, the Reynolds number (Re) from 1000 to 10 000, and the Grashof number (Gr) from 105 to 5 × 108. The linear stability analysis predicts two primary instability modes: (i) bulk instability associated with the inflection point in the velocity profile near the "hot" wall and (ii) side-wall boundary layer instability. A mixed instability mode is also possible. An equation for the critical Hartmann number has been obtained as a function of Re and Gr. Effects of Ha, Re, and Gr on turbulent flows are addressed via nonlinear computations that demonstrate two characteristic turbulence regimes. In the "weak" turbulence regime, the induced vortices are localized near the inflection point of the basic velocity profile, while the boundary layer at the wall parallel to the magnetic field is slightly disturbed. In the "strong" turbulence regime, the bulk vortices interact with the boundary layer causing its destabilization and formation of secondary vortices that may travel across the flow, even reaching the opposite wall. In this regime, the key phenomena are vortex-wall and various vortex-vortex interactions. Flow and magnetic field effects on heat transfer are also analyzed.

  10. Study of the replacement correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry by Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lilie

    In ionization chamber radiation dosimetry, the introduction of the ion chamber into medium will unavoidably distort the radiation field near the chamber because the chamber cavity material (air) is different from the medium. A replacement correction factor, Prepl was introduced in order to correct the chamber readings to give an accurate radiation dose in the medium without the presence of the chamber. Generally it is very hard to measure the values of Prepl since they are intertwined with the chamber wall effect. In addition, the P repl values always come together with the stopping-power ratio of the two media involved. This makes the problem of determining the P repl values even more complicated. Monte Carlo simulation is an ideal method to investigate the replacement correction factors. In this study, four different methods of calculating the values of Prepl by Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Two of the methods are designated as 'direct' methods in the sense that the evaluation of the stopping-power ratio is not necessary. The systematic uncertainties of the two direct methods are estimated to be about 0.1-0.2% which comes from the ambiguous definition of the energy cutoff Delta used in the Spencer-Attix cavity theory. The two direct methods are used to calculate the values of P repl for both plane-parallel chambers and cylindrical thimble chambers in either electron beams or photon beams. The calculation results are compared to measurements. For electron beams, good agreements are obtained. For thimble chambers in photon beams, significant discrepancies are observed between calculations and measurements. The experiments are thus investigated and the procedures are simulated by the Monte Carlo method. It is found that the interpretation of the measured data as the replacement correction factors in dosimetry protocols are not correct. In applying the calculation to the BIPM graphite chamber in a 60Co beam, the calculated values of P repl differ from those

  11. Flow visualisation studies of aerodynamic characteristics of an open-top chamber.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, F; Ruck, B

    1987-01-01

    Studies to determine potential locations of ingress of ambient air into an open-top chamber, using flow visualisation, are described. Rates of chamber ventilation necessary to avoid ambient air entrainment have been estimated from wind tunnel experiments. The dependence of the exit velocity of air from the chamber on the ambient air velocity was non-linear, so that for low wind speeds other mechanisms are more important than for high ambient air flows. Wind speeds ranged from 0.5m s(-1)

  12. Vibration study of the APS storage ring vacuum-chamber/girder assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1991-02-01

    The overall objective of this study is to obtain insights into the dynamic coupling between the storage ring vacuum chamber and girder, and an assessment of the potential for unacceptable vibration amplitudes that would require redesign of the vacuum chamber supports. Specific objectives include determination of the vibrational characteristics (natural frequencies and modes) of the coupled vacuum-chamber/girder system, measurement of response amplitudes to forced excitation and ambient floor motion, and calculation of magnification factors associated with the various coupled vibration modes. 1 ref.

  13. An Altitude Chamber for the Study and Calibration of Aeronautical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, J E; Kirchner, Otto E

    1925-01-01

    The design and construction of an altitude chamber, in which both pressure and temperature can be varied independently, was carried out by the NACA at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for the purpose of studying the effects of temperature and pressure on aeronautical research instruments. Temperatures from +20c to -50c are obtained by the expansion of CO2from standard containers. The chamber can be used for the calibration of research instruments under altitude conditions simulating those up to 45,000 feet. Results obtained with this chamber have a direct application in the design and calibration of instruments used in free flight research.

  14. Indoor air pollution by organic emissions from textile floor coverings. Climate chamber studies under dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollinger, S.; Levsen, K.; Wünsch, G.

    The time dependence of the emission of organic compounds from a polyamide floor covering with styrene-butadiene-rubber (SBR) backing was studied in three climate chambers (0.03, 1.0 and 38 m 3) at 23°C 5nd 45% RH. While volatile compounds such as toluene reach a maximum concentration in the gas phase within 1 h and decrease in concentration to less than 2% within 60 h, the concentration of less volatile compounds, such as 4-phenylcyclohexene, decreases slowly over a period of months. If the chamber is well mixed and a defined chamber loading is maintained the observed concentrations do not depend on the chamber size, the wall material and air velocity. The concentration of the observed emissions is roughly proportional to the chamber loading. Surprisingly it is not inversely proportional to the air exchange rate. Rather, at high air exchange rates mass transfer from the carpet to the gas phase is enhanced. The "decreasing source models" of Dunn and Tichenor ( Atmospheric Environment22, 885-894, 1988) have been applied to the data. They allow the extrapolation of experimental data beyond the time available for measurement. The model calculations reveal the presence of sink effects. The role of the chamber walls as sinks can be determined more reliably if constant sources of an organic compound are placed into the chamber and their increase in concentration with time is compared with the theoretical predictions neglecting sink effects.

  15. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-butanol in helium: a comparative study of a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and a laminar flow diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Zdímal, Vladimír; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2005-06-01

    Isothermal homogeneous nucleation rates of 1-butanol were measured both in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and in a laminar flow diffusion chamber built recently at the Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. The chosen system 1-butanol-helium can be studied reasonably well in both devices, in the overlapping range of temperatures. The results were compared with those found in the literature and those measured by Lihavainen in a laminar flow diffusion chamber of a similar design. The same isotherms measured with the thermal diffusion cloud chamber occur at highest saturation ratios of the three devices. Isotherms measured with the two laminar flow diffusion chambers are reasonably close together; the measurements by Lihavainen occur at lowest saturation ratios. The temperature dependences observed were similar in all three devices. The molecular content of critical clusters was calculated using the nucleation theorem and compared with the Kelvin equation. Both laminar flow diffusion chambers provided very similar sizes slightly above the Kelvin equation, whereas the thermal diffusion cloud chamber suggests critical cluster sizes significantly smaller. The results found elsewhere in the literature were in reasonable agreement with our results. PMID:15974753

  16. Carbon influx studies in the main chamber of ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütterich, T.; Dux, R.; Gafert, J.; Kallenbach, A.; Neu, R.; Pugno, R.; Yoon, S. W.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2003-10-01

    Carbon sources in the main chamber of ASDEX Upgrade, especially the 12 guard limiters at the low field side (LFS), were determined spectroscopically using recently installed lines of sight. Absolute photon fluxes were measured for spectral lines in the visible wavelength range referring to all spin systems of C+1 and C+2. A simple transport model for carbon enabled the simulation of the radial distribution of carbon radiation and the determination of the effective inverse photon efficiency, which was used for the evaluation of ion fluxes. The model also predicts the fraction of eroded particles that are transported out of the plasma before further ionization occurs. Comparison of the calculated losses with measurements showed good agreement in L-mode cases, whereas in H-mode cases the CIII/CII radiation ratio was too high by a factor 1.5. The contribution of each spin system to the ion flux was independently measured. For C+1 and C+2 the spin system distribution was found to be close to equilibrium. The line-of-sight-integrated photon fluxes were spatially separated for many lines of sight by Zeeman-analysis and differential measurements. This allowed us to determine the total influx from the high field side and LFS. Surprisingly, the carbon source at the inner heatshield was larger than the carbon influx from the limiter source at the LFS. This is very pronounced for the H-mode case investigated, where 60-80% of the carbon atoms emerge from the heatshield. This source is due to recycling or re-erosion of carbon, which probably originates from the limiters, because ap85% of the heatshield area consisted of tungsten coated tiles.

  17. Characterization and testing of a new environmental chamber designed for emission aging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskinen, A.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Kuuspalo, K.; Sippula, O.; Jalava, P.; Hirvonen, M.-R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Virtanen, A.; Komppula, M.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.

    2014-06-01

    A 29 m3 Teflon chamber, designed for aging studies of combustion aerosols, at the University of Eastern Finland is described and characterized. The chamber belongs to a research facility, called Ilmari, where small-scale combustion devices, a dynamometer for vehicle exhaust studies, dilution systems, the chamber, as well as cell and animal exposure devices are side by side under the same roof. The small surface-to-volume ratio of the chamber enables reasonably long experiment times, with particle wall loss rate constants of 0.088, 0.080, 0.045, and 0.040 h-1 for polydisperse, 50, 100, and 200 nm monodisperse aerosols, respectively. The NO2 photolysis rate can be adjusted from zero to 0.62 min-1. The irradiance spectrum is centered at 365 nm and the maximum irradiance, produced by 160 blacklight lamps, is 29.7 W m-2, which corresponds to the UV irradiance in Central Finland at noon on a sunny day in the midsummer. The temperature inside the chamber is uniform and can be kept at 25 ± 1 °C when half of the blacklights are on. The chamber is kept in an overpressure with a moving top frame, which prevents sample dilution and contamination from entering the chamber during an experiment. The functionality of the chamber was tested with oxidation experiments of toluene, resulting in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields of 33-44%, depending on the initial conditions, such as the NOx concentration. The highest gaseous oxidation product yields of 14.4-19.5% were detected with ions corresponding to 2-butenedial (m/z 73.029) and 4-oxo-2-pentenal (m/z 99.044). Overall, reasonable yields of SOA and gaseous reaction products, comparable to those obtained in other laboratories, were obtained.

  18. Studies of Helium Based Gas Mixtures Using a Small Cell Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Heise, Jaret; /British Columbia U.

    2006-07-07

    An international collaboration is currently working on the construction and design of an asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center that will be ready to collect data in 1999. The main physics motivation for such a facility is to test the description and mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model of particle physics and provide insight into the question of why more matter than antimatter is observed in the universe today. In particular, this experiment will measure CP violation in the decay of B mesons. In the early stages of this effort, the Canadian contingent proposed to build the central tracking chamber for the BaBar detector. Presently, a prototype drift chamber is in operation and studies are being performed to test some of the unique features of drift chamber design dictated by the conditions of the experiment. Using cosmic muons, it is possible to study tracking and pattern recognition in the prototype chamber, and therefore calculate the efficiency and spatial resolution of the prototype chamber cells. These performance features will be used to test whether or not the helium-based gas mixtures proposed for the BaBar drift chamber are a viable alternative to the more traditional argon-based gases.

  19. Experimental and Computational Study of Intraglottal Pressures in a Three-Dimensional Model with a Non-Rectangular Glottal Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkaman, Saeed

    2011-12-01

    applied to study the flow patterns exiting the glottis. The false vocal folds were not included in this study. The glottis with half-sinusoidal arcs makes a difference relative to intraglottal pressures at the anterior (1/4), middle, and posterior (3/4) planes for all cases. The amount of the pressure difference across the three locations varied based on the glottal angle and diameter; however, the maximum pressure differences did not rise above approximately 8% of the transglottal pressure, even in the presence of the arytenoid cartilages. There were pressure and velocity gradients in both the axial (upstream-downstream) and longitudinal (anterior-posterior) directions, with primary gradients axially and secondary gradients longitudinally. The flow in the M6 model was more stable than in the M5 model downstream of the vocal folds and it did not skew except for the smallest glottal diameter; however, in the M5 model, even for large glottal diameters, the flow skews randomly and creates two different pressure distributions. Flow contraction toward the midcoronal plane within and downstream of the glottis was a primary finding of this study, which was not seen in the rectangular models of the glottis. The arytenoid cartilages structure produced additional secondary flow only for the cases with the largest glottal diameter, which changed the intraglottal pressures along the longitudinal direction. The results of this study present initial information about the relationship among intraglottal pressures, flow patterns, and the three-dimensionality of the glottis. This study suggests that the pressures and flows within the glottis are three-dimensional, and flow contraction in the sagittal plane is to be expected and considered in future phonatory modeling. Non-rectangular laryngeal geometries need to be accurately specified and are required in research programs of basic laryngeal function to establish benchmark empirical data.

  20. Treadmill chamber for studies of respiratory gas exchange in the rat during exercise.

    PubMed

    Ardévol, A; Adán, C; Fernández-López, J A; Pérez, J; Corts, J L; Binagui, D; Remesar, X; Alemany, M

    1995-05-01

    A treadmill for studying gas exchange in small mammals during exercise is presented. The system consists of a motor-driven running mat enclosed in a gastight chamber that receives a measured flow of air from a compressed air cylinder. The gas flow and temperature, pressure and instantaneous gas composition of the chamber (oxygen, carbon dioxide and water) are measured continuously and the data are computed to include the effects on chamber atmosphere of the rat activity, either running or at rest. The system is completed with a shock delivery grid that stimulates the rat to run. The calculations are based on the changes in the composition of the gas in the chamber (constantly stirred by a small electric fan) induced by the rat instead of relying on the alterations induced in the outflowing gas. The consumption of oxygen, and production of carbon dioxide and water by the rat are computed in real time, giving a very fast response to physiological change induced by exercise. The chamber is custom-made from an aluminium block and a plexiglass lid; all other components are available commercially. The system, as described, allows for a detailed analysis of respiratory gas (and water) exchange by rats under varying exercise conditions, there is practically no time lag between changes in respiratory gases and the detection of these changes, and the buffering effect of the chamber size is practically eliminated because of the calculation approach used. PMID:9338089

  1. Flow chamber

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  2. Design of an environmentally controlled rotating chamber for bioaerosol aging studies.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Duchaine, Caroline; Marcoux-Voiselle, Melissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Roy, Chad J

    2014-08-01

    A chamber was designed and built to study the long-term effects of environmental conditions on air-borne microorganisms. The system consists of a 55.5-L cylindrical chamber, which can rotate at variable speeds on its axis. The chamber is placed within an insulated temperature controlled enclosure which can be either cooled or heated with piezoelectric units. A germicidal light located at the chamber center irradiates at a 360° angle. Access ports are located on the stationary sections on both ends of the chamber. Relative humidity (RH) is controlled by passing the aerosol through meshed tubes surrounded by desiccant. Validation assay indicates that the interior temperature is stable with less than 0.5 °C in variation when set between 18 and 30 °C with the UV light having no effect of temperature during operation. RH levels set at 20%, 50% and 80% varied by 2.2%, 3.3% and 3.3%, respectively, over a 14-h period. The remaining fraction of particles after 18 h of suspension was 8.8% at 1 rotation per minute (rpm) and 2.6% at 0 rpm with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) changing from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 1.30 ± 0.02 µm at 1 rpm and from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 0.91 ± 0.01 µm at 0 rpm within the same time period. This chamber can be used to increase the time of particle suspension in an aerosol cloud and control the temperature, RH and UV exposure; the design facilitates stationary sampling to be performed while the chamber is rotating. PMID:25055842

  3. Design of an environmentally controlled rotating chamber for bioaerosol aging studies

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Daniel; Duchaine, Caroline; Marcoux-Voiselle, Melissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Roy, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    A chamber was designed and built to study the long-term effects of environmental conditions on air-borne microorganisms. The system consists of a 55.5-L cylindrical chamber, which can rotate at variable speeds on its axis. The chamber is placed within an insulated temperature controlled enclosure which can be either cooled or heated with piezoelectric units. A germicidal light located at the chamber center irradiates at a 360° angle. Access ports are located on the stationary sections on both ends of the chamber. Relative humidity (RH) is controlled by passing the aerosol through meshed tubes surrounded by desiccant. Validation assay indicates that the interior temperature is stable with less than 0.5 °C in variation when set between 18 and 30 °C with the UV light having no effect of temperature during operation. RH levels set at 20%, 50% and 80% varied by 2.2%, 3.3% and 3.3%, respectively, over a 14-h period. The remaining fraction of particles after 18 h of suspension was 8.8% at 1 rotation per minute (rpm) and 2.6% at 0 rpm with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) changing from 1.21 ± 0.04 μm to 1.30 ± 0.02 μm at 1 rpm and from 1.21 ± 0.04 μm to 0.91 ± 0.01 μm at 0 rpm within the same time period. This chamber can be used to increase the time of particle suspension in an aerosol cloud and control the temperature, RH and UV exposure; the design facilitates stationary sampling to be performed while the chamber is rotating. PMID:25055842

  4. Photochemical transformation of flue gas from a coal-fired power plant: a smog chamber study

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna, K.J.; Luria, M.; Meagher, J.F.

    1982-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between the formation of sulfate aerosols and other secondary products and various environmental parameters is reported. Actual flue gas is used in these experiments which were conducted in smog chambers. Smog chamber techniques and instrumentation have progressed recently and are being utilized for the purposes of this study to simulate urban smog with emphasis on the photochemistry of sulfur dioxide. The purpose for examining the oxidation process of SO/sub 2/ to sulfate aerosols is because of the implication of sulfates in health effects, visibility degradation, and acidic precipitation.

  5. Computational Study of Primary Electrons in the Cusp Region of an Ion Engine's Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor); Deshpande, Shirin S.; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a computer code called PRIMA is used to study the motion of primary electrons in the magnetic cusp region of the discharge chamber of an ion engine. Even though the amount of wall area covered by the cusps is very small, the cusp regions are important because prior computational analyses have indicated that most primary electrons leave the discharge chamber through the cusps. The analysis presented here focuses on the cusp region only. The affects of the shape and size of the cusp region on primary electron travel are studied as well as the angle and location at which the electron enters the cusp region. These affects are quantified using the confinement length and the number density distributions of the primary electrons. In addition to these results comparisons of the results from PRIMA are made to experimental results for a cylindrical discharge chamber with two magnetic rings. These comparisons indicate the validity of the computer code called PRIMA.

  6. Study of Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of non-periodical attack angle in Narrow Rectangular Channel with Longitudinal Vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Huang, J.

    2010-03-01

    The heat transfer enhancement of Longitudinal Vortex (LV) is a kind of technology with good efficiency and low resistance. LV is produced by Longitudinal Vortex Generators (LVGs) mounted on the heated surface. With relative long influence distance and simple structure, the LVGs can be used in narrow channels with flat surface. The dimension of narrow rectangular channel is 600 mm (length)×40 mm (width) ×3 mm (gap width), the single rectangular block LVGs is laid out in one heated plate. The dimension of LVGs is as follows: height is 1.8 mm, width is 2.2 mm, length is 14 mm, transverse distance is 4 mm, and longitudinal distance is 150 mm. The attack angle of LVGs is very important to extend this kind of technology in narrow rectangular channel with water medium. In previous study, the attack angle of LVGs of periodicity mounted was discussed and the optimal value was 440. In this paper, the attack angle of the first and the second LVG are changed and the others keep 440. Study of flow and heat transfer characteristic of non-periodicity attack angle is completed. The result shows that with the change of attack angle of the first and the second LVGs, the heat transfer enhancement of water medium is advantageous. This conclusion should be extended when the working medium is vapor-liquid two-phase. The results of this calculate method are compared with the experimental results of thermal infrared imager and phase doppler particle analyzer, and they are reasonable. FLUENT6.2 is used to simulate this question, and three velocity components of water flow have been used to define residual intensity ratio of LV.

  7. Advantages in using multifrequency excitation of contrast microbubbles for enhancing echo particle image velocimetry techniques: initial numerical studies using rectangular and triangular waves.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hairong; Mukdadi, Osama; Kim, Hyoungbum; Hertzberg, Jean R; Shandas, Robin

    2005-01-01

    Accurate measurement of velocity profiles, multiple velocity vectors and local shear stress in arteries is very important for a variety of cardiovascular diseases. We have recently developed an ultrasound based velocimetry technique, termed echo particle image velocimetry (echo PIV). This method takes advantage of the nonlinear backscatter characteristics of ultrasound contrast microbubbles when exposed to certain ultrasonic forcing conditions. Preliminary in vitro, animal and clinical studies have shown significant promise of this method for measuring multiple velocity components with good temporal (up to 2 ms) and spatial (<1 mm) resolution. However, there is still difficulty in maximizing the nonlinearity of bubble backscatter using conventional Gaussian-pulse excitation techniques because: (1) significant harmonic components may not be produced at modest pressure amplitudes; and (2) the higher incident pressure amplitudes required to induce nonlinear behavior may cause bubble destruction. We present here a potential solution to this problem through the use of multifrequency excitation, where rectangular and triangular pulses with four harmonics are used to drive the bubble. The nonlinear behavior of the microbubble, as well as fragility and backscatter, were studied through numerical modeling via a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Results show that the rectangular wave is effective in improving the visibility of microbubbles, with effective scattering cross-section area significantly higher (up to 35 times) than the widely-used Gaussian waveform. However, velocity and acceleration analysis of the bubble wall shows that the rectangular wave may threaten bubble stability. Due to lower wall velocity and acceleration, the triangular wave should decrease the potential for bubble destruction yet maintain relatively high second harmonic backscatter components. The impact of higher harmonics was studied by examining backscatter differences from incident rectangular

  8. Lean stability augmentation study. [on gas turbine combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, J. B.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical conceptual design study and an experimental test program were conducted to investigate techniques and develop technology for improving the lean combustion limits of premixing, prevaporizing combustors applicable to gas turbine engine main burners. The use of hot gas pilots, catalyzed flameholder elements, and heat recirculation to augment lean stability limits was considered in the conceptual design study. Tests of flameholders embodying selected concepts were conducted at a pressure of 10 arm and over a range of entrance temperatures simulating conditions to be encountered during stratospheric cruise. The tests were performed using an axisymmetric flametube test rig having a nominal diameter of 10.2 cm. A total of sixteen test configurations were examined in which lean blowout limits, pollutant emission characteristics, and combustor performance were evaluated. The use of a piloted perforated plate flameholder employing a pilot fuel flow rate equivalent to 4 percent of the total fuel flow at a simulated cruise condition resulted in a lean blowout equivalence ratio of less than 0.25 with a design point (T sub zero = 600k, Phi = 0.6) NOx emission index of less than 1.0 g/kg.

  9. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies, final rept (May 1997), Subcontract No. B291847

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Jin, H.; Scott, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. Various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the final optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 {Angstrom}) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change- outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. In addition to the work described briefly above, we performed extensive analysis of the target-chamber thermal response to in- chamber CO{sub 2} Cleaning and of work performed to model the behavior of silica vapor. The work completed this year has been published in several papers and a dissertation [1-6]. This report provides a summary of the work completed this year, as well as copies

  10. Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: A room-sized chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Lauren M.; Sleiman, Mohamad; Dubowski, Yael; Gundel, Lara A.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2011-09-01

    Exposure to tobacco pollutants that linger indoors after smoking has taken place ( thirdhand smoke, THS) can occur over extended periods and is modulated by chemical processes involving atmospheric reactive species. This study investigates the role of ozone and indoor surfaces in chemical transformations of tobacco smoke residues. Gas and particle constituents of secondhand smoke (SHS) as well as sorbed SHS on chamber internal walls and model materials (cotton, paper, and gypsum wallboard) were characterized during aging. After smoldering 10 cigarettes in a 24-m 3 room size chamber, gas-phase nicotine was rapidly removed by sorption to chamber surfaces, and subsequently re-emitted during ventilation with clean air to a level of ˜10% that during the smoking phase. During chamber ventilation in the presence of ozone (180 ppb), ozone decayed at a rate of 5.6 h -1 and coincided with a factor of 5 less nicotine sorbed to wallboard. In the presence of ozone, no gas phase nicotine was detected as a result of re-emission, and higher concentrations of nicotine oxidation products were observed than when ventilation was performed with ozone-free air. Analysis of the model surfaces showed that heterogeneous nicotine-ozone reaction was faster on paper than cotton, and both were faster than on wallboard. However, wallboard played a dominant role in ozone-initiated reaction in the chamber due to its large total geometric surface area and sink potential compared to the other substrates. This study is the first to show in a room-sized environmental chamber that the heterogeneous ozone chemistry of sorbed nicotine generates THS constituents of concern, as observed previously in bench-top studies. In addition to the main oxidation products (cotinine, myosmine and N-methyl formamide), nicotine-1-oxide was detected for the first time.

  11. Designing a chamber for studies involving manipulation of light:dark cycles.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Edwin; Krueger, Karen; Thompson, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The authors designed and built a device that can house mice or rats and allow researchers to control the light:dark cycles inside. They developed this chamber for neuroscientists who are studying the condition-dependent plasticity of the mouse visual cortex. The chamber, which (when closed) completely blocks outside light, consists of two units. Each unit can hold eight small mouse cages or six rat cages. Each unit contains an optical sensor that triggers an audible and visual alarm when light is detected. Researchers can monitor the environmental conditions inside each unit using a control panel located outside the unit. Researchers have reported that this chamber is ideal for use in their work involving manipulations of light:dark cycles. PMID:20962762

  12. Study of Parameters Effect on Hydrodynamics of a Gas-Solid Chamber Experimentally and Numerically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzehei, Mahdi; Rahimzadeh, Hassan

    2012-04-01

    In this research, gas velocity, initial static bed height and particle size effect on hydrodynamics of a non-reactive gas-solid fluidized bed chamber were studied experimentally and computationally. A multi fluid Eulerian model incorporating the kinetic theory for solid particles was applied to simulate the unsteady state behavior of this chamber and momentum exchange coefficients were calculated by using the Syamlal- O'Brien drag functions. Simulation results were compared with the experimental data in order to validate the CFD model. Pressure drops predicted by the simulations at different particle sizes and initial static bed height were in good agreement with experimental measurements at superficial gas velocity higher than the minimum fluidization velocity. Simulation results also indicated that small bubbles were produced at the bottom of the bed. These bubbles collided with each other as they moved upwards forming larger bubbles. Furthermore, this comparison showed that the model can predict hydrodynamic behavior of gas solid fluidized bed chambers reasonably well.

  13. Reception and study of lunar surface material in inert gas medium. [considering laboratory vacuum receiving chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkov, Y. A.; Rudnitskiy, Y. M.; Glotov, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    The reception and study of lunar material returned by the Luna 16 space station is described. The layout of a vacuum receiving chamber for working with material in a helium atmosphere is examined along with the main operations involved in extracting the material from the ampule and drill.

  14. MECHANISMS OF PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS IN URBAN AIR. VOLUME II. CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The smog chamber facility of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center has been employed in a study designed to provide experimental data required for the validation of kinetic computer models of chemical transformations in polluted atmospheres. A 5800-l, Teflon-coated, evacuab...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A SMALL CHAMBER METHOD FOR SVOC SINK EFFECT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the details of the improved chamber system and reports the sink effect study for organophosphorus flame retardants (OP-FRs), including tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate(TCEP), tris(1-chlor-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDC...

  16. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY OF POTENTIAL EMISSIONS FROM FUEL CONVERSION FACILITIES. A SMOG CHAMBER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric chemistry of chemical species that may be emitted from fuel conversion facilities were studied in smog chambers. Of 17 compounds assessed for ozone-forming potential, 6 compounds were selected along with a control species, propylene, for testing in the presence of...

  17. Outdoor chamber study to test multi-day effects. Volume 2. Environmental chamber data tabulations. Final report, August 1982-August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.P.L.; Dodd, M.C.; Long, W.D.; Atkinson, R.

    1984-12-01

    The smog chamber facilities of the University of California, Riverside were used to collect experimental data to assess the effects of multi-day irradiations on photochemical oxidant formation. This volume contains the printouts of all the data that were collected in the study. These data are suitable for use in developing and testing kinetic mechanisms of photochemical smog formation.

  18. Summary of Previous Chamber or Controlled Anthrax Studies and Recommendations for Possible Additional Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2010-12-29

    This report and an associated Excel file(a) summarizes the investigations and results of previous chamber and controlled studies(b) to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing and/or transporting, extracting, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis (BA) or related simulants. This report and the Excel are the joint work of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate. The report was originally released as PNNL-SA-69338, Rev. 0 in November 2009 with limited distribution, but was subsequently cleared for release with unlimited distribution in this Rev. 1. Only minor changes were made to Rev. 0 to yield Rev. 1. A more substantial update (including summarizing data from other studies and more condensed summary tables of data) is underway

  19. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  20. Turbulence Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles with Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers particle image velocimetry measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratios 2, 4, and 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously, showed that increasing aspect ratios increased the high frequency noise, especially directed in the polar plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. The measurements presented here have important implications in the modeling of turbulent sources for acoustic analogy theories. While the nonaxisymmetric mean flow from the rectangular nozzles can be studied reliably using computational solutions, the nonaxisymmetry of the turbulent fluctuations, particularly at the level of velocity components, cannot; only measurements such as these can determine the impact of nozzle geometry on acoustic source anisotropy. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. The paper first documents the velocity fields, mean and variance, from the round, rectangular, and beveled rectangular nozzles at high subsonic speeds. A second section introduces measures of the isotropy of the turbulence, such as component ratios and lengthscales, first by showing them for a round jet and then for the rectangular nozzles. From these measures the source models of acoustic analogy codes can be judged or modified to account for these anisotropies.

  1. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies. [ion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate whether changes in performance are caused by changes in the loss rate of primary electrons to the anode or the loss rate of ions to discharge chamber walls or cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid; (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline; and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  2. Computational analysis of a human inhalation test chamber for dosimetry-and-health effect studies.

    PubMed

    Hyun, S; Kleinstreuer, C

    2002-08-01

    Proper air flow and tracer gas distribution or contaminant ventilation are of great importance in biomedical test chambers or industrial workrooms. The focus is on mass transfer in an inhalation test chamber with a breathing subject on a bike exposed to a tracer gas environment (e.g., carbon monoxide). This is an environmentally realistic setup for dosimetry-and-health effect studies, which require controlled, near-uniform pollutant concentrations. However, unmodified test chambers exhibit a strong single vortex in the larger breathing zone, which, depending upon the subject's location, implies possible trace gas depletion during inhalation, foreign particle entrainment, excessive air velocities, and so on. Employing a commercial finite-volume code with user-enhanced Fortran programs, the transient three-dimensional turbulent momentum, mass, and heat transfer equations have been solved and the configurations of a suitable flow redirection device, different man-machine locations, and thermal effects have been analyzed. As a result, the best air flow device configuration and man-machine orientation have been determined to achieve high and consistent trace gas concentrations inhaled by the subject, for example, 96 percent of the CO concentration at the chamber inlet is inhaled by the subject for the optimal scenario. PMID:12166891

  3. Morphologic Measurements of Anatomic Landmarks in Pulp Chambers of Human First Molars: A Study of Bitewing Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Khojastepour, Leila; Rahimizadeh, Naser; Khayat, Akbar

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knowledge of the anatomic location and dimension of the molar pulp chamber may preserve healthy pulp during operative procedure and reduce risk of perforation of chamber during access preparation. A review of literatures regarding the morphology of pulp chamber however revealed very little information; so the aim of this in vivo study was to measure the dimensions of first molar pulp chambers as seen on bitewing (BW) radiographs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study molar's BW radiographs of 130 subjects in two age groups were taken under standardized conditions (group of 18-25 years old subjects and group of 50-65 years old subjects). The films were digitized and nine anatomical landmarks were evaluated from the image of each first molar as follow: A; mesial to distal pulp horn distance, B; mesial to distal walls at the middle of pulp chamber, C; mesial to distal orifices, D; mesial cusp tip to its horn, E; distal cusp tip to its horn, F; pulp chamber height, G; pulp chamber floor to furcation, H; pulp chamber ceiling to furcation, I; cusp tips to furcation. The data were evaluated by using AUTOCAD (2007) software with 0.00 precision. Two way ANOVA test (Uni-variant analysis) were used to determine the interaction between restoration and age on pulp chamber dimensions. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in pulp chamber dimensions between the genders. Although there was significant reduction in the size of pulp chamber with advancing age, no significant differences were found in the restored and non restored teeth. CONCLUSION: The finding of this study showed size reduction and changes of pulp chamber with age so may enhance knowledge to minimize errors during endodontics treatments. PMID:24265638

  4. Feasibility Study on Neutron Diffraction Method for Evaluation of Residual Strain Distribution of Regenerative Cooled Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuoka, Tadashi; Moriya, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Masaki; Yoshida, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    The regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine is exposed to a large temperature difference between the hot gas (about 3500K) and the liquid hydrogen (about 20K). This induces thermal stress, and strain is accumulated in the chamber wall throughout the cyclic firing tests. Evaluation of the stress and the strain distribution in a chamber wall is essential since chamber life is usually related to such stress and strain. In this study, the residual strain in a regenerative cooled combustion chamber wall was measured by applying the neutron diffraction method and the X-ray diffraction method. The measured data were compared with the numerical data by finite element analysis, and the feasibility of the neutron diffraction method for the regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine was evaluated.

  5. Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular cuvette

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Gupta, Gautam; Morris, David E

    2013-09-10

    Electrochemical apparatus includes a disposable rectangular cuvette modified with at least one hole through a side and/or the bottom. Apparatus may include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates and some means of fastening one plate to the other. The apparatus may be interfaced with a fiber optic or microscope objective, and a spectrometer for spectroscopic studies. The apparatus are suitable for a variety of electrochemical experiments, including surface electrochemistry, bulk electrolysis, and flow cell experiments.

  6. Comparative study on mode-identification algorithms using a phased-array system in a rectangular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takao; Day, Benjamin J.

    2015-07-01

    To identify multiple acoustic duct modes, conventional beam-forming, CLEAN as well as L2 (i.e. pseudo-inverse) and L1 generalized-inverse beam-forming are applied to phased-array pressure data. A tone signal of a prescribed mode or broadband signal is generated upstream of a curved rectangular duct, and acoustic fields formed in both upstream and downstream stations of the test section are measured with identical wall-mounted microphone arrays. Sound-power distributions of several horizontal and vertical modes including upstream- and downstream-propagating waves can be identified with phased-array techniques, and the results are compared among the four approaches. The comparisons using synthetic data demonstrate that the L2 generalized-inverse algorithm can sufficiently suppress undesirable noise levels and detect amplitude distributions accurately in over-determined cases (i.e. the number of microphones is more than the number of cut-on modes) with minimum computational cost. As the number of cut-on modes exceeds the number of microphones (i.e. under-determined problems), the L1 algorithm is necessary to retain better accuracy. The comparison using test data acquired in the curved duct test rig (CDTR) at NASA Langley Research Center suggests that the L1 /L2 generalized-inverse approach as well as CLEAN can improve the dynamic range of the detected mode by as much as 10 dB relative to conventional beam-forming even with mean flow of M=0.5.

  7. COMPASS - COMparative Particle formation in the Atmosphere using portable Simulation chamber Study techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Sun, S.; Haunold, W.; Sitals, R.; van Beesel, E.; dos Santos, L.; Nillius, B.; Jacobi, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the set-up of a novel twin chamber technique that uses the comparative method and establishes an appropriate connection of atmospheric and laboratory methods to broaden the tools for investigations. It is designed to study the impact of certain parameters and gases on ambient processes, such as particle formation online, and can be applied in a large variety of conditions. The characterisation of both chambers proved that both chambers operate identically, with a residence time xT (COMPASS1) = 26.5 ± 0.3 min and xT (COMPASS2) = 26.6 ± 0.4 min, at a typical flow rate of 15 L min-1 and a gas leak rate of (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10-5 s-1. Particle loss rates were found to be larger (due to the particles' stickiness to the chamber walls), with an extrapolated maximum of 1.8 × 10-3 s-1 at 1 nm, i.e. a hundredfold of the gas leak rate. This latter value is associated with sticky non-volatile gaseous compounds, too. Comparison measurement showed no significant differences. Therefore operation under atmospheric conditions is trustworthy. To indicate the applicability and the benefit of the system, a set of experiments was conducted under different conditions, i.e. urban and remote, enhanced ozone and terpenes as well as reduced sunlight. In order to do so, an ozone lamp was applied to enhance ozone in one of two chambers; the measurement chamber was protected from radiation by a first-aid cover and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were added using a small additional flow and a temperature-controlled oven. During the elevated ozone period, ambient particle number and volume increased substantially at urban and remote conditions, but by a different intensity. Protection of solar radiation displayed a clear negative effect on particle number, while terpene addition did cause a distinct daily pattern. E.g. adding β pinene particle number concentration rose by 13% maximum at noontime, while no significant effect was observable during darkness. Therefore

  8. Outdoor chamber study to test multi-day effects. Volume 3. Documentation for computer-readable environmental chamber data. Final report, August 1982-August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.P.L.; Dodd, M.C.; Long, W.D.; Atkinson, R.

    1984-12-01

    The smog chamber facilities of the University of California, Riverside were used to collect experimental data to assess the effects of multi-day irradiations on photochemical oxidant formation. This volume includes documentation on the computer-readable magnetic tape that contains all the data collected in the study. The tape is suitable for use by modelers to develop and test kinetic mechanisms of photochemical smog formation.

  9. Transport in rectangular quadrupole channels

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E.

    1983-08-01

    Multiple electrostatic quadrupole arrays can be produced in many different geometries. However, the fabrication process can be considerably simplified if the poles are rectangular. This is especially true for millimeter sized channels. This paper presents the results of a series of measurements comparing the space charge limits in cylindrical and rectangular quadrupole channels.

  10. Anterior chamber depth and primary angle-closure glaucoma. II. A genetic study.

    PubMed

    Alsbirk, P H

    1975-06-01

    The genetics of primary angle-closure glaucome (a.c.g.) was studied: a) through the prevalence in sibs and children of a.c.g. probands, and b) through the family distribution of the closely correlated axial anterior chamber depth (ACD). The material emerged from an epidemiologic study in Greeland Eskimos. a) Compared with the general population, the observed prevalence of a.c.g. was increased in sibs of a.c.g. probands and the estimated, future prevalence was found to be the same in sibs and children. Age influence prevented a proper Mendelian analysis, but no simple monogenic inheritance seems probable. b) The biometric study showed a relatively shallow chamber in sibs, children, nephews, nieces and grandchildren of a.c.g. probands. Regression analyses revealed a corresponding pattern, also in control families of probands with shallow chambers and in general population families. A heritability of 70% was found, indicating that about two thirds of the age and sex independent variation in ACD seems to be genetic. PMID:1174403

  11. Study on thermally induced vibration of flexible boom in various thermal environments of vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Changduk; Oh, Kyung-Won; Park, Hyun-Bum; Sugiyama, Y.

    2005-02-01

    In order to simulate the thermally-induced vibration phenomenon of the flexible thin boom structure of the spacecraft such as the thin solar panel and the flexible cantilever with the attached tip mass in space, the thermally-induced vibration including thermal flutter of the flexible thin boom with the concentrated tip mass was experimentally investigated at various thermal environments using a heat lamp and both vacuum and air condition using the vacuum chamber. In this experimental study, divergence speed, natural frequency and thermal strains of the thermally-induced vibration were comparatively evaluated at various thermal environment conditions. Finally the thermally-induced vibration of the flexible boom structure of the earth orbit satellite in solar radiation environment from the earth eclipse region including umbra and penumbra was simulated using the vacuum chamber and power control of the heating lamp.

  12. Acoustic studies for alpha background rejection in dark matter bubble chamber detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Cabo, M.; Felis, I.; Ardid, M.; Collaboration: COUPP Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics) is an experiment with bubble chambers able to detect dark matter directly either with Spin-Dependent or with Spin-Independent interactions. The target material is a superheated liquid (usually CF3I) that can be bubble nucleated due to nuclear recoils produced by elastic collisions of dark matter particles. The bubble growth inside the chamber is accompanied with an acoustic signature. The acoustic technique has been successfully used to have a good alpha discrimination (about 99%). In this paper, we present different studies and results related with the characterization of the acoustic properties of the detector and the different phenomena involved in the acoustic measurements of the bubble growth, such as sound generation, sound transmission and optimization of piezoelectric transducers.

  13. Construction and establishment of a new environmental chamber to study real-time cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Gülay; Baron, Stephan; Norozi, Kambiz; Männer, Jörg; Hornung, Oliver; Blume, Holger; Misske, Judith; Heimann, Bodo; Wessel, Armin; Yelbuz, T Mesud

    2007-06-01

    Heart development, especially the critical phase of cardiac looping, is a complex and intricate process that has not yet been visualized "live" over long periods of time. We have constructed and established a new environmental incubator chamber that provides stable conditions for embryonic development with regard to temperature, humidity, and oxygen levels. We have integrated a video microscope in the chamber to visualize the developing heart in real time and present the first "live" recordings of a chick embryo in shell-less culture acquired over a period of 2 days. The time-lapse images we show depict a significant time window that covers the most critical and typical morphogenetic events during normal cardiac looping. Our system is of interest to researchers in the field of embryogenesis, as it can be adapted to a variety of animal models for organogenesis studies including heart and limb development. PMID:17490503

  14. Chamber bioaerosol study: human emissions of size-resolved fluorescent biological aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Bhangar, S; Adams, R I; Pasut, W; Huffman, J A; Arens, E A; Taylor, J W; Bruns, T D; Nazaroff, W W

    2016-04-01

    Humans are a prominent source of airborne biological particles in occupied indoor spaces, but few studies have quantified human bioaerosol emissions. The chamber investigation reported here employs a fluorescence-based technique to evaluate bioaerosols with high temporal and particle size resolution. In a 75-m(3) chamber, occupant emission rates of coarse (2.5-10 μm) fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs) under seated, simulated office-work conditions averaged 0.9 ± 0.3 million particles per person-h. Walking was associated with a 5-6× increase in the emission rate. During both walking and sitting, 60-70% or more of emissions originated from the floor. The increase in emissions during walking (vs. while sitting) was mainly attributable to release of particles from the floor; the associated increased vigor of upper body movements also contributed. Clothing, or its frictional interaction with human skin, was demonstrated to be a source of coarse particles, and especially of the highly fluorescent fraction. Emission rates of FBAPs previously reported for lecture classes were well bounded by the experimental results obtained in this chamber study. In both settings, the size distribution of occupant FBAP emissions had a dominant mode in the 3-5 μm diameter range. PMID:25704637

  15. The Chamber for Studying Rice Response to Elevated Nighttime Temperature in Field

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Zheng, Xi; Wang, Dangying; Xu, Chunmei; Laza, Ma. Rebecca C.; Zhang, Xiufu

    2013-01-01

    An in situ temperature-controlled field chamber was developed for studying a large population of rice plant under different nighttime temperature treatments while maintaining conditions similar to those in the field during daytime. The system consists of a pipe hoop shed-type chamber with manually removable covers manipulated to provide a natural environment at daytime and a relatively stable and accurate temperature at night. Average air temperatures of 22.4 ± 0.3°C at setting of 22°C, 27.6 ± 0.4°C at 27°C, and 23.8 ± 0.7°C ambient conditions were maintained with the system. No significant horizontal and vertical differences in temperature were found and only slight changes in water temperatures were observed between the chambers and ambient conditions at 36 days after transplanting. A slight variation in CO2 concentration was observed at the end of the treatment during the day, but the 10-μmol CO2 mol−1 difference was too small to alter plant response. The present utilitarian system, which only utilizes an air conditioner/heater, is suitable for studying the effect of nighttime temperature on plant physiological responses with minimal perturbation of other environmental factors. At the same time, it will enable in situ screening of many rice genotypes. PMID:24089603

  16. State-of-the-art exposure chamber for highly controlled and reproducible THz biological effects studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerna, Cesario Z.; Elam, David P.; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Sloan, Mark A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging and sensing technologies are increasingly being used at international airports for security screening purposes and at major medical centers for cancer and burn diagnosis. The emergence of new THz applications has directly resulted in an increased interest regarding the biological effects associated with this frequency range. Knowledge of THz biological effects is also desired for the safe use of THz systems, identification of health hazards, and development of empirically-based safety standards. In this study, we developed a state-of-the-art exposure chamber that allowed for highly controlled and reproducible studies of THz biological effects. This innovative system incorporated an industry grade cell incubator system that permitted a highly controlled exposure environment, where temperatures could be maintained at 37 °C +/- 0.1 °C, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels at 5% +/- 0.1%, and relative humidity (RH) levels at 95% +/- 1%. To maximize the THz power transmitted to the cell culture region inside the humid incubator, a secondary custom micro-chamber was fabricated and incorporated into the system. This micro-chamber shields the THz beam from the incubator environment and could be nitrogen-purged to eliminate water absorption effects. Additionally, a microscope that allowed for real-time visualization of the live cells before, during, and after THz exposure was integrated into the exposure system.

  17. Experimental and numerical studies of a microfluidic device with compliant chambers for flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, V.; Raj, A.; Annabattula, R. K.; Sen, A. K.

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports experimental and numerical studies of a passive microfluidic device that stabilizes a pulsating incoming flow and delivers a steady flow at the outlet. The device employs a series of chambers along the flow direction with a thin polymeric membrane (of thickness 75-250 µm) serving as the compliant boundary. The deformation of the membrane allows accumulation of fluid during an overflow and discharge of fluid during an underflow for flow stabilization. Coupled fluid-structure simulations are performed using Mooney-Rivlin formulations to account for a thin hyperelastic membrane material undergoing large deformations to accurately predict the device performance. The device was fabricated with PDMS as the substrate material and thin PDMS membrane as the compliant boundary. The performance of the device is defined in terms of a parameter called ‘Attenuation Factor (AF)’. The effect of various design parameters including membrane thickness, elastic modulus, chamber size and number of chambers in series as well as operating conditions including the outlet pressure, mean input flow rate, fluctuation amplitude and frequency on the device performance were studied using experiments and simulations. The simulation results successfully confront the experimental data (within 10%) which validates the numerical simulations. The device was used at the exit of a PZT actuated valveless micropump to take pulsating flow at the upstream and deliver steady flow downstream. The amplitude of the pulsating flow delivered by the micropump was significantly reduced (AF = 0.05 for a device with three 4 mm chambers) but at the expense of a reduction in the pressure capability (<20%). The proposed device could potentially be used for reducing flow pulsations in practical microfluidic circuits.

  18. Evaluation of the pulp chamber size of human maxillary first molars: an institution based in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Abarajithan, Mohan; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the morphological measurements of the pulp chamber and also to establish the relationship of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) to the roof of the pulp chamber of the maxillary first molars in an Indian population. One hundred extracted human maxillary first molars were used. Each molar tooth was radiographed by radio visiography (RVG). Measurements were made by using the grid option in RVG. The results (mean +/- SD; in mm) were as follows: distance from floor of the pulp chamber to the furcation = 2.7 +/- 0.63; distance from roof of the pulp chamber to the furcation = 5.34 +/- 0.9; distance from tip of the palatal cusp to the furcation = 11.58 +/- 1.01; distance from the tip of the palatal cusp to the floor of the pulp chamber = 8.86 +/- 0.68; distance from the tip of the palatal cusp to the roof of the pulp chamber = 6.2 +/- 0.66; height of the pulp chamber = 2.62 +/- 0.61. The results of these measurements revealed that the morphological measurements of the maxillary first molars in the Indian population were similar to that reported by previous studies; the roof of the pulp chamber was found at the CEJ in 96% of the specimens. PMID:18445922

  19. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardin, Denis E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 °C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  20. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gardin, D.E.; Somorjai, G.A. )

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 [degree]C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  1. NASA's biomass production chamber: a testbed for bioregenerative life support studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Sager, J. C.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Fortson, R. E.; Dreschel, T. W.; Knott, W. M.; Corey, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    The Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) located at Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA provides a large (20 m^2 area, 113 m^3 vol.), closed environment for crop growth tests for NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. Since the summer of 1988, the chamber has operated on a near-continuous basis (over 1200 days) without any major failures (excluding temporary power losses). During this time, five crops of wheat (64-86 days each), three crops of soybean (90 to 97 days), five crops of lettuce (28-30 days), and four crops of potato (90 to 105 days) were grown, producing 481 kg of dry plant biomass, 196 kg edible biomass, 540 kg of oxygen, 94,700 kg of condensed water, and fixing 739 kg of carbon dioxide. Results indicate that total biomass yields were close to expected values for the given light input, but edible biomass yields and harvest indices were slightly lower than expected. Stand photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and nutrient uptake rates were monitored throughout growth and development of the different crops, along with the build-up of ethylene and other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Data were also gathered on system hardware maintenance and repair, as well as person-hours required for chamber operation. Future tests will include long-term crop production studies, tests in which nutrients from waste treatment systems will be used to grow new crops, and multi-species tests.

  2. A comparative study of remote plasma sources for environmentally-friendly CVD chambers cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Raoux, S.; Lai, K.C.; Nguyen, H.; Sarfaty, M.; Li, S.T.; Davidow, J.; Huang, T.F.

    1999-07-01

    CVD chamber cleaning is the main source of perfluorocompound (PFC) emission from semiconductor fabrication plants. Over the past years, several attempts have been made to optimize chamber cleaning efficiency and reduce its environmental impact. A new cleaning technology has been introduced that improves the overall tool productivity while virtually eliminating PFC emission concerns. A remote high-density plasma source dissociates NF{sub 3} molecules, and the reactive byproducts are injected in the CVD chamber to etch the deposition residues. Due to near-complete utilization of the source gas, the technology provides reduced clean time, and the MMTCE (Million Metric Ton Carbon Equivalent) of the process can be reduced by two orders of magnitude, compared to classical in-situ RF plasma cleans. In this study, the authors compare the characteristics of a microwave-driven and a magnetically-enhanced indicatively coupled NF{sub 3} discharge. Optical Emission Spectroscopy. Quadrupole Mass Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra Red and etch rate measurements were used to characterize the different sources and assess the environmental impact of the clean processes. A comparative analysis of the two types of plasma sources is made with respect to implementation of this cleaning technology in an industrial environment.

  3. Indoor pollution by organic emissions from textile floor coverings: Climate test chamber studies under static conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollinger, S.; Levsen, K.; Wünsch, G.

    The emission of organic compounds from textile floor coverings was studied in a climate test chamber under static conditions (zero air exchange) in order to test the parameters which influence such chamber experiments, i.e. the temperature, the humidity and the adsorption on the walls. While depending on the volatility and the polarity of the compound, the equilibrium concentrations increase in part substantially with increasing temperature, the humidity has little impact on the observed concentrations. The chamber walls represent an important sink for polar and less volatile compounds, although this sink does not influence the equilibrium concentrations. Ten textile floor coverings have been tested (7 of which had a polyamide pile and a styrene-butadiene rubber backing). Ninety-nine compounds have been identified. The equilibrium concentrations of 20 compounds have been determined. These equilibrium concentrations do not depend on the sample size, the sample loading nor on wall effects, in contrast to the dynamic method, where these parameters play an important role.

  4. Prevention of cartilage dehydration in imaging studies with a customized humidity chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Ryan J.; Firminger, Colin; Müller, Ralph; Stok, Kathryn S.

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative three-dimensional imaging methods such as micro-computed tomography (μCT) allow for the rapid and comprehensive evaluation of cartilage and bone in animal models, which can be used for drug development and related research in arthritis. However, when imaging fresh cartilage tissue in air, a common problem is tissue dehydration which causes movement artifact in the resulting images. These artifacts distort scans and can render them unusable, leading to a considerable loss of time and effort with sample preparation and measurement. The sample itself is also irretrievably damaged by the dehydration, often unable to return to its full tissue thickness upon rehydration. Additionally, imaging with ionic contrast agents such as HexabrixTM must be performed in air, otherwise the agent will be washed out if immersed in a liquid. The first goal of this study was to design a customized humidity chamber to maintain cartilage hydration without the need for immersion. Following this, the use of the humidity chamber during a synchrotron radiation-μCT scan was validated and its performance evaluated. Results showed that the loss of fluid film volume is associated with scanning at low humidity (87%), and can be avoided using the humidity chamber. Coupling this technology with advances in synchrotron imaging (e.g., phase contrast imaging) or contrast agents is promising.

  5. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Norman, J.H.; Price, R.J.; Porter, J.; Schuster, H.L.; Simnad, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO/sub 2/ granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO/sub 2/ granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs.

  6. NASA's Biomass Production Chamber: a testbed for bioregenerative life support studies.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M; Mackowiak, C L; Stutte, G W; Sager, J C; Yorio, N C; Ruffe, L M; Fortson, R E; Dreschel, T W; Knott, W M; Corey, K A

    1996-01-01

    The Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) located at Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA provides a large (20 m2 area, 113 m3 vol.), closed environment for crop growth tests for NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. Since the summer of 1988, the chamber has operated on a near-continuous basis (over 1200 days) without any major failures (excluding temporary power losses). During this time, five crops of wheat (64-86 days each), three crops of soybean (90 to 97 days), five crops of lettuce (28-30 days), and four crops of potato (90 to 105 days were grown, producing 481 kg of dry plant biomass, 196 kg edible biomass, 540 kg of oxygen, 94,700 kg of condensed water, and fixing 739 kg of carbon dioxide. Results indicate that total biomass yields were close to expected values for the given light input, but edible biomass yields and harvest indices were slightly lower than expected. Stand photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and nutrient uptake rates were monitored throughout growth and development of the different crops, along with the build-up of ethylene and other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Data were also gathered on system hardware maintenance and repair, as well as person-hours required for chamber operation. Future tests will include long-term crop production studies, tests in which nutrients from waste treatment systems will be used to grow new crops, and multi-species tests. PMID:11538800

  7. NASA's Biomass Production Chamber: a testbed for bioregenerative life support studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Sager, J. C.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Fortson, R. E.; Dreschel, T. W.; Knott, W. M.; Corey, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    The Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) located at Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA provides a large (20 m2 area, 113 m3 vol.), closed environment for crop growth tests for NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. Since the summer of 1988, the chamber has operated on a near-continuous basis (over 1200 days) without any major failures (excluding temporary power losses). During this time, five crops of wheat (64-86 days each), three crops of soybean (90 to 97 days), five crops of lettuce (28-30 days), and four crops of potato (90 to 105 days were grown, producing 481 kg of dry plant biomass, 196 kg edible biomass, 540 kg of oxygen, 94,700 kg of condensed water, and fixing 739 kg of carbon dioxide. Results indicate that total biomass yields were close to expected values for the given light input, but edible biomass yields and harvest indices were slightly lower than expected. Stand photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and nutrient uptake rates were monitored throughout growth and development of the different crops, along with the build-up of ethylene and other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Data were also gathered on system hardware maintenance and repair, as well as person-hours required for chamber operation. Future tests will include long-term crop production studies, tests in which nutrients from waste treatment systems will be used to grow new crops, and multi-species tests.

  8. Phasing rectangular apertures.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utterback, E; Jones, S M

    2009-10-26

    Several techniques have been developed to phase apertures in the context of astronomical telescopes with segmented mirrors. Phasing multiple apertures, however, is important in a wide range of optical applications. The application of primary interest in this paper is the phasing of multiple short pulse laser beams for fast ignition fusion experiments. In this paper analytic expressions are derived for parameters such as the far-field distribution, a line-integrated form of the far-field distribution that could be fit to measured data, enclosed energy or energy-in-a-bucket and center-of-mass that can then be used to phase two rectangular apertures. Experimental data is taken with a MEMS device to simulate the two apertures and comparisons are made between the analytic parameters and those derived from the measurements. Two methods, fitting the measured far-field distribution to the theoretical distribution and measuring the ensquared energy in the far-field, produced overall phase variance between the 100 measurements of less than 0.005 rad(2) or an RMS displacement of less than 12 nm. PMID:19997175

  9. Numerical studies on electrostatic field configuration of Resistive Plate Chambers for the INO-ICAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jash, A.; Majumdar, N.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2015-11-01

    As a part of detailed optimization studies on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) to be used in INO-ICAL experiment, the effect of geometrical artifacts like edge, corner, spacers on the device response should be investigated thoroughly. In this context, the electrostatic field within an RPC has been computed following Finite Element Method and Boundary Element Method to study the effect of these artifacts on the field map. The weighting field distribution for the given geometry has also been evaluated which is necessary for simulating the device signal. A unified model to calculate both physical and weighting field within RPC has been proposed and tested for its validity.

  10. Dosimetric study of 2D ion chamber array matrix for the modern radiotherapy treatment verification.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Sathiyan; Manickam, Ravikumar; Chandraraj, Varatharaj; Supe, Sanjay S

    2010-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment demands stringent quality assurance and accurate dose determination for delivery of highly conformal dose to the patients. Generally 3D dose distributions obtained from a treatment planning system have to be verified by dosimetric methods. Mainly, a comparison of two-dimensional calculated and measured data in several coplanar planes is performed. In principle, there are many possibilities to measure two-dimensional dose distributions such as films, flat-panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPID), ion chambers and ionization chamber arrays, and radiographic and radiochromic films. The flat-panel EPIDs show a good resolution and offer a possibility for real-time measurements: however to convert the signal into dose, a separate commercial algorithm is required. The 2D ion chamber array system offers the real-time measurements. In this study, dosimetric characteristics of 2D ion chamber array matrix were analyzed for verification of radiotherapy treatments. The dose linearity and dose rate effect of the I'matriXX device was studied using 6 MV, 18 MV photons and 12 MeV electrons. The output factor was estimated using I'matriXX device and compared with ion chamber measurements. The ion chamber array system was found to be linear in the dose range of 2-500 cGy and the response of the detector was found to be independent of dose rate between 100 MU/min to 600 MU/min. The estimated relative output factor with I'matriXX was found to match very well with the ion chamber measurements. To check the final dose delivered during IMRT planning, dose distribution patterns such as field-in-field, pyramidal, and chair tests were generated with the treatment planning system (TPS) and the same was executed in the accelerator and measured with the I'matriXX device. The dose distribution pattern measured by the matrix device for field-in-field, pyramidal, and chair test were found to be in good agreement with the calculated dose distribution

  11. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  12. Rectangular Microstrip Antenna with Slot Embedded Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambresh, P. A.; Hadalgi, P. M.; Hunagund, P. V.; Sujata, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a novel design that improves the performance of conventional rectangular microstrip antenna is discussed. Design adopts basic techniques such as probe feeding technique with rectangular inverted patch structure as superstrate, air filled dielectric medium as substrate and slot embedded patch. Prototype of the proposed antenna has been fabricated and various antenna performance parameters such as impedance bandwidth, return loss, radiation pattern and antenna gain are considered for Electromagnetic-study. The antennas are designed for the wireless application operating in the frequency range of 3.3 GHz to 3.6 GHz, and UK based fixed satellite service application (3 GHz to 4 GHz), and are named as single inverted patch conventional rectangular microstrip antenna (SIP-CRMSA) and slots embedded inverted patch rectangular microstrip antenna (SEIP-RMSA), respectively. Measurement outcomes for SEIP-RMSA1 and SEIP-RMSA2 showed the satisfactory performance with an achievable impedance bandwidth of 260 MHz (7 %) and 250 MHz (6.72 %), with return loss (RL) of -11.06 dB and -17.98 dB, achieved gain of 8.17 dB and 5.17 dB with 10% and 8% size reduction in comparison with the conventional patch antenna.

  13. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  14. Analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of microstrip antennas covered by a dielectric substrate is formulated in terms of coupled integro-differential equations with the current distribution on the conducting patch as an unknown quantity. The Galerkin method is used to solve for the unknown patch current. Using the present formulation, the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency, and the bandwidth of a rectangular microstrip antenna are computed. Design data for a rectangular microstrip antenna are also presented.

  15. Chamber bioaerosol study: outdoor air and human occupants as sources of indoor airborne microbes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachel I; Bhangar, Seema; Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward A; Taylor, John W; Lindow, Steven E; Nazaroff, William W; Bruns, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    Human occupants are an important source of microbes in indoor environments. In this study, we used DNA sequencing of filter samples to assess the fungal and bacterial composition of air in an environmental chamber under different levels of occupancy, activity, and exposed or covered carpeting. In this office-like, mechanically ventilated environment, results showed a strong influence of outdoor-derived particles, with the indoor microbial composition tracking that of outdoor air for the 2-hour sampling periods. The number of occupants and their activity played a significant but smaller role influencing the composition of indoor bioaerosols. Human-associated taxa were observed but were not particularly abundant, except in the case of one fungus that appeared to be transported into the chamber on the clothing of a study participant. Overall, this study revealed a smaller signature of human body-associated taxa than had been expected based on recent studies of indoor microbiomes, suggesting that occupants may not exert a strong influence on bioaerosol microbial composition in a space that, like many offices, is well ventilated with air that is moderately filtered and moderately occupied. PMID:26024222

  16. Chamber Bioaerosol Study: Outdoor Air and Human Occupants as Sources of Indoor Airborne Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rachel I.; Bhangar, Seema; Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward A.; Taylor, John W.; Lindow, Steven E.; Nazaroff, William W.; Bruns, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Human occupants are an important source of microbes in indoor environments. In this study, we used DNA sequencing of filter samples to assess the fungal and bacterial composition of air in an environmental chamber under different levels of occupancy, activity, and exposed or covered carpeting. In this office-like, mechanically ventilated environment, results showed a strong influence of outdoor-derived particles, with the indoor microbial composition tracking that of outdoor air for the 2-hour sampling periods. The number of occupants and their activity played a significant but smaller role influencing the composition of indoor bioaerosols. Human-associated taxa were observed but were not particularly abundant, except in the case of one fungus that appeared to be transported into the chamber on the clothing of a study participant. Overall, this study revealed a smaller signature of human body-associated taxa than had been expected based on recent studies of indoor microbiomes, suggesting that occupants may not exert a strong influence on bioaerosol microbial composition in a space that, like many offices, is well ventilated with air that is moderately filtered and moderately occupied. PMID:26024222

  17. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. Aim The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Materials and Methods Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. Results The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). Conclusion For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to

  18. COMPASS - COMparative Particle formation in the Atmosphere using Simulation chamber Study techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Sun, S.; Haunold, W.; Sitals, R.; van Beesel, E.; dos Santos, L.; Nillius, B.; Jacobi, S.

    2013-06-01

    The anthropogenic influence on climate and environment has increased strongly since industrialization about 150 yr ago. The consequences for the atmosphere became more and more apparent and nowadays affect our life quality on Earth progressively. Because of that it is very important to understand the atmospheric processes, on which these effects are based on, in detail. In this study we report the set-up of a novel twin chamber technique that uses the comparative method and establishes an appropriate connection of atmospheric and laboratory methods to broaden the tools for investigations. It is designed to study the impact of certain parameters and gases on ambient processes such as particle formation online and can be applied in a large variety of conditions. The characterisation of both chambers proved that both chambers operate identically with a residence time (xT (COMPASS 1) = 26.5 ± 0.3 min and xT (COMPASS 2) = 26.6 ± 0.4 min) at a typical flow rate of 15 L min-1 and a deposition rate (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10-5 s-1. Comparison measurement showed no significant differences. Therefore operation under atmospheric conditions is trustworthy. To indicate the applicability and the benefit of the system a set of experiments was conducted at different conditions, i.e. urban and remote, enhancing ozone and terpenes as well as reducing sunlight. In the ozone enhanced ambient particle number and volume increased substantially at urban and remote conditions in a different strength. Solar radiation displayed a clear positive effect on particle number as well as terpene addition did at remote conditions. Therefore the system is a useful tool to investigate local precursors, the details of ambient particle formation at surface locations as well as future feedback processes.

  19. Trade study comparing specimen chamber servicing methods for the Space Station Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvisi, Michael L.; Sun, Sidney C.

    1991-01-01

    The Specimen Chamber Service Unit, a component of the Space Station Centrifuge Facility, must provide a clean enclosure on a continuing basis for the facility's plant, rodent and primate specimens. The specimen chambers can become soiled and can require periodic servicing to maintain a clean environment for the specimens. Two methods of servicing the specimen chambers are discussed: washing the chambers with an on-board washer, or disposing of the soiled chambers and replacing them with clean ones. Many of these issues are addressed by developing several servicing options, using either cleaning or replacement as the method of providing clean specimen chambers, and then evaluating each option according to a set of established quantitative and qualitative criteria. Disposing and replacing the Specimen Chambers is preferable to washing them.

  20. Studying Molecular Interactions at the Single Bond Level with a Laminar Flow Chamber.

    PubMed

    Pierres, Anne; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-12-01

    During the last decade, many investigators developed new methodologies allowing to study ligand-receptor interactions with unprecedented accuracy, up to the single bond level. Reported results include information on bond mechanical properties, association behaviour of surface-attached molecules, and dissection of energy landscapes and reaction pathways. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the potential and limitations of laminar flow chambers operated at low shear rates. This includes a brief review of basic principles, practical tips and problems associated with data interpretation. It is concluded that flow chambers are ideally suited to analyze weak interactions between a number of biomolecules, including the main families of adhesion receptors such as selectins, integrins, cadherins and members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The sensitivity of the method is limited by the quality of surfaces and efficiency of the studied ligand-receptor couple rather than the hardware. Analyzing interactions with a resolution of a piconewton and a few milliseconds shows that ligand-receptor complexes may experience a number of intermediate binding states, making it necessary to examine the definition of association and dissociation rates. Finally, it is emphasized that association rates measured on surface-bound molecules are highly dependent on parameters unrelated to binding surfaces. PMID:21151952

  1. IN VITRO STUDY OF THE PULP CHAMBER TEMPERATURE RISE DURING LIGHT-ACTIVATED BLEACHING

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Thaise Graciele; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39) was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39) not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13) were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach) according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LED)-laser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the groups. When the bleaching agent was not applied, the halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (2.38±0.66°C). The LED unit produced the lowest temperature increase (0.29±0.13°C); but there was no significant difference between LED unit and LED-laser system (0.35±0.15°C) (p>0.01). When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01): halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41±0.64°C), and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33±0.12°C); however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44±0.11°C). LED and LED-laser system did not differ

  2. In vitro study of the pulp chamber temperature rise during light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Thaise Graciele; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39) was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39) not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13) were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach) according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LED)laser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the groups. When the bleaching agent was not applied, the halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (2.38+/-0.66 degrees C). The LED unit produced the lowest temperature increase (0.29+/-0.13 degrees C); but there was no significant difference between LED unit and LED-laser system (0.35+/-0.15 degrees C) (p>0.01). When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01): halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41+/-0.64 degrees C), and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33+/-0.12 degrees C); however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44+/-0.11 degrees C

  3. Numerical study of the ferrofluid flow and heat transfer through a rectangular duct in the presence of a non-uniform transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminfar, H.; Mohammadpourfard, M.; Ahangar Zonouzi, S.

    2013-02-01

    This paper investigates numerically the hydro-thermal characteristics of a ferrofluid (water and 4 vol% Fe3O4) in a vertical rectangular duct which is exposed to a non-uniform transverse magnetic field generated by an electric current going through a wire located parallelly under the duct. The two phase mixture model and the control volume technique have been used to study the flow. The results show that applying the aforementioned magnetic field increases the Nusselt number and friction factor and also creates a pair of vortices that enhances heat transfer and prevents sedimentation of nano-particles. Furthermore, unlike the axial non-uniform magnetic field, the increase of the Nusselt number for the transverse magnetic field is considerable in all length along the duct and it is also concluded that with increasing the Reynolds number, the effect of the transverse non-uniform magnetic field on the Nusselt number is more than that of the axial non-uniform magnetic field.

  4. Experimental study on the 3D image reconstruction in a truncated Archimedean-like spiral geometry with a long-rectangular detector and its image characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Daeki; Cho, Heemoon; Cho, Hyosung; Choi, Sungil; Je, Uikyu; Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we performed a feasibility study on the three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction in a truncated Archimedean-like spiral geometry with a long-rectangular detector for application to high-accurate, cost-effective dental x-ray imaging. Here an x-ray tube and a detector rotate together around the rotational axis several times and, concurrently, the detector moves horizontally in the detector coordinate at a constant speed to cover the whole imaging volume during the projection data acquisition. We established a table-top setup which mainly consists of an x-ray tube (60 kVp, 5 mA), a narrow CMOS-type detector (198-μm pixel resolution, 184 (W)×1176 (H) pixel dimension), and a rotational stage for sample mounting and performed a systematic experiment to demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach to volumetric dental imaging. For the image reconstruction, we employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate reconstruction. We successfully reconstructed 3D images of considerably high quality and investigated the image characteristics in terms of the image value profile, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the spatial resolution.

  5. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  6. ac electroosmosis in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele; Accoto, Dino; Dario, Paolo

    2005-11-22

    Motivated by the growing interest in ac electroosmosis as a reliable no moving parts strategy to control fluid motion in microfluidic devices for biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip, we study transient and steady-state electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmosis and streaming currents) in infinitely extended rectangular charged microchannels. With the aid of Fourier series and Laplace transforms we provide a general formal solution of the problem, which is used to study the time-dependent response to sudden ac applied voltage differences in case of finite electric double layer. The Debye-Huckel approximation has been adopted to allow for an algebraic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann problem in Fourier space. We obtain the expressions of flow velocity profiles, flow rates, streaming currents, as well as expressions of the complex hydraulic and electrokinetic conductances. We analyze in detail the dependence of the electrokinetic conductance on the extension of linear dimensions relative to the Debye length, with an eye on finite electric double layer effects. PMID:16351310

  7. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1993-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct was experimentally and analytically investigated. To prevent the dripping of condensate on the film, the experiment was conducted inside a horizontal rectangular duct with vapor condensing only on the bottom cooled plate of the duct. R-113 and FC-72 (Fluorinert Electronic Fluid developed by the 3M Company) were used as the condensing fluids. The experimental program included measurements of film thickness, local and average heat transfer coefficients, wave length, wave speed, and a study of wave initiation. The measured film thickness was used to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient. The wave initiation was studied both with condensation and with an adiabatic air-liquid flow. The test sections used in both experiments were identical.

  8. Eddy viscosity measurements in a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, David H.; Morrison, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at a Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Velocity gradients, Reynolds stress tensor components, and scalar eddy viscosities are presented for the major and minor axis planes of the jet. The eddy viscosity model was found to be applicable only in the direction of maximum mean velocity gradient.

  9. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  10. Studies of aqueous humor proteins in rabbits after posterior chamber lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Kałuzny; Rózyczka, J; Gutsze, A; Mierzejewski, A; Pieniazek, W

    1991-01-01

    In 13 rabbits, 1 month to 1 year after posterior chamber lens implantation/polymethylmetacrylate/, the level of aqueous humor proteins was evaluated and the proteins separation in polyacylamide gel was performed. The studies were also carried out in unoperated eyes of the same animals and control group was composed of the eyes before surgery. It was found that in pseudophakic eyes an increased level of proteins remained during the whole year/the highest one month after surgery, slowly decreasing afterwards/, with the appearance of additional fractions. The moderate increase of the proteins concentration was also observed in unoperated eyes. The increase of aqueous humor proteins in pseudophakic eyes indicates that the presence of polymethyl metacrylate is not completely indifferent to the eyeball in spite of the suggestions derived from the clinical observations. PMID:1911644

  11. [Effects of elevated ozone on Pinus armandii growth: a simulation study with open-top chamber].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Fu; Liu, Chen; He, Xing-Yuan; Ruan, Ya-Nan; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Zhen-Ju; Peng, Jun-Jie; Li, Teng

    2013-10-01

    By using open-top chamber (OTC) and the techniques of dendrochronology, this paper studied the growth of Pinus armandii under elevated ozone, and explored the evolution dynamics and adaptation mechanisms of typical forest ecosystems to ozone enrichment. Elevated ozone inhibited the stem growth of P. armandii significantly, with the annual growth of the stem length and diameter reduced by 35.0% and 12.9%, respectively. The annual growth of tree-ring width and the annual ring cells number decreased by 11.5% and 54.1%, respectively, but no significant change was observed in the diameter of tracheid. At regional scale, the fluctuation of ozone concentration showed significant correlation with the variation of local vegetation growth (NDVI). PMID:24483064

  12. Chamber study of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber servin...

  13. Chamber study of polychlorinated biphenyl {PCB} emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber servin...

  14. Chamber study of PCB emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber servin...

  15. Three-dimensional study of macro- and mesosegregation formation in a rectangular cavity cooled from one vertical side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, V. F.; Tveito, K. O.; Založnik, M.; Combeau, H.; M'Hamdi, M.

    2012-07-01

    In metal alloys the solidification process leads to heterogeneities in chemical composition, which result in macroscopic (on the scale of the product) and mesoscopic (on the scale of several grains) segregation structures in the casting. Mesosegregations are a severe form of segregation in which solute concentration changes abruptly with respect to the surrounding regions and can induce structural heterogeneities in the casting. In this paper we move on from [1,2], in which channel mesosegregations and their numerical prediction were studied on a two-dimensional configuration - a small (10 × 6 cm) ingot of a Sn-10wt%Pb binary alloy. We extend the study to a slender three-dimensional cavity (10 × 6 × 1 cm) and we investigate three-dimensional effects in the formation of channel mesosegregations in a columnar mushy zone. We investigate the effects of the three-dimensionality on the structure of channels in the mushy zone and of channel mesosegregations. We present the influence of the permeability of the mushy zone on the channel structures. We show that channels can form either as lamellar or as tubular structures: at higher permeability secondary instabilities across the cavity thickness promote a transition from lamellar to tubular channels.

  16. Numerical study of three-dimensional detonation structure transformations in a narrow square tube: from rectangular and diagonal modes into spinning modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ji, H.; Lien, F.; Tang, H.

    2014-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) detonation structure transformations from rectangular and diagonal modes into spinning modes in a narrow square tube are investigated by high-resolution simulation. Numerical simulations are performed with a Riemann solver of the HLLC-type, new cell-based structured adaptive mesh refinement data structure, high-order, parallel adaptive mesh refinement reactive flow code. A simplified one-step kinetic reaction model is used to reveal the 3-D detonation structure. The four different types of initial disturbances applied in the ZND profiles lead to the structures of rectangular in phase, rectangular out of phase, rectangular partial out of phase and diagonal, respectively, during the initial stages of detonation propagation. Eventually, all these detonation structures evolve into the self-sustained spinning detonations. The asymmetric disturbance leads to a stable spinning detonation much faster than the rest. The important features in the formation of spinning detonation are revealed using a 3-D visualization, and a remarkable qualitative agreement with experimental and numerical results is obtained with respect to the transverse wave dynamics and detonation front structures. The transverse wave collisions produce the unburnt gas pockets and the energy to sustain the detonation front propagation and distortion. The periodic pressure oscillation of front plays a complex role as it shifts the reaction zone structure with an accompanying change in the driving energy of transition and the detonation parameters which result in the more distorted front and the unstable detonation. Eventually, the unstable distorted detonation evolves into a spinning detonation.

  17. RF impedance studies of a beam chamber and longitudinally slot-coupled vacuum pumping antechamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kustom, R.L.; Nicholls, G.L.; Kramer, S.L.; Khoe, T.K.; Cook, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The storage ring vacuum chamber of the proposed 7-GeV synchrotron light source at Argonne National Laboratory is planned to have a semi-elliptical beam chamber, with a longitudinal slot coupled to an antechamber containing NEG pumping strips. Concern over the RF impedance of this complex chamber has stimulated the need to understand the limitations it will have on the beam intensity, the RF acceleration system and on the beam lifetime. Calculations using numerical EM field programs have estimated the waveguide modes of this chamber and the impedance and loss parameter for the expected 1 to 2 cm beam bunch length. The loss parameter is shown to differ little from an elliptical beam chamber without the slot and antechamber. An experimental program has begun to verify the estimates of the impedance for these complex vacuum chamber components using laboratory methods. Preliminary results are presented for the measured loss parameter for a short length of beam vacuum chamber and for other components. These results are compared with their calculated values.

  18. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  19. Rectangular configuration improves superconducting cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, M.; Laverick, C.; Lobell, G.

    1968-01-01

    Superconducting cable for a cryogenic electromagnet with improved mechanical and thermal properties consists of a rectangular cross-sectioned combination of superconductor and normal conductor. The conductor cable has superconductors embedded in a metallic coating with high electrical and mechanical conductivity at liquid helium temperatures.

  20. Experimental study of the performance of a siphon sediment cleansing set in a CSO chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongchao; Zhang, Yiping; Tang, Ping; Chen, Yongmin; Zhu, David Z

    2013-01-01

    Model experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of a siphon sediment cleansing set (SSCS) for preventing sediment deposition on the combined sewer overflow (CSO) chamber bottom. The results confirmed the effectiveness of siphon suction in sediment removal in the chamber. The sediment scour test revealed that the equilibrium scour depth correlated significantly with the siphon-lift capacity of the SSCS, which was a function of the initial siphon head and the cross-sectional area ratio between the CSO chamber and the siphon. PMID:23823555

  1. Studying energy evolution in the discharge chamber of a multichamber lightning protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchuk, M. E.; Budin, A. V.; Kumkova, I. I.; Chusov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental data on the distribution of energy deposition along the discharge chamber of a multichamber lightning protection system at the initial stage of a discharge process modeling a lightning current pulse with 10 kA amplitude. The multichamber system comprised serially connected gas-discharge chambers. The breakdown between electrodes situated on the bottom of a channel in each chamber induces the formation of a shock wave. Subsequent energy evolution during the development of discharge proceeds in the entire volume bounded by the shock wave.

  2. A chamber system for maintaining a hyperbaric environment for long-term animal studies.

    PubMed

    Pearce, P C; Ross, J A; Luff, N P; Halsey, M J; Monk, S

    1991-01-01

    An experimental hyperbaric chamber system is described whereby animals, including nonhuman primates, can be cared for under altered environmental conditions for periods in excess of 1 wk. The chamber itself is capable of a working pressure of 200 atm abs, used with various mixtures of gases which can be varied independently. The novel approach of vertical mounting enables cages to be lowered into position, and food and water can be supplied from above while excreta can be removed from below, irrespective of the internal pressure. The chamber has an integrated life support system such that temperature, both of the chamber and of the mass of gas inside, humidity, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and noise levels can be accurately and finely controlled, all within a pathogen-free environment. PMID:2021021

  3. Ageing and performance studies of drift chamber prototypes for the MEG II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Marco; MEG Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present the tests aimed at verifying the proper functioning of the tracking systems of MEG II on small prototypes, estimating the achievable resolutions and evaluating the gain loss experienced by the chamber during its operation.

  4. Internal flow field studies in a simulated cylindrical port rocket chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, R.; Blackner, A. M.; Waugh, R. C.; Brown, R. S.; Willoughby, P. G.

    1990-12-01

    The present experimental characterization of the mean and fluctuating flow field along the length of a simulated cylindrical port rocket chamber employed flow simulations in which ambient-temperature nitrogen was uniformly injected along the walls of a porous-tube chamber connected to a choked sonic nozzle. The data obtained indicate that velocity fluctuations near the head of the chamber generally decrease in intensity relative to the centerline speed over the first five port diameters. Regular velocity fluctuations then appear near the wall, just ahead of the transition to turbulent flow; vortical disturbances are noted to exhibit pairing as they move away from the wall. Both buoyant flow influences and flow spinning are discovered in the forward portions of the chamber.

  5. OXIDANT-PRECURSOR RELATIONSHIPS UNDER POLLUTANT TRANSPORT CONDITIONS. OUTDOOR SMOG CHAMBER STUDY. VOLUME II. APPENDIXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple-day experiments were conducted in outdoor smog chambers to investigate the influence of simulated transport on ozone generation by various combinations of a surrogate urban hydrocarbon mixture and nitrogen oxides. The simulation of transport was accomplished by progressi...

  6. Predicting respiratory morbidity from pulmonary function tests: A reanalysis of ozone chamber studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Jewell, N.P.

    1989-10-01

    Some consequences of acute exposure to ozone are best measured in studies of human respiratory responses in controlled exposure chambers. These studies typically examine relationships between exposures to alternative pollutant concentrations and indicators of lung function as measured by spirometry, such as forced expiratory volume in one second, FEV1. However, the association of respiratory morbidity with these changes in lung function is not well established. To gain a better understanding of the relationship between ozone-related changes in pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms, data from several clinical studies have been reanalyzed. Logistic regression models were used to determine the quantitative relationship between changes in FEV1 and the probability of a mild or moderate lower respiratory symptom. Models were developed that corrected for repeated sampling of individuals and both population-averaged and subject-specific effects were determined. The results indicate the existence of a strong and consistent quantitative relationship between changes in lung function and the probability of a respiratory symptom. Specifically, a 10 percent reduction in FEV1 is associated with a 15 percentage point increase in the probability of a mild, moderate or severe lower respiratory symptom and a 6 percentage point increase in the probability of a moderate or severe lower respiratory symptom.

  7. Calibration study of the X-T relation for the BESIII drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiao-Lin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Wu, Zhi; Luo, Tao; Hu, Chen; Wang, Hai-Xia; Fang, Shuang-Shi; He, Kang-Lin; Li, Wei-Dong; Li, Wei-Guo; Liu, Huai-Min; Mao, Ze-Pu; Wang, Liang-Liang; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yao

    2015-02-01

    Offline calibration plays an important role in BESIII offline data processing. In order to achieve good spatial and momentum resolution, it is necessary to implement high precision offline calibration for the BESIII drift chamber. This paper studies the time-to-distance relations, which are important calibration constants for track reconstruction. The parameterization of the time-to-distance relation, studies of left-right asymmetry and studies of variation with entrance angle are performed. The impact of dead channels on the time-to-distance relation is given special attention in order to reduce the shift in measured momentum for tracks passing near dead cells. Finally we present the resolutions for barrel Bhabha events (|cosθ|<0.8) from a J/ψ data set taken in 2012. The average spatial resolution is 123 μm and the momentum resolution for 1.548 GeV/c Bhabha tracks is 11.9 MeV/c. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205184, 11205182, 11121092, 11179020) and Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232201)

  8. Passive Control of Supersonic Rectangular Jets through Boundary Layer Swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sang Yeop; Taghavi, Ray R.; Farokhi, Saeed

    2013-06-01

    Mixing characteristics of under-expanded supersonic jets emerging from plane and notched rectangular nozzles are computationally studied using nozzle exit boundary layer swirl as a mean of passive flow control. The coupling of the rectangular jet instability modes, such as flapping, and the swirl is investigated. A three-dimensional unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code with shock adaptive grids is utilized. For plane rectangular nozzle with boundary layer swirl, the flapping and spanwise oscillations are captured in the jet's small and large dimensions at twice the frequencies of the nozzles without swirl. A symmetrical oscillatory mode is also observed in the jet with double the frequency of spanwise oscillation mode. For the notched rectangular nozzle with boundary layer swirl, the flapping oscillation in the small jet dimension and the spanwise oscillation in the large jet dimension are observed at the same frequency as those without boundary layer swirl. The mass flow rates in jets at 11 and 8 nozzle heights downstream of the nozzles increased by nearly 25% and 41% for the plane and notched rectangular nozzles respectively, due to swirl. The axial gross thrust penalty due to induced swirl was 5.1% for the plane and 4.9% for the notched rectangular nozzle.

  9. Laboratory and Cloud Chamber Studies of Formation Processes and Properties of Atmospheric Ice Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisner, T.; Abdelmonem, A.; Benz, S.; Brinkmann, M.; Möhler, O.; Rzesanke, D.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Wagner, R.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of ice in tropospheric clouds controls the evolution of precipitation and thereby influences climate and weather via a complex network of dynamical and microphysical processes. At higher altitudes, ice particles in cirrus clouds or contrails modify the radiative energy budget by direct interaction with the shortwave and longwave radiation. In order to improve the parameterisation of the complex microphysical and dynamical processes leading to and controlling the evolution of tropospheric ice, laboratory experiments are performed at the IMK Karlsruhe both on a single particle level and in the aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA. Single particle experiments in electrodynamic levitation lend themselves to the study of the interaction between cloud droplets and aerosol particles under extremely well characterized and static conditions in order to obtain microphysical parameters as freezing nucleation rates for homogeneous and heterogeneous ice formation. They also allow the observation of the freezing dynamics and of secondary ice formation and multiplication processes under controlled conditions and with very high spatial and temporal resolution. The inherent droplet charge in these experiments can be varied over a wide range in order to assess the influence of the electrical state of the cloud on its microphysics. In the AIDA chamber on the other hand, these processes are observable under the realistic dynamic conditions of an expanding and cooling cloud- parcel with interacting particles and are probed simultaneously by a comprehensive set of analytical instruments. By this means, microphysical processes can be studied in their complex interplay with dynamical processes as for example coagulation or particle evaporation and growth via the Bergeron - Findeisen process. Shortwave scattering and longwave absorption properties of the nucleating and growing ice crystals are probed by in situ polarised laser light scattering measurements and infrared extinction

  10. Effect of nitrous acid on lung function in asthmatics: a chamber study.

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, W S; Russi, M B; Haber, A D; Rivkin, R M; Sullivan, J R; Tameroglu, Z; Mohsenin, V; Leaderer, B P

    1995-01-01

    Nitrous acid, a component of photochemical smog and a common indoor air pollutant, may reach levels of 100 ppb where gas stoves and unvented portable kerosene heaters are used. Nitrous acid is a primary product of combustion and may also be a secondary product by reaction of nitrogen dioxide with water. Because the usual assays for nitrogen dioxide measure several oxides of nitrogen (including nitrous acid) together, previous studies of indoor nitrogen dioxide may have included exposure to and health effects of nitrous acid. To assess the respiratory effects of nitrous acid exposure alone, we carried out a double-blinded crossover chamber exposure study with 11 mildly asthmatic adult subjects. Each underwent 3-hr exposures to 650 ppb nitrous acid and to filtered room air with three 20-min periods of moderate cycle exercise. Symptoms, respiratory parameters during exercise, and spirometry after exercise were measured. A statistically significant decrease in forced vital capacity was seen on days when subjects were exposed to nitrous acid. This effect was most marked at 25 min and 85 min after exposure began. Aggregate respiratory and mucous membrane symptoms were also significantly higher with nitrous acid. We conclude that this concentration and duration of exposure to nitrous acid alters lung mechanics slightly, does not induce significant airflow obstruction, and produces mild irritant symptoms in asthmatics. Images Figure 1. PMID:7607138

  11. Design and experimental study of an integrated vapor chamber-thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Krishna M.

    Future defense, aerospace and automotive technologies involve electronic systems that release high pulsed waste heat like during high power microwave and laser diode applications in tactical and combat aircraft, and electrical and electronic systems in hybrid electric vehicles, which will require the development of an efficient thermal management system. A key design issue is the need for fast charging so as not to overheat the key components. The goal of this work is to study the fabrication and technology implementation feasibility of a novel high energy storage, high heat flux passive heat sink. Key focus is to verify by theory and experiments, the practicability of using phase change materials as a temporary storage of waste heat for heat sink applications. The reason for storing the high heat fluxes temporarily is to be able to reject the heat at the average level when the heat source is off. Accordingly, a concept of a dual latent heat sink intended for moderate to low thermal duty cycle electronic heat sink applications is presented. This heat sink design combines the features of a vapor chamber with rapid thermal energy storage employing graphite foam inside the heat storage facility along with phase change materials and is attractive owing to its passive operation unlike some of the current thermal management techniques for cooling of electronics employing forced air circulation or external heat exchangers. In addition to the concept, end-application dependent criteria to select an optimized design for this dual latent heat sink are presented. A thermal resistance concept based design tool/model has been developed to analyze and optimize the design for experiments. The model showed that it is possible to have a dual latent heat sink design capable of handling 7 MJ of thermal load at a heat flux of 500 W/cm2 (over an area of 100 cm 2) with a volume of 0.072 m3 and weighing about 57.5 kg. It was also found that with such high heat flux absorption capability

  12. Design and characterization of a smog chamber for studying gas-phase chemical mechanisms and aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Liu, T.; Bernard, F.; Ding, X.; Wen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; He, Q.; Lü, S.; Chen, J.; Saunders, S.; Yu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe here characterization of a new state-of-the-art smog chamber facility for studying atmospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry. The chamber consists of a 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor housed in a temperature-controlled enclosure equipped with black lamps as the light source. Temperature can be set in the range from -10 to 40 °C at accuracy of ±1 °C as measured by eight temperature sensors inside the enclosure and one just inside the reactor. Matrix air can be purified with non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) < 0.5 ppb, NOx/O3/carbonyls < 1 ppb and particles < 1 cm-3. The photolysis rate of NO2 is adjustable between 0 and 0.49 min-1. At 298 K under dry conditions, the average wall loss rates of NO, NO2 and O3 were measured to be 1.41 × 10-4 min-1, 1.39 × 10-4 min-1 and 1.31 × 10-4 min-1, respectively, and the particle number wall loss rate was measured to be 0.17 h-1. Auxiliary mechanisms of this chamber are determined and included in the Master Chemical Mechanism to evaluate and model propene-NOx-air irradiation experiments. The results indicate that this new smog chamber can provide high-quality data for mechanism evaluation. Results of α-pinene dark ozonolysis experiments revealed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields comparable to those from other chamber studies, and the two-product model gives a good fit for the yield data obtained in this work. Characterization experiments demonstrate that our Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy Sciences (GIG-CAS), smog chamber facility can be used to provide valuable data for gas-phase chemistry and secondary aerosol formation.

  13. A microfluidic chamber to study the dynamics of muscle-contraction-specific molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Roman, Horia Nicolae; Juncker, David; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-03-01

    In vitro motility and laser trap assays are commonly used for molecular mechanics measurements. However, chemicals cannot be added during these measurements, because they create flows that alter the molecular mechanics. Thus, we designed a microfluidic device that allows the addition of chemicals without creating bulk flows. Biocompatibility of the components of this device was tested. A microchannel chamber was created by photolithography with the patterns transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The PDMS chamber was bound to a polycarbonate membrane, which itself was bound to a molecular mechanics chamber. The microchannels ensured rapid distribution of the chemicals over the membrane, whereas the membrane ensured efficient delivery to the mechanics chamber while preventing bulk flow. The biocompatibility of the materials was tested by comparing the velocity (ν(max)) of propulsion by myosin of fluorescently labeled actin filaments to that of the conventional assay; no difference in ν(max) was observed. To estimate total chemical delivery time, labeled bovine serum albumin was injected in the channel chamber and TIRF was used to determine the time to reach the assay surface (2.7 ± 0.1 s). Furthermore, the standard distance of a trapped microsphere calculated during buffer diffusion using the microfluidic device (14.9 ± 3.2 nm) was not different from that calculated using the conventional assay (15.6 ± 5.3 nm, p = 0.922). Finally, ν(max) obtained by injecting adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the microchannel chamber (2.37 ± 0.48 μm/s) was not different from that obtained when ATP was delivered directly to the mechanics chamber (2.52 ± 0.42 μm/s, p = 0.822). This microfluidic prototype validates the design for molecular mechanics measurements. PMID:25629255

  14. Studies of material and process compatibility in developing compact silicon vapor chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qingjun; Bhunia, Avijit; Tsai, Chialun; Kendig, Martin W.; DeNatale, Jeffrey F.

    2013-06-01

    The performance and long-term reliability of a silicon vapor chamber (SVC) developed for thermal management of high-power electronics critically depend on compatibility of the component materials. A hermetically sealed SVC presented in this paper is composed of bulk silicon, glass-frit as a bonding agent, lead/tin solder as an interface sealant and a copper charging tube. These materials, in the presence of a water/vapor environment, may chemically react and release noncondensable gas (NCG), which can weaken structural strength and degrade the heat transfer performance with time. The present work reports detailed studies on chemical compatibility of the components and potential solutions to avoid the resulting thermal performance degradation. Silicon surface oxidation and purification of operating liquid are necessary steps to reduce performance degradation in the transient period. A lead-based solder with its low reflow temperature is found to be electrochemically stable in water/vapor environment. High glazing temperature solidifies molecular bonding in glass-frit and mitigates PbO precipitation. Numerous liquid flushes guarantee removal of chemical residual after the charging tube is soldered to SVC. With these improvements on the SVC material and process compatibility, high effective thermal conductivity and steady heat transfer performance are obtained.

  15. Study of Anterior Chamber Aqueous Tube Shunt by Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunhui; Li, Yan; Huang, David; Francis, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. This cross-sectional, observational study used Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) to examine the position, patency, and the interior entrance site of anterior chamber (AC) aqueous tube shunts. Methods. The OCT, slitlamp biomicroscopy, and gonioscopy findings of 23 eyes of 18 patients with AC shunts were collected and compared. Results. OCT images demonstrated the shunt position and patency in all 23 eyes, and the details of the AC entrance in 16 eyes. The position of the tube varied, with the majority (14/23) on the surface of the iris. The exact position of the AC entrance relative to Schwalbe's line (SL) could be determined in 9 eyes (posterior to SL in 7 eyes, anterior in 2 eyes). At the AC entrance, growth of fibrous scar tissue was present between the tube and the corneal endothelium in all 16 eyes in which the entrance could be clearly visualized. It's a new finding that could not be visualized by slitlamp examination or lower resolution OCT. Conclusion. Compared to slitlamp examination, Fourier-domain OCT of AC tube shunts provided more detailed anatomic information regarding the insertion level relative to SL, scar tissue between the tube and the corneal endothelium, and patency of the tube opening. PMID:22778909

  16. Total OH reactivity study from VOC photochemical oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Hohaus, T.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wahner, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that hydroxyl radicals (OH) act as a dominant reactive species in the degradation of VOCs in the atmosphere. In recent field studies, directly measured total OH reactivity often showed poor agreement with OH reactivity calculated from VOC measurements (e.g. Nölscher et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2012a). This "missing OH reactivity" is attributed to unaccounted biogenic VOC emissions and/or oxidation products. The comparison of total OH reactivity being directly measured and calculated from single component measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products gives us a further understanding on the source of unmeasured reactive species in the atmosphere. This allows also the determination of the magnitude of the contribution of primary VOC emissions and their oxidation products to the missing OH reactivity. A series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, to explore in detail the photochemical degradation of VOCs (isoprene, ß-pinene, limonene, and D6-benzene) by OH. The total OH reactivity was determined from the measurement of VOCs and their oxidation products by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) with a GC/MS/FID system, and directly measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at the same time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements showed an increase of missing OH reactivity in the presence of oxidation products of VOCs, indicating a strong contribution to missing OH reactivity from uncharacterized oxidation products.

  17. Extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol components in an environmental aerosol chamber: IR resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogili, Praveen K.; Yang, K. H.; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. To better understand the impact that mineral dust aerosol may have on climate forcing and on remote sensing, we have initiated a study of the optical properties of important components of mineral dust aerosol including silicate clays (illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite), quartz, anhydrite, and calcite. The extinction spectra are measured in an environmental simulation chamber over a broad wavelength range, which includes both the IR (650-5000 cm -1) and UV-vis (12,500-40,000 cm -1) spectral regions. In this paper, we focus on the IR region from 800 to 1500 cm -1, where many of these mineral dust constituents have characteristic vibrational resonance features. Experimental spectra are compared with Mie theory simulations based on published mineral optical constants. We find that Mie theory generally does a poor job in fitting the IR resonance peak positions and band profiles for nonspherical aerosols in the accumulation mode size range ( D˜0.1-2.5 μm). We explore particle shape effects on the IR resonance line profiles by considering analytic models for extinction of particles with characteristic shapes (i.e. disks, needles, and ellipsoids). Interestingly, Mie theory often appears to give more accurate results for the absorption line profiles of larger particles that fall in the coarse mode size range.

  18. Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers for EAS study in the EEE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; An, S.; Antolini, R.; Badala, A.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Blanco, F.; Bressan, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Chiri, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Coccia, E.; de Pasquale, S.; di Giovanni, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Imponente, G.; Kim, J.; La Rocca, P.; Librizzi, F.; Maggiora, A.; Menghetti, H.; Miozzi, S.; Moro, R.; Panareo, M.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Piragino, G.; Riggi, F.; Romano, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Sbarra, C.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Williams, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyenski, R.

    The EEE (Extreme Energy Event) Project is an extensive air shower experiment devoted to the study of very high energy events through the detection at ground of the muon component of the shower. The detectors are installed inside many Italian High Schools, involving students in the experiment. The detector used is a tracking telescope made of 3 planes of Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs), a simplified, large and cheap version of the detector designed for the time of flight measurements (TOF) of the ALICE experiment at LHC. Exploiting the concept of the multiple small gas gaps combined with the use of high gain and fast gas mixture (Freon and SF6 based), the MRPCs show an overall time resolution of 100 ps. The particle tracking is performed equipping MRPCs with 24 copper strips read at both ends by front end electronics based on NINO ASIC and using commercial multi-hit TDCs. The MRPCs for the EEE experiment are built at CERN by Italian High School students and teachers under the supervision of INFN and Centro “E. Fermi” experts. After construction they are shipped to Italy and after preliminary tests they are installed inside the schools. Here we present the status and first results of the already operating stations.

  19. A comprehensive study on different modelling approaches to predict platelet deposition rates in a perfusion chamber

    PubMed Central

    Pallarès, Jordi; Senan, Oriol; Guimerà, Roger; Vernet, Anton; Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Vilahur, Gemma; Badimon, Lina; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Cito, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Thrombus formation is a multiscale phenomenon triggered by platelet deposition over a protrombotic surface (eg. a ruptured atherosclerotic plaque). Despite the medical urgency for computational tools that aid in the early diagnosis of thrombotic events, the integration of computational models of thrombus formation at different scales requires a comprehensive understanding of the role and limitation of each modelling approach. We propose three different modelling approaches to predict platelet deposition. Specifically, we consider measurements of platelet deposition under blood flow conditions in a perfusion chamber for different time periods (3, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes) at shear rates of 212 s−1, 1390 s−1 and 1690 s−1. Our modelling approaches are: i) a model based on the mass-transfer boundary layer theory; ii) a machine-learning approach; and iii) a phenomenological model. The results indicate that the three approaches on average have median errors of 21%, 20.7% and 14.2%, respectively. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using an empirical data set as a proxy for a real-patient scenario in which practitioners have accumulated data on a given number of patients and want to obtain a diagnosis for a new patient about whom they only have the current observation of a certain number of variables. PMID:26391513

  20. Development studies for the ILC: Measurements and simulations for a time projection chamber with GEM technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledermann, Bernhard; Kaminski, Jochen; Kappler, Steffen; Müller, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology is well suited for usage as central tracker at the International Linear Collider (ILC). To study the high potential of this detector type a small prototype of 25 cm length was built in Karlsruhe and used in several experimental setups. In this publication the results of these measurements and of additional Monte Carlo simulations are presented. By introducing the so-called equivalent drift distance a combination of all results was possible leading to a recommended configuration of the multi-GEM tower for the ILC-TPC. It will be shown that for conditions considered in the TESLA-TDR the transverse spatial resolution will be able to reach 65 μm for 10 cm and 190 μm for 200 cm drift at the ILC. This as well as the expectations for longitudinal spatial resolution, for energy resolutions of the specific ionization, and for single pad row efficiency should be able to meet the requirements of a future ILC-TPC.

  1. Analytic and numerical analysis of the longitudinal coupling impedance of a rectangular slot in a thin coaxial liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, Alexei V.; Gluckstern, Robert L.

    1997-09-01

    Beam pipes of high-energy superconducting colliders require a shielding tube (liner) with pumping slots to screen cold chamber walls from synchrotron radiation. Pumping slots in the liner walls are required to keep high vacuum inside the beam pipe and provide for a long beam lifetime. As previously discussed [Fedotov and Gluckstern, Phys. Rev. E 54, 1930 (1996)], for a long narrow slot whose length may be comparable with the wavelength, the usual static approximation for the polarizability and susceptibility that enter into the impedance is a poor one. Therefore, finding semianalytic expressions for the impedance of a rectangular slot in a broad frequency range is highly desirable. We develop a general analysis based on a variational formulation, which includes both the realistic coaxial structure of the beam-pipe and the effect of finite wavelength, in order to calculate the coupling impedance of a rectangular slot in a liner wall of zero thickness. We then present a numerical study of the frequency dependence of the coupling impedance of a transverse rectangular slot. Numerical results for a small square hole are presented for frequencies above and below cutoff, and compared with the results of other calculations.

  2. Rectangular groupoids and related structures

    PubMed Central

    Boykett, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The quasivariety of groupoids (N,∗) satisfying the implication a∗b=c∗d⇒a∗d=c∗b=a∗b generalises rectangular semigroups and central groupoids. We call them rectangular groupoids and find three combinatorial structures based upon arrays, matrices and graphs that are closely related. These generalise several groupoids of independent interest. The quasivariety generates the variety of all groupoids; they satisfy no nontrivial equations. We see some strong connections with isotopy, this being one of the classes of algebras (along with quasigroups) closed under isotopy. We investigate some constructions and show that a regular automorphism exists iff the groupoid is derived from a group via a Cayley graph construction. PMID:23836949

  3. Rectangular beam (5 X 40 cm multipole ion source). M.S. Thesis - Nov. 1979; [applications to electron bombardment in materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    A 5 x 40 cm rectangular-beam ion source was designed and fabricated. A multipole field configuration was used to facilitate design of the modular rectangular chamber, while a three-grid ion optics system was used for increased ion current densities. For the multipole chamber, a magnetic integral of 0.000056 Tesla-m was used to contain the primary electrons. This integral value was reduced from the initial design value, with the reduction found necessary for discharge stability. The final value of magnetic integral resulted in discharge losses at typical operating conditions which ranged from 600 to 1000 eV/ion, in good agreement with the design value of 800 eV/ion. The beam current density at the ion optics was limited to about 3.2 mA/sq cm at 500 eV and to about 3.5 mA/sq cm at 1000 ev. The effects of nonuniform ion current, dimension tolerance, and grid thermal warping were considered. The use of multiple rectangular-beam ion sources to process wider areas than would be possible with a single source (approx. 40 cm) was also studied. Beam profiles were surveyed at a variety of operating conditions and the results of various amounts of beam overlap calculated.

  4. A patient-specific quality assurance study on absolute dose verification using ionization chambers of different volumes in RapidArc treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Syam Kumar, S.A.; Sukumar, Prabakar; Sriram, Padmanaban; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Aketi, Srinu; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan

    2012-01-01

    The recalculation of 1 fraction from a patient treatment plan on a phantom and subsequent measurements have become the norms for measurement-based verification, which combines the quality assurance recommendations that deal with the treatment planning system and the beam delivery system. This type of evaluation has prompted attention to measurement equipment and techniques. Ionization chambers are considered the gold standard because of their precision, availability, and relative ease of use. This study evaluates and compares 5 different ionization chambers: phantom combinations for verification in routine patient-specific quality assurance of RapidArc treatments. Fifteen different RapidArc plans conforming to the clinical standards were selected for the study. Verification plans were then created for each treatment plan with different chamber-phantom combinations scanned by computed tomography. This includes Medtec intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) phantom with micro-ionization chamber (0.007 cm{sup 3}) and pinpoint chamber (0.015 cm{sup 3}), PTW-Octavius phantom with semiflex chamber (0.125 cm{sup 3}) and 2D array (0.125 cm{sup 3}), and indigenously made Circular wax phantom with 0.6 cm{sup 3} chamber. The measured isocenter absolute dose was compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) plan. The micro-ionization chamber shows more deviations when compared with semiflex and 0.6 cm{sup 3} with a maximum variation of -4.76%, -1.49%, and 2.23% for micro-ionization, semiflex, and farmer chambers, respectively. The positive variations indicate that the chamber with larger volume overestimates. Farmer chamber shows higher deviation when compared with 0.125 cm{sup 3}. In general the deviation was found to be <1% with the semiflex and farmer chambers. A maximum variation of 2% was observed for the 0.007 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber, except in a few cases. Pinpoint chamber underestimates the calculated isocenter dose by a maximum of 4.8%. Absolute dose

  5. An Experimental Study of the Flowfield on a Semispan Rectangular Wing with a Simulated Glaze Ice Accretion. Ph.D. Thesis, 1993 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khodadoust, Abdollah

    1994-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were conducted in order to study the effect of a simulated glaze ice accretion on the flowfield of a semispan, reflection-plane, rectangular wing at Re = 1.5 million and M = 0.12. A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to map the flowfield on the upper surface of the model in both the clean and iced configurations at alpha = 0, 4, and 8 degrees angle of attack. At low angles of attack, the massive separation bubble aft of the leading edge ice horn was found to behave in a manner similar to laminar separation bubbles. At alpha = 0 and 4 degrees, the locations of transition and reattachment, as deduced from momentum thickness distributions, were found to be in good agreement with transition and reattachment locations in laminar separation bubbles. These values at y/b = 0.470, the centerline measurement location, matched well with data obtained on a similar but two dimensional model. The measured velocity profiles on the iced wing compared reasonably with the predicted profiles from Navier-Stokes computations. The iced-induced separation bubble was also found to have features similar to the recirculating region aft of rearward-facing steps. At alpha = 0 degrees and 4 degrees, reverse flow magnitudes and turbulence intensity levels were typical of those found in the recirculating region aft of rearward-facing steps. The calculated separation streamline aft of the ice horn at alpha = 4 degrees, y/b = 0.470 coincided with the locus of the maximum Reynolds normal stress. The maximum Reynolds normal stress peaked at two locations along the separation streamline. The location of the first peak-value coincided with the transition location, as deduced from the momentum thickness distributions. The location of the second peak was just upstream of reattachment, in good agreement with measurements of flows over similar obstacles. The intermittency factor in the vicinity of reattachment at alpha = 4 degrees, y/b = 0.470, revealed the time-dependent nature of

  6. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  7. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  8. An ionization chamber with Frisch grids for studies of high-energy neutron-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutin, G. A.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Eismont, V. P.; Kireev, A. V.; Condé, H.; Elmgren, K.; Olsson, N.; Renberg, P.-U.

    2001-01-01

    A gridded ionization chamber for fission fragment detection is described. The chamber has been specially designed for use at the quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p, n) neutron source at the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. The detector permits measurements of fission fragment energy and emission angle for two targets with diameter of up to 10 cm. The time response of the chamber (⩽5 ns FWHM) is adequate to apply time-of-flight discrimination against background events induced by non-peak neutrons. Results of angular anisotropy measurements for the 232Th (n, f) and 238U(n, f) reactions in the 20-160 MeV energy range are given.

  9. Controlled environment fumigation chambers for the study of reactive air pollutant effects on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, N. J.; Lucas, P. W.; Nicholas Hewitt, C.

    The design and construction of eight 1-m 3 fumigation chambers for exposing plants to reactive air pollutants at low concentrations are reported. Teflon surfaces are used where possible to minimize the adsorption, absorption, desorption and chemical reaction of the pollutants. A purified ambient air supply, to which metered quantities of gaseous pollutants are added, is used to give two air changes per minute at constant, low, pollutant concentrations. Comparative analysis of the chambers indicates that conditions may be maintained with a significant degree of precision, i.e. temperature ±0.3°C, RH ±6%, light intensity ±5 μmol m -2 s -1. Boundary layer analysis from models of cherry tree ( Prunus avium) leaves indicate that the minimum conductance value within these chambers is 2 cm s -1.

  10. Note: Sample chamber for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of battery materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, CJ; Timofeeva, EV; Katsoudas, JP; Segre, CU

    2014-12-01

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides element-specific characterization of both crystalline and amorphous phases and enables direct correlations between electrochemical performance and structural characteristics of cathode and anode materials. In situ XAS measurements are very demanding to the design of the experimental setup. We have developed a sample chamber that provides electrical connectivity and inert atmosphere for operating electrochemical cells and also accounts for x-ray interactions with the chamber and cell materials. The design of the sample chamber for in situ measurements is presented along with example XAS spectra from anode materials in operating pouch cells at the Zn and Sn K-edges measured in fluorescence and transmission modes, respectively. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  11. Modeling and sensitivity study of the dual-chamber SMART (SMA ReseTtable) lift device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntz, Jonathan E.; Young, Jonathan R.; Brei, Diann; Radice, Joshua; Strom, Kenneth A.

    2007-04-01

    Morphing structures for applications such as impact mitigation is a challenging problem due to the speed and repeatability requirements that limit the viable actuation approaches. This paper examines a promising stored-energy, active-release approach that can be deployed quickly (~40 ms), is reusable/resetable and can be tuned in the field for changing conditions such as additional mass, temperature compensation or platform changes. The Dual-Chamber SMART (SMA ReseTtable) Lift is a pneumatic air spring controlled via an ultra-fast SMA actuated valve. This paper presents the modeling, sensitivity analysis and experimental validation of this new technology. A control-volume based analytical model was derived that employs compressible, sonic flow and thermodynamic relations to provide a set of differential equations that relate the design parameters (cylinder and valve geometry), application parameters (deployed mass), and operational parameters (pressure, temperature and SMA valve actuation profile), to the deployment performance (deploy time, profile, position, etc.). The model was exercised to explore the sensitivity of the performance with regards to these parameters and explore the off-line and on-line adjustability of the device's performance to compensate for cross platform applications and uncontrolled environmental effects such as temperature and added mass. As proof-of-concept, a full-scale prototype was designed via the model, built and experimentally characterized across several of the parameters for the real case-study of automotive pedestrian protection. The prototype performance agreed closely with model predictions and met the rigorous specifications of the case study with in-situ tailoring which is applicable to a wide range of morphing applications beyond this case study.

  12. A TPC (Time Projection Chamber) detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Bieser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Klienfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wieman, H.; Wright, M.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx} 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Experimental and simulation study of a Gaseous oxygen/Gaseous hydrogen vortex cooling thrust chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nanjia; Zhao, Bo; Li, Gongnan; Wang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, RNG k-ε turbulence model and PDF non-premixed combustion model are used to simulate the influence of the diameter of the ring of hydrogen injectors and oxidizer-to-fuel ratio on the specific impulse of the vortex cooling thrust chamber. The simulation results and the experimental tests of a 2000 N Gaseous oxygen/Gaseous hydrogen vortex cooling thrust chamber reveal that the efficiency of the specific impulse improves significantly with increasing of the diameter of the ring of hydrogen injectors. Moreover, the optimum efficiency of the specific impulse is obtained when the oxidizer-to-fuel ratio is near the stoichiometric ratio.

  14. Inconsistency of mesophyll conductance estimate causes the inconsistency for the estimates of maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation among the linear, rectangular and non-rectangular hyperbola biochemical models of leaf photosynthesis--a case study of CO₂ enrichment and leaf aging effects in soybean.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jindong; Feng, Zhaozhong; Leakey, Andrew D B; Zhu, Xinguang; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The responses of CO2 assimilation to [CO2] (A/Ci) were investigated at two developmental stages (R5 and R6) and in several soybean cultivars grown under two levels of CO2, the ambient level of 370 μbar versus the elevated level of 550 μbar. The A/Ci data were analyzed and compared by either the combined iterations or the separated iterations of the Rubisco-limited photosynthesis (Ac) and/or the RuBP-limited photosynthesis (Aj) using various curve-fitting methods: the linear 2-segment model; the non-rectangular hyperbola model; the rectangular hyperbola model; the constant rate of electron transport (J) method and the variable J method. Inconsistency was found among the various methods for the estimation of the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax), the mitochondrial respiration rate in the light (Rd) and mesophyll conductance (gm). The analysis showed that the inconsistency was due to inconsistent estimates of gm values that decreased with an instantaneous increase in [CO2], and varied with the transition Ci cut-off between Rubisco-limited photosynthesis and RuBP-regeneration-limited photosynthesis, and due to over-parameters for non-linear curve-fitting with gm included. We proposed an alternate solution to A/Ci curve-fitting for estimates of Vcmax, Rd, Jmax and gm with the various A/Ci curve-fitting methods. The study indicated that down-regulation of photosynthetic capacity by elevated [CO2] and leaf aging was due to partially the decrease in the maximum rates of carboxylation and partially the decrease in gm. Mesophyll conductance lowered photosynthetic capacity by 18% on average for the case of soybean plants. PMID:25113450

  15. Chamber study of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emissions of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners from 13 caulk samples were tested in a micro-chamber system. Twelve samples were from PCB-contaminated buildings and one was prepared in the laboratory. Nineteen light ballasts collected from buildings that represent 13 di...

  16. A Diffusion Cloud Chamber Study of Very Slow Mesons. II. Beta Decay of the Muon

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lederman, L. M.; Sargent, C. P.; Rinehart, M.; Rogers, K.

    1955-03-01

    The spectrum of electrons arising from the decay of the negative mu meson has been determined. The muons are arrested in the gas of a high pressure hydrogen filled diffusion cloud chamber. The momenta of the decay electrons are determined from their curvature in a magnetic field of 7750 gauss. The spectrum of 415 electrons has been analyzed according to the theory of Michel.

  17. Development of a large titanium bone chamber to study in vivo bone ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Hannink, Gerjon; Aspenberg, Per; Schreurs, B Willem; Buma, Pieter

    2006-03-01

    In the bone conduction chamber (BCC) various materials and factors have been tested for their effect on bone graft incorporation and bone healing. However, biomaterials often have to be crushed to fit in this small chamber. Since cellular responses to biomaterials are influenced by the size and shape of particles, research concerning the evaluation of biomaterials is limited by the dimensions of this bone chamber. We enlarged and modified the BCC in order to be able to investigate the in vivo influences of biomaterials, growth factors and bone graft processing on tissue and bone ingrowth. Seven goats received four bone chambers each, three modified models and a BCC. The first model (BCC+) had two ingrowth openings, similar to that of the BCC. The second model had two round ingrowth openings (ROU). The third model had a open bottom for bone ingrowth (BOT). After 12 weeks, bone ingrowth distances were measured on histological sections and using muCT. Bone ingrowth was significantly higher (p=0.009 and 0.008) in the ROU compared to the BCC+ and the BOT, respectively. Similar results were found using muCT. The ROU model performed most similar to the BCC (gold standard) and is considered to be a promising new tool in biomaterials research. PMID:16307797

  18. Test Outline for Flutter Analysis of Rectangular Panels in Rarefied Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, Fred A.

    1996-01-01

    Jet plume impingement forces acting on large flexible space structures may precipitate dynamically unstable behavior during space flights. Typical operating conditions in space involve rarefied gas flow regimes which are intrinsically distinct from continuum gas flow and are normally modeled using the kinetic theory of gas flow. Docking and undocking operations of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Mir space laboratory represent a scenario in which the stability boundaries of solar panels may be of interest. Extensive literature review of research work on the dynamic stability of rectangular panels in rarefied gas flow conditions indicated the lack of published reports dealing with this phenomenon. A recently completed preliminary study for NASA JSC dealing with the mathematical analysis of the stability of two-degree-of-freedom elastically supported rigid panels under the effect of rarefied gas flow was reviewed. A test plan outline is prepared for the purpose of conducting a series of experiments on four rectangular rigid test articles in a vacuum chamber under the effect of continuous and pulsating Nitrogen jet plumes. The purpose of the test plan is to gather enough data related to a number of key parameters to allow the validation of the two-degree-of-freedom mathematical model. The hardware required careful design to select a very lightweight material while satisfying rigidity and frequency requirements within the constraints of the test environment. The data to be obtained from the vacuum chamber tests can be compared with the predicted behavior of the theoretical two-degree-of-freedom model. Using the data obtained in this study, further research can identify the limitations of the mathematical model. In addition modifications to the mathematical model can be made, if warranted, to accurately predict the behavior of rigid panels under rarefied gas flow regimes.

  19. WIND TUNNEL STUDY OF THE FLOW FIELD WITHIN AND AROUND OPEN-TOP CHAMBERS USED FOR AIR POLLUTION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Meteorological Wind Tunnel was used to examine the flow field in and around models of open-top field plant growth chambers used to assess the effects of pollutant gases on plant growth. Baffles designed to reduce the ingress of ambient air into the chamber through the ope...

  20. Designing Rectangular RHCP Microstrip Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Shayla E.

    1987-01-01

    RHCP, Right-Handed, Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna program, aids in design of rectangular microstrip-antenna element, given desired frequency of operation and characteristics of substrate. Begins design calculations on basis of square element with linear polarization. Effective dielectric constant and changes in electrical length due to fringing at edges of radiating element taken into account. Coaxial feed inset with 50 ohms input impedance. Placement of feed such that two orthonormal modes produced in antenna cavity, right- or left-handed circular polarization obtained. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  1. Magma chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of terrestrial magma chambers (MCs) are reviewed. Consideration is given to the evidence for MCs with active convection and crystal sorting, problems of direct MC detection, theoretical models of MC cooling, the rheology and dynamics of solidification fronts, crystal capture and differentiation, convection with solidification, MC wall flows, and MC roof melting. Diagrams, graphs, and a list of problems requiring further research are provided.

  2. Formation of secondary aerosols from biomass burning plumes: chamber simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Hu, Q.; Fang, Z.; Deng, W.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning contributed substantially to carbonaceous aerosols in China's ambient air, even in its highly industrialized megacities, based on recent source attributions by receptor modeling or by molecular and isotopic tracers. Although chemical evolution of biomass burning plumes in the ambient is a vital issue for the study of climatic and health effects, the understanding of secondary pollutants formation during the aging of biomass burning plumes is far from complete. Here we collected typical agriculture residues and forest plant branches in the Pearl River Delta in south China, and got them burned in laboratory-controlled conditions and introduced the plumes from burning these biomass directly into the GIGCAS indoor smog chamber with a reactor of 30 m3 to investigate the photochemical aging of the plumes. The inorganic trace gases, including SO2, NOx, NH3 and O3, were monitored online with chemiluminescence gas analyzers, precursor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitor online with a PTR-ToF-MS and offline by a preconcentrator coupled with a gas chromatography-mass selective detector/flame ionization detector/electron capture detector (GC-MSD/FID/ECD), particle number concentrations and size distributions were obtained using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) was used to measure the chemical compositions and evolutions of submicron aerosols and to trace the change in the average element ratios of organics, like H/C, O/C, and N/C. The results from the study were summarized in the following aspects: 1) primary emission factors of gaseous and particulate pollutants from burning of typical biomass including agricultural remains and forest wood plants; 2) yields of secondary pollutants, including secondary inorganic and organic aerosols and gaseous products (like O3) during photochemical aging of biomass burning plumes; 3) relationship between the formed secondary

  3. The Drift Chamber for the Experiment to Study the Nature of the Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The spectrum of these states and their mass splitting from normal mesons may yield information on confinement. The description of the GlueX spectrometer and Forward Drift Chambers (FDC) as a part of track reconstruction system is presented in the text. FDC‘s are multiwire chambers with cathode and anode read-out. The system allows reconstructing tracks of charged particles with ~200mkm accuracy with angles from 20° up to 1°. One of the detector features is 1.64% X0 material amount in the active area. The cathode gain calibration procedure is presented. The results of such calibration using cosmic data and beam data are presented as well.

  4. The Drift Chamber for the Experiment to Study the Nature of the Confinement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir; Zihlmann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The spectrum of these states and their mass splitting from normal mesons may yield information on confinement. The description of the GlueX spectrometer and Forward Drift Chambers (FDC) as a part of track reconstruction system is presented in the text. FDC‘s are multiwire chambers with cathode and anode read-out. The system allows reconstructing tracks of charged particles with ~200mkm accuracy with angles from 20° up to 1°. One of the detector features ismore » 1.64% X0 material amount in the active area. The cathode gain calibration procedure is presented. The results of such calibration using cosmic data and beam data are presented as well.« less

  5. The Drift Chamber for the Experiment to Study the Nature of the Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, V. V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, L.; Zihlmann, B.

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The spectrum of these states and their mass splitting from normal mesons may yield information on confinement. The description of the GlueX spectrometer and Forward Drift Chambers (FDC) as a part of track reconstruction system is presented in the text. FDC's are multiwire chambers with cathode and anode read-out. The system allows reconstructing tracks of charged particles with ∼200mkm accuracy with angles from 20 ̊up to 1 ̊. One of the detector features is 1.64% X0 material amount in the active area. The cathode gain calibration procedure is presented. The results of such calibration using cosmic data and beam data are presented as well.

  6. SOYCHMBR.I - A model designed for the study of plant growth in a closed chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhold, C.

    1982-01-01

    The analytical model SOYCHMBER.I, an update and alteration of the SOYMOD/OARDC model, for describing the total processes experienced by a plant in a controlled mass environment is outlined. The model is intended for use with growth chambers for examining plant growth in a completely controlled environment, leading toward a data base for the design of spacecraft food supply systems. SOYCHMBER.I accounts for the assimilation, respiration, and partitioning of photosynthate and nitrogen compounds among leaves, stems, roots, and potentially, flowers of the soybean plant. The derivation of the governing equations is traced, and the results of the prediction of CO2 dynamics for a seven day experiment with rice in a closed chamber are reported, together with data from three model runs for soybean. It is concluded that the model needs expansion to account for factors such as relative humidity.

  7. An environmental chamber system for prolonged metabolic studies on small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Huston, L. J.; Simmons, J. B., II; Clarkson, D. P.; Martz, W. W.; Schatte, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of metabolic adaptation to marginally stressful environments requires both precise regulation of a variety of atmospheric factors for extended periods of time and the capacity to employ sensitive parameters in an undisturbed subject. This paper describes a metabolic chamber system which can simultaneously maintain groups of small animals in two completely separate closed environments having different pressures, temperatures and gas compositions for an indefinite period. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food and water consumption and animal activity cycles can be continuously monitored and quantified 24 h per day while the animals are in an unrestrained state. Each chamber can be serviced and the animals handled, injected and sacrificed without subjecting them to barometric stress. Several unique electrical and mechanical components allow semi-automated data collection on a continuous basis for indefinite periods of time.

  8. Performance study of the CMS barrel resistive plate chambers with cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CMS Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    In October and November 2008, the CMS collaboration conducted a programme of cosmic ray data taking, which has recorded about 270 million events. The Resistive Plate Chamber system, which is part of the CMS muon detection system, was successfully operated in the full barrel. More than 98% of the channels were operational during the exercise with typical detection efficiency of 90%. In this paper, the performance of the detector during these dedicated runs is reported.

  9. Analysis of cell flux in the parallel plate flow chamber: implications for cell capture studies.

    PubMed Central

    Munn, L L; Melder, R J; Jain, R K

    1994-01-01

    The parallel plate flow chamber provides a controlled environment for determinations of the shear stress at which cells in suspension can bind to endothelial cell monolayers. By decreasing the flow rate of cell-containing media over the monolayer and assessing the number of cells bound at each wall shear stress, the relationship between shear force and binding efficiency can be determined. The rate of binding should depend on the delivery of cells to the surface as well as the intrinsic cell-surface interactions; thus, only if the cell flux to the surface is known can the resulting binding curves be interpreted correctly. We present the development and validation of a mathematical model based on the sedimentation rate and velocity profile in the chamber for the delivery of cells from a flowing suspension to the chamber surface. Our results show that the flux depends on the bulk cell concentration, the distance from the entrance point, and the flow rate of the cell-containing medium. The model was then used in a normalization procedure for experiments in which T cells attach to TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC monolayers, showing that a threshold for adhesion occurs at a shear stress of about 3 dyn/cm2. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:7948702

  10. A design method for entrance sections of transonic wind tunnels with rectangular cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionel, L.; Mcdevitt, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical technique developed to design entrance sections for transonic or high-speed subsonic wind tunnels with rectangular cross sections is discribed. The transition from a circular cross-section setting chamber to a rectangular test section is accomplished smoothly so as not to introduce secondary flows (vortices or boundary-layer separation) into a uniform test stream. The results of static-pressure measurements in the transition region and of static and total-pressure surveys in the test section of a pilot model for a new facility at the Ames Research Center are presented.

  11. Dirichlet problem for equations of mixed type in rectangular domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirovich, Sabitov Kamil

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, developed an interest in the study of boundary value problems for equations of mixed type in rectangular areas. This method proved theorems on the unique solubility and stability of the Dirichlet problem [1 - 3] under certain restrictions on the aspect ratio of the rectangular region of the hyperbolic. In this paper, for the mixed type equation with the Lavrent'ev-Bitsadze Dirichlet problem in a rectangular area. The criterion of uniqueness of the solution of the Dirichlet problem. The solution is built as the sum of the Fourier series. In justifying the convergence of a problem of small denominators regarding the relationship of the parties of the hyperbolic part of the rectangle. In connection with this evaluation are set to secede from scratch small denominator corresponding to the asymptotic behavior of rational and irrational values of the ratio, which allowed to substantiate the convergence of the series constructed in the class of regular solutions.

  12. Resonance in cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound microstrip structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Sami M.; Kong, Jin AU; Habashy, Tarek M.; Kiang, Jean-Fu

    1989-01-01

    A rigorous analysis of the resonance frequency problem of both the cylindrical-rectangular and the wraparound microstrip structure is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of a set of vector integral equations. Using Galerkin's method to solve the integral equations, the complex resonance frequencies are studied with sinusoidal basis functions which incorporate the edge singularity. The complex resonance frequencies are computed using a perturbation approach. Modes suitable for resonator or antenna applications are investigated. The edge singularity of the patch current is shown to have no significant effect on the accuracy of the results. It is shown that the HE10 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches are more appropriate for resonator applications. The HE01 and TE01 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches, respectively, are efficient radiating modes.

  13. Design Study Conducted of a Stirred and Perfused Specimen Chamber for Culturing Suspended Cells on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Kizito, John P.

    2003-01-01

    A tightly knit numerical/experimental collaboration among the NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Payload Systems, Inc., was formed to analyze cell culturing systems for the International Space Station. The Cell Culture Unit is a facility scheduled for deployment on the space station by the Cell Culture Unit team at Ames. The facility houses multiple cell specimen chambers (CSCs), all of which have inlets and outlets to allow for replenishment of nutrients and for waste removal. For improved uniformity of nutrient and waste concentrations, each chamber has a pair of counterrotating stir bars as well. Although the CSC can be used to grow a wide variety of organic cells, the current study uses yeast as a model cell. Previous work identified groundbased protocols for perfusion and stirring to achieve yeast growth within the CSC that is comparable to that for yeast cultures grown in a shaken Ehrlenmeyer flask.

  14. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  15. Track studies in water vapor using a low-pressure cloud chamber. II. Microdosimetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Stonell, G P; Marshall, M; Simmons, J A

    1993-12-01

    A low-pressure cloud chamber has been adapted to operate with pure water vapor. Photographs were obtained of tracks arising from the passage of ionizing radiation. The sources used were low-energy X rays, 242Cm alpha particles, and low-energy protons. Distributions of lineal energy, radial distances around an ion track, and interdroplet distances were measured and compared with the predictions of Monte Carlo calculations. After allowing for diffusion and the limitations of the geometry of the system, the measured and calculated distributions were found to be in good agreement. PMID:8278576

  16. Performance and Aging Studies of BaBar Resistive Plate Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Band, H.R.; Hollar, J.; Tan, P.; Anulli, F.; Baldini, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Cheng, C.H.; Lange, D.J.; Wright, D.M.; Messner, R.; Wisniewski, W.J.; Pappagallo, M.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; /Wisconsin U., Madison /Frascati /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Oregon U. /UC, Riverside

    2006-10-13

    The BaBar detector is currently operating nearly 200 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), constructed as part of an upgrade of the forward endcap muon detector in 2002. Although the average RPC efficiency remains high, numerous changes in the RPC performance (increased currents and rates) have been observed. A few of the highest rate RPCs have suffered efficiency losses of more than 15%. Several types of efficiency loss have been observed. Tests with humidified gas have shown that some of the lost efficiency is recoverable. However, efficiency losses in the highest rate regions have not yet improved with humid gases.

  17. Spectrophotometric evaluation of peroxide penetration into the pulp chamber from whitening strips and gel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ramesh; Wadhwani, KK

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate pulp chamber penetration of different concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods: Fifty extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth were taken and grouped into five (n = 10). All teeth were cut approximately 3 mm apical to the cemento-enamel junction. Pulp was removed and the pulp chamber filled with acetate buffer. Buccal crown surfaces of teeth in the experimental groups were subjected to whitening strip and paint on whitener gel. Control group teeth were exposed to distilled water. The acetate buffer solution in each tooth was then transferred to a glass test tube after 30 min. Leuco-crystal violet dye and enzyme horse radish peroxidase were added. The optical density of resultant blue color in the tubes was measured by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The values were converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Results: The results were evaluated statistically using nonparametric Mann–Whitney U test. Whitening strip showed the lowest pulpal peroxide penetration whereas paint on whitener gel showed highest pulpal peroxide penetration. Conclusion: This study demonstrate that peroxide is readily penetrate into the pulp chamber of teeth. PMID:23716964

  18. Mapping from rectangular to harmonic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.; Bateman, G.

    1986-08-01

    An algorithm is developed to determine the Fourier harmonics representing the level contours of a scalar function given on a rectangular grid. This method is applied to the problem of computing the flux coordinates and flux surface average needed for 1-1/2-D transport codes and MHD stability codes from an equilibrium flux function given on a rectangular grid.

  19. Oxidation of a new Biogenic VOC: Chamber Studies of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Methyl Chavicol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloss, William; Alam, Mohammed; Adbul Raheem, Modinah; Rickard, Andrew; Hamilton, Jacqui; Pereira, Kelly; Camredon, Marie; Munoz, Amalia; Vazquez, Monica; Vera, Teresa; Rodenas, Mila

    2013-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to formation of ozone and SOA, with consequences for air quality, health, crop yields, atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer. Recent observations have identified Methyl Chavicol ("MC": Estragole; 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene, C10H12O) as a major BVOC above pine forests in the USA, and oil palm plantations in Malaysian Borneo. Palm oil cultivation, and hence MC emissions, may be expected to increase with societal food and bio fuel demand. We present the results of a series of simulation chamber experiments to assess the atmospheric fate of MC. Experiments were performed in the EUPHORE facility, monitoring stable product species, radical intermediates, and aerosol production and composition. We determine rate constants for reaction of MC with OH and O3, and ozonolysis radical yields. Stable product measurements (FTIR, PTRMS, GC-SPME) are used to determine the yields of stable products formed from OH- and O3- initiated oxidation, and to develop an understanding of the initial stages of the MC degradation chemistry. A surrogate mechanism approach is used to simulate MC degradation within the MCM, evaluated in terms of ozone production measured in the chamber experiments, and applied to quantify the role of MC in the real atmosphere.

  20. Track studies in water vapor using a low-pressure cloud chamber. I. Macroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Stonell, G P; Marshall, M; Simmons, J A

    1993-12-01

    Techniques have been developed to operate a low-pressure cloud chamber with pure water vapor. Photographs have been obtained of the tracks arising in this medium from the passage of ionizing radiation. The sources used were low-energy X rays, 242Cm alpha particles, and low-energy protons. Track lengths of the electrons were similar to those found previously in tissue-equivalent gas. W values of 35.6 +/- 0.4 and 32.6 +/- 0.6 eV per ion pair for carbon and aluminum X rays also compare closely with those in tissue-equivalent gas, but are somewhat higher than the predictions of Monte Carlo calculations. Differential w values were obtained: for alpha particles of energy 5.3 MeV the value was 33.0 +/- 3.0 eV per ion pair; for protons of energy 390, 230, and 85 keV the values were 30.6 +/- 1.9, 31.9 +/- 2.0, and 33.6 +/- 3.4 eV per ion pair. The energy losses of protons in water vapor were measured in a second (dummy) chamber used for energy calibration. Results support Janni's values of stopping power for protons in the energy range 40-480 keV. PMID:8278575

  1. Twin chamber sample assembly in DAC and HPHT studies on GaN nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Balmukund; Shekar, N. V. Chandra; Kumar, N. R. Sanjay; Ravindran, T. R.; Sahoo, P.; Dhara, S.; Sahu, P. Ch

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we have suggested a novel idea of twin chamber sample assembly for separating ruby from the sample to overcome certain problems during high pressure-high temperature experiments using diamond anvil cell. Two holes of diameter 70μm were drilled symmetrically about the centre of the preindented area (500 μm diameter) in a stainless steel gasket using EDM. Using ruby pressure calibration, good pressure correlation between these two holes was established up to about 15GPa. Also, high pressure - high temperature (HPHT) experiments on the III-V compound semiconductor GaN were performed up to ~ 3GPa and 2000K using the two chamber sample assembly and a laser heated diamond anvil cell facility. NaCl, both hydrous and anhydrous, were used as the pressure transmitting media in two separate experiments. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to characterise the HPHT treated samples. While GaN remained stable in its wurtzite phase when heated in anhydrous NaCl medium, it transformed to Ga2O3 with rocksalt structure in the hydrous NaCl medium.

  2. Utilizing custom-designed galvanotaxis chambers to study directional migration of prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-ya; La, Thi Dinh; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2014-01-01

    The physiological electric field serves specific biological functions, such as directing cell migration in embryo development, neuronal outgrowth and epithelial wound healing. Applying a direct current electric field to cultured cells in vitro induces directional cell migration, or galvanotaxis. The 2-dimensional galvanotaxis method we demonstrate here is modified with custom-made poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) chambers, glass surface, platinum electrodes and the use of a motorized stage on which the cells are imaged. The PVC chambers and platinum electrodes exhibit low cytotoxicity and are affordable and re-useable. The glass surface and the motorized microscope stage improve quality of images and allow possible modifications to the glass surface and treatments to the cells. We filmed the galvanotaxis of two non-tumorigenic, SV40-immortalized prostate cell lines, pRNS-1-1 and PNT2. These two cell lines show similar migration speeds and both migrate toward the cathode, but they do show a different degree of directionality in galvanotaxis. The results obtained via this protocol suggest that the pRNS-1-1 and the PNT2 cell lines may have different intrinsic features that govern their directional migratory responses. PMID:25549020

  3. Restoring contaminated wires, removing gas contaminants, and aging studies of drift tube chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Thomas

    2003-12-01

    The original muon detection system of the Fermilab D0 colliding beam experiment contained 12,000 drift cells 10 cm×5 cm in cross-section and up to 580 cm in length. The gas mixture used was Ar/CF 4/CO 2 (90:6:4). There was one recycling gas system for all the chambers. During the first year of operation, it was discovered that inefficient cells, all in regions of high radiation, had a contaminating shell of crud coating their wires. The source of the contaminant was outgassing of the cathode pads, which were made from a laminate of fiberglass and epoxy/polyester resin, with a copper cladding on one surface. The vapor formed a brittle sheath on the wires, but only in regions of high current discharge due to radiation from the accelerator and colliding beams. A method for cleaning wires in place was devised. By heating the wire quickly to a temperature close to the melting temperature of gold, the sheath was ripped to shreds and blown away. The procedure for "zapping" wires and for removing the contaminating vapor is presented. The upgraded D0 experiment now uses Iarocci-type mini-drift tubes for the forward muon system. The results of aging tests for these chambers are also presented.

  4. A wind tunnel study of the flow field within and around open-top chambers used for air pollution studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. M.; Riordan, A. J.; Lawson, R. E.

    1983-02-01

    The EPA Meteorological Wind Tunnel was used to examine the flow field in and around models of open-top field-plant growth chambers used to assess the effects of pollutant gases on plant growth. Baffles designed to reduce the ingress of ambient air into the chamber through the open top were tested; the mean flow and turbulence in the simulated boundary layer with and without the chambers were compared (the chamber was operated with and without the pollutant flow system on); and the effects of surrounding chambers on the concentration field were measured. Results showed that a baffle with a reduced opening vertically above the test area maintained the highest uniform concentration in the test area. The major differences between the three (no chamber and the chamber with flow on and off) mean velocity profiles occurred below z/h = 2.0 ( h is chamber height) and at z/h ≤ 4.2. The three Reynolds stress profiles were similar above z/h = 2.0. Downwind of the chamber, the Reynolds stresses in the on-mode were greater than those in the off-mode above z/h = 1.1. The reverse was true below that point. Both longitudinal and vertical intensities above and downwind of the chamber were greater with the mixture flow system on rather than off, below about z/h < 1.5. Lateral variations in the mean wind indicated that the mean velocity was greater with the mixture flow system on except near the centerline where the reverse was true. The concentrations in the downwind wake resembled those for a cube. The location of a cylinder within a regular array had some effect on its internal gas concentration. Locations near the upwind and downwind edges of the array were associated with lower concentrations, although for all locations the highest internal values were always found at the lowest portion of the upwind wall. With active cylinders downwind, the gas plume emitted from a source cylinder at the windward edge of the array was forced 0.5 h higher and the centerline meandered laterally

  5. The Lateral Instability of Deep Rectangular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumont, C; Hill, H N

    1937-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies were made of solid and hollow deep rectangular beams to study their lateral instability under various conditions of loading and restraint. The tests were made on bars and tubes of 17ST aluminum alloy. Failure by lateral buckling occurred only in tests on the solid beams. It was found that, within the elastic range, the test results were in agreement with the classical theory for the lateral buckling of deep beams as given by Prandtl, Mitchell, and Timoshenko. The tests were extended to the inelastic range, where it was found that the substitution for Young's modulus of an average modulus of elasticity derived from the stress-strain curve made it possible to predict instability at high stresses.

  6. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber: Adverse operating conditions test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures are described along with results of electrically heated tube and channel tests conducted to determine adverse operating condition limits for convectively cooled chambers typical of Space Shuttle Orbit Manuevering Engine designs. Hot-start tests were conducted with corrosion resistant steel and nickel tubes with both monomethylhydrazine and 50-50 coolants. Helium ingestion, in both bubble and froth form, was studied in tubular test sections. Helium bubble ingestion and burn-out limits in rectangular channels were also investigated.

  7. Location and composition of haptics of posterior chamber intraocular lenses. Histopathologic study of postmortem eyes.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P J; Champion, R; Green, W R

    1987-02-01

    Of 110 eyes with posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs) examined postmortem, 37% had both haptics outside of the capsular bag; 57% had one haptic in the capsular bag and the other haptic outside of the bag. Typically, these optics were decentered by 1 to 2 mm. Only six eyes (5%) had both haptics within the capsular bag. Erosion into the ciliary sulcus produced obliteration of the major arterial circle of the iris in 12 eyes (11%). The local tissue response to eroding haptics was similar for haptics composed of polypropylene and haptics composed of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The authors found considerable discrepancy between the actual location of haptics and the surgeon's desired location (i.e., capsular bag or ciliary sulcus). Most of these cases were clinically successful. PMID:3574878

  8. Theoretical study of Jesse effect in tritium measurements using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Lu, Hanghang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Wang, Heyi; Long, Xingui; Masao, Matsuyama

    2016-01-01

    Jesse effect caused by impurities in helium might enhance the output signal significantly in tritium measurements with ionization chamber, which will lead to overestimation of tritium concentration in experiments. A theoretical method was proposed to evaluate Jesse effect quantitatively. Results indicate that besides Penning ionization, sub-excitation electrons also place very important influence on ionization enhancement by Jesse effect. An experiential expression about the relationship between enhancement factor and impurity concentration was established, in which second order of it fits experimental results very well. Theoretical calculation method in this paper is also applicable to evaluate Jesse effect in other kinds of mixtures besides hydrogen as impurities in helium. In addition, Jesse effects about tritium molecules as impurities have also been investigated.

  9. SπRIT: A time-projection chamber for symmetry-energy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, R.; McIntosh, A. B.; Isobe, T.; Lynch, W. G.; Baba, H.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Estee, J.; Famiano, M.; Hong, B.; Ieki, K.; Jhang, G.; Lemmon, R.; Lu, F.; Murakami, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Nishimura, M.; Olsen, R.; Powell, W.; Sakurai, H.; Taketani, A.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Usukura, T.; Wang, R.; Yennello, S. J.; Yurkon, J.

    2015-06-01

    A time-projection chamber (TPC) called the SAMURAI Pion-Reconstruction and Ion-Tracker (SπRIT) has recently been constructed at Michigan State University as part of an international effort to constrain the symmetry-energy term in the nuclear Equation of State (EoS). The SπRIT TPC will be used in conjunction with the SAMURAI spectrometer at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN to measure yield ratios for pions and other light isospin multiplets produced in central collisions of neutron-rich heavy ions, such as 132Sn+124Sn. The SπRIT TPC can function both as a TPC detector and as an active target. It has a vertical drift length of 50 cm, parallel to the magnetic field. Gas multiplication is achieved through the use of a multi-wire anode plane. Image charges, produced in the 12096 pads, are read out with the recently developed Generic Electronics for TPCs.

  10. Flow-Field Surveys for Rectangular Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for three rectangular nozzles are presented for a low subsonic condition obtained primarily by hot-wire anemometry. The three nozzles have aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1. A fourth case included has 2:1 aspect ratio with chevrons added to the long edges. Data on mean velocity, turbulent normal and shear stresses as well as streamwise vorticity are presented covering a streamwise distance up to sixteen equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. These detailed flow properties, including initial boundary layer characteristics, are usually difficult to measure in high speed flows and the primary objective of the study is to aid ongoing and future computational and noise modeling efforts.

  11. Nonlinear vibrations of viscoelastic rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear vibrations of viscoelastic thin rectangular plates subjected to normal harmonic excitation in the spectral neighborhood of the lowest resonances are investigated. The von Kármán nonlinear strain-displacement relationships are used and geometric imperfections are taken into account. The material is modeled as a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic solid by retaining all the nonlinear terms. The discretized nonlinear equations of motion are studied by using the arclength continuation and collocation method. Numerical results are obtained for the fundamental mode of a simply supported square plate with immovable edges by using models with 16 and 22 degrees of freedom and investigating solution convergence. Comparison to viscous damping and the effect of neglecting nonlinear viscoelastic damping terms are shown. The change of the frequency-response with the retardation time parameter is also investigated as well as the effect of geometric imperfections.

  12. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion. PMID:27098659

  13. Pancreatoduodenectomy as a source of human small intestine for Ussing chamber investigations and comparative studies with rat tissue.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; O'Reilly, Derek A; Sherlock, David J; Kauser, Ambareen; Womack, Chris; Coleman, Tanya

    2011-05-01

    A clear understanding of oral drug absorption is an important aspect of the drug development process. The permeability of drug compounds across intact sections of small intestine from numerous species, including man, has often been investigated using modified Ussing chambers. The maintenance of viable, intact tissue is critical to the success of this technique. This study therefore aimed to assess the viability and integrity of tissue from patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy, for use in cross-species Ussing chamber studies. Electrical parameters (potential difference, mV; short-circuit current, µA.cm(-2) ; resistance, Ω.cm(2) ) were monitored over the duration of each experiment, as was the permeability of the paracellular marker atenolol. The permeability values (Papp; cm/s × 10(-6) ) for a training-set of compounds, displaying a broad range of physicochemical properties and known human fraction absorbed values, were determined in both rat and human jejunum, as well as Caco-2 cell monolayers. The results indicate that human jejunum sourced from pancreatoduodenectomy remained viable and intact for the duration of experiments. Permeability values generated in rat and human jejunum correlate well (R(2) = 0.86), however the relationship between permeability in human tissue and Caco-2 cells was comparatively weak (R(2) = 0.58). Relating permeability to known human fraction absorbed (hFabs) values results in a remarkably similar relationship to both rat and human jejunum Papp values. It can be concluded that human jejunum sourced from pancreatoduodenectomy is a suitable source of tissue for Ussing chamber permeability investigations. The relationship between permeability and hFabs is comparable to results reported using alternative test compounds. PMID:21416475

  14. An experimental study of the flow through and over two dimensional rectangular roughness elements: Deductions for urban boundary layer parameterizations and exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neophytou, M. K.-A.; Markides, C. N.; Fokaides, P. A.

    2014-08-01

    This paper investigates the flow through and over two-dimensional rectangular roughness elements, arranged in a building-street canyon geometry through a series of experiments. Geometries of different packing densities of the roughness elements (λp) were examined and the packing density values ranged from λp = 0.30 to 0.67. The purpose of the work is: (i) to investigate the flow physics observed both at the boundary layer scale as well as at the scale within the roughness elements for a range of packing densities, (ii) to deduce parameterizations of the adjusted rough boundary layer and their variation with a change in the packing density, and (iii) given a particular interest in and application to the urban atmosphere, a final aim at the roughness-element scale is to deduce the variation of the breathability with the packing density variation. Particle image velocimetery measurements of the velocity flow field as well as the turbulent kinetic energy and the Reynolds Stress (within and up to well-above the street canyons) were conducted. The results reveal qualitative flow features as well as features of the adjusted boundary layer structure—in particular the roughness and inertial sublayers, which can be associated with the surface roughness length, zero-plane displacement thickness, and the friction velocity. The lowest friction velocities are exhibited in the geometries with the highest- and lowest packing densities while the maximum friction velocities are observed in the medium-packed geometries. The exchange processes and breathability at the level of the roughness elements top were characterized and quantified by a mean exchange velocity. The results show that unlike friction velocity, the normalized exchange velocity (over the mean bulk velocity) for the most dense and sparse geometries differ by more than 80%, with the denser-packed geometries exhibiting lower exchange velocities; this is shown to be related with the thickness of the developed

  15. The reactive oxidant potential of different types of aged atmospheric particles: An outdoor chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Rosen, Eli; Zhang, Haofei; Li, Qianfeng; Pantong, Karun; Kamens, Richard M.

    2011-07-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) potential of aged diesel exhaust particulate matter (PM) and other aged aerosol systems in the presence and absence of an urban hydrocarbon environment was assessed. Experiments were performed in a 274 m 3 dual outdoor Teflon film chamber. Filter samples were taken to assess the oxidant generation associated with PM by an optimized dithiothreitol (DTT) method. Diesel exhaust PM had a higher ROS response when it was in the presence of an urban hydrocarbon mixture and was associated with significant O 3 production. For all the aged dilute diesel systems, ROS expression increased by a factor of 2-4 over fresh diesel particles. Other particle systems were also investigated. A low ROS was observed in most of the nighttime experiments, including the nighttime aerosols from SO 2 with O 3 and SO 2 aged by itself. However, when all the systems were compared, aged diesel exhaust tended to express very high ROS potentials, with secondary organic aerosols from an α-pinene + toluene + an urban HC mixture giving the highest ROS response.

  16. In situ studies with membrane diffusion chambers of antibiotic resistance transfer in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Altherr, M R; Kasweck, K L

    1982-01-01

    Coliform bacteria were isolated from raw sewage and sewage effluent-receiving waters and tested for their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance to Escherichia coli K-12 C600. An environmental isolate of E. coli (MA527) capable of transferring antibiotic resistance to C600 was mated, both in vitro and in situ, with an antibiotic-sensitive E. coli environmental isolate (MA728). In situ matings were conducted in modified membrane diffusion chambers, in the degritter tank at the Grant Street (Melbourne, Fla.) sewage treatment facility, and in the sewage effluent-receiving waters in Melbourne, Fla. The transfer frequencies in situ were 3.2 x 10(-5) to 1.0 x 10(-6), compared with 1.6 x 10(-4) to 4.4 x 10(-5) observed in vitro. Transfer was shown to occur in raw sewage but was not detected in the effluent-receiving waters. The presence of a 60-megadalton plasmid species in both donor and transconjugants, but not in the recipients, provided physical evidence for the transfer of antibiotic resistance in situ. Images PMID:6756306

  17. Study of deposit associated with discharge in micro-pixel gas chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Y.; Ochi, A.; Moriya, K.; Matsuda, S.; Yoshida, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    2009-02-01

    We found some deposits associated with discharge on dielectric (polyimide) substrates in "Micro-Pixel Gas Chambers" ( μ-PIC) operating with Ar/C2H6 90/10. Secondary electron images taken with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that they were a conductive material. Auger electron spectroscopy clearly showed that their main component was carbon (98%). Their origin was clarified using spark tests in which a single pixel was sparked a specific number of times. Secondary electron images clearly showed that discharge occurred in the narrow gaps between the electrodes. With a Ar/C2H6 50/50 gas mixture, the amount of carbon deposited depended on the number of sparks. The drop in the applied voltage after the test depended on the number of sparks. With pure N2 gas, no deposits were clearly found, however, a decrease in the applied voltage after the tests was observed. This can be attributed to carbonization of the polyimide surface. Although the SEM images did not show clear proof of this, this carbonization could contribute much less than the ethane dissociation.

  18. Numerical studies of transient gain reduction process in a multi-wire proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, Ken; Furukawa, Takuji; Noda, Koji

    2011-05-15

    A gain reduction process caused by successive beam irradiation in a multi-wire proportional chamber was numerically investigated to clarify the relations between the gas gain variation and the ion density distribution. A numerical code was developed based on a two-dimensional drift-diffusion model in order to evaluate the ion and electron density distributions and the electric field variation caused by the space charge effect. In order to consider the gain reduction process which occurs under the high rate and successive irradiation, the simulations were performed for the time period of {approx}10-100 {mu}s, which is much longer than the time required for ions to travel from an anode to a cathode. The numerical simulation results showed that for the low gas gain regime of {approx}10, quasi-stationary density distribution of the ions was formed by the high-rate beams of {approx}10{sup 8}- 10{sup 10} particles per second, and that the transient variation of the gas gain became constant after establishment of the quasi-stationary ion density distributions.

  19. Full System Model of Magnetron Sputter Chamber - Proof-of-Principle Study

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C; Gilmer, G; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Wemhoff, A; Barbee, T

    2007-05-04

    The lack of detailed knowledge of internal process conditions remains a key challenge in magnetron sputtering, both for chamber design and for process development. Fundamental information such as the pressure and temperature distribution of the sputter gas, and the energies and arrival angles of the sputtered atoms and other energetic species is often missing, or is only estimated from general formulas. However, open-source or low-cost tools are available for modeling most steps of the sputter process, which can give more accurate and complete data than textbook estimates, using only desktop computations. To get a better understanding of magnetron sputtering, we have collected existing models for the 5 major process steps: the input and distribution of the neutral background gas using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), dynamics of the plasma using Particle In Cell-Monte Carlo Collision (PIC-MCC), impact of ions on the target using molecular dynamics (MD), transport of sputtered atoms to the substrate using DSMC, and growth of the film using hybrid Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and MD methods. Models have been tested against experimental measurements. For example, gas rarefaction as observed by Rossnagel and others has been reproduced, and it is associated with a local pressure increase of {approx}50% which may strongly influence film properties such as stress. Results on energies and arrival angles of sputtered atoms and reflected gas neutrals are applied to the Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of film growth. Model results and applications to growth of dense Cu and Be films are presented.

  20. The Resistive Plate Chambers of the ATLAS experiment:. performance studies on Calibration Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaferro, Luca

    2012-08-01

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is one of the four experiments installed on the hadron-hadron collider LHC at CERN. It is a general purpose experiment, with a physics program which spans from the search for the Higgs Boson to the search of physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM). An integrated luminosity of about 5 fb-1 is expected to be reached by the end of 2011. The Resistive Plate Chambers, installed in the barrel region, are used to provide the first muon level trigger, and cover an area of 16000 m2, readout by about 350000 electronic channels. To ensure optimal trigger performance, the RPC operational parameters like cluster size, efficiency and spatial resolution are constantly monitored. In order to achieve the desired precision, the data used for the analysis are extracted directly from the second level of the trigger, hence assuring very high statistics. This dedicated event stream, called Calibration Stream, is sent automatically to the RPC Calibration Center in Naples. Here the analysis is performed using an automatic tool tightly integrated in the ATLAS GRID environment, the Local Calibration Data Splitter (LCDS), which configures and manages all the operations required by the analysis (e.g. software environment initialization, grid jobs configuration and submission, data saving and retrieval, etc). The monitored RPC operational parameters, the performance analysis and the LCDS will be presented.

  1. Increases of Chamber Height and Base Diameter Have Contrasting Effects on Grazing Rate of Two Cladoceran Species: Implications for Microcosm Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying; Zhang, Yunshu; Peng, Yan; Zhao, Qinghua; Sun, Shucun

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic microcosm studies often increase either chamber height or base diameter (to increase water volume) to test spatial ecology theories such as “scale” effects on ecological processes, but it is unclear whether the increase of chamber height or base diameter have the same effect on the processes, i.e., whether the effect of the shape of three-dimensional spaces is significant. We orthogonally manipulated chamber height and base diameter and determined swimming activity, average swimming velocity and grazing rates of the cladocerans Daphnia magna and Moina micrura (on two algae Scenedesmus quadricauda and Chlorella vulgaris; leading to four aquatic algae-cladoceran systems in total) under different microcosm conditions. Across all the four aquatic systems, increasing chamber height at a given base diameter significantly decreased the duration and velocity of horizontal swimming, and it tended to increase the duration but decrease the velocity of vertical swimming. These collectively led to decreases in both average swimming velocity and grazing rate of the cladocerans in the tall chambers (at a given base diameter), in accordance with the positive relationship between average swimming velocity and grazing rate. In contrast, an increase of base diameter at a given chamber height showed contrasting effects on the above parameters. Consistently, at a given chamber volume increasing ratio of chamber height to base diameter decreased the average swimming velocity and grazing rate across all the aquatic systems. In general, increasing chamber depth and base diameter may exert contrasting effects on zooplankton behavior and thus phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions. We suggest that spatial shape plays an important role in determining ecological process and thus should be considered in a theoretical framework of spatial ecology and also the physical setting of aquatic microcosm experiments. PMID:26273836

  2. Experimental Study of High Efficiency CO2 Scroll Compressor with a Control of Oil Flow to Compression Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Kiyoshi; Hiwata, Akira; Futagami, Yoshiyuki; Iida, Noboru; Morimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Noriaki

    As the carbon dioxides (CO2) is a high density refrigerant, the displacement volume of the CO2 compressor becomes smaller for a fixed cooling capacity, while the pressure difference between the adjacent compression chambers becomes larger. For developing a CO2 compressor with high efficiency, it was necessary to reduce the leakages through the clearances between the orbiting and fixed scrolls. The previous study for a R410A scroll compressor has addressed a new intermittent oil supply mechanism exhibiting the superior characteristics in oil flow control. In this study, therefore, the same intermittent oil supply mechanism was applied to a CO2 scroll compressor, where the relationship between the oil flow rate to the compression chamber and the corresponding performance was investigated in detail. As a result, it was made clear that the optimal ratio of the oil flow rate to the refrigerant flow rate in CO2 scroll compressor is about 5 % to achieve the higher efficiency, which is larger than that of the R410A scroll compressor.

  3. Differences in aerosolization of Rift Valley fever virus resulting from choice of inhalation exposure chamber: implications for animal challenge studies

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, Laura M.; Powell, Diana S.; Caroline, Amy L.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aerosol characteristics of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) were evaluated to achieve reproducible infection of experimental animals with aerosolized RVFV suitable for animal efficacy studies. Spray factor (SF), the ratio between the concentrations of the aerosolized agent to the agent in the aerosol generator, is used to compare performance differences between aerosol exposures. SF indicates the efficiency of the aerosolization process; a higher SF means a lower nebulizer concentration is needed to achieve a desired inhaled dose. Relative humidity levels as well as the duration of the exposure and choice of exposure chamber all impacted RVFV SF. Differences were also noted between actual and predicted minute volumes for different species of nonhuman primates. While NHP from Old World species (Macaca fascicularis, M. mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops) generally had a lower actual minute volume than predicted, the actual minute volume for marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) was higher than predicted (150% for marmosets compared with an average of 35% for all other species examined). All of these factors (relative humidity, chamber, duration, and minute volume) impact the ability to reliably and reproducibly deliver a specific dose of aerosolized RVFV. The implications of these findings for future pivotal efficacy studies are discussed. PMID:24532259

  4. Effect of shell drilling stiffness on response calculations of rectangular plates and tubes of rectangular cross-section under compression.

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Jhana; Hales, Jason Dean; Corona, Edmundo

    2010-05-01

    This report considers the calculation of the quasi-static nonlinear response of rectangular flat plates and tubes of rectangular cross-section subjected to compressive loads using quadrilateralshell finite element models. The principal objective is to assess the effect that the shell drilling stiffness parameter has on the calculated results. The calculated collapse load of elastic-plastic tubes of rectangular cross-section is of particular interest here. The drilling stiffness factor specifies the amount of artificial stiffness that is given to the shell element drilling Degree of freedom (rotation normal to the plane of the element). The element formulation has no stiffness for this degree of freedom, and this can lead to numerical difficulties. The results indicate that in the problems considered it is necessary to add a small amount of drilling tiffness to obtain converged results when using both implicit quasi-statics or explicit dynamics methods. The report concludes with a parametric study of the imperfection sensitivity of the calculated responses of the elastic-plastic tubes with rectangular cross-section.

  5. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  6. Knudsen cell and smog chamber study of the heterogeneous uptake of sulfur dioxide on Chinese mineral dust.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Weigang; Gai, Yanbo; Ge, Maofa

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneous uptake processes of sulfur dioxide on two types of Chinese mineral dust (Inner Mongolia desert dust and Xinjiang sierozem) were investigated using both Knudsen cell and smog chamber system. The temperature dependence of the uptake coefficients was studied over a range from 253 to 313 K using the Knudsen cell reactor, the initial uptake coefficients decreased with the increasing of temperature for these two mineral dust samples, whereas the steady state uptake coefficients of the Xinjiang sierozem increased with the temperature increasing, and these temperature dependence functions were obtained for the first time. In the smog chamber experiments at room temperature, the steady state uptake coefficients of SO2 decreased evidently with the increasing of sulfur dioxide initial concentration from 1.72 × 10¹² to 6.15 × 10¹² mol/cm³. Humid air had effect on the steady state uptake coefficients of SO₂onto Inner Mongolia desert dust. Consequences about the understanding of the uptake processes onto mineral dust samples and the environmental implication were also discussed. PMID:25499490

  7. An Evaluation of Effects of Different Mydriatics on Choroidal Thickness by Examining Anterior Chamber Parameters: The Scheimpflug Imaging and Enhanced Depth Imaging-OCT Study

    PubMed Central

    Yuvacı, İsa; Pangal, Emine; Yuvacı, Sümeyra; Bayram, Nurettin; Ataş, Mustafa; Başkan, Burhan; Demircan, Süleyman; Akal, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To assess the effects of mydriatics commonly used in clinical practice on choroidal thickness and anterior chamber change. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded study including a single eye of the participants. The subjects were assigned into 4 groups to receive tropicamide 1%, phenylephrine 2.5%, cyclopentolate 1%, and artificial tears. At the baseline, anterior chamber parameters were assessed using a Pentacam Scheimpflug camera system, and choroidal thickness (CT) was measured using a spectral-domain OCT with Enhanced Depth Imaging (EDI) modality. All measurements were repeated again after drug administration. Results. Increases in pupil diameter, volume, and depth of anterior chamber were found to be significant (p = 0.000, p = 0.000, and p = 0.000, resp.), while decreases in the choroidal thickness were found to be significant in subjects receiving mydriatics (p < 0.05). Conclusions. The study has shown that while cyclopentolate, tropicamide, and phenylephrine cause a decrease in choroidal thickness, they also lead to an increase in the volume and depth of anterior chamber. However, no correlation was detected between anterior chamber parameters and choroidal changes after drug administration. These findings suggest that the mydriatics may affect the choroidal thickness regardless of anterior chamber parameters. This study was registered with trial registration number 2014/357. PMID:26509080

  8. Chamber for Growing and Observing Fungi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Molina, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    A chamber has been designed to enable growth and observation of microcolonies of fungi in isolation from the external environment. Unlike prior fungus-growing apparatuses, this chamber makes it possible to examine a fungus culture without disrupting it. Partly resembling a small picture frame, the chamber includes a metal plate having a rectangular through-thethickness opening with recesses for a top and a bottom cover glass, an inlet for air, and an inlet for water. The bottom cover glass is put in place and held there by clips, then a block of nutrient medium and a moisture pad are placed in the opening. The block is inoculated, then the top cover glass is put in place and held there by clips. Once growth is evident, the chamber can be sealed with tape. Little (if any) water evaporates past the edges of the cover glasses, and, hence there is little (if any) need to add water. A microscope can be used to observe the culture through either cover glass. Because the culture is sealed in the chamber, it is safe to examine the culture without risking contamination. The chamber can be sterilized and reused.

  9. Ultrasonic Drying Processing Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Bon, J.; Riera, E.; Pinto, A.

    The design of a high intensity ultrasonic chamber for drying process was investigated. The acoustic pressure distribution in the ultrasonic drying chamber was simulated solving linear elastic models with attenuation for the acoustic-structure interaction. Together with the government equations, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions, mesh refinement, and configuration parameters of the calculation methods, which is of great importance to simulate adequately the process, were considered. Numerical solution, applying the finite element method (FEM), of acoustic-structure interactions involves to couple structural and fluid elements (with different degrees of freedom), whose solution implies several problems of hardware requirements and software configuration, which were solved. To design the drying chamber, the influence of the directivity of the drying open camera and the staggered reflectors over the acoustic pressure distribution was analyzed. Furthermore, to optimize the influence of the acoustic energy on the drying process, the average value of the acoustic energy distribution in the drying chamber was studied. This would determine the adequate position of the food samples to be dried. For this purpose, the acoustic power absorbed by the samples will be analyzed in later studies.

  10. Hubbell rectangular source integral calculation using a fast Chebyshev wavelets method.

    PubMed

    Manai, K; Belkadhi, K

    2016-07-01

    An integration method based on Chebyshev wavelets is presented and used to calculate the Hubbell rectangular source integral. A study of the convergence and the accuracy of the method was carried out by comparing it to previous studies. PMID:27152913

  11. Partial Rectangular Metric Spaces and Fixed Point Theorems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of partial rectangular metric spaces as a generalization of rectangular metric and partial metric spaces. Some properties of partial rectangular metric spaces and some fixed point results for quasitype contraction in partial rectangular metric spaces are proved. Some examples are given to illustrate the observed results. PMID:24672366

  12. Comprehensive study on regional human intestinal permeability and prediction of fraction absorbed of drugs using the Ussing chamber technique.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Åsa; Lutz, Mareike; Tannergren, Christer; Wingolf, Caroline; Borde, Anders; Ungell, Anna-Lena

    2013-01-23

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of human intestinal tissue in Ussing chamber to predict oral and colonic drug absorption and intestinal metabolism. Data on viability, correlation between apparent permeability coefficients (P(app)) and fraction absorbed (f(a)) after oral and colonic administration, regional permeability, active uptake and efflux of drugs as well as intestinal metabolism were compiled from experiments using 159 human donors. Permeability coefficients for up to 28 drugs were determined using one or several of four intestinal regions: duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon and 10 drugs were studied bidirectionally. Viability was monitored simultaneously with transport experiments by recording potential difference (PD), short-circuit current (SCC) and the resistance (TER). Intestinal metabolism was studied using testosterone and midazolam as probe substrates. There was a steep sigmoidal correlation between P(app) in the Ussing chamber, using jejunal segments, and oral f(a) in humans, for a set of 25 drugs (R(2): 0.85, p<0.01). A clear sigmoidal relationship was also obtained between P(app) in colonic segments and f(a) after colonic administration in humans for a set of 10 drugs (R(2): 0.93, p<0.05). Regional permeability data showed a tendency for highly permeable compounds to have higher or similar P(app) in colon as in the small intestinal segments, while the colonic regions showed a lower P(app) for more polar compounds as well as for d-glucose and l-leucine. Bidirectional transport (mucosa to serosa and serosa to mucosa direction) in jejunum showed well functioning efflux- and uptake asymmetry. Intestinal metabolic extraction during transport across jejunum segments was found for both testosterone and midazolam. In conclusion, viable excised human intestine mounted in the Ussing chamber, is a powerful technique for predicting regional fraction absorbed (f(a)), transporter-mediated uptake or efflux as well as intestinal metabolism of

  13. An instrument employing electronic counters and an emulsion chamber for studying heavy cosmic ray interactions (JACEE-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, R. W.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Selig, W. J.; Watts, J. W.; Burnett, T. H.; Iwai, J.; Lord, J. J.; Strauscz, S.; Wilkes, R. J.; Jones, W. V.

    1983-01-01

    A JACEE-3 instrument was flown on a balloon in June 1982 for 6.1 sq m sr hr exposure at an average atmospheric depth of 5 gm/sq cm in order to study the cosmic ray spectra, composition, and interactions above 1 TeV. The nucleus-nucleus interactions were studied above 20 GeV/amu from z = 6 to z = 26. The electronic counters contained gas Cerenkov structures with a 1.0-cm thick lead glass and a 1.27-cm thick Teflon radiator. A comparison to the instrument prototype is made. Based on the electronic counter event data, the finding efficiency of the hodoscope is noted to be near 100 percent for z greater than or equal to 22. A comparison is made between the hodoscope-predicted position and track found at P3 in an emulsion chamber.

  14. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  15. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber. Task 13: Subscale helium ingestion and two dimensional heating test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Descriptions are given of the test hardware, facility, procedures, and results of electrically heated tube, channel and panel tests conducted to determine effects of helium ingestion, two dimensional conduction, and plugged coolant channels on operating limits of convectively cooled chambers typical of space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine designs. Helium ingestion in froth form, was studied in tubular and rectangular single channel test sections. Plugged channel simulation was investigated in a three channel panel. Burn-out limits (transition of film boiling) were studied in both single channel and panel test sections to determine 2-D conduction effects as compared to tubular test results.

  16. Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Charges: Combustion in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-22

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30% of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and, by means of the hot detonation products, the energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum flakes, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or hexosen (sucrose) and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in four different chambers: two cylindrical vessels of 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume with a height-to-diameter ratio of approximately 1, a rectangular chamber of 41 (10.5 x 10.5 x 38.6 cm) and a 299.6 cm long tunnel model with a cross section of 8 x 8 cm (volume 19.21) closed at both ends.

  17. Study of d E/ d x in a Drift Chamber with He-C 2H 6 Gas Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emi, Keiko; Tsukamoto, Toshifumi; Hirano, Hiroyuki; Mamada, Haruhiko; Sakai, Yoshihide; Uno, Shoji; Itami, Shunsuke; Kajikawa, Ryoichi; Nitoh, Osamu; Ohishi, Noritsugu; Sugiyama, Akira; Suzuki, Shiro; Takahashi, Kaoru; Tamagawa, Yoichi; Tomoto, Makoto; Yamaki, Tetsuji

    1996-03-01

    We studied dE/ dx in a small-celldrift chamber filled with a gas mixture of 50% He and 50% C2H6.The dE/ dx resolution, measured in terms of the 80% truncated meanof 41 layer samples, was 5.2% when the incident angle of the trackwith respect to the wire direction was 45°.The βγ dependence showed asmaller relativistic rise than in the case of P-10 gas.At an incident angle of 90°, we observed gas gain saturationdue to the space charge effect. Although thismakes the βγ dependence of dE/ dx weaker, the dE/ dx resolution was improved. As a result,a π-K separation of 2σ is achieved at all incident anglesfor 2 GeV/c tracks.

  18. AEROSOL GROWTH IN A STEADY-STATE, CONTINUOUS FLOW CHAMBER: APPLICATION TO STUDIES OF SECONDARY AEROSOL FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical solution for the steady-state aerosol size distribution achieved in a steady-state, continuous flow chamber is derived, where particle growth is occurring by gas-to-particle conversion and particle loss is occurring by deposition to the walls of the chamber. The s...

  19. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  20. Anatexis at the roof of an oceanic magma chamber at IODP Site 1256 (equatorial Pacific): an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Lennart A.; France, Lydéric; Zhang, Chao; Godard, Marguerite; Koepke, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Replenished axial melt lenses at fast-spreading mid-oceanic ridges may move upward and intrude into the overlying hydrothermally altered sheeted dikes, resulting in high-grade contact metamorphism with the potential to trigger anatexis in the roof rocks. Assumed products of this process are anatectic melts of felsic composition and granoblastic, two-pyroxene hornfels, representing the residue after partial melting. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expeditions 309, 312, and 335 at Site 1256 (eastern equatorial Pacific) sampled such a fossilized oceanic magma chamber. In this study, we simulated magma chamber roof rock anatectic processes by performing partial melting experiments using six different protoliths from the Site 1256 sheeted dike complex, spanning a lithological range from poorly to strongly altered basalts to partially or fully recrystallized granoblastic hornfels. Results show that extensively altered starting material lacking primary magmatic minerals cannot reproduce the chemistry of natural felsic rocks recovered in ridge environments, especially elements sensitive to hydrothermal alteration (e.g., K, Cl). Natural geochemical trends are reproduced through partial melting of moderately altered basalts from the lower sheeted dikes. Two-pyroxene hornfels, the assumed residue, were reproduced only at low melting degrees (<20 vol%). The overall amphibole absence in the experiments confirms the natural observation that amphibole is not produced during peak metamorphism. Comparing experimental products with the natural equivalents reveals that water activity ( aH2O) was significantly reduced during anatectic processes, mainly based on lower melt aluminum oxide and lower plagioclase anorthite content at lower aH2O. High silica melt at the expected temperature (1000-1050 °C; peak thermal overprint of two-pyroxene hornfels) could only be reproduced in the experimental series performed at aH2O = 0.1.

  1. Augmented Beta rectangular regression models: A Bayesian perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Luo, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Mixed effects Beta regression models based on Beta distributions have been widely used to analyze longitudinal percentage or proportional data ranging between zero and one. However, Beta distributions are not flexible to extreme outliers or excessive events around tail areas, and they do not account for the presence of the boundary values zeros and ones because these values are not in the support of the Beta distributions. To address these issues, we propose a mixed effects model using Beta rectangular distribution and augment it with the probabilities of zero and one. We conduct extensive simulation studies to assess the performance of mixed effects models based on both the Beta and Beta rectangular distributions under various scenarios. The simulation studies suggest that the regression models based on Beta rectangular distributions improve the accuracy of parameter estimates in the presence of outliers and heavy tails. The proposed models are applied to the motivating Neuroprotection Exploratory Trials in Parkinson's Disease (PD) Long-term Study-1 (LS-1 study, n = 1741), developed by The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Exploratory Trials in Parkinson's Disease (NINDS NET-PD) network. PMID:26289406

  2. The hydrodynamic focusing effect inside rectangular microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwo-Bin; Chang, Chih-Chang; Huang, Sung-Bin; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental investigation into the hydrodynamic focusing effect in rectangular microchannels. Two theoretical models for two-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing are proposed. The first model predicts the width of the focused stream in symmetric hydrodynamic focusing in microchannels of various aspect ratios. The second model predicts the location and the width of the focused stream in asymmetric hydrodynamic focusing in microchannels with a low or high aspect ratio. In both models, the theoretical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Hence, the models provide a useful means of performing a theoretical analysis of flow control in microfluidic devices using hydrodynamic focusing effects. The ability of the proposed models to control the focused stream within a micro flow cytometer is verified in a series of experimental trials performed using polystyrene microparticles with a diameter of 20 µm. The experimental data show that the width of the focused stream can be reduced to the same order of magnitude as that of the particle size. Furthermore, it is shown that the microparticles can be successfully hydrodynamically focused and switched to the desired outlet port of the cytometer. Hence, the models presented in this study provide sufficient control to support cell/particle counting and sorting applications.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann Equation On a 2D Rectangular Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouzidi, MHamed; DHumieres, Dominique; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We construct a multi-relaxation lattice Boltzmann model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The model is partly inspired by a previous work of Koelman to construct a lattice BGK model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The linearized dispersion equation is analyzed to obtain the constraints on the isotropy of the transport coefficients and Galilean invariance for various wave propagations in the model. The linear stability of the model is also studied. The model is numerically tested for three cases: (a) a vortex moving with a constant velocity on a mesh periodic boundary conditions; (b) Poiseuille flow with an arbitrasy inclined angle with respect to the lattice orientation: and (c) a cylinder &symmetrically placed in a channel. The numerical results of these tests are compared with either analytic solutions or the results obtained by other methods. Satisfactory results are obtained for the numerical simulations.

  4. IR photodetector based on rectangular quantum wire in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Nandan

    2014-04-24

    In this paper we study rectangular quantum wire based IR detector with magnetic field applied along the wires. The energy spectrum of a particle in rectangular box shows level repulsions and crossings when external magnetic field is applied. Due to this complex level dynamics, we can tune the spacing between any two levels by varying the magnetic field. This method allows user to change the detector parameters according to his/her requirements. In this paper, we numerically calculate the energy sub-band levels of the square quantum wire in constant magnetic field along the wire and quantify the possible operating wavelength range that can be obtained by varying the magnetic field. We also calculate the photon absorption probability at different magnetic fields and give the efficiency for different wavelengths if the transition is assumed between two lowest levels.

  5. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S. R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444kW/cm2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control overmore » the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.« less

  6. Flexural rigidity of biaxially loaded reinforced concrete rectangular column sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resheidat, M.; Ghanma, M.; Sutton, C.; Chen, Wai-Fah

    1995-05-01

    An exact analysis is carried out utilizing the parabola-rectangle stress-strain curve for concrete and a typical idealized stress-strain curve for steel to develop the moment-curvature relationship for biaxially loaded reinforced concrete rectangular column sections. Based on that, the flexural rigidity EI of the section is determined at the yield curvature. A computer program is written by FORTRAN 77 to handle the required computations. The influence of material properties, the effect of steel ratios, and the impact of axial loads on the EI estimation were investigated. This study leads to the development of a new equation to estimate the flexural rigidity EI of reinforced concrete biaxially loaded rectangular columns in which these factors were considered. It is shown that the new equation stems from the actual behavior of the column. Therefore, it is recommended for general use in the design of slender columns.

  7. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  8. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-à-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-01

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  9. Experimental and analytical study of one- and two-component flows in spherical chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate techniques for obtaining high inner-gas concentrations in a spherical cavity for application to the open-cycle gaseous-core nuclear rocket. The study included flow visualization tests with water and gases as the working fluids, calculations of the streamline distribution, and calculation and measurement of the inner-gas concentration with air and Freon-11 as the inner-stream gases. The cavity shape, the outer-stream injection conditions, the turbulent transport coefficients, and the buoyancy effects were found to affect the inner-stream flow patterns.

  10. A sample chamber for in situ high-energy X-ray studies of crystal growth at deeply buried interfaces in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, A. E. F.; Vonk, V.; Honkimäki, V.; Gorges, B.; Vitoux, H.; Vlieg, E.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a high pressure high temperature chamber for in situ synchrotron X-ray studies. The chamber design allows for in situ studies of thin film growth from solution at deeply buried interfaces in harsh environments. The temperature can be controlled between room temperature and 1073 K while the pressure can be set as high as 50 bar using a variety of gases including N2 and NH3. The formation of GaN on the surface of a Ga13Na7 melt at 1073 K and 50 bar of N2 is presented as a performance test.

  11. Böhm extrapolation chamber: Study of its behavior in beta radiation fields at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Patrícia L.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    The Calibration Laboratory (LCI) at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) is going to establish a Böhm extrapolation chamber as a primary standard system for the dosimetry and calibration of beta radiation sources and detectors. This chamber was already tested in beta radiation beams with an aluminized Mylar entrance window, and now, it was characterized with an original Hostaphan entrance window. A comparison between the results of the extrapolation chamber with the two entrance windows was performed. The results showed that this extrapolation chamber presents the same effectiveness in beta radiation fields as a primary standard system with both entrance windows, showing that any one of them may be utilized.

  12. Design and Construction of Field Reversed Configuration Plasma Chamber for Plasma Material Interaction Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, DuWayne L.

    A Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma source was designed and constructed to conduct high energy plasma-materials interaction studies. The purpose of these studies is the development of advanced materials for use in plasma based electric propulsion systems and nuclear fusion containment vessels. Outlined within this thesis is the basic concept of FRC plasmoid creation, an overview of the device design and integration of various diagnostics systems for plasma conditions and characterization, discussion on the variety of material defects resulting from the plasma exposure with methods and tools designed for characterization. Using a Michelson interferometer it was determined that the FRC plasma densities are on the order of ~1021 m-3. A novel dynamic pressure probe was created to measure ion velocities averaging 300 km/s. Compensating flux loop arrays were used to measure magnetic field strength and verify the existence of the FRC plasmoid and when used in combination with density measurements it was determined that the average ion temperatures are ~130 eV. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was employed as a means of characterizing the size and shape of the plasma jet in the sample exposure positions. SEM results from preliminary studies reveal significant morphological changes on plasma facing material surfaces, and use of XRD to elucidate fuel gas-ion implantation strain rates correlated to plasma exposure energies.

  13. Augmentation of heat transfer in a bubble agitated vertical rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Asish; Dutta, Tapas Kumar; Ghosh, Dibyendu Narayan

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of convective heat transfer between three parallel vertical plates symmetrically spaced with and without bubble agitation to ascertain the degree of augmentation of the heat transfer coefficients due to agitation. The centre plate was electrically heated, while the other side plates were water-cooled forming two successive parallel vertical rectangular channels of dimensions 20 cm × 3.5 cm × 35 cm (length W, gap L, height H) each. At the bottom of the hot and cold plates air spargers were fitted. Water/ethylene glycol (100%) was used to fill the channels. The superficial gas velocity ranged from 0.0016 to 0.01 m/s. Top, bottom and sides of the channels were open to the water/ethylene glycol in the chamber which is the novel aspect of this study. Experimental data have been correlated as under: Natural convective heat transfer: Nu = 0.60 Gr 0.29, r = 0.96, σ = 0.186, 1.17 E6 < Gr < 1.48 E7; Bubble agitated heat transfer: St = 0.11( ReFrPr 2)-0.23, r = 0.82, σ = 0.002, 1.20 E-2 < ( ReFrPr 2) < 1.36 E2.

  14. Comparative study of Finn Chambers and T.R.U.E. test methodologies in detecting the relevant allergens inducing contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Suneja, T; Belsito, D V

    2001-12-01

    T.R.U.E. Test is a ready-to-use patch test system, which contains 23 allergens and is the only Food and Drug Administration-approved source of allergens currently commercially available in the United States. Previously, allergens dispersed in either petrolatum or water and designed to be applied utilizing Finn Chambers were also commercially available in the United States. During a 5-year study at the University of Kansas Medical Center, 167 patients were patch tested using both Finn Chamber and T.R.U.E. Test methodologies. Discordant positive reactions were examined for clinical relevance. The Finn Chamber methodology was superior in detecting clinically relevant allergies to fragrance mix, balsam of Peru, and thiuram mix. T.R.U.E. Test performed somewhat better than the Finn Chamber in detecting relevant allergic reactions to nickel, neomycin, and methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone. Neither T.R.U.E. Test nor Finn Chamber methodologies performed optimally in detecting relevant allergies to formaldehyde and carbamates. Practitioners limited to only the T.R.U.E. Test methodology need to be aware that relevant reactions to fragrances, rubber accelerators/pesticides (carbamates and thiurams), and formaldehyde may be missed with this system. PMID:11712026

  15. Analysis of Mirnov signals from coils mounted in a rectangular array

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, A P; Dunlap, J L; Pare, V K; Burris, R D

    1980-01-01

    Data analysis techniques for determining the structure of MHD instabilities in the ISX-B tokamak from Mirnov signals have been under development. Standard techniques cannot be applied directly in this case since the rectangular shape of the vacuum chamber requires a similar shape for the poloidal array of magnetic pickup coils. Components of the poloidal field perturbation are considered both parallel and perpendicular to the chamber walls and a twofold problem is addressed: (a) determining the relative signal phases as a function of poloidal angle along the array for any particular poloidal structure of plasma perturbation, without boundary effects; and (b) determining distortions of these phase lines due to eddy currents in the chamber. Results from simulation of plasma perturbations and from ISX-B experimental data are discussed.

  16. The hydrodynamic advantages of synchronized swimming in a rectangular pattern.

    PubMed

    Daghooghi, Mohsen; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-10-01

    Fish schooling is a remarkable biological behavior that is thought to provide hydrodynamic advantages. Theoretical models have predicted significant reduction in swimming cost due to two physical mechanisms: vortex hypothesis, which reduces the relative velocity between fish and the flow through the induced velocity of the organized vortex structure of the incoming wake; and the channeling effect, which reduces the relative velocity by enhancing the flow between the swimmers in the direction of swimming. Although experimental observations confirm hydrodynamic advantages, there is still debate regarding the two mechanisms. We provide, to our knowledge, the first three-dimensional simulations at realistic Reynolds numbers to investigate these physical mechanisms. Using large-eddy simulations of self-propelled synchronized swimmers in various rectangular patterns, we find evidence in support of the channeling effect, which enhances the flow velocity between swimmers in the direction of swimming as the lateral distance between swimmers decreases. Our simulations show that the coherent structures, in contrast to the wake of a single swimmer, break down into small, disorganized vortical structures, which have a low chance for constructive vortex interaction. Therefore, the vortex hypothesis, which is relevant for diamond patterns, was not found for rectangular patterns, but needs to be further studied for diamond patterns in the future. Exploiting the channeling mechanism, a fish in a rectangular school swims faster as the lateral distance decreases, while consuming similar amounts of energy. The fish in the rectangular school with the smallest lateral distance (0.3 fish lengths) swims 20% faster than a solitary swimmer while consuming similar amount of energy. PMID:26447493

  17. A two-dimensional numerical study of the flow inside the combustion chambers of a motored rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I. P.; Yang, S. L.; Schock, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the unsteady, multidimensional flow inside the combustion chambers of an idealized, two-dimensional, rotary engine under motored conditions. The numerical study was based on the time-dependent, two-dimensional, density-weighted, ensemble-averaged conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and total energy valid for two-component ideal gas mixtures. The ensemble-averaged conservation equations were closed by a K-epsilon model of turbulence. This K-epsilon model of turbulence was modified to account for some of the effects of compressibility, streamline curvature, low-Reynolds number, and preferential stress dissipation. Numerical solutions to the conservation equations were obtained by the highly efficient implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming. The grid system needed to obtain solutions were generated by an algebraic grid generation technique based on transfinite interpolation. Results of the numerical study are presented in graphical form illustrating the flow patterns during intake, compression, gaseous fuel injection, expansion, and exhaust.

  18. A two-dimensional numerical study of the flow inside the combustion chamber of a motored rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I-P.; Yang, S. L.; Schock, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the unsteady, multidimensional flow inside the combustion chambers of an idealized, two-dimensional, rotary engine under motored conditions. The numerical study was based on the time-dependent, two-dimensional, density-weighted, ensemble-averaged conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and total energy valid for two-component ideal gas mixtures. The ensemble-averaged conservation equations were closed by a K-epsilon model of turbulence. This K-epsilon model of turbulence was modified to account for some of the effects of compressibility, streamline curvature, low-Reynolds number, and preferential stress dissipation. Numerical solutions to the conservation equations were obtained by the highly efficient implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming. The grid system needed to obtain solutions were generated by an algebraic grid generation technique based on transfinite interpolation. Results of the numerical study are presented in graphical form illustrating the flow patterns during intake, compression, gaseous fuel injection, expansion, and exhaust.

  19. Fog chamber studies of soot-catalyzed SO/sub 2/ oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, W.H.; Brodzinsky, R.; Novakov, T.

    1980-11-01

    The oxidation of SO/sub 2/ by wet soot particles has been suggested as an important reaction pathway for the production of particulate sulfate in the ambient atmosphere. We studied this reaction in two systems. The first consisted of a flask-type reaction study. H/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ (diluted final concentration between 7 x 10/sup -8/ M and 1 x 10/sup -3/ M) was added to a flask containing several hundred milliliters of a constantly stirred aqueous suspension of Nuchar-SN in which the soot particle concentration was between 0.002 and 0.32% w/v carbon. For H/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ concentrations less than 10/sup -4/ M, sulfite and sulfate were determined by ion chromatography. Above 10/sup -4/ M H/sub 2/SO/sub 3/, sulfite concentration was determined by iodometric titrations while sulfate was measured turbidometrically only in selected runs. The pH of a soot suspension was controlled by the buffering capacity of the SO/sub 2/.H/sub 2/O, HSO/sub 3//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup =/ system.

  20. Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry of Seabird Guano Fertilization: Results from Growth Chamber Studies with Maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Szpak, Paul; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Millaire, Jean-François; White, Christine D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stable isotope analysis is being utilized with increasing regularity to examine a wide range of issues (diet, habitat use, migration) in ecology, geology, archaeology, and related disciplines. A crucial component to these studies is a thorough understanding of the range and causes of baseline isotopic variation, which is relatively poorly understood for nitrogen (δ15N). Animal excrement is known to impact plant δ15N values, but the effects of seabird guano have not been systematically studied from an agricultural or horticultural standpoint. Methodology/Principal Findings This paper presents isotopic (δ13C and δ15N) and vital data for maize (Zea mays) fertilized with Peruvian seabird guano under controlled conditions. The level of 15N enrichment in fertilized plants is very large, with δ15N values ranging between 25.5 and 44.7‰ depending on the tissue and amount of fertilizer applied; comparatively, control plant δ15N values ranged between −0.3 and 5.7‰. Intraplant and temporal variability in δ15N values were large, particularly for the guano-fertilized plants, which can be attributed to changes in the availability of guano-derived N over time, and the reliance of stored vs. absorbed N. Plant δ13C values were not significantly impacted by guano fertilization. High concentrations of seabird guano inhibited maize germination and maize growth. Moreover, high levels of seabird guano greatly impacted the N metabolism of the plants, resulting in significantly higher tissue N content, particularly in the stalk. Conclusions/Significance The results presented in this study demonstrate the very large impact of seabird guano on maize δ15N values. The use of seabird guano as a fertilizer can thus be traced using stable isotope analysis in food chemistry applications (certification of organic inputs). Furthermore, the fertilization of maize with seabird guano creates an isotopic signature very similar to a high-trophic level marine resource, which must

  1. Experimental and numerical study of premixed hydrogen/air flame propagating in a combustion chamber.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huahua; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Peng

    2014-03-15

    An experimental and numerical study of dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flame in a closed explosion vessel is described. High-speed shlieren cinematography and pressure recording are used to elucidate the dynamics of the combustion process in the experiment. A dynamically thickened flame model associated with a detailed reaction mechanism is employed in the numerical simulation to examine the flame-flow interaction and effect of wall friction on the flame dynamics. The shlieren photographs show that the flame develops into a distorted tulip shape after a well-pronounced classical tulip front has been formed. The experimental results reveal that the distorted tulip flame disappears with the primary tulip cusp and the distortions merging into each other, and then a classical tulip is repeated. The combustion dynamics is reasonably reproduced in the numerical simulations, including the variations in flame shape and position, pressure build-up and periodically oscillating behavior. It is found that both the tulip and distorted tulip flames can be created in the simulation with free-slip boundary condition at the walls of the vessel and behave in a manner quite close to that in the experiments. This means that the wall friction could be unimportant for the tulip and distorted tulip formation although the boundary layer formed along the sidewalls has an influence to a certain extent on the flame behavior near the sidewalls. The distorted tulip flame is also observed to be produced in the absence of vortex flow in the numerical simulations. The TF model with a detailed chemical scheme is reliable for investigating the dynamics of distorted tulip flame propagation and its underlying mechanism. PMID:24486615

  2. Comparing the Volumes of Rectangular Prisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assuah, Charles K.; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2010-01-01

    Can middle-grades students determine which of two rectangular prisms has a larger volume? Can they do so without using a formula? Geometry, and particularly the concept of volume, is important in many subjects, such as physics and chemistry. Students greatly enhance their mathematics knowledge when they make generalizations and construct arguments…

  3. Normal-Pressure Tests of Rectangular Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramberg, Walter; Mcpherson, Albert E; Levy, Samuel

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of normal-pressure tests made of 56 rectangular plates with clamped edges and of 5 plates with freely supported edges. Pressure was applied and the center deflection and the permanent set at the center were measured. For some of the plates, in addition, strains and contours were measured.

  4. Design and Fabrication of Low-Cost 1536-Chamber Microfluidic Microarrays for Mood-Disorders-Related Serological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Mood disorders are common mental diseases, but physiological diagnostic methods are still lacking. Since much evidence has implied a relationship between mood disorders and the protein composition of blood sera, it is conceivable to develop a serological criterion for assisting diagnosis of mood disorders, based on a correlative database with enough capacity and high quality. In this pilot study, a low-cost microfluidic microarray device for quantifying at most 384 serological biomarkers at the same time was designed for the data acquisition of the serological study. The 1,536-chamber microfluidic device was modeled on a 1,536-well microtiter plate in order to employ a common microplate reader as the detection module for measuring the chemiluminescent immunoassay tests on the chips. The microfluidic microarrays were rapidly fabricated on polymethylmethacrylate slides using carbon dioxide laser ablation, followed by effective surface treatment processing. Sixteen types of different capture antibodies were immobilized on the chips to test the corresponding hormones and cytokines. The preliminary tests indicated that the signal-to-noise ratio and the limit of detection of microfluidic microarrays have reached the level of standard ELISA tests, whereas the operation time of microfluidic microarrays was sharply reduced. PMID:24169541

  5. Study on the influence of the B4C layer thickness on the neutron flux and energy distribution shape in multi-electrode ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tymińska, K; Maciak, M; Ośko, J; Tulik, P; Zielczyński, M; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A model of a multi-electrode ionisation chamber, with polypropylene electrodes coated with a thin layer of B4C was created within Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNPX) and Fluktuierende Kaskade (FLUKA) codes. The influence of the layer thickness on neutron absorption in B4C and on the neutron spectra in the consecutive intra-electrode gas volumes has been studied using the MCNPX and FLUKA codes. The results will be used for designing the new type of the ionisation chamber. PMID:24729596

  6. Method for the preparation of mucosal flaps from the jejunum of laying hens for transporter studies in Ussing chambers.

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, Isabelle; Röhe, Ilen; Meyer, Wilfried; Kröger, Susan; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Ussing chambers are frequently used for in vitro evaluation of intestinal transport physiology. The current study describes investigating the jejunal tissue from laying hens using a specific preparation method and evaluates the effect of glutamine in the maintenance buffer. Tunica mucosa was stripped from 104 jejunal samples from 10 hens and stabilised by a net device. Fifty samples were maintained with modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer (Control), 54 samples with additional 5 mM glutamine (Group Gln). The percentage of responding samples varied between 87 and 100%. Mean short circuit current (ΔI sc,) [µA/cm(2)] of samples exposed to 10 mM glucose in the Control group and Group Gln was 17.0 and 14.6 (p = 0.836), respectively, of samples exposed to 100 µM phloridzin -13.3 and -11.8 (p = 0.712), respectively, and of samples exposed to 100 µM carbachol 4.7 and 3.7 (p = 0.450), respectively. In conclusion, the net-supported method enabled a reliable investigation of jejunum from laying hens. Glutamine in the maintenance buffer was of no significant benefit. PMID:23521695

  7. Influence of soil conditions on dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils: a controlled growth chamber study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Nguyen, Hang Vo-Minh; Oh, Hae Sung; Hur, Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of various soil conditions, including drying-rewetting, nitrogen deposition, and temperature rise, on the quantities and the composition of dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils. A set of forest and wetland soils with and without the nitrogen deposition were incubated in the growth chambers under three different temperatures. The moisture contents were kept constant, except for two-week drying intervals. Comparisons between the original and the treated samples revealed that drying-rewetting was a crucial environmental factor driving changes in the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The DOC was also notably increased by the nitrogen deposition to the dry forest soil and was affected by the temperature of the dry wetland soil. A parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis identified three sub-fractions of the fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) from the fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and their compositions depended on drying-rewetting. The data as a whole, including the DOC and PARAFAC components and other optical indices, were possibly explained by the two main variables, which were closely related with the PARAFAC components and DOC based on principal component analysis (PCA). Our results suggested that the DOC and PARAFAC component information could provide a comprehensive interpretation of the changes in the soil-leached DOM in response to the different environmental conditions. PMID:26561321

  8. [Scintigraphic study of the lymphatic drainage of the anterior chamber of the mouse eye and its pathophysiological implications].

    PubMed

    Guignier, B; Bourahla, K; Bekaert, V; Brasse, D; Gaucher, D; Speeg-Schatz, C; Bourcier, T

    2013-12-01

    For many years, the intraocular lymphatic system and particularly the drainage of the aqueous humor by this system have been considered non-existant. Our study is the first to demonstrate, in a dynamic in vivo fashion, the existence of lymphatic drainage in the mouse eye. This has become possible with lymphoscintigraphy with nano-molecules of rhenium sulphide, marked by technetium-99m and injected into the anterior chamber of the mouse eye. Readings were taken using an experimental gamma camera specially built for the small animal. The hypothesis of a "uveolymphatic" drainage pathway within the ciliary body, contributing to aqueous outflow, has recently been highlighted by new improvements in microbiology (discovery of lymphatic endothelial-specific markers) and imaging. This new pathway may lead to many prospects: the development of techniques for visualization and quantification of this in vivo lymphatic flow may help to increase our understanding of the physiopathology and perhaps treatment of chronic glaucoma as well as neoplastic conditions. PMID:24099697

  9. Feasibility study of monitoring of plasma etching chamber conditions using superimposed high-frequency signals on rf power transmission line.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Y; Uesugi, F

    2015-10-01

    An in situ monitoring system that can detect changes in the conditions of a plasma etching chamber has been developed. In the system, low-intensity high-frequency signals are superimposed on the rf power transmission line used for generating plasma. The system measures reflected high-frequency signals and detects the change in their frequency characteristics. The results indicate that the system detects the changes in the conditions in etching chambers caused by the changes in the electrode gap and the inner wall condition and demonstrate the effectiveness of the system. The system can easily be retrofitted to mass-production equipment and it can be used with or without plasma discharge. Therefore, our system is suitable for in situ monitoring of mass-production plasma etching chambers. The system is expected to contribute to development of predictive maintenance, which monitors films deposited on the inner wall of the chamber and prevents equipment faults caused by misalignment of chamber parts in mass-production equipment. PMID:26520984

  10. Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet with quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lifeng Hu, Haiyan

    2014-06-21

    The thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet is investigated by using a rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with quantum effects taken into account when the law of energy equipartition is unreliable. The relation between the temperature and the Root of Mean Squared (RMS) amplitude of vibration at any point of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet in simply supported case is derived first from the rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with the strain gradient of the second order taken into consideration so as to characterize the effect of microstructure of the graphene sheet. Then, the RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet simply supported on an elastic foundation is derived. The study shows that the RMS amplitude of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet predicted from the quantum theory is lower than that predicted from the law of energy equipartition. The maximal relative difference of RMS amplitude of thermal vibration appears at the sheet corners. The microstructure of the graphene sheet has a little effect on the thermal vibrations of lower modes, but exhibits an obvious effect on the thermal vibrations of higher modes. The quantum effect is more important for the thermal vibration of higher modes in the case of smaller sides and lower temperature. The relative difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet decreases monotonically with an increase of temperature. The absolute difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet increases slowly with the rising of Winkler foundation modulus.

  11. A study of the control problem of the shoot side environment delivery system of a closed crop growth research chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, C. C.; Blackwell, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The details of our initial study of the control problem of the crop shoot environment of a hypothetical closed crop growth research chamber (CGRC) are presented in this report. The configuration of the CGRC is hypothetical because neither a physical subject nor a design existed at the time the study began, a circumstance which is typical of large scale systems control studies. The basis of the control study is a mathematical model which was judged to adequately mimic the relevant dynamics of the system components considered necessary to provide acceptable realism in the representation. Control of pressure, temperature, and flow rate of the crop shoot environment, along with its oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water concentration is addressed. To account for mass exchange, the group of plants is represented in the model by a source of oxygen, a source of water vapor, and a sink for carbon dioxide. In terms of the thermal energy exchange, the group of plants is represented by a surface with an appropriate temperature. Most of the primitive equations about an experimental operating condition and a state variable representation which was extracted from the linearized equations are presented. Next, we present the results of a real Jordan decomposition and the repositioning of an undesirable eigenvalue via full state feedback. The state variable representation of the modeling system is of the nineteenth order and reflects the eleven control variables and eight system disturbances. Five real eigenvalues are very near zero, with one at zero, three having small magnitude positive values, and one having a small magnitude negative value. A Singular Value Decomposition analysis indicates that these non-zero eigenvalues are not results of numerical error.

  12. Study of the single cluster response of a helium-isobutane drift chamber prototype using 8 keV X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoto, G.; Dabagov, S.; Hampai, D.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Voena, C.; Zullo, A.

    2015-03-01

    The identification of single clusters in the electronic signals produced by ionizing particles within a drift chamber is expected to significantly improve the performances of this kind of detectors in terms of particle identification capabilities and space resolution. In order to develop refined cluster recognition algorithms, it is essential to measure the response of the chamber and its electronics to single ionization clusters. This can be done by irradiating the chamber with X-rays. We report here on the studies performed on a drift chamber prototype for the MEG-II experiment at the X-ray facility of the INFN Frascati's National Laboratories ``XLab Frascati''. The prototype is operated with a helium-isobutane mixture and instrumented with high bandwidth custom pre-amplifiers. The results of this study have been used to develop an innovative method for cluster recognition, based on the Wiener filter technique, which has been tested on data collected at the Frascati's Beam Test Facility. As a side measurement, we also performed a study of the gas gain in a configuration which is similar to that of the MEG-II experiment.

  13. Eigenvalues of Rectangular Waveguide Using FEM With Hybrid Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.; Hall, John M.

    2002-01-01

    A finite element analysis using hybrid triangular-rectangular elements is developed to estimate eigenvalues of a rectangular waveguide. Use of rectangular vector-edge finite elements in the vicinity of the PEC boundary and triangular elements in the interior region more accurately models the physical nature of the electromagnetic field, and consequently quicken the convergence.

  14. Ducted combustion chamber for direct injection engines and method

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, Charles

    2015-03-03

    An internal combustion engine includes an engine block having a cylinder bore and a cylinder head having a flame deck surface disposed at one end of the cylinder bore. A piston connected to a rotatable crankshaft and configured to reciprocate within the cylinder bore has a piston crown portion facing the flame deck surface such that a combustion chamber is defined within the cylinder bore and between the piston crown and the flame deck surface. A fuel injector having a nozzle tip disposed in fluid communication with the combustion chamber has at least one nozzle opening configured to inject a fuel jet into the combustion chamber along a fuel jet centerline. At least one duct defined in the combustion chamber between the piston crown and the flame deck surface has a generally rectangular cross section and extends in a radial direction relative to the cylinder bore substantially along the fuel jet centerline.

  15. Impregnation of bone chips with alendronate and cefazolin, combined with demineralized bone matrix: a bone chamber study in goats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bone grafts from bone banks might be mixed with bisphosphonates to inhibit the osteoclastic response. This inhibition prevents the osteoclasts to resorb the allograft bone before new bone has been formed by the osteoblasts, which might prevent instability. Since bisphosphonates may not only inhibit osteoclasts, but also osteoblasts and thus bone formation, we studied different bisphosphonate concentrations combined with allograft bone. We investigated whether locally applied alendronate has an optimum dose with respect to bone resorption and formation. Further, we questioned whether the addition of demineralized bone matrix (DBM), would stimulate bone formation. Finally, we studied the effect of high levels of antibiotics on bone allograft healing, since mixing allograft bone with antibiotics might reduce the infection risk. Methods 25 goats received eight bone conduction chambers in the cortical bone of the proximal medial tibia. Five concentrations of alendronate (0, 0.5 mg/mL, 1 mg/mL, 2 mg/mL, and 10 mg/mL) were tested in combination with allograft bone and supplemented with cefazolin (200 μg/mL). Allograft not supplemented with alendronate and cefazolin served as control. In addition, allograft mixed with demineralized bone matrix, with and without alendronate, was tested. After 12 weeks, graft bone area and new bone area were determined with manual point counting. Results Graft resorption decreased significantly (p < 0.001) with increasing alendronate concentration. The area of new bone in the 1 mg/mL alendronate group was significantly (p = 0.002) higher when compared to the 10 mg/mL group. No differences could be observed between the group without alendronate, but with demineralized bone, and the control groups. Conclusions A dose-response relationship for local application of alendronate has been shown in this study. Most new bone was present at 1 mg/mL alendronate. Local application of cefazolin had no effect on bone remodelling. PMID:22443362

  16. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  17. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  18. Clinical Variability in Arch Wires: A Preliminary Study Evaluating Mechanical and Surface Characteristics of Two Different Sized Rectangular Stainless Steel Wires

    PubMed Central

    Vena, Alessandro; Carey, Jason; Badawi, Hisham

    2007-01-01

    Experimental characterization of arch wires has been performed in many previous studies; however with the advent of new arch wire materials being introduced, some new experimental methods and characterization are required. Since literature is available for comparison, this paper examines mechanical and physical characteristics of steel arch wires to quantify their variability in engineering terms. Furthermore, the effect of wire size on properties was evaluated using two of the most common wire sizes. Finally, manufacturing consistency was verified by testing samples from different lots. PMID:19662123

  19. RWGSCAT - RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE JUNCTION SCATTERING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize frequency response and determine the tolerances required to meet RF specifications, accurate computer modeling of passive rectangular waveguide components is often required. Many rectangular waveguide components may be represented either exactly or approximately as a number of different size rectangular waveguides which are connected in series. RWGSCAT, Rectangular WaveGuide junction SCATtering program, solves for the scattering properties of a waveguide device. This device must consist of a number of rectangular waveguide sections of different cross sectional area which are connected in series. Devices which fall into this category include step transformers, filters, and smooth or corrugated rectangular horns. RWGSCAT will model such devices and accurately predict the reflection and transmission characteristics, taking into account higher order (other than dominant TE 10) mode excitation if it occurs, as well as multiple reflections and stored energy at each discontinuity. For devices which are large with respect to the wavelength of operation, the characteristics of the device may be required for computing a higher order mode or a number of higher order modes exciting the device. Such interactions can be represented by defining a scattering matrix for each discontinuity in the device, and then cascading the individual scattering matrices in order to determine the scattering matrix for the overall device. The individual matrices are obtained using the mode matching method. RWGSCAT is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. It has been successfully compiled and implemented using Lahey FORTRAN 77 under MS-DOS. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. It requires 377K of RAM for execution. Sample input data is also provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are

  20. Simulated Altitude Performance of Combustors for the 24C Turbojet Engine. III - Performance of Rectangular-Slot Baskets. 3; Performance of Rectangular-Slot Baskets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Adelbert O.

    1948-01-01

    The performance of an annular combustion chamber from a 24C turbojet engine was investigated over a range of simulated altitudes from 20,000 to 55,000 feet and corrected engine rotor speeds from 6000 to 13,000 rpm at a simulated ram-pressure ratio of 1.04. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effects on the altitude operational limits, combustor-outlet gas temperature distribution, combustion efficiencies, and combustor inlet-to-outlet total-pressure drops of two changes in the 24C-4B basket air-passage arrangements that were designed to improve combustor-outlet temperature distribution. These changes were: (a) replacement of the downstream secondary air holes with large rectangular slots further upstream (rectangular-slot basket), and (b) enlargement of anticoking holes in the rectangular-slot basket (modified rectangular-slot basket). The results indicate that improved outlet-gas temperature distribution of each succeeding combustor basket investigated was attained at a sacrifice in the altitude limit of operation. The altitude limits of operation of the combustor with the original basket ranged from 34,000 feet at a corrected engine speed of 6000 rpm to a maximum of 52,000 feet at 12 ' 500 rpm. The altitude limits of the rectangular-slot basket were about 2000 feet lower throughout the engine speed range than those of the original basket. The altitude limits of the combustor with the modified rectangular-slot basket were about equivalent to those of the other baskets in the corrected-engine-speed range from 12,000 to 12,500 rpm but were about 10,000 feet lower than those of the original basket in the corrected-engine-speed range from 6000 to 9000 rpm. For the same inlet-air conditions, the combustion efficiencies were highest for the original basket and progressively lower for each of the other two baskets. The combustor inlet-to-outlet pressure drops of all three combustor baskets at the same operating conditions were within +/- 10 percent of

  1. Enhanced Mixing in a Rectangular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; True, B.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the mixing of non-reacting opposed rows of jets injected normal to a confined rectangular crossflow has been conducted. Planar Mie-scattering was used to measure the time-average concentration distribution of the jet fluid in planes perpendicular to the duct axis. Particular emphasis was placed on the study of closely spaced orifice configurations applicable to the mixing zone of an RQL combustor. Baseline studies were performed of mixing under "ideal" conditions, i.e., plenum fed jets injecting into a crossflow uniform in velocity and turbulence intensity. In addition, more practical ("non-ideal") issues encountered during hardware design were also studied. As in other studies, mixing effectiveness, determined using a spatial unmixedness parameter based on the variance of mean jet concentration distributions, was found to be optimum when the spacing-to-duct-height ratio was inversely proportional to the square root of the jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio. This relationship is suitable for design under ideal flow conditions. Inlet flow boundary conditions of the jet and approach flow (mainstream) were found to strongly influence mixing performance, but no attempt was made to determine optimum performance under non-ideal conditions. The tests performed do offer some guidance as to expected mixing behavior for several common variables likely to be imposed by hardware constraints. Additionally, in this study it was found that for rows of orifices with opposite centerlines inline, mixing was similar for blockages up to 89 percent (previous crossflow mixing studies concerned with dilution zone configurations, blockages were typically less than 50 percent). Lower levels of unmixedness were obtained as a function of downstream location when axial injection length was minimized. Mixing may be enhanced if orifice centerlines of opposed rows are staggered, but blockage must be =50 percent in this configuration. Round hole and "square

  2. A Study of Dean Vortex Development and Structure in a Curved Rectangular Channel with Aspect Ratio of 40 at Dean Numbers up to 430

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligrani, Phillip M.

    1994-01-01

    Flow in a curved channel with mild curvature, an aspect ratio of 40 to 1, and an inner to outer radius ratio of 0.979 is studied at Dean numbers De ranging from 35 to 430. For positions from the start of curvature ranging from 85 to 145 degrees, the sequence of transition events begins with curved channel Poiseuille flow at De less than 40-64. As the Dean number increases, observations show initial development of Dean vortex pairs, followed by symmetric vortex pairs which, when viewed in spanwise/radial planes, cover the entire channel height (De=90-100). At De from 40 to 125-130, the vortex pairs often develop intermittent waviness in the form of vortex undulations. Splitting and merging of vortex pairs is also observed over the same experimental conditions as well as at higher De. When Dean numbers range from 130 to 185-200, the undulating wavy mode is replaced by a twisting mode with higher amplitudes of oscillation and shorter wavelengths. The twisting wavy mode results in the development of regions where turbulence intensity is locally augmented at Dean numbers from 150 to 185-200, principally in the upwash regions between the two individual vortices which make up each vortex pair. These turbulent regions eventually increase in intensity and spatial extent as the Dean number increases further, until individual regions merge together so that the entire cross section of the channel contains chaotic turbulent motions. When Dean numbers then reach 400-435, spectra of velocity fluctuations then evidence fully turbulent flow.

  3. A multipurpose ultra-high vacuum-compatible chamber for in situ X-ray surface scattering studies over a wide range of temperature and pressure environment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, P.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Heyman, C.; Esteban-Betegón, F.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A low/high temperature (60-1000K) and pressure (10-10-3x103 mbar) "baby chamber", specially adapted to the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering station, has been designed, developed and installed at the Spanish CRG BM25 SpLine beamline at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The chamber has a cylindrical form with 100 mm of diameter, built on a 360° beryllium nipple of 150 mm height. The UHV equipment and a turbo pump are located on the upper part of the chamber to leave a wide solid angle for exploring reciprocal space. The chamber features 4 CF16 and 5 CF40 ports for electrical feed through and leak valves, ion gun, etc. The heat exchanger is a customized compact LN2 (or LHe) continuous flow cryostat. The sample is mounted on a Mo support on the heat exchanger, which has in the back side a BORALECTRIC® Heater Elements. Experiments of surfaces/interfaces/ multilayer materials, thin films or single crystals in a huge variety of environments can be performed, also in situ studies of growth or evolution of the samples. Data measurement can be collected with a punctual and a bi-dimensional detector, being possible to simultaneously use them.

  4. Study on the stability of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W. C.; Yang, J. D.; Chen, J. P.; Teng, Y.

    2014-03-01

    According to the fact that the effects of penstock, unit and governor on stability of water level fluctuation for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber are neglected in previous researches, in this paper, Thoma assumption is broken through, the complete mathematical model of waterpower-speed control system for hydropower station with air cushion surge chamber is established, and the comprehensive transfer function and linear homogeneous differential equation that characterize the dynamic characteristics of system are derived. The stability domain that characterizes the good or bad of stability quantitatively is drawn by using the stability conditions. The effects of the fluid inertia in water diversion system, the air cushion surge chamber parameters, hydraulic turbine characteristics, generator characteristics, and regulation modes of governor on the stability of waterpower-speed control system are analyzed through stability domain. The main conclusions are as follows: The fluid inertia in water diversion system and hydraulic turbine characteristics have unfavorable effects on the system while generator characteristics have favorable effect. The stability keeps getting better with the increase of chamber height and basal area and the decrease of air pressure and air polytropic exponent. The stability of power regulation mode is obviously better than that of frequency regulation mode.

  5. Dual chamber shape memory alloy unplugging and mixing system coupled to a high pressure optical cell for biophysical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leist, Steven K.; Kunkle, Claire; Lee-Gau Chong, Parkson; Zhou, Jack

    2015-03-01

    High pressure optical measurements are useful for understanding structure and function of biological molecules. Commonly used high-pressure optical cells can only observe a single sample under elevated pressure. If researchers wish to observe the interaction between different biological samples, they must mix the samples at atmospheric pressure, place the mixture within the pressure chamber, and wait until the desired pressure is reached. In many cases, researchers want to observe the initial reaction between two separate biological samples; however, the sample mixing and the assembly of the high pressure optical cell coupled with a spectrometer at desired pressures can take several minutes or longer. Our current design uses a shape memory alloy (SMA) spring actuator to seal a dual chamber cuvette for separation of two different biological samples. Once the desired pressure is reached, power is applied to the system that activates the SMA to unplug and mix the two samples using a micro dc-motor. During the mixing efficiency tests, deionized water was placed in the top chamber of the cuvette and an aqueous solution of carboxyfluorescein (a fluorescent dye) placed in the bottom chamber. Based on this design, we were able to achieve a total unplugging and mixing time within a few seconds (at atmospheric pressure). Quicker mixing means researchers will have more reliable data for analyzing the initial reactions between two different biological samples. Future tests on this new actuator will be conducted at elevated pressures.

  6. Hydrazine decay in the atmosphere: Controlled-environment chamber studies and kinetic modeling. Final report, October 1987-September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.A.; Long, J.R.

    1992-02-01

    This report documents a series of experiments conducted to shed additional light on the role of surface-catalyzed reactions on the atmospheric oxidation of hydrazine vapor. The experiments were conducted in a controlled-environment chamber consisting of a one-meter diameter stainless steel sphere which is Teflon coated. Vapor-phase hydrazine was introduced into the chamber at the 50-100 ppm concentration level. It was combined with four different synthetic atmospheric mixtures (all at one atmosphere total pressure): dry helium, humid (approx. 75 percent R.H.) helium, 80 percent dry helium plus 20 percent oxygen and 80 percent humid helium plus 20 percent oxygen. A series of experiments were conducted, using the same four synthetic atmospheres listed above, with several types of plates which were placed into a rack in the chamber. These plates included: Teflon-coated aluminum (TCA), black iron (BI), corroded aluminum (CA), and F-16 painted aluminum (PA). The reactivity of the plates towards hydrazine decay was: TAC < BI approx. PA < CA.... Hydrazine, Controlled-environment chamber, FT-IR Spectroscopy, Kinetic modeling, Surface-catalyzed reactions.

  7. Rectangular shape distributed piezoelectric actuator: analytical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bohua; Qiu, Yan

    2004-04-01

    This paper is focused on the development of distributed piezoelectric actuators (DPAs) with rectangular shapes by using PZT materials. Analytical models of rectangular shape DPAs have been constructed in order to analyse and test the performance of DPA products. Firstly, based on the theory of electromagnetics, DPAs have been considered as a type of capacitor. The charge distributed density on the interdigitated electrodes (IDEs), which has been applied in the actuators, and the capacitance of the DPAs have been calculated. The accurate distribution and intensity of electrical field in DPA element have also been calculated completely. Secondly, based on the piezoelectric constitutive relations and the compound plates theory, models for mechanical strain and stress fields of DPAs have been developed, and the performances of rectangular shape DPAs have been discussed. Finally, on the basis of the models that have been developed in this paper, an improved design of a rectangular shape DPA has been discussed and summed up. Due to the minimum hypotheses that have been used during the processes of calculation, the characteristics of this paper are that the accurate distribution and intensity of electrical fields in DPAs have been concluded. The proposed accurate calculations have not been seen in the literature, and can be used in DPA design and manufacture processes in order to improve mechanical performance and reduce the cost of DPA products in further applications. In this paper, all the processes of analysis and calculation have been done by MATLAB and MathCAD. The FEM results used for comparison were obtained using the ABAQUS program.

  8. A clamped rectangular plate containing a crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    The general problem of a rectangular plate clamped along two parallel sides and containing a crack parallel to the clamps is considered. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations and the asymptotic behavior of the stress state near the corners is investigated. Numerical examples are considered for a clamped plate without a crack and with a centrally located crack, and the stress intensity factors and the stresses along the clamps are calculated.

  9. Efficient Algorithm for Rectangular Spiral Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Breckenridge, William

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm generates grid coordinates for a computationally efficient spiral search pattern covering an uncertain rectangular area spanned by a coordinate grid. The algorithm does not require that the grid be fixed; the algorithm can search indefinitely, expanding the grid and spiral, as needed, until the target of the search is found. The algorithm also does not require memory of coordinates of previous points on the spiral to generate the current point on the spiral.

  10. Rectangular Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kishida, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Masahiro; Horisawa, Hideyuki

    2010-10-13

    Experimental investigation of impulse-bit and propellant consumption rate, or mass shot, per single pulse discharge was conducted to characterize the thrust performance of the rectangular laser-electromagnetic hybrid acceleration thruster with various propellant materials. From the result, alumina propellant showed significantly superior performance. The largest values of the measured impulse-bit, specific impulse and thrust efficiency were 49 {mu}Nsec, 6,200 sec and 22%, respectively.

  11. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles With Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  12. Force on a storage ring vacuum chamber after sudden turn-off of a magnet power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Gautam; Prabhu, S. S.

    2011-10-01

    We are commissioning a 2.5 GeV synchrotron radiation source (SRS) where electrons travel in high vacuum inside the vacuum chambers made of aluminum alloys. These chambers are kept between the pole gaps of magnets and are made to facilitate the radiation coming out of the storage ring to the experimental station. These chambers are connected by metallic bellows. During the commissioning phase of the SRS, the metallic bellows became ruptured due to the frequent tripping of the dipole magnet power supply. The machine was down for quite some time. In the case of a power supply trip, the current in the magnets decays exponentially. It was observed experimentally that the fast B field decay generates a large eddy current in the chambers and consequently the chambers are subjected to a huge Lorentz force. This motivated us to develop a theoretical model to study the force acting on a metallic plate when exposed to an exponentially decaying field and then to extend it for a rectangular vacuum chamber. The problem is formulated using Maxwell’s equations and converted to the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation. After taking the Laplace transform, the equation is solved with appropriate boundary conditions. Final results are obtained after taking the appropriate inverse Laplace transform. The expressions for eddy current contour and magnetic field produced by the eddy current are also derived. Variations of the force on chambers of different wall thickness due to spatially varying and exponentially time decaying field are presented. The result is a general theory which can be applied to different geometries and calculation of power loss as well. Comparisons are made with results obtained by simulation using a finite element based code, for quick verification of the theoretical model.

  13. Diversity of acoustic streaming in a rectangular acoustofluidic field.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiang; Hu, Junhui

    2015-04-01

    Diversity of acoustic streaming field in a 2D rectangular chamber with a traveling wave and using water as the acoustic medium is numerically investigated by the finite element method. It is found that the working frequency, the vibration excitation source length, and the distance and phase difference between two separated symmetric vibration excitation sources can cause the diversity in the acoustic streaming pattern. It is also found that a small object in the acoustic field results in an additional eddy, and affects the eddy size in the acoustic streaming field. In addition, the computation results show that with an increase of the acoustic medium's temperature, the speed of the main acoustic streaming decreases first and then increases, and the angular velocity of the corner eddies increases monotonously, which can be clearly explained by the change of the acoustic dissipation factor and shearing viscosity of the acoustic medium with temperature. Commercialized FEM software COMSOL Multiphysics is used to implement the computation tasks, which makes our method very easy to use. And the computation method is partially verified by an established analytical solution. PMID:25541360

  14. The Gross-Pitaevskii Hierarchy on General Rectangular Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Sebastian; Sohinger, Vedran

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we study the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy on general—rational and irrational—rectangular tori of dimensions two and three. This is a system of infinitely many linear partial differential equations which arises in the rigorous derivation of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We prove a conditional uniqueness result for the hierarchy. In two dimensions, this result allows us to obtain a rigorous derivation of the defocusing cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation from the dynamics of many-body quantum systems. On irrational tori, this question was posed as an open problem in the previous work of Kirkpatrick, Schlein, and Staffilani.

  15. Width effects in transonic flow over a rectangular cavity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-07-24

    A previous experiment by the present authors studied the flow over a finite-width rectangular cavity at freestream Mach numbers 1.5–2.5. In addition, this investigation considered the influence of three-dimensional geometry that is not replicated by simplified cavities that extend across the entire wind-tunnel test section. The latter configurations have the attraction of easy optical access into the depths of the cavity, but they do not reproduce effects upon the turbulent structures and acoustic modes due to the length-to-width ratio, which is becoming recognized as an important parameter describing the nature of the flow within narrower cavities.

  16. Crack problems for a rectangular plate and an infinite strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Civelek, M. B.; Erdogan, F.

    1980-01-01

    The general plane problem for an infinite strip containing multiple cracks perpendicular to its boundaries is considered. The problem is reduced to a system of singular integral equations. Two specific problems of practical interest are then studied in detail. The first problem explores the interaction effect of multiple edge cracks in a plate or beam under tension or bending. The second problem is that of a rectangular plate containing an arbitrarily oriented crack in the plane of symmetry. Particular emphasis is placed on the problem of a plate containing an edge crack and subjected to concentrated forces.

  17. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) Chambers during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centreville, AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Y.; Karakurt Cevik, B.; Hernandez, C.; Griffin, R. J.; Taylor, N.; Matus, J.; Collins, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) represents a large portion of sub-micron particulate matter on a global scale. The composition of SOA and its formation processes are heavily influenced by anthropogenic and biogenic activity. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted naturally from forests or from human activity serve as precursors to SOA formation. Biogenic SOA (BSOA) is formed from biogenic VOCs and is prevalent in forested regions like the Southeastern United States. The formation and enhancement of BSOA under anthropogenic influences such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and oxygen radicals are still not well understood. The lack of information on anthropogenic BSOA enhancement and the reversibility of SOA formation could explain the underprediction of SOA in current models. To address some of these gaps in knowledge, this study was conducted as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centreville, AL during the summer of 2013. SOA growth experiments were conducted in two Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) outdoor chambers located at the SEARCH site. Ambient trace gas concentrations were maintained in these chambers using semi-permeable gas-exchange membranes, while studying the growth of injected monodisperse seed aerosol. The control chamber was operated under ambient conditions; the relative humidity and oxidant and NOx levels were perturbed in the second chamber. This design allows experiments to capture the natural BSOA formation processes in the southeastern atmosphere and to study the influence of anthropogenic activity on aerosol chemistry. Chamber experiments were periodically monitored with physical and chemical instrumentation including a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA), and an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The CAGE experiments focused on SOA

  18. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  19. Fluid and Cell Transport Through a Microfabricated Flow Chamber.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, James Patrick

    We use silicon processing techniques to construct microfabricated fluid flow chambers. Custom designed silicon wafers with feature sizes of 1-10 μm and etch depths from 0.5-5 μm are anodically bonded to Pyrex glass to create a hermetically sealed chamber. A pressure gradient is placed across the chamber to induce bulk fluid flow. Properties of fluid flow and red blood cells are recorded using video microscopy. The human red blood cell is ideal for studying cellular membranes. It is an 8 μm diameter biconcave disc containing a membrane and associated cytoskeleton which surrounds a thick solution of hemoglobin. The material properties of individual red blood cells have been extensively studied in the past using micropipettes. However, we can get statistics on hundreds of red blood cells by fabricating an array of narrow channels 4 mu m x 4 μm in cross-section (the diameter of the smallest capillaries in the human body) and 13 μm long. These narrow channels are followed by an open space. This geometry forces red cells to repeatedly fold and unfold. Using these arrays, we show that the shear modulus of the membrane does not have a unique value, but has a distribution that ranges from 3-12 times 10 ^{-6} N/m. The surprisingly wide distribution is not due to cell size or cell age. It does seem to be correlated with intracellular Ca^ {2+}<=vels, leading us to believe that cell rigidity is controlled by some active process. We also report observations on red blood cells changing their rigidity by factors of fifty over tens of seconds. These microfabricated flow chambers are ideal for studying fluid flow through porous media. We construct custom designed two-dimensional environments with micron size features. These environments can be described by simple analytical theories which also attempt to describe flow through rock. For example, we image viscous imbibition of water into a percolation grid with 5 mu m edges in real time, and measure the permeability as a function

  20. Development and application of noninvasive technology for study of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.; Abramchuk, T. V.; Shipigusev, V. A.; Andreeva, T. P.; Gumerov, A. R.; Ilyin, A. N.; Gubaidullin, I. T.

    2015-05-01

    The paper formulates the issue of development of experimental base with noninvasive optical-electronic tools for control of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine. The design and specifications of a pilot sample of optronic system are explained; this noninvasive system was created in the framework of project of development of main critical technologies for designing of aviation gas turbine engine PD-14. The testbench run data are presented.

  1. Excised segments of rat small intestine in Ussing chamber studies: A comparison of native and stripped tissue viability and permeability to drugs.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Erik; Eriksson, Johanna; Vedin, Charlotta; Breitholtz, Katarina; Hilgendorf, Constanze

    2016-05-30

    Excised rat intestinal tissue mounted in an Ussing chamber can be used for intestinal permeability assessments in drug development. The outer layer of the intestine, the serosa and part of the muscle layer, is traditionally removed since it is considered a barrier to the diffusion of nutrients and oxygen as well as to that of pharmaceutical substances. However, the procedure for removing the serosal-muscle layer, i.e. stripping, is a technically challenging process in the pre-experimental preparation of the tissue which may result in tissue damage and reduced viability of the segment. In this study, the viability of stripped and native (non-stripped) rat small intestine tissue segments mounted in Ussing chambers was monitored and the apparent permeability of the tissue to a set of test compounds across both tissue preparations was determined. Electrical measurements, in particular the potential difference (PD) across the intestinal membrane, were used to evaluate the viability. In this study, there were no differences in initial PD (health status of the tissue) or PD over time (viability throughout the experiment) between native and stripped rat jejunum segments. Overall, there were also no significant differences in permeability between stripped and native rat intestinal tissue for the compounds in this study. Based on these results, we propose that stripping can be excluded from the preparation procedures for rat jejunal tissue for permeability studies when using the Ussing chamber technique. PMID:27073083

  2. Laser-filament-induced snow formation in a subsaturated zone in a cloud chamber: experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingjing; Sun, Haiyi; Sridharan, Aravindan; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Chin, See Leang

    2013-12-01

    1 kHz, 2 mJ, 45 fs, 800 nm laser pulses were fired into a laboratory diffusion cloud chamber through a subsaturated zone (relative humidity ∼73%, T ∼ 4.3 °C). After 60 min of laser irradiation, an oval-shaped snow pile was observed right below the filament center and weighed ∼12.0 mg. The air current velocity at the edge of the vortices was estimated to be ∼16.5 cm/s. Scattering scenes recorded from the side show that filament-induced turbulence were formed inside the cloud chamber with two vortices below the filament. Two-dimensional simulations of the air flow motion in two cross sections of the cloud chamber confirm that the turbulent vortices exist below the filament. Based upon this simulation, we deduce that the vortices indeed have a three-dimensional elliptical shape. Hence, we propose that inside vortices where the humidity was supersaturated or saturated the condensation nuclei, namely, HNO(3), N(2)(+), O(2)(+) and other aerosols and impurities, were activated and grew in size. Large-sized particles would eventually be spun out along the fast moving direction towards the cold plate and formed an oval-shaped snow pile at the end. PMID:24483507

  3. Investigation of imaging properties for submillimeter rectangular pinholes

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Dan; Moore, Stephen C. E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu Park, Mi-Ae E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu Cervo, Morgan E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Recently, a multipinhole collimator with inserts that have both rectangular apertures and rectangular fields of view (FOVs) has been proposed for SPECT imaging since it can tile the projection onto the detector efficiently and the FOVs in transverse and axial directions become separable. The purpose of this study is to investigate the image properties of rectangular-aperture pinholes with submillimeter apertures sizes. Methods: In this work, the authors have conducted sensitivity and FOV experiments for 18 replicates of a prototype insert fabricated in platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir) alloy with submillimeter square-apertures. A sin{sup q}θ fit to the experimental sensitivity has been performed for these inserts. For the FOV measurement, the authors have proposed a new formula to calculate the projection intensity of a flood image on the detector, taking into account the penumbra effect. By fitting this formula to the measured projection data, the authors obtained the acceptance angles. Results: The mean (standard deviation) of fitted sensitivity exponents q and effective edge lengths w{sub e} were, respectively, 10.8 (1.8) and 0.38 mm (0.02 mm), which were close to the values, 7.84 and 0.396 mm, obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the parameters of the designed inserts. For the FOV measurement, the mean (standard deviation) of the transverse and axial acceptances were 35.0° (1.2°) and 30.5° (1.6°), which are in good agreement with the designed values (34.3° and 29.9°). Conclusions: These results showed that the physical properties of the fabricated inserts with submillimeter aperture size matched our design well.

  4. Sloshing roof impact tests of a rectangular tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minowa, Chikahiro; Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Harada, Iki; Ma, David C.

    Some tanks have been damaged at the roofs due to sloshing impact caused by strong earthquakes. It is, therefore, necessary to consider the impact force in the aseismic design code for tank roofs. However, there are few studies on the earthquake responses of storage and process tank roofs. As a first step to investigate the effects of sloshing impact a series of the shaking table tests of a rectangular tank have been conducted at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). The results of these shaking table tests are presented in the paper. The test tank is rectangular in shape having dimensions of 5 m x 3 m x 2 m (length x width x height). The tank was constructed of glass-fiber reinforced plastic panels. Every panel had a flange on four edges, and each panel was connected by bolts along the flange. The test tank was set on the NIED shaking table (15 m by 15 m). Two types of liquid were used, water and a viscous liquid (water mixed with polymeric powders). The roof impact pressures and other quantities were measured. During the tests using the 400 pi El-Centro excitation, the roof deformation sensor steel beam was damaged. The response of side walls with different rigidity were measured in the wall bulging tests. The measured vibrations within the panel plates were larger than those in the panel flanges. The viscous liquid of 100 cp had little influence on wall bulging responses. However, the viscous effects on sloshing responses were observed in the sloshing tests. Approximate analyses of rectangular tanks, considering the influence of static water pressure, are also presented in this paper.

  5. Sloshing roof impact tests of a rectangular tank

    SciTech Connect

    Minowa, C.; Ogawa, N.; Harada, I.; Ma, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    Some tanks have been damaged at the roofs due to sloshing impact caused by strong earthquakes. It is, therefore, necessary to consider the impact force in the aseismic design code for tank roofs. However, there are few studies on the earthquake responses of storage and process tank roofs. As a first step to investigate the effects of sloshing impact a series of the shaking table tests of a rectangular tank have been conducted at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). The results of these shaking table tests are presented in the paper. The test tank is rectangular in shape having dimensions of 5 m {times} 3 m {times} 2 m length {times} width {times} height). The tank was constructed of glass-fiber reinforced plastic panels. Every panel had a flange on four edges, and each panel was connected by bolts along the flange. The test tank was set on the NIED shaking table (15 m by 15 m). Two types of liquid were used, water and a viscous liquid (water mixed with polymeric powders). The roof impact pressures and other quantities were measured. During the tests using the 400 pi El-Centro excitation, the roof deformation sensor steel beam was damaged. The response of side walls with different rigidity were measured in the wall bulging tests. The measured vibrations within the panel plates were larger than those in the panel flanges. The viscous liquid of 100 cp had little influence on wall bulging responses. However, the viscous effects on sloshing responses were observed in the sloshing tests. Approximate analyses of rectangular tanks, considering the influence of static water pressure, are also presented in this paper.

  6. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  7. Placebo-controlled study with OHIO chamber of prophylactic pranlukast for children with Japanese cedar pollinosis: TOPIC-J III study

    PubMed Central

    Hosoya, Kei; Masuno, Satoru; Hashiguchi, Kazuhiro; Okubo, Kimihiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective This double-blind, placebo-controlled comparative study was designed to investigate whether pranlukast dry syrup, a leukotriene receptor antagonist, has a protective effect against priming, controlled pollen exposure, and natural pollen exposure in children with Japanese cedar pollinosis. Research design and methods Thirty children aged 12–15 years with Japanese cedar pollinosis (positive skin test for Japanese cedar pollen), who had suffered from pollinosis for at least 2 years and developed severe nasal obstruction when exposed to Japanese cedar pollen, were enrolled in this study. They were randomly allocated to treatment with pranlukast or placebo orally after breakfast and dinner for 8 weeks during the Japanese cedar pollen season. Soon after the start of the pollen season, all subjects underwent a challenge by exposure for 3 h to Japanese cedar pollen (8000 grains/m3) in an artificial exposure chamber (OHIO chamber). Clinical trial registration The University Hospital Medical Information Network in Japan (UMIN000009840). Main outcome measures The effect of pranlukast was evaluated using self-rating of nasal symptoms by the subjects and measurement of eosinophil cationic protein in nasal discharge specimens. Results Scores for the symptoms of pollinosis were lower in the pranlukast group than in the placebo group during treatment in the priming state, as well as after controlled pollen exposure and natural pollen exposure. Pranlukast significantly improved the score for nasal obstruction, compared with placebo. A correlation was found between changes of the scores for symptoms of pollinosis and changes of the eosinophil cationic protein level. Conclusions These results confirm a protective effect of pranlukast against both priming and challenge (controlled and natural) with Japanese cedar pollen. The present findings suggested that pranlukast dry syrup may be useful for prophylaxis against pollinosis in children.

  8. Engineering verification of the biomass production chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III; Sager, J. C.; Jones, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for life support systems, both biological and physical-chemical, for long-term human attended space missions are under serious study throughout NASA. The KSC 'breadboard' project has focused on biomass production using higher plants for atmospheric regeneration and food production in a special biomass production chamber. This chamber is designed to provide information on food crop growth rate, contaminants in the chamber that alter plant growth requirements for atmospheric regeneration, carbon dioxide consumption, oxygen production, and water utilization. The shape and size, mass, and energy requirements in relation to the overall integrity of the biomass production chamber are under constant study.

  9. Plant growth chamber M design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Crop production is just one of the many processes involved in establishing long term survival of man in space. The benefits of integrating higher plants into the overall plan was recognized early by NASA through the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. The first step is to design, construct, and operate a sealed (gas, liquid, and solid) plant growth chamber. A 3.6 m diameter by 6.7 m high closed cylinder (previously used as a hypobaric vessel during the Mercury program) is being modified for this purpose. The chamber is mounted on legs with the central axis vertical. Entrance to the chamber is through an airlock. This chamber will be devoted entirely to higher plant experimentation. Any waste treatment, food processing or product storage studies will be carried on outside of this chamber. Its primary purpose is to provide input and output data on solids, liquids, and gases for single crop species and multiple species production using different nutrient delivery systems.

  10. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  11. Recharge from rectangular areas to finite aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. H.; Sarma, P. B. S.

    1981-10-01

    A generalized analytical solution is derived for the growth of groundwater mound in finite aquifers bounded by open water bodies, in response to recharge from rectangular areas. Finite Fourier transforms are used to solve the linearized differential equation of groundwater flow. Unlike earlier solutions, the method presented here does not require the use of tables for evaluation of complicated functions. The solution is evaluated by comparison with existing numerical and analytical results. In stream-aquifer systems similar to those described above, application of the proposed solution is more realistic than using solutions available for infinite aquifers.

  12. Steady evaporating flow in rectangular microchannels.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Martinez, Mario J.; Tchikanda, Serge W.; Nilson, Robert H.

    2005-02-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions are presented for steady evaporating flow in open microchannels having a rectangular cross section and a uniform depth. The flow, driven by the axial gradient of capillary pressure, generally consists of an entry region where the meniscus is attached to the top corners of the channel followed by a jump-like transition to a corner-flow region in which the meniscus progressively recedes into the bottom corners of the channel. Illustrative numerical solutions are used to guide the derivation of an easily applied analytical approximation for the maximum sustainable heat flux or capillary limit.

  13. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  14. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  15. The impact of rapid recharge events on the evolution of magma chambers: Case studies of Santorini Volcano (Greece) and Volcan Quizapu (Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degruyter, Wim; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Cooper, Kari; Kent, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Magma reservoirs in the crust are thought to be dominantly formed by episodic recharge events at rates that are much larger than the long-term average magma inflow rates. Hence, a better understanding of the evolution of a magma reservoir requires elucidating the mass change, pressurization, heating, deformation and the potential for an eruption associated with different recharge scenarios. Most importantly, the bifurcation in behavior between a recharge event that leads to eruption and one that will grow the chamber requires quantification for better volcanic hazard assessment. We use a numerical model to determine the change in pressure, temperature and volume of a magma chamber as it is exposed to a recharge event. The model is applied to the well-studied volcanic systems of Santorini Volcano (Greece) and Volcan Quizapu (Chile). We establish the rates and the duration of magma recharge events that will lead to an eruption. In doing so, we demonstrate the importance of the state of the magma chamber prior to the recharge event, i.e. its size and exsolved volatile content, on the subsequent evolution of the reservoir. In the case of Santorini, the model successfully reproduces the main features of the Minoan eruption and Nea Kameni activity, providing volume estimates for the active part of the current subvolcanic reservoir as well as information regarding the presence of exsolved volatiles. For Quizapu, we suggest that the change in eruptive style, from an effusive outpouring of lava in 1846-1847 to an explosive Plinian eruption in 1932, was controlled by a shift in the state of the magma chamber induced by the first eruption. These case studies show that thermo-mechanical models offer a new framework to integrate the historic eruption record with geodetic measurements and provide a context to understand the past, present and future of active volcanic centers.

  16. Phase space analysis of multipactor saturation in rectangular waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingwood, C. J.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Smith, J. D. A.; Goudket, P.; Stoltz, P. H.

    2012-03-01

    In certain high power RF systems multipactor cannot be avoided for all operating points, but its existence places limits on performance, efficiency, lifetime, and reliability. As an example multipactor in the input couplers of superconducting RF cavities can be a major limitation to the maximum RF power. Several studies have concentrated on rectangular waveguide input couplers which are used in many light sources. Most of these studies neglect space charge assuming that the effect of space charge is simply to defocus the electron bunches. Modelling multipactor to saturation is of interest in determining the performance of waveguide under a range of conditions. Particle-in-cell modelling including space charge has been performed for 500 MHz half-height rectangular waveguide. Phase plots of electron trajectories can aid understanding the processes taking place in the multipactor. Results strongly suggest that the multipacting trajectories are strongly perturbed by space charge causing the electrons to transition from two-surface to single-surface trajectories as the multipactor approaches saturation.

  17. Secondary magnetic field harmonics dependence on vacuum beam chamber geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, S. Y.; Wilfert, S.; Muehle, C.

    2013-08-01

    The harmonic magnetic field properties due to eddy currents have been studied with respect to the geometry of the vacuum beam chamber. We derived a generalized formula enabling the precise prediction of any field harmonics generated by eddy currents in beam tubes with different cross-sectional geometries. Applying our model to study the properties of field harmonics in beam tubes with linear dipole magnetic field ramping clearly proved that the circular cross section tube generates only a dipole field from eddy currents. The elliptic tube showed noticeable magnitudes of sextupole and dipole fields. We demonstrate theoretically that it is feasible to suppress the generation of the sextupole field component by appropriately varying the tube wall thickness as a function of angle around the tube circumference. This result indicates that it is possible to design an elliptical-shaped beam tube that generates a dipole field component with zero magnitude of sextupole. In a rectangular-shaped beam tube, one of the selected harmonic fields can be prevented if an appropriate wall thickness ratio between the horizontal and vertical tube walls is properly chosen. Our generalized formalism can be used for optimization of arbitrarily complex-shaped beam tubes, with respect to suppression of detrimental field harmonics.

  18. Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, Thomas F.; Mitra, Atindra K.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the results on analytical models and measurement and simulation of statistical properties from a study of microwave reverberation (mode-stirred) chambers performed at Texas Tech University. Two analytical models of power transfer vs. frequency in a chamber, one for antenna-to-antenna transfer and the other for antenna to D-dot sensor, were experimentally validated in our chamber. Two examples are presented of the measurement and calculation of chamber Q, one for each of the models. Measurements of EM power density validate a theoretical probability distribution on and away from the chamber walls and also yield a distribution with larger standard deviation at frequencies below the range of validity of the theory. Measurements of EM power density at pairs of points which validate a theoretical spatial correlation function on the chamber walls and also yield a correlation function with larger correlation length, R(sub corr), at frequencies below the range of validity of the theory. A numerical simulation, employing a rectangular cavity with a moving wall shows agreement with the measurements. The determination that the lowest frequency at which the theoretical spatial correlation function is valid in our chamber is considerably higher than the lowest frequency recommended by current guidelines for utilizing reverberation chambers in EMC testing. Two suggestions have been made for future studies related to EMC testing.

  19. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  20. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  1. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  2. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  3. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Flow Around Rectangular Cylinders with and Without Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N .; Pidugu, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of flow past bluff bodies was studied extensively in the past. The problem of drag reduction is very important in many high speed flow applications. Considerable work has been done in this subject area in case of circular cylinders. The present study attempts to investigate the feasibility of drag reduction on a rectangular cylinder by flow injection by flow injection from the rear stagnation region. The physical problem is modeled as two-dimensional body and numerical analysis is carried out with and without trailing jets. A commercial code is used for this purpose. Unsteady computation is performed in case of rectangular cylinders with no trailing jets where as steady state computation is performed when jet is introduced. It is found that drag can be reduced by introducing jets with small intensity in rear stagnation region of the rectangular cylinders.

  5. Chambers versus Relaxed Eddy Accumulation: an intercomparison study of two methods for short-term measurements of biogenic CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasek, Alina; Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Chmura, Lukasz; Necki, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    The presented work is a part of comprehensive study aimed at thorough characterization of carbon cycle in the urban environment of Krakow, southern Poland. In the framework of this study two independent methods were employed to quantify biogenic CO2 flux in the city: (i) closed chambers, and (ii) Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA). The results of a three-day intensive intercomparison campaign performed in July 2013 and utilizing both measurement methods are reported here. The chamber method is a widely used approach for measurements of gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The system implemented in this study consisted of a single chamber operating in a closed-dynamic mode, combined with Vaisala CarboCAP infrared CO2 sensor in a mobile setup. An alternative flux measurement method, covering larger area is represented by REA, which is a modification of the eddy covariance method. It consists of a 3D anemometer (Gill Windmaster Pro) and the system collecting updraft and downdraft samples to 5-litre Tedlar bags. The CO2 mixing ratios in the collected samples are measured by Picarro G2101i analyzer. The setup consists of two sets of bags so that the sampling can be performed continuously with 15-min temporal resolution. A 48-hectares open meadow located close the city center was chosen as a test site for comparison of the two methods of CO2 flux measurements outlined above. In the middle of the meadow a 3-metre high tripod was installed with the anemometer and REA inlet system. For a period of 46 hours the system was measuring net CO2 flux from the surrounding area. A meteorological conditions and intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also recorded. In the same time, CO2 flux from several points around the REA inlet was measured with the chamber system, resulting in 93 values for both respiration and net CO2 flux. Chamber results show rather homogenous distribution of the soil CO2 flux (the mean value equal to 40.9 ± 2.2 mmol/m2h), with

  6. Environmental aging in polycrystalline-Si photovoltaic modules: comparison of chamber-based accelerated degradation studies with field-test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, T.; Biggie, R.; Brooks, A.; Potter, B. G.; Simmons-Potter, K.

    2015-09-01

    Lifecycle degradation testing of photovoltaic (PV) modules in accelerated-degradation chambers can enable the prediction both of PV performance lifetimes and of return-on-investment for installations of PV systems. With degradation results strongly dependent on chamber test parameters, the validity of such studies relative to fielded, installed PV systems must be determined. In the present work, accelerated aging of a 250 W polycrystalline silicon module is compared to real-time performance degradation in a similar polycrystalline-silicon, fielded, PV technology that has been operating since October 2013. Investigation of environmental aging effects are performed in a full-scale, industrial-standard environmental chamber equipped with single-sun irradiance capability providing illumination uniformity of 98% over a 2 x 1.6 m area. Time-dependent, photovoltaic performance (J-V) is evaluated over a recurring, compressed night-day cycle providing representative local daily solar insolation for the southwestern United States, followed by dark (night) cycling. This cycle is synchronized with thermal and humidity environmental variations that are designed to mimic, as closely as possible, test-yard conditions specific to a 12 month weather profile for a fielded system in Tucson, AZ. Results confirm the impact of environmental conditions on the module long-term performance. While the effects of temperature de-rating can be clearly seen in the data, removal of these effects enables the clear interpretation of module efficiency degradation with time and environmental exposure. With the temperature-dependent effect removed, the normalized efficiency is computed and compared to performance results from another panel of similar technology that has previously experienced identical climate changes in the test yard. Analysis of relative PV module efficiency degradation for the chamber-tested system shows good comparison to the field-tested system with ~2.5% degradation following

  7. A practical approach to estimate emission rates of indoor air pollutants due to the use of personal combustible products based on small-chamber studies.

    PubMed

    Szulejko, Jan E; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    As emission rates of airborne pollutants are commonly measured from combusting substances placed inside small chambers, those values need to be re-evaluated for the possible significance under practical conditions. Here, a simple numerical procedure is investigated to extrapolate the chamber-based emission rates of formaldehyde that can be released from various combustible sources including e-cigarettes, conventional cigarettes, or scented candles to their concentration levels in a small room with relatively poor ventilation. This simple procedure relies on a mass balance approach by considering the masses of pollutants emitted from source and lost through ventilation under the assumption that mixing occurs instantaneously in the room without chemical reactions or surface sorption. The results of our study provide valuable insights into re-evaluation procedure of chamber data to allow comparison between extrapolated and recommended values to judge the safe use of various combustible products in confined spaces. If two scented candles with a formaldehyde emission rate of 310 µg h(-1) each were lit for 4 h in a small 20 m(3) room with an air change rate of 0.5 h(-1), then the 4-h (candle lit) and 8-h (up to 8 h after candle lighting) TWA [FA] were determined to be 28.5 and 23.5 ppb, respectively. This is clearly above the 8-h NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) time weighted average of 16 ppb. PMID:26495830

  8. Subsonic Round and Rectangular Twin Jet Flow Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Rick; Wernet, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Subsonic and supersonic aircraft concepts proposed by NASAs Fundamental Aeronautics Program have integrated propulsion systems with asymmetric nozzles. The asymmetry in the exhaust of these propulsion systems creates asymmetric flow and acoustic fields. The flow asymmetries investigated in the current study are from two parallel round, 2:1, and 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular jets at the same nozzle conditions. The flow field was measured with streamwise and cross-stream particle image velocimetry (PIV). A large dataset of single and twin jet flow field measurements was acquired at subsonic jet conditions. The effects of twin jet spacing and forward flight were investigated. For round, 2:1, and 8:1 rectangular twin jets at their closest spacings, turbulence levels between the two jets decreased due to enhanced jet mixing at near static conditions. When the flight Mach number was increased to 0.25, the flow around the twin jet model created a velocity deficit between the two nozzles. This velocity deficit diminished the effect of forward flight causing an increase in turbulent kinetic energy relative to a single jet. Both of these twin jet flow field effects decreased with increasing twin jet spacing relative to a single jet. These variations in turbulent kinetic energy correlate with changes in far-field sound pressure level.

  9. Magma chamber evolution: implication for the generation of continental crust: A case study in Kekeli batholith, North Qilian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Niu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally, zircon in situ Hf (Zir-Hf) isotope composition is considered to record faithfully the Hf isotope composition of the magma at the time of crystallization and because zircon is the major host of Hf in granitoids, zircon Hf isotope composition is regarded as representing the whole rock Hf (WR-Hf) isotope composition (Schmitz et al., 2004). However, in Kekeli Batholith in the North Qilian Orogenic Belt, the zircon ɛHf(t) is dominantly < 0, whereas the whole-rock ɛHf(t) is mostly > 0. Such significant WR-Hf and Zir-Hf isotope decoupling demonstrates that (1) Zir-Hf isotope composition does not necessarily represent WR Hf composition, and (2) zircon is not the sole major host of Hf. Besides, WR-Hf isotope is largely decoupled from WR-Nd isotope but Zir-Hf is not. The significant positive correlation between WR-Hf isotope and TiO2 indicates that the TiO2-rich minerals may be important Hf host apart from zircons. This correlation combined with the broad negative correlations between both ɛNd and ɛHf and silica further constrain that Kekeli batholith suites are the hybrids of magma mixing. The discrepancy between WR-Hf and Zir-Hf isotope composition cannot be explained by the 'analytical bias' (i.e., the inherited zircons are analysed in the whole rock but not analysed in the in situ zircons). The possibility is that during homogenising process in the course of magma mixing, Ti-rich minerals such as amphibole (Amp), Fe-Ti oxides, biotite (Bi) etc. crystallize earlier in the more mafic composition and preserve the isotope signature closer to the mafic endmember. Zircons do not crystallize until the later stage when the hybrid magma is saturated in Zr. Therefore, zircons generally record isotope compositions closer to the felsic endmember. The decoupling between WR-Hf and Nd isotopes should be inherited from the mafic endmember. The Kekeli Batholith dated at 500 Ma in this study contains abundant cumulate assemblages dominated by amphibole and plagioclase

  10. Thermal quenching sample chamber for grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering studies of polymer films.

    PubMed

    Singh, M A; Groves, M N; Müller, M S; Stahlbrand, I J; Smilgies, D-M

    2007-11-01

    The second generation of a sample chamber designed for in situ measurement of temperature- and time-dependent polymer film nanostructure using the method of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering is presented. An increased operating temperature limit (from 260 to 400 degrees C) with precise control (+/-0.1 degrees C) at fixed temperatures as well as a fourfold increase in maximum instantaneous cooling rate (up to 73 degrees C/s) relative to the first generation chamber [M. N. Groves et al, J. Appl. Crystallogr. 39, 120 (2006)] are reported. Thermal quenches from 220 to 90 degrees C are shown to be reproducible to within +/-1 degrees C of the final temperature. Experimental tests on spin-coated films of symmetric diblock styrene-butadiene copolymer demonstrate the ability to resolve the kinetics of orientation of lamellar domains parallel to the silicon substrate, distinct from the initial formation of randomly oriented lamellar domains immediately following the thermal quench. PMID:18052491

  11. Thermal quenching sample chamber for grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering studies of polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. A.; Groves, M. N.; Müller, M. S.; Stahlbrand, I. J.; Smilgies, D.-M.

    2007-11-01

    The second generation of a sample chamber designed for in situ measurement of temperature- and time-dependent polymer film nanostructure using the method of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering is presented. An increased operating temperature limit (from 260to400°C) with precise control (±0.1°C) at fixed temperatures as well as a fourfold increase in maximum instantaneous cooling rate (up to 73°C/s) relative to the first generation chamber [M. N. Groves et al, J. Appl. Crystallogr. 39, 120 (2006)] are reported. Thermal quenches from 220to90°C are shown to be reproducible to within ±1°C of the final temperature. Experimental tests on spin-coated films of symmetric diblock styrene-butadiene copolymer demonstrate the ability to resolve the kinetics of orientation of lamellar domains parallel to the silicon substrate, distinct from the initial formation of randomly oriented lamellar domains immediately following the thermal quench.

  12. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulphuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich Plant-Atmosphere Simulation Chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulphuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulphuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOC). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulphuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapor mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulphuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulphuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  13. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulfuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich plant-atmosphere simulation chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulfuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulfuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulfuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  14. Magnetophoresis Effects on the Flow Characteristics of Oil-Based Ferrofluids in Rectangular Enclosures.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyeon-Seok; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2015-10-01

    This study numerically investigated the flow characteristics in a rectangular enclosure filled with oil-based ferrofluid (EFH-1, Ferrotec.) under the influence of external magnetic fields. The rectangular enclosure contained obstacles with different shapes, such as a rectangle and a triangle mounted on the top and bottom wall surfaces. In order to generate external magnetic fields, a permanent magnet was located in the lower part of the rectangular enclosure, and its direction was selected to be either horizontal or vertical. Our results showed that the ferrofluid flow fields were affected by the applied external magnetic field direction and eddy flow phenomena in the working fluid were generated in the vicinity of high magnetic flux density distributions, such as at the edge of the permanent magnet. It was also confirmed that the magnetophoretic force distributions in the analysis model played a significant role in the development of the ferrofluid flow fields. PMID:26726349

  15. Vibration analysis of sandwich rectangular plates with magnetorheological elastomer damping treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Jia-Yi

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the vibration analysis of sandwich rectangular plates with magnetorheological (MR) elastomer damping treatment is presented. The rectangular plate is combined with a magnetorheological elastomer core layer and a constraining layer to improve the vibration behaviors of the sandwich system. The MR material shows variations in the rheological properties when subjected to varying magnetic fields. Additionally, the MR material exhibits a rapid time response and is applicable to structures or devices when a tunable system is required. The magnetorheological elastomer is found to have a significant effect on the vibration characteristics of the sandwich rectangular plate. The modal damper and the natural frequencies for the sandwich plate system are calculated for various magnetic fields and some designed parameters by utilizing the finite element method. The damping effects of the sandwich plate system can be controlled and changed when different magnetic field strengths are applied.

  16. Is referencing the posterior condyles sufficient to achieve a rectangular flexion gap in total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Christoph; Nessler, Jochen; König, Dietmar Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Femoral malrotation in total knee arthroplasty causes flexion gap instability. Conventional instruments mostly reference the posterior condylar angle (PCA). The aim of this study was to verify whether the computer-navigated flexion gap (GAP) method produces a rectangular flexion gap and if a balanced flexion gap could also be achieved by referencing the PCA. A total of 100 knee prostheses were analysed using the navigated GAP method, and flexion gap symmetry along with femoral rotation were recorded. The GAP technique resulted in a rectangular flexion gap with adequate femoral rotational alignment. If the PCA technique had been used, only 51% of the femoral components would have been implanted in correct femoral rotation; the remaining 49% would have implanted with flexion gap instability. The GAP technique produces a rectangular flexion gap. The referencing of the PCA was shown to be less reliable. Thus, modern knee prosthesis instrumentation should not base femoral rotation solely on the PCA. PMID:18956189

  17. Left-Handed Effect of Composite Rectangular SRRs and Its Application in Patch Antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming; Zhou, Yue-Qun; Shen, Ting-Gen

    2010-01-01

    We concentrate on describing the important influence and physical law of the split resonant ring (SRR) based left-handed materials on patch antennae. The finite-difference time-domain method, together with the finite element method is used to study the characteristics of patch antennae based on composite rectangular SRRs. A novel composite rectangular SRR system is formed by assembling the conventional patch antennae and SRRs, it is found that electromagnetic wave resonance occurs near f = 3.15 GHz, the equivalent permittivity and permeability are both negative, and the electromagnetic wave's tunnel effect and evanescent waves' enhancing effect are formed, which can improve the localization extent of electromagnetic wave's energy apparently. Such effects can improve the antenna's radiation gain and its matching condition. The phenomenon indicates that such composite rectangular patch antennae are promising in wireless communications such as mobile phones, satellite communication and aviation.

  18. Shear flow control of cold and heated rectangular jets by mechanical tabs. Volume 2: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of mechanical protrusions on the jet mixing characteristics of rectangular nozzles for heated and unheated subsonic and supersonic jet plumes were studied. The characteristics of a rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4 without the mechanical protrusions were first investigated. Intrusive probes were used to make the flow measurements. Possible errors introduced by intrusive probes in making shear flow measurements were also examined. Several scaled sizes of mechanical tabs were then tested, configured around the perimeter of the rectangular jet. Both the number and the location of the tabs were varied. From this, the best configuration was selected. This volume contains tabulated data for each of the data runs cited in Volume 1. Baseline characteristics, mixing modifications (subsonic and supersonic, heated and unheated) and miscellaneous charts are included.

  19. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  20. 45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), VIEW LOOKING EAST. LEAD ENCLOSED PIPING IS DRAIN FROM BOILER CHAMBER No. 1 - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  1. Assessment of pulverized-coal-fired combustor performance. Parametric screening studies for the calculation of heat transfer in combustion chambers. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, W.

    1982-01-01

    The screening studies performed to identify those parameters most influencing the thermal performance of full-scale combustion chambers, such as those of industrial furnaces or utility boilers are presented. Special attention is given to pulverized-coal (p.f.) firing. The report consists basically of two parts. Part one deals with overall thermal behavior, expressed in terms of a furnace efficiency and a furnace exit temperature. In part two, local heat transfer, characterized by local temperature and heat flux distributions, is investigated. It is also shown how these local inhomogeneities may influence the overall performance. The screening studies are carried out analytically.

  2. Propagation properties of electromagnetic rectangular multi-Gaussian Schell-model beams in oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xudong; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-08-01

    A model of electromagnetic rectangular multi-Gaussian Schell-model (ERMGSM) beams is introduced. Its analytic expression for the elements of the cross-spectral density matrix of such beams passing through oceanic turbulence is derived. It is shown that the rectangular shape of the ERMGSM beams holds a small distance on propagation in oceanic turbulence. The spectral density, the degree of coherence and the degree of polarization of ERMGSM beams are also studied in detail. The results will be helpful for underwater communication by using ERMGSM beams.

  3. Structures of cholesteric liquid crystals confined in rectangular micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi-Huo; Guo, Yubing; Xiang, Jie; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    When cholesteric liquid crystals are confined in various geometries, the interplays between the boundary conditions, the bulk structures and different length scales (pitch, penetration depth, and confinement size) may cause frustration and formation of intriguing topological defects and disclination lines. This paper presents our recent studies on the structures of cholesteric liquid crystals confined in rectangular microchannels with homeotropic alignments. The rectangular microchannels with various sizes and aspect ratios are made in glass substrates by using modern nanofabrication techniques. Detailed liquid crystal structures and their optical characterizations will be presented as a function of the channel depth and width. Work was supported by ACS PRF 53018-ND7.

  4. A new laboratory facility to study gas-aerosol-cloud interactions in a turbulent environment: The Π Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Bench, Jim; Shaw, Raymond

    2015-04-01

    A detailed understanding of interactions of aerosols, cloud droplets/ice crystals, and trace gases within the turbulent atmosphere is of prime importance for an accurate understanding of Earth's climate system. But despite extensive research activity during the last decades these interactions are still poorly understood and ill quantified. For example: Every cloud droplet in Earth's atmosphere (~1025) was catalyzed by a preexisting aerosol particle. While every cloud droplet began as an aerosol particle, not every aerosol particle becomes a cloud droplet. The particle to droplet transformation, known as activation, requires that the particle be exposed to some critical concentration of water vapor, which differs for different combinations of particle size and chemical composition. Similarly, the formation of ice particles in the atmosphere is often catalyzed by aerosol particles, either activated or not. Even in the simplest scenarios it is challenging to gain a full understanding of the aerosol activation and ice nucleation processes, but at least two other factors contribute greatly to the complexity observed in the atmosphere. First, aerosols and cloud particles are not static entities, but are continuously interacting with their chemical environment, and therefore changing in their properties. Second, clouds are ubiquitously turbulent, and therefore thermodynamic and compositional variables, such as water vapor or trace gas concentration, fluctuate in space and time. Indeed, the coupling between turbulence and microphysical processes is recognized as one of the major research challenges in cloud physics today. We have developed a multiphase, turbulent reaction chamber - called the Π Chamber because of the internal volume of 3.14 m3 (with cylindical wall installed) - designed to address the open issues outlined above. It is capable of pressures ranging from sea level to ~60 mbar, and can sustain temperatures of +55 to -55

  5. Plasticity and rectangularity in survival curves

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2011-01-01

    Living systems inevitably undergo a progressive deterioration of physiological function with age and an increase of vulnerability to disease and death. To maintain health and survival, living systems should optimize survival strategies with adaptive interactions among molecules, cells, organs, individuals, and environments, which arises plasticity in survival curves of living systems. In general, survival dynamics in a population is mathematically depicted by a survival rate, which monotonically changes from 1 to 0 with age. It would be then useful to find an adequate function to describe complicated survival dynamics. Here we describe a flexible survival function, derived from the stretched exponential function by adopting an age-dependent shaping exponent. We note that the exponent is associated with the fractal-like scaling in cumulative mortality rate. The survival function well depicts general features in survival curves; healthy populations exhibit plasticity and evolve towards rectangular-like survival curves, as examples in humans or laboratory animals. PMID:22355622

  6. A transonic rectangular grid embedded panel method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. T.; Bussoletti, J. E.; James, R. M.; Young, D. P.; Woo, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    A method is presented that has the potential for solving transonic flow problems about the same complex aircraft configurations currently being analyzed by subsonic panel methods. This method does not require the generation of surface fitted grids. Instead it uses rectangular grids and subgrids together with embedded surface panels on which boundary conditions are imposed. Both the Euler and full potential equations are considered. The method of least squares is used to reduce the solution of these equations to the solution of a sequence of Poisson problems. The Poisson problems are solved using fast Fourier transforms and panel influence coefficient techniques. The overall method is still in its infancy but some two dimensional results are shown illustrating various key features.

  7. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  8. Magnetization reversal in single ferromagnetic rectangular nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Alexandre B.; da Silva, Gilvânia L.; Rezende, Sergio M.; Azevedo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We report on the magnetoresistance (MR) investigation of the magnetization reversal processes in single rectangular nanowire of Permalloy. A set of nanowires with lengths ranging from 6 to 20 μm, thicknesses fixed in 10 nm, and widths between 250 nm and 1.2 μm, was fabricated by means of AFM local anodic oxidation lithography. Magnetoresistive hysteresis loops show an abrupt jump corresponding to the magnetization reversal that depends on the angle between the wire axis and the applied magnetic field direction. The field value corresponding to the abrupt jump of the MR was associated to the nucleation field deduced from the Brown equations. By the angular dependence of this magnetization reversal field we were able to identify the nucleation mode as the magnetization buckling. We have investigated the temperature dependence of the switching field as well as its stochastic nature as a function of the in-plane angle.

  9. Contribution of Round vs. Rectangular Expandable Cage Endcaps to Spinal Stability in a Cadaveric Corpectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Mundis, Gregory M.; Moazzaz, Payam; Turner, Alexander W. L.; Cornwall, G. Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Background Expandable cages are gaining popularity in anterior reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine following corpectomy as they can provide adjustable distraction and deformity correction. Rectangular, rather than circular, endcaps provide increased resistance to subsidence by spanning the apophyseal ring; however their impact on construct stability is not known. The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of expandable corpectomy cage endcap shape (round vs. rectangular) and fixation method (anterior plate vs. posterior pedicle screws) to the stability of an L1 sub-total corpectomy construct. Methods Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens (T11-L3) were subjected to multi-directional flexibility testing to 6 N·m with a custom spine simulator. Test conditions were: intact, L1 sub-total corpectomy defect, expandable cage (round endcap) alone, expandable cage (round endcap) with anterior plate, expandable cage (round endcap) with bilateral pedicle screws, expandable cage (rectangular endcap) alone, expandable cage (rectangular endcap) with anterior plate, expandable cage (rectangular endcap) with bilateral pedicle screws. Range-of-motion across T12-L2 was measured with an optoelectronic system. Results The expandable cage alone with either endcap provided significant stability to the corpectomy defect, reducing motion to intact levels in flexion-extension with both endcap types, and in lateral bending with rectangular endcaps. Round endcaps allowed greater motion than intact in lateral bending, and axial rotation ROM was greater than intact for both endcaps. Supplemental fixation provided the most rigid constructs, although there were no significant differences between instrumentation or endcap types. Conclusions These results suggest anterior-only fixation may be adequate when using an expandable cage in a sub-total corpectomy application and choice of endcap type may be driven by other factors such as subsidence resistance. PMID:26609508

  10. The Mars Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mars chamber is a box about the size of a refrigerator that re-creates the temperatures, pressures, and atmosphere of the Martian surface, essentially creating a Mars environment on Earth! Scie...

  11. Helping Students Acquainted with Multiplication in Rectangular Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasman, Fridgo; den Hertog, Jaap; Zulkardi; Hartono, Yusuf

    2011-01-01

    Usually, multiplication is introduced to students to represent quantities that come in groups. However there is also rectangular array model which is also related to multiplication. Barmby et al. (2009) has shown that the rectangular model such as array representations encourage students to develop their thinking about multiplication as a binary…

  12. Method and structure for cache aware transposition via rectangular subsections

    DOEpatents

    Gustavson, Fred Gehrung; Gunnels, John A

    2014-02-04

    A method and structure for transposing a rectangular matrix A in a computer includes subdividing the rectangular matrix A into one or more square submatrices and executing an in-place transposition for each of the square submatrices A.sub.ij.

  13. Experimental Modal Analysis of Rectangular and Circular Beams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emory, Benjamin H.; Zhu, Wei Dong

    2006-01-01

    Analytical and experimental methods are used to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of Aluminum 6061-T651 beams with rectangular and circular cross-sections. A unique test stand is developed to provide the rectangular beam with different boundary conditions including clamped-free, clamped-clamped, clamped-pinned, and pinned-pinned.…

  14. Development of the mean velocity distribution in rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Swan, D. H.; Deotte, R. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The mean flowfield of 1 x 2 and 1 x 4 aspect ratio rectangular jets has been measured using a laser Doppler anemometer system. The development of the downstream velocity distribution is analyzed with respect to centerline velocity decay, shear layer growth, axis switching, and velocity profile development. Comparisons are made with axisymmetric, planar, and other rectangular jets.

  15. Chamber Clearing First Principles Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G

    2009-06-09

    LIFE fusion is designed to generate 37.5 MJ of energy per shot, at 13.3 Hz, for a total average fusion power of 500 MW. The energy from each shot is partitioned among neutrons ({approx}78%), x-rays ({approx}12%), and ions ({approx}10%). First wall heating is dominated by x-rays and debris because the neutron mean free path is much longer than the wall thickness. Ion implantation in the first wall also causes damage such as blistering if not prevented. To moderate the peak-pulse heating, the LIFE fusion chamber is filled with a gas (such as xenon) to reduce the peak-pulse heat load. The debris ions and majority of the x-rays stop in the gas, which re-radiates this energy over a longer timescale (allowing time for heat conduction to cool the first wall sufficiently to avoid damage). After a shot, because of the x-ray and ion deposition, the chamber fill gas is hot and turbulent and contains debris ions. The debris needs to be removed. The ions increase the gas density, may cluster or form aerosols, and can interfere with the propagation of the laser beams to the target for the next shot. Moreover, the tritium and high-Z hohlraum debris needs to be recovered for reuse. Additionally, the cryogenic target needs to survive transport through the gas mixture to the chamber center. Hence, it will be necessary to clear the chamber of the hot contaminated gas mixture and refill it with a cool, clean gas between shots. The refilling process may create density gradients that could interfere with beam propagation, so the fluid dynamics must be studied carefully. This paper describes an analytic modeling effort to study the clearing and refilling process for the LIFE fusion chamber. The models used here are derived from first principles and balances of mass and energy, with the intent of providing a first estimate of clearing rates, clearing times, fractional removal of ions, equilibrated chamber temperatures, and equilibrated ion concentrations for the chamber. These can be used

  16. Shear flow control of cold and heated rectangular jets by mechanical tabs. Volume 1: Results and discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of mechanical protrusions on the jet mixing characteristics of rectangular nozzles for heated and unheated subsonic and supersonic jet plumes were studied. The characteristics of a rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4 without the mechanical protrusions were first investigated. Intrusive probes were used to make the flow measurements. Possible errors introduced by intrusive probes in making shear flow measurements were also examined. Several scaled sizes of mechanical tabs were then tested, configured around the perimeter of the rectangular jet. Both the number and the location of the tabs were varied. From this, the best configuration was selected. The conclusions derived were: (1) intrusive probes can produce significant errors in the measurements of the velocity of jets if they are large in diameter and penetrate beyond the jet center; (2) rectangular jets without tabs, compared to circular jets of the same exit area, provide faster jet mixing; and (3) further mixing enhancement is possible by using mechanical tabs.

  17. New insights into the degradation of terpenoids with OH: a study of the OH budget in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Martin; Fuchs, Hendrik; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Häseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Li, Xin; Lutz, Anna; Nehr, Sascha; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main oxidation agent in the atmosphere during daytime. Recent field campaigns studying the radical chemistry in forested areas showed large discrepancies between measured and modeled OH concentration at low NOx conditions and when OH reactivity was dominated by VOC. These observations were only partially explained by the evidence for new efficient hydroxyl radical regeneration pathways in the isoprene oxidation mechanism. The question arises if other reactive VOCs with high global emission rates are also capable of additional OH recycling. Beside isoprene, monoterpenes and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) are the volatile organic compounds (VOC) with the highest global emission rates. Due to their high reactivity towards OH monoterpenes and MBO can dominate the radical chemistry of the atmosphere in forested areas under certain conditions. In the present study the photochemical degradation mechanism of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, myrcene and MBO was investigated in the Jülich atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. The focus of this study was in particular on the investigation of the OH budget in the degradation process. The photochemical degradation of these terpenoids was studied in a dedicated series of experiments in the years 2012 and 2013. The SAPHIR chamber was equipped with instrumentation to measure radicals (OH, HO2, RO2), the total OH reactivity, all important OH precursors (O3, HONO, HCHO), the parent VOC, its main oxidation products and photolysis frequencies to investigate the radical budget in the SAPHIR chamber. All experiments were carried out under low NOx conditions (≤ 2ppb) and atmospheric terpenoid concentrations (≤ 5ppb) with and without addition of ozone into the SAPHIR chamber. For the investigation of the OH budget all measured OH production terms were compared to the measured OH destruction. Within the limits of accuracy of the instruments the OH budget was balanced in all cases. Consequently unaccounted

  18. Detailed diesel exhaust characteristics including particle surface area and lung deposited dose for better understanding of health effects in human chamber exposure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicka, Aneta; Nilsson, Patrik T.; Rissler, Jenny; Sallsten, Gerd; Xu, Yiyi; Pagels, Joakim H.; Albin, Maria; Österberg, Kai; Strandberg, Bo; Eriksson, Axel; Bohgard, Mats; Bergemalm-Rynell, Kerstin; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2014-04-01

    Several diesel exhaust (DE) characteristics, comprising both particle and gas phase, recognized as important when linking with health effects, are not reported in human chamber exposure studies. In order to understand effects of DE on humans there is a need for better characterization of DE when performing exposure studies. The aim of this study was to determine and quantify detailed DE characteristics during human chamber exposure. Additionally to compare to reported DE properties in conducted human exposures. A wide battery of particle and gas phase measurement techniques have been used to provide detailed DE characteristics including the DE particles (DEP) surface area, fraction and dose deposited in the lungs, chemical composition of both particle and gas phase such as NO, NO2, CO, CO2, volatile organic compounds (including aldehydes, benzene, toluene) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Eyes, nose and throat irritation effects were determined. Exposure conditions with PM1 (<1 μm) mass concentration 280 μg m-3, number concentration 4 × 105 cm-3 and elemental to total carbon fraction of 82% were generated from a diesel vehicle at idling. When estimating the lung deposited dose it was found that using the size dependent effective density (in contrast to assuming unity density) reduced the estimated respiratory dose by 132% by mass. Accounting for agglomerated structure of DEP prevented underestimation of lung deposited dose by surface area by 37% in comparison to assuming spherical particles. Comparison of DE characteristics reported in conducted chamber exposures showed that DE properties vary to a great extent under the same DEP mass concentration and engine load. This highlights the need for detailed and standardized approach for measuring and reporting of DE properties. Eyes irritation effects, most probably caused by aldehydes in the gas phase, as well as nose irritation were observed at exposure levels below current occupational exposure limit

  19. Oscillating laminar electrokinetic flow in infinitely extended rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Bhattacharyya, A; Masliyah, J H; Kwok, D Y

    2003-05-01

    This paper has addressed analytically the problem of laminar flow in microchannels with rectangular cross-section subjected to a time-dependent sinusoidal pressure gradient and a sinusoidal electric field. The analytical solution has been determined based on the Debye-Hückel approximation of a low surface potential at the channel wall. We have demonstrated that Onsager's principle of reciprocity is valid for this problem. Parametric studies of streaming potential have shown the dependence of the electroviscous effect not only on the Debye length, but also on the oscillation frequency and the microchannel width. Parametric studies of electroosmosis demonstrate that the flow rate decreases due to an increase in frequency. The obtained solutions for both the streaming potential and electroosmotic flows become those for flow between two parallel plates in the limit of a large aspect ratio. PMID:12725820

  20. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  1. Mixing of Multiple Jets With a Confined Subsonic Crossflow. Part 2; Opposed Rows of Orifices in Rectangular Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Liscinsky, David S.; Bain, Daniel B.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes experimental and computational results on the mixing of opposed rows of jets with a confined subsonic crossflow in rectangular ducts. The studies from which these results were excerpted investigated flow and geometric variations typical of the complex 3-D flowfield in the combustion chambers in gas turbine engines. The principal observation was that the momentum-flux ratio, J, and the orifice spacing, S/H, were the most significant flow and geometric variables. Jet penetration was critical, and penetration decreased as either momentum-flux ratio or orifice spacing decreased. It also appeared that jet penetration remained similar with variations in orifice size, shape, spacing, and momentum-flux ratio when the orifice spacing was inversely proportional to the square-root of the momentum-flux ratio. It was also seen that planar averages must be considered in context with the distributions. Note also that the mass-flow ratios and the offices investigated were often very large (jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio greater than 1 and the ratio of orifices-area-to-mainstream-cross-sectional-area up to 0.5 respectively), and the axial planes of interest were often just downstream of the orifice trailing edge. Three-dimensional flow was a key part of efficient mixing and was observed for all configurations.

  2. Mixing of Multiple Jets with a Confined Subsonic Crossflow. Part 2; Opposed Rows of Orifices in Rectangular Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Liscinsky, D. S.; Bain, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes experimental and computational results on the mixing of opposed rows of jets with a confined subsonic crossflow in rectangular ducts. The studies from which these results were excerpted investigated flow and geometric variations typical of the complex three-dimensional flowfield in the combustion chambers in gas turbine engines. The principal observation was that the momentum-flux ratio, J, and the orifice spacing, S/H, were the most significant flow and geometric variables. Jet penetration was critical, and penetration decreased as either momentum-flux ratio or orifice spacing decreased. It also appeared that jet penetration remained similar with variations in orifice size, shape, spacing, and momentum-flux ratio when the orifice spacing was inversely proportional to the square-root of the momentum-flux ratio. It was also seen that planar averages must be considered in context with the distributions. Note also that the mass-flow ratios and the orifices investigated were often very large (jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio > 1 and the ratio of orifices-area-to-mainstream- cross-sectional-area up to 0.5, respectively), and the axial planes of interest were often just downstream of the orifice trailing edge. Three-dimensional flow was a key part of efficient mixing and was observed for all configurations.

  3. Developing Multiplicative Thinking with Rectangular Array Tasks in a Computer Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Amy I-Yu

    2013-01-01

    This study reports findings from a teaching experiment in which 4th grade children engaged in solving multiplication tasks with rectangular arrays in a computer environment. The environment provided flexible task-solving through dynamic virtual manipulatives (VMs) so children could use their existing knowledge of multiplication to complete array…

  4. The Effects of a Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacon on Vehicle Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanWagner, Michelle; Van Houten, Ron; Betts, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, nearly 31% of vehicle fatalities were related to failure to adhere to safe vehicle speeds (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA], 2009). The current study evaluated the effect of a rectangular rapid-flashing beacon (RRFB) triggered by excessive speed on vehicle speed using a combined alternating treatments and reversal…

  5. Evaluation of the Hubbell rectangular source integral using Haar wavelets method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkadhi, K.; Manai, K.

    2016-05-01

    Haar wavelets numerical integration method is exposed and used for evaluating the Hubbell rectangular source integral. The method convergence is studied to get the minimum iteration number for a desired precision. Haar wavelets results are finally compared to those obtained with other integration methods.

  6. Round versus rectangular: Does the plot shape matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserloh, Thomas; Bäthke, Lars; Ries, Johannes B.

    2016-04-01

    Field rainfall simulators are designed to study soil erosion processes and provide urgently needed data for various geomorphological, hydrological and pedological issues. Due to the different conditions and technologies applied, there are several methodological aspects under review of the scientific community, particularly concerning design, procedures and conditions of measurement for infiltration, runoff and soil erosion. Extensive discussions at the Rainfall Simulator Workshop 2011 in Trier and the Splinter Meeting at EGU 2013 "Rainfall simulation: Big steps forward!" lead to the opinion that the rectangular shape is the more suitable plot shape compared to the round plot. A horizontally edging Gerlach trough is installed for sample collection without forming unnatural necks as is found at round or triangle plots. Since most research groups did and currently do work with round plots at the point scale (<1m²), a precise analysis of the differences between the output of round and square plots are necessary. Our hypotheses are: - Round plot shapes disturb surface runoff, unnatural fluvial dynamics for the given plot size such as pool development especially directly at the plot's outlet occur. - A square plot shape prevent these problems. A first comparison between round and rectangular plots (Iserloh et al., 2015) indicates that the rectangular plot could indeed be the more suitable, but the rather ambiguous results make a more elaborate test setup necessary. The laboratory test setup includes the two plot shapes (round, square), a standardised silty substrate and three inclinations (2°, 6°, 12°). The analysis of the laboratory test provide results on the best performance concerning undisturbed surface runoff and soil/water sampling at the plot's outlet. The analysis of the plot shape concerning its influence on runoff and erosion shows that clear methodological standards are necessary in order to make rainfall simulation experiments comparable. Reference

  7. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  8. Ice crystal habits from cloud chamber studies obtained by in-line holographic microscopy related to depolarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Amsler, Peter; Stetzer, Olaf; Schnaiter, Martin; Hesse, Evelyn; Benz, Stefan; Moehler, Ottmar; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2009-10-20

    We investigate hydrometeor habits at the AIDA chamber with a newly developed in-line holographic microscope HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects (HOLIMO). Sizes and habits of ice crystals and droplets in a mixed-phase cloud experiment are related to relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(ice)), temperature (T), and experiment time. This experiment is initiated with supercooled water drops. As a result, ice crystals within a maximum particle diameter size range of 2 to 118 microm (average size of 19 microm) are detected and 63% of them reveal regular habits. The observed particle habits match those predicted for a given RH(ice) and T. Two different growth modes emerge from this cloud. The first one appears during water injection and reveals mainly optical particle sizes in the range of 5 to 250 microm. The second mode grows to sizes of 5 to 63 microm, just after the particles of the first one fall out. It is found that an increasing aspect ratio chi of maximum length over thickness from 2 to 20 as obtained by HOLIMO corresponds to a decreasing linear depolarization ratio from 0.1 to 0.04, as independently obtained by depolarization measurements. PMID:19844319

  9. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  10. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  11. Oscillating flow and separation of species in rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacioglu, A.; Narayanan, R.

    2016-07-01

    The mass transfer and separation of species in a tube using oscillatory flows are strongly affected by the fluid flow profiles in the tube. It has been well established that oscillatory motion in a one-dimensional flow configuration leads to a single tuning dimensionless frequency, where optimum separation may be effected. In this work, the effect on species separation by two-dimensional laminar flow arising in a rectangular cross section is studied and a surprising result is that a second tuning frequency may occur at lower dimensionless oscillation frequencies. The physics reveals that this new optimum disappears when the aspect ratio is either very large or close to unity. These observations are related to the flow profiles at different aspect ratios.

  12. Geometrically nonlinear vibrations of rectangular plates carrying a concentrated mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, M.

    2010-10-01

    Nonlinear forced vibrations of rectangular plates carrying a central concentrated mass are studied. The plate is assumed to have immovable edges and rotational springs; numerical results are presented for clamped plates. The Von Kármán nonlinear plate theory is used, but in-plane inertia in both the plate and the mass is retrained. The problem is discretized into a multi-degree-of-freedom (dof) system by using an energy approach and Lagrange equations taking damping into account. A pseudo-arclength continuation method is used in order to obtain numerical solutions. Results are presented as both (i) frequency-amplitude curves and (ii) time domain responses. The effect of gravity and the effect of the consequent initial plate deflection are also investigated.

  13. Flow-Field Surveys for Rectangular Nozzles. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for three rectangular nozzles are presented for a low subsonic condition obtained primarily by hot-wire anemometry. The three nozzles have aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1. A fourth case included has 2:1 aspect ratio with chevrons added to the long edges. Data on mean velocity, turbulent normal and shear stresses as well as streamwise vorticity are presented covering a streamwise distance up to sixteen equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. These detailed flow properties, including initial boundary layer characteristics, are usually difficult to measure in high speed flows and the primary objective of the study is to aid ongoing and future computational and noise modeling efforts. This supplement contains data files, charts and source code.

  14. Elastostatic stress analysis of orthotropic rectangular center-cracked plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, G. S.; Mendelson, A.

    1972-01-01

    A mapping-collocation method was developed for the elastostatic stress analysis of finite, anisotropic plates with centrally located traction-free cracks. The method essentially consists of mapping the crack into the unit circle and satisfying the crack boundary conditions exactly with the help of Muskhelishvili's function extension concept. The conditions on the outer boundary are satisfied approximately by applying the method of least-squares boundary collocation. A parametric study of finite-plate stress intensity factors, employing this mapping-collocation method, is presented. It shows the effects of varying material properties, orientation angle, and crack-length-to-plate-width and plate-height-to-plate-width ratios for rectangular orthotropic plates under constant tensile and shear loads.

  15. Finite-element analysis of corner cracks in rectangular bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, L. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for a wide range of quarter-elliptical corner cracks in rectangular bars are presented. Cracked configurations were subjected to remote tension, in-plane bending, or out-of-plane bending. Results were compared with other numerical results for a quarter-circular corner crack configuration. The present results along the interior of the crack generally agreed within 3 percent with those from the literature. Some larger differences (3 to 13 percent) were observed near the intersection of the crack front and the free surfaces in the boundary layer region. Analyses were performed to study the effect of mesh refinement in the boundary layer region and the influence of Poisson's ratio on the distribution of stress-intensity factors.

  16. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Adrien A P; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A; Chergui, Majed

    2015-10-01

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment. PMID:26520998

  17. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P.; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A.; Chergui, Majed

    2015-10-01

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  18. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P. Chergui, Majed; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A.

    2015-10-15

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  19. An atmospheric exposure chamber for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. M.; Weiss, H. S.; Pitt, J. F.; Grimard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design a long-term environmental exposure chamber for small animals. This chamber is capable of producing hypoxic, normoxic and hyperoxic atmospheres which are closely regulated. The chamber, which is of the recycling type, is fashioned after clear plastic germ-free isolators. Oxygen concentration is set and controlled by a paramagnetic O2 analyzer and a 3-way solenoid valve. In this way either O2 or N2 may be provided to the system by way of negative O2 feedback. Relative humidity is maintained at 40-50 percent by a refrigeration type dryer. Carbon dioxide is absorbed by indicating soda lime. A diaphragm pump continuously circulates chamber gas at a high enough flow rate to prevent buildup of CO2 and humidity. This chamber has been used for numerous studies which involve prolonged exposure of small animals to various O2 concentrations.

  20. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  1. Rise of the main meniscus in rectangular capillaries: Experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pingkeng; Zhang, Hua; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh

    2016-01-01

    The rise of the main meniscus in rectangular capillaries is important in interpreting the phenomenon of fluid flow in porous media. Despite many experimental studies reported in the literature, there is no universal model for the rise of the main meniscus in either rectangular or square capillaries. In this work, we present an extensive experimental study and modeling of the rise of the main meniscus in both square and rectangular capillaries. Experimental work was carried out using three different liquids (water, ethanol, and hexadecane) in borosilicate glass and plastic (polystyrene) capillaries to investigate the effect of the contact angle and capillary size on the equilibrium main meniscus height. A universal model (an extended two-wall model) based on the Laplace equation was developed to predict the equilibrium height of the main meniscus in rectangular capillaries. Results have shown that, in a wide range of capillary sizes and contact angles, the predicted equilibrium heights of the main meniscus are in good agreement with the experimentally measured values. PMID:26402778

  2. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  3. Residual Stress Measurement Using Rectangular Spiral Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiyan; Plotnikov, Yuri

    2008-02-01

    Shot peening process provides compressive residual stress within a depth of about 150˜200 um from the surface. It has been demonstrated that multi-frequency eddy current measurement can be effectively used for the residual stress estimation on Ni-based superalloys. In order to measure the stress profile over the entire compressive zone, the probe needs to work in a wide frequency range from 0.1 MHz to above 50 MHz. Due to its wide bandwidth and high precision fabrication process, spiral coils fabricated on flexible substrate using photolithographic technology are good candidate for this task It is useful to develop a coil model in order to optimize coil design, minimize liftoff effect and maximize coil gauge factor. In this work, a 3D analytical model was used to simulate rectangular spiral coil response on a half-space conductor. The results were compared with commercial available 3D finite element software and experimental results. The analytical model was also used to simulate 4-point calibration process that was used to calculate apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC). The experimental setup was described and AECC profile was obtained for shot-peening samples with different peening intensity and different heat treatment.

  4. Perceptual guidelines for creating rectangular treemaps.

    PubMed

    Kong, Nicholas; Heer, Jeffrey; Agrawala, Maneesh

    2010-01-01

    Treemaps are space-filling visualizations that make efficient use of limited display space to depict large amounts of hierarchical data. Creating perceptually effective treemaps requires carefully managing a number of design parameters including the aspect ratio and luminance of rectangles. Moreover, treemaps encode values using area, which has been found to be less accurate than judgments of other visual encodings, such as length. We conduct a series of controlled experiments aimed at producing a set of design guidelines for creating effective rectangular treemaps. We find no evidence that luminance affects area judgments, but observe that aspect ratio does have an effect. Specifically, we find that the accuracy of area comparisons suffers when the compared rectangles have extreme aspect ratios or when both are squares. Contrary to common assumptions, the optimal distribution of rectangle aspect ratios within a treemap should include non-squares, but should avoid extremes. We then compare treemaps with hierarchical bar chart displays to identify the data densities at which length-encoded bar charts become less effective than area-encoded treemaps. We report the transition points at which treemaps exhibit judgment accuracy on par with bar charts for both leaf and non-leaf tree nodes. We also find that even at relatively low data densities treemaps result in faster comparisons than bar charts. Based on these results, we present a set of guidelines for the effective use of treemaps and suggest alternate approaches for treemap layout. PMID:20975136

  5. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  6. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  7. NOVEL CHAMBER DESIGN FOR AN IN-VACUUM CRYO-COOLED MINI-GAP UNDULATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HU, J.-P.; FOERSTER, C.L.; SKARITKA, J.R.; WATERMAN, D.

    2006-05-24

    A stainless steel, Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) chamber, featuring a large vertical rectangular port (53''W by 16''H), has been fabricated to house the one-meter magnet assembly of a newly installed undulator insertion device for beamline X-25 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. To achieve UHV, the new chamber is equipped with a differential ion pump, NEG pump, nude ion gauge, residual gas analyzer, and an all metal roughing valve. Temperature of the magnet assembly is maintained below 90 C during vacuum bake. The large rectangular port cover is sealed to the main flange of the chamber using a one-piece flat aluminum gasket and special sealing surfaces developed exclusively by Nor-Cal Products, Inc. The large flange provides easy access to the gap of the installed magnet girders for in situ magnetic measurements and shimming. Special window ports were designed into the cover and chamber for manipulation of optical micrometers external to the chamber to provide precise measurements of the in-vacuum magnet gap. The vacuum chamber assembly features independently vacuum-isolated feedthroughs that can be used for either water-or-cryogenic refrigeration-cooling of the monolithic magnet girders. This would allow for cryogenic-cooled permanent magnet operation and has been successfully tested within temperature range of +100 C to -150 C. Details of the undulator assembly for beamline X-25 is described in the paper.

  8. Quantifying Contaminant Mass for the Feasibility Study of the DuPont Chambers Works FUSRAP Site - 13510

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Carl; Rahman, Mahmudur; Johnson, Ann; Owe, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) - Philadelphia District is conducting an environmental restoration at the DuPont Chambers Works in Deepwater, New Jersey under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Discrete locations are contaminated with natural uranium, thorium-230 and radium-226. The USACE is proposing a preferred remedial alternative consisting of excavation and offsite disposal to address soil contamination followed by monitored natural attenuation to address residual groundwater contamination. Methods were developed to quantify the error associated with contaminant volume estimates and use mass balance calculations of the uranium plume to estimate the removal efficiency of the proposed alternative. During the remedial investigation, the USACE collected approximately 500 soil samples at various depths. As the first step of contaminant mass estimation, soil analytical data was segmented into several depth intervals. Second, using contouring software, analytical data for each depth interval was contoured to determine lateral extent of contamination. Six different contouring algorithms were used to generate alternative interpretations of the lateral extent of the soil contamination. Finally, geographical information system software was used to produce a three dimensional model in order to present both lateral and vertical extent of the soil contamination and to estimate the volume of impacted soil for each depth interval. The average soil volume from all six contouring methods was used to determine the estimated volume of impacted soil. This method also allowed an estimate of a standard deviation of the waste volume estimate. It was determined that the margin of error for the method was plus or minus 17% of the waste volume, which is within the acceptable construction contingency for cost estimation. USACE collected approximately 190 groundwater samples from 40 monitor wells. It is expected that excavation and disposal of

  9. Kinetic smog-chamber studies on halogen activation from a simulated salt pan, using dry and wet NaCl/NaBr surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, Sergej; Balzer, Natalja; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Buxmann, Joelle; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Field experiments and laboratory studies have shown that atomic Br and Cl are released from sea-salt aerosol and saline soils. This halogen release is based on the uptake of gaseous HOX by aqueous, acidified salt surfaces. Br and Cl play an important role in atmospheric ozone depletion and the destruction of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) and HUmic LIke Substances (HULIS) may take part in these reaction cycles by halogenation and production of volatile organic halogen compounds. Aerosol smog-chamber facilities (coolable to -25°C) enable us to simulate the halogen release mechanism under arctic tropospheric conditions. Mechanistic and kinetic studies are carried out to investigate the influence of SOA and HULIS on halogen cycles and to determine halogenated gaseous and solid organic products. The present laboratory measurements study halogen activation from salt surfaces, which are similar to typical salt pan environments. In these experiments we placed different artificial salt mixtures with NaCl/NaBr ratios up to 300:1 on a Teflon pan located in a Teflon chamber with a volume of 3.5 m3. Under clean air conditions we inject ozone and a mixture of non-methane hydrocarbons with well-known reactivities against OH and Cl and irradiated the chamber with a solar simulator. Beside the usual observing instruments like an ozone monitor and a gas chromatograph we used Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in a White cell with a light path up to 320 m to observe various gas-phase species including BrO radicals. A dry air / dry salt pan environment showed no ozone depletion and no halogen activation. At relative humidity above 50%, a rapid ozone depletion (4.7 h half-life) was observed, which is much faster than for pure NaCl under the same conditions (77 h). Furthermore, the mixed salt was acidified with H2SO4 to a pH value of 4.3, no difference in ozone depletion and halogen activation was observed at this point. The DOAS

  10. A smog chamber study coupling a photoionization aerosol electron/ion spectrometer to VUV synchrotron radiation: organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosol analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza-Romero, María Teresa; Gaie-Levrel, Francois; Mahjoub, Ahmed; López-Arza, Vicente; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    A reaction chamber was coupled to a photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on an electron/ion coincidence scheme and applied for on-line analysis of organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosols using synchrotron tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons as the ionization source. In this proof of principle study, both aerosol and gas phase were detected simultaneously but could be differentiated. Present results and perspectives for improvement for this set-up are shown in the study of ozonolysis ([O3] = 0.13-3 ppm) of α-pinene (2-3 ppm), and the uptake of glyoxal upon ammonium sulphate. In this work the ozone concentration was monitored in real time, together with the particle size distributions and chemical composition, the latter taking advantage of the coincidence spectrometer and the tuneability of the synchrotron radiation as a soft VUV ionization source.

  11. The crop growth research chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenbach, Kimberly

    1993-01-01

    The Crop Growth Research Chamber (CGRC) has been defined by CELSS principle investigators and science advisory panels as a necessary ground-based tool in the development of a regenerative life support system. The focus of CGRC research will be on the biomass production component of the CELSS system. The ground-based Crop Growth Research Chamber is for the study of plant growth and development under stringently controlled environments isolated from the external environment. The chamber has importance in three areas of CELSS activities: (1) crop research; (2) system control and integration, and (3) flight hardware design and experimentation. The laboratory size of the CGRC will be small enough to allow duplication of the unit, the conducting of controlled experiments, and replication of experiments, but large enough to provide information representative of larger plant communities. Experiments will focus on plant growth in a wide variety of environments and the effects of those environments on plant production of food, water, oxygen, toxins, and microbes. To study these effects in a closed system, tight control of the environment is necessary.

  12. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams.

    PubMed

    Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; dos Santos, Gelson P; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of (60)Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams. PMID:22153889

  13. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  14. Choice chamber experiments to test the attraction of postflexion Rhabdosargus holubi larvae to water of estuarine and riverine origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Nicola C.; Cowley, Paul D.; Whitfield, Alan K.; Kaiser, Horst

    2008-03-01

    Although the recruitment of larvae and juveniles of marine fishes into estuaries has been well documented, little is known about the factors governing the immigration of estuary-associated marine fishes into estuaries. Fishes have a well-developed sense of smell and it has been suggested by several workers that olfactory cues of freshwater or estuarine origin serve as stimuli, attracting larvae and juveniles of estuary-associated species into estuaries. Attraction of postflexion Rhabdosargus holubi larvae to estuary and river water from the Kowie estuarine system, South Africa, was measured using a rectangular choice chamber. In experiments, conducted during peak recruitment periods, larvae selected estuary and river water with a significantly higher frequency than sea water. This study, the first to assess the possible role of olfaction in the recruitment process of an estuary-associated marine fish species, demonstrates that larvae are able to recognise water from different origins, probably based on odour.

  15. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EARTH MOUND. NOTE THE RECTANGULAR OPENINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EARTH MOUND. NOTE THE RECTANGULAR OPENINGS USED FOR OBSERVATION EQUIPMENT AND PERISCOPE TOPS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PIT IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Detail of ump that is attached to rectangular rearing tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of ump that is attached to rectangular rearing tanks (pair). Pump located on the north end of rearing tank. View to the northwest. - Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Hwy. 101, Orick, Humboldt County, CA

  18. A chamber study on the reactions of O3, NO, NO2 and selected VOCs with a photocatalytically active cementitious coating material.

    PubMed

    Mothes, F; Böge, O; Herrmann, H

    2016-08-01

    Chamber studies were performed to investigate the efficiency of a photocatalytically active cementitious coating material to depollute contaminated air. The results showed a photocatalytic effect on ozone (O3), proven by an increase of the geometric uptake coefficient from 5.2 × 10(-6) for the inactive to 7.7 × 10(-6) for the active material under irradiation. Measured first-order rate constants for nitrogen oxides (NOx) under irradiation are in the range of 2.6-5.9 × 10(-4) s(-1), which is significantly higher compared to the inactive material (7.3-9.7 × 10(-5) s(-1)) demonstrating the photocatalytic effect. However, no significant photocatalytic degradation was observed for the studied volatile organic compounds (VOCs) toluene and isoprene resulting in only an upper limit uptake coefficient of 5.0 × 10(-7) for both VOCs. In all experiments using the photocatalytically active material, a clear formation of small carbonyl (C1-C5) gas phase compounds was identified which is suggested to result from the photocatalytic degradation of organic additives. In contrast to the uptake observed for pure O3, during the experiments with NOx (≥50 % relative humidity), a clear photocatalytic formation of O3 was observed. For the material investigated, an empirically derived overall zero-order rate constant of k 0 (O3) ≈ 5 × 10(7) molecules cm(-3) s(-1) was determined. The results demonstrate the necessity of detailed studies of heterogeneous reactions on such surfaces under more complex simulated atmospheric conditions as enabled by simulation chambers. PMID:27102618

  19. Consensus dynamics on random rectangular graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Sheerin, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    A random rectangular graph (RRG) is a generalization of the random geometric graph (RGG) in which the nodes are embedded into a rectangle with side lengths a and b = 1 / a, instead of on a unit square [ 0 , 1 ] 2. Two nodes are then connected if and only if they are separated at a Euclidean distance smaller than or equal to a certain threshold radius r. When a = 1 the RRG is identical to the RGG. Here we apply the consensus dynamics model to the RRG. Our main result is a lower bound for the time of consensus, i.e., the time at which the network reaches a global consensus state. To prove this result we need first to find an upper bound for the algebraic connectivity of the RRG, i.e., the second smallest eigenvalue of the combinatorial Laplacian of the graph. This bound is based on a tight lower bound found for the graph diameter. Our results prove that as the rectangle in which the nodes are embedded becomes more elongated, the RRG becomes a 'large-world', i.e., the diameter grows to infinity, and a poorly-connected graph, i.e., the algebraic connectivity decays to zero. The main consequence of these findings is the proof that the time of consensus in RRGs grows to infinity as the rectangle becomes more elongated. In closing, consensus dynamics in RRGs strongly depend on the geometric characteristics of the embedding space, and reaching the consensus state becomes more difficult as the rectangle is more elongated.

  20. A cold-flow experimental and numerical study of fuel injector nozzle and combustor chamber dynamics with swirl and non-swirl flows

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, M.J.; Strab, D.L.; Richards, G.A.; Rogers, W.A.

    1998-07-01

    The US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) has developed a bench-scale atmospheric cold-flow rig to study the dynamic response of a premix fuel injector to pressure oscillations. A variable speed rotating disk was used to perturb the flow in the rig to simulate instability. fuel injector nozzles of different lengths, and with and without swirling flows were tested. This paper presents the preliminary results on the dynamic pressures and velocities at the nozzle and the chamber interface. Phase-averaged velocity and pressure measurements indicate frequency doubling in the nozzle under harmonic and sub-harmonic excitations. This frequency doubling is also observed in the numerical computation results.

  1. Study of radiation heat transfer and the temperature state in the combustion chambers of small-size gas-turbine engines (GTEs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukash, V. P.

    1993-03-01

    The experimental data on the radiation flux surface density distribution in the combusion chamber of a small-size gas-turbine engine are presented. Experiments are made at elevated pressures and temperatures of the stagnated flow at the chamber inlet. Satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  2. Experimental study of the vidicon system for information recording using the wide-gap spark chamber of gamma - telescope gamma-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akimov, V. V.; Bazer-Bashv, R.; Voronov, S. A.; Galper, A. M.; Gro, M.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Kerl, P.; Kozlov, V. D.; Koten, F.; Kretol, D.

    1979-01-01

    The development of the gamma ray telescope is investigated. The wide gap spark chambers, used to identify the gamma quanta and to determine the directions of their arrival, are examined. Two systems of information recording with the spark chambers photographic and vidicon system are compared.

  3. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  4. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  5. Combustor with fuel preparation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelina, Joseph (Inventor); Myers, Geoffrey D. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Ram (Inventor); Reynolds, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An annular combustor having fuel preparation chambers mounted in the dome of the combustor. The fuel preparation chamber comprises an annular wall extending axially from an inlet to an exit that defines a mixing chamber. Mounted to the inlet are an air swirler and a fuel atomizer. The air swirler provides swirled air to the mixing chamber while the atomizer provides a fuel spray. On the downstream side of the exit, the fuel preparation chamber has an inwardly extending conical wall that compresses the swirling mixture of fuel and air exiting the mixing chamber.

  6. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Chamber Characteristics Test

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andy; Park, Seongtae; Hahn, Changhie; Baldeloma, Edwin; Tran, Nam; McIntire, Austin; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab

    2011-01-11

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) have been used in many HEP experiments as tracking detectors. They are sensitive to X-rays which allows use beyond that of HEP. The UTA High Energy group has been working on using GEMs as the sensitive gap detector in a DHCAL for the ILC. The physics goals at the ILC put a stringent requirement on detector performance. Especially the precision required for jet mass and positions demands an unprecedented jet energy resolution to hadronic calorimeters. A solution to meet this requirement is using the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). In order for PFA to work well, high calorimeter granularity is necessary. Previous studies based on GEANT simulations using GEM DHCAL gave confidence on the performance of GEM in the sensitive gap in a sampling calorimeter and its use as a DHCAL in PFA. The UTA HEP team has built several GEM prototype chambers, including the current 30cm x 30cm chamber integrated with the SLAC-developed 64 channel kPiX analog readout chip. This chamber has been tested on the bench using radioactive sources and cosmic ray muons. In order to have fuller understanding of various chamber characteristics, the experiments plan to expose 1-3 GEM chambers of dimension 35cm x 35cm x 5cm with 1cm x 1cm pad granularity with 64 channel 2-D simultaneous readout using the kPiX chip. In this experiment the experiments pan to measure MiP signal height, chamber absolute efficiencies, chamber gain versus high voltage across the GEM gap, the uniformity of the chamber across the 8cm x 8cm area, cross talk and its distance dependence to the triggered pad, chamber rate capabilities, and the maximum pad occupancy rate.

  7. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumard, B.; Henderson, D. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Tang, X. D.

    2007-08-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. × 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  8. 50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ENCLOSURE (LOCATION III) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  9. 61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION PPP) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  10. 44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING DRAIN PIPE FROM SUMP - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  11. 41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER (LOCATION AAA) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  12. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  13. Three dimensional thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Brogren, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to analytically determine the cyclic thermomechanical behavior and fatigue life of three configurations of a Plug Nozzle Thrust Chamber. This thrust chamber is a test model which represents the current trend in nozzle design calling for high performance coupled with weight and volume limitations as well as extended life for reusability. The study involved the use of different materials and material combinations to evaluate their application to the problem of low-cycle fatigue in the thrust chamber. The thermal and structural analyses were carried out on a three-dimensional basis. Results are presented which show plots of continuous temperature histories and temperature distributions at selected times during the operating cycle of the thrust chamber. Computed structural data show critical regions for low-cycle fatigue and the histories of strain within the regions for each operation cycle.

  14. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  15. Cloud chamber visualization of primary cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, James A.

    2013-02-07

    From 1948 until 1963, cloud chambers were carried to the top of the atmosphere by balloons. From these flights, which were begun by Edward P. Ney at the University of Minnesota, came the following results: discovery of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, development of scintillation and cherenkov detectors, discovery of cosmic ray electrons, and studies of solar proton events. The history of that era is illustrated here by cloud chamber photographs of primary cosmic rays.

  16. Control Effect of a Large Geological Discontinuity on the Seismic Response and Stability of Underground Rock Caverns: A Case Study of the Baihetan #1 Surge Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhen; Sheng, Qian; Leng, Xianlun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the seismic stability of the #1 surge chamber of the Baihetan hydropower plant, which is influenced by a large dominating geological discontinuity [the interlayer shear weakness zone (ISWZ) C2)], is studied. An advanced, nonlinear, continuously yielding (CY) model was adopted to describe the complex mechanical properties of ISWZ C2. This model considers a power function type, normal stress dependent behavior and the progressive damage that occurred during shear tests. The applicability of the CY model is proved via a comparison with field test results and the theoretical solution. Verification work was conducted in 3DEC code to show that the 3DEC software is suitable for implementing this model. Three ground motion waveforms were utilized to conduct a seismic analysis of the #1 surge chamber after a special response spectrum matching process. The seismic analysis confirmed the control effect of ISWZ C2 on the seismic stability of the cavern. The majority of the cavern's seismic displacement consists of elastic body movement, while the plastic deformation is relatively limited. Further, most of the deformations were caused by the contact deformation of C2. For the contact deformation of C2, the magnitude of permanent shear deformation is larger than that of the normal deformation. The magnitude of permanent shear deformation is more notable along the strike direction of C2, and the permanent normal displacement n of C2 mainly occurs along the dip direction of C2. Finally, the seismic stability of the cavern is assessed via the overload method. The seismic safety factor of the cavern is approximately 2-3.

  17. Running a marathon from −45°C to +55°C in a climate chamber: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Kälin, Kaspar; Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Mydlak, Karsten; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background We describe a runner who completed a self-paced marathon (42.195 km) in a climate chamber with a temperature difference of 100°C, starting at an ambient temperature (Tambient) of −45°C and finishing at an Tambient of +55°C. Methods Tambient was set at −45°C at the start, and was steadily increased at a rate of 1°C at 4.5-minute intervals to +55°C. Before the start, after every 10.5 km, and at the end of the marathon, body mass, urine, and sweat production were measured and samples of venous blood and urine were collected. The runner’s temperature was recorded every 10 seconds at four sites, ie, the rectum for body core temperature (Tcore), and at the forehead, right wrist, and right ankle for surface temperatures (Tskin). Results The subject took 6.5 hours to complete the marathon, during which Tcore varied by 0.9°C (start 37.5°C, peak 38.4°C). The largest difference (∆) of Tskin was recorded at the ankle (∆16°C). The calculated amount of sweat produced increased by 888% from baseline. In the blood samples, myoglobin (+250%) showed the highest change. Of the pituitary hormones, somatotropic hormone (+391%) and prolactin (+221%) increased the most. Regarding fluid regulation hormones, renin (+1145%) and aldosterone (+313%) showed the greatest increase. Conclusion These results show that running a marathon in a climate chamber with a total ∆Tambient of 100°C is possible, and that the Tambient to Tcore relationship is maintained. These results may offer insight into regulatory mechanisms to avoid hypothermia and hyperthermia. The same study is to be performed using more subjects with the same characteristics to validate the present findings. PMID:24198596

  18. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  19. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  20. Advanced thrust chamber designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, F. J.; Leach, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    A regeneratively cooled thrust chamber has been designed and fabricated, consisting of an inner TD nickel liner which was spin formed, welded, and machined and an outer shell of electroformed nickel. Coolant channels were produced in the outer surface of the inner liner by the electric discharge machining process before electroforming the shell. Accessory manifolds and piping were attached by welding. Manufacturing processes employed are described.

  1. Digital optical spark chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, Paul; Tuska, Evelyn

    1989-01-01

    The authors constructed and tested a prototype digital readout system for optical spark chambers using a linear, solid-state charge-coupled-device detector array. Position resolution of 0.013 mm (sigma) over a 25-cm field of view has been demonstrated. It is concluded that this technique should permit the construction of economical, lightweight and low-power trajectory hodoscopes for use in cosmic-ray instrumentation on balloons and in spacecraft.

  2. Longitudinal impedance of a smooth toroidal chamber at low and intermediate frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, King-Yuen; Warnock, R.

    1989-03-01

    We evaluate the longitudinal coupling impedance of a toroidal chamber with rectangular cross section in the frequency domain below the synchronous resonant modes. With infinite wall conductivity the impedance is purely reactive and consists of a ''space charge'' term, proportional to ..gamma../sup /minus/2/, and a ''curvature'' term which survives at large ..gamma... The curvature term is well represented as a quadratic function of frequency. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  4. Corpectomy cage subsidence with rectangular versus round endcaps.

    PubMed

    Deukmedjian, Armen R; Manwaring, Jotham; Le, Tien V; Turner, Alexander W L; Uribe, Juan S

    2014-09-01

    Corpectomy cages with rectangular endcaps utilize the stronger peripheral part of the endplate, potentially decreasing subsidence risk. The authors evaluated cage subsidence during cyclic biomechanical testing, comparing rectangular versus round endcaps. Fourteen cadaveric spinal segments (T12-L2) were dissected and potted at T12 and L2, then assigned to a rectangular (n=7) or round (n=7) endcap group. An L1 corpectomy was performed and under uniform conditions a cage/plate construct was cyclically tested in a servo-hydraulic frame with increasing load magnitude. Testing was terminated if the test machine actuator displacement exceeded 6mm, or the specimen completed cyclic loading at 2400 N. Number of cycles, compressive force and force-cycles product at test completion were all greater in the rectangular endcap group compared with the round endcap group (cycles: 3027 versus 2092 cycles; force: 1943 N versus 1533 N; force-cycles product: 6162kN·cycles versus 3973 kN·cycles), however these differences were not statistically significant (p ⩾ 0.076). After normalizing for individual specimen bone mineral density, the same measures increased to a greater extent with the rectangular endcaps (cycles: 3014 versus 1855 cycles; force: 1944 N versus 1444 N; force-cycles product: 6040 kN·cycles versus 2980 kN·cycles), and all differences were significant (p⩽0.030). The rectangular endcap expandable corpectomy cage displayed increased resistance to subsidence over the round endcap cage under cyclic loading as demonstrated by the larger number of cycles, maximum load and force-cycles product at test completion. This suggests rectangular endcaps will be less susceptible to subsidence than the round endcap design. PMID:24831343

  5. Observation of LOX/Hydrogen Combustion Flame in a Rocket Chamber during Chugging Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masaki; Masuya, Goro

    To obtain concrete information on the mechanism of unstable combustion of liquid oxygen-hydrogen rocket engines, a rectangular rocket chamber with four glass windows was developed. The chamber was designed to simulate a 100-kN-sized cylindrical rocket chamber. Combustion tests were conducted at a chamber pressure of 1.7MPa. Combustion flames and oxygen jets were visualized with a high-speed video at a rate of 4,000 frame/s during low frequency unstable combustion. Oxygen jet images with a backlight, combustion flame and intensity of combustion flame were obtained. Stability analysis based on the double time lag model by Szuch was conducted to assist the understanding of the mechanism of unstable combustion.

  6. Secondary Electron Yield and Groove Chamber Tests in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Pivi, MTF; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Seeman, J.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2007-11-06

    Possible remedies for the electron cloud in positron damping ring (DR) of the International Linear Collider (ILC) includes thin-film coatings, surface conditioning, photon antechamber, clearing electrodes and chamber with grooves or slots [1]. We installed chambers in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) to monitor the secondary electron yield (SEY) of TiN, TiZrV (NEG) and technical accelerator materials under the effect of electron and photon conditioning in situ. We have also installed chambers with rectangular grooves in straight sections to test this possible mitigation technique. In this paper, we describe the ILC R&D ongoing effort at SLAC to reduce the electron cloud effect in the damping ring, the chambers installation in the PEP-II and latest results.

  7. A study of P wave charm mesons, a search for radially excited charm mesons and a study of microstrip gas chambers with polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Naresh Nandrumar

    Using approximately 4 × 106e +e- --> cc¯ events at √ s = 10.5GeVc2 obtained with the CLEO II.V detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated properties of the two narrow L = 1 charmed mesons, D 1(2420)0 and D*2 (2460)0. We observe and measure the mass and decay width of the two mesons in the charmed continuum by studying D +π- and D*+π - final states. We measure B(D*0 2-->D+p- )/B(D* 02-->D* +p-) = 2.94 +/- 0.40(stat.) +/- 0.44( sys.) +/- 0.25( B ). All these parameters have historically been poorly determined and our measurements have precisions which are better than the combined world average. We also search for the forbidden decay mode D 1 --> D+π- and find no evidence for this ( B ( D01 --> D+π-)/ B ( D01 --> D*+π-) <= 0.069 at 90% C.L.). Using approximately 107e+ e- --> cc¯ events at √s = 10.5GeV/c2 obtained with the CLEO II and CLEO II. V detectors we present our results for the search for a narrow radially excited charmed meson D*'+ . The DELPHI collaboration presented first evidence for a narrow radially excited charm meson in the summer of 1997 by comparing their D*'+ signal to their DJ0 production (s(e+e- -->Z--> D*'+)B(D *'+-->D*+ p+p- ))/ (s(e+e- --> Z-->DJ0)B (DJ0 -->D*+p- )) = 0.49 +/- 0.18(stat.) +/- 0.10( syst.). We find no evidence for a narrow D*'+ signal in the decay modes of D*'+-->D*+p -p+(s(e +e- -->D*'+) B(D*'+ -->D*+p+p -)/(s(e+e--->DJ0) B(DJ 0-->D*+p- )) <= 0.09 at 90% C.L.) and D*'+-->DJ 0p+(s(e +e- -->D*'+) B(D*'+ -->DJ0p +) /(s(e+e--->DJ 0)B(DJ 0-->D*+p- ) <= 0.053 at 90% C.L.). For the latter analysis we use data obtained with the CLEO II.V detector only. We presented preliminary results with the CLEO II data set at ICHEP'98. The upper limits presented above supersedes the previous results and is approximately 60% smaller. We report on the study of Microstrip Gas Chambers (MSGCs) with Polymer substrates. We discuss the applicability of these detectors to two dimensional imaging of photons (X- rays) and

  8. A Study of Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Huajie

    2014-11-01

    Robust results of WIMP direct detection experiments depend on rm understandings of nuclear recoils in the detector media. This thesis documents the most comprehensive study to date on nuclear recoils in liquid argon - a strong candidate for the next generation multi-ton scale WIMP detectors. This study investigates both the energy partition from nuclear recoil energy to secondary modes (scintillation and ionization) and the pulse shape characteristics of scintillation from nuclear recoils.

  9. Exploratory study of the effects of injection configurations and inlet flow conditions on the characteristics of flow in spherical chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.

    1972-01-01

    Flow visualization studies were conducted to evaluate techniques for injecting simulated-fuel and simulated-propellant gases into a spherical cavity for application to open-cycle gaseous-core nuclear rockets. Preliminary studies were conducted with six simulated-fuel injectors and eight simulated-propellant injection configurations. Additional tests were conducted with the best configuration to determine the effect of weight-flow ratio, gas density ratio, injector location, and flow distribution on the simulated-fuel containment characteristics.

  10. Silicon drift chamber studies for the RHIC STAR experiment. Progress report, June 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Humanic, T.J.

    1994-09-01

    In the last year, the OSU group has made progress in all three of the areas in which we have taken our main responsibility for the SVT: (A) design of STAR SDC prototypes, (B) detector testing and radiation damage studies and (C) Monte Carlo studies to determining the feasibility of using the SVT for boson interferometry measurements. These three areas will now be discussed in this report.

  11. The effect of riblets in rectangular duct flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Brian; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-02-01

    Much is known about the benefits of surface structures which mimic the riblets found on the skin of fast swimming sharks. Structures have been fabricated for study and application which replicate and improve upon the natural shape of the shark skin riblets, providing a maximum drag reduction of nearly 10% in external turbulent fluid flow. Mechanisms of fluid drag in turbulent flow and riblet-drag reduction theories from experiment and simulation are discussed. A brief review of riblet performance studies is given, and optimal riblet geometries are defined for external flow. A discussion of the structure of internal turbulent fluid flow is provided, and existing data for riblet drag reduction benefit is presented. A flow cell for studying riblet effects in internal rectangular duct flow is discussed, and data collected using several riblet surfaces fabricated for the flow cell is presented and analyzed. A discussion of the effects of the riblets on fluid flow is given, and conclusions are drawn about the possible benefits of riblets in internal fluid flow.

  12. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  13. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  14. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  15. Test Cases for a Rectangular Supercritical Wing Undergoing Pitching Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    Steady and unsteady measured pressures for a Rectangular Supercritical Wing (RSW) undergoing pitching oscillations have been presented. From the several hundred compiled data points, 27 static and 36 pitching oscillation cases have been proposed for computational Test Cases to illustrate the trends with Mach number, reduced frequency, and angle of attack. The wing was designed to be a simple configuration for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) comparisons. The wing had an unswept rectangular planform plus a tip of revolution, a panel aspect ratio of 2.0, a twelve per cent thick supercritical airfoil section, and no twist. The model was tested over a wide range of Mach numbers, from 0.27 to 0.90, corresponding to low subsonic flows up to strong transonic flows. The higher Mach numbers are well beyond the design Mach number such as might be required for flutter verification beyond cruise conditions. The pitching oscillations covered a broad range of reduced frequencies. Some early calculations for this wing are given for lifting pressure as calculated from a linear lifting surface program and from a transonic small perturbation program. The unsteady results were given primarily for a mild transonic condition at M = 0.70. For these cases the agreement with the data was only fair, possibly resulting from the omission of viscous effects. Supercritical airfoil sections are known to be sensitive to viscous effects (for example, one case cited). Calculations using a higher level code with the full potential equations have been presented for one of the same cases, and with the Euler equations. The agreement around the leading edge was improved, but overall the agreement was not completely satisfactory. Typically for low-aspect-ratio rectangular wings, transonic shock waves on the wing tend to sweep forward from root to tip such that there are strong three-dimensional effects. It might also be noted that for most of the test, the model was tested with free transition, but a

  16. Use of high-volume outdoor smog chamber photo-reactors for studying physical and chemical atmospheric aerosol formation and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter has a large impact on climate, biosphere behaviour and human health. Its study is complex because of large number of species are present at low concentrations and the continuous time evolution, being not easily separable from meteorology, and transport processes. Closed systems have been proposed by isolating specific reactions, pollutants or products and controlling the oxidizing environment. High volume simulation chambers, such as EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE), are an essential tool used to simulate atmospheric photochemical reactions. This communication describes the last results about the reactivity of prominent atmospheric pollutants and the subsequent particulate matter formation. Specific experiments focused on organic aerosols have been developed at the EUPHORE photo-reactor. The use of on-line instrumentation, supported by off-line techniques, has provided well-defined reaction profiles, physical properties, and up to 300 different species are determined in particulate matter. The application fields include the degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollutants, and pesticides under several atmospheric conditions, studying their contribution on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The studies performed at the EUPHORE have improved the mechanistic studies of atmospheric degradation processes and the knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particulate matter formed during these processes.

  17. Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal features of the liquid argon TPC are outlined and the status of development efforts, particularly at UCI, are discussed. Technical problems associated with liquid TPC's are: the liquid must be maintained at a high level of purity to enable long distance drifting of ionization electrons, and the signal size is small due to the absence of practical charge multiplication as found in gas chambers. These problems have been largely resolved in studies using small (1 to 100 l) detectors, thus allowing a realistic consideration of the physics potential of such devices.

  18. Evaluation of Treadmill Exercise in a Lower Body Negative Pressure Chamber as a Countermeasure for Weightlessness-Induced Bone Loss: a Bed Rest Study with Identical Twins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; Fesperman, J. Vernell; Calkins, D. S.; Bawa, Maneesh; Macias, Brandon R.; Meyer, R. Scott; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    Counteracting bone loss is required for future space exploration. We evaluated the ability of treadmill exercise in a LBNP chamber to counteract bone loss in a 30-day bed rest study. Eight pairs of identical twins were randomly assigned to sedentary control or exercise groups. Exercise within LBNP decreased the bone resorption caused by bed rest and may provide a countermeasure for spaceflight. INTRODUCTION: Bone loss is one of the greatest physiological challenges for extended-duration space missions. The ability of exercise to counteract weightlessness-induced bone loss has been studied extensively, but to date, it has proven ineffective. We evaluated the effectiveness of a combination of two countermeasures-treadmill exercise while inside a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) chamber-on bone loss during a 30-day bed rest study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight pairs of identical twins were randomized into sedentary (SED) or exercise/LBNP (EX/LBNP) groups. Blood and urine samples were collected before, several times during, and after the 30-day bed rest period. These samples were analyzed for markers of bone and calcium metabolism. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine statistical significance. Because identical twins were used, both time and group were treated as repeated variables. RESULTS: Markers of bone resorption were increased during bed rest in samples from sedentary subjects, including the collagen cross-links and serum and urinary calcium concentrations. For N-telopeptide and deoxypyridinoline, there were significant (p < 0.05) interactions between group (SED versus EX/LBNP) and phase of the study (sample collection point). Pyridinium cross-links were increased above pre-bed rest levels in both groups, but the EX/LBNP group had a smaller increase than the SED group. Markers of bone formation were unchanged by bed rest in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that this weight-bearing exercise combined with LBNP ameliorates some of the negative

  19. On the electromagnetic scattering from infinite rectangular conducting grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C.

    1985-01-01

    The study and development of two numerical techniques for the analysis of electromagnetic scattering from a rectangular wire mesh are described. Both techniques follow from one basic formulation and they are both solved in the spectral domain. These techniques were developed as a result of an investigation towards more efficient numerical computation for mesh scattering. These techniques are efficient for the following reasons: (a1) make use of the Fast Fourier Transform; (b2) they avoid any convolution problems by converting integrodifferential equations into algebraic equations; and (c3) they do not require inversions of any matrices. The first method, the SIT or Spectral Iteration Technique, is applied for regions where the spacing between wires is not less than two wavelengths. The second method, the SDCG or Spectral Domain Conjugate Gradient approach, can be used for any spacing between adjacent wires. A study of electromagnetic wave properties, such as reflection coefficient, induced currents and aperture fields, as functions of frequency, angle of incidence, polarization and thickness of wires is presented. Examples and comparisons or results with other methods are also included to support the validity of the new algorithms.

  20. Aeroacoustics of rectangular T-junctions subject to combined grazing and bias flows - An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Andreas; Karlsson, Mikael; Åbom, Mats

    2015-03-01

    Scattering matrices are determined experimentally and used to study the low-amplitude interaction, between the acoustic and the hydrodynamic fields in a T-junction of rectangular ducts. In particular, combinations of grazing and bias flows are investigated in the study. It is observed that for all flow combinations, waves incident on the junction at the downstream side only are attenuated, while waves incident at the other branches may be amplified or attenuated, depending on the Strouhal number. When bias in-flow is introduced to a grazing flow, there is first an increase and then a decrease in both amplification and attenuation, as the bias in-flow Mach number is increased. Comparing with T-junctions of circular ducts, the interaction is stronger for rectangular duct junctions.

  1. Multi-channel quantum dragons from rectangular nanotubes with even-odd structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkoom, Godfred; Novotny, Mark

    Recently, a large class of nanostructures called quantum dragons have been discovered theoretically. Quantum dragons are nanostuctures with correlated disorder but have an electron transmission probability  (E) =1 for all energies E when connected to idealized leads. Hence for a single channel, the electrical conductance for a two-probe measurement should give the quantum of conductance Go =2e2/h . The time independent Schrödinger equation for the single band tight binding model is solved exactly to obtain  (E) . We have generalized the matrix method and the mapping methods of in order to study multi-channel quantum dragons for rectangular nanotubes with even-odd structure. The studies may be relevant for experimental rectangular nanotubes, such as MgO, copper phthalocyanine or some types of graphyne.. Supported in part by NSF Grant DMR-1206233.

  2. Inelastic Stability Analysis Of Uniaxially Compressed Flat Rectangular Isotropic CCSS Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibearugbulem, O. M.; Eziefula, U. G.; Onwuka, D. O.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the inelastic stability of a thin flat rectangular isotropic plate subjected to uniform uniaxial compressive loads using Taylor-Maclaurin series formulated deflection function. The plate has clamped and simply supported edges in both characteristic directions (CCSS boundary conditions). The governing equation is derived using a deformation plasticity theory and a work principle. Values of the plate buckling coefficient are calculated for aspect ratios from 0.1 to 2.0 at intervals of 0.1. The results compared favourably with the elastic stability values and the percentage differences ranged from -0.353% to -7.427%. Therefore, the theoretical approach proposed in this study is recommended for the inelastic stability analysis of thin flat rectangular isotropic plates under uniform in-plane compression.

  3. The V-3 contamination test of the chamber A facility and a subsequent cryogenic/vacuum study of the V-3 test quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. W., Jr.; Tashbar, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    The areas of orbital and ground contamination of flight experiment hardware have been well established. This report relates directly to results of vacuum chamber testing for the ground evaluation of flight experiment hardware performance. First, the data obtained during the V-3 contamination testing in the Johnson Space Center's Chamber A space simulation test facility are presented. Second, during the V-3 contamination tests, the MSFC Space Sciences Laboratory's quartz crystal microbalance exhibited two periods of anomalous readings. Therefore, a subsequent small chamber tests was conducted in a controlled cryogenic/vacuum environment. The objective was to reproduce with known parameters the anomalous behavior patterns of the V-3 test data. Analyses of the anomalous readings are made on the basis of these tests. Additionally, as a by-product of the small chamber tests, calibration curves then existing for the quartz crystal microbalance were empirically extended, and certain data-formatting aids were documented.

  4. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Smith, Graham; Mahler, George J.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  5. The Automated Dynamic Directed Evolution Chamber: A Tool for Studying Extremophile-Environment Interactions in Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, N.; Grace, J. M.; Liang, J.; Owyang, S.; Storrs, A.; Zhou, J.; Rothschild, L. J.; Gentry, D.

    2014-12-01

    Life acclimated to harsh conditions is frequently difficult to study using normal lab techniques and conventional equipment. Simplified studies using in-lab 'simulated' extreme environments, such as UV bulbs or cold blocks, are manually intensive, error-prone, and lose many complexities of the microbe/environment interaction. We have built a prototype instrument to address this dilemma by allowing automated iterations of microbial cultures to be subject to combinations of modular environmental pressures such as heat, radiation, and chemical exposure. The presence of multiple sensors allows the state of the culture and internal environment to be continuously monitored and adjusted in response.Our first prototype showed successful iterations of microbial growth and thermal exposure. Our second prototype, presented here, performs an demonstration of repeated exposure of Escherichia coli to ultraviolet radiation, a well-established procedure. As the E. coli becomes more resistant to ultraviolet radiation, the device detects their increased survival and growth and increases the dosage accordingly. Calibration data for the instrument was generated by performing the same proof-of-concept exposure experiment, at a smaller scale, by hand. Current performance data indicates that our finalized instrument will have the ability to run hundreds of iterations with multiple selection pressures. The automated sensing and adaptive exposure that the device provides will inform the challenges of managing and culturing life tailored to uncommon environmental stresses. We have designed this device to be flexible, extensible, low-cost and easy to reproduce. We hope that it enter wide use as a tool for conducting scalable studies of the interaction between extremophiles and multiple environmental stresses, and potentially for generating artificial extremophiles as analogues for life we might find in extreme environments here on Earth or elsewhere.

  6. Pathway Study of Cl-cycle on Mars, Step-I & II: Oxychlorine Salts and Electrostatic Discharge Phenomenon in a Mars Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Wang, A.; Ling, Z.; Li, B.; Zhang, J.; Xu, W.

    2015-12-01

    The directly measured high ClO4-/Cl- ratio (4.3-8.75) at Phoenix site and the implied ClO4- existences at Curiosity and Viking sites reminded Mars science community on the importance of (1) the global distribution of ClO4-/Cl- ratio; (2) the mechanisms that are responsible for Cl- to ClOy- (y=1,2,3,4) transformation; and (3) the current and historical Cl- cycle on Mars. Our goal is to study electrostatic discharge (ESD) in a Mars Chamber, as one of the four proposed mechanisms for the formation of Martian perchlorate. ESD was anticipated during dust storm/devil on Mars. A model estimated that ESD generated oxidants can be 200 times of those produced by photochemistry. Our study is conducted in three steps. Firstly, oxychlorine salts, NaClOy, Mg(ClO4)2.xH2O (x=0,6), and Ca(ClO4)2.xH2O (x=0,4), were analyzed at ambient conditions using MIR, NIR (1.4-2.6 µm), Raman spectroscopy, and in a Mars Chamber using in-situ NIR and Raman spectroscopy. Our purpose is to understand their phase transition and spectral change at Mars pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions. We have found: (1) Under current surface/subsurface P-T conditions in mid-latitudes/equatorial regions on Mars, Mg(ClO4)2.6H2O and Ca(ClO4)2.4H2O are stable, while the hydration degree of NaClO4.H2O would increase at T<-30℃ and decrease in 5

  7. Homogenization of rectangular cross-section fibre-reinforced materials: bending-torsion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Jarroudi, Mustapha; Er-Riani, Mustapha

    2016-07-01

    We study the homogenization of an elastic material in contact with periodic parallel elastic rectangular cross-section fibres of higher rigidity. The interactions between the matrix and the fibres are described by a local adhesion contact law with interfacial adhesive stiffness parameter depending on the period. Assuming that the Lamé constants in the fibres and the stiffness parameter have appropriate orders of magnitude, we derive a class of energy functionals involving extension, flexure and torsion terms.

  8. Boiling Visualization and Critical Heat Flux Phenomena In Narrow Rectangular Gap

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Kim; Y. H. Kim; S. J. Kim; S. W. Noh; K. Y. Suh; J. Rempe; F. B. Cheung; S. B. Kim

    2004-12-01

    An experimental study was performed to investifate the pool boling critical hear flux (CHF) on one-dimensional inclined rectangular channels with narrow gaps by changing the orientation of a copper test heater assembly. In a pool of saturated water at atmospheric pressure, the test parameters include the gap sizes of 1,2,5, and 10 mm, andthe surface orientation angles from the downward facing position (180 degrees) to the vertical position (90 degress) respectively.

  9. Asymptotic modal analysis of a rectangular acoustic cavity and characterization of its intensification zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretti, Linda F.; Dowell, Earl H.

    1989-01-01

    Asymptotic modal analysis (AMA) is used to study a rectangular cavity with a flexible vibrating portion on one wall and five rigid walls. The agreement between mean square pressure levels of the cavity interior calculated from classical modal analysis and from the AMA method improved as the number of responding modes increased. It is shown that intensification effects were due to both the excitation location and the response location.

  10. The excitation and propagation of dimensionless magnetostatic waves and oscillations in rectangular YIG rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurilenko, B. E.

    1983-04-01

    The spectrum of bulk magnetostatic waves (BMW) and oscillations (BMO) is studied in a rectangular YIG rod during excitation by different antenna systems. Theoretical and experimental results show that, besides the modes whose wave numbers depend on the specimen size, it is possible to excite BMW and BMO modes with various wave field structures. Dependencies and expressions are obtained for these dimensionless modes and oscillations which describe the structure of the wave field both inside and outside the specimen.

  11. Investigation of the Rocket Induced Flow Field in a Rectangular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. Brian; Thames, Mignon; Parkinson, Doug; Gautney, Serena; Hawk, Clark

    1999-01-01

    Several tests were performed on a one-sixth scale Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine model at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The UAH RBCC facility consists of a rectangular duct with a vertical strut mounted in the center. The scaled strut consists of two supersonic rocket nozzles with an embedded vertical turbine between the rocket nozzles. The tests included mass flow, flow visualization and horizontal pressure traverses. The mass flow test indicated a c:hoked condition when the rocket chamber pressure is between 200 psi and 300 psi. The flow visualization tests narrowed the rocket chamber pressure range from, 250 psi to 300 psi. Also, from this t.est, an assumption of a minimum

  12. Wire chambers revisited.

    PubMed

    Ott, R J

    1993-04-01

    Detectors used for radioisotope imaging have, historically, been based on scintillating crystal/photomultiplier combinations in various forms. From the rectilinear scanner through to modern gamma cameras and positron cameras, the basic technology has remained much the same. Efforts to overcome the limitations of this form of technology have foundered on the inability to reproduce the required sensitivity, spatial resolution and sensitive area at acceptable cost. Multiwire proportional chambers (MWPCs) have long been used as position-sensitive charged particle detectors in nuclear and high-energy physics. MWPCs are large-area gas-filled ionisation chambers in which large arrays of fine wires are used to measure the position of ionisation produced in the gas by the passage of charged particles. The important properties of MWPCs are high-spatial-resolution, large-area, high-count-rate performance at low cost. For research applications, detectors several metres square have been built and small-area detectors have a charged particle resolution of 0.4 mm at a count rate of several million per second. Modification is required to MWPCs for nuclear medicine imaging. As gamma rays or X-rays cannot be detected directly, they must be converted into photo- or Compton scatter electrons. Photon-electron conversion requires the use of high atomic number materials in the body of the chamber. Pressurised xenon is the most useful form of "gas only" photon-electron convertor and has been used successfully in a gamma camera for the detection of gamma rays at energies below 100 keV. This camera has been developed specifically for high-count-rate first-pass cardiac imaging. This high-pressure xenon gas MWPC is the key to a highly competitive system which can outperform scintillator-based systems. The count rate performance is close to a million counts per second and the intrinsic spatial resolution is better than the best scintillator-based camera. The MWPC camera produces quantitative

  13. Investigation on temperature separation and flow behaviour in vortex chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Yuhi; Fukushima, Yusuke; Matsuo, Shigeru; Hashimoto, Tokitada; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-04-01

    In the previous researches, it is known that the swirl flow in circular pipe causes the temperature separation. Recently, it is shown that the temperature separation occurs in a vortex chamber when compressed air are pumped into this device from the periphery. Especially, in a cavity installed in the periphery of the chamber, the highest temperature was observed. Therefore, it is expected that this device can be used as a heat source in the engineering field. In recent researches, the mechanism of temperature separation in vortex chamber has been investigated by some researchers. However, there are few researches for the effect of diameter and volume of vortex chamber, height of central rod and position of cavity on the temperature separation. Further, no detailed physical explanation has been made for the temperature separation phenomena in the vortex chamber. In the present study, the effects of chamber configuration and position of the cavity on temperature separation in the vortex chamber were investigated experimentally.

  14. Review of wire chamber aging

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    1986-02-01

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Streamwise Vortex Formation Upstream of a Rectangular Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, T. Y.; Wei, T.

    2001-11-01

    High resolution DPIV measurements were made to examine the hydrodynamic stability of initially laminar flow passing through a sudden contraction. This motivation for this study was understanding the effects of nozzle geometry and turbulence on papermaking. Experiments were conducted with water using a simplified two-dimensional rectangular nozzle constructed to match the Reynolds number of industrial papermaking machines. The nozzle consisted of a 60 cm wide x 10 cm high channel whose downstream end could be blocked by as much as 50orthogonal planes at various positions upstream of the nozzle exit. The Reynolds number range, based on the jet height and the free stream velocity (1-2 m/s), was 10,000 to 100,000. An unsteady spanwise vortex 1.6 cm in diameter was found at the corner of the vertical solid wall and the top wall of the contraction. Further, unsteady streamwise vortices with 2 cm in diameter were identified both visually and by using spectrum analysis. These findings will be related to the streaks found in a sheet of paper.

  16. Visualization of Boiling Phenomena in Inclined Rectangular Gap

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe

    2005-05-01

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the pool boiling critical heat flux (CHF) in one-dimensional inclined rectangular channels by changing the orientation of a copper test heater assembly. In a pool of saturated water under the atmospheric pressure, the test parameters include the gap sizes of 1, 2, 5, and 10 mm, and the surface orientation angles from the downward-facing position (1800) to the vertical position (90º), respectively. Tests were conducted on the basis of the visualization of boiling phenomena in the narrowly confined channel and open periphery utilizing a high-speed digital camera. To prevent the heat loss from the water pool and copper test heater, a state-of-the-art vacuum pumping technique was introduced. It was observed that the CHF generally decreases as the surface inclination angle increases and as the gap size decreases. In the downward-facing position (180o), however, the vapor movement was enhanced by the gap structure, which produced the opposing result, say, the CHF increases as the gap size decreases. Phenomenological characteristics regarding the interfacial instability of vapor layer were addressed in terms of visualization approaching the CHF. It was found that there exists a transition angle, around which the CHF changes with a rapid slope.

  17. Capillary driven flow of polydimethylsiloxane in open rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Timothy W; Sarkar, Rohit; Eswarappa Prameela, Suhas; Izadi, Ehsan; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2016-06-29

    The flow of liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, Dow Corning Sylgard 184, 10 : 1 base to cross-linker ratio) in open, rectangular silicon microchannels, with and without a coating (100 nm) of poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene (PTFE), was studied. Photolithographic patterning and etching of silicon wafers was used to create microchannels with a range of widths (∼5-50 μm) and depths (5-20 μm). Experimental PDMS flow rates in both PTFE-coated and uncoated channels were compared to an analytical model based on the work of Lucas and Washburn. The experimental flow rates matched the predicted flow rates reasonably well when the channel aspect ratio (width to depth), p, was less than 2. For channels with p > 2, the observed flow rates progressively lagged model predictions with increasing p. The experimental data, including zero flow rates in certain high aspect ratio PTFE-coated channels, can largely be explained by changes in the front and upper meniscus morphology of the flow as the channel aspect ratio is varied. The results strongly suggest that meniscus morphology needs to be taken into account to accurately model capillary flow in microchannels, especially those with large aspect ratios. PMID:27301750

  18. Single-channel noise reduction using optimal rectangular filtering matrices.

    PubMed

    Long, Tao; Chen, Jingdong; Benesty, Jacob; Zhang, Zhenxi

    2013-02-01

    This paper studies the problem of single-channel noise reduction in the time domain and presents a block-based approach where a vector of the desired speech signal is recovered by filtering a frame of the noisy signal with a rectangular filtering matrix. With this formulation, the noise reduction problem becomes one of estimating an optimal filtering matrix. To achieve such estimation, a method is introduced to decompose a frame of the clean speech signal into two orthogonal components: One correlated and the other uncorrelated with the current desired speech vector to be estimated. Different optimization cost functions are then formulated from which non-causal optimal filtering matrices are derived. The relationships among these optimal filtering matrices are discussed. In comparison with the classical sample-based technique that uses only forward prediction, the block-based method presented in this paper exploits both the forward and backward prediction as well as the temporal interpolation and, therefore, can improve the noise reduction performance by fully taking advantage of the speech property of self correlation. There is also a side advantage of this block-based method as compared to the sample-based technique, i.e., it is computationally more efficient and, as a result, more suitable for practical implementation. PMID:23363124

  19. Deformation of rectangular thin glass plate coated with magnetostrictive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Yao, Youwei; Liu, Tianchen; Liu, Chian; Ulmer, M. P.; Cao, Jian

    2016-08-01

    As magnetic smart materials (MSMs), magnetostrictive materials have great potential to be selected as coating materials for lightweight x-ray telescope mirrors due to their capability to tune the mirror profile to the desired shape under a magnetic field. To realize this potential, it is necessary to study the deformation of the mirror substrate with the MSM coating subjected to a localized magnetic field. In this paper, an analytical model is developed to calculate the deformation of rectangular coated samples locally affected by magnetostrictive strains driven by an external magnetic field. As a specific case to validate the model, a square glass sample coated with MSMs is prepared, and its deformation is measured in a designed experimental setup by applying a magnetic field. The measured deformation of the sample is compared with the results calculated from the analytical model. The comparison results demonstrate that the analytical model is effective in calculating the deformation of a coated sample with the localized mismatch strains between the film and the substrate. In the experiments, different shape patterns of surface profile changes are achieved by varying the direction of the magnetic field. The analytical model and the experimental method proposed in this paper can be utilized to further guide the application of magnetostrictive coating to deformable lightweight x-ray mirrors in the future.

  20. On the structure of an underexpanded rectangular jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krothapalli, A.; Hsia, Y.; Baganoff, D.; Karamcheti, K.

    1982-07-01

    An underexpanded jet of air issuing from a converging rectangular nozzle of moderate aspect ratio was investigated. Schileren pictures of the flow field along with hot-wire measurements in the jet were obtained at different pressure ratios. At the pressure ratio corresponding to the maximum screeching sound, Schlieren photographs show a very strong organized cylindrical wave pattern on either side of the jet, with their respective sources being located at the end of the third shock cell. Associated with this wave pattern is a large increase in the angle of spread of the jet. It is shown that the self excitation helps to induce large-scale vortical motions in the jet both in the plane containing the small dimension of the nozzle and in the plane containing the long dimension of the nozzle. However, the locations of these structures are different in the two planes. Nevertheless, the characteristic Strouhal number corresponding to these large-scale structures in both planes is the same and equal to 0.12. The influence of the self excitation on the mean velocities and rms intensities was also investigated. For the full range of pressure ratios studied, similarity was found in the mean velocity and rms intensity profiles in the two central planes beyond 80 widths downstream of the nozzle exit. However, the shapes of the similarity profiles are different in the two planes.