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Sample records for rectus muscle surgery

  1. Surgery for complete vertical rectus paralysis combined with horizontal strabismus.

    PubMed

    Zou, Leilei; Liu, Rui; Liu, Yan; Lin, Jing; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To report outcomes of the simultaneous surgical correction of vertical rectus paralysis combined with moderate-to-large angle horizontal strabismus. Methods. If a preoperative forced duction test was positive, antagonist muscle weakening surgery was performed, and then augmented partial rectus muscle transposition (APRMT) + partial horizontal rectus recession-resection was performed 2 months later. If a preoperative forced duction test was negative, APRMT + partial horizontal rectus recession-resection was performed. Antagonistic muscle weakening surgery and/or conventional recession-resection of the horizontal and/or vertical muscles of the contralateral eye was performed 2 months later, as needed. Results. Ten patients with a mean age of 22.3 ± 13.0 years were included and mean follow-up was 7.1 months. The mean vertical deviation that APRMT corrected was 21.4 ± 3.7 PD (prism diopter). The absolute deviation in horizontal significantly decreased from a preoperative value of 48.5 ± 27.4 PD to a value of 3.0 ± 2.3 PD 6 months postoperatively. The movement score decreased from a value of -5 ± 0 preoperatively to a value of -2.7 ± 0.8 at 6 months postoperatively. Conclusion. For patients with complete vertical rectus paralysis combined with a moderate- to-large angle of horizontal strabismus, combined APRMT and partial horizontal rectus recession-resection is safe and effective for correcting vertical and horizontal strabismus. PMID:24883204

  2. Traumatic transection of the lateral rectus muscle with chorioretinitis sclopetaria.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Kelly; Verity, David; Ali, Nadeem

    2015-03-01

    A man, aged 67 years, sustained monocular trauma to the left eye while gardening, presenting with light perception, complete absence of abduction, and chorioretinitis sclopetaria. At surgery, the lateral rectus was found to be transected at the equator of the globe, with an area of locally abraded sclera. A few posterior muscle fibers were identified and sutured to the residual anterior fibers. With a partial improvement of the esodeviation, after a further 6 months he proceeded to lateral transposition of the superior and inferior recti to healthy sclera 4?mm from the limbus, with adjunctive medial rectus botulinum toxin. Six months later, the angle of primary deviation remained stable at 4 prism diopters base out with improved abduction. Vision in the eye remained reduced at 20/200 (with eccentric fixation) due to macular changes secondary to the sclopetaria. In conclusion, this case describes a rare example of complete traumatic transection of the lateral rectus with chorioretinitis sclopetaria, due to orbital injury. With appropriate surgery, the angle of deviation can be considerably improved despite complete muscle transection and scleral injury. PMID:25790075

  3. Iatrogenic Injury to Medial Rectus After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bipasha; Priyadarshini, Omega; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Agarkar, Sumita

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is the mainstay of the treatment in sinus disorders, to re-establish the drainage of the affected sinus. The close proximity of the orbital structures to paranasal sinuses makes them vulnerable to inadvertent injury during the sinus surgery. Medial rectus (MR) muscle is the most commonly injured extraocular muscle during ESS due to its anatomic proximity to the thin medial wall of the orbit. This is a non-comparative, retrospective, interventional case series of six patients presenting with MR injury after ESS. We discuss the management, outcome and review the published literature. A total of six patients met the inclusion criteria. The presenting complaints were diplopia, squinting and limitation of ocular movements. Two patients underwent surgical exploration of the MR muscle and reattachment of the muscle along with injection botulinum to the antagonist lateral rectus muscle. Two patients who had small angle strabismus and who were able to fuse were advised orthoptic exercises and prisms as management. Remaining two patients were advised surgical intervention to correct strabismus but they declined further surgical intervention. Management of MR injury following ESS is complex, often resulting in suboptimal outcomes. Since early intervention is associated with better outcomes, early referral by otolaryngologists to ophthalmologists would result in better outcome. PMID:26693458

  4. Medial rectus muscle anchoring in complete oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyung; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-10-01

    The management of exotropia resulting from complete oculomotor nerve palsy is challenging. Conventional therapeutic interventions, including supramaximal resection and recession, superior oblique tendon resection and transposition, and several ocular anchoring procedures have yielded less-than-adequate results. Here we describe a novel surgical technique of anchoring the medial rectus muscle to the medial orbital wall in combination with lateral rectus disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall. PMID:26486032

  5. Function of transected or avulsed rectus muscles following recovery using an anterior orbitotomy approach

    PubMed Central

    Pineles, Stacy L.; Laursen, Jessica; Goldberg, Robert A.; Demer, Joseph L.; Velez, Federico G.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the function of muscles retrieved from a retrobulbar location using an anterior orbitotomy approach and to identify the prognostic factors favoring a good outcome. METHODS The records of all patients undergoing anterior orbitotomy for the retrieval of a transected or avulsed muscle in a retrobulbar location were reviewed. Ocular motility, before and after retrieval (with ductions scaled from ?4 to +4), was evaluated. RESULTS Record review identified 11 patients who had suffered trauma to 12 muscles (5 inferior, 6 medial, and 1 lateral rectus muscle). Ductions improved from ?4 ± 0.4 preoperatively to ?2.7 ± 0.9 postoperatively (P = 0.002); mean primary position deviation improved from 34? ± 14?-15? ± 9? (P < 0.001), and mean deviation in the field of action improved from 47? ± 20?-20? ± 22? (P = 0.02). Ductions improved by at least two units in three patients, all of whom had medial rectus trauma. Single binocular vision in primary gaze was achieved in 6 patients. Patients with medial rectus muscle injury and patients injured by sinus surgery had the lowest likelihood of recovering single binocular vision. CONCLUSIONS Our results are similar to historical series in which muscles were not retrieved and transpositions performed; however, muscle retrieval avoids risks associated with transposition surgeries such as anterior segment ischemia. Muscle recovery via the anterior orbitotomy approach may be reasonable to consider in those cases with a reasonable possibility of having active force generation postoperatively. PMID:22835914

  6. Rectus femoris transfer surgery affects balance recovery in children with cerebral palsy: A computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Misagh; Clark, Ashley E; Seth, Ajay; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Stiff-knee gait is a troublesome movement disorder among children with cerebral palsy (CP), where peak swing phase knee flexion is diminished due to over-activity of the rectus femoris muscle. A common treatment for stiff-knee gait, rectus femoris transfer surgery, moves the muscle's distal tendon from the patella to the sartorius insertion on the tibia. As a biarticular muscle, rectus femoris may play a role in motor control and have unrecognized benefits for maintaining balance. We used musculoskeletal modeling, neuromuscular control, and forward dynamic simulation to investigate the role of rectus femoris tendon transfer surgery on balance recovery after support-surface perturbations for children with CP adopting two different crouched postures. We combined both high-level supraspinal and low-level spinal signals to generate 92 muscle excitations for tracking experimental whole body center of mass positions and velocities. Stability during balance recovery was evaluated by the minimum distance between the extrapolated center of mass and base of support boundary (bmin) and the minimum time to reach the boundary (TtBmin). The balance recovery of pre-surgical simulations (bmin=2.3+1.1cm, TtBmin=0.2+0.1s) were different (p=0.02), on average, than post-surgical simulations (bmin=-4.9+11.4cm, TtBmin=-0.1+0.3s) of rectus femoris transfers. The moderate crouch simulations (bmin=2.4+0.4cm, TtBmin=0.2+0.03s) were more stable than the mild crouch simulations (bmin=1.2+0.3cm, TtBmin=0.1+0.02s) following anterior translations of the support surface. These findings suggest that tendon transfer of rectus femoris affects balance recovery in children with CP. PMID:26669947

  7. Lateral rectus muscle injury, orbital fracture, mouth locking, and facial palsy resulting from reduction malarplasty.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun

    2011-01-01

    I report here on a patient with serious complications (lateral rectus muscle injury, orbital fracture, mouth locking, and facial palsy) that were caused by reduction malarplasty. A 32-year-old woman was referred to our department with complaints of inability to move her right eyeball laterally and inability to open her mouth. She has undergone reduction malarplasty 30 days previously at a local clinic. On examination, her maximal mouth opening was less than 3 mm. Her upper lip deviated to the left side when whistling. The orbit was displaced laterally and inferiorly. The upward and lateral gaze were limited. Computed tomography revealed fracture of the right orbital floor and lateral orbital wall extending to the orbital roof. The right lateral rectus muscle showed disconnection. The osteotomized segments were displaced inferiorly, and they pressed on the masseter muscle and coronoid process on the left side. On the 43rd postoperative day, a revision operation for the zygoma and orbit was carried out. Four days after the revision operation, surgery was performed for the myorrhaphy of the lateral rectus muscle and transposition of the medial rectus muscle. This case suggests the possibility of orbital fracture that can occur as a result of sawing in the wrong direction when using the intraoral approach. Although orbital fracture is extremely rare, it is hoped that this case will heighten the awareness of surgeons for this potential orbital fracture. PMID:21187757

  8. Horizontal Rectus Muscle Anatomy in Naturally and Artificially Strabismic Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Anita; Tychsen, Lawrence; Poukens, Vadims; Demer, Joseph L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Structural abnormalities of extraocular muscles (EOMs) or their pulleys are associated with some forms of human strabismus. This experiment was conducted to investigate whether such abnormalities are associated with artificial or naturally occurring strabismus in monkeys. Methods Binocular alignment and grating visual acuities were determined in 10 monkeys representing various species using search coil recording and direct observations. Four animals were orthotropic, two had naturally occurring “A”-pattern esotropia, two had concomitant and one had “V”-pattern esotropia artificially induced by alternating or unilateral occlusion in infancy, and one had “A”-pattern exotropia artificially induced by prism wear. After euthanasia, 16 orbits were examined by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the quasicoronal plane. Paths and sizes of horizontal rectus EOMs were analyzed quantitatively in a standardized coordinate system. Whole orbits were then serially sectioned en bloc in the quasicoronal plane, stained for connective tissue, and compared with MRI. Nerve and EOM features were analyzed quantitatively. Results Quantitative analysis of MRI revealed no significant differences in horizontal rectus EOM sizes or paths among orthotropic or naturally or artificially strabismic monkeys. Histologic examination demonstrated no differences in EOM size, structure, or innervation among the three groups, and no differences in connective tissues in the pulley system. The accessory lateral rectus (ALR) EOM was present in all specimens, but was small, inconsistently located, and sparsely innervated. Characteristics of the ALR did not correlate with strabismus. Conclusions Major structural abnormalities of horizontal rectus EOMs and associated pulleys are unrelated to natural or artificial horizontal strabismus in the monkeys studied. The ALR is unlikely to contribute to horizontal strabismus in primates. However, these findings do not exclude a possible role of pulley abnormalities in disorders such as cyclovertical strabismus. PMID:17525187

  9. Variation in Tendinous Intersections of Rectus Abdominis Muscle in North Indian Population with Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mahboobul; Gupta, Amrita; Nasar, Areeba

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study Incisions through the abdominal wall are based on anatomical principles and Rectus abdominis muscle provides an excellent myocutaneous flap. The present work was proposed to identify variations in numbers and location of tendinous intersections of the Rectus Abdominis muscle in the cadavers as a guide to the surgical procedures. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 54 cadavers of North Indian origin allotted to undergraduate medical student for Anatomy dissection classes. Manual dissection was done to identify tendinous intersections of the Rectus Abdominis muscle with reference to number and location. Results In the present study one cadaver had five tendinous intersections (1.85%), one cadaver had four tendinous intersections (1.85%) and 52 cadavers had three tendinous intersections (96.29%). Conclusion The present study is an effort to provide data about the anatomical variation in numbers and location of tendinous intersections of the Rectus Abdomini muscles. Rectus abdominis muscle provides an excellent myocutaneous flap because the muscle belly is separated from surrounding tissue within the rectus sheath. This study is representative of a small study of the human population and only serves to illustrate the variations in the anatomy of the tendinous intersections. More extensive studies are required to establish a definitive pattern among local populations to serve as a guide for surgical procedures. PMID:26266107

  10. Giant pseudocyst of the rectus femoris muscle--repetitive strain injury in recreational soccer player.

    PubMed

    Cicvari?, Tedi; Lucin, Ksenija; Roth, Sandor; Ivanci?, Aldo; Marinovi?, Marin; Santi?, Veljko

    2010-04-01

    We report a case of a traumatic pseudocyst, in a recreational soccer player, after rupture of rectus femoris muscle. 37-year-old male, with history of repetitive painful accidents, was examined because of a double fist-sized mass in the anterior thigh. Ultrasound examination revealed a cystic mass in the rectus femoris muscle. Surgical removal of the mass and proximal remnant of muscle was done. Primary healing and functional recovery was achieved. Histological analysis revealed pseudocyst filled with degenerating clot and surrounded with thick fibrous capsule. The repetitive strain muscle injury, with prolonged period of healing, can occur like pseudocyst. PMID:21302702

  11. Rectus abdominis muscle injuries in elite handball players: management and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Balius, Ramon; Pedret, Carles; Pacheco, Laura; Gutierrez, Josep Antoni; Vives, Joan; Escoda, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    Muscle injuries generally occur in two-joint muscles with a high percentage of type II fibers during the performance of eccentric activity. Some muscle injuries, such as those located in the adductor longus, a monoarticular muscle, as well as rectus abdominis do not fully comply with these requirements. This study examines five cases of elite handball players with ruptured rectus abdominals. Sonographically, lesions in rectus abdominis are shown as a disruption of the fibrillar pattern with a hematic suffusion that invades the entire lesion. In some of the cases, the ultrasound study was complemented with a MRI. A unified rehabilitation protocol was applied and the return to play time of each handball player ranged between 16 and 22 days, with an average of 18.2 days. Follow-up at 15 months showed no evidence of re-injury or residual discomfort and all of them are playing at their highest level. The aim of this study was to illustrate a feature of handball injury that, as in tennis and volleyball, is uncommon and so far has not been specifically reported. The phenomenon of contralateral abdominal hypertrophy in handball appears in the dominant arm as in tennis and volleyball. PMID:24198573

  12. Rectus abdominis muscle injuries in elite handball players: management and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Balius, Ramon; Pedret, Carles; Pacheco, Laura; Gutierrez, Josep Antoni; Vives, Joan; Escoda, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    Muscle injuries generally occur in two-joint muscles with a high percentage of type II fibers during the performance of eccentric activity. Some muscle injuries, such as those located in the adductor longus, a monoarticular muscle, as well as rectus abdominis do not fully comply with these requirements. This study examines five cases of elite handball players with ruptured rectus abdominals. Sonographically, lesions in rectus abdominis are shown as a disruption of the fibrillar pattern with a hematic suffusion that invades the entire lesion. In some of the cases, the ultrasound study was complemented with a MRI. A unified rehabilitation protocol was applied and the return to play time of each handball player ranged between 16 and 22 days, with an average of 18.2 days. Follow-up at 15 months showed no evidence of re-injury or residual discomfort and all of them are playing at their highest level. The aim of this study was to illustrate a feature of handball injury that, as in tennis and volleyball, is uncommon and so far has not been specifically reported. The phenomenon of contralateral abdominal hypertrophy in handball appears in the dominant arm as in tennis and volleyball. PMID:24198573

  13. The structure of the external rectus eye muscles of the carpet shark Cephaloscyllium isabella.

    PubMed Central

    Housley, G D; Montgomery, J C

    1984-01-01

    The external rectus muscles of the carpet shark Cephaloscyllium isabella contain two types of muscle fibre. A core of large white fibres which have regular myofibrils with extensive sarcoplasmic reticulum, triads located at the Z disc and a pronounced H band and M line. Mitochondria are frequent but tend to be smaller and less abundant than mitochondria of the smaller red fibre type. The red fibres which surround the central region are rich in mitochondria, have little sarcoplasmic reticulum and triads which are infrequent and dispersed. Sarcomere banding of red fibres is characterised by a faint H band and M line while the Z disc is thick in comparison with that found on the white muscle fibre sarcomere. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6746403

  14. Surgical effects of nasal transposition of inferior rectus muscle - 135 cases of acquired superior oblique palsy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Mana; Kimura, Akiko; Masuda, Akiko; Mimura, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Nasal transposition of the inferior rectus (IR) muscle, which is transposed nasally with the insertion parallel to the spiral of Tillaux, could correct excyclotropia. However, as far as we are aware, there have been no reports examining the surgical effects of this procedure in multiple cases. Therefore, we examined the surgical effects of IR nasal transposition in 135 cases with acquired trochlear nerve palsy at Hyogo College of Medicine Hospital, Nishinomiya, Japan. One muscle width of IR nasal transposition corrected an average 5.6° in excyclotorsion, while bilateral IR nasal transposition corrected average 10.9°. This result shows this procedure is accurate quantitatively. Moreover, IR nasal transposition in combination with IR recession or resection can correct vertical deviation and excyclotorsion simultaneously. The results of this study suggest that IR nasal transposition should become first-line treatment for acquired superior oblique palsy. PMID:25945030

  15. Using the traditional model to evaluate the active force of the human lateral rectus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, ZhiPeng; Chen, WeiYi; Jing, Lin; Feng, PengFei; Wu, XiaoGang; Guo, HongMei

    2014-05-01

    The information on the force of extraocular muscles (EOMs) is beneficial for strabismus diagnosis and surgical planning, and a direct and simple method is important for surgeons to obtain these forces. Based on the traditional model, a numerical simulation method was proposed to achieve this aim, and then the active force of the lateral rectus (LR) muscle was successfully simulated when the eye rotated every angle from 0° to 30° in the horizontal plane from the nasal to the temporal side. In order to verify these simulations, the results were compared with the previous experimental data. The comparison shows that the simulation results diverged much more than the experimental data in the range of 0°-10°. The errors were corrected to make the simulation results closer to the experimental data. Finally, a general empirical equation was proposed to evaluate the active force of the LR muscle by fitting these data, which represent the relationship between the simulation forces and the contractive amounts of the LR muscle.

  16. Rectus and oblique muscles of eyeball: a morphometric study of Indian population.

    PubMed

    Athavale, Sunita; Kotgirwar, Sheetal; Lalwani, Rekha

    2015-09-01

    During the strengthening and weakening procedures of intraocular muscles, distance of insertion from the sclerocorneal junction is an important determinant in the identification of muscles. During repositioning of the aponeurosis of the muscles, it is desired that the width should not change in order to avoid diversion of forces. Available anatomic studies on insertions of extraocular muscles are few, date back to early twentieth century and have been conducted on mostly white population. The present study is an attempt to document the insertions of recti and oblique muscles in Indian population. Forty eyeballs were removed from orbit. Insertion of recti and obliqui were cleaned and eyeballs were perfused with normal saline to regain the volume (hence shape and size) before recording observations. Insertion of recti and obliqui muscles were observed under various study parameters. The distance of insertion of recti from the limbus were found to be 7.3 mm, 8.06 mm, 8.71 mm, and 8.74 mm for medial, inferior, lateral, and superior rectus, respectively. The superior oblique was aponeurotic and found to be more variable in mode of insertion as compared to inferior oblique which had a fleshy and relatively constant insertion. The observations on insertion of recti and obliqui as obtained in present study differ from earlier studies to the tune of 1-1.5 mm. This may be attributed to adoption of method of reperfusion of eyeball before recording observations thus maintaining size close to in vivo. The observations are expected to be closer to actual. PMID:26417480

  17. Rectus and oblique muscles of eyeball: a morphometric study of Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Kotgirwar, Sheetal; Lalwani, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    During the strengthening and weakening procedures of intraocular muscles, distance of insertion from the sclerocorneal junction is an important determinant in the identification of muscles. During repositioning of the aponeurosis of the muscles, it is desired that the width should not change in order to avoid diversion of forces. Available anatomic studies on insertions of extraocular muscles are few, date back to early twentieth century and have been conducted on mostly white population. The present study is an attempt to document the insertions of recti and oblique muscles in Indian population. Forty eyeballs were removed from orbit. Insertion of recti and obliqui were cleaned and eyeballs were perfused with normal saline to regain the volume (hence shape and size) before recording observations. Insertion of recti and obliqui muscles were observed under various study parameters. The distance of insertion of recti from the limbus were found to be 7.3 mm, 8.06 mm, 8.71 mm, and 8.74 mm for medial, inferior, lateral, and superior rectus, respectively. The superior oblique was aponeurotic and found to be more variable in mode of insertion as compared to inferior oblique which had a fleshy and relatively constant insertion. The observations on insertion of recti and obliqui as obtained in present study differ from earlier studies to the tune of 1-1.5 mm. This may be attributed to adoption of method of reperfusion of eyeball before recording observations thus maintaining size close to in vivo. The observations are expected to be closer to actual. PMID:26417480

  18. Ischemic complications in pedicle, free, and muscle sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Andrades, Patricio; Fix, R Jobe; Danilla, Stefan; Howell, Robert E; Campbell, William J; De la Torre, Jorge; Vasconez, Luis O

    2008-05-01

    Muscle sparing and perforator flaps techniques for breast reconstruction have focused in reducing the donor site morbidity. Theoretically this may result in a less robust blood supply to the flap. The purpose of this study was to assess flap ischemic complications with the pedicle, free, and the different muscle sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAMs) flaps for breast reconstruction and determine the factors associated with these complications. A total of 301 consecutive patients that underwent 399 breast reconstructions were retrospectively reviewed. Patient, oncologic, and reconstruction data were recorded. A flap ischemic complication scale was design including: wound healing problems, skin flap necrosis, fat necrosis, partial flap loss, and total flap loss. Analysis of donor site complications, bilateral and unilateral reconstructions were also performed. There were 147 pedicle TRAM and 154 free TRAM with the following subgroup distribution: MS-0 = 102; MS-1 = 37; and MS-2 = 15 patients. The groups were comparable in relation to age, comorbidities, cancer stage, and treatment. The overall complication rate after reconstruction had no statistical differences between the groups. The variables related to flap ischemia were statistically lower in the free TRAM. Mild and severe fat necrosis were the indicators with a statistical difference. The MS-0 group had lower ischemic complications and fat necrosis than the pedicled group, but no differences were observed for the MS-1 and MS-2 groups. The same results were seen in the unilateral reconstructions but not in the bilateral ones. No differences in donor site bulging or hernia were observed between the groups. In our study, the free TRAM flap demonstrated lower ischemic complications than the pedicle TRAM. A trend for decreased flap blood supply when more muscle is preserved and less number of perforators are used with a constant tissue volume was observed. PMID:18434832

  19. Consecutive exotropia: why does it happen, and can medial rectus advancement correct it?

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Bhambi Gesite-de; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether consecutive exotropia following medial rectus muscle recession is associated with muscle slippage and to assess the effectiveness of treating the condition with medial rectus advancement. Methods The records of patients with consecutive exotropia after medial rectus recession were reviewed to determine medial rectus muscle insertion location at the time of advancement surgery. Measurements before and after medial rectus advancement were compared. Success was defined as alignment within 10? of orthotropia. The dose effect of medial rectus advancement was determined by nonlinear regression. Results A total of 20 patients were included. The mean age (± standard deviation) at time of surgery was 19 ± 19 years (range, 1.1–65.4). The mean preoperative exotropia was 28? ± 16? (range, 12?–60?). Medial rectus slippage of 2.5 ± 1.7 mm (range, 1.0–5.0 mm) was found in 14 patients (36%) who had previously undergone medial rectus recession. Surgery corrected about 4? of exotropia per mm total medial rectus advancement. Although 95% of patients were aligned successfully immediately after surgery, averaging 2? ± 4? esotropia, there was significant late exodrift, averaging 17? at final follow-up. At final follow-up, 1.6 ± 1.8 (range, 0.10–6.2) years after surgery, 50% of patients maintained alignment within 10? of orthotropia (mean, 3? ± 4? exotropia); the rest experienced recurrent exotropia of 25? ± 8?. Conclusions Medial rectus slippage is common in consecutive exotropia. Medial rectus advancement effectively treated consecutive exotropia, whether or not there was muscle slippage. It is however, associated with late exodrift; hence patients should be warned about potential for further XT recurrence. PMID:25454022

  20. Predicting outcomes of rectus femoris transfer surgery Jeffrey A. Reinbolt a,

    E-print Network

    Delp, Scott

    is one of the most common gait abnormalities in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy [1]. Stiff knee with cerebral palsy following a variety of surgical treatments. Goldberg et al. [18] used statistical analysis Keywords: Predicting outcomes Rectus femoris transfer Stiff knee gait Cerebral palsy Gait analysis A B

  1. Enthesitis of the direct tendon of the rectus femoris muscle in a professional volleyball player: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, C; Coscia, D R; Ferrozzi, G

    2011-06-01

    Enthesitis of the direct tendon of the rectus femoris muscle is a rare pathology which mainly affects professional athletes, and it is caused by overuse and repetitive microtrauma. Athletic jumping and kicking exert a great stress on the direct tendon of the rectus femoris muscle, and volleyball and football players are therefore most frequently affected. Enthesitis may occur suddenly causing pain and functional impairment possibly associated with partial or complete tendon injuries, or it may be a chronic condition causing non-specific clinical symptoms.We present the case of a professional volleyball player who felt a sudden pain in the left side of the groin area during a training session although she had suffered no accidental injury. The pain was associated with impaired ipsilateral limb function. Tendon rupture was suspected, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. MRI showed a lesion at the myotendinous junction associated with marked inhomogeneity of the direct tendon. Ultrasound (US) examination confirmed the presence of both lesions and allowed a more detailed study of the pathology.This is a typical case of enthesitis which confirms that MRI should be considered the examination of choice in hip pain, particularly when the patient is a professional athlete, thanks to its panoramic visualization. However, also US is an ideal imaging technique for evaluating tendon injuries thanks to its high spatial resolution, and it can therefore be used effectively as a second line of investigation. PMID:23396666

  2. Predictors of the Dose-Effect Relationship regarding Unilateral Inferior Rectus Muscle Recession in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate whether inferior rectus muscle (IRM) thickness, the degree of adipose change in the IRM, smoking status, and the previous history of orbital radiotherapy can predict the dose-effect relationship regarding unilateral IRM recession in thyroid eye disease (TED). Methods. Twenty-five patients were retrospectively reviewed. We calculated the largest IRM cross-sectional area and evaluated the degree of adipose change in the IRM using magnetic resonance imaging. The degree of adipose change and smoking status were classified using grading scales (0–3); previous orbital radiotherapy was graded as 0 when a history was not available and 1 when it was available. The correlation between the dose-effect relationship and the hypothesized predictive factors was evaluated using stepwise multiple regression analysis. Results. The multiple regression model, with the exception of the history of the previous orbital radiotherapy, estimated a significant dose-effect relationship for the parameters evaluated (YDOSE-EFFECT = 0.013XIRM?AREA??? 0.222XADIPOSE??? 0.102XSMOKING + 1.694; r = 0.668; adjusted r2 = 0.367; P = 0.005). Conclusions. The dose-effect relationship regarding unilateral IRM recession in TED could be predicted using IRM thickness, degree of intramuscular adipose change, and smoking status but could not be predicted using the previous orbital radiotherapy history. PMID:26221140

  3. Predictors of the Dose-Effect Relationship regarding Unilateral Inferior Rectus Muscle Recession in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate whether inferior rectus muscle (IRM) thickness, the degree of adipose change in the IRM, smoking status, and the previous history of orbital radiotherapy can predict the dose-effect relationship regarding unilateral IRM recession in thyroid eye disease (TED). Methods. Twenty-five patients were retrospectively reviewed. We calculated the largest IRM cross-sectional area and evaluated the degree of adipose change in the IRM using magnetic resonance imaging. The degree of adipose change and smoking status were classified using grading scales (0-3); previous orbital radiotherapy was graded as 0 when a history was not available and 1 when it was available. The correlation between the dose-effect relationship and the hypothesized predictive factors was evaluated using stepwise multiple regression analysis. Results. The multiple regression model, with the exception of the history of the previous orbital radiotherapy, estimated a significant dose-effect relationship for the parameters evaluated (Y DOSE-EFFECT = 0.013X IRM?AREA??- 0.222X ADIPOSE??- 0.102X SMOKING + 1.694; r = 0.668; adjusted r (2) = 0.367; P = 0.005). Conclusions. The dose-effect relationship regarding unilateral IRM recession in TED could be predicted using IRM thickness, degree of intramuscular adipose change, and smoking status but could not be predicted using the previous orbital radiotherapy history. PMID:26221140

  4. Rectus Femoris Tendon Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zini, Raul; Panascì, Manlio; Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since it was developed, hip arthroscopy has become the favored treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. Due to recent considerable improvements, the indications for this technique have been widely extended. Injuries of the rectus femoris tendon origin, after an acute phase, could result in a chronic tendinopathy with calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition, leading to pain and loss of function. Traditionally, this condition is addressed by local injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids or, when conservative measures fail, by open excision of the calcific lesion by an anterior approach. Purpose: To assess whether arthroscopic excision of calcification of the proximal rectus is a safe and effective treatment. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Outcomes were studied from 6 top amateur athletes (age range, 30-43 years; mean, 32.6 years) affected by calcification of the proximal rectus who underwent arthroscopic excision of the calcification. Patients were preoperatively assessed radiographically, and diagnosis was confirmed by a 3-dimensional computed tomography scan. To evaluate the outcome, standardized hip rating scores were used pre- and postoperatively (at 6 and 12 months): the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Oxford Hip Score, and Modified Harris Hip Score. Moreover, visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, sport activity level (SAL), and activities of daily living (ADL) were also used. Results: One year after surgery, all patients reported satisfactory outcomes, with 3 of 6 rating their return-to-sport level as high as preinjury level, and the remaining 3 with a percentage higher than 80%. Five patients ranked their ability to carry on daily activities at 100%. Statistical analysis showed significant improvement of the Oxford Hip Score, the Modified Harris Hip Score, and all 3 VAS subscales (pain, SAL, and ADL) from pre- to latest postoperative assessment (P < .05). Conclusion: Arthroscopic excision of rectus femoris tendon calcification yields satisfying results with few risks to the patient as well as rapid recovery. Clinical Relevance: The recent improvements in hip arthroscopy give the opportunity to address an increasing number of hip conditions effectively and safely, with rapid recovery for the patient. Arthroscopic excision of rectus femoris tendon calcification can be considered a feasible option, with few risks to the patient, rapid recovery, and satisfying outcomes. PMID:26535288

  5. The Role of Thyroid Eye Disease and Other Factors in the Overcorrection of Hypotropia Following Unilateral Adjustable Suture Recession of the Inferior Rectus (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Natalie C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Overcorrection of hypotropia subsequent to adjustable suture surgery following inferior rectus recession is undesirable, often resulting in persistent diplopia and reoperation. I hypothesized that overcorrection shift after suture adjustment may be unique to thyroid eye disease, and the use of a nonabsorbable suture may reduce the occurrence of overcorrection. Methods A retrospective chart review of adult patients who had undergone eye muscle surgery with an adjustable suture technique was performed. Overcorrection shifts that occurred between the time of suture adjustment and 2 months postoperatively were examined. Descriptive statistics, linear regression, Anderson-Darling tests, generalized Pareto distributions, odds ratios, and Fisher tests were performed for two overcorrection shift thresholds (>2 and >5 prism diopters [PD]). Results Seventy-seven patients were found: 34 had thyroid eye disease and inferior rectus recession, 30 had no thyroid eye disease and inferior rectus recession, and 13 patients had thyroid eye disease and medial rectus recession. Eighteen cases exceeded the 2 PD threshold, and 12 exceeded the 5 PD threshold. Statistical analyses indicated that overcorrection was associated with thyroid eye disease (P=6.7E-06), inferior rectus surgery (P=6.7E-06), and absorbable sutures (>2 PD: OR=3.7, 95% CI=0.4–35.0, P=0.19; and >5 PD: OR=6.0, 95% CI=1.1–33.5, P=0.041). Conclusions After unilateral muscle recession for hypotropia, overcorrection shifts are associated with thyroid eye disease, surgery of the inferior rectus, and use of absorbable sutures. Surgeons performing unilateral inferior rectus recession on adjustable suture in the setting of thyroid eye disease should consider using a nonabsorbable suture to reduce the incidence of postoperative overcorrection. PMID:22253487

  6. Changes in the Range of Motion of the Hip Joint and the Muscle Activity of the Rectus Femoris and Biceps Femoris of Stroke Patients during Obstacles Crossing on the Ground and Underwater

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-chul; Han, Seul-ki; Kim, Seung-kyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine range of motion (ROM) and the muscle activity of stroke patients during obstacle task on the ground and underwater. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were seven stroke patients in a hospital located in Daejeon, South Korea. [Methods] The measurements in this study were conducted in an exercise therapy room and a pool dedicated to underwater exercise (water temperature 33.5?°C, air temperature 27?°C) in the hospital building. The pool’s water depth was determined by considering the levels of the xiphoid process of the study subjects. Ten-centimeter-high obstacles were used. An electrogoniometer was used to examine the ROM of flexion and extension of the hip joints on the affected side. An MP150 system a BioNomadix 2-channel wireless EMG transmitter was used to examine the muscle activity of the rectus femoris and biceps femoris of the affected side. [Conclusion] The results suggest that the unaffected side was supported, that the affected side moved, and that the hip joint was bent more underwater than on the ground. The rectus femoris and bicpes femoris were activated significantly less underwater than on the ground in all sections. PMID:25202169

  7. Precaruncular periosteal anchor of medial rectus, a new technique in the management of complete external third nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Rohit; Sinha, Ankur; Sharma, Pradeep; Pathak, Harish; Menon, Vimla; Sethi, Harinder

    2006-09-01

    Management of complete external third nerve palsy is a challenge to a strabismologist; as four of six extra-ocular muscles are affected, it leaves eye in fixed hypotropic and exotropic position (Srivastava et al., 2004). Although numerous surgical procedures have been described, none has been found to be ideal for all cases. Horizontal supramaximal recession-resection procedure may work in cases having some function of medial rectus (Harley, 1980). In cases of complete external palsy, anchoring of globe to periosteum of medial orbital wall using different structures has been described (Villasenor Solares et al., 2000; Bicas, 1991; Salazar-Leon et al., 1998), as recession-resection may result in large residual deviation and/or eye drifts back to abducted position due to unopposed lateral rectus action (Von Noorder, 1996). These anchoring procedures are with associated problems of skin incision, thigh surgery or loss of superior oblique function (Villasenor Solares et al., 2000; Bicas, 1991; Salazar-Leon et al., 1998). We describe a new and safe technique for management of complete external third nerve palsy by anchoring insertion of medial rectus to medial wall periosteum, posterior to posterior lacrimal crest, along with supra maximal recession of lateral rectus. PMID:16987767

  8. Predictive Factors Affecting the Short Term and Long Term Exodrift in Patients with Intermittent Exotropia after Bilateral Rectus Muscle Recession and Its Effect on Surgical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Jason C. S.; Chong, Gabriela S. L.; Wu, Patrick K. W.; Wong, Ursula S. F.; Chan, Clement W. N.; Ko, Simon T. C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the predictive factors that affect short term and long term postoperative drift in intermittent exotropia after bilateral lateral rectus recession and to evaluate its effect on surgical outcome. Methods. Retrospective review of 203 patients with diagnosis of intermittent exotropia, who had surgical corrections with more than 3 years of followup. Different preoperative parameters were obtained and evaluated using Pearson's correlation analysis. Results. The proportion of exodrift increased from 62% at 6 weeks to 84% at 3 years postoperatively. The postoperative drift was 4.3 ± 8.1?PD at 6 weeks, 5.8 ± 8.4?PD at 6 months, 7.2 ± 8.3?PD at 1 year, 7.4 ± 8.4?PD at 2 years, and 7.7 ± 8.5?PD at 3 years. Preoperative deviation and initial overcorrection were significant factors affecting the postoperative drift at 3 years (r = 0.177, P = 0.011, r = ?0.349, and P < 0.001, resp.). Conclusions. Postoperative exodrift along three years occurs in a majority of patients after bilateral lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia. The long term surgical success is significantly affected by this postoperative exodrift. A larger preoperative deviation and a larger initial overcorrection are associated with a larger early and late postoperative exodrift. PMID:25093170

  9. Unilateral superior rectus recession for the treatment of dissociated vertical deviation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, T; Scott, W

    1991-01-01

    The management of dissociated vertical deviation (DVD) is an unsettled issue. Several authors have advocated bilateral superior rectus recession for all patients with DVD unless a dense amblyopia is present in the nonfixating eye. Our experience suggested that DVD was being successfully treated with unilateral bilateral superior rectus recession. We reviewed the charts of 57 patients who underwent graded unilateral superior rectus recession and 10 patients who had bilateral superior rectus recession for the treatment of DVD. DVD, a manifest deviation, was considered as distinct from occlusion hyperphoria, a latent deviation present only under cover. Of the patients who underwent unilateral superior rectus recession, only six developed a significant (14 prism diopters or more) DVD in the unoperated eye. The presence of any DVD in the unoperated eye appeared to be predictive of an unacceptable postoperative deviation (15 times greater chance, P less than .001). Patients with an occlusion hyperphoria in the unoperated eye showed no increased propensity to develop a significant DVD following surgery. The results of bilateral surgery were disappointing. Eight of ten patients had residual DVD in one or both eyes of 10 delta or greater. Our results suggest that unilateral surgery is an effective treatment of DVD in patients with a manifest deviation in only one eye. Although neither unilateral nor bilateral surgery was entirely satisfactory for the treatment of bilateral DVD, we recommend bilateral superior rectus recession for these patients. PMID:1919970

  10. Artificial muscles for a novel simulator in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Hollensteiner, Marianne; Fuerst, David; Schrempf, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are commonly used minimally invasive methods to treat vertebral compression fractures. Novice surgeons gather surgical skills in different ways, mainly by "learning by doing" or training on models, specimens or simulators. Currently, a new training modality, an augmented reality simulator for minimally invasive spine surgeries, is going to be developed. An important step in investigating this simulator is the accurate establishment of artificial tissues. Especially vertebrae and muscles, reproducing a comparable haptical feedback during tool insertion, are necessary. Two artificial tissues were developed to imitate natural muscle tissue. The axial insertion force was used as validation parameter. It appropriates the mechanical properties of artificial and natural muscles. Validation was performed on insertion measurement data from fifteen artificial muscle tissues compared to human muscles measurement data. Based on the resulting forces during needle insertion into human muscles, a suitable material composition for manufacturing artificial muscles was found. PMID:25570007

  11. Muscle Union Procedure in Patients with Paralytic Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Ah; Lyu, Injeong; Yoon, Jungmin; Jeong, Unchang; Oh, Jae-Eung; Lim, Han Woong; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2015-01-01

    To present the surgical outcomes of a muscle union procedure in patients with paralytic strabismus, this retrospective study included 27 patients with paralytic strabismus who underwent a muscle union procedure. In this procedure, the two vertical rectus muscles are united with the paralytic horizontal muscle without splitting the muscles. Postoperative ocular deviations, complications, surgical success rates, and reoperation rates were obtained by examining the medical records of the patients. Seventeen patients had a sixth cranial nerve palsy, seven patients had a third cranial nerve palsy, and three patients had a medial rectus muscle palsy after endoscopic sinus surgery. The mean preoperative angle of horizontal deviation in the primary position was 56 ± 21 prism diopters. The mean follow-up period was 12 ± 9 months. The mean final postoperative ocular deviation was 8 ± 13 prism diopters. The success rate was 74%, and the reoperation rate was 0%. No significant complications, including anterior ischemia, occurred in any of the patients. One patient exhibited an increase in intraocular pressure in the immediate postoperative period, but this resolved spontaneously within 1 week. Our muscle union procedure was effective in patients with paralytic strabismus, especially in patients with a large angle of deviation. This muscle union procedure is potentially a suitable option for muscle transposition in patients with paralytic strabismus who have large-angle deviation or a significant residual angle after conventional surgery. PMID:26070148

  12. Decellularized Human Skeletal Muscle as Biologic Scaffold for Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Porzionato, Andrea; Sfriso, Maria Martina; Pontini, Alex; Macchi, Veronica; Petrelli, Lucia; Pavan, Piero G.; Natali, Arturo N.; Bassetto, Franco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Engineered skeletal muscle tissues have been proposed as potential solutions for volumetric muscle losses, and biologic scaffolds have been obtained by decellularization of animal skeletal muscles. The aim of the present work was to analyse the characteristics of a biologic scaffold obtained by decellularization of human skeletal muscles (also through comparison with rats and rabbits) and to evaluate its integration capability in a rabbit model with an abdominal wall defect. Rat, rabbit and human muscle samples were alternatively decellularized with two protocols: n.1, involving sodium deoxycholate and DNase I; n.2, trypsin-EDTA and Triton X-NH4OH. Protocol 2 proved more effective, removing all cellular material and maintaining the three-dimensional networks of collagen and elastic fibers. Ultrastructural analyses with transmission and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the preservation of collagen, elastic fibres, glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans. Implantation of human scaffolds in rabbits gave good results in terms of integration, although recellularization by muscle cells was not completely achieved. In conclusion, human skeletal muscles may be effectively decellularized to obtain scaffolds preserving the architecture of the extracellular matrix and showing mechanical properties suitable for implantation/integration. Further analyses will be necessary to verify the suitability of these scaffolds for in vitro recolonization by autologous cells before in vivo implantation. PMID:26140375

  13. Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Intervention in Extremity Fracture Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Qin; Deng, Yun-Long; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Richmond, Christopher J; Tang, Ying; Zhou, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of progressive muscle relaxation on state anxiety and self-efficacy in hospitalized patients admitted for an extremity fracture receiving elective surgery. Eighty four patients met the inclusion criteria and all were randomly assigned to either the progressive muscle relaxation group or the control group. The control group received standard orthopedic nursing care, and the experimental group received standard care along with daily progressive muscle relaxation throughout their hospitalization. The State Anxiety Inventory and Self-Efficacy Scales were administered before and after the intervention. Both paired-sample t tests and independent t tests showed that progressive muscle relaxation is effective in reducing state anxiety and enhancing the self-efficacy of patients with extremity fracture undergoing an elective surgery. PMID:25248661

  14. Clinical study of the Pronator Quadratus muscle: anatomical features and feasibility of Pronator-Sparing Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background No clinical data for the relationship of pronator quadratus (PQ) muscle to distal radius had been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical features of the PQ muscle related to plate osteosynthesis for distal radius fractures in clinical cases. The feasibility of PQ muscle sparing surgery was investigated as well. Methods Fifty two distal radius fractures (23-A2) were enclosed in this study. The whole width of the muscle and the distance from the distal edge of the muscle to the joint surface of the distal radius were measured. The distance from the fracture site of the radius to the joint surface was measured as well. Results The average width of the pronator quadratus muscle was 37.6 mm. The average distance from the pronator quadratus muscle to the lunate fossa surface was 12.2 mm, and the average distance from the pronator quadratus muscle to the scaphoid fossa surface was 13.6 mm. The average distance from the lunate fossa of the distal radius to the fracture site was 12.2 mm (range, 7.3-17 mm), and the scaphoid fossa of the distal radius to the fracture site was 13.2 mm (range, 9.4-18.8 mm). Conclusions This PQ muscle sparing surgery is feasible and can be performed without difficulty. The data might provide a useful basis for the preservation of pronator quadratus muscle applied to a functionally reduced fracture regarding the potential efficacy of conventional volar plate osteosynthesis. PMID:24762047

  15. Simultaneous Prosthetic Mesh Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Abdominoplasty for Ventral Hernia and Severe Rectus Diastasis Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Standard abdominoplasty rectus plication techniques may not suffice for severe cases of rectus diastasis. In the authors’ experience, prosthetic mesh facilitates the repair of severe rectus diastasis with or without concomitant ventral hernias. Methods: A retrospective review of all abdominal wall surgery patients treated in the past 8 years by the senior author (G.A.D.) was performed. Patients with abdominoplasty and either rectus diastasis repair with mesh or a combined ventral hernia repair were analyzed. Results: Thirty-two patients, 29 women and three men, underwent mesh-reinforced midline repair with horizontal or vertical abdominoplasty. Patient characteristics included the following: mean age, 53 years; mean body mass index, 26 kg/m2; average width of diastasis or hernia, 6.7 cm; and average surgery time, 151 minutes. There were no surgical-site infections and two surgical-site occurrences—two seromas treated with drainage in the office. After an average of 471 days’ follow-up, none of the patients had recurrence of a bulge or a hernia. Conclusions: For patients with significant rectus diastasis, with or without concomitant hernias, the described mesh repair is both safe and durable. Although this operation requires additional dissection and placement of prosthetic mesh in the retrorectus plane, it may be safely combined with standard horizontal or vertical abdominoplasty skin excision techniques to provide an aesthetically pleasing overall result. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, IV. PMID:25539311

  16. Laparoscopic surgery and muscle relaxants: is deep block helpful?

    PubMed

    Kopman, Aaron F; Naguib, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that providing deep neuromuscular block (a posttetanic count of 1 or more, but a train-of-four [TOF] count of zero) when compared with moderate block (TOF counts of 1-3) for laparoscopic surgery would allow for the use of lower inflation pressures while optimizing surgical space and enhancing patient safety. We conducted a literature search on 6 different medical databases using 3 search strategies in each database in an attempt to find data substantiating this proposition. In addition, we studied the reference lists of the articles retrieved in the search and of other relevant articles known to the authors. There is some evidence that maintaining low inflation pressures during intra-abdominal laparoscopic surgery may reduce postoperative pain. Unfortunately most of the studies that come to these conclusions give few if any details as to the anesthetic protocol or the management of neuromuscular block. Performing laparoscopic surgery under low versus standard pressure pneumoperitoneum is associated with no difference in outcome with respect to surgical morbidity, conversion to open cholecystectomy, hemodynamic effects, length of hospital stay, or patient satisfaction. There is a limit to what deep neuromuscular block can achieve. Attempts to perform laparoscopic cholecystectomy at an inflation pressure of 8 mm Hg are associated with a 40% failure rate even at posttetanic counts of 1 or less. Well-designed studies that ask the question "is deep block superior to moderate block vis-à-vis surgical operating conditions" are essentially nonexistent. Without exception, all the peer-reviewed studies we uncovered which state that they investigated this issue have such serious flaws in their protocols that the authors' conclusions are suspect. However, there is evidence that abdominal compliance was not increased by a significant amount when deep block was established when compared with moderate neuromuscular block. Maintenance of deep block for the duration of the pneumoperitoneum presents a problem for clinicians who do not have access to sugammadex. Reversal of block with neostigmine at a time when no response to TOF stimulation can be elicited is slow and incomplete and increases the potential for postoperative residual neuromuscular block. The obligatory addition of sugammadex to any anesthetic protocol based on the continuous maintenance of deep block is not without associated caveats. First, monitoring of neuromuscular function is still essential and second, antagonism of deep block necessitates doses of sugammadex of ?4.0 mg/kg. Thus, maintenance of deep block has substantial economic repercussions. There are little objective data to support the proposition that deep neuromuscular block (when compared with less intense block; TOF counts of 1-3) contributes to better patient outcome or improves surgical operating conditions. PMID:25625254

  17. Evaluation of peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Kelli Maria Souza; de Cerqueira Neto, Manoel Luiz; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; de Santana Filho, Valter Joviniano; da Silva Junior, Walderi Monteiro; Araújo Filho, Amaro Afrânio; Cerqueira, Telma Cristina Fontes; Cacau, Lucas de Assis Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral muscle strength has been little explored in the literature in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. Objective To evaluate the peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods This was a longitudinal observational study. The peripheral muscle strength was measured using isometric dynamometry lower limb (knee extensors and flexors) at three different times: preoperatively (M1), the day of discharge (M2) and hospital discharge (M3). Participants received physiotherapy pre and postoperatively during the days of hospitalization during the morning and afternoon. Results Twenty-two patients were evaluated. The values of peripheral muscle strength of knee extensors preoperative found were about 50% lower than those predicted for the healthy population. When comparing muscle strength prior (M1), with the remaining evaluation, found himself in a fall of 29% for the movement of knee extension and 25% for knee flexion in M2 and a decrease of 10% movement for knee extension and 13% for knee flexion in M3 when comparing with M1. Conclusion The values of peripheral muscle strength prior of the study patients were lower than predicted for the healthy population of the same age. After the surgical event this reduction is even more remarkable, being reestablished until the time of discharge, to values close to baseline. PMID:25372909

  18. Blunt transection of rectus abdominis following seatbelt related trauma with associated small and large bowel injury?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K.; Doolin, R.; Suggett, N.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Closed rupture of rectus abdominis following seatbelt related trauma is rare. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a 45 year old female who presented with closed rupture of the rectus abdominis in conjunction with damage to small bowel mesentery and infarction of small and large bowel following a high velocity road traffic accident. Multiple intestinal resections were required resulting in short bowel syndrome and abdominal wall reconstruction with a porcine collagen mesh. Post-operative complications included intra-abdominal sepsis and an enterocutaneous fistula. DISCUSSION The presence of rupture of rectus abdominis muscle secondary to seatbelt injury should raise the suspicion of intra-abdominal injury. CONCLUSION Our case highlights the need for suspicion, investigation and subsequent surgical management of intra-abdominal injury following identification of this rare consequence of seatbelt trauma. PMID:24055917

  19. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  20. Masticatory performance, muscle activity, and occlusal force in preorthognathic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Tate, G S; Throckmorton, G S; Ellis, E; Sinn, D P

    1994-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated that patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery tend to have lower maximum bite forces and exert lower forces during mastication. The effect of these deficits on masticatory performance have not been previously assessed. Masticatory performance was analyzed in four groups: male and female orthognathic surgery patients prior to presurgical orthodontics (n = 12 and 23), and male and female controls (n = 27 and 31). Mastication performance was analyzed by having the subjects chew 5-g pieces of carrot for 20 cycles and measuring the resulting median particle size with a standard sieve method. Masticatory performance showed the same trends as maximum bite force and masticatory forces: male controls had the best and patients the poorest masticatory performance. There was a weak correlation between masticatory performance and maximum bite force at the molar positions. Masticatory performance also weakly correlated to electromyographic signals during mastication of a constant bolus (gummy bears) for all muscles except the left posterior temporalis. Correlations were generally not present or were very weak between masticatory performance, estimated masticatory forces, and muscle efficiency, suggesting that muscle efficiency and forces generated during mastication are not the primary factors that determine masticatory performance. Other factors contributing to a person's ability to chew food might include occlusal relationships and mechanical advantage. PMID:8169710

  1. Compartmentalization of extraocular muscle function.

    PubMed

    Demer, J L

    2015-02-01

    Ocular motor diversity exceeds capabilities of only six extraocular muscles (EOMs), but this deficiency is overcome by the plethora of fibers within individual EOMs surpassing requirements of homogeneous actuators. This paper reviews emerging evidence that regions of individual EOMs can be differentially innervated to exert independent oculorotary torques, broadening the oculomotor repertoire, and potentially explaining diverse strabismus pathophysiology. Parallel structure characterizes EOM and tendon fibers, with little transverse coupling of experimentally imposed or actively generated tension. This arrangement enables arbitrary groupings of tendon and muscle fibers to act relatively independently. Coordinated force generation among EOM fibers occurs only upon potentially mutable coordination of innervational commands, whose central basis is suggested by preliminary findings of apparent compartmental segregation of abducens motor neuron pools. Humans, monkeys, and other mammals demonstrate separate, nonoverlapping intramuscular nerve arborizations in the superior vs inferior compartments of the medial rectus (MR) and lateral rectus (LR) EOMs that could apply force at the superior vs inferior portions of scleral insertions, and in the medial vs lateral compartments of the superior oblique that act at the equatorial vs posterior scleral insertions that might preferentially implement incycloduction vs infraduction. Magnetic resonance imaging of the MR during several physiological ocular motor behaviors indicates differential compartmental function. Differential compartmental pathology can influence clinical strabismus. Partial abducens palsy commonly affects the superior LR compartment more than the inferior, inducing vertical strabismus that might erroneously be attributed to cyclovertical EOM pathology. Surgery may selectively manipulate EOM compartments. PMID:25341434

  2. Characteristics of Back Muscle Strength in Patients with Scheduled for Lumbar Fusion Surgery due to Symptomatic Lumbar Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Won Hah; Lee, Chong Suh; Kang, Kyung Chung

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional study. Purpose To evaluate characteristics of back muscle strength in patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery. Overview of Literature Little is known regarding muscle strength in patients with symptomatic lumbar degenerative diseases who require fusion surgery. Methods Consecutive 354 patients scheduled for posterior lumbar interbody fusion due to symptomatic degenerative diseases were approached for participation. 316 patients were enrolled. Before surgery, muscle strength was assessed by measuring maximal isometric extension strength at seven angular positions (0°, 12°, 24°, 36°, 48°, 60°, and 72°) and mean isometric strength was calculated. The Oswestry Disability Index (0-100) and visual analogue scale (0-100) for back pain were recorded. Muscle strength was compared according to gender, age (<60, 60-70, and ?70 years) and scheduled fusion level (short, <3; long, ?3). Results Isometric strength was significantly decreased compared with previously reported results of healthy individuals, particularly at extension positions (0°-48°, p<0.05). Mean isometric strength was significantly lower in females (p<0.001) and older patients (p<0.05). Differences of isometric strength between short and long level fusion were not significantly different (p>0.05). Isometric strengths showed significant, but weak, inverse correlations with age and Oswestry Disability Index (r<0.4, p<0.05). Conclusions In patients with symptomatic lumbar degenerative diseases, back muscle strength significantly decreased, particularly at lumbar extension positions, and in females and older patients. PMID:25346820

  3. Unilateral duplication of the anterior digastric muscle belly: a case report with implications for surgeries of the submental region.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Matthew J; Soloninka, Hannah J; Lambert, H Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Anterior belly of the digastric muscle (ABDM) variations have been reported to occur in as few as 2.7% to as many as 69.6% of individuals. Therefore, it is important to understand the anatomical diversity of ABDM variants, particularly with regard to head and neck surgery. The report documents a unilateral duplication of the ABDM with an oblique belly which crosses the midline. Measurements of muscle length, width, orientation and inferior surface area are documented. ABDM variants may cause confusion during surgeries, including submental lipectomy, rhytidectomy, surgical alteration of the cervicomental angle via partial resection of the ABDM, muscle transfer for reanimation of the mouth and submental artery flap procedures. Therefore, knowledge of this particular variant may aid in surgical planning as well as prevent confusion and disorientation during operations in the submental region. PMID:25480836

  4. Unilateral duplication of the anterior digastric muscle belly: a case report with implications for surgeries of the submental region

    PubMed Central

    Zdilla, Matthew J.; Soloninka, Hannah J.; Lambert, H. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Anterior belly of the digastric muscle (ABDM) variations have been reported to occur in as few as 2.7% to as many as 69.6% of individuals. Therefore, it is important to understand the anatomical diversity of ABDM variants, particularly with regard to head and neck surgery. The report documents a unilateral duplication of the ABDM with an oblique belly which crosses the midline. Measurements of muscle length, width, orientation and inferior surface area are documented. ABDM variants may cause confusion during surgeries, including submental lipectomy, rhytidectomy, surgical alteration of the cervicomental angle via partial resection of the ABDM, muscle transfer for reanimation of the mouth and submental artery flap procedures. Therefore, knowledge of this particular variant may aid in surgical planning as well as prevent confusion and disorientation during operations in the submental region. PMID:25480836

  5. Aesthetic breast reconstruction using a combination of free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flaps and breast implants.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Rock, C S; Robb, G L

    1996-09-01

    Some women electing immediate bilateral postmastectomy breast reconstruction have inadequate autologous tissue to achieve an aesthetic result and also wish to avoid tissue expansion or a back scar. These patients are candidates for reconstruction using free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flaps and breast implants. Since November 1993, 5 women have been reconstructed bilaterally with a combination of free TRAM flaps and adjustable saline breast implants. Each patient was young (age, 29-47 years) and of slender body habitus. During the procedure, the implants were placed in a submuscular pocket formed by the pectoralis major, the serratus anterior, and the muscular portion of the TRAM flap. Careful approximation of the serratus anterior to the lateral border of the pectoralis major muscle created a reliable layer of tissue to protect the vascular pedicle of the TRAM flap from contact with the implant. The saline chambers of the implants were filled to 60% to 80% capacity at the time of surgery. TRAM flap skin was tailored to precisely replace missing breast envelope, and subcutaneous fat increased implant coverage, creating a mound with normal-appearing ptosis. There were no occurrences of microvascular thrombosis. Three patients experienced prolonged formation of serous fluid, with 2 patients requiring late aspiration of a serosa after drain removal. Although there were no documented infections, 1 patient experienced postoperative erythema of the mastectomy skin flaps and was treated empirically with antibiotics with resolution of the erythema. All breasts have remained soft and appear natural. Using free TRAM flaps and adjustable saline breast implants allows selected women to undergo immediate breast reconstruction without the need for prolonged tissue expansion or back scars. Aesthetic results are excellent and the immediate use of an implant does not appear to pose a risk to the success of the free tissue transfer. PMID:8883723

  6. Immediate reconstruction using inframammary adipofascial flap of the anterior rectus sheath after partial mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Funasako, Yawara; Aikou, Takashi

    2007-06-01

    Treatment of early breast cancer using breast conservative therapy (BCT) usually ensures local control and acceptable cosmetic results. To repair defects caused by partial mastectomy in the lower region of the breast, some reconstruction should be used. We developed a procedure involving the cranial based adipofascial (anterior rectus sheath) flap from immediately below the inframammary area for the reconstruction of defect due to partial mastectomy for patients with early breast cancer. In this procedure, a skin incision is made at the inframammary line, and the inframammary skin area is undermined. A tongue shaped flap composed of the subcutaneous fat and the anterior sheath of rectus abdominis muscle is pulled up and a C-shaped flap is rotated, gathered, and inserted to reconstruct the breast defect. PMID:17512298

  7. Surgically Mismanaged Ptosis in a Patient with Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type I

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Hatem A.; Rashad, Mohamed A.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosis syndromes comprise a rare form of severe limitation of ocular motility. An 11-year-old girl was referred for the correction of eyelid retraction. The eyelid retraction occurred immediately following levator resection surgery performed by a plastic surgeon who missed the restrictive extraocular muscle abnormalities. On examination, both eyes were fixed in an infraducted position (20 prism diopters (?)), with a chin-up position and significant lagophthalmos. Bilateral 12-mm inferior rectus recession with adjustable sutures was performed, which resulted in significant reduction of lagophthalmos and elimination of the head tilt. PMID:23248547

  8. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  9. Mechanical characterisation of porcine rectus sheath under uniaxial and biaxial tension.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mathew; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2014-06-01

    Incisional hernia development is a significant complication after laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is known to initiate the extrusion of intestines through the abdominal wall, but there is limited data on the mechanics of IAP generation and the structural properties of rectus sheath. This paper presents an explanation of the mechanics of IAP development, a study of the uniaxial and biaxial tensile properties of porcine rectus sheath, and a simple computational investigation of the tissue. Analysis using Laplace?s law showed a circumferential stress in the abdominal wall of approx. 1.1MPa due to an IAP of 11kPa, commonly seen during coughing. Uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests were conducted on samples of porcine rectus sheath to characterise the stress-stretch responses of the tissue. Under uniaxial tension, fibre direction samples failed on average at a stress of 4.5MPa at a stretch of 1.07 while cross-fibre samples failed at a stress of 1.6MPa under a stretch of 1.29. Under equi-biaxial tension, failure occurred at 1.6MPa with the fibre direction stretching to only 1.02 while the cross-fibre direction stretched to 1.13. Uniaxial and biaxial stress-stretch plots are presented allowing detailed modelling of the tissue either in silico or in a surrogate material. An FeBio computational model of the tissue is presented using a combination of an Ogden and an exponential power law model to represent the matrix and fibres respectively. The structural properties of porcine rectus sheath have been characterised and add to the small set of human data in the literature with which it may be possible to develop methods to reduce the incidence of incisional hernia development. PMID:24725440

  10. Isolated Total Rupture of Extraocular Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Kang, Ying; Deng, Daming; Shen, Tao; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Total rupture of extraocular muscles is an infrequent clinical finding. Here we conducted this retrospective study to evaluate their causes of injury, clinical features, imaging, surgical management, and final outcomes in cases of isolated extraocular muscle rupture at a tertiary center in China. Thirty-six patients were identified (24 men and 12 women). Mean age was 34 years (range 2–60). The right eye was involved in 21 patients and the left 1 in 15. A sharp object or metal hook was the cause of this lesion in 16 patients, sinus surgery in 14 patients, traffic accident in 3 patients, orbital surgery in 2 patients, and conjunctive tumor surgery in 1 patient. The most commonly involved muscles were medial (18 patients) and inferior rectus muscles (13 patients). The function of the ruptured muscles revealed a scale of ?3 to ?4 defect of ocular motility and the amount of deviation in primary position varied from 10 to 140 PD (prism diopter). Computerized tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of ruptured muscles. An end-to-end muscle anastomosis was performed and 3 to 5?mm of muscle was resected in 23 patients. When the posterior border of the injured muscle could not be identified (13 patients), a partial tendon transposition was performed, together with recession of the antagonist in most patients, whereas a recession of the antagonist muscle plus a resection of the involved muscle with or without nasal periosteal fixation was performed in the remaining patients. After an average of 16.42 months of follow-up an excellent result was achieved in 23 patients and results of 13 patients were considered as a failure. In most patients, the posterior border of the ruptured muscle can be identified and an early surgery can be performed to restore function. Alternatively, a partial tendon transposition should be performed. When muscular rupture is suspected, an early orbital CT is required to confirm this possibility, which can then verify the necessity for an early surgical intervention. PMID:26426604

  11. Isolated Medial Rectus Nuclear Palsy as a Rare Presentation of Midbrain Infarction.

    PubMed

    Al-Sofiani, Mohammed; Lee Kwen, Peterkin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diplopia is a common subjective complaint that can be the first manifestation of a serious pathology. Here, we report a rare case of midbrain infarction involving the lateral subnucleus of the oculomotor nuclear complex presenting as diplopia, with no other stroke manifestations. CASE REPORT An 83-year-old right-handed white man with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and coronary artery disease presented to the emergency department (ED) with diplopia and unsteadiness. Two days prior to admission, the patient woke up with constant horizontal diplopia and unsteadiness, which limited his daily activities and led to a fall at home. He denied any weakness, clumsiness, nausea, vomiting, photophobia, fever, or chills. Ocular exam showed a disconjugate gaze at rest, weakness of the left medial rectus muscle, impaired convergence test, and bilateral 3-mm reactive pupils. The diplopia resolved by closing either eye. The remaining extraocular muscles and other cranial nerves were normal. There was no nystagmus, ptosis, or visual field deficit. Sensation, muscle tone, and strength were normal in all extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a tiny focus of restricted diffusion in the left posterior lateral midbrain. CONCLUSIONS A thorough history and physical examination is essential to diagnose and manage diplopia. Isolated extraocular palsy is usually thought to be caused by orbital lesions or muscular diseases. Here, we report a case of midbrain infarction manifested as isolated medial rectus palsy. PMID:26447784

  12. Consecutive exotropia following surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Folk, E R; Miller, M T; Chapman, L

    1983-01-01

    We studied 250 patients with consecutive exotropia. The interval between the surgical procedure and the onset of the consecutive exotropia may take many years. Consecutive exotropia occurred with all types of corrective esotropia surgery that we studied. Amblyopia and medial rectus limitation postoperatively seemed to be common factors associated with consecutive exotropia. PMID:6871147

  13. Exercise and Weight Loss Improve Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration, Lipid Partitioning, and Insulin Sensitivity After Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Coen, Paul M; Menshikova, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Giovanna; Zheng, Donghai; Tanner, Charles J; Standley, Robert A; Helbling, Nicole L; Dubis, Gabriel S; Ritov, Vladimir B; Xie, Hui; Desimone, Marisa E; Smith, Steven R; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G S; Houmard, Joseph A; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2015-11-01

    Both Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity. However, the impact of RYGB with or without exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondria, intramyocellular lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) is unknown. We conducted a randomized exercise trial in patients (n = 101) who underwent RYGB surgery and completed either a 6-month moderate exercise (EX) or a health education control (CON) intervention. SI was determined by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Mitochondrial respiration and intramyocellular triglyceride, sphingolipid, and diacylglycerol content were measured in vastus lateralis biopsy specimens. We found that EX provided additional improvements in SI and that only EX improved cardiorespiratory fitness, mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities, and cardiolipin profile with no change in mitochondrial content. Muscle triglycerides were reduced in type I fibers in CON, and sphingolipids decreased in both groups, with EX showing a further reduction in a number of ceramide species. In conclusion, exercise superimposed on bariatric surgery-induced weight loss enhances mitochondrial respiration, induces cardiolipin remodeling, reduces specific sphingolipids, and provides additional improvements in insulin sensitivity. PMID:26293505

  14. Outcome study of bilateral lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Ing, M R; Nishimura, J; Okino, L

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: This paper reports an outcome study of 52 consecutive children treated by bilateral lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia over a 9 year period (1981-90) with a minimum follow up of 6 months. METHODS: Successful alignment was defined as the absence of any postoperative intermittent or constant tropia in any position of gaze. The study examined the variables that might be predictive of successful alignment. The charts were abstracted for age at initial surgery, quantity of initial deviation, initial refraction, motor alignment at 1 week and 6 months, final alignment, secondary surgery results and the incidence of a monofixation syndrome result. RESULTS: Motor tests demonstrated that 32 (62%) of the patients were successfully aligned by the initial procedure performed for a mean of 25 prism diopters of preoperative deviation while viewing distant targets at a mean age of 4 years 8 months, followed for a mean of 4 years, 4 months. The incidence of undercorrections and overcorrections were approximately equal in quantity suggesting that the current surgical dosage was adequate, but the age at initial surgery, initial deviation, initial refraction and 1 week postoperative alignment results were not predictive of success. Alignment at 6 months, however, was highly correlated with successful alignment by the end of the study (p = 0.002). Secondary surgery was performed for 11 patients and 5 patients were found to have a monofixation syndrome result. CONCLUSION: Successful alignment was achieved in the majority of children treated for intermittent exotropia by an initial bilateral lateral rectus recession. However, 20% of the patients received secondary surgery for a residual deviation, and the study confirmed a previously reported 10% incidence of monofixation syndrome result in children surgically treated for this type of strabismus. PMID:9440183

  15. Medial Wall Fracture and Orbital Emphysema Mimicking Inferior Rectus Entrapment in a Child.

    PubMed

    Collin, John; Afshar, Farid; Thomas, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Orbital emphysema is commonly associated with fractures of the orbital floor or medial wall. The air often dissipates spontaneously, but rarely can cause increased intraocular pressure and even loss of vision. Entrapment of the extraocular muscles can also occur with orbital fractures and may require prompt treatment in the pediatric patient due to the risk muscle ischemia. Both conditions can cause diplopia due to restriction of eye movement and differentiation of the two etiologies is important to prevent unnecessary surgical exploration. Identification and prompt management of raised intraocular pressure is essential in patients with orbital trauma. We present a case of orbital emphysema mimicking inferior rectus entrapment following trauma in an 11-year-old boy. PMID:26576241

  16. The use of rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps following excision of vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J H; Van Dam, P A; Jobling, T W; Breach, N

    1990-11-01

    Rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps have been used in 16 women following radical excision of extensive vulvar cancer. In two women the procedure was part of the primary surgery, in 11 for recurrence of vulvar cancer and in three for symptomatic palliation. Fifteen (94%) of the grafts took with primary healing. Thirteen of the 16 patients are alive 6-60 months (median 29 months) after surgery and the three who died benefited from symptomatic palliation. Simultaneous vulvar reconstruction allows good cosmetic rehabilitation and is an important part of the armamentarium for the management of patients with advanced primary or recurrent vulvar carcinoma. This technique offers excellent surgical clearance of massive offensive and painful vulvar tumors. PMID:2252868

  17. Isolated Medial Rectus Nuclear Palsy as a Rare Presentation of Midbrain Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sofiani, Mohammed; Kwen, Peterkin Lee

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 83 Final Diagnosis: Midbrain infarction Symptoms: Diplopia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Computed tomography of the head and magnetic resonance image of the brain Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Diplopia is a common subjective complaint that can be the first manifestation of a serious pathology. Here, we report a rare case of midbrain infarction involving the lateral subnucleus of the oculomotor nuclear complex presenting as diplopia, with no other stroke manifestations. Case Report: An 83-year-old right-handed white man with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and coronary artery disease presented to the emergency department (ED) with diplopia and unsteadiness. Two days prior to admission, the patient woke up with constant horizontal diplopia and unsteadiness, which limited his daily activities and led to a fall at home. He denied any weakness, clumsiness, nausea, vomiting, photophobia, fever, or chills. Ocular exam showed a disconjugate gaze at rest, weakness of the left medial rectus muscle, impaired convergence test, and bilateral 3-mm reactive pupils. The diplopia resolved by closing either eye. The remaining extraocular muscles and other cranial nerves were normal. There was no nystagmus, ptosis, or visual field deficit. Sensation, muscle tone, and strength were normal in all extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a tiny focus of restricted diffusion in the left posterior lateral midbrain. Conclusions: A thorough history and physical examination is essential to diagnose and manage diplopia. Isolated extraocular palsy is usually thought to be caused by orbital lesions or muscular diseases. Here, we report a case of mid-brain infarction manifested as isolated medial rectus palsy. PMID:26447784

  18. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  19. Evaluation of periosteal fixation of lateral rectus and partial VRT for cases of exotropic Duane retraction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pradeep; Tomer, Ruchi; Menon, Vimla; Saxena, Rohit; Sharma, Anudeepa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the lateral rectus periosteal fixation and partial vertical rectus transpositioning (VRT) as treatment modalities to correct exotropic Duane retraction syndrome (Exo-DRS). Materials and Methods: Prospective interventional case study of cases of Exo-DRS with limitation of adduction. A total of 13 patients were subdivided into two groups. Six patients underwent only lateral rectus periosteal fixation (group A) and seven patients also underwent partial VRT (group B). Assessment involved prism bar cover test, abduction and adduction range, extent of binocular single visual field and exophthalmometry. These tests were repeated at 1 week, 1 month and 3 months post-operatively and data analyzed. Results: The pre-operative mean values and ranges were 26.2? (22-35) exotropia for group A and ?21.3? (14-30) exotropia for group B. The post-operative mean and range was +0.6? esotropia (+20 to ?8) for group A and 8? (?2 to ?20) exotropia for group B. Mean grade of limitation of abduction changed from ?3.8 to ?3.6 versus ?3.6 to ?2.8 and mean grade of limitation of adduction changed from ?1.9 to ?0.7 versus ?1.5 to ?0.5 in the groups A and B respectively. Mean binocular single visual field changed from 14.7° to 23.3° in group A and 11.8° to 26.4° in the group B respectively. Conclusion: Lateral rectus periosteal fixation is an effective surgery to correct the exodeviation, anomalous head posture and improving adduction in Exo-DRS and partial VRT in addition is effective in improving abduction and binocular single visual fields. PMID:24618490

  20. Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis in athletes: a review

    PubMed Central

    Valent, Alessandro; Frizziero, Antonio; Bressan, Stefano; Zanella, Elena; Giannotti, Erika; Masiero, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Summary Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis is common in male athletes, especially in soccer players. It may be worsened by physical activity and it usually limits sport performance. The management goal in the acute phase consists of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs and physical rehabilitation. In the early stages of rehabilitation, strengthening exercises of adductors and abdominal muscles, such as postural exercises, have been suggested. In the sub-acute phase, muscular strength is targeted by overload training in the gym or aquatherapy; core stability exercises seem to be useful in this phase. Finally, specific sport actions are introduced by increasingly complex exercises along with a preventive program to limit pain recurrences. PMID:23738289

  1. Muscle Relaxation in Laparoscopic Surgery: What is the Evidence for Improved Operating Conditions and Patient Outcome? A Brief Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ledowski, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    When neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) were introduced into clinical practice in 1942, the event was called the "second revolution in anesthesia." Despite some significant side effects, NMBAs have remained in the anesthetists' repertoire, not at least because muscle relaxation has been claimed to allow or facilitate many surgical procedures. Aim of this literature review was to investigate the evidence for the use of NMBA as well as the optimum depth of neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic surgery. Muscle relaxation may optimize laparoscopic operating conditions by preventing patient movement and achieving more intra-abdominal space for a given intra-abdominal insufflation pressure. In this context, deeper than normally maintained levels of neuromuscular blockade appear to be superior. However, the decision to utilize deeper than standard muscle relaxation should currently be based on a risk-benefit analysis for each individual patient. Thus good communication between surgeon and anesthetist remains crucial to achieve best outcomes. PMID:26121545

  2. Deep inferior epigastric artery perforated rectus abdominis free flap for head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Johnny; Piazza, Cesare; Taglietti, Valentina; Nicolai, Piero

    2012-04-01

    The deep inferior epigastric artery perforated rectus abdominis (DIEAP-ra) free flap is a modification of the classic myocutaneous DIEA free flap in which only fasciocutaneous tissue is harvested based on the paraumbilical perforators of the medial row. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe our experience with this reconstructive technique in head and neck surgery. Between 2004 and 2009, 24 patients affected by oncologic maxillofacial, skull base, oral, and oropharyngeal defects were submitted to reconstruction with DIEAP-ra. After harvesting the DIEAP-ra, the longitudinally split muscular belly was sutured and the anterior rectus sheath closed with a nonabsorbable mattress suture without inlay mesh interposition. Surgical defects encompassed half of the hard palate in ten patients, orbit and part of the cranial vault in one, radical extended parotidectomy in four, subtotal glossectomy in seven, and total glossectomy in two cases. The only complete flap necrosis (4%) developed as a consequence of an orocutaneous fistula and required a second latissimus dorsi free flap. Another case (4%) developed a partial necrosis for oropharyngeal fistula after total glossectomy that healed after transposition of a pedicled myofascial pectoralis major. Two patients (8%) presented a minor salivary fistula that healed by medication alone. No major complication of the donor site was observed. DIEAP-ra is a valid alternative to the DIEA free flap when applied to complex maxillofacial or tongue major defects. Its greatest advantages are the reduced donor site morbidity and a more adjustable thickness of the skin paddle, particularly in females and obese patients. PMID:21866360

  3. Clinical Paper Orthognathic Surgery

    E-print Network

    Frey, Pascal

    . Stoelinga4,5 1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, Academic Centre for Dentistry of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands; 5 DepartmentClinical Paper Orthognathic Surgery Do the changes in muscle mass, muscle direction, and rotations

  4. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with overcorrected strabismus (and several patients with undercorrection after extraocular muscle resection) underwent exploration of previously operated muscles, with the intention of advancing their tendons to prevent the need for surgery on additional muscles. Unexpectedly, it was found that, in many cases, an elongated scar segment of variable length was interposed between the muscle and its insertion site on the sclera. Laboratory investigations were carried out to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s) and to create an animal model of the disorder. METHODS: Lengthened scars were repaired on 198 muscles during 134 procedures performed on 123 patients. The scars consisted of amorphous connective tissue interposed between the globe and normal tendon. Repair was accomplished by excision of the scar and reattachment of the muscle to sclera, using absorbable sutures in 64 cases and nonabsorbable sutures in 70 cases. Histopathologic examination was performed on 82 clinical specimens, and tissue culture studies were performed on 7 specimens. To develop an animal model, 10 New Zealand white rabbits underwent bilateral superior rectus resection. Half of the eyes received sub-Tenon's injections of collagenase over the operative site during weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6 postoperatively; the other half received saline solution injections on the same schedule. At 10 weeks, half the sites were studied histologically, and the other half underwent collagen creep analysis. In a second study, the use of absorbable versus nonabsorbable sutures was compared in the rabbit model. RESULTS: In the clinical cases, the mean length of the elongated scar segments was 4.2 mm. A total of 105 of the 134 repair procedures were judged successful. Thirty-one procedures resulted in recurrence of the original overcorrection; 7 of these had documented restretches. Factors that distinguished patients with stretched scars from patients with classic slipped muscles included minimal or no limitation of versions, less separation of the tendons from sclera, and thicker appearance of the scar segments. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in the repair procedure reduced the recurrence rate. Histologic examination of the clinical stretched scar specimens showed dense connective tissue that was less well organized compared with normal tendon. In the tissue culture studies, cells cultured from the stretched scar specimens grew rapidly and were irregularly shaped. A high-molecular-weight protein was identified in the culture medium. By contrast, cells cultured from normal tendon (controls) grew more slowly and regularly, stopped growing at 4 days, and produced less total protein than cultured stretched scar specimens. In the animal model studies, the collagenase-treated sites showed elongated scars with increased collagen between the muscle and the sclera, as well as increased collagen creep rates, compared with the saline-treated controls. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in collagenase-treated animal model surgery sites was associated with shorter, thicker scars compared with similar sites sutured with absorbable sutures. CONCLUSIONS: A lengthened or stretched, remodeled scar between an operated muscle tendon and sclera is a common occurrence and is a factor contributing to the variability of outcome after strabismus repair, even years later. This abnormality may be revealed by careful exploration of previously operated muscles. Definitive repair requires firm reattachment of tendon to sclera with nonabsorbable suture support. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 52 FIGURE 53 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 55 FIGURE 58 FIGURE 59 FIGURE 60 FIGURE 61 FIGURE 62 FIGURE 63

  5. Relative EMG levels in training exercises for abdominal and hip flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Andersson, E A; Ma, Z; Thorstensson, A

    1998-09-01

    The main purpose of our study was to compare systematically EMG levels in sub-maximal training exercises for the trunk and hip flexor muscles with those voluntarily attainable in corresponding situations. Six healthy subjects performed three types of standardized training exercises, whose static positions, movement velocity and range of motion were reproduced during maximal voluntary isokinetic strength tests. EMG was recorded with wire electrodes from the iliacus muscle and with surface electrodes from the rectus femoris, sartorius, rectus abdominis, obliquus externus and internus muscles. The relative EMG values demonstrated a task dependency which could differ between individual muscles. The maximal voluntary activation levels were relatively constant across conditions. Exceptions were present, particularly for the rectus femoris and iliacus muscles. These findings highlight the consequences of using different methods of normalizing EMG. The relative EMG values presented may serve as guidelines when selecting training exercises for specific trunk and hip flexor muscles in sports and rehabilitation. PMID:9782545

  6. Possible postsynaptic action of aminoglycosides in the frog rectus abdominis.

    PubMed

    Karata?, Y; Ergün, Y; Göçmen, C; Seçilmi?, A; Singirik, E; Dikmen, A; Baysal, F

    2000-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the postsynaptic effects of aminoglycosides on contractions evoked by acetylcholine (ACh), KCl, electrical field stimulation (EFS) and Na(+)- and Ca(2+)-free Ringer solution with 0.2 mM Na2 EDTA (NaFCaFR) in the isolated frog rectus abdominis. Neomycin inhibited contraction elicited by ACh, NaFCaFR, and EFS at the higher frequencies (8 and 10 Hz) but not those elicited by KCl and EFS at the lower frequencies (2, 3 and 5 Hz). D-tubocurarine inhibited ACh-induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, drug reduced EFS-evoked contractions to a limited extent. Lower concentrations (10(-5), 5 x 10(-5), 10(-4), 2 x 10(-4) and 3 x 10(-4) M) but not higher concentrations (4 x 10(-4) and 5 x 10(-4) M) of methoxyverapamil exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibitory action on NaFCaFR-induced contractions. Similar inhibitions of the same type of contraction were displayed by aminoglycosides (neomycin, streptomycin, netilmycin, gentamycin and amikacin). These results suggest that in addition to their antagonistic action on nicotinic receptors in the frog rectus abdominis, aminoglycosides may exert stabilizing effects on some functional components contributing to contractions at the membrane. PMID:10806525

  7. Predictive Factors Affecting Long-Term Outcome of Unilateral Lateral Rectus Recession

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Mi-Jin; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background There are few long-term outcome reports of unilateral lateral rectus (LR) recession for exotropia including a large number of subjects. Previous reports on unilateral LR recession commonly show extremely low rates of initial overcorrection and large exodrifts after surgery suggesting that the surgical dose may be increased. However, little is known of the long-term outcome of a large unilateral LR recession for exotropia. Objectives To determine long-term outcomes and predictive factors of recurrence after a large unilateral LR recession in patients with exotropia. Data Extraction Retrospective analysis was performed on 92 patients aged 3 to 17 years who underwent 10 mm unilateral LR recession for exotropia of ? 25 prism diopters (?) with prism and alternate cover testing and were followed up for more than 2 years after surgery. Final success rates within 10? of exophoria/tropia and 5? of esophoria/tropia at distance in the primary position, improvement in stereopsis and the predictive factors for recurrence were evaluated. Results At 24 months after surgery, 54% of patients had ocular alignment meeting the defined criteria of success, 45% had recurrence and 1% had overcorrection. After a mean follow-up of 39 months, 36% showed success, 63% showed recurrence and 1% resulted in overcorrection. The average time of recurrence was 23.4±14.7 months (range, 1–60 months) and the rate of recurrence per person-year was 23% after unilateral LR recession. Predictive factors of recurrence were a larger preoperative near angle of deviation (>16?) and larger initial postoperative exodeviation (>5?) at distance. Conclusions Long-term outcome of unilateral LR recession for exotropia showed low success rates with high recurrence, thus should be reserved for patients with a small preoperative near angle of exodeviation. PMID:26418819

  8. Laughing: a demanding exercise for trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Rehmes, Ulrich; Kohle, Daniel; Puta, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Social, psychological, and physiological studies have provided evidence indicating that laughter imposes an increased demand on trunk muscles. It was the aim of this study to quantify the activation of trunk muscles during laughter yoga in comparison with crunch and back lifting exercises regarding the mean trunk muscle activity. Muscular activity during laughter yoga exercises was measured by surface electromyography of 5 trunk muscles. The activation level of internal oblique muscle during laughter yoga is higher compared to the traditional exercises. The multifidus, erector spinae, and rectus abdominis muscles were nearly half activated during laughter yoga, while the activation of the external oblique muscle was comparable with the crunch and back lifting exercises. Our results indicate that laughter yoga has a positive effect on trunk muscle activation. Thus, laughter seems to be a good activator of trunk muscles, but further research is required whether laughter yoga is a good exercise to improve neuromuscular recruitment patterns for spine stability. PMID:24246140

  9. Relationships between muscle contributions to walking subtasks and functional walking status in persons with post-stroke hemiparesis

    E-print Network

    propulsion increased with improved functional walking status, with the non-paretic leg muscles (i.e., rectus muscles (i.e., hamstrings) also increased as functional walking status improved. Power generation was alsoRelationships between muscle contributions to walking subtasks and functional walking status

  10. Comparison of orbital muscle akinesia caused by rocuronium versus hyaluronidase mixed to the local anesthetic in single injection peribulbar block for cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Messeha, Medhat M.; Elhesy, Abd-Elmonem

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare orbital muscle akinesia caused by rocuronium versus hyaluronidase when mixed with the local anesthetic in single-injection peribulbar anesthesia (PBA). Patients and Methods: Sixty patients were included in the study and subjected to cataract extraction using phacoemulsification technique with intraocular lens implantation. Group I received peribulbar block with 5 ml mixture of 30 IU/ml hyaluronidase and 2% lidocaine. Group II received peribulbar block with 5 ml mixture of rocuronium 5 mg and 2% lidocaine. The onset and duration of akinesia were assessed; the akinesia score at 2, 5, and 10 min was measured after injection. The need for supplementary injection was also recorded. Results and Conclusion: PBA using a mixture of rocuronium and lidocaine provides optimal globe akinesia and faster establishment of suitable conditions to start eye surgery and shortens the block onset time as compared with the addition of hyaluronidase to lidocaine. PMID:26712977

  11. Age-Related Ultrasound Changes in Muscle Quantity and Quality in Women.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Ikezoe, Tome; Yamada, Yosuke; Tsukagoshi, Rui; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Takagi, Yui; Kimura, Misaka; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the age-related changes in muscle quantity and quality in the trunk and limbs of women. A total of 128 females were divided into four age groups: young, middle-aged, young-old and old-old. Muscle thickness (MT) and echo intensity (EI) of the biceps brachii, quadriceps femoris, rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis were measured using B-mode ultrasonography. The EIs of the biceps brachii, quadriceps femoris and transversus abdominis were significantly higher in the middle-aged group than in the young group; however, there were no significant differences in MT. Compared with the young group, all other groups had significant changes in both MT and EI of the rectus abdominis, external oblique and internal oblique muscles. Thus, qualitative changes in muscle may occur earlier than quantitative changes, and loss of muscle mass may occur earlier in the superficial abdominal muscles than in the other muscles. PMID:26278633

  12. [Computed tomography in endocrine orbitopathy: the effects of varying gantry tilt and patient positioning on the measurement of eye muscle thickness and the possibilities for correction].

    PubMed

    Markl, A; Hilbertz, T; Pickardt, C R; Mayr, B; Lissner, J

    1986-06-01

    Thickening of eye muscles in endocrine orbitopathy can be demonstrated particularly impressively in coronary computed tomograms. However, when measuring the height and width of rectus eye muscles manifesting pathologic changes, the measurement is increased by a deviation from the coronary section plane; this is due to different tilting of the gantry. This often leads to an incorrect stage classification and makes objective observation of the course (e.g., under therapy) impossible. By converting the measured values into the actual extent of the muscles by means of the cosine set, appreciable changes in the pattern and frequency of affection of the rectus eye muscles were found in 121 patients examined. PMID:3731695

  13. Preliminary results using a flexible endoscope for orbital surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Alexander M.; Braunstein, Richard E.; Schubert, Herman D.; Trokel, Stephen L.; Odel, Jeffery G.; Behrens, Myles M.

    1992-08-01

    A technique for visualizing the optic nerve, the short and long posterior ciliary arteries and nerves, the ophthalmic vein, and the rectus muscles using a flexible endoscope was developed in human cadavers. Previous reports of orbital endoscopy were limited to the use of a rigid endoscope. Potential applications for this new flexible endoscopic technique include the biopsy of orbital tumors, fenestration of the optic nerve sheath with mid-infrared lasers, photocoagulation of orbital tumors, and retrieval of foreign bodies or slipped muscles.

  14. Effect of Camphylobacter rectus on Serum Iron and Transferrin– In-Vivo Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lele, Suresh Vasant; Mali, Pradnya Prabhakar; Jain, Pinal Mahendra; Darawade, Dattatray Anant; Medikeri, Manjushri Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Periodontopathogens require iron constituents for their growth and metabolism in subgingival crevice. In this study, C.rectus was detected and quantified by using 16s rDNA based PCR in chronic periodontitis and compared with the levels of serum iron, total iron binding capacity and transferrin in chronic periodontitis and healthy sites. Materials and Methods One hundred twenty subjects divided into chronic periodontitis and healthy controls. Deep subgingival plaque was collected and genomic DNA was extracted from each sample analysed for C.rectus using 16s rRNA based PCR analysis. Blood samples were collected from both groups for estimation of serum iron, serum total iron binding capacity and serum transferrin levels. The quantified bacterial count was compared with blood samples. C. rectus was detected in both groups. Results There was significant increase in bacterial count in chronic periodontitis (p<0.05). Serum iron level was significantly raised in healthy group. TIBC and transferrin levels were elevated in periodontitis. Although these differences were non-significant. Regression analysis showed significant linear relationship between C.rectus counts and decreasing iron levels and consequently increasing serum transferrin and TIBC (p<0.05). Conclusion The preliminary in vivo findings suggests C.rectus requires iron as a significant source of nutrition for its survival and growth form its hosts in deeper subgingival sites. PMID:26393200

  15. Evaluation of endotracheal intubating conditions without the use of muscle relaxants following induction with propofol and sevoflurane in pediatric cleft lip and palate surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sunil; Gotluru, Priyanka; Andews, Susamma; Paul, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Children with facial clefts are usually difficult to intubate and it is considered safer to keep them spontaneously breathing while securing the airway. This prospective comparative study was conducted to evaluate endotracheal intubating conditions in pediatric patients undergoing cleft surgeries, without the use of muscle relaxants following induction with propofol and sevoflurane. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients aged 1month to 3 years, were randomly allocated into two equal groups. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane 8% in oxygen in group 1 and with propofol 3 mg/kg in group 2. Laryngoscopy and intubation were attempted 150 s after induction in both groups and ease of laryngoscopy, position of vocal cords, degree of coughing, jaw relaxation, and limb movements were assessed and scored. Total score of 5 was considered excellent, 6-10 good, 11-15 poor, and 16-20 bad. Total score ? 10 was considered clinically acceptable, and >10 as clinically unacceptable. Chi-square and Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze data. Results: There was no significant difference between groups when ease of laryngoscopy was compared. Sevoflurane induced patients had significantly better position of vocal cords at intubation and the propofol group had significantly more episodes of coughing. Significantly less number of patients had limb movements in sevoflurane group. There was no significant difference in degree of jaw relaxation between groups. The sevoflurane group had significantly better total scores and clinically acceptable intubating conditions. Conclusion: Sevoflurane 8% in oxygen provides clinically acceptable intubating conditions without use of muscle relaxants in pediatric cleft patients. PMID:25190944

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates compartmental muscle mechanisms of human vertical fusional vergence.

    PubMed

    Demer, Joseph L; Clark, Robert A

    2015-04-01

    Vertical fusional vergence (VFV) normally compensates for slight vertical heterophorias. We employed magnetic resonance imaging to clarify extraocular muscle contributions to VFV induced by monocular two-prism diopter (1.15°) base-up prism in 14 normal adults. Fusion during prism viewing requires monocular infraduction. Scans were repeated without prism, and with prism shifted contralaterally. Contractility indicated by morphometric indexes was separately analyzed in medial and lateral vertical rectus and superior oblique (SO) putative compartments, and superior and inferior horizontal rectus extraocular muscle putative compartments, but in the whole inferior oblique (IO). Images confirmed appropriate VFV that was implemented by the inferior rectus (IR) medial compartment contracting ipsilateral and relaxing contralateral to prism. There was no significant contractility in the IR lateral compartment. The superior but not inferior lateral rectus (LR) compartment contracted significantly in the prism viewing eye, but not contralateral to prism. The IO contracted ipsilateral but not contralateral to the prism. In the infraducting eye, the SO medial compartment relaxed significantly, while the lateral compartment was unchanged; contralateral to prism, the SO lateral compartment contracted, while the medial compartment was unchanged. There was no contractility in the superior or medial rectus muscles in either eye. There was no globe retraction. We conclude that the vertical component of VFV is primarily implemented by IR medial compartment contraction. Since appropriate vertical rotation is not directly implemented, or is opposed, by associated differential LR and SO compartmental activity, and IO contraction, these actions probably implement a torsional component of VFV. PMID:25589593

  17. Penetration of ceforanide and cefamandole into the right atrial appendage, pericardial fluid, sternum, and intercostal muscle of patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, L D; French, M A; Nightingale, C H; Low, H B; Ellison, L H; Quintiliani, R

    1982-01-01

    Doses of 30 mg of ceforanide or cefamandole per kg were administered intravenously to 26 patients just before their chests were opened for coronary artery bypass or cardiac valve replacement surgery. Samples of right atrial appendage, pericardial fluid, plasma, aortic wall, intercostal muscle, and sternum were obtained at different times after the antibiotic was injected, and these samples were assayed for cephalosporin concentration. For ceforanide the pre-bypass plasma half-life was 2.5 h, and the atrial appendage half-life was 2.1 h; for cefamandole the pre-bypass plasma half-life was 0.75 h and the atrial appendage half-life was 0.72 h. At 3 h the concentrations of ceforanide and cefamandole in atrial appendages were 28.0 and 5.0 micrograms/g, respectively. Ceforanide achieved higher and more sustained concentrations in other tissues than cefamandole. Considering the minimal inhibitory concentrations of these drugs for staphylococci, cefamandole and ceforanide should provide adequate protection against infection by these organisms for the duration of the surgical procedure. PMID:7103445

  18. Postcraniotomy Function of the Temporal Muscle in Skull Base Surgery: Technical Note Based on a Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdulazim, Amr; Filis, Andreas; Sadr-Eshkevari, Pooyan; Schulte, Fried; Sandu, Nora; Schaller, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Patients undergoing craniotomies necessitating preparation of the temporal muscle (TM) may experience postoperative functional impairment of the temporomandibular joint. This topic has not been thoroughly discussed in the literature so far. In the present study, the authors propose a questionnaire as an evaluation tool to assess to what degree different TM preparation techniques correlate with postoperative temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Materials and Methods. Between 2004 and 2006, 286 patients underwent either pterional or temporal craniotomies in the department of craniotomies at the University of Münster in Germany. Intraoperatively the TM was prepared either interfascial, submuscular, or subfascial. A patient-based questionnaire was designed and validated (Kendalls-? = +1) in order to evaluate the patients' postoperative temporomandibular functional outcome. Based on strict inclusion/exclusion criteria, 69 patients were eligible for the application of the questionnaire in this preliminary study. Results. Seventeen percent of the patients complained of either temporomandibular joint pain (3%) or restricted mouth opening (13%) postoperatively in a follow-up period between 3 and 12 months. In 92% postoperative complaints were reported within the first 3 months and in 58% of the patients with complaints the pain eased off. In 34% a therapy was required for the pain to be controlled. In one patient (8%) a postoperative arthroscopy has been necessary. Of the patients who experienced postoperative complaints, 67% had undergone temporal and 33% pterional craniotomy. In the group where postoperatively there were issues of temporomandibular pain/dysfunction, 42% had had the TM dissected, in 25% incised, and in 8% transected. For 25% of the patients, the type of intraoperative manipulation remained unknown. Conclusion. For postoperative quality control, the questionnaire showed to be a suitable evaluation tool. Concerning the different preparation techniques, subfascial preparation of the TM tends to result in less postoperative complaints and is thus recommended. PMID:22536141

  19. Successful return to high-level sports following early surgical repair of combined adductor complex and rectus abdominis avulsion.

    PubMed

    Tansey, R J; Benjamin-Laing, H; Jassim, S; Liekens, K; Shankar, A; Haddad, F S

    2015-11-01

    Hip and groin injuries are common in athletes who take part in high level sports. Adductor muscle tendon injuries represent a small but important number of these injuries. Avulsion of the tendons attached to the symphysis pubis has previously been described: these can be managed both operatively and non-operatively. We describe an uncommon variant of this injury, namely complete avulsion of the adductor sleeve complex: this includes adductor longus, pectineus and rectus abdominis. We go on to describe a surgical technique which promotes a full return to the pre-injury level of sporting activity. Over a period of ten years, 15 high-level athletes with an MRI-confirmed acute adductor complex avulsion injury (six to 34 days old) underwent surgical repair. The operative procedure consisted of anatomical re-attachment of the avulsed tissues in each case and mesh reinforcement of the posterior inguinal wall in seven patients. All underwent a standardised rehabilitation programme, which was then individualised to be sport-specific. One patient developed a superficial wound infection, which was successfully treated with antibiotics. Of the 15 patients, four complained of transient local numbness which resolved in all cases. All patients (including seven elite athletes) returned to their previous level of participation in sport. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:1488-92. PMID:26530650

  20. Endolymphatic sac surgery versus tenotomy of the stapedius and tensor tympani muscles in the management of patients with unilateral definite Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Albu, Silviu; Babighian, Gregorio; Amadori, Maurizio; Trabalzini, Franco

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to compare the outcomes of patients with Meniere's disease submitted to either endolymphatic mastoid shunt (ES) or tenotomy of the stapedius and tensor tympani muscles (TSTM). This is a retrospective chart review of patients treated with ES or TSTM between 2000 and 2010 and followed up for at least 12 months. The main outcomes were represented by: (1) vertigo class, hearing stage and functional level according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery criteria; (2) adjustment of dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) and (3) complete and substantial vertigo control using the Kaplan-Meier survival method. Sixty-three patients met the inclusion criteria: 34 underwent ES and 29 TSTM. The baseline demographic characteristics, the hearing stage, the functional level, the DHI and hearing levels were not different between the two groups. No significant difference in vertigo class was demonstrated: 66 % of TSTM patients attained class A compared to 44 % in the ES group (p = 0.14). Kaplan-Meier survival curves specific to class A showed significant differences, favoring TSTM (log-rank test, p = 0.022). TSTM patients demonstrated significantly improved functional level (p = 0.0004) and improved DHI scores (p = 0.001). Eight ES patients (25 %) demanded a second surgical attempt compared to none in the TSTM. Aural fullness was significantly improved in TSTM group (p = 0.01), while the difference in tinnitus improvement was non-significant. Hearing preservation was significantly better in TSTM group (p = 0.001). TSTM is a safe surgical procedure, with significant vertigo control rates, and important hearing preservation rates. More patients and longer follow-up are needed to support our preliminary findings. PMID:25488280

  1. An analysis on muscle tone of lower limb muscles on flexible flat foot

    PubMed Central

    Um, Gi-Mai; Wang, Joong-San; Park, Si-Eun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine differences in the muscle tone and stiffness of leg muscles according to types of flexible flat foot. [Subjects and Methods] For 30 subjects 10 in a normal foot group (NFG), 10 in group with both flexible flat feet (BFFG), and 10 in a group with flexible flat feet on one side (OFFG), myotonometry was used to measure the muscle tone and stiffness of the tibialis anterior muscle (TA), the rectus femoris muscle (RF), the medial gastrocnemius (MG), and the long head of the biceps femoris muscle (BF) of both lower extremities. [Results] In the measurement results, only the stiffness of TA and MG of the NFG and the BFFG showed significant differences. The muscle tone and stiffness were highest in the BFFG, followed by the OFFG and NFG, although the difference was insignificant. In the case of the OFFG, there was no significant difference in muscle tone and stiffness compared to that in the NGF and the BFFG. Furthermore, in the NFG, the non-dominant leg showed greater muscle tone and stiffness than the dominant leg, although the difference was insignificant. [Conclusion] During the relax condition, the flexible flat foot generally showed a greater muscle tone and stiffness of both lower extremities compared to the normal foot. The stiffness was particularly higher in the TA and MG muscles. Therefore, the muscle tone and stiffness of the lower extremity muscles must be considered in the treatment of flat foot. PMID:26644650

  2. An analysis on muscle tone of lower limb muscles on flexible flat foot.

    PubMed

    Um, Gi-Mai; Wang, Joong-San; Park, Si-Eun

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine differences in the muscle tone and stiffness of leg muscles according to types of flexible flat foot. [Subjects and Methods] For 30 subjects 10 in a normal foot group (NFG), 10 in group with both flexible flat feet (BFFG), and 10 in a group with flexible flat feet on one side (OFFG), myotonometry was used to measure the muscle tone and stiffness of the tibialis anterior muscle (TA), the rectus femoris muscle (RF), the medial gastrocnemius (MG), and the long head of the biceps femoris muscle (BF) of both lower extremities. [Results] In the measurement results, only the stiffness of TA and MG of the NFG and the BFFG showed significant differences. The muscle tone and stiffness were highest in the BFFG, followed by the OFFG and NFG, although the difference was insignificant. In the case of the OFFG, there was no significant difference in muscle tone and stiffness compared to that in the NGF and the BFFG. Furthermore, in the NFG, the non-dominant leg showed greater muscle tone and stiffness than the dominant leg, although the difference was insignificant. [Conclusion] During the relax condition, the flexible flat foot generally showed a greater muscle tone and stiffness of both lower extremities compared to the normal foot. The stiffness was particularly higher in the TA and MG muscles. Therefore, the muscle tone and stiffness of the lower extremity muscles must be considered in the treatment of flat foot. PMID:26644650

  3. Effects of a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system on hemiplegic gait and muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jing-Guang; Rong, Ke; Qian, Zhenyun; Wen, Chen; Zhang, Songning

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to design and implement a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system and investigate acute effects of functional electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris on ankle and knee sagittal-plane kinematics and related muscle forces of hemiplegic gait. [Subjects and Methods] A multichannel dynamic electrical stimulation system was developed with 8-channel low frequency current generators. Eight male hemiplegic patients were trained for 4 weeks with electric stimulation of the tibia anterior and rectus femoris muscles during walking, which was coupled with active contraction. Kinematic data were collected, and muscle forces of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris of the affected limbs were analyzed using a musculoskelatal modeling approach before and after training. A paired sample t-test was used to detect the differences between before and after training. [Results] The step length of the affected limb significantly increased after the stimulation was applied. The maximum dorsiflexion angle and maximum knee flexion angle of the affected limb were both increased significantly during stimulation. The maximum muscle forces of both the tibia anterior and rectus femoris increased significantly during stimulation compared with before functional electrical stimulation was applied. [Conclusion] This study established a functional electrical stimulation strategy based on hemiplegic gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. The multichannel functional electrical stimulation system successfully corrected foot drop and altered circumduction hemiplegic gait pattern. PMID:26696734

  4. Effects of a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system on hemiplegic gait and muscle forces

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing-guang; Rong, Ke; Qian, Zhenyun; Wen, Chen; Zhang, Songning

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to design and implement a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system and investigate acute effects of functional electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris on ankle and knee sagittal-plane kinematics and related muscle forces of hemiplegic gait. [Subjects and Methods] A multichannel dynamic electrical stimulation system was developed with 8-channel low frequency current generators. Eight male hemiplegic patients were trained for 4 weeks with electric stimulation of the tibia anterior and rectus femoris muscles during walking, which was coupled with active contraction. Kinematic data were collected, and muscle forces of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris of the affected limbs were analyzed using a musculoskelatal modeling approach before and after training. A paired sample t-test was used to detect the differences between before and after training. [Results] The step length of the affected limb significantly increased after the stimulation was applied. The maximum dorsiflexion angle and maximum knee flexion angle of the affected limb were both increased significantly during stimulation. The maximum muscle forces of both the tibia anterior and rectus femoris increased significantly during stimulation compared with before functional electrical stimulation was applied. [Conclusion] This study established a functional electrical stimulation strategy based on hemiplegic gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. The multichannel functional electrical stimulation system successfully corrected foot drop and altered circumduction hemiplegic gait pattern. PMID:26696734

  5. Parallel growth of rectus sheath grafts and recipient aorta. Critical role of graft tissue preservation.

    PubMed

    Bilfinger, T V; Beere, P E; Sanderson, C; Glagov, S; Anagnostopoulos, C E

    1983-08-01

    Previous experimental studies revealed striking similarities in mechanical properties of host aortic tissue and rectus sheath inserted as an aortic graft, as well as enlargement of some of the grafts. We have now evaluated the capacity of rectus sheath grafts to keep pace with aortic growth and investigated the role of tissue preservation in determining the ability of such grafts to maintain suitable dimensions. Autologous rectus sheath grafts were substituted for thoracic aortic segments in 15 puppies, 8 weeks of age. Nine grafts were inserted with careful attention to tissue preservation (live grafts), but in six experiments, cells were killed and tissues fixed by freezing and thawing in acetone before graft implantation (devitalized grafts). Grafts were fixed in situ by controlled pressure perfusion and examined 1, 2, and 3 months after implantation. Over the 3 month experimental interval, body weight increased from 2.0 +/- 1 pounds to 25.0 +/- 2.5 pounds, and as is characteristic for the period of maximum growth rate for the animals. Total thoracic aortic length increased 41.2% +/- 6.1% and aortic diameter, 30.0% +/- 3.1%, during this time. Growth rate of the total thoracic aortic length during the first month was greater for the devitalized graft group, but aortic length was the same for both groups at 3 months. The live grafts increased 42.3% +/- 12.0% in length and 27.3% +/- 3.0% in diameter, i.e., to the same degree as the aorta, whereas the devitalized grafts showed only slight increases in length and diameter (2.1% +/- 2% and 5.3% +/- 5%, respectively). The live rectus sheath grafts were augmented and largely replaced by a newly formed, layered fibrocellular structure, 45.8 +/- 25.8 mm3 in volume, whereas in the devitalized grafts more of the original rectus sheath persisted and only a minimal amount of organized connective tissue sheath was formed (volume 18.7 +/- 8.9 mm3). In addition, cellularity was much greater in live grafts than in devitalized specimens (990.9 +/- 186.8 cells/mm2 and 423.6 +/- 124.7 cells/mm2, respectively). All of the grafts were lined by endothelium. These findings indicate that autologous rectus sheath aortic grafts may be used to provide channels which keep pace with aortic dimensions during the period of maximum growth, provided that the graft tissue is viable on implantation. Long-term durability of such grafts may also depend on tissue preservation. PMID:6224050

  6. Localization of motoneurons innervating individual abdominal muscles of the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a systematic investigation of the innervation of the cat's individual abdominal muscles. The segmental distribution of the different motor pools was determined by using electrical microstimulation of the ventral horn to produce visible localized muscle twitches and by retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase injected into individual muscles. The segmental distribution of each motor pool was as follows: rectus abdominis, T4-L3; external oblique, T6-L3; transverse abdominis, T9-L3; and internal oblique, T13-L3.

  7. Optimizing Muscle Parameters in Musculoskeletal Modeling Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Andrea; Reed, Erik; Cavanagh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts assigned to long-duration missions experience bone and muscle atrophy in the lower limbs. The use of musculoskeletal simulation software has become a useful tool for modeling joint and muscle forces during human activity in reduced gravity as access to direct experimentation is limited. Knowledge of muscle and joint loads can better inform the design of exercise protocols and exercise countermeasure equipment. In this study, the LifeModeler(TM) (San Clemente, CA) biomechanics simulation software was used to model a squat exercise. The initial model using default parameters yielded physiologically reasonable hip-joint forces. However, no activation was predicted in some large muscles such as rectus femoris, which have been shown to be active in 1-g performance of the activity. Parametric testing was conducted using Monte Carlo methods and combinatorial reduction to find a muscle parameter set that more closely matched physiologically observed activation patterns during the squat exercise. Peak hip joint force using the default parameters was 2.96 times body weight (BW) and increased to 3.21 BW in an optimized, feature-selected test case. The rectus femoris was predicted to peak at 60.1% activation following muscle recruitment optimization, compared to 19.2% activation with default parameters. These results indicate the critical role that muscle parameters play in joint force estimation and the need for exploration of the solution space to achieve physiologically realistic muscle activation.

  8. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  9. Your Muscles

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page Your Muscles KidsHealth > Kids > How the Body Works > Your Muscles ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  10. Arthroscopic treatment of chronically painful calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Relatively large calcific tendinitis with persistent symptoms after extended periods of conservative treatment is an indication for operative therapy. Arthroscopy, as a treatment for calcific tendinitis of the hip abductors and calcinosis circumscripta, has been described previously; however, to our knowledge, the clinical and radiological response to arthroscopic removal of calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris tendon has not. Methods We present arthroscopic treatment of unusual calcific tendonitis of the origin of the rectus femoris and associated intra-articular lesions in 3 patients with chronic coxa pain. Results Our cases show that hip arthroscopy is an effective therapeutic modality for calcific tendinitis of the hip joint with satisfactory short-term outcomes. Conclusions Calcific tendinitis, although an uncommon clinical entity, should be a part of the differential diagnosis of acute or chronic hip pain. PMID:24266900

  11. Successful Treatment of Rectus Femoris Calcification with Ultrasound-guided Injection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Myong Joo; Park, Jeong Ki; Kang, Tai Ug

    2015-01-01

    Painful periarticular calcification most commonly occurs within the rotator cuff of the shoulder and rarely around the elbow, hip, foot, and neck. As acute inflammatory reaction develops, severe pain, exquisite tenderness, local swelling, and limitation of motion with pain occur. In case of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, it can be easily diagnosed according to the symptoms and with x-ray. However, in lesions of the hip, as it is a rare location and usually involves pain in the posterolateral aspect of the thigh, which can simulate radicular pain from a lumbar intervertebral disc, it could be difficult to diagnose. Hence, physicians usually focus on lumbar lesions; therefore, misdiagnosis is common and leads to a delayed management. Here, we report the case of a 30-year-old female patient with calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris that was successfully managed with ultrasound-guided steroid injection. This study offers knowledge about the rectus femoris calcification. PMID:25589947

  12. Comparative analysis of trunk muscle activities in climbing of during upright climbing at different inclination angles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung-Joon; Kim, Joong-Hwi; Kim, Jang-Hwan; Choi, Byeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to provide evidence for the therapeutic exercise approach through a compative analysis of muscle activities according to climbing wall inclination. [Subjects and Methods] Twentyfour healthy adult subjects without climbing experience performed static exercises at a therapeutic climbing at with various inclination angles (0°, 10°, 20°), and the activities of the trunk muscles (rectus abdominis, obliquus externus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, erector spinae) were measured using surface electromyography (EMG) for 7 seconds. [Results] Significant differences were found between the inclination angles of 10° and 0°, as well as 20° in the rectus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, right obliquus externus abdominis, and right erector spinae. [Conclusion] Based on measurements of trunk muscle activity in a static climbing standing position at different angles, significant changes in muscle activity appear to be induced at 10 degrees. Therefore, the results appear to provide clinically relevant evidence. PMID:26644661

  13. Essential amino acid ingestion as an efficient nutritional strategy for the preservation of muscle mass following gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Christos S; Madura, James A; Roust, Lori R

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle in patients who have undergone gastric bypass is a consistent observation. Skeletal muscle constitutes the largest protein/amino acid pool in the body, and loss of skeletal muscle has important implications in health and disease. Sustaining a given level of muscle protein requires a balance between the rates of muscle protein synthesis and breakdown. Current evidence suggests that reduced rate of protein synthesis is implicated in the loss of muscle after gastric bypass. This is not surprising given a less than optimal dietary protein intake after the procedure and because, unlike other macronutrients, protein/amino acids are not stored in the body. Ingesting essential amino acids (EAAs), which cannot be synthesized de novo and have the primary role in the regulation of muscle protein synthesis, can potentially ameliorate loss of muscle protein after gastric bypass. At the same time, ingestion of EAAs provides a more efficient nutritional approach (i.e., greater stimulation of protein synthesis relative to the amount of amino acids ingested) to enhance muscle protein synthesis compared with the ingestion of intact protein. Changing current dietary practices toward increasing ingestion of EAAs provides an approach that can potentially prevent loss of lean body tissue and ultimately achieve a more sustained level of health in patients who have undergone gastric bypass. PMID:26456190

  14. Muscle Activation during Push-Ups with Different Suspension Training Systems

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Colado, Juan C.; Martín, Fernando F; Rogers, Michael E.; Behm, David G.; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze upper extremity and core muscle activation when performing push-ups with different suspension devices. Young fit male university students (n = 29) performed 3 push-ups each with 4 different suspension systems. Push-up speed was controlled using a metronome and testing order was randomized. Average amplitude of the electromyographic root mean square of Triceps Brachii, Upper Trapezius, Anterior Deltoid, Clavicular Pectoralis, Rectus Abdominis, Rectus Femoris, and Lumbar Erector Spinae was recorded. Electromyographic signals were normalized to the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Electromyographic data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance with a Bonferroni post hoc. Based upon global arithmetic mean of all muscles analyzed, the suspended push-up with a pulley system provided the greatest activity (37.76% of MVIC; p < 0.001). Individually, the suspended push-up with a pulley system also provided the greatest triceps brachii, upper trapezius, rectus femoris and erector lumbar spinae muscle activation. In contrast, more stable conditions seem more appropriate for pectoralis major and anterior deltoid muscles. Independent of the type of design, all suspension systems were especially effective training tools for reaching high levels of rectus abdominis activation. Key Points Compared with standard push-ups on the floor, suspended push-ups increase core muscle activation. A one-anchor system with a pulley is the best option to increase TRICEP, TRAPS, LUMB and FEM muscle activity. More stable conditions such as the standard push-up or a parallel band system provide greater increases in DELT and PEC muscle activation. A suspended push-up is an effective method to achieve high muscle activity levels in the ABS. PMID:25177174

  15. Muscle Activation during Push-Ups with Different Suspension Training Systems.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Colado, Juan C; Martín, Fernando F; Rogers, Michael E; Behm, David G; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze upper extremity and core muscle activation when performing push-ups with different suspension devices. Young fit male university students (n = 29) performed 3 push-ups each with 4 different suspension systems. Push-up speed was controlled using a metronome and testing order was randomized. Average amplitude of the electromyographic root mean square of Triceps Brachii, Upper Trapezius, Anterior Deltoid, Clavicular Pectoralis, Rectus Abdominis, Rectus Femoris, and Lumbar Erector Spinae was recorded. Electromyographic signals were normalized to the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Electromyographic data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance with a Bonferroni post hoc. Based upon global arithmetic mean of all muscles analyzed, the suspended push-up with a pulley system provided the greatest activity (37.76% of MVIC; p < 0.001). Individually, the suspended push-up with a pulley system also provided the greatest triceps brachii, upper trapezius, rectus femoris and erector lumbar spinae muscle activation. In contrast, more stable conditions seem more appropriate for pectoralis major and anterior deltoid muscles. Independent of the type of design, all suspension systems were especially effective training tools for reaching high levels of rectus abdominis activation. Key PointsCompared with standard push-ups on the floor, suspended push-ups increase core muscle activation.A one-anchor system with a pulley is the best option to increase TRICEP, TRAPS, LUMB and FEM muscle activity.More stable conditions such as the standard push-up or a parallel band system provide greater increases in DELT and PEC muscle activation.A suspended push-up is an effective method to achieve high muscle activity levels in the ABS. PMID:25177174

  16. Analysis of muscle activations in lower extremities muscles at various angles of ankle flexion using wedges during static squat exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Chang-Hwan; Jeong, Yeon-Woo; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate changes in activation of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles during one-legged squats performed at various angles of ankle flexion. With the use of wedges, the muscles were activated at different angles of ankle flexion angles to establish the appropriate posture necessary for muscle strengthening and rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy adults aged 20–40?years were recruited from Good Morning Hospital in Ulsan City. Of the 22 participants, two dropped out during the tests, leaving a final sample of 20 participants. The wedges were 100?mm wide and 200?mm long and had inclinations of 10°, 30°, and 50°. EMG Analyzer software was used to measure muscle activation. [Results] A significant difference in the activation of the rectus femoris muscle at various angles of ankle flexion was seen. The gastrocnemius muscle exhibited significant differences in activation among the 0°–30°, 0°–50°, and 10°–50° inclinations. [Conclusion] Wedge-assisted muscle activation under different ankle flexion angles can be introduced as an effective exercise option under clinical conditions. PMID:26504309

  17. Effects of age and inactivity due to prolonged bed rest on atrophy of trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Tome; Mori, Natsuko; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of age and inactivity due to being chronically bedridden on atrophy of trunk muscles. The subjects comprised 33 young women (young group) and 41 elderly women who resided in nursing homes or chronic care institutions. The elderly subjects were divided into two groups: independent elderly group who were able to perform activities of daily living involving walking independently (n = 28) and dependent elderly group who were chronically bedridden (n = 13). The thickness of the following six trunk muscles was measured by B-mode ultrasound: the rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, transversus abdominis, thoracic erector spinae (longissimus) and lumbar multifidus muscles. All muscles except for the transversus abdominis and lumbar multifidus muscles were significantly thinner in the independent elderly group compared with those in the young group. The thicknesses of all muscles in the dependent elderly group was significantly smaller than that in the young group, whereas there were no differences between the dependent elderly and independent elderly groups in the muscle thicknesses of the rectus abdominis and internal oblique muscles. In conclusion, our results suggest that: (1) age-related atrophy compared with young women was less in the deep antigravity trunk muscles than the superficial muscles in the independent elderly women; (2) atrophy associated with chronic bed rest was more marked in the antigravity muscles, such as the back and transversus abdominis. PMID:21472438

  18. Ontogenetic changes of trunk muscle structure in the Japanese black salamander (Hynobius nigrescens).

    PubMed

    Omura, Ayano; Anzai, Wataru; Koyabu, Daisuke; Endo, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    We investigated ontogenetic changes in the trunk muscles of the Japanese black salamander (Hynobius nigrescens) before, during and after metamorphosis. Given that amphibians change their locomotive patterns with metamorphosis, we hypothesized that they may also change the structure of their trunk muscles. The trunk muscles were macroscopically observed, and the weight ratios of each trunk muscle group were quantified at six different developmental stages. Immediately after hatching, we found that the lateral hypaxial muscle was composed of one thick M. ventralis, from ventral edge of which M. transversus abdominis arose later, followed by M. obliquus externus and M. rectus abdominis. The weight ratios of the dorsal and abdominal muscles to the trunk muscles increased with growth. We suggest that a single thick and large lateral hypaxial muscle facilitates swimming during early developmental stages. The increase in the weight ratios of the dorsal and abdominal muscles with growth possibly assists with gravity resistance necessary for terrestrial life. PMID:25816856

  19. The influence of non-paretic leg movement on muscle action in the paretic leg of hemiplegic patients.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, T; Hara, Y; Chino, N

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the effect of non-involved-side exercise on the involved (paretic) leg-muscle of patients with stroke. Each of the ten adults studied attempted to perform, while seated, a predetermined sequence of the following actions : (1) a voluntary knee extension on the involved side; (2) a maximal, isometric knee-flexion on the non-involved side; (3) a maximal, isometric knee-flexion on the non-involved side with counter-resistance (in front of the ankle joint) on the involved side. The root-mean-square voltage was measured across the rectus femoris, the medial hamstring, the tibialis anterior, and the medial gastrocnemius muscles (on the involved side) with surface electrodes. The root-mean-square voltages of the involved-side rectus femoris and the tibialis anterior muscles were found to increase substantially during non-involved-side knee flexion relative to that detected for voluntary knee extension on the involved side. The voltage of the rectus femoris muscle increased substantially also when counter-resistance was present. There was no similar substantial increase of muscular activity, in the medial hamstring and medial gastrocnemius, induced by contralateral isometric knee-flexion. This study suggests that, among patients with severe hemiplegia, isometric knee flexion in the non-involved side may be useful for facilitating the paretic rectus femoris and tibialis anterior muscular activities. PMID:10458315

  20. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face ...

  1. Bilateral Orbital Abscesses After Strabismus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Lee, Winston; Garg, Aakriti; Garibaldi, Daniel C; Leibert, Michelle; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Infectious orbital complications after strabismus surgery are rare. Their incidence is estimated to be 1 case per 1,100 surgeries and include preseptal cellulitis, orbital cellulitis, subconjunctival and sub-Tenon's abscesses, myositis, and endophthalmitis. This report describes the case of an otherwise healthy 3-year-old boy who underwent bilateral medial rectus recession and disinsertion of the inferior obliques. A few days after surgery, the patient presented with bilateral periorbital edema and inferotemporal chemosis. A series of CT scans with contrast revealed inferotemporal orbital collections OU. The patient immediately underwent transconjunctival drainage of fibrinous and seropurulent collections in the sub-Tenon's space and experienced rapid improvement a few days later. The patient is reported to be in stable condition in a follow-up examination performed more than a year after the reported events. PMID:24896771

  2. The MRC1/CD68 Ratio Is Positively Associated with Adipose Tissue Lipogenesis and with Muscle Mitochondrial Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Ortega, Francisco; Gómez-Serrano, María; García-Santos, Eva; Ricart, Wifredo; Tinahones, Francisco; Mingrone, Geltrude; Peral, Belén; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Alternative macrophages (M2) express the cluster differentiation (CD) 206 (MCR1) at high levels. Decreased M2 in adipose tissue is known to be associated with obesity and inflammation-related metabolic disturbances. Here we aimed to investigate MCR1 relative to CD68 (total macrophages) gene expression in association with adipogenic and mitochondrial genes, which were measured in human visceral [VWAT, n?=?147] and subcutaneous adipose tissue [SWAT, n?=?76] and in rectus abdominis muscle (n?=?23). The effects of surgery-induced weight loss were also longitudinally evaluated (n?=?6). Results MCR1 and CD68 gene expression levels were similar in VWAT and SWAT. A higher proportion of CD206 relative to total CD68 was present in subjects with less body fat and lower fasting glucose concentrations. The ratio MCR1/CD68was positively associated with IRS1gene expression and with the expression of lipogenic genes such as ACACA, FASN and THRSP, even after adjusting for BMI. The ratio MCR1/CD68 in SWAT increased significantly after the surgery-induced weight loss (+44.7%; p?=?0.005) in parallel to the expression of adipogenic genes. In addition, SWAT MCR1/CD68ratio was significantly associated with muscle mitochondrial gene expression (PPARGC1A, TFAM and MT-CO3). AT CD206 was confirmed by immunohistochemistry to be specific of macrophages, especially abundant in crown-like structures. Conclusion A decreased ratio MCR1/CD68 is linked to adipose tissue and muscle mitochondrial dysfunction at least at the level of expression of adipogenic and mitochondrial genes. PMID:23951013

  3. Knee extensor muscle oxygen consumption in relation to muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, R D; Blaauboer, M E; Born, J R; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2006-12-01

    Recently, fatigability and muscle oxygen consumption (mVO(2)) during sustained isometric contractions were found to be less at shorter (30 degrees knee angle; 0 degrees = full extension) compared to longer knee extensor muscle lengths (90 degrees ) and, at low torques, less in the rectus femoris (RF) muscle than in the vastus lateralis and medialis. In the present study we hypothesized that these findings could be accounted for by a knee angle- and a muscle-dependent activation respectively. On two experimental days rectified surface EMG (rsEMG) was obtained as a measure of muscle activation in nine healthy young males. In addition, on day 1 maximal torque capacity (MTC) was carefully determined using superimposed nerve stimulation on brief high intensity contractions (> 70%MVC) at 30, 60 and 90 degrees knee angles. On day 2, subjects performed longer lasting isometric contractions (10-70%MTC) while mVO(2) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). At 30 degrees , maximal mVO(2) was reached significantly later (11.0 s +/- 6.5 s) and was 57.9 +/- 8.3% less (average +/- SD, across intensities and muscles) than mVO(2) at 60 and 90 degrees (p < 0.05). However, rsEMG was on average only 18.0 +/- 11.8% (p = 0.062) less at the start of the contraction at 30 degrees . At 10%MTC at all knee angles, maximal mVO(2) of the RF occurred significantly later (28.8 +/- 36.0 s) and showed a significantly smaller increase in rsEMG compared to both vasti. In conclusion, it is unlikely that the tendency for less intense muscle activation could fully account for the approximately 60% lower oxygen consumption at 30 degrees , but the later increase in RFmVO(2) seemed to be caused by a less strong activation of the RF. PMID:17089159

  4. Influence of exercise training on the oxidative capacity of rat abdominal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uribe, J. M.; Stump, C. S.; Tipton, C. M.; Fregosi, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine if endurance exercise training would increase the oxidative capacity of the abdominal expiratory muscles of the rat. Accordingly, 9 male rats were subjected to an endurance training protocol (1 h/day, 6 days/week, 9 weeks) and 9 litter-mates served as controls. Citrate synthase (CS) activity was used as an index of oxidative capacity, and was determined in the following muscles: soleus, plantaris, costal diaphragm, crural diaphragm, and in all four abdominal muscles: rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique. Compared to their non-trained litter-mates, the trained rats had higher peak whole body oxygen consumption rates (+ 16%) and CS activities in plantaris (+34%) and soleus (+36%) muscles. Thus, the training program caused substantial systemic and locomotor muscle adaptations. The CS activity of costal diaphragm was 20% greater in the trained animals, but no difference was observed in crural diaphragm. The CS activity in the abdominal muscles was less than one-half of that in locomotor and diaphragm muscles, and there were no significant changes with training except in the rectus abdominis where a 26% increase was observed. The increase in rectus abdominis CS activity may reflect its role in postural support and/or locomotion, as none of the primary expiratory pumping muscles adapted to the training protocol. The relatively low levels of CS activity in the abdominal muscles suggests that they are not recruited frequently at rest, and the lack of an increase with training indicates that these muscles do not contribute significantly to the increased ventilatory activity accompanying exercise in the rat.

  5. Influence of exercise intensity on atrophied quadriceps muscle in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shoji; Obatake, Taishi; Hoshino, Koichi; Nakagawa, Takao

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of resistance training on atrophied skeletal muscle in rats based on evidence derived from physical therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were forced to undergo squats as resistance training for 3 weeks after atrophying the rectus femoris muscle by hindlimb suspension for 2 weeks. The intensity of resistance training was adjusted to 50% and 70% of the maximum lifted weight, i.e., 50% of the one-repetition maximum and 70% of the one-repetition maximum, respectively. [Results] Three weeks of training did not alter the one-repetition maximum, and muscle fibers were injured while measuring the one-repetition maximum and reloading. The decrease in cross-sectional area in the rectus femoris muscle induced by unloading for 2 weeks was significantly recovered after training at 70% of the one-repetition maximum. The levels of muscle RING-finger protein-1 mRNA expression were significantly lower in muscles trained at 70% of the one-repetition maximum than in untrained muscles. [Conclusion] These results suggest that high-intensity resistance training can promote atrophic muscle recovery, which provides a scientific basis for therapeutic exercise methods for treatment of atrophic muscle in physical therapy. PMID:26696716

  6. Reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects using rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap: A report of fifteen cases

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Y.; Hattori, T.; Niimoto, M.; Toge, T. )

    1986-02-01

    In 15 patients chest walls were excised because of recurrent breast cancer, radiation ulcer, or rib tumor. In most cases the full-thickness defect of the chest wall was about 10 x 10 cm. Reconstruction was performed using only a rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. No patient developed circulation problems in the flap or severe flail chest, and we had successful results in all our cases. These results show that the rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap is quite effective and safe to use in the reconstruction of chest wall defects.

  7. In vitro effects of VD-99-11 on Angiostrongylus cantonensis and isolated frog rectus.

    PubMed

    Lee, H H; Shyu, L Y; Terada, M

    1995-01-01

    In vitro effects of VD-99-11 were examined using adult Angiostrongylus cantonensis and isolated frog rectus. In A. cantonensis, paralysis was elicited by VD-99-11 at 10(-9)-10(-6) g/ml. The paralysis caused by VD-99-11 (10(-8) g/ml) was antagonized by picrotoxin or bicuculline but not by phentolamine. A relationship between VD-99-11 and gabergic antagonists was observed in worm preparations contracted by eserine or pyrantel: VD-99-11 at higher concentrations (3x10(-6) g/ml) caused a marked contraction. In worm preparations contracted with eserine or pyrantel, the only additional contraction induced by VD-99-11 (5x10(-6) g/ml) was antagonized by strychnine. In experiments on the guanidine (2.5x10(-3) M)-induced twitch responses in isolated frog rectus, marked stimulation was caused by VD-99-11 (3-5x10(-6) g/ml). The stimulated responses induced by VD-99-11 were antagonized by tetrodotoxin, D-tubocurarine, strychnine, and hemicholinium-3, respectively. These results suggest that VD-99-11 seems superior to milbemycin D, milbemycin oxime, and ivermectin in some aspects, such as in vitro potency, though this new substance is similar to these drugs in having two different actions on the gabergic mechanism at lower concentrations and on the cholinergic mechanism at higher concentrations. PMID:7479654

  8. Effect of Different Forefoot and Heel Support Surfaces on the Activities of the RF and HAM Muscles during the Sit-to-stand Task while Wearing High-heel Shoes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to show the effect of different forefoot and heel support surfaces on the activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles during the sit-to-stand task while wearing high-heel shoes. [Subjects] Fifteen female subjects were recruited. [Methods] The muscle activities of the rectus femoris and hamstring muscles were recorded using an MP150 system during the sit-to-stand task while wearing various high-heeled shoes. [Results] The activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles significantly decreased when subjects wore condition 1 shoes compared with when they wore condition 2, 3 or 4 high-heeled shoes. The activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles significantly decreased when subjects wore condition 2 high-heeled shoes compared with condition 3 or 4 high-heeled shoes. [Conclusion] The results can be interpreted as indicating that the size of the forefoot supporting surface can influence the lower extremity muscles of women wearing high-heeled shoes more than the size of the heel supporting surface. PMID:25364105

  9. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePLUS

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy. Disuse atrophy occurs from a lack of physical activity. In most people, muscle atrophy is caused by not using the ...

  10. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  11. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePLUS

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  12. Impact of osteoid osteomas of the hip on the size and fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Ladjeroud, Salima; Touraine, Sébastien; Laouénan, Cédric; Parlier-Cuau, Caroline; Bousson, Valérie; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the impact of osteoid osteomas of the hip on the size and fatty infiltration of the muscle thigh in 42 patients. The thigh circumference, cross-sectional areas, and fatty atrophy of four anterior muscles were assessed on magnetic resonance axial T1-weighted images. A significant fatty atrophy was found in the studied muscles of the ipsilateral thigh except for the rectus femoris. No significant association was demonstrated with pain duration suggesting that muscle atrophy may rather be related to the locoregional inflammation than subsequent to the disuse of the limb. PMID:25135371

  13. Muscle ribosomal protein synthesis in normal pregnancy: implication for carrier detection in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ionasescu, Victor; White, Charles; Zellweger, Hans; Lewis, Ruth; Conway, Thomas W.

    1974-01-01

    Muscle samples of rectus abdominis were obtained from 11 normal pregnant women 21-30 years old during elective Caesarean section and from 10 normal, non-pregnant controls of comparable age. The in-vitro amino-acid incorporation of polyribosomes extracted from the muscle homogenates of the pregnant women showed high activity for the synthesis of non-collagen protein in six cases, while control values were found in five cases. These results indicate that carrier detection in Duchenne muscular dystrophy based on increased muscle ribosomal protein synthesis cannot be done accurately during pregnancy, unless adequate values for known carriers at a comparable stage of gestation are available. PMID:4841079

  14. Evaluating potential biomarkers of cachexia and survival in skeletal muscle of upper gastrointestinal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Nathan A; Skipworth, Richard J E; Gallagher, Iain J; Greig, Carolyn A; Guttridge, Denis C; Ross, James A; Fearon, Kenneth C H

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to grow the potential therapeutic armamentarium in the cachexia domain of supportive oncology, there is a pressing need to develop suitable biomarkers and potential drug targets. This pilot study evaluated several potential candidate biomarkers in skeletal muscle biopsies from a cohort of upper gastrointestinal cancer (UGIC) patients. Methods One hundred seven patients (15 weight-stable healthy controls (HC) and 92 UGIC patients) were recruited. Mean (standard deviation) weight-loss of UGIC patients was 8.1 (9.3%). Cachexia was defined as weight-loss ?5%. Rectus?abdominis muscle was obtained at surgery and was analysed by western blotting or quantitative real-time–polymerase chain reaction. Candidate markers were selected according to previous literature and included Akt and phosphorylated Akt (pAkt, n?=?52), forkhead box O transcription factors (n?=?59), ubiquitin E3 ligases (n?=?59, control of muscle anabolism/catabolism), BNIP3 and GABARAPL1 (n?=?59, as markers of autophagy), myosin heavy-chain (MyHC, n?=?54), dystrophin (n?=?39), ?-dystroglycan (n?=?52), and ?-sarcoglycan (n?=?52, as markers of structural alteration in a muscle). Patients were followed up for an average of 1255?days (range 581–1955?days) or until death. Patients were grouped accordingly and analysed by (i) all cancer patients vs. HC; (ii) cachectic vs. non-cachectic cancer patients; and (iii) cancer patients surviving ?1 vs. >1?year post operatively. Results Cancer compared with HC patients had reduced mean (standard deviation) total Akt protein [0.49 (0.31) vs. 0.89 (0.17), P?=?0.001], increased ratio of phosphorylated to total Akt [1.33 (1.04) vs. 0.32 (0.21), P?=?0.002] and increased expression of GABARAPL1 [1.60 (0.76) vs. 1.10 (0.57), P?=?0.024]. ?-Dystroglycan levels were higher in cachectic compared with non-cachectic cancer patients [1.01 (0.16) vs. 0.87 (0.20), P?=?0.007]. Survival was shortened in patients with low compared with high MyHC levels (median 316 vs. 1326?days, P?=?0.023) and dystrophin levels (median 341 vs. 660?days, P?=?0.008). Conclusions The present study has identified intramuscular protein level of ?-dystroglycan as a potential biomarker of cancer cachexia. Changes in the structural elements of muscle (MyHC or dystrophin) appear to be survival biomarkers. PMID:26136412

  15. Oxidative proteome alterations during skeletal muscle ageing

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço dos Santos, Sofia; Baraibar, Martin A.; Lundberg, Staffan; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar; Larsson, Lars; Friguet, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia corresponds to the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality, and strength associated with ageing and leads to a progressive impairment of mobility and quality of life. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are not completely understood. A hallmark of cellular and tissular ageing is the accumulation of oxidatively modified (carbonylated) proteins, leading to a decreased quality of the cellular proteome that could directly impact on normal cellular functions. Although increased oxidative stress has been reported during skeletal muscle ageing, the oxidized protein targets, also referred as to the ‘oxi-proteome’ or ‘carbonylome’, have not been characterized yet. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins build up and potentially affect muscle function, proteins targeted by these modifications have been identified in human rectus abdominis muscle obtained from young and old healthy donors using a bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach coupled with immunodetection of carbonylated proteins. Among evidenced protein spots, 17 were found as increased carbonylated in biopsies from old donors comparing to young counterparts. These proteins are involved in key cellular functions such as cellular morphology and transport, muscle contraction and energy metabolism. Importantly, impairment of these pathways has been described in skeletal muscle during ageing. Functional decline of these proteins due to irreversible oxidation may therefore impact directly on the above-mentioned pathways, hence contributing to the generation of the sarcopenic phenotype. PMID:26073261

  16. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  17. Foot Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Feet » Foot Health Information Surgery When is Foot Surgery Necessary? Many foot problems do not respond ... restore the function of your foot. Types of Foot Surgery Fusions: Fusions are usually performed to treat ...

  18. Trunk Muscle Activities During Abdominal Bracing: Comparison Among Muscles and Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Maeo, Sumiaki; Takahashi, Takumi; Takai, Yohei; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bracing is often adopted in fitness and sports conditioning programs. However, there is little information on how muscular activities during the task differ among the muscle groups located in the trunk and from those during other trunk exercises. The present study aimed to quantify muscular activity levels during abdominal bracing with respect to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Ten healthy young adult men performed five static (abdominal bracing, abdominal hollowing, prone, side, and supine plank) and five dynamic (V- sits, curl-ups, sit-ups, and back extensions on the floor and on a bench) exercises. Surface electromyogram (EMG) activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and erector spinae (ES) muscles were recorded in each of the exercises. The EMG data were normalized to those obtained during maximal voluntary contraction of each muscle (% EMGmax). The % EMGmax value during abdominal bracing was significantly higher in IO (60%) than in the other muscles (RA: 18%, EO: 27%, ES: 19%). The % EMGmax values for RA, EO, and ES were significantly lower in the abdominal bracing than in some of the other exercises such as V-sits and sit-ups for RA and EO and back extensions for ES muscle. However, the % EMGmax value for IO during the abdominal bracing was significantly higher than those in most of the other exercises including dynamic ones such as curl-ups and sit-ups. These results suggest that abdominal bracing is one of the most effective techniques for inducing a higher activation in deep abdominal muscles, such as IO muscle, even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements. Key Points Trunk muscle activities during abdominal bracing was examined with regard to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Abdominal bracing preferentially activates internal oblique muscles even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements. Abdominal bracing should be included in exercise programs when the goal is to improve spine stability. PMID:24149153

  19. Age-Related Differences in Muscle Shear Moduli in the Lower Extremity.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Yamashita, Yota; Ueyasu, Yuta

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the age-related differences in shear moduli of the rectus femoris muscle (RF), the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle (LG) and the soleus muscle (SOL) using shear wave ultrasound elastography. Thirty-one young individuals and 49 elderly individuals volunteered for this study. The shear modulus of RF was determined at 50% of the thigh length, and those of LG and SOL were determined at 30% of the lower leg length. RF and LG shear moduli were significantly higher in young individuals than in elderly individuals, but there was no age-related difference in SOL shear modulus. From the standpoint of an index reflecting muscle mechanical properties, it is suggested that the lower muscle shear moduli of RF and LG are the reason for the decreased explosive muscle strength in the lower extremity and the increased risk of falls for elderly individuals. PMID:26314496

  20. Determination of passive viscoelastic response of the abdominal muscle and related constitutive modeling: stress-relaxation behavior.

    PubMed

    Calvo, B; Sierra, M; Grasa, J; Muñoz, M J; Peña, E

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the passive viscoelastic properties of rabbit abdominal wall. In vitro strain relaxation tests were performed in the oblique muscle (in two perpendicular directions), the rectus abdominis and the linea alba in the longitudinal direction. Based on experimental data, a model for the viscoelastic mechanical properties of this tissue is presented here. In particular, we used a 3D non-linear viscoelastic model to fit data sets obtained from tissue of the rabbit abdominal wall. Uniaxial relaxation tests were carried out for samples obtained from the abdominal wall. The experimental results clearly demonstrate the anisotropy and nonlinearity of the abdominal tissue. The stress relaxation was higher in the transverse direction (closer to muscle fibers) with an average value of the final stress ratio of 48%, than in the longitudinal direction with around 56% of this ratio for the oblique muscle. These tests, at several stretch levels, presented a different behavior depending on the region where the tissue sample was located. There was no dependence between the stress relaxation ratio and the stretch level for the oblique muscles in their longitudinal or transverse directions (p>0.01). In contrast, for rectus abdominis and linea alba a dependence between the stress relaxation ratio and stretch level was found. Our study revealed an increase in the stress relaxation ratio for the rectus abdominis (p<0.01) and a decrease for the linea alba with higher stretch levels (p<0.01). Overall good predictions ?<0.115 were obtained with the model proposed for the oblique muscle (no dependence on the stretch level) and to reproduce the non-linear viscoelastic response of rectus abdominis and linea alba. PMID:24793173

  1. Effects of bridge exercise performed on an unstable surface on lumbar stabilizing muscles according to the knee angle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo; Lee, Daehee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of bridge exercise performed on an unstable surface on lumbar stabilizing muscles according to the knee angle. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy adult men were selected for this study. [Methods] The study subjects performed the bridge exercise on an unstable surface and a stable surface, with the knees at different angles (45°, 90°, and 120°). An aero-step device was used as the unstable surface, and the flat ground was used as the stable surface. External oblique, internal oblique, and rectus abdominis muscle activities were assessed and compared using electromyography. [Results] The study results demonstrated that performing the bridge exercise on an unstable surface with a knee angle of 120° led to a greater increase in the external oblique, internal oblique, and rectus abdominis muscle activities than when performed on a stable surface. [Conclusion] The bridge exercise with the knees at a 120° angle was found to be an effective intervention for increasing the external oblique, internal oblique, and rectus abdominis muscle activities. PMID:26357450

  2. Testing procedures for abdominal muscles using the muscle dynamometer SD02.

    PubMed

    Malátová, R; Drevikovská, P

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two tests both frequently used for determination of the state of the lumbar spine muscle system during static and dynamic loads. The sit-up test is a commonly used terrain test, while the diaphragm test is a more exact laboratory procedure. For both tests, measurements conducted by the muscular dynamometer SD02 were used to assure congruency in evaluation. The tests are based on the general information that the muscles of the deep stabilizing spine system (DSSS) are interconnected and form one functional unit, and that dysfunction of just one of these muscles may cause total dysfunction of the whole muscle system. It is therefore expected that the participation and force generated by the largest muscles of the area, musculus rectus abdominis and musculus transversus abdominis, will be comparable also during the testing procedures. Forty-five healthy women joined in the research, with the average age of 21.6 years. The results obtained were statistically evaluated using Statistica 6. The results showed the clear incapability of the sit-up test to indicate correctly the imbalances of the muscles of the DSSS, also implying that the tested subjects suffer to a high degree from dysfunctions of the DSSS. PMID:20092100

  3. An Uncommon Presentation of Spontaneous Rectus Sheath Hematoma with Acute Kidney Injury due to Obstructive Uropathy and Prerenal Azotemia

    PubMed Central

    Mourounoglou, Maria; Sabanis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Rectus Sheath Hematoma (RSH) represents an unusual entity which is characterized by acute abdominal pain and tender palpable abdominal mass usually, among elderly patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. We report the case of an 81-year-old woman admitted to our department due to acute abdominal pain and oligoanuria. The patient had recently been hospitalized due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and atrial fibrillation (AF) and received both anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies. The radiological assessments revealed an extended Rectus Sheath Hematoma and bilateral hydronephrosis. Treatment of the hematoma required cessation of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, immobilization, blood and fresh frozen plasma transfusion, and administration of vasopressors. The patient recovered gradually and was discharged home fifteen (15) days later. PMID:25126429

  4. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects. PMID:26506612

  5. Muscle activation and strength in squat and Bulgarian squat on stable and unstable surface.

    PubMed

    Andersen, V; Fimland, M S; Brennset, O; Haslestad, L R; Lundteigen, M S; Skalleberg, K; Saeterbakken, A H

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to compare muscle activity using the same relative resistance in squats and Bulgarian squats on stable and unstable surface. Muscle strength and activity were assessed by 6-repetition maximum and concomitant surface electromyography. A cohort of 15 resistance-trained males performed the exercises on the floor or a foam cushion in randomized order. The muscle activity was greater in biceps femoris (63-77%, p<0.01) and core muscle external obliques (58-62%, p<0.05) for the Bulgarian squat compared to regular squats, but lower for rectus femoris (16-21%, p<0.05). Only Bulgarian squat showed differences concerning the surface, e.?g. the unstable surface reduced the activation of erector spinae (10%, p<0.05) and biceps femoris (10%, p<0.05) compared to a stable surface. There were similar activations in the vasti muscles and rectus abdominis between the different exercises (p=0.313-0.995). Unstable surfaces resulted in a load decrement of 7% and 10% compared to stable surfaces (p<0.001). In conclusion, the squat was somewhat favorable for the activation of agonists, whereas Bulgarian squat was advantageous for the antagonist and somewhat for core muscles. Bulgarian- and regular squats complement each other, and it may be useful to include both in a periodized resistance training program. PMID:25254898

  6. Chest wall dynamics and muscle recruitment during professional flute playing.

    PubMed

    Cossette, Isabelle; Monaco, Pierpaolo; Aliverti, Andrea; Macklem, Peter T

    2008-02-01

    Respiratory parameters and sound were recorded during professional flute playing in order to assess what physiological processes were associated with the control of sound production that results in 'breath support' which in turn is associated with high quality playing. Four standing young professional flautists played flute excerpts with and without breath support. Recordings included optoelectronic plethysmographic measurements of chest wall volume (V(cw)) and its compartments, surface electromyography of the scalene, lateral abdominal, rectus abdominus, parasternal and sternocleidomastoid muscles, mouth pressure, and sound. Flow was estimated from differentiating V(cw) during playing. Results showed that flute support entails antagonistic contraction of non-diaphragmatic inspiratory muscles that tends to hold the rib cage at higher lung volume. This relieves the expiratory muscles from the task of producing the right mouth pressure, especially at the end of the phrases, so they can contribute more to the finer control of mouth pressure modulations required for high quality playing. PMID:17977805

  7. Modified Vertical Rectus Abdominis Musculocutaneous Flap for Limb Salvage Procedures in Proximal Lower Limb Musculoskeletal Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Haitham H.; El-Ghoneimy, Ahmed; Farid, Yasser; Ebeid, Walid; Afifi, Ahmed; Elaffandi, Ahmed; Mahboub, Tarek

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and aim. Management of complicated wounds after tumor extipiration of pelvic and proximal lower limb musculoskeletal sarcoma represents an essential component in the outcome of these patients. The authors present modified vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (VRAM) flap techniques to reconstruct extensive defects after debridment of these complicated wounds. Material and Methods. Over a period of 4 years (2002–2005), 5 men and 2 women were managed. Median age was 21 years (range 15–49). The patients were managed for complicated lower trunk, groin, and upper thigh wounds after resection of three pelvic chondrosarcomas as well as two pelvic and two proximal femur osteosarcomas. The modifications included a VRAM flap with lateral and tongue-like extension design of the skin paddle (5 cases) or a delayed extended VRAM flap (2 cases). Results. All flaps showed complete survival and healing with no ischemic events providing stable coverage. All patients were ambulant with good limb functions in terms of walking and gait after adequate rehabilitation, 2 needed support with crutches. Conclusion. The modified VRAM flaps offer reliable reconstructive tools for coverage of complex groin and thigh defects by providing larger well-vascularized soft tissue with acceptable donor site. PMID:18389069

  8. Modified vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap for limb salvage procedures in proximal lower limb musculoskeletal sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Haitham H; El-Ghoneimy, Ahmed; Farid, Yasser; Ebeid, Walid; Afifi, Ahmed; Elaffandi, Ahmed; Mahboub, Tarek

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and aim. Management of complicated wounds after tumor extipiration of pelvic and proximal lower limb musculoskeletal sarcoma represents an essential component in the outcome of these patients. The authors present modified vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (VRAM) flap techniques to reconstruct extensive defects after debridment of these complicated wounds. Material and Methods. Over a period of 4 years (2002-2005), 5 men and 2 women were managed. Median age was 21 years (range 15-49). The patients were managed for complicated lower trunk, groin, and upper thigh wounds after resection of three pelvic chondrosarcomas as well as two pelvic and two proximal femur osteosarcomas. The modifications included a VRAM flap with lateral and tongue-like extension design of the skin paddle (5 cases) or a delayed extended VRAM flap (2 cases). Results. All flaps showed complete survival and healing with no ischemic events providing stable coverage. All patients were ambulant with good limb functions in terms of walking and gait after adequate rehabilitation, 2 needed support with crutches. Conclusion. The modified VRAM flaps offer reliable reconstructive tools for coverage of complex groin and thigh defects by providing larger well-vascularized soft tissue with acceptable donor site. PMID:18389069

  9. Long-term outcomes of unilateral lateral rectus recession versus recess-resect for intermittent exotropia of 20-25 prism diopters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare surgical outcomes of unilateral lateral rectus recession (ULR) and unilateral recess-resect (RR) for intermittent exotropia of 20-25 prism diopters (PD). Methods In this retrospective study, ULR was performed on 82 patients and RR on 98 patients for the treatment of intermittent exotropia of 20-25 PD with a follow-up period of 24 months or more. The main outcome measures were postoperative exodeviation angles and final success rates. A surgical success was considered to be an alignment within 10 PD. Results The mean follow-up duration after the surgery was 53.8?±?26.4 months in the ULR group and 52.5?±?27.4 months in the RR group (p?=?0.482). The mean deviation angles at postoperative 1 day were -0.49 PD (esodeviation) in the ULR group and -1.98 PD in the RR group. Subsequently, at postoperative 1 week, 1 and 3 months, the deviations became more exotropic in the ULR group than in the RR group (p?

  10. Fiber Composition of the Grasscutter (Thryonomys swinderianus, Temminck 1827) Thigh Muscle: An Enzyme-histochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bakou, Serge Niangoran; Nteme Ella, Gualbert Simon; Aoussi, Serge; Guiguand, Lydie; Cherel, Yannick; Fantodji, Agathe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe de fiber composition in the thigh muscles of grass cutter (Thryonomys swinderianus, Temminck 1827). Ten 4 to 6-month-old (3 to 4 kg) male grasscutter were used in this study. Eleven skeletal muscles of the thigh [M. biceps femoris (BF), M. rectus femoris (RF), M. vastus lateralis (VL), M. vastus medialis (VM), M. tensor fasciae latae (TFL), M. semitendinosus (ST), M. semimembranosus (SM), M. semimembranosus accessorius (SMA), M. Sartorius (SRT), M. pectineus (PCT), M. adductor magnus (AM)] were collected after animals euthanasia and examined by light microscopy. Three muscle fiber types (I, IIB and IIA) were found in these muscles using enzyme histochemical techniques [myosine adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase (NADH-TR)]. Ten of these eleven muscles are composed by 89% to 100% of fast contracting fibers (types IIA and IIB), while the SMA was almost exclusively formed by slow contracting fibers. PMID:26167391

  11. Adaptation of Slow Myofibers: The Effect of Sustained BDNF Treatment of Extraocular Muscles in Infant Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Christy L.; Fleuriet, Jérome; Walton, Mark M.; Mustari, Michael J.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated promising new treatment options for strabismus. Neurotrophic factors have emerged as a potential treatment for oculomotor disorders because of diverse roles in signaling to muscles and motor neurons. Unilateral treatment with sustained release brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to a single lateral rectus muscle in infant monkeys was performed to test the hypothesis that strabismus would develop in correlation with extraocular muscle (EOM) changes during the critical period for development of binocularity. Methods. The lateral rectus muscles of one eye in two infant macaques were treated with sustained delivery of BDNF for 3 months. Eye alignment was assessed using standard photographic methods. Muscle specimens were analyzed to examine the effects of BDNF on the density, morphology, and size of neuromuscular junctions, as well as myofiber size. Counts were compared to age-matched controls. Results. No change in eye alignment occurred with BDNF treatment. Compared to control muscle, neuromuscular junctions on myofibers expressing slow myosins had a larger area. Myofibers expressing slow myosin had larger diameters, and the percentage of myofibers expressing slow myosins increased in the proximal end of the muscle. Expression of BDNF was examined in control EOM, and observed to have strongest immunoreactivity outside the endplate zone. Conclusions. We hypothesize that the oculomotor system adapted to sustained BDNF treatment to preserve normal alignment. Our results suggest that BDNF treatment preferentially altered myofibers expressing slow myosins. This implicates BDNF signaling as influencing the slow twitch properties of EOM. PMID:26030102

  12. Skeletal muscle responses to unloading in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G.; Tesch, P.; Hather, B.; Adams, G.; Buchanan, P.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the effects of unloading on skeletal muscle structure. Method: Eight subjects walked on crutches for six weeks with a 110 cm elevated sole on the right shoe. This removed weight bearing by the left lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging of both lower limbs and biopsies of the left m. vastus laterallis (VL) were used to study muscle structure. Results: Unloading decreased (P less than 0.05) muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the knee extensors 16 percent. The knee flexors showed about 1/2 of this response (-7 percent, P less than 0.05). The three vasti muscles each showed decreases (P less than 0.05) of about 15 percent. M. rectus femoris did not change. Mean fiber CSA in VL decreased (P less than 0.05) 14 percent with type 2 and type 1 fibers showing reductions of 15 and 11 percent respectively. The ankle extensors showed a 20 percent decrease (P less than 0.05) in CSA. The reduction for the 'fast' m. gastrocnemius was 27 percent compared to the 18 percent decrease for the 'slow' soleus. Summary: The results suggest that decreases in muscle CSA are determined by the relative change in impact loading history because atrophy was (1) greater in extensor than flexor muscles, (2) at least as great in fast as compared to slow muscles or fibers, and (3) not dependent on single or multi-joint function. They also suggest that the atrophic responses to unloading reported for lower mammals are quantitatively but not qualitatively similar to those of humans.

  13. The hyal and ventral branchial muscles in caecilian and salamander larvae: homologies and evolution.

    PubMed

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Haas, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    Amphibians (Lissamphibia) are characterized by a bi-phasic life-cycle that comprises an aquatic larval stage and metamorphosis to the adult. The ancestral aquatic feeding behavior of amphibian larvae is suction feeding. The negative pressure that is needed for ingestion of prey is created by depression of the hyobranchial apparatus as a result of hyobranchial muscle action. Understanding the homologies of hyobranchial muscles in amphibian larvae is a crucial step in understanding the evolution of this important character complex. However, the literature mostly focuses on the adult musculature and terms used for hyal and ventral branchial muscles in different amphibians often do not reflect homologies across lissamphibian orders. Here we describe the hyal and ventral branchial musculature in larvae of caecilians (Gymnophiona) and salamanders (Caudata), including juveniles of two permanently aquatic salamander species. Based on previous alternative terminology schemes, we propose a terminology for the hyal and ventral branchial muscles that reflects the homologies of muscles and that is suited for studies on hyobranchial muscle evolution in amphibians. We present a discussion of the hyal and ventral branchial muscles in larvae of the most recent common ancestor of amphibians (i.e. the ground plan of Lissamphibia). Based on our terminology, the hyal and ventral branchial musculature of caecilians and salamanders comprises the following muscles: m. depressor mandibulae, m. depressor mandibulae posterior, m. hyomandibularis, m. branchiohyoideus externus, m. interhyoideus, m. interhyoideus posterior, m. subarcualis rectus I, m. subarcualis obliquus II, m. subarcualis obliquus III, m. subarcualis rectus II-IV, and m. transversus ventralis IV. Except for the m. branchiohyoideus externus, all muscles considered herein can be assigned to the ground plan of the Lissamphibia with certainty. The m. branchiohyoideus externus is either apomorphic for the Batrachia (frogs + salamanders) or salamander larvae depending on whether or not a homologous muscle is present in frog tadpoles. PMID:21374703

  14. After Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  15. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  16. Pulmonary Function After Pedicled Transverse Rectus Abdominis Musculocutaneous Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Kevin J; Don, Scott; Mahabir, Raman C; Verheyden, Charles N

    2014-07-17

    Tight abdominal closures, as can be seen during transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction, have been shown to increase intra-abdominal pressure, thereby decreasing thoracopulmonary compliance and increasing the workload of breathing. The purpose of this article was to quantitate pulmonary function in patients who underwent pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction.A prospective clinical trial was conducted involving 22 women undergoing unilateral or bilateral pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction. Pulmonary function testing was conducted 1 week before the operation, 24 hours postoperatively, and 2 months postoperatively. The patients were stratified by age (<50 years vs ?50 years), type of TRAM flap (unilateral vs bilateral), tobacco use (smoker vs nonsmoker), and body mass index. Changes were analyzed using 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t tests. All comparisons used a 2-tailed test at the 0.05 level of significance.Other than residual volume, the 24-hour postoperative values were significantly lower than the preoperative values. The smokers had less change in functional residual capacity, total lung capacity, and forced vital capacity values than the nonsmokers at 24 hours postoperatively; however, they were noted to have decreased pulmonary function at baseline. The patients 50 years or older had significantly greater decline in functional residual capacity and residual volume compared with the younger cohort. No significant difference in pulmonary function testing values existed between those undergoing bilateral versus unilateral pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction. Pulmonary function tests returned to baseline at 2-month follow-up.Pulmonary function test values were significantly decreased at 24 hours after pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction. PMID:25046670

  17. The effects of sling exercise using vibration on trunk muscle activities of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngin; Kang, Hyungkyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of sling exercises with and without vibration on the muscular activity of the internal oblique (IO), rectus abdominis (RA), multifidus (MF), and erector spinae (ES) muscles of healthy adults. [Methods] Eleven healthy university students (11 men) with a mean age of 22.8?years were enrolled in this study. Subjects performed supine and prone bridge exercises with the knees flexed using a sling suspension system with and without vibration. The amplitudes of the EMG activities of selected trunk muscles (internal oblique, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, multifidus) were recorded. Two types of exercise conditions were executed in a random sequence for 5 seconds each. The signals detected from the middle 3 seconds (after discarding the signals of the first and the last one seconds) were used in the analysis. A 3-minute break was given after each exercise to minimize muscle fatigue. [Results] During the supine bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES muscles were significantly higher than those of the supine bridge exercise without vibration. Additionally, during the prone bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES were significantly higher than those of the prone bridge exercise without vibration. [Conclusion] Sling exercises with vibration improved the trunk muscle activities of healthy adults compared to the sling exercises without vibration. The information presented here is important for clinicians who use lumbar stabilization exercises as an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise. PMID:24259778

  18. Myofascial force transmission between transferred rat flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and former synergistic palmaris longus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Huub; Huijing, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We investigated the extent of mechanical interaction between rat flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL) muscles following transfer of FCU to the distal tendons of extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus (ECRB/L) muscles. Five weeks after recovery from surgery, isometric forces exerted at the distal tendons of FCU and PL were quantified at various FCU lengths. PL was kept at a constant length. Changing the muscle-tendon complex length of transferred FCU (by maximally 3.5 mm) decreased PL force significantly (by 7%). A linear relationship was found between changes in FCU muscle belly length, being a measure of muscle relative positions, and PL force. These results indicate that despite transfer of FCU muscle to the extensor side of the forearm, changing FCU length still affects force transmission of its, now, antagonistic PL muscle. We conclude that a transferred muscle may still be mechanically linked to its former synergistic muscles. PMID:23738260

  19. Piriformis muscle syndrome: a recurrent case after surgical release

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Motalebi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    We report a recurrent Piriformisc muscle syndrome after surgical release. After the primary neurolysis, a second operation was performed to release adhesions. This case shows a different type of sciatic nerve entrapment by an abnormal thin muscle slip. Results of the revision surgery guide us to the point that revision surgery for Piriformis muscle syndrome should be meticulously selected, and after considering medical and interventional therapies. PMID:26286539

  20. Breakpoints in ventilation, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and muscle activity during an incremental cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the breakpoints of cerebral and muscle oxygenation and muscle electrical activity during a ramp exercise in reference to the first and second ventilatory thresholds. Twenty-five cyclists completed a maximal ramp test on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 25 W/min. Expired gazes (breath-by-breath), prefrontal cortex and vastus lateralis (VL) oxygenation [Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)] together with electromyographic (EMG) Root Mean Square (RMS) activity for the VL, rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were continuously assessed. There was a non-linear increase in both cerebral deoxyhemoglobin (at 56 ± 13% of the exercise) and oxyhemoglobin (56 ± 8% of exercise) concomitantly to the first ventilatory threshold (57 ± 6% of exercise, p > 0.86, Cohen's d < 0.1). Cerebral deoxyhemoglobin further increased (87 ± 10% of exercise) while oxyhemoglobin reached a plateau/decreased (86 ± 8% of exercise) after the second ventilatory threshold (81 ± 6% of exercise, p < 0.05, d > 0.8). We identified one threshold only for muscle parameters with a non-linear decrease in muscle oxyhemoglobin (78 ± 9% of exercise), attenuation in muscle deoxyhemoglobin (80 ± 8% of exercise), and increase in EMG activity of VL (89 ± 5% of exercise), RF (82 ± 14% of exercise), and BF (85 ± 9% of exercise). The thresholds in BF and VL EMG activity occurred after the second ventilatory threshold (p < 0.05, d > 0.6). Our results suggest that the metabolic and ventilatory events characterizing this latter cardiopulmonary threshold may affect both cerebral and muscle oxygenation levels, and in turn, muscle recruitment responses. PMID:24782786

  1. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  2. Site-dependent differences in density of sympathetic nerve fibers in muscle-innervating nerves of the human head and neck.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Fumio; Katori, Yukio; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Fujimiya, Mineko; Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    The autonomic nerve supply of skeletal muscle has become a focus of interest because it is closely related to the adaptation of energy metabolism with aging. We have performed an immunohistochemistry study on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) using specimens obtained from ten selected elderly cadavers (mean age 83.3 years) in which we examined muscle-innervating nerves (abbreviated ‘‘muscle-nerves’’ hereafter) of ten striated muscles (soleus, infraspinatus, extra-ocular inferior rectus, lateral rectus, superior obliquus, temporalis, orbicularis oculi, posterior cricoarytenoideus, trapezius and genioglossus) and, as a positive control, the submandibular ganglion. We found that the extra-ocular muscles received no or very few TH-positive nerve fibers. Muscle-nerves to the other head and neck muscles contained a few or several TH-positive fibers per section, but their density (proportional area of TH-positive fibers per nerve cross-section) was one-half to one-third of that in nerves to the soleus or infraspinatus. We did not find nNOS-positive fibers in any of these muscle-nerves. In the head and neck muscles, with the exception of those of the tongue, there appeared to be very few TH-positive nerve fibers along the feeding artery. Consequently, the head and neck muscles seemed to receive much fewer sympathetic nerves than limb muscles. There was no evidence that nNOS-positive nerves contributed to vasodilation of feeding arteries in striated muscles. This site-dependent difference in sympathetic innervation would reflect its commitment to muscle activity. However, we did not find any rules determining the density of nerves according to muscle fiber type and the mode of muscle activity. PMID:24078519

  3. Blocking the rectus sheath guided by ultrasound in an 8-year-old patient with cystic fibrosis: reporting a case

    PubMed Central

    Encarnación-Martínez, Juan; Barberá-Alacreu, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a severe disease that is transmitted with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, and is the commonest disease among Caucasian populations (1/2,500). There are many clinical manifestations that derive from its multiorgan dysfunctions, mainly in the respiratory and digestive tract. In addition, lung disease injury is principally responsible for morbidity and mortality in CF patients. Blocking the rectus sheath, first described by Schleich in 1899, is a loco-regional technique that provides adequate analgesia in those surgical procedures with midline or umbilical incisions.

  4. Timing of Muscle Response to a Sudden Leg Perturbation: Comparison between Adolescents and Adults with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Maria Stella; Cioni, Matteo; Pisasale, Mariangela; Pantò, Maria Rosita; Casabona, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    Movement disturbances associated with Down syndrome reduce mechanical stability, worsening the execution of important tasks such as walking and upright standing. To compensate these deficits, persons with Down syndrome increase joint stability modulating the level of activation of single muscles or producing an agonist-antagonist co-activation. Such activations are also observed when a relaxed, extended leg is suddenly released and left to oscillate passively under the influence of gravity (Wartenberg test). In this case, the Rectus femoris of adults with Down syndrome displayed peaks of activation after the onset of the first leg flexion. With the aim to verify if these muscular reactions were acquired during the development time and to find evidences useful to give them a functional explanation, we used the Wartenberg test to compare the knee joint kinematics and the surface electromyography of the Rectus femoris and Biceps femoris caput longus between adolescents and adults with Down syndrome. During the first leg flexion, adolescents and adults showed single Rectus femoris activations while, a restricted number of participants exhibited agonist-antagonist co-activations. However, regardless the pattern of activation, adults initiated the muscle activity significantly later than adolescents. Although most of the mechanical parameters and the total movement variability were similar in the two groups, the onset of the Rectus femoris activation was well correlated with the time of the minimum acceleration variability. Thus, in adolescents the maximum mechanical stability occurred short after the onset of the leg fall, while adults reached their best joint stability late during the first flexion. These results suggest that between the adolescence and adulthood, persons with Down syndrome explore a temporal window to select an appropriate timing of muscle activation to overcome their inherent mechanical instability. PMID:24278374

  5. Muscle activation patterns when passively stretching spastic lower limb muscles of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Lynn; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-01-01

    The definition of spasticity as a velocity-dependent activation of the tonic stretch reflex during a stretch to a passive muscle is the most widely accepted. However, other mechanisms are also thought to contribute to pathological muscle activity and, in patients post-stroke and spinal cord injury can result in different activation patterns. In the lower-limbs of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) these distinct activation patterns have not yet been thoroughly explored. The aim of the study was to apply an instrumented assessment to quantify different muscle activation patterns in four lower-limb muscles of children with CP. Fifty-four children with CP were included (males/females n = 35/19; 10.8 ± 3.8 yrs; bilateral/unilateral involvement n =? 32/22; Gross Motor Functional Classification Score I-IV) of whom ten were retested to evaluate intra-rater reliability. With the subject relaxed, single-joint, sagittal-plane movements of the hip, knee, and ankle were performed to stretch the lower-limb muscles at three increasing velocities. Muscle activity and joint motion were synchronously recorded using inertial sensors and electromyography (EMG) from the adductors, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius. Muscles were visually categorised into activation patterns using average, normalized root mean square EMG (RMS-EMG) compared across increasing position zones and velocities. Based on the visual categorisation, quantitative parameters were defined using stretch-reflex thresholds and normalized RMS-EMG. These parameters were compared between muscles with different activation patterns. All patterns were dominated by high velocity-dependent muscle activation, but in more than half, low velocity-dependent activation was also observed. Muscle activation patterns were found to be both muscle- and subject-specific (p<0.01). The intra-rater reliability of all quantitative parameters was moderate to good. Comparing RMS-EMG between incremental position zones during low velocity stretches was found to be the most sensitive in categorizing muscles into activation patterns (p<0.01). Future studies should investigate whether muscles with different patterns react differently to treatment. PMID:24651860

  6. Changes in muscle coordination and power output during sprint cycling.

    PubMed

    O'Bryan, Steven J; Brown, Nicholas A T; Billaut, François; Rouffet, David M

    2014-07-25

    This study investigated the changes in muscle coordination associated to power output decrease during a 30-s isokinetic (120rpm) cycling sprint. Modifications in EMG amplitude and onset/offset were investigated from eight muscles [gluteus maximus (EMGGMAX), vastus lateralis and medialis obliquus (EMGVAS), medial and lateral gastrocnemius (EMGGAS), rectus femoris (EMGRF), biceps femoris and semitendinosus (EMGHAM)]. Changes in co-activation of four muscle pairs (CAIGMAX/GAS, CAIVAS/GAS, CAIVAS/HAM and CAIGMAX/RF) were also calculated. Substantial power reduction (60±6%) was accompanied by a decrease in EMG amplitude for all muscles other than HAM, with the greatest deficit identified for EMGRF (31±16%) and EMGGAS (20±14%). GASonset, HAMonset and GMAXonset shifted later in the pedalling cycle and the EMG offsets of all muscles (except GASoffset) shifted earlier as the sprint progressed (P<0.05). At the end of the sprint, CAIVAS/GAS and CAIGMAX/GAS were reduced by 48±10% and 43±12%, respectively. Our results show that substantial power reduction during fatiguing sprint cycling is accompanied by marked reductions in the EMG activity of bi-articular GAS and RF and co-activation level between GAS and main power producer muscles (GMAX and VAS). The observed changes in RF and GAS EMG activity are likely to result in a redistribution of the joint powers and alterations in the orientation of the pedal forces. PMID:24861507

  7. Statistical analysis of surface electromyographic signal for the assessment of rectus femoris modalities of activation during gait.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, Francesco; Fioretti, Sandro

    2013-02-01

    Aim of the present study was to identify the different modalities of activation of rectus femoris (RF) during gait at self-selected speed, by a statistical analysis of surface electromyographic signal from a large number (hundreds) of strides per subject. The analysis of ten healthy adults showed that RF is characterized by different activation modalities within different strides of the same walk. RF most recurrent modality (observed in 53 ± 6% of total strides) consists of three activations, at the beginning of gait cycle, around foot-off and in the terminal swing. Further two modalities of RF activation differ from the most recurrent one because of the lack of activity around foot-off (26 ± 6%) or the splitting into two (or three) small activations around stance-to-swing transition (17 ± 2%). Despite the large variability, our statistical analysis allowed to identify two patterns of activation that characterize completely the behavior of rectus femoris during gait. The first pattern, around stance-to-swing transition, can be monophasic, biphasic or triphasic and is necessary to control knee extension and hip flexion from pre-swing to initial swing. The second pattern, from terminal swing to following mid-stance, is likely due to the contribution of low-level RF activity and cross-talk from surrounding vastii. PMID:22841481

  8. Lower muscle co-contraction in flutter kicking for competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yuji; Hirano, Masami; Yamada, Yosuke; Ikuta, Yasushi; Nomura, Teruo; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Oda, Shingo

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in muscle activation pattern and co-contraction of the rectus and biceps femoris in flutter-kick swimming between competitive and recreational swimmers, to better understand the mechanism of repetitive kicking movements during swimming. Ten competitive and 10 recreational swimmers swam using flutter kicks at three different velocities (100%, 90%, and 80% of their maximal velocity) in a swimming flume. Surface electromyographic signals (EMG) were obtained from the rectus (RF) and biceps femoris (BF), and lower limb kinematic data were obtained at the same time. The beginning and ending of one kick cycle was defined as when the right lateral malleolus reached its highest position in the vertical axis. The offset timing of muscle activation of RF in the recreational swimmers was significantly later at all velocities than in the competitive swimmers (47-48% and 26-33% of kick time of one cycle for recreational and competitive swimmers, respectively), although the kinematic data and other activation timing of RF and BF did not differ between groups. A higher integrated EMG of RF during hip extension and knee extension induced a higher level of muscle co-contraction between RF and BF in the recreational swimmers. These results suggest that long-term competitive swimming training can induce an effective muscle activation pattern in the upper legs. PMID:26590483

  9. Unnecessary surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Leape, L L

    1989-01-01

    The extent of unnecessary surgery has been the object of considerable speculation and occasional wild accusation in recent years. Most evidence of the existence of unnecessary surgery, such as information from studies of geographic variations and the results of second surgical opinion programs, is circumstantial. However, results from the few studies that have measured unnecessary surgery directly indicate that for some highly controversial operations the fraction that are unwarranted could be as high as 30 percent. Most unnecessary surgery results from physician uncertainty about the effectiveness of an operation. Elimination of this uncertainty requires more efficient production and dissemination of scientific information about clinical effectiveness. In the absence of adequate data from scientific studies, the use of a consensus of expert opinion, disseminated by means of comprehensive practice guidelines, offers the best opportunity to identify and eliminate unnecessary surgery. PMID:2668237

  10. Surgical Sciences Cardiovascular Surgery, Thoracic Surgery ------------------------------------------------------

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    38 Surgical Sciences Cardiovascular Surgery, Thoracic Surgery ------------------------------------------------------ http://ctstokyo.umin.ne.jp/ We are leading in Japan by annual surgery case volume of 700. New knowledge. ·Clinical research · Brain and spinal cord protection in thoracic aortic surgery · Minimally invasive

  11. Advances in quantitative muscle ultrasonography using texture analysis of ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Filippo; Caresio, Cristina; Acharya, U Rajendra; Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Minetto, Marco Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging can be used to investigate the skeletal muscle structure in terms of architecture (thickness, cross-sectional area, fascicle length and fascicle pennation angle) and texture. Gray-scale analysis is commonly used to characterize transverse scans of the muscle. Gray mean value is used to distinguish between normal and pathologic muscles, but it depends on the image acquisition system and its settings. In this study, quantitative ultrasonography was performed on five muscles (biceps brachii, vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, medial gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior) of 20 healthy patients (10 women, 10 men) to assess the characterization performance of higher-order texture descriptors to differentiate genders and muscle types. A total of 53 features (7 first-order descriptors, 24 Haralick features, 20 Galloway features and 2 local binary pattern features) were extracted from each muscle region of interest (ROI) and were used to perform the multivariate linear regression analysis (MANOVA). Our results show that first-order descriptors, Haralick features (energy, entropy and correlation measured along different angles) and local binary pattern (LBP) energy and entropy were highly linked to the gender, whereas Haralick entropy and symmetry, Galloway texture descriptors and LBP entropy helped to distinguish muscle types. Hence, the combination of first-order and higher-order texture descriptors (Haralick, Galloway and LBP) can be used to discriminate gender and muscle types. Therefore, multi-texture analysis may be useful to investigate muscle damage and myopathic disorders. PMID:26026375

  12. Kinesiology Taping does not Modify Electromyographic Activity or Muscle Flexibility of Quadriceps Femoris Muscle: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study in Healthy Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Halski, Tomasz; Dymarek, Robert; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; S?upska, Lucyna; Rajfur, Katarzyna; Rajfur, Joanna; Pasternok, Ma?gorzata; Smykla, Agnieszka; Taradaj, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Background Kinesiology taping (KT) is a popular method of supporting professional athletes during sports activities, traumatic injury prevention, and physiotherapeutic procedures after a wide range of musculoskeletal injuries. The effectiveness of KT in muscle strength and motor units recruitment is still uncertain. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of KT on surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity and muscle flexibility of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), and vastus medialis (VM) muscles in healthy volleyball players. Material/Methods Twenty-two healthy volleyball players (8 men and 14 women) were included in the study and randomly assigned to 2 comparative groups: “kinesiology taping” (KT; n=12; age: 22.30±1.88 years; BMI: 22.19±4.00 kg/m2) in which KT application over the RF muscle was used, and “placebo taping” (PT; n=10; age: 21.50±2.07 years; BMI: 22.74±2.67 kg/m2) in which adhesive nonelastic tape over the same muscle was used. All subjects were analyzed for resting sEMG activity of the VL and VM muscles, resting and functional sEMG activity of RF muscle, and muscle flexibility of RF muscle. Results No significant differences in muscle flexibility of the RF muscle and sEMG activity of the RF, VL, and VM muscles were registered before and after interventions in both groups, and between the KT and PT groups (p>0.05). Conclusions The results show that application of the KT to the RF muscle is not useful to improve sEMG activity. PMID:26232122

  13. Ocular torsion and the function of the vertical extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Jampel, R S

    1975-02-01

    The vertical corneal meridia are not kept perpendicular to the horizon in human and nonhuman primates when the head or body is tilted, i.e., compensatory counter-rolling of the eyes does not occur. The slight torsional displacement of the vertical corneal meridia noted by many observers may be the result of rotation around an axis or to translation of the globe. The neurologic and structural systems that control the actions of the vertical muscles in human and nonhuman primates do not appear to provide a mechanism for wheel-rotation of the eyes around the pupillary axis. Ocular torsion is not a normal function of the vertical extraocular muscles. Their function is probably the reverse, i.e., the inhibition or prevention of ocular torsion and the stabilization of the eyes when the head or body inclines. Torsional displacement of a vertical corneal meridian occurs only when there is an abnormal muscle imbalance. Wheel-like movements (cycloduction) around the pupillary axis or visual line do not occur. Torsional displacement of a vertical corneal meridian occurs only with a simultaneous vertical movement. The vertical rectus and the oblique muscles in man work together to produce vertical ocular movements regardless of head position of body posture while maintaining the vertical corneal meridia parallel to the sagittal plane of the head. The vestibular apparatus may be responsible for distributing innervation among these muscles, enabling them to function in this manner. PMID:803789

  14. Effects of gabergic anthelmintics at higher concentrations on the guanidine-induced twitch responses in isolated frog rectus preparations.

    PubMed

    Terada, M; Chen, W; Wang, H H; Kachi, S; Lee, H H

    1994-01-01

    Effects of various gabergic anthelmintics on the guanidine-induced twitch responses in isolated frog rectus preparations were examined. All gabergic anthelmintics such as milbemycin oxime, milbemycin D, avermectin B1a, ivermectin, and diethylcarbamazine (DEC) showed stimulatory effects on the guanidine-induced twitch responses at their higher concentrations. Only piperazine caused inhibitory effects on the twitch responses, even at higher concentrations. The stimulation of the twitch responses by the gabergic anthelmintics was antagonized with tetrodotoxin, hemicholinium-3, d-tubocurarine, and strychnine. These results suggest that all gabergic anthelmintics except piperazine stimulate the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings and that all of them, including piperazine, have different effects on the gabergic mechanism at lower concentrations and on the cholinergic mechanism at higher concentrations. PMID:7855122

  15. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Surgery Procedures Who is a Candidate for Bariatric Surgery? Childhood and Adolescent Obesity Find a Provider Benefits of Bariatric Surgery ... Search Patient Learning Center Bariatric Surgery FAQs Bariatric Surgery ... and Adolescent Obesity 100 SW 75th Street, Suite 201, Gainesville, ...

  16. Brain surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  17. Thyroid Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... thyroid surgery, requiring treatment with thyroid hormone (see Hypothyroidism brochure ). This is especially true if you had ... Radioactive Iodine Low Iodine Diet Thyroid Function Tests Hypothyroidism Hyperthyroidism Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine ...

  18. Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sinus computed tomography (CT) scan (without contrast), nasal physiology (rhinomanometry and nasal cytology), smell testing, and selected ... altered anatomical landmarks, or where a patient?s sinus anatomy is very unusual, making typical surgery difficult. Image ...

  19. Cataract Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Eyeglasses IOLs Refractive Surgery & LASIK Sunglasses Living EyeSmart About Ophthalmologists Adults Under 40 Adults 40 to 60 Adults Over 60 Babies, Children & Teenagers Computer Usage Diabetes Diet & Nutrition Eye Injuries Eye ...

  20. Nose Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is as high a priority as appearance. Can Cosmetic Nasal Surgery Create A "Perfect" Nose? Aesthetic nasal ... be corrected with a surgical procedure called septoplasty. Cosmetic changes to the nose are often performed at ...

  1. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... appearance and self-image through both reconstructive and cosmetic procedures. Reconstructive procedures correct defects on the face ... a woman's breast after surgery for breast cancer. Cosmetic (also called aesthetic ) procedures alter a part of ...

  2. Lung surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    You will have several visits with your health care provider and undergo medical tests before your surgery. Your health care provider will: Do a complete physical exam Make sure other medical conditions you may have, such as ...

  3. Classification and characterization of beef muscles using front-face fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sahar, Amna; Dufour, Eric

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy to identify different muscles and to predict some physicochemical and rheological parameters. Samples were taken from three muscles (Semitendinosus, Rectus abdominis and Infraspinatus) of Charolais breed. Dry matter content, fat content, protein content, texture and collagen content were determined. Moreover emission spectra were recorded in the range of 305-400nm, 340-540nm and 410-700nm by fixing the excitation wavelength at 290, 322 and 382nm, respectively. The results obtained were evaluated by partial least square discriminant analysis and partial least square regression. Results of our research work show that front-face fluorescence spectroscopy and chemometrics offer significant potential for the development of rapid and non-destructive methods for the identification and characterization of muscles. PMID:25306513

  4. The impact of the pelvic floor muscles on dynamic ventilation maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hankyu; Hwang, Byoungha; Kim, Yeoungsung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) on dynamic ventilation maneuvers. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 19 healthy female adults in their 20s who consented to participate in the present study. Electromyography (EMG) was used to examine respiratory muscle activity, and a spirometer was used to examine vital capacity before and during contraction of the PFM. [Results] There were statistically significant differences in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), transverse abdominis/internal oblique (TrA/IO), and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV) when the PFM was contracted. [Conclusion] Contraction of the PFM can be effective in promoting activation of the respiratory muscles and vital capacity. Therefore, the PFM should be considered to improve the effects of respiratory activity. PMID:26644664

  5. Between-muscle differences in the adaptation to experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Hug, François; Hodges, Paul W; van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Tucker, Kylie

    2014-11-15

    This study aimed to determine whether muscle stress (force per unit area) can be redistributed between individual heads of the quadriceps muscle when pain is induced into one of these heads. Elastography was used to measure muscle shear elastic modulus (an index of muscle stress). Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), and rectus femoris (RF). In experiment I (n = 20), participants matched a knee extension force, and thus any reduction of stress within the painful muscle would require compensation by other muscles. In experiment II (n = 13), participants matched VL EMG amplitude and were free to vary external force such that intermuscle compensation would be unnecessary to maintain the experimental task. In experiments I and II, pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline into VM or RF. Experiment III aimed to establish whether voluntary drive to the individual muscles could be controlled independently. Participants (n = 13) were asked to voluntarily reduce activation of VM or RF while maintaining knee extension force. During VM pain, there was no change in shear elastic modulus (experiments I and II) or EMG amplitude of VM (experiment II). In contrast, RF pain was associated with a reduction in RF elastic modulus (experiments I and II: -8 to -17%) and EMG amplitude (experiment II). Participants could voluntarily reduce EMG amplitude of RF (-26%; P = 0.003) but not VM (experiment III). These results highlight between-muscle differences in adaptation to pain that might be explained by their function (monoarticular vs. biarticular) and/or the neurophysiological constraints associated to their activation. PMID:25213640

  6. Muscle twitching

    MedlinePLUS

    ... common and normal. Others are signs of a nervous system disorder. ... muscular atrophy Weak muscles (myopathy) Symptoms of a nervous system disorder include: Loss of, or change in, sensation Loss ...

  7. Jano van Hemert jvanhemert@optos.com

    E-print Network

    Greenaway, Alan

    . conjunctiva 14. inferior oblique muscle 15. inferior rectus muscle 16. medial rectus muscle 17. retinal. superior rectus muscle 30. retina What? 5Sunday, 3 March 13 Diabetic retinopathy incidence in +40 year

  8. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  9. Lower Extremity Muscle Thickness During 30-Day 6 degrees Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Kirby, L. C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Muscle thickness was measured in 19 Bed-Rested (BR) men (32-42 year) subjected to IsoTonic (ITE, cycle orgometer) and IsoKi- netic (IKE, torque orgometer) lower extremity exercise training, and NO Exercise (NOE) training. Thickness was measured with ultrasonography in anterior thigh-Rectus Femoris (RF) and Vastus Intermadius (VI), and combined posterior log-soleus, flexor ballucis longus, and tibialis posterior (S + FHL +TP) - muscles. Compared with ambulatory control values, thickness of the (S + FHL + TP) decreased by 90%-12% (p less than 0.05) In all three test groups. The (RF) thickness was unchanged in the two exercise groups, but decreased by 10% (p less than 0.05) in the NOE. The (VI) thickness was unchanged In the ITE group, but decreased by 12%-l6% (p less than 0.05) in the IKE and NOE groups. Thus, intensive, alternating, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise training is as effective as intensive, intermittent, isokinetic exercise training for maintaining thicknesses of rectus femoris and vastus lntermedius anterior thigh muscles, but not posterior log muscles, during prolonged BR deconditioning.

  10. Effect of transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation on postoperative muscle mass and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Vinge, O; Edvardsen, L; Jensen, F; Jensen, F G; Wernerman, J; Kehlet, H

    1996-03-01

    In an experimental study, 13 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were given postoperative transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation (TEMS) to the quadriceps femoris muscle on one leg; the opposite leg served as control. Changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) and muscle protein synthesis were assessed by computed tomography and ribosome analysis of percutaneous muscle biopsies before surgery and on the sixth postoperative day. The percentage of polyribosomes in the ribosome suspension decreased significantly (P < 0.03) after operation in control legs, but not in stimulated legs (P > 0.16). The total concentration of ribosomes decreased significantly in legs treated with TEMS (P < 0.03) but not in control legs (P > 0.16). CSA decreased significantly in both legs. The decrease in polyribosomes and CSA after operation was significantly less in stimulated legs than in controls (P < 0.05). TEMS may be a simple and effective method for improving muscle protein synthesis and muscle mass after abdominal surgery and should be evaluated in other catabolic states with muscle wasting. PMID:8665192

  11. Hypertrophy of palmaris longus muscle, a rare anatomic aberration.

    PubMed

    Barkáts, N

    2015-01-01

    The palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is considered to be a phylogenetically degenerate muscle. For many authors, this may be the cause of its great variability. The loss of function in the PLM makes it an important muscle in plastic and reconstructive surgery. During a study of PLM agenesis rate in the Hungarian population, a 22-year-old female showed an unusual pattern of muscles in her left forearm, which was found to be a hypertrophied PLM. The hypertrophied muscle was causing symptoms of median and ulnar nerve compression. PMID:26050817

  12. Department of Surgery Colorectal Surgery Section

    E-print Network

    Department of Surgery Colorectal Surgery Section 200 Hawkins Drive, 4621 JCP Iowa City, IA 52242.uihealthcare.org Colorectal Surgery and General Gastrointestinal Surgery Education Topics Neoplastic Disease 1. Controversies. Management of the patient with Stage IV colorectal cancer: Role of surgery 5. Options in patients

  13. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  14. Wound surgery.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Michael D

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the concepts behind, and practice of, wound surgery. The techniques of wound surgery, born of necessity in the art of military surgeons, have found their renaissance in the modern age of wound care driven by the economic and functional considerations inherent to the outcome-based management of chronic disease. Over 300 years of literature on wound healing has shown an innate ability of the wound (in the absence of infection and repeated trauma) to control its progress, largely through the local inflammatory cells. This article discusses several historical works on wound surgery and healing, topical wound therapy, minimal intervention, and emphasizes the closure of chronic wounds. PMID:21074031

  15. [Foreskin surgery].

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Maija; Taskinen, Seppo; Ossi, Lindell

    2010-01-01

    Balanitis, phimosis and foreskin adhesions are common indications for foreskin surgery during childhood. In phimosis, the foreskin cannot be drawn behind the glans penis because of the narrow external opening of the former. It is important to be able to distinguish between physiologic and pathologic phimosis, since their treatment is different. In adulthood, the need for surgery can be caused by phimosis, a difficult sequel of paraphimosis, recurrent inflammations of the glans penis and foreskin, diseases and cancers of the skin as well as difficulties at intercourse due to the shortness of the frenulum of the prepuce of the penis. PMID:20405611

  16. Atrial Fibrillation Surgery - Maze Procedure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Thoracic Surgeon? Adult Cardiac Surgery What is Pediatric Heart Disease? What is Risk Adjustment? Valve Repair/Replacement Surgery Esophageal Surgery Lung/Thoracic Surgery Aneurysm Surgery Arrhythmia Surgery Atrial Fibrillation Surgery - Maze Procedure ...

  17. Abdominal perforator vs. muscle sparing flaps for breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liza C.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominally based free flaps have become the mainstay for women that desire to use their own tissue as a means of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. As the techniques have evolved, significant effort has been invested in finding the best means of minimizing morbidity to the abdominal donor site while ensuring a viable reconstructed breast that is aesthetically pleasing. This manuscript reviews and compares the muscle sparing free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (MsfTRAM), the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP), and the superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flaps, regarding flap success rate, operative times, abdominal donor site morbidity and residual functionality, hospital lengths of stay and associated costs, impact of co-morbid conditions, and resilience after adjuvant radiation treatment. PMID:26161306

  18. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Rodding Surgery 804 W. Diamond Ave., Ste. 210 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (800) 981-2663 (301) 947-0083 Fax: (301) 947-0456 Internet: www.oif.org ... osteogenesis imperfecta contact: Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation 804 W. Diamond Avenue, Suite 210, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 Tel: 800- ...

  19. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  20. Cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The psychotherapeutic nature of cosmetic surgery is emphasised by outlining the range of symptoms from which patients suffer and by explaining the sequence of psychological reactions which cause them. The principles which govern the selection of patients are defined. A brief account of each of the main cosmetic operations is given together with notes on their limitations and risks. PMID:2589786

  1. Arthroscopic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Arthroscopic surgery (or microsurgery) is a significant breakthrough in treating knee injuries. Its applications range from basic diagnosis to arthroscopic menisectomy, although its use in some procedures is still highly controversial. Many surgeons perform the diagnostic procedure, but follow this with the conventional surgical approach.…

  2. Evaluation of three-dimensional printing for internal fixation of unstable pelvic fracture from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Canjun; Xiao, Jidong; Wu, Zhanglin; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of three-dimensional printing (3D printing) assisted internal fixation of unstable pelvic fracture from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach. Methods: A total of 38 patients with unstable pelvic fractures were analyzed retrospectively from August 2012 to February 2014. All cases were treated operatively with internal fixation assisted by three-dimensional printing from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach. Both preoperative CT and three-dimensional reconstruction were performed. Pelvic model was created by 3D printing. Data including the best entry points, plate position and direction and length of screw were obtained from simulated operation based on 3D printing pelvic model. The diaplasis and internal fixation were performed by minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach according to the optimized dada in real surgical procedure. Matta and Majeed score were used to evaluate currative effects after operation. Results: According to the Matta standard, the outcome of the diaplasis achieved 97.37% with excellent and good. Majeed assessment showed 94.4% with excellent and good. The imageological examination showed consistency of internal fixation and simulated operation. The mean operation time was 110 minutes, mean intraoperative blood loss 320 ml, and mean incision length 6.5 cm. All patients have achieved clinical healing, with mean healing time of 8 weeks. Conclusion: Three-dimensional printing assisted internal fixation of unstable pelvic fracture from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach is feasible and effective. This method has the advantages of trauma minimally, bleeding less, healing rapidly and satisfactory reduction, and worthwhile for spreading in clinical practice. PMID:26550226

  3. Acute effects of anterior thigh foam rolling on hip angle, knee angle, and rectus femoris length in the modified Thomas test

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Gregory J.; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris; Chung, Bryan; Feser, Erin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Foam rolling has been shown to acutely increase range of motion (ROM) during knee flexion and hip flexion with the experimenter applying an external force, yet no study to date has measured hip extensibility as a result of foam rolling with controlled knee flexion and hip extension moments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of foam rolling on hip extension, knee flexion, and rectus femoris length during the modified Thomas test. Methods. Twenty-three healthy participants (male = 7; female = 16; age = 22 ± 3.3 years; height = 170 ± 9.18 cm; mass = 67.7 ± 14.9 kg) performed two, one-minute bouts of foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh. Hip extension and knee flexion were measured via motion capture before and after the foam rolling intervention, from which rectus femoris length was calculated. Results. Although the increase in hip extension (change = +1.86° (+0.11, +3.61); z(22) = 2.08; p = 0.0372; Pearson’s r = 0.43 (0.02, 0.72)) was not due to chance alone, it cannot be said that the observed changes in knee flexion (change = ?1.39° (?5.53, +2.75); t(22) = ?0.70; p = 0.4933; Cohen’s d = ? 0.15 (?0.58, 0.29)) or rectus femoris length (change = ?0.005 (?0.013, +0.003); t(22) = ?1.30; p = 0.2070; Cohen’s d = ? 0.27 (?0.70, 0.16)) were not due to chance alone. Conclusions. Although a small change in hip extension was observed, no changes in knee flexion or rectus femoris length were observed. From these data, it appears unlikely that foam rolling applied to the anterior thigh will improve passive hip extension and knee flexion ROM, especially if performed in combination with a dynamic stretching protocol. PMID:26421244

  4. Assessment of muscle fatigue after an ultra-endurance triathlon using tensiomyography (TMG).

    PubMed

    García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Ruiz, David; Rodríguez-Matoso, Dario; de Saa, Yves; Sarmiento, Samuel; Quiroga, Miriam

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we used tensiomyography (TMG) to assess muscle status immediately after an ultra-endurance triathlon. Maximal radial displacement or deformation of the muscle belly, contraction time, delay time, sustain time, and relaxation time were measured for both legs, and dependent t-tests were used to compare means between the beginning and end of the race. The 19 men assessed (age 37.9 ± 7.1 years; height 177.5 ± 4.6 cm; weight: 73.6 ± 6.5 kg) participated in the 2009 edition of the Lanzarote Ironman. Deterioration in the neural response was observed for contraction time (P = 0.008) and relaxation time (P = 0.011), with a moderate decrease in the response time (sustain time) and a loss in muscle stiffness (deformation of the muscle belly). The effect of muscle fatigue on the rectus femoris and biceps femoris was different. Barely any changes in contraction time, relaxation time, sustain time, and deformation of the muscle belly were observed, while only the contraction response time decreased to a significant extent (reduction in delay time; P = 0.003). The considerable loss in contractile capacity induced by a long-distance race was reflected in changes in the neuromuscular response and fluctuations in the contractile capacity of the muscle. These modifications, derived from a prolonged, exhausting effort, can be assessed in a simple, non-aggressive, non-invasive way using tensiomyography. PMID:21391085

  5. Gallbladder Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treated? Next Topic Radiation therapy for gallbladder cancer Surgery for gallbladder cancer There are 2 general types ... gallbladder: Potentially curative surgery Palliative surgery Potentially curative surgery is done when imaging tests or the results ...

  6. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Gosens T. Lateral and medical epicondylitis. In: Stanley D, Trail IA, eds. Operative Elbow Surgery . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2012:chap 35. ...

  7. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  8. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... find out more. asc"} Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  9. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... find out more. asc"} Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... find out more. asc"} Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  11. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  12. A Comparison of Flexi-bar and General Lumbar Stabilizing Exercise Effects on Muscle Activity and Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hee; So, Ki-Hyun; Bae, Yu-Ri; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to compare the effects of flexi-bar training and general lumbar stabilization training on muscle activity and fatigue. [Methods] Twenty normal persons participated in this study. After warm up and a Maximum Voluntary Isomeric Contraction (MVIC) test, participants performed bridging exercise, quadruped lumbar stabilization exercise on quadruped and curl-up, with and without the flexi-bar training, each exercise lasting for 30 seconds. Electromyography was used for the assessment of the muscle activity and fatigue of the rectus abdominis, erector spinae, external oblique and internal oblique muscles. [Results] The bridging and quadruped exercises with the flexi-bar elicited significant increases in the muscle activates of the muscle groups. The curl-up exercise with the flexi-bar showed significant differences in external oblique and internal oblique muscle activities compared to the exercise without the flexi-bar. Muscle fatigue showed different results depending on the exercise. [Conclusion] Generally, flexi-bar exercise induced greater muscle activation and fatigue. However, because there were differences of effect dependent on the posture, we should prescribe the appropriate exercise for the target muscles. PMID:24648637

  13. Resistance training induces qualitative changes in muscle morphology, muscle architecture, and muscle function in elderly postoperative patients.

    PubMed

    Suetta, Charlotte; Andersen, Jesper L; Dalgas, Ulrik; Berget, Jakob; Koskinen, Satu; Aagaard, Per; Magnusson, S Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Although the negative effects of bed rest on muscle strength and muscle mass are well established, it still remains a challenge to identify effective methods to restore physical capacity of elderly patients recovering from hospitalization. The present study compared different training regimes with respect to muscle strength, muscle fiber size, muscle architecture, and stair walking power in elderly postoperative patients. Thirty-six patients (60-86 yr) scheduled for unilateral hip replacement surgery due to hip osteoarthritis were randomized to either 1) resistance training (RT: 3/wk x 12 wk), 2) electrical stimulation (ES: 1 h/day x 12 wk), or 3) standard rehabilitation (SR: 1 h/day x 12 wk). All measurements were performed at baseline, at 5 wk and 12 wk postsurgery. After 12 wk of resistance training, maximal dynamic muscle strength increased by 30% at 60 degrees /s (P < 0.05) and by 29% at 180 degrees /s (P < 0.05); muscle fiber area increased for type I (+17%, P < 0.05), type IIa (+37%, P < 0.05), and type IIx muscle fibers (+51%, P < 0.05); and muscle fiber pennation angle increased by 22% and muscle thickness increased by 15% (P < 0.05). Furthermore, stair walking power increased by 35% (P < 0.05) and was related to the increase in type II fiber area (r = 0.729, P < 0.05). In contrast, there was no increase in any measurement outcomes with electrical stimulation and standard rehabilitation. The present study is the first to demonstrate the effectiveness of resistance training to induce beneficial qualitative changes in muscle fiber morphology and muscle architecture in elderly postoperative patients. In contrast, rehabilitation regimes based on functional exercises and neuromuscular electrical stimulation had no effect. The present data emphasize the importance of resistance training in future rehabilitation programs for elderly individuals. PMID:18420714

  14. Muscle "Building."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of constructivism in teaching human anatomy. Provides directions for constructing arm-hand and leg-foot models that include extensor and flexor muscles and that are easily and cheaply constructed. Lists resources that provide ideas for using such models depending upon the curriculum implemented in a school or the course that is…

  15. Assessment of bioelectrical activity of synergistic muscles during pelvic floor muscles activation in postmenopausal women with and without stress urinary incontinence: a preliminary observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Paprocka-Borowicz, Ma?gorzata; S?upska, Lucyna; Bartnicki, Janusz; Dymarek, Robert; Rosi?czuk, Joanna; Heimrath, Jerzy; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Objective Muscles such as adductor magnus (AM), gluteus maximus (GM), rectus abdominis (RA), and abdominal external and internal oblique muscles are considered to play an important role in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and the relationship between contraction of these muscles and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) has been established in previous studies. Synergistic muscle activation intensifies a woman’s ability to contract the PFM. In some cases, even for continent women, it is not possible to fully contract their PFM without involving the synergistic muscles. The primary aim of this study was to assess the surface electromyographic activity of synergistic muscles to PFM (SPFM) during resting and functional PFM activation in postmenopausal women with and without SUI. Materials and methods This study was a preliminary, prospective, cross-sectional observational study and included volunteers and patients who visited the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Forty-two patients participated in the study and were screened for eligibility criteria. Thirty participants satisfied the criteria and were categorized into two groups: women with SUI (n=16) and continent women (n=14). The bioelectrical activity of PFM and SPFM (AM, RA, GM) was recorded with a surface electromyographic instrument in a standing position during resting and functional PFM activity. Results Bioelectrical activity of RA was significantly higher in the incontinent group than in the continent group. These results concern the RA activity during resting and functional PFM activity. The results for other muscles showed no significant difference in bioelectrical activity between groups. Conclusion In women with SUI, during the isolated activation of PFM, an increased synergistic activity of RA muscle was observed; however, this activity was not observed in asymptomatic women. This may indicate the important accessory contribution of these muscles in the mechanism of continence. PMID:26445533

  16. Breast reconstruction with a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: spectrum of normal and abnormal MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Devon, Ronit Karpati; Rosen, Mark A; Mies, Carolyn; Orel, Susan G

    2004-01-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed their clinical database for cases of breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed in women who had undergone breast reconstruction with a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap. Patient histories, MR imaging results, and, when available, biopsy results were reviewed. During a 4-year period, 24 neobreasts were imaged in 22 women who had undergone TRAM flap reconstruction after mastectomy. In most of the cases (64%), the indication for MR imaging was a palpable abnormality or pain. In four of 24 cases (17%), recurrent breast cancer was detected. These cases consisted of a local chest wall tumor (n = 2), an infiltrating chest wall tumor (n = 1), and axillary nodal recurrence (n = 1). In all four cases, MR imaging demonstrated a suspicious lesion or abnormality. In 11 of 24 cases (46%), benign findings only were demonstrated. These consisted of localized or diffuse skin thickening, fibrosis, fat necrosis, and seroma. In nine of 24 cases (38%), no pathologic abnormality was identified. MR imaging is useful in detection of locally recurrent tumor in patients who have undergone breast reconstruction with a TRAM flap. MR imaging allows differentiation between benign and malignant findings in patients with palpable abnormalities or pain after TRAM flap reconstruction. PMID:15371609

  17. Reorganised motor control strategies of trunk muscles due to acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hirata, R P; Salomoni, S E; Christensen, S W; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed how the low back motor control strategies were affected by experimental pain. In twelve volunteers the right m. longissimus was injected by hypertonic and isotonic (control) saline. The pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects were seated on a custom-designed chair including a 3-dimensional force sensor adjusted to the segmental height of T1. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from longissimus, multifidus, rectus abdominis, and external oblique muscles. Isometric trunk extensions were performed before, during, and after the saline injections at 5%, 10%, and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction force. Visual feedback of the extension force was provided whereas the tangential force components were recorded. Compared with isotonic saline, VAS scores were higher following hypertonic saline injections (P<.01). Experimental low back pain reduced the EMG activity bilaterally of the rectus abdominis muscles during contractions at 10% and 20% MVC (P<.01) although force accuracy and tangential force variability was not affected. Increased variability in the tangential force composition was found during pain compared with the non-painful condition (P<.05). The immediate adaptation to pain was sufficient to maintain the quality of the task performance; however the long-term consequence of such adaptation is unknown and may overload other structures. PMID:25879794

  18. Quantifying the Elastic Property of Nine Thigh Muscles Using Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Chakouch, Mashhour K.; Charleux, Fabrice; Bensamoun, Sabine F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pathologies of the muscles can manifest different physiological and functional changes. To adapt treatment, it is necessary to characterize the elastic property (shear modulus) of single muscles. Previous studies have used magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), a technique based on MRI technology, to analyze the mechanical behavior of healthy and pathological muscles. The purpose of this study was to develop protocols using MRE to determine the shear modulus of nine thigh muscles at rest. Methods Twenty-nine healthy volunteers (mean age = 26 ± 3.41 years) with no muscle abnormalities underwent MRE tests (1.5 T MRI). Five MRE protocols were developed to quantify the shear moduli of the nine following thigh muscles at rest: rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VM), vastus intermedius (VI), vastus lateralis (VL), sartorius (Sr), gracilis (Gr), semimembranosus (SM), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps (BC). In addition, the shear modulus of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was analyzed. Results The gracilis, sartorius, and semitendinosus muscles revealed a significantly higher shear modulus (?_Gr = 6.15 ± 0.45 kPa, ?_ Sr = 5.15 ± 0.19 kPa, and ?_ ST = 5.32 ± 0.10 kPa, respectively) compared to other tissues (from ?_ RF = 3.91 ± 0.16 kPa to ?_VI = 4.23 ± 0.25 kPa). Subcutaneous adipose tissue had the lowest value (?_adipose tissue = 3.04 ± 0.12 kPa) of all the tissues tested. Conclusion The different elasticities measured between the tissues may be due to variations in the muscles' physiological and architectural compositions. Thus, the present protocol could be applied to injured muscles to identify their behavior of elastic property. Previous studies on muscle pathology found that quantification of the shear modulus could be used as a clinical protocol to identify pathological muscles and to follow-up effects of treatments and therapies. These data could also be used for modelling purposes. PMID:26397730

  19. Department of Surgery Acute Care Surgery Service

    E-print Network

    Department of Surgery Acute Care Surgery Service 200 Hawkins Drive Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1086 319-356-2902 Clinic Scheduling 319-356-7892 Administrative Support 319-356-3392 Fax www.uihealthcare.org/surgery Acute Care Surgery Education Topics Burns: 1. Acute Burn Resuscitation 2. Necrotizing Acute Soft Tissue

  20. Department of Surgery Colorectal Surgery Section

    E-print Network

    Department of Surgery Colorectal Surgery Section 200 Hawkins Drive, 4621 JCP Iowa City, IA 52242.uihealthcare.org Minimally Invasive Surgery Education Topics Foregut 1. Controversies in Rx of achalasia: Botox versus time to consider surgery? 3. GERD and Nissen fundoplication. Are we under diagnosing this disorder? 4

  1. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevski? VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  2. Acute effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction and muscle electromyographical activity in indoor soccer players.

    PubMed

    Reis, Erika da Fonseca Silva; Pereira, Guilherme Borges; de Sousa, Nuno Manuel Frade; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Silva, Mauro Fernando; Araujo, Marcia; Gomes, Italo; Prestes, Jonato

    2013-11-01

    The aim was to investigate and compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and static stretching (SS) on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and muscle activation in indoor soccer players. Thirty-three young adult men were divided into two groups: (i) sedentary and (ii) trained. Each group completed three different experimental trials: SS, PNF and no stretching (NS). The MVC of knee extension was evaluated before and immediately after each condition along with electromyography from the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles of the dominant leg. PNF or SS techniques induced no decrease on MVC and muscle electromyographical activity in indoor soccer players (P>0·05). The electromyography of the RF and VL was lower after SS only in the sedentary group (P?0·05). Short-duration PNF or SS has no effect on isometric MVC and muscle activity in indoor soccer players. PMID:23701400

  3. Assessing viability of extracorporeal preserved muscle transplants using external field stimulation: a novel tool to improve methods prolonging bridge-to-transplantation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeger, Christian D.; Friedrich, Oliver; Dragu, Adrian; Weigand, Annika; Hobe, Frieder; Drechsler, Caroline; Geppert, Carol I.; Arkudas, Andreas; Münch, Frank; Buchholz, Rainer; Pollmann, Charlotte; Schramm, Axel; Birkholz, Torsten; Horch, Raymund E.; Präbst, Konstantin

    2015-07-01

    Preventing ischemia-related cell damage is a priority when preserving tissue for transplantation. Perfusion protocols have been established for a variety of applications and proven to be superior to procedures used in clinical routine. Extracorporeal perfusion of muscle tissue though cumbersome is highly desirable since it is highly susceptible to ischemia-related damage. To show the efficacy of different perfusion protocols external field stimulation can be used to immediately visualize improvement or deterioration of the tissue during active and running perfusion protocols. This method has been used to show the superiority of extracorporeal perfusion using porcine rectus abdominis muscles perfused with heparinized saline solution. Perfused muscles showed statistically significant higher ability to exert force compared to nonperfused ones. These findings can be confirmed using Annexin V as marker for cell damage, perfusion of muscle tissue limits damage significantly compared to nonperfused tissue. The combination of extracorporeal perfusion and external field stimulation may improve organ conservation research.

  4. Effects of wearing gumboots and leather lace-up boots on lower limb muscle activity when walking on simulated underground coal mine surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Jessica A; Riddiford-Harland, Diane L; Steele, Julie R

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of wearing two standard underground coal mining work boots (a gumboot and a leather lace-up boot) on lower limb muscle activity when participants walked across simulated underground coal mining surfaces. Quadriceps (rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis) and hamstring (biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscle activity were recorded as twenty male participants walked at a self-selected pace around a circuit while wearing each boot type. The circuit consisted of level, inclined and declined surfaces composed of rocky gravel and hard dirt. Walking in a leather lace-up boot, compared to a gumboot, resulted in increased vastus lateralis and increased biceps femoris muscle activity when walking on sloped surfaces. Increased muscle activity appears to be acting as a slip and/or trip prevention strategy in response to challenging surfaces and changing boot features. PMID:25766420

  5. Assessing viability of extracorporeal preserved muscle transplants using external field stimulation: a novel tool to improve methods prolonging bridge-to-transplantation time

    PubMed Central

    Taeger, Christian D.; Friedrich, Oliver; Dragu, Adrian; Weigand, Annika; Hobe, Frieder; Drechsler, Caroline; Geppert, Carol I.; Arkudas, Andreas; Münch, Frank; Buchholz, Rainer; Pollmann, Charlotte; Schramm, Axel; Birkholz, Torsten; Horch, Raymund E.; Präbst, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Preventing ischemia-related cell damage is a priority when preserving tissue for transplantation. Perfusion protocols have been established for a variety of applications and proven to be superior to procedures used in clinical routine. Extracorporeal perfusion of muscle tissue though cumbersome is highly desirable since it is highly susceptible to ischemia-related damage. To show the efficacy of different perfusion protocols external field stimulation can be used to immediately visualize improvement or deterioration of the tissue during active and running perfusion protocols. This method has been used to show the superiority of extracorporeal perfusion using porcine rectus abdominis muscles perfused with heparinized saline solution. Perfused muscles showed statistically significant higher ability to exert force compared to nonperfused ones. These findings can be confirmed using Annexin V as marker for cell damage, perfusion of muscle tissue limits damage significantly compared to nonperfused tissue. The combination of extracorporeal perfusion and external field stimulation may improve organ conservation research. PMID:26145230

  6. The effects of horseback riding simulator exercises on the muscle activity of the lower extremities according to changes in arm posture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungseo; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of horseback riding simulator exercise on the muscle activities of the lower extremities according to changes in arm posture. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 30 normal adult males and females. [Methods] The horseback riding simulator exercise used a horseback riding simulator device; two arm postures were used, posture 1 (holding the handle of the device) and posture 2 (crossing both arms, with both hands on the shoulders). Electromyography was used to compare the muscle activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and hip adductors in the lower extremities. [Results] Posture 2 had significantly higher muscle activity than posture 1. [Conclusion] Posture 2, which entailed crossing both arms with both hands on the shoulders, was an effective intervention for improved muscle activity in the hip adductors. PMID:26504280

  7. Modelling of Muscle Force Distributions During Barefoot and Shod Running

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Richards, Jim; Vincent, Hayley

    2015-01-01

    Research interest in barefoot running has expanded considerably in recent years, based around the notion that running without shoes is associated with a reduced incidence of chronic injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the differences in the forces produced by different skeletal muscles during barefoot and shod running. Fifteen male participants ran at 4.0 m·s-1 (± 5%). Kinematics were measured using an eight camera motion analysis system alongside ground reaction force parameters. Differences in sagittal plane kinematics and muscle forces between footwear conditions were examined using repeated measures or Freidman’s ANOVA. The kinematic analysis showed that the shod condition was associated with significantly more hip flexion, whilst barefoot running was linked with significantly more flexion at the knee and plantarflexion at the ankle. The examination of muscle kinetics indicated that peak forces from Rectus femoris, Vastus medialis, Vastus lateralis, Tibialis anterior were significantly larger in the shod condition whereas Gastrocnemius forces were significantly larger during barefoot running. These observations provide further insight into the mechanical alterations that runners make when running without shoes. Such findings may also deliver important information to runners regarding their susceptibility to chronic injuries in different footwear conditions. PMID:26557186

  8. Modelling of Muscle Force Distributions During Barefoot and Shod Running.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Richards, Jim; Vincent, Hayley

    2015-09-29

    Research interest in barefoot running has expanded considerably in recent years, based around the notion that running without shoes is associated with a reduced incidence of chronic injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the differences in the forces produced by different skeletal muscles during barefoot and shod running. Fifteen male participants ran at 4.0 m·s-1 (± 5%). Kinematics were measured using an eight camera motion analysis system alongside ground reaction force parameters. Differences in sagittal plane kinematics and muscle forces between footwear conditions were examined using repeated measures or Freidman's ANOVA. The kinematic analysis showed that the shod condition was associated with significantly more hip flexion, whilst barefoot running was linked with significantly more flexion at the knee and plantarflexion at the ankle. The examination of muscle kinetics indicated that peak forces from Rectus femoris, Vastus medialis, Vastus lateralis, Tibialis anterior were significantly larger in the shod condition whereas Gastrocnemius forces were significantly larger during barefoot running. These observations provide further insight into the mechanical alterations that runners make when running without shoes. Such findings may also deliver important information to runners regarding their susceptibility to chronic injuries in different footwear conditions. PMID:26557186

  9. Artificial MusclesArtificial Muscles Douglas ThorDouglas Thor

    E-print Network

    Hansma, Paul

    Artificial MusclesArtificial Muscles Douglas ThorDouglas Thor #12;Human MusclesHuman Muscles 3Skeletal Muscles These are the type of musclesThese are the type of muscles that Artificial Muscles emulatethat Artificial Muscles emulate StriatedStriated ­­ contain sarcomerescontain sarcomeres and are packed

  10. Functional imaging of muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption in the knee extensor muscles during isometric contractions by spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kek, Khai Jun; Miyakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we showed that exercise type- and intensity-dependent regional differences in muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption rate (Vo II) of the knee extensor muscles could be imaged in real time with a multi-channel spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SR-NIRS) imaging device. Healthy subjects performed isometric knee extension exercise for 30 s (without- or with-leg-press action) at different exercise intensities [10%, 40% and 70% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)]. "Separation-type" probes were attached to the skin over the major knee extensor muscles: vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM). Placement of the probes enabled simultaneously measurement of 12 sites over a skin area of about 30 cm2 (temporal resolution = 0.25 s). Local Vo II of each muscle, resting Vo II (Vo II, rest) and recovery Vo II (Vo II, rec ), were determined with arterial occlusion before the start and after the end of contraction, respectively. There was no significant difference between the values of Vo II rest, in the muscles. However, during knee extension exercise without-leg-press action, Vo II rec, value of the RF was significantly greater than the values of the VL and VM at all exercise intensities. In contrast, during exercise with-leg-press action, Vo II rec, values of the RF and VM were greater than those of the VL, especially during exercise at 40% and 70% MVC. In summary, the regional differences in muscle oxygenation and Vo II of the knee extensor muscles, probably due to the differences in relative contributions of muscles to exercise and in muscle architecture, were imaged using SR-NIRS.

  11. Acute Effects of Whole-Body Vibration on Trunk and Neck Muscle Activity in Consideration of Different Vibration Loads

    PubMed Central

    Perchthaler, Dennis; Hauser, Simon; Heitkamp, Hans-Christian; Hein, Tobias; Grau, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical parameters in terms of different peak-to-peak displacements and knee angles on trunk and neck muscle activity during whole-body vibration (WBV). 28 healthy men and women (age 23 ± 3 years) performed four static squat positions (2 peak-to-peak displacements x 2 knee angles) on a side alternating vibration platform with and without vibration stimulus. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the erector spinae muscle, the rectus abdominis muscle, and of the splenius muscle. EMG levels normalized to maximal voluntary contractions ranged between 3.2 – 27.2 % MVC during WBV. The increase in muscle activity caused by WBV was significant, particularly for the back muscles, which was up to 19.0 % MVC. The impact of the factor ‘condition’ (F-values ranged from 13.4 to 132.0, p ? 0.001) and of the factor ‘peak-to-peak displacement’ (F-values ranged from 6.4 to 69.0 and p-values from < 0.001 to 0.01) were statistically significant for each muscle tested. However, the factor ‘knee angle’ only affected the back muscles (F-value 10.3 and 7.3, p ? 0.01). The results of this study should give more information for developing effective and safe training protocols for WBV treatment of the upper body. Key points The maximum levels of muscle activity were significantly reached at high amplitudes at a vibration frequency of 30 Hz. WBV leads to a higher muscle activation of the lower back muscles than of the abdominal muscles. Both knee angles of 30° and 45° have similar effects on the vibration load and represent safe positions to prevent any actual harm. Certain combinations of the biomechanical variables have similar effects on the level of muscle activity. PMID:25729303

  12. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF MUSCLE ACTIVITY BETWEEN GENDERS DURING UNILATERAL WEIGHT?BEARING TASKS USING ADJUSTED DISTANCES

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Jacqueline; Eisel, Patricia; Wiesner, Jessica; Rachow, Megan; Hatteberg, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Researchers have observed differences in muscle activity patterns between males and females during functional exercises. The research methods employed have used various step heights and lunge distances to assess functional exercise making gender comparisons difficult. The purpose of this study was to examine core and lower extremity muscle activity between genders during single?limb exercises using adjusted distances and step heights based on a percentage of the participant's height. Methods: Twenty men and 20 women who were recreationally active and healthy participated in the study. Two?dimensional video and surface electromyography (SEMG) were used to assess performance during three exercise maneuvers (step down, forward lunge, and side?step lunge). Eight muscles were assessed using SEMG (rectus abdominus, external oblique, erector spinae, rectus femoris, tensor fascia latae, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, biceps femoris). Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) were used for each muscle and expressed as %MVIC to normalize SEMG to account for body mass differences. Exercises were randomized and distances were normalized to the participant's lower limb length. Descriptive statistics, mixed?model ANOVA, and ICCs with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Males were taller, heavier, and had longer leg length when compared to the females. No differences in %MVIC activity were found between genders by task across the eight muscles. For both males and females, the step down task resulted in higher %MVIC for gluteus maximus compared to lunge, (p=0.002). Step down exercise produced higher %MVIC for gluteus medius than lunge (p=0.002) and side step (p=0.006). ICC3,3 ranged from moderate to high (0.74 to 0.97) for the three tasks. Conclusions: Muscle activation among the eight muscles was similar between females and males during the lunge, side?step, and step down tasks, with distances adjusted to leg length. Both males and females elicited higher muscle activity for gluteus maximus and gluteus medius as compared to the trunk, hip flexors, or hamstring muscles. However these values were well below the recruitment levels necessary for strengthening in both genders. Level of evidence: 4 PMID:23316423

  13. Effect of acute noxious stimulation to the leg or back on muscle synergies during walking.

    PubMed

    van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Hodges, Paul W; van Dieën, Jaap H; Hug, François

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine how acute muscle pain affects muscle coordination during gait with consideration of muscle synergies (i.e., group of muscles activated in synchrony), amplitude of muscle activity and kinematics. A secondary aim was to determine whether any adaptation was specific to pain location. Sixteen participants walked on a treadmill during 5 conditions [control, low back pain (LBP), washout LBP, calf pain (CalfP), and washout CalfP]. Five muscle synergies were identified for all of the conditions. Cross-validation analysis showed that muscle synergy vectors extracted for the control condition accounted for >81% of variance accounted for from the other conditions. Muscle synergies were altered very little in some participants (n = 7 for LBP; n = 10 for CalfP), but were more affected in the others (n = 9 for LBP; n = 6 for CalfP). No systematic differences between pain locations were observed. Considering all participants, synergies related to propulsion and weight acceptance were largely unaffected by pain, whereas synergies related to other functions (trunk control and leg deceleration) were more affected. Gastrocnemii activity was less during both CalfP and LBP than control. Soleus activity was further reduced during CalfP, and this was associated with reduced plantar flexion. Some lower leg muscles exhibited adaptations depending on pain location (e.g., greater vastus lateralis and rectus femoris activity during CalfP than LBP). Overall, these changes in muscle coordination involve a participant-specific strategy that is important to further explore, as it may explain why some people are more likely to develop persistence of a painful condition. PMID:25298391

  14. Prognostic value of sarcopenia in liver surgery.

    PubMed

    Cornet, M; Lim, C; Salloum, C; Lazzati, A; Compagnon, P; Pascal, G; Azoulay, D

    2015-11-01

    Current knowledge indicates that malnutrition increases the rate of post-operative complications, particularly respiratory and infectious, after major surgery. Almost all liver surgery is performed in patients with cancer, a factor that increases the risk of malnutrition. The primary risk factors for post-operative complications are pre-operative hypo-albuminemia and a body mass index less than 20kg/m(2). To improve the prediction of complications in these patients, some teams have suggested measurement of muscle thickness by computed tomography. Muscular mass can thus be quantified by measuring the total surface of the psoas muscle or the total surface of all muscles (i.e. external and internal oblique, transverse, psoas and paravertebral muscles) seen on an axial CT slice at L3. As well, data exist suggesting that sarcopenia is an independent predictive factor of post-operative morbidity and poor long-term survival after resection for cancer. Nonetheless, the literature on the subject is limited, there are no standardized definitions for sarcopenia, and the need of special software to calculate the surfaces limits its usefulness. Lastly, there are little if any data concerning the nutritional or pharmacologic means to treat sarcopenia. This update, based on a literature review, deals with the value and the prognostic impact of sarcopenia in surgery for liver tumors. The current definition of sarcopenia, validated internationally, the methods of measurement, and the consequences of sarcopenia on the outcome of liver resections are detailed in this review. PMID:26476674

  15. Adynamic and dynamic muscle transposition techniques for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bariši?, Goran; Krivokapi?, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Gracilis muscle transposition is well established in general surgery and has been the main muscle transposition technique for anal incontinence. Dynamization, through a schedule of continuous electrical stimulation, converts the fatigue-prone muscle fibres to a tonic fatigue-resistant morphology with acceptable results in those cases where there is limited sphincter muscle mass. The differences between gluteoplasty and graciloplasty, as well as the techniques and complications of both procedures, are outlined in this review. Overall, these techniques are rarely carried out in specialized units with experience, as there is a high revision and explantation rate. PMID:24759348

  16. DEHN SURGERY SIDDHARTHA GADGIL

    E-print Network

    Gadgil, Siddhartha

    DEHN SURGERY SIDDHARTHA GADGIL Contents 1. Introduction 1 2. Co-ordinates for surgery 1 3. Some algebraic topology 2 4. The theorem of Lickorish and Wallace 3 5. Surgeries and Cobordisms 4 6. The Kirby Calculus 5 7. Constructing knots using surgery 5 8. Surgeries about knots 5 References 6 1. Introduction

  17. Laser surgery - skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  18. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  19. Joint Replacement Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Arthritis July 2014 Joint Replacement Surgery: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family What Is Joint Replacement Surgery? Joint replacement surgery is removing a ...

  20. Types of Heart Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... heart surgery that is becoming more common is robotic-assisted surgery. For this surgery, a surgeon uses a computer to control surgical tools on thin robotic arms. The tools are inserted through small incisions ...

  1. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  2. Extraocular muscle function testing

    MedlinePLUS

    Extraocular muscle function testing examines the function of the eye muscles. A health care provider observes the movement of ... evaluate weakness or other problem in the extraocular muscles. These problems may result in double vision or ...

  3. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath catheters: A feasible and effective, opioid-sparing, post-operative pain management technique: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Sumitra; Mapari, Amol; Paliwal, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia, though the gold standard of post-operative pain management for laparotomies, is associated with limitations and is contraindicated in many patients. Opioid-based pain management, which is an alternative to epidural, has been implicated in post-operative nausea, vomiting, and ileus. We report successful management of post operative pain with ultrasound guided rectus sheath (RS) catheters. RS block is a promising alternative in scenarios were epidural is contraindicated, has failed or in case of unexpected change in the surgical plan. PMID:25788745

  4. A novel method for teaching key steps of strabismus surgery in the wet lab.

    PubMed

    White, Cassandra A; Wrzosek, James A; Chesnutt, David A; Enyedi, Laura B; Cabrera, Michelle T

    2015-10-01

    The surgical laboratory environment plays an important role in modern surgical education. Learning how to complete the key steps of strabismus surgery prior to actual surgery may enhance efficiency and sensitize the surgeon to potential complications. Cadaveric extraocular muscle is difficult to manipulate and specimens are not readily available; therefore, an alternative is needed to teach strabismus surgery techniques. We developed a wet lab to practice the key steps of strabismus surgery using commercially available bacon as an extraocular muscle substitute and cadaveric pig eyes for conjunctival and scleral tissue in a framework of peer teaching, expert supervision, and validated written feedback. PMID:26486033

  5. Robotic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Automated Endoscopic System for Optimal Positioning, or AESOP, was developed by Computer Motion, Inc. under a SBIR contract from the Jet Propulsion Lab. AESOP is a robotic endoscopic positioning system used to control the motion of a camera during endoscopic surgery. The camera, which is mounted at the end of a robotic arm, previously had to be held in place by the surgical staff. With AESOP the robotic arm can make more precise and consistent movements. AESOP is also voice controlled by the surgeon. It is hoped that this technology can be used in space repair missions which require precision beyond human dexterity. A new generation of the same technology entitled the ZEUS Robotic Surgical System can make endoscopic procedures even more successful. ZEUS allows the surgeon control various instruments in its robotic arms, allowing for the precision the procedure requires.

  6. Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePLUS

    2014 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics Cosmetic Procedure Trends 2014 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report Please credit the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS when citing statistical data or using ...

  7. Independent Passive Mechanical Behavior of Bovine Extraocular Muscle Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew; Yoo, Lawrence; Chaudhuri, Zia; Demer, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Intramuscular innervation of horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is segregated into superior and inferior (transverse) compartments, while all EOMs are also divided into global (GL) and orbital (OL) layers with scleral and pulley insertions, respectively. We sought evidence of potential independent action by examining passive mechanical coupling between EOM compartments. Methods. Putative compartments of each of the six whole bovine anatomical EOMs were separately clamped to a physiologically controlled, dual channel microtensile load cell (5-mN force resolution) driven by independent, high-speed, linear motors having 20-nm position resolution. One channel at a time was extended or retracted by 3 to 5 mm, with the other channel stationary. Fiducials distributed on the EOM global surface enabled optical tracking of local deformation. Loading rates of 5 to 100 mm/sec were applied to explore speeds from slow vergence to saccades. Control loadings employed transversely loaded EOM and isotropic latex. Results. All EOM bellies and tendons exhibited substantial compartmental independence when loaded in the physiologic direction, both between OL and GL, and for arbitrary transverse parsings of EOM width ranging from 60%:40% to 80%:20%. Intercompartmental force coupling in the physiologic direction was less than or equal to 10% in all six EOMS even for saccadic loading rates. Coupling was much higher for nonphysiologic transverse EOM loading and isotropic latex. Optical tracking demonstrated independent strain distribution between EOM compartments. Conclusions. Substantial mechanical independence exists among physiologically loaded fiber bundles in bovine EOMs and tendons, providing biomechanical support for the proposal that differential compartmental function in horizontal rectus EOMs contributes to novel torsional and vertical actions. PMID:23188730

  8. Local architecture of the vastus intermedius is a better predictor of knee extension force than that of the other quadriceps femoris muscle heads.

    PubMed

    Ando, Ryosuke; Saito, Akira; Umemura, Yoshihisa; Akima, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the muscle architecture of each head of the quadriceps femoris (QF) at multiple regions can be used to predict knee extension force. Muscle thickness and pennation angle were measured using sonographic images from multiple regions on each muscle of the QF with the knee flexed to 90°. The fascicle lengths of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles were estimated based on sonographic images taken along the length of the thigh. The muscle architecture of the vastus intermedius was determined in two separate locations using sonographic images of the anterior (ant-VI) and lateral portions (lat-VI). The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured during isometric knee extension at a knee joint angle of 90°. The relationship between MVC force and muscle architecture was examined using a stepwise linear regression analysis with MVC force as the dependent variable. The muscle thickness of the ant-VI was selected as an independent variable in the first step of the linear regression analysis (R(2) = 0.66, P<0.01). In the second step, pennation angle of the lat-VI was added to the model (R(2) = 0.91, P<0.01). These results suggest that among the four muscles that make up the QF, the muscle architecture of the VI is the best predictor of knee extension force. PMID:24915999

  9. Effect of Traditional vs. Modified Bent-Knee Sit-Up on Abdominal and Hip Flexor Muscle Electromyographic Activity.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, William; Gardin, Fredrick A; Bellon, Christopher R; Leigh, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Sullivan, W, Gardin, FA, Bellon, CR, and Leigh, S. Effect of traditional vs. modified bent-knee sit-up on abdominal and hip flexor muscle electromyographic activity. J Strength Cond Res 29(12): 3472-3479, 2015-The traditional sit-up may be a poor choice for core strength training due to its focus on hip flexion. The purpose of this study was to determine differences in abdominal and hip flexor muscle activation and trunk and hip kinematics between the traditional U.S. Army sit-up and a modified sit-up focusing on trunk flexion. Eighteen trained males performed 30 seconds of repetitions of each sit-up style, while muscle activation of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and rectus femoris (RF) was recorded using electromyography (EMG). Trunk and hip kinematics were measured using 2-D videography. Maximum and mean muscle activation, integrated EMG (iEMG), and trunk and hip flexion were compared using a repeated-measures design. Maximum EMG of the RF and EO and mean EMG and iEMG of the RF were greater during the traditional sit-up. In contrast, mean EMG and iEMG of the RA and EO were greater during the modified sit-up. Peak trunk flexion was greater during the modified sit-up, and peak hip flexion was greater during the traditional sit-up. The greater RF EMG activity and peak hip flexion during the traditional sit-up suggest a greater emphasis on hip flexion during this sit-up style, which may result in lumbar hyperextension. The greater RA and EO activity and peak trunk flexion during the modified sit-up suggest a greater emphasis on trunk flexion during this exercise, which may decrease the lumbar spine load. Therefore, the modified sit-up may be a better exercise selection to train the abdominal muscles. PMID:25970493

  10. Connective tissues reflect different mechanisms of strabismus over the life span

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Connective tissue pulleys determine extraocular muscle force directions and pulley heterotopy can induce strabismus. The etiology and type of pulley abnormalities vary with patient age, resulting in different but predictable types presentations of strabismus. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained in 95 patients with pulley heterotopy, of whom 56 had childhood-onset pattern strabismus, and was compared with published data on 28 patients aged 69 ± 12 years who had sagging eye syndrome. Control data were from age-matched with no strabismus. Results Patients with childhood-onset strabismus had intact lateral rectus–superior rectus band ligaments and straight extraocular muscle paths but exhibited pulley array A pattern–associated incyclorotation or V pattern–associated excyclorotation. Rectus transposition surgery collapsed patterns. Patients with sagging eye syndrome exhibited blepharoptosis, superior sulcus defect, and inferolateral displacement of rectus pulleys with elongation of extraocular muscles that followed curved paths. Symmetrical lateral rectus pulley sag was associated with divergence paralysis esotropia; asymmetrical sag >1 mm, with cyclovertical strabismus. Both lateral rectus resection and medial rectus recession treated divergence paralysis esotropia. Partial vertical rectus tenotomy treated cyclovertical strabismus. Conclusions Childhood onset pulley abnormalities are associated with A or V pattern strabismus and external anatomical features suggest that these pulley defects are probably congenital. Adult onset pulley defects commonly result from age-related tissue involution and external features such as adnexal laxity are also helpful in recognizing involution as a possible etiology of strabismus. PMID:25173891

  11. Interface Stability Influences Torso Muscle Recruitment and Spinal Load During Pushing Tasks

    PubMed Central

    LEE, P. J.; GRANATA, K. P.

    2006-01-01

    Handle or interface design can influence torso muscle recruitment and spinal load during pushing tasks. The objective of the study was to provide insight into the role of interface stability with regard to torso muscle recruitment and biomechanical loads on the spine. Fourteen subjects generated voluntary isometric trunk flexion force against a rigid interface and similar flexion exertions against an unstable interface, which simulated handle design in a cart pushing task. Normalized electromyographic (EMG) activity in the rectus abdominus, external oblique and internal oblique muscles increased with exertion effort. When using the unstable interface, EMG activity in the internal and external oblique muscle groups was greater than when using the rigid interface. Results agreed with trends from a biomechanical model implemented to predict the muscle activation necessary to generate isometric pushing forces and maintain spinal stability when using the two different interface designs. The co-contraction contributed to increased spinal load when using the unstable interface. It was concluded that handle or interface design and stability may influence spinal load and associated risk of musculoskeletal injury during manual materials tasks that involve pushing exertions. PMID:16540437

  12. Effects of combined exercise on changes of lower extremity muscle activation during walking in older women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaehyun; Lee, Joongsook; Yang, Jeongok; Lee, Bomjin; Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effects of combined exercise for a period of 12 weeks on the changes in lower extremity muscle activation during walking in older women. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 22 elderly women who were 65?years of age or older and living in B-City. The subjects had no nervous system or muscular system diseases that might affect walking in the previous two years. [Methods] Muscle activation was measured by using surface EMG (QEMG-8, Laxtha, Daejeon, Republic of Korea). The subjects were asked to walk on an 8?m of footpath at a natural speed. In order to minimize the noise from the cable connecting the EMG measuring instrument to the electrodes, tape was used to affix the electrodes so that they would not fall off the subjects. The EMG data were analyzed by using the RMS. [Results] Muscle activation of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius was increased significantly after combined exercise for 12 weeks. However, no increase was observed in the left biceps femoris. [Conclusion] It was demonstrated that our exercise program, which includes aerobic walking exercises, senior-robics, and muscle strengthening exercises using elastic bands, is very effective for reorganizing the normal gait pattern in the cerebral cortex and improving muscle strength. PMID:26157253

  13. Maintenance of skeletal muscle energy homeostasis during prolonged wintertime fasting in the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Sanni; Mänttäri, Satu; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Saarela, Seppo

    2015-05-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a canid species with autumnal fattening and prolonged wintertime fasting. Nonpathological body weight cycling and the ability to tolerate food deficiency make this species a unique subject for studying physiological mechanisms in energy metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor regulating energy homeostasis. During acute fasting, AMPK promotes fatty acid oxidation and enhances glucose uptake. We evaluated the effects of prolonged fasting on muscle energy metabolism in farm-bred raccoon dogs. Total and phosphorylated AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT 4), insulin receptor and protein kinase B (Akt) protein expressions of hind limb muscles were determined by Western blot after 10 weeks of fasting. Plasma insulin, leptin, ghrelin, glucose and free fatty acid levels were measured, and muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition analyzed. Fasting had no effects on AMPK phosphorylation, but total AMPK expression decreased in m. rectus femoris, m. tibialis anterior and m. extensor digitorum longus resulting in a higher phosphorylation ratio. Decreased total expression was also observed for ACC. Fasting did not influence GLUT 4, insulin receptor or Akt expression, but Akt phosphorylation was lower in m. flexor digitorum superficialis and m. extensor digitorum longus. Three MHC isoforms (I, IIa and IIx) were detected without differences in composition between the fasted and control animals. The studied muscles were resistant to prolonged fasting indicating that raccoon dogs have an effective molecular regulatory system for preserving skeletal muscle function during wintertime immobility and fasting. PMID:25652584

  14. Effects of combined exercise on changes of lower extremity muscle activation during walking in older women.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehyun; Lee, Joongsook; Yang, Jeongok; Lee, Bomjin; Han, Dongwook

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effects of combined exercise for a period of 12 weeks on the changes in lower extremity muscle activation during walking in older women. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 22 elderly women who were 65?years of age or older and living in B-City. The subjects had no nervous system or muscular system diseases that might affect walking in the previous two years. [Methods] Muscle activation was measured by using surface EMG (QEMG-8, Laxtha, Daejeon, Republic of Korea). The subjects were asked to walk on an 8?m of footpath at a natural speed. In order to minimize the noise from the cable connecting the EMG measuring instrument to the electrodes, tape was used to affix the electrodes so that they would not fall off the subjects. The EMG data were analyzed by using the RMS. [Results] Muscle activation of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius was increased significantly after combined exercise for 12 weeks. However, no increase was observed in the left biceps femoris. [Conclusion] It was demonstrated that our exercise program, which includes aerobic walking exercises, senior-robics, and muscle strengthening exercises using elastic bands, is very effective for reorganizing the normal gait pattern in the cerebral cortex and improving muscle strength. PMID:26157253

  15. The effects of aquatic trunk exercise on gait and muscle activity in stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between muscle activity and gait function following aquatic trunk exercise in hemiplegic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study's participants included thirteen hemiplegic patients (ten males and three females). The aquatic therapy consisted of administering concentrative aquatic therapy for four weeks in a therapeutic pool. Gait parameters were measured using a gait analysis system adjusted to each subject's comfortable walking speed. Electromyographic signals were measured for the rectus abdominis, external abdominal oblique, transversus abdominis/internal-abdominal oblique, and erector spine of each patients. [Results] The pre- and post-training performances of the transversus abdominis/internal-abdominal oblique were compared statistically. There was no statistical difference between the patients' pre- and post-training values of maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the rectus abdominis, but the external abdominal oblique values tended to improve. Furthermore, gait factors improved significantly in terms of walking speeds, walking cycles, affected-side stance phases, affected-stride lengths, and stance-phase symmetry indices, respectively. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the trunk exercise during aquatic therapy may in part contribute to clinically relevant improvements in muscle activities and gait parameters. PMID:26696736

  16. The effects of aquatic trunk exercise on gait and muscle activity in stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between muscle activity and gait function following aquatic trunk exercise in hemiplegic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study’s participants included thirteen hemiplegic patients (ten males and three females). The aquatic therapy consisted of administering concentrative aquatic therapy for four weeks in a therapeutic pool. Gait parameters were measured using a gait analysis system adjusted to each subject’s comfortable walking speed. Electromyographic signals were measured for the rectus abdominis, external abdominal oblique, transversus abdominis/internal-abdominal oblique, and erector spine of each patients. [Results] The pre- and post-training performances of the transversus abdominis/internal-abdominal oblique were compared statistically. There was no statistical difference between the patients’ pre- and post-training values of maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the rectus abdominis, but the external abdominal oblique values tended to improve. Furthermore, gait factors improved significantly in terms of walking speeds, walking cycles, affected-side stance phases, affected-stride lengths, and stance-phase symmetry indices, respectively. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the trunk exercise during aquatic therapy may in part contribute to clinically relevant improvements in muscle activities and gait parameters. PMID:26696736

  17. The influence of different footwear on 3-D kinematics and muscle activation during the barbell back squat in males.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; McCarthy, Derek; Bentley, Ian; Hurst, Howard Thomas; Atkins, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    The barbell back squat is commonly used by athletes participating in resistance training. The barbell squat is typically performed using standard athletic shoes, or specially designed weightlifting footwear, although there are now a large number of athletes who prefer to squat barefoot or in barefoot-inspired footwear. This study aimed to determine how these footwear influence 3-D kinematics and muscle activation potentials during the barbell back squat. Fourteen experienced male participants completed squats at 70% 1 rep max in each footwear condition. 3-D kinematics from the torso, hip, knee and ankle were measured using an eight-camera motion analysis system. In addition, electromyographical (EMG) measurements were obtained from the rectus femoris, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, erector spinae and biceps femoris muscles. EMG parameters and joint kinematics were compared between footwear using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Participants were also asked to subjectively rate which footwear they preferred when performing their squat lifts; this was examined a chi-squared test. The kinematic analysis indicated that, in comparison to barefoot the running shoe was associated with increased squat depth, knee flexion and rectus femoris activation. The chi-squared test was significant and showed that participants preferred to squat barefoot. This study supports anecdotal evidence of athletes who prefer to train barefoot or in barefoot-inspired footwear although no biomechanical evidence was found to support this notion. PMID:25331484

  18. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n?=?20) and male (n?=?17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p) ?=?p?×?ACSA(max) ?×?L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy. PMID:24975992

  19. A comparison of optimisation methods and knee joint degrees of freedom on muscle force predictions during single-leg hop landings.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarzadeh, Hossein; Perraton, Luke; Fok, Laurence; Muñoz, Mario A; Clark, Ross; Pivonka, Peter; Bryant, Adam L

    2014-09-22

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of different optimisation methods and different knee joint degrees of freedom (DOF) on muscle force predictions during a single legged hop. Nineteen subjects performed single-legged hopping manoeuvres and subject-specific musculoskeletal models were developed to predict muscle forces during the movement. Muscle forces were predicted using static optimisation (SO) and computed muscle control (CMC) methods using either 1 or 3 DOF knee joint models. All sagittal and transverse plane joint angles calculated using inverse kinematics or CMC in a 1 DOF or 3 DOF knee were well-matched (RMS error<3°). Biarticular muscles (hamstrings, rectus femoris and gastrocnemius) showed more differences in muscle force profiles when comparing between the different muscle prediction approaches where these muscles showed larger time delays for many of the comparisons. The muscle force magnitudes of vasti, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius were not greatly influenced by the choice of muscle force prediction method with low normalised root mean squared errors (<48%) observed in most comparisons. We conclude that SO and CMC can be used to predict lower-limb muscle co-contraction during hopping movements. However, care must be taken in interpreting the magnitude of force predicted in the biarticular muscles and the soleus, especially when using a 1 DOF knee. Despite this limitation, given that SO is a more robust and computationally efficient method for predicting muscle forces than CMC, we suggest that SO can be used in conjunction with musculoskeletal models that have a 1 or 3 DOF knee joint to study the relative differences and the role of muscles during hopping activities in future studies. PMID:25129166

  20. Journal of Biomechanics 41 (2008) 23622369 Importance of preswing rectus femoris activity in stiff-knee gait

    E-print Network

    Delp, Scott

    2008-01-01

    reserved. Keywords: Dynamic simulation; Muscle function; Knee flexion; Stiff-knee gait; Cerebral palsy 1. Introduction Stiff-knee gait is a debilitating consequence of cerebral palsy characterized by diminished knee one or more of the symptoms of cerebral palsy (CDC, 2004). The ambulatory types of cerebral palsy

  1. Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Background Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m2.1 Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m2. An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999–2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ? 30 kg/m2). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the “normal” range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m2 and extend into the “overweight” range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their height and under-report their weight. The actual number of Ontario adults who are overweight or obese may be higher. Diet, exercise, and behavioural therapy are used to help people lose weight. The goals of behavioural therapy are to identify, monitor, and alter behaviour that does not help weight loss. Techniques include self-monitoring of eating habits and physical activity, stress management, stimulus control, problem solving, cognitive restructuring, contingency management, and identifying and using social support. Relapse, when people resume old, unhealthy behaviour and then regain the weight, can be problematic. Drugs (including gastrointestinal lipase inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and appetite suppressants) may be used if behavioural interventions fail. However, estimates of efficacy may be confounded by high rates of noncompliance, in part owing to the side effects of the drugs. In addition, the drugs have not been approved for indefinite use, despite the chronic nature of obesity. The Technology Morbidly obese people may be eligible for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity is considered an intervention of last resort for patients who have attempted first-line forms of medical management, such as diet, increased physical activity, behavioural modification, and drugs. There are various bariatric surgical procedures and several different variations for each of these procedures. The surgical interventions can be divided into 2 general types: malabsorptive (bypassing parts of the gastrointestinal tract to limit the absorption of food), and restrictive (decreasing the size of the stomach so that the patient is satiated with less food). All of these may be performed as either open surgery or laparoscopically. An example of a malabsorptive technique is Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Examples of restrictive techniques are vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). The Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) Schedule of Benefits for Physician Services includ

  2. Chronic muscle stimulation increases lactate transport in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, K J; Juel, C; O'Brien, M; Bonen, A

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of chronic low frequency stimulation on the lactate transport across the plasma membrane of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of the rat. Stimulating electrodes were implanted on either side of the peroneal nerve in one hindlimb. Chronic stimulation (10 Hz, 50 microsecond bursts, 24h/day) commenced 7 days after surgery, and were continued for 7 days. Animals were then left for 24 h, and thereafter muscles were obtained. Cytochrome C-oxidase activity was increased 1.9-fold in the stimulated TA compared to the control TA (p < 0.05). Lactate transport (zero-trans) was measured in giant sarcolemmal vesicles obtained from the chronically stimulated TA and the control TA. At each of the concentrations used in these studies a significant increase in lactate transport was observed; 2.8-fold increase at 1 mM lactate p < 0.05); 2-fold increases at both 30 mM and 50 mM lactate p < 0.05). These studies have shown that lactate transport capacity is markedly increased in response to chronic muscle contraction. PMID:8709976

  3. Creating and Simulating Skeletal Muscle from the Visible Human Data Set

    E-print Network

    Varadarajan, Veeravalli S.

    Creating and Simulating Skeletal Muscle from the Visible Human Data Set Joseph Teran, Eftychios--Simulation of the musculoskeletal system has important applications in biomechanics, biomedical engineering, surgery simulation

  4. Patterns of muscle coordination during stepping responses post-stroke.

    PubMed

    Gray, V L; Pollock, C L; Wakeling, J M; Ivanova, T D; Garland, S J

    2015-12-01

    This study compared self-induced stepping reactions of seventeen participants after stroke and seventeen controls. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded bilaterally from the soleus (SOL), tibialis anterior (TA), biceps femoris (BF) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the data into muscle activation patterns and examine group differences (paretic, non-paretic, control leg). The first principal component (PC1) explained 46.7% of the EMG signal of the stepping leg. Two PCs revealed distinct activation features for the stepping paretic leg: earlier TA onset at step initiation and earlier BF and SOL onset at mid-step. For the stance leg, PC1 explained 44.4% of the EMG signal and significant differences were found in the non-paretic leg compared to paretic (p<0.001) and control (p<0.001). In PC1, at step onset the BF and SOL EMG and the RF and TA EMG were increased over the latter half of the step. No PC loadings were distinct for the paretic leg during stance, however differences were found in the non-paretic leg: earlier TA burst and increased BF and SOL EMG at step initiation. The results suggest impairments in the paretic leg when stepping and compensatory strategies in the non-paretic stance leg. PMID:26475243

  5. Physically-based Modeling and Simulation of Extraocular Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qi; Sueda, Shinjiro; Pai, Dinesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic simulation of human eye movements, with realistic physical models of extraocular muscles (EOMs), may greatly advance our understanding of the complexities of the oculomotor system and aid in treatment of visuomotor disorders. In this paper we describe the first three dimensional (3D) biomechanical model which can simulate the dynamics of ocular motility at interactive rates. We represent EOMs using “strands”, which are physical primitives that can model an EOM's complex nonlinear anatomical and physiological properties. Contact between the EOMs, the globe, and orbital structures can be explicitly modeled. Several studies were performed to assess the validity and utility of the model. EOM deformation during smooth pursuit was simulated and compared with published experimental data; the model reproduces qualitative features of the observed non-uniformity. The model is able to reproduce realistic saccadic trajectories when the lateral rectus muscle was driven by published measurements of abducens neuron discharge. Finally, acute superior oblique palsy, a pathological condition, was simulated to further evaluate the system behavior; the predicted deviation patterns agree qualitatively with experimental observations. This example also demonstrates potential clinical applications of such a model. PMID:20868704

  6. Architectural Analysis of Human Abdominal Wall Muscles: Implications for Mechanical Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephen H. M.; Ward, Samuel R.; Cook, Mark S.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Cadaveric analysis of human abdominal muscle architecture. Objective To quantify the architectural properties of rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO) and transverse abdominis (TrA), and model mechanical function in light of these new data. Summary of Background Data Knowledge of muscle architecture provides the structural basis for predicting muscle function. Abdominal muscles greatly affect spine loading, stability, injury prevention and rehabilitation; however, their architectural properties are unknown. Methods Abdominal muscles from eleven elderly human cadavers were removed intact, separated into regions and micro-dissected for quantification of physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), fascicle length and sarcomere length. From these data, sarcomere operating length ranges were calculated. Results IO had the largest PCSA and RA the smallest, and would thus generate the largest and smallest isometric forces, respectively. RA had the longest fascicle length, followed by EO, and would thus be capable of generating force over the widest range of lengths. Measured sarcomere lengths, in the post-mortem neutral spine posture, were significantly longer in RA and EO (3.29±0.07 and 3.18±0.11 ?m) compared to IO and TrA (2.61±0.06 and 2.58±0.05 ?m) (p < 0.0001). Biomechanical modeling predicted that RA, EO and TrA act at optimal force-generating length in the mid-range of lumbar spine flexion, where IO can generate approximately 90% of its maximum force. Conclusions These data provide clinically relevant insights into the ability of the abdominal wall muscles to generate force and change length throughout the lumbar spine range of motion. This will impact the understanding of potential postures in which the force-generating and spine stabilizing ability of these muscles become compromised, which can guide exercise/rehabilitation development and prescription. Future work should explore the mechanical interactions among these muscles and their relationship to spine health and function. PMID:21325932

  7. Tensiomyography of selected lower-limb muscles in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Rey, Ezequiel; Lago-Peñas, Carlos; Lago-Ballesteros, Joaquín

    2012-12-01

    Tensiomyography is a non-invasive method of neuromuscular assessment used to measure muscle action characteristics, muscle tone, and muscle fiber type, and provides information on acute and chronic responses of muscle to different training loads. The aims of the present study were: to analyse differences in muscle response and mechanical characteristics of two major muscles of the lower extremity in a large group of Spanish soccer players according to playing position, and to provide group norms against which clinical findings may be compared. Data were collected from 78 professional soccer players (age 26.6 ± 4.4 years; height: 179.2 ± 5.3 cm; body mass: 75.8 ± 5.3 kg). Tensiomyography was recorded from the rectus femoris (RF) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles after 2 days without take part in any strenuous exercise or training. Five tensiomyographic parameters were analyzed: maximal displacement (D(m)), contraction time (T(c)), sustain time (T(s)), delay time (T(d)), and half-relaxation time (T(r)). A good to excellent intra-session reliability was found for all contractile parameters (ICC ranged from 0.78 to 0.95). No significant differences between players of any position were observed in absolute values of BF. However, significant differences were observed for T(c), T(r) and T(s) between the different playing positions on RF (P < 0.05, effect size ranged from 1.3 to 1.6). Professional soccer players showed muscles with ability to rapidly generate force during contractions. The neuromuscular profile provided could help in identifying the normative data that are important for the different positions in order to optimize the training and recovery process of each individual player. PMID:22776612

  8. Electrical manifestations of muscle fatigue during concentric and eccentric isokinetic knee flexion-extension movements.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Filippo; Knaflitz, Marco; Bonato, Paolo; Actis, Maria Vittoria

    2006-07-01

    The quantification of the progression of muscle fatigue during a sustained contraction is a valuable tool in several clinical applications, ranging from the evaluation of functional impairment to the development of specific rehabilitative and training protocols. In these fields, great importance is given to isokinetic contractions. The aim of this paper was twofold: first, to propose signal processing methods for assessing the spectral changes of the surface myoelectric signal due to fatigue during isokinetic concentric and eccentric knee flexion-extension movements at a given angular velocity (60 degrees/s); second, to analyze the electrical manifestations of muscle fatigue of four thigh muscles (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris) in the two contraction modalities (i.e. concentric versus eccentric). We demonstrated that, when considering concentric contractions, localized muscle fatigue can be assessed by computing the mean frequency of the frequency marginal of the time-frequency distribution derived from the surface myoelectric signal collected during each contraction cycle. Stronger nonstationarities were observed in the surface myoelectric data recorded within each cyclical movement of the studied eccentric exercise. Thus we propose the computation of the instantaneous mean frequency of the signal based on an original cross-time-frequency algorithm, which proved more sensitive than the frequency marginal in tracking the spectral changes associated with localized muscle fatigue. We derived the average fatigue pattern of the investigated muscles from experimental data recorded from a sample population consisting of twenty healthy subjects and we statistically compared the two contraction modalities. Our results showed that the electrical manifestations of muscle fatigue during concentric contractions were higher than those found during eccentric contractions, although in the latter modality the torque exerted and the mechanical work produced by the subjects were larger than those recorded during the concentric exercise. The results presented in this paper have potential clinical application and they could play an important future role in investigations of muscle behavior during dynamic, highly fatiguing contractions. PMID:16830935

  9. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  10. Comparison of toe grip strength and muscle activities during maximal toe grip strength exertion according to the presence/absence of an ankle immobilization belt

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yousuke; Murata, Jun; Miyazaki, Junya

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare toe grip strength and muscle activity during toe grip strength exertion according to the presence/absence of an ankle immobilization belt and to examine the relationship between the differences in muscle activity and toe grip strength. [Subjects] The Subjects were 13 healthy young women. [Methods] We measured toe grip strength and muscle activity during toe grip strength exertion in the presence and absence of an ankle immobilization belt using electromyography. Activity in the following leg muscles was recorded: rectus femoris, biceps femoris, medial head of the gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior. We then calculated the percent integrated electromyography during toe gripping. [Results] Toe grip strength and percent integrated electromyography of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle were significantly higher with ankle belt immobilization compared with without ankle belt immobilization. In addition, in the presence of ankle belt immobilization, the percent integrated electromyography of the tibialis anterior muscle and medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated a positive correlation with toe grip strength (r = 0.75 and r = 0.65, respectively). [Conclusion] These findings suggest that greater toe grip strength could be exerted in the presence of ankle belt immobilization. The measured values reflect the percent integrated electromyography of the crural muscles. Therefore, it was shown that toe grip strength should be measured in the presence of an immobilization belt. PMID:26644648

  11. Frontalis Suspension Surgery in Upper Eyelid Blepharoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Leibovitch, Igal; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2010-01-01

    Frontalis suspension is a commonly used surgery that is indicated in patients with blepharoptosis and poor levator muscle function. The surgery is based on connecting the tarsal plate to the eyebrow with various sling materials. Although fascia lata is most commonly used due to its long-lasting effect and low rate of complications, it has several limitations such as difficulty of harvesting, insufficient amounts in small children, and postoperative donor-site complications. Other sling materials have overcome these limitations, but on the other hand, have been reported to be associated with other complications. In this review we focus on the different techniques and materials which are used in frontalis suspension surgeries, as well as the advantage and disadvantage of these techniques. PMID:21331314

  12. The effects of isometric exercise types on pain and muscle activity in patients with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Rhyu, Hyun-Seung; Park, Hun-Kyung; Park, Jung-Sub; Park, Hye-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of isometric exercise types on low back pain (LBP) patients. Isometric exercise types were mat exercise and I-Zer exercise. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: LBP control group, LBP mat exercise group, and LBP I-Zer exercise group in 23–25 aged men. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and electromyography (EMG) were used to evaluate the degree of pain and the muscle activity in LBP patients. Root mean square (RMS), median frequency (MDF), and mean frequency (MNF) were checked by EMG power spectrum analysis on longissimus thoracic (LT), iliocostalis lumborum (IL), mulitifidus (M), and rectus abdominis (RA). LBP mat exercise program and LBP I-Zer exercise program were conducted 5 sets once time, 3 times per week during 6 weeks. The two-way ANOVA with repeated measure was used to check the pain degree and muscle activity. The present results showed that muscle activity in the LBP I-Zer exercise group was increased compared to the LBP mat exercise group and LBP control group (P<0.05). LBP I-Zer exercise group and LBP mat exercise group showed increased mean frequency in LT, IL, M, and RA muscles than the LBP control group. Therefore, LBP patients performed isometric exercise may have positive effect to reduce pain degree and to increase muscle activity. Especially, LBP I-Zer exercise type showed more effectiveness in reducing pain degree and enhancing muscle activity. PMID:26331136

  13. A novel outlier detection method for identifying torque-related transient patterns of in vivo muscle behavior.

    PubMed

    Sheng Han; Xin Chen; Sheng Zhong; Yongjin Zhou; Zhiguo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed a novel outlier detection method, named l1-regularized outlier isolation and regression (LOIRE), to examine torque-related transient patterns of in vivo muscle behavior from multimodal signals, including electromyography (EMG), mechanomyography (MMG) and ultrasonography (US), during isometric muscle contraction. Eight subjects performed isometric ramp contraction of knee up to 90% of the maximal voluntary contraction, and EMG, MMG and US were simultaneously recorded from the rectus femoris muscle. Five features, including two root mean square amplitudes from EMG and MMG, muscle cross sectional area, muscle thickness and width from US were extracted. Then, local polynomial regression was used to obtain the signal-to-torque relationships and their derivatives. By assuming the signal-to-torque functions are basically quadratic, the LOIRE method is applied to identify transient torque-related patterns of EMG, MMG and US features as outliers of the linear derivative-to-torque functions. The results show that the LOIRE method can effectively reveal transient patterns in the signal-to-torque relationships (for example, sudden changes around 20% MVC can be observed from all features), providing important information about in vivo muscle behavior. PMID:25570922

  14. The Patient Deficit Model Overturned: a qualitative study of patients' perceptions of invitation to participate in a randomized controlled trial comparing selective bladder preservation against surgery in muscle invasive bladder cancer (SPARE, CRUK/07/011)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that poor recruitment into clinical trials rests on a patient ‘deficit’ model – an inability to comprehend trial processes. Poor communication has also been cited as a possible barrier to recruitment. A qualitative patient interview study was included within the feasibility stage of a phase III non-inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) (SPARE, CRUK/07/011) in muscle invasive bladder cancer. The aim was to illuminate problems in the context of randomization. Methods The qualitative study used a ‘Framework Analysis’ that included ‘constant comparison’ in which semi-structured interviews are transcribed, analyzed, compared and contrasted both between and within transcripts. Three researchers coded and interpreted data. Results Twenty-four patients agreed to enter the interview study; 10 decliners of randomization and 14 accepters, of whom 2 subsequently declined their allocated treatment. The main theme applying to the majority of the sample was confusion and ambiguity. There was little indication that confusion directly impacted on decisions to enter the SPARE trial. However, confusion did appear to impact on ethical considerations surrounding ‘informed consent’, as well as cause a sense of alienation between patients and health personnel. Sub-optimal communication in many guises accounted for the confusion, together with the logistical elements of a trial that involved treatment options delivered in a number of geographical locations. Conclusions These data highlight the difficulty of providing balanced and clear trial information within the UK health system, despite best intentions. Involvement of multiple professionals can impact on communication processes with patients who are considering participation in RCTs. Our results led us to question the ‘deficit’ model of patient behavior. It is suggested that health professionals might consider facilitating a context in which patients feel fully included in the trial enterprise and potentially consider alternatives to randomization where complex interventions are being tested. Trial Registration ISRCTN61126465 PMID:23190503

  15. On high heels and short muscles: a multiscale model for sarcomere loss in the gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Alexander M; Pok, Jacquelynn M; McWalter, Emily J; Gold, Garry E; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-21

    High heels are a major source of chronic lower limb pain. Yet, more than one third of all women compromise health for looks and wear high heels on a daily basis. Changing from flat footwear to high heels induces chronic muscle shortening associated with discomfort, fatigue, reduced shock absorption, and increased injury risk. However, the long-term effects of high-heeled footwear on the musculoskeletal kinematics of the lower extremities remain poorly understood. Here we create a multiscale computational model for chronic muscle adaptation to characterize the acute and chronic effects of global muscle shortening on local sarcomere lengths. We perform a case study of a healthy female subject and show that raising the heel by 13cm shortens the gastrocnemius muscle by 5% while the Achilles tendon remains virtually unaffected. Our computational simulation indicates that muscle shortening displays significant regional variations with extreme values of 22% in the central gastrocnemius. Our model suggests that the muscle gradually adjusts to its new functional length by a chronic loss of sarcomeres in series. Sarcomere loss varies significantly across the muscle with an average loss of 9%, virtually no loss at the proximal and distal ends, and a maximum loss of 39% in the central region. These changes reposition the remaining sarcomeres back into their optimal operating regime. Computational modeling of chronic muscle shortening provides a valuable tool to shape our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of muscle adaptation. Our study could open new avenues in orthopedic surgery and enhance treatment for patients with muscle contracture caused by other conditions than high heel wear such as paralysis, muscular atrophy, and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25451524

  16. Free functional muscle transplantation of an anomalous femoral adductor with a very large muscle belly: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old man with a total brachial plexus injury that was treated by free functional muscle transplantation to restore simultaneously elbow flexion and finger extension. The muscle had a very large muscle belly (12 cm width), which was considered anatomically to be a fusion of the gracilis and the adductor longus muscles. Although the muscle possessed two major vascular pedicles with almost equal diameters, only the proximal vascular pedicle was anastomosed to the recipient vessels during the transplantation surgery, resulting in partial necrosis of the muscle. Several authors have reported on the successful simultaneous transplantation of the gracilis and adductor longus muscles, because they are supplied generally by a single common vascular pedicle. However, the present study suggests that when a surgeon encounters an aberrant femoral adductor with a very large muscle belly that can be considered to be a fusion of these muscles, the surgeon should assess intraoperatively the vascularity of the muscle using Doppler sonography, indocyanine green fluorescence injection, or other techniques. PMID:24164731

  17. Do Changes in Muscle Architecture Affect Post-Activation Potentiation?

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Danielle; Hoffman, Jay R.; Mangine, Gerald T.; Wells, Adam J.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; McCormack, William P.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Fukuda, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, cross-over design study was to examine the effect of three different muscle potentiation protocols on acute changes in muscle architecture and vertical jump performance. Eleven experienced, resistance trained men (25.2±3.6y) completed three potentiation squat protocols using moderate intensity (MI; 75%, 3 sets x 10 repetitions), high intensity (HI; 90%, 3 sets x 3 repetitions) and 100% (1RM; 1 set x 1repetition) of their 1RM. In addition, all participants completed a control session (CTL) in which no protocol was performed. During each testing session, muscle architecture and vertical jump testing were assessed at baseline (BL), 8min post (8P) and 20min post (20P) workout. Ultrasound measures included cross sectional area (CSA) and pennation angle (PANG) of both the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Following each ultrasound measure, peak vertical jump power (PVJP) and mean (MVJP) power was assessed using an accelerometer. Magnitude based inferences were used to make comparisons between trials. The MI trial resulted in a likely greater increase from BL to 8P and 20P in RF-CSA and VL-CSA, while the HI trial resulted in a likely greater change from BL to 20P in both RF-CSA and VL-CSA. Meanwhile, changes in PVJP and MVJP for the MI trial was likely decreased at BL-8P and BL–20P, while the HI trial was shown to result in a likely or possible decrease compared to CTL at BL-8P and BL–20P, respectively. A likely negative relationship was observed between changes in VL-PANG and MVJP (r = -0.35; p , 0.018) at BL-8P, and between changes in PVJP and RF-CSA (r = -0.37; p , 0.014) at BL–20P. Results of this study were unable to demonstrate any potentiation response from the trials employed, however these protocols did result in acute muscle architectural changes. Key points Three squat protocols using moderate intensity (75% 1-RM; 3 sets x 10 repetitions), high intensity (90% 1-RM, 3 sets x 3 repetitions) and maximal intensity (100% 1RM; 1 set x 1repetition) were unable to potentiate jump height or jump power in experienced, resistance trained men. Experienced, resistance trained athletes who are not competitive may be limited in regards to potentiation due to a poor level of conditioning. Both the moderate and high intensity potentiation protocols stimulated acute changes in muscle architecture. Greater increases in the CSA of both the RF and VL muscles were noted. A different potentiation protocol may have elicited greater changes in muscle architecture. PMID:25178394

  18. [Muscle fiber atrophy].

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Muscle fibers have been classified into two major forms of red (slow twitch) and white (fast twitch) muscles. The red muscle utilizes lipid as energy source through mitochondrial metabolism and function to sustain the position against gravity (sometimes called as antigravity muscle). Under microgravity the red muscle is selectively involved. In our unloading study by hindlimb suspension experiment on rats, the one of the representative red muscle of soleus muscle underwent rapid atrophy; they reduced their weights about 50% after 2 week-unloading. In addition, myofibrils were occasionally markedly disorganized with selective thin filament loss. Mitochondria in the degenerated area were decreased in number. The white muscle fibers in the soleus muscle had mostly transformed to the red ones. It took about 1 month to recover morphologically. The satellite cell playing a major role in muscle regeneration was not activated. There still remained unsolved what are the mechanosensors to keep muscle function under normal gravity. Dr Nikawa's group proposed that one of ubiquitin ligases, Cbl-b is activated under microgravity and induces muscle fiber degeneration. There might be many factors to induce muscle atrophy and degeneration under microgravity. Further study is necessary to explore the pathomechanism of muscle atrophy in disused and under immobility conditions. PMID:23196603

  19. Unifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the superior oblique muscle.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Figueira, Edwin; Kearney, Daniel; McKelvie, Penelope; Davis, Garry; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Orbital Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) without bone involvement is rare. Isolated involvement of an extraocular muscle without bone change, to the best of the authors' knowledge, has not been previously reported. They describe a unique case of unifocal LCH of the superior oblique muscle with no bone involvement. A 16-year-old girl presented with a 2-week history of diplopia and headache. CT and MRI showed an enlarged right superior oblique muscle with no associated bone involvement. Biopsy with partial debulking revealed LCH and staging confirmed unifocal disease. The lesion underwent complete radiologic resolution following surgery. There was no recurrence after 16 months follow up. PMID:24801257

  20. Trunk muscle activation during stabilization exercises with single and double leg support.

    PubMed

    García-Vaquero, María Pilar; Moreside, Janice M; Brontons-Gil, Evaristo; Peco-González, Noelia; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze trunk muscle activity during bridge style stabilization exercises, when combined with single and double leg support strategies. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers performed bridge exercises in 3 different positions (back, front and side bridges), with and without an elevated leg, and a quadruped exercise with contralateral arm and leg raise ("bird-dog"). Surface EMG was bilaterally recorded from rectus abdominis (RA), external and internal oblique (EO, IO), and erector spinae (ES). Back, front and side bridges primarily activated the ES (approximately 17% MVC), RA (approximately 30% MVC) and muscles required to support the lateral moment (mostly obliques), respectively. Compared with conventional bridge exercises, single leg support produced higher levels of trunk activation, predominantly in the oblique muscles. The bird-dog exercise produced greatest activity in IO on the side of the elevated arm and in the contralateral ES. In conclusion, during a common bridge with double leg support, the antigravity muscles were the most active. When performed with an elevated leg, however, rotation torques increased the activation of the trunk rotators, especially IO. This information may be useful for clinicians and rehabilitation specialists in determining appropriate exercise progression for the trunk stabilizers. PMID:22436839

  1. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis for Meningioma Surgery - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, V K; Agrawal, S; Ahmed, M; Sharma, S

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease of great challenge to the anesthesiologist, because it affects the neuromuscular junction. Anesthetic management involves either muscle relaxant or non-muscle relaxant techniques. This case report documents the safe use of fentanyl, propofol and sevoflurane combination guided by bispectral index, without the use of muscle relaxants in a patient with myasthenia gravis who presented for meningioma surgery. PMID:26620756

  2. Unusual fibularis (peroneus) muscle.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Philip A

    2015-10-01

    Routine dissection has identified a previously unrecorded fibularis (peroneus) muscle in a 74-year-old male cadaver. The anomalous fibularis muscle was found lying immediately antero-medial to the fibularis longus (FL) muscle of the left leg. The anomalous muscle arose from the muscle belly of the FL in the proximal 1/2 of the leg. The muscle belly gave way to a long slender tendon that continued distally behind the lateral malleolus and inserted onto the superficial aspect of the inferior fibular retinaculum. The current finding and clinical significance are discussed. PMID:25431295

  3. Trunk Muscle Activation at the Initiation and Braking of Bilateral Shoulder Flexion Movements of Different Amplitudes

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson Crommert, M.; Halvorsen, K.; Ekblom, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if trunk muscle activation patterns during rapid bilateral shoulder flexions are affected by movement amplitude. Eleven healthy males performed shoulder flexion movements starting from a position with arms along sides (0°) to either 45°, 90° or 180°. EMG was measured bilaterally from transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI) with intra-muscular electrodes, and from rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES) and deltoideus with surface electrodes. 3D kinematics was recorded and inverse dynamics was used to calculate the reactive linear forces and torque about the shoulders and the linear and angular impulses. The sequencing of trunk muscle onsets at the initiation of arm movements was the same across movement amplitudes with ES as the first muscle activated, followed by TrA, RA and OI. All arm movements induced a flexion angular impulse about the shoulders during acceleration that was reversed during deceleration. Increased movement amplitude led to shortened onset latencies of the abdominal muscles and increased level of activation in TrA and ES. The activation magnitude of TrA was similar in acceleration and deceleration where the other muscles were specific to acceleration or deceleration. The findings show that arm movements need to be standardized when used as a method to evaluate trunk muscle activation patterns and that inclusion of the deceleration of the arms in the analysis allow the study of the relationship between trunk muscle activation and direction of perturbing torque during one and the same arm movement. PMID:26562017

  4. Imaging in gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Liselotte; Sammur, Wael; Alkatout, Ibrahim; Schollmeyer, Thoralf

    2011-03-01

    The technical development of instruments for endoscopic surgery started in the field of gynecology. In the early 1970s, with the improvement of optics and instruments for laparoscopic surgery, gyne-endoscopic surgery developed and set milestones for all other surgical fields. However, the general surgeons propagated the advantages of 2D or 3D imaging surgery much better than the conservative gynecologists. Surgery on a 2D screen without direct vision is regarded as more advantageous than open surgery and has achieved wide acceptance. Several schools of gynecologic endoscopy in Europe (in Kiel, Giessen, Clermont Ferrand and Strasbourg) have set guidelines for gyne-endoscopic surgery. Our catalog of indications in the areas of gyne-endoscopic surgery, published in 2002, reveals the broad application of these techniques today. 3D vision, robotic instruments and systems, such as the da Vinci(®) Surgical System from Intuitive Surgical, Inc. (CA, USA), round up the picture of endoscopic surgery. The advantages of endoscopic surgery over open surgery (more precision, less trauma, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stays and a faster recovery period) are becoming more accepted. The present healthcare systems and hospital administrations understand the challenges of imaging in surgery, particularly in endoscopic surgery. PMID:21410349

  5. No effect of sex steroids on compensatory muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N. E.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of orchiectomy and/or subcutaneously implanted testosterone propionate (TP) on the hypertrophic response of rat plantaris muscles to functional overload (induced by bilateral removal of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles) are investigated experimentally. Muscle wet weight, metabolic substrate oxidation, and cytosolic androgen-receptor binding are measured, and the results are presented in tables. Eight weeks after surgery, the plantaris muscle weight as a percentage of body weight is found to be about twice that in rats without muscle overload, regardless of the sex-hormone status. Overloading causes decreased ability to oxidize glucose and pyruvate, decreased succinate dehydrogenase specific activity, and no change in the ability to oxidize beta-hydroxybutyrate or in androgen-receptor binding. The oxidative response is unaffected by orchiectomy or TP or both. It is argued that the actions of sex hormones and functional overload are not synergistic.

  6. Muscle Biophysics 1 THE BIOMECHANICS OF SKELETAL MUSCLES1

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    Muscle Biophysics 1 THE BIOMECHANICS OF SKELETAL MUSCLES1 You are probably comfortable with the notion that muscles convert chemical potential energy responsible for this conversion. However, it may surprise you that muscles also

  7. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  8. [Blepharoplasty in aesthetic facial surgery].

    PubMed

    Jansma, J; Schepers, R H; Schouten, H J; Vissink, A

    2014-01-01

    Blepharoplasty is the most commonly performed procedure in aesthetic facial surgery. The upper eyelid is part of the same aesthetic subunit as the eyebrow and the lower eyelid is part of the same aesthetic subunit as the cheek. In upper eyelid blepharoplasty the excess skin and possibly also a portion of the sphincter is removed. A low-hanging eyebrow is preferably corrected by lifting the brow instead of over excising the redundant eyelid skin. Blepharoplasty of the lower eyelid is generally carried out by a very limited excision of the skin and the orbicularis oculi muscle in order to prevent lower lid retraction (ectropion). Rejuvenation in the lower lid region is also achieved by fat resection or redistribution, by means of which the double convex contour deformity is reduced. Blepharoplasty is generally performed under local anaesthesia and complications are rare. Patient satisfaction is generally high. PMID:25174189

  9. Compensatory responses of the insulin signaling pathway restore muscle glucose uptake following long-term denervation

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Zachary J; Oxendine, Michael; Wheatley, Joshua L; Menke, Chelsea; Cassell, Emily A; Bartos, Amanda; Geiger, Paige C; Schaeffer, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of muscle activity in maintaining normal glucose homeostasis via transection of the sciatic nerve, an extreme model of disuse atrophy. Mice were killed 3, 10, 28, or 56 days after transection or sham surgery. There was no difference in muscle weight between sham and transected limbs at 3 days post surgery, but it was significantly lower following transection at the other three time points. Transected muscle weight stabilized by 28 days post surgery with no further loss. Myocellular cross-sectional area was significantly smaller at 10, 28, and 56 days post transection surgery. Additionally, muscle fibrosis area was significantly greater at 56 days post transection. In transected muscle there was reduced expression of genes encoding transcriptional regulators of metabolism (PPAR?, PGC-1?, PGC-1?, PPAR?), a glycolytic enzyme (PFK), a fatty acid transporter (M-CPT 1), and an enzyme of mitochondrial oxidation (CS) with transection. In denervated muscle, glucose uptake was significantly lower at 3 days but was greater at 56 days under basal and insulin-stimulated conditions. Although GLUT 4 mRNA was significantly lower at all time points in transected muscle, Western blot analysis showed greater expression of GLUT4 at 28 and 56 days post surgery. GLUT1 mRNA was unchanged; however, GLUT1 protein expression was also greater in transected muscles. Surgery led to significantly higher protein expression for Akt2 as well as higher phosphorylation of Akt. While denervation may initially lead to reduced glucose sensitivity, compensatory responses of insulin signaling appeared to restore and improve glucose uptake in long-term-transected muscle. PMID:25896980

  10. Weight Loss Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight ... obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food you ...

  11. Cataract surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Cataract surgery usually works very well. The operation has few risks, the pain and recovery period are short, ... improved. Ninety-five percent or more of all cataract surgeries result in improved vision.

  12. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your belly. The surgery is called laparoscopy . The scope allows the surgeon to see inside your belly. ... to 6 small cuts in your belly. The scope and instruments needed to perform the surgery are ...

  13. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  14. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... further intracranial surgeries. Impaired sense of taste or smell : The sense of smell usually improves after the procedure because airflow is ... in their voice after sinus surgery. Impairment of smell or taste: (see above) Infection: The most common ...

  15. Blood donation before surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you, if you need blood transfusion after surgery. Blood from these donors must be collected at least a few days ... blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. It is important to note that there is ...

  16. Gum Graft Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With Member ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With Find ...

  17. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Higdon KK. Reduction mammoplasty. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 8. ... Gabriel A. Breast augmentation. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap 2.

  18. Activation timing patterns of the abdominal and leg muscles during the sit-to-stand movement in individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Heon; Choi, Jong-Duk; Lee, Nam-Gi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the activation timing patterns of abdominal and leg muscles during the sit-to-stand movement in individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects] Twenty adults with chronic hemiparetic stroke participated in this study. [Methods] Subjects performed five sit-to-stand movements at a self-selected velocity without using their hands. Surface electromyography was used to measure the reaction time of the bilateral transverse abdominis/internal oblique, rectus femoris, and tibialis anterior muscles during the sit-to-stand movement. [Results] There were significant differences in the reaction time between the affected and unaffected sides of the abdominal and leg muscles. Muscles on the unaffected side had faster reaction time than those on the affected side. Activation of the transverse abdominis/internal oblique muscles was delayed relative to activation of the tibialis anterior muscle during the sit-to-stand movement. [Conclusion] Our findings provide information that may aid clinicians in the examination and management of paretic muscles for transfers in individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke. PMID:26696744

  19. Robotic liver surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  20. Brain surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Craniotomy - discharge; Surgery - brain - discharge; Neurosurgery - discharge; Craniectomy - discharge; Stereotactic craniotomy - discharge; Stereotactic brain biopsy - discharge; Endoscopic craniotomy - discharge

  1. A preliminary study on the differences in male and female muscle force distribution patterns during squatting and lunging maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Rena; Hausselle, Jerome G.; Gonzalez, Roger V.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, 250,000 people tear their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) annually with females at higher risk of ACL failure then males. By predicting muscle forces during low impact maneuvers we may be able to estimate possible muscle imbalances that could lead to ACL failure during highly dynamic maneuvers. The purpose of this initial study was to predict muscle forces in males and females similar in size and activity level, during squat and lunge maneuvers. We hypothesized that during basic low impact maneuvers (a) distribution of quadriceps forces are different in males and females and (b) females exhibit quadriceps dominance when compared to males. Two males and three females performed squatting and lunging maneuvers while electromyography (EMG) data, motion capture data, and ground reaction forces were collected. Nine individual muscle forces for muscles that cross the knee were estimated using an EMG-driven model. Results suggest that males activate more their rectus femoris muscle than females, who in turn activate more their vastus lateralis muscle at their maximum flexion angle, and more their vastus medialis muscle when ascending from a squat. During the lunge maneuver, males used greater biceps femoris force than females, throughout the lunge, and females exhibited higher semitendinosus force. Quadriceps dominance was evident in both males and females during the prescribed tasks, and there was no statistical difference between genders. Understanding individual muscle force distributions in males and females during low impact maneuvers may provide insights regarding failure mechanisms during highly dynamic maneuvers, when ACL injuries are more prevalent. PMID:25016289

  2. Healthy Muscles Matter

    MedlinePLUS

    ... keep my muscles more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Injuries Almost everyone has had sore muscles ... If you have been inactive, “start low and go slow” by gradually increasing how often and how ...

  3. Exercising with a Muscle Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are: • cramping in muscles (probably related to insufficient energy supply for muscles) • pain in muscles • weakness of ... is muscle exertion (use), requiring the expenditure of energy. It can be very roughly divided into two ...

  4. Optical fiber distributed temperature sensor in cardiological surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapa, Jan; Látal, Jan; Penhaker, Marek; Koudelka, Petr; Hancek, František; Vasinek, Vladimír

    2010-04-01

    In those days a lot of cardiological surgeries is made every day. It is a matter of very significant importance keeping the temperature of the hearth low during the surgery because it decides whether the cells of the muscle will die or not. The hearth is cooled by the ice placed around the hearth muscle during the surgery and cooling liquid is injected into the hearth also. In these days the temperature is measured only in some points of the hearth using sensors based on the pH measurements. This article describes new method for measurement of temperature of the hearth muscle during the cardiological surgery. We use a multimode optical fiber and distributed temperature sensor (DTS) based on the stimulated Raman scattering in temperature measurements. This principle allows us to measure the temperature and to determine where the temperature changes during the surgery. Resolution in the temperature is about 0.1 degrees of Celsius. Resolution in length is about 1 meter. The resolution in length implies that the fiber must be wound to ensure the spatial resolution about 5 by 5 centimeters.

  5. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Laryngeal Muscle Fiber Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses…

  6. Optimal management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer – a review

    PubMed Central

    Scarpato, Kristen R; Morgans, Alicia K; Moses, Kelvin A

    2015-01-01

    Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is a complex disease requiring aggressive management. Patients are often older with comorbid conditions that impact treatment options. This review describes the available therapies for invasive urothelial carcinoma, including chemotherapy, radical extirpative surgery, and bladder-preserving strategies. PMID:26380230

  7. [Ambulatory emergency surgery].

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Development of outpatient cases in emergency is still a controversy. Ambulatory surgery is possible in ambulatory surgical unit (ASU), or in emergency surgical units (ESU). Quality of care and safety need to be associated to patients' ambulatory management without impairment of ASU and ESU organization. Patient eligibility concerns not only traumatic hand surgery but also general or visceral surgery. PMID:24530140

  8. Pediatric Surgery Gallengangatresie

    E-print Network

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    1 Pediatric Surgery Gallengangatresie: eine seltene Erkrankung fällt durch die Maschen eines Versorgungsnetzes C. Petersen, B. M. Ure Pediatric Surgery Warum machen wir so viel Wirbel um eine seltene Surgery Die Gallengangatresie ist ein Problem! Seltene Erkrankung: ca. 1: 18.000 In Deutschland ca. 40

  9. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  10. An Eccentrically Biased Rehabilitation Program Early after TKA Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Robin L.; Yoshida, Yuri; Meier, Whitney; Peters, Christopher; LaStayo, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Rehabilitation services are less-studied aspects of the management following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) despite long-term suboptimal physical functioning and chronic deficits in muscle function. This paper describes the preliminary findings of a six-week (12 session) eccentrically-biased rehabilitation program targeted at deficits in physical function and muscle function, initiated one month following surgery. A quasiexperimental, one group, pretest-posttest study with thirteen individuals (6 female, 7 male; mean age 57 ± 7 years) examined the effectiveness of an eccentrically-biased rehabilitation program. The program resulted in improvements in the primary physical function endpoints (SF-36 physical component summary and the six-minute walk test) with increases of 59% and 47%, respectively. Muscle function endpoints (knee extension strength and power) also increased 107% and 93%, respectively. Eccentrically-biased exercise used as an addition to rehabilitation may help amplify and accelerate physical function following TKA surgery. PMID:22046514

  11. The effects of progressive functional training on lower limb muscle architecture and motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, MiHye; Ko, YoungJun; Shin, Mary Myong Sook; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of progressive functional training on lower limb muscle architecture and motor function of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 26 children with spastic CP. [Methods] Thirteen subjects in the experimental group performed general neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) and additional progressive functional trainings and 13 subjects in the control group performed only general NDT 3 times a week for 6 weeks. Ultrasonography, gross motor function measurement (GMFM) and the mobility questionnaire (MobQue) were evaluated. [Results] After the intervention, the muscle thickness of the quadriceps femoris (QF), cross-sectional area of the rectus femoris (RF), pennation angle of the gastrocnemius (GCM) and the MobQue score of the experimental group were significantly greater than those of the control group. The muscle thickness of QF correlated with the cross-sectional area (CSA) of RF and the pennation angle of GCM, and GMFM score correlated with the pennation angle of GCM. [Conclusion] Progressive functional training can increase muscle thickness, CSA, and the pennation angle of the lower limb muscles, and improve the mobility of spastic CP children making it useful as a practical adjunct to rehabilitation therapy. PMID:26157267

  12. Phasic-to-tonic shift in trunk muscle activity relative to walking during low-impact weight bearing exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, Nick; Gibbon, Karl; Hibbs, Angela; Evetts, Simon; Debuse, Dorothée

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of an exercise device, designed to improve the function of lumbopelvic muscles via low-impact weight-bearing exercise, on electromyographic (EMG) activity of lumbopelvic, including abdominal muscles. Surface EMG activity was collected from lumbar multifidus (LM), erector spinae (ES), internal oblique (IO), external oblique (EO) and rectus abdominis (RA) during overground walking (OW) and exercise device (EX) conditions. During walking, most muscles showed peaks in activity which were not seen during EX. Spinal extensors (LM, ES) were more active in EX. Internal oblique and RA were less active in EX. In EX, LM and ES were active for longer than during OW. Conversely, EO and RA were active for a shorter duration in EX than OW. The exercise device showed a phasic-to-tonic shift in activation of both local and global lumbopelvic muscles and promoted increased activation of spinal extensors in relation to walking. These features could make the exercise device a useful rehabilitative tool for populations with lumbopelvic muscle atrophy and dysfunction, including those recovering from deconditioning due to long-term bed rest and microgravity in astronauts.

  13. The effects of progressive functional training on lower limb muscle architecture and motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, MiHye; Ko, YoungJun; Shin, Mary Myong Sook; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of progressive functional training on lower limb muscle architecture and motor function of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 26 children with spastic CP. [Methods] Thirteen subjects in the experimental group performed general neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) and additional progressive functional trainings and 13 subjects in the control group performed only general NDT 3 times a week for 6 weeks. Ultrasonography, gross motor function measurement (GMFM) and the mobility questionnaire (MobQue) were evaluated. [Results] After the intervention, the muscle thickness of the quadriceps femoris (QF), cross-sectional area of the rectus femoris (RF), pennation angle of the gastrocnemius (GCM) and the MobQue score of the experimental group were significantly greater than those of the control group. The muscle thickness of QF correlated with the cross-sectional area (CSA) of RF and the pennation angle of GCM, and GMFM score correlated with the pennation angle of GCM. [Conclusion] Progressive functional training can increase muscle thickness, CSA, and the pennation angle of the lower limb muscles, and improve the mobility of spastic CP children making it useful as a practical adjunct to rehabilitation therapy. PMID:26157267

  14. Effects of a therapeutic climbing program on muscle activation and SF-36 scores of patients with lower back pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Hun; Seo, Dong-Yel

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stability exercises on chronic lower back pain by using a therapeutic climbing program on lumbar muscle activity and function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult subjects with chronic back pain participated. The subjects were assigned to 2 exercise groups, namely the lumbar stabilization (Mat Ex) and therapeutic climbing exercise groups (TC Ex). Each group trained for 30 minutes, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Short-form 36-item Questionnaire (SF-36) was administered and the surface electromyographic (sEMG) activities of the lumbar muscles were measured. [Results] Both therapy groups showed significant increases in the SF-36 score, and the increase was greater in the TC Ex group. Significant increases in the sEMG activities of the lumbar muscles were found in both groups. The increases in the sEMG activities of the rectus abdominis and internal and external oblique muscles of the abdomen were greater in the TC Ex group than in the Mat Ex group. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that TC Ex, which is similar to normal lumbar stabilization exercise, is effective at activating and improving the function of the lumbar muscles. These results suggest that TC Ex has a positive impact on the stabilization of the lumbar region. PMID:25931721

  15. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  16. Electromyographic analysis of trunk and lower extremity muscle activities during pulley-based shoulder exercises performed on stable and unstable surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Doochul; Cha, Jaeyun; Song, Changho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of an unstable support surface (USS) on the activities of trunk and lower extremity muscles during pulley-based shoulder exercise (PBSE). [Subjects] Twenty healthy college students were included in this study. [Methods] Surface EMG was carried out in twenty healthy adult men. The activities of trunk and lower extremity muscles performed during PBSE using a resistance of 14?kg on a stable or unstable support surface were compared. The PBSE included shoulder abduction, adduction, flexion, extension, internal rotation, and external rotation. [Results] On the unstable surface, the rectus abdominis and erector spinae showed significantly less activation during shoulder external rotation, but the extent of activation was not significantly different during other shoulder exercises. The external oblique and rectus femoris showed no significant difference during any shoulder exercises. The tibialis anterior showed significantly greater activation during all shoulder exercises, except flexion and extension. The gastrocnemius showed significantly greater activation during shoulder abduction, extension, and internal rotation. However, during shoulder adduction, flexion, and external rotation, the gastrocnemius showed no significant difference. [Conclusion] The use of USS to increase core stability during PBSE is probably not effective owing to compensatory strategies of the ankle. PMID:25642041

  17. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-09-16

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  18. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  19. Muscle microvascular hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation within the contraction-relaxation cycle.

    PubMed

    Lutjemeier, Barbara J; Ferreira, Leonardo F; Poole, David C; Townsend, Dana; Barstow, Thomas J

    2008-02-01

    Inability to directly measure microvascular oxygen distribution and extraction in striated muscle during a contraction/relaxation cycle limits our understanding of oxygen transport to and utilization by contracting muscle. We examined muscle microvascular hemoglobin concentration (total [Hb/Mb]) and oxygenation within the contraction-relaxation cycle to determine if microvascular RBC volume would be preserved and if oxygen extraction continued during the actual contraction phase. Eight subjects performed dynamic knee extension exercise (40 contractions/min) at moderate ( approximately 30% of peak work rate) and heavy ( approximately 80% of peak) work rates. Total hemoglobin/myoglobin (total [Hb/Mb]) and deoxy-hemoglobin/myoglobin (deoxy-[Hb/Mb]) were measured in the rectus femoris using NIRS to determine if microvascular total [Hb/Mb] would be preserved during the contraction, and to estimate microvascular oxygen extraction, respectively. Mean values during the relaxation (RP) and contractile phases and the peak values during the contractile phase for both moderate and heavy exercise were calculated. Total [Hb/Mb] increased from rest to steady-state exercise (6.36+/-5.08 microM moderate; 5.72+/-4.46 microM heavy exercise, both P<0.05), but did not change significantly within the contraction/relaxation cycle. Muscle contractions were associated with a significant (1.29+/-0.98 microM moderate; 2.16+/-2.12 microM heavy exercise, P<0.05) increase in deoxy-[Hb/Mb] relative to RP. We conclude that (a) microvascular RBC volume is preserved during muscle contractions (i.e., RBCs are present in the capillaries), and (b) the cyclical pattern of deoxygenation/oxygenation during the respective contraction/relaxation phases of the contraction cycle suggests that oxygen extraction is not restricted to the relaxation phase but continues to occur during muscle contractions. PMID:17964228

  20. Balance recovery is compromised and trunk muscle activity is increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle D; Chang, Angela T; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Increased respiration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires greater abdominal muscle activation, which may impact on contribution of the trunk to postural control. This study aimed to determine whether recovery of balance from postural perturbations and trunk muscle activity differs in people with and without COPD before and/or after exercise. Electromyography (EMG) of the obliquus internus (OI) and externus (OE) abdominis, rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES) and deltoid muscles was recorded with surface electrodes during rapid shoulder flexion and extension. Time taken to regain baseline centre of pressure velocity (vCOP) and the number of postural adjustments following arm movement was calculated from force plate data. Time to recover balance in the direction of postural disturbance (anteroposterior vCOP) was longer in COPD, particularly more severe COPD, than controls. Mediolateral vCOP (perpendicular to the perturbation) and the number of postural adjustments did not differ between groups, but people with more severe COPD were less successful at returning their mediolateral vCOP to baseline. Abdominal muscle EMG was similar between groups, but controls had greater ES EMG during arm movements. Individuals with more severe COPD had greater OE and RA EMG both before and during arm movement compared to those with less severe COPD and controls. Following exercise, OE and ES EMG increased in people with less severe COPD. This study shows that severe COPD is associated with impaired ability to recover balance and greater trunk muscle activity during postural challenges. Augmented trunk muscle activity may limit the contribution of trunk movements to balance recovery and could contribute to increased falls risk. PMID:26471324

  1. Neurosedative and muscle-relaxant activities of ethyl acetate extract of Baphia nitida AFZEL.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Olufunmilayo O; Yemitan, Omoniyi K; Taiwo, Adefunmilayo E

    2006-07-19

    The sedative, anxiolytic and muscle-relaxant effects of the ethyl acetate leaf extract of Baphia nitida (BN) was investigated in intact mice, using the hole-board head-dip test for exploratory behavioural effect, elevated plus maze (EPM) and Y-maze (YM) models of anxiety; chimney, inclined screen, traction and climbing tests for muscle-relaxant effects. In each of these tests, BN (100-400mg/kg, p.o.), diazepam (1mg/kg, i.p.) or distilled water (10ml/kg, p.o.) was administered, 30 or 60min before performing the tests in mice. For exploratory behavioural test, number of head-dip within 15min was counted. For EPM and YM tests, the cumulative time spent in open and closed arms was recorded within 5min. In the muscle-relaxant tests, mice were subjected to modified models such as chimney, inclined screen, traction and climbing tests. BN produced a significant (P<0.05) dose-related decrease in exploratory behaviour in the head-dip test and prolongation of cumulative time spent in open arms of both EPM and YM. BN did not show any significant effect in the chimney and traction tests, but produced significant, dose-dependent muscle relaxation in the inclined screen and climbing tests. Furthermore, BN (200-1200microg/ml) non-competitively shifted the curves of acetylcholine contractions of the toad Rectus abdominis muscle to the right. Oral doses of BN (0.1-20g/kg) did not produce mortality, but the LD(50) when given intraperitoneally, was 645.65mg/kg. Results suggest that the leaf extract of Baphia nitida has sedative, anxiolytic and skeletal muscle-relaxant effects and support its neurosedative use in traditional African medicine. PMID:16516421

  2. Muscle activation and knee biomechanics during squatting and lunging after lower extremity fatigue in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Longpré, Heather S; Acker, Stacey M; Maly, Monica R

    2015-02-01

    Muscle activations and knee joint loads were compared during squatting and lunging before and after lower extremity neuromuscular fatigue. Electromyographic activations of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris, and the external knee adduction and flexion moments were collected on 25 healthy women (mean age 23.5 years, BMI of 23.7 kg/m(2)) during squatting and lunging. Participants were fatigued through sets of 50 isotonic knee extensions and flexions, with resistance set at 50% of the peak torque achieved during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Fatigue was defined as a decrease in peak isometric knee extension or flexion torque ?25% from baseline. Co-activation indices were calculated between rectus femoris and biceps femoris; and between vastus lateralis and biceps femoris. Fatigue decreased peak isometric extension and flexion torques (p<0.05), mean vastus lateralis activation during squatting and lunging (p<0.05), and knee adduction and flexion moments during lunging (p<0.05). Quadriceps activations were greater during lunging than squatting (p<0.05). Thus, fatigue altered the recruitment strategy of the quadriceps during squatting and lunging. Lunging challenges quadriceps activation more than squatting in healthy, young women. PMID:25258248

  3. Regeneration of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Turner, Neill J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2012-03-01

    Skeletal muscle has a robust capacity for regeneration following injury. However, few if any effective therapeutic options for volumetric muscle loss are available. Autologous muscle grafts or muscle transposition represent possible salvage procedures for the restoration of mass and function but these approaches have limited success and are plagued by associated donor site morbidity. Cell-based therapies are in their infancy and, to date, have largely focused on hereditary disorders such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. An unequivocal need exists for regenerative medicine strategies that can enhance or induce de novo formation of functional skeletal muscle as a treatment for congenital absence or traumatic loss of tissue. In this review, the three stages of skeletal muscle regeneration and the potential pitfalls in the development of regenerative medicine strategies for the restoration of functional skeletal muscle in situ are discussed. PMID:21667167

  4. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  5. Effect of constrained weight shift on the static balance and muscle activation of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung Woo; Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Na Kyung; Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of constrained weight shift induced by shoe lift beneath the unaffected lower extremity, on balance functions and electromyography of the affected lower extremity of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve patients with unilateral stroke were recruited as volunteers for this study. The subjects were repeatedly measured in a randomized order under three conditions: no-shoe lift, and shoe lifts of 5?mm and 10?mm heights beneath the unaffected lower extremity. [Results] Standing with a 10?mm shoe lift for the unaffected lower extremity decreased the mean velocity of mediolateral sway compared to no-shoe lift. Regarding the velocity of anteroposterior sway, standing with 5?mm and 10?mm shoe lifts decreased the mean velocity of anteroposterior sway. The muscle activation of the affected lower extremity was not significantly different among the no-shoe lift, 5?mm shoe lift and 10?mm shoe lift conditions; however, the muscle activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and medial gastrocnemius of the affected lower extremity progressively improved with increasing height of the shoe lift. [Conclusion] A constrained weight shift to the affected side elicited by a shoe insole of 10?mm height on the unaffected side can improve the static standing balance of stroke patients, and it resulted in 14–24% increases in the muscle activities of the affected leg. PMID:25931729

  6. Strategies to Improve Regeneration of the Soft Palate Muscles After Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A.D.T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. These patients are unable to separate the nasal from the oral cavity leading to air loss during speech. Although surgical repair ameliorates soft palate function by joining the clefted muscles of the soft palate, optimal function is often not achieved. The regeneration of muscles in the soft palate after surgery is hampered because of (1) their low intrinsic regenerative capacity, (2) the muscle properties related to clefting, and (3) the development of fibrosis. Adjuvant strategies based on tissue engineering may improve the outcome after surgery by approaching these specific issues. Therefore, this review will discuss myogenesis in the noncleft and cleft palate, the characteristics of soft palate muscles, and the process of muscle regeneration. Finally, novel therapeutic strategies based on tissue engineering to improve soft palate function after surgical repair are presented. PMID:22697475

  7. ULTRASOUND OF THE PECTORALIS MAJOR MUSCLE AFTER REVERSE SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Mascarinas, Angelie L.; Newman, Joel S.; Warner, Jon J.P.; Jain, Nitin B.

    2014-01-01

    Only a few reports exist in the literature for sonographic assessment of the pectoralis major muscle. We present a case of pectoralis major muscle atrophy as a cause of persistent internal rotation weakness diagnosed via ultrasound in a patient with multiple prior surgeries and contraindication to MRI due to a shoulder implant. This patient’s physical examination suggested an abnormal contour of the pectoralis major muscle on contraction, so he was referred for diagnostic ultrasound. The ultrasound was key to guiding the management of this patient since a surgical repair of a torn pectoralis major muscle was planned if this was found. No pectoralis major tear or rupture was seen on ultrasound, but there was evidence of pectoralis major muscle atrophy. Accordingly, surgery was avoided and the patient was able to continue with his physical therapy program. PMID:25251253

  8. Characteristic behavior of the respiratory muscles, esophagus, and external anal and urethral sphincters during straining, retching, and vomiting in the decerebrate dog.

    PubMed

    Koga, T; Fukuda, H

    1990-01-01

    To ascertain differences in the brainstem pattern generators for straining and retching, discharges of 230 respiratory single motor units from the intercostal nerves and discharges of the nerves to accessory respiratory muscles, the esophagus, and external anal and urethral sphincters were observed during straining, retching, and vomiting (fictive expulsion) in decerebrate and paralyzed dogs. Straining and retching were identified with coactivation of the phrenic nerve and the nerve to the rectus abdominis, which was elicited by distension of the rectum and stomach, respectively. Synchronous discharges with each retch and straining were always exhibited by the phrenic nerve, the nerves innervating the abdominal part of the rectus abdominis and the external anal and urethral sphincters. In contrast, different behaviours were constantly observed in four nerves. 1) The nerves to the serratus dorsalis cranialis was inhibited during straining, but activated synchronously with each retch and vomiting. 2) Vagal pharyngeal branches innervating the upper esophagus and branches of the recurrent nerve innervating the lower part of the cervical esophagus fired synchronously with straining. The esophageal nerves, on the other hand, did not fire with each retch, but did fire strongly between retches. 3) The nerve to the sacrocaudalis dorsalis lateralis discharged concomitantly with straining but did not with retches. Straining and retching behaviors exhibited by the nerves innervating other thoracic accessory inspiratory muscles (the intercartilagineus, rectus thoracis, scalenus) varied from dog to dog. The nerves innervating the thoracic parts of the rectus abdominis and obliquus externus abdominis always discharged synchronously with straining, and discharged with retches in the majority of dogs, but did not in a minority of dogs. The expiratory units from the internal intercostal nerves showed intense discharges synchronously with coactivation in straining (96%), retching (65%), and vomiting (100%). In contrast, none of the inspiratory units from the external intercostal nerves exhibited such intense discharges with straining and retching. These results suggest that the functional difference in straining and retching mainly depends on the differences in the behavior of the serratus dorsalis cranialis and esophagus. The forms of this dependence were discussed. PMID:1965598

  9. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  10. Validation of a high-power, time-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy system for measurement of superficial and deep muscle deoxygenation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Koga, Shunsaku; Barstow, Thomas J; Okushima, Dai; Rossiter, Harry B; Kondo, Narihiko; Ohmae, Etsuko; Poole, David C

    2015-06-01

    Near-infrared assessment of skeletal muscle is restricted to superficial tissues due to power limitations of spectroscopic systems. We reasoned that understanding of muscle deoxygenation may be improved by simultaneously interrogating deeper tissues. To achieve this, we modified a high-power (?8 mW), time-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy system to increase depth penetration. Precision was first validated using a homogenous optical phantom over a range of inter-optode spacings (OS). Coefficients of variation from 10 measurements were minimal (0.5-1.9%) for absorption (?a), reduced scattering, simulated total hemoglobin, and simulated O2 saturation. Second, a dual-layer phantom was constructed to assess depth sensitivity, and the thickness of the superficial layer was varied. With a superficial layer thickness of 1, 2, 3, and 4 cm (?a = 0.149 cm(-1)), the proportional contribution of the deep layer (?a = 0.250 cm(-1)) to total ?a was 80.1, 26.9, 3.7, and 0.0%, respectively (at 6-cm OS), validating penetration to ?3 cm. Implementation of an additional superficial phantom to simulate adipose tissue further reduced depth sensitivity. Finally, superficial and deep muscle spectroscopy was performed in six participants during heavy-intensity cycle exercise. Compared with the superficial rectus femoris, peak deoxygenation of the deep rectus femoris (including the superficial intermedius in some) was not significantly different (deoxyhemoglobin and deoxymyoglobin concentration: 81.3 ± 20.8 vs. 78.3 ± 13.6 ?M, P > 0.05), but deoxygenation kinetics were significantly slower (mean response time: 37 ± 10 vs. 65 ± 9 s, P ? 0.05). These data validate a high-power, time-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy system with large OS for measuring the deoxygenation of deep tissues and reveal temporal and spatial disparities in muscle deoxygenation responses to exercise. PMID:25840439

  11. Influence of Gender and Muscle Architecture Asymmetry on Jump and Sprint Performance

    PubMed Central

    Mangine, Gerald T.; Fukuda, David H.; LaMonica, Michael B.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Wells, Adam J.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Hoffman, Jay R.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle architecture is a determinant for sprinting speed and jumping power, which may be related to anaerobic sports performance. In the present investigation, the relationships between peak (PVJP) and mean (MVJP) vertical jump power, 30m maximal sprinting speed (30M), and muscle architecture were examined in 28 college-aged, recreationally-active men (n = 14; 24.3 ± 2.2y; 89.1 ± 9.3kg; 1.80 ± 0.07 m) and women (n = 14; 21.5 ± 1.7y; 65.2 ± 12.4kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m). Ultrasound measures of muscle thickness (MT), pennation angle (PNG), cross-sectional area (CSA), and echo intensity (ECHO) were collected from the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) of both legs; fascicle length (FL) was estimated from MT and PNG. Men possessed lower ECHO, greater muscle size (MT & CSA), were faster, and were more powerful (PVJP & MVJP) than women. Stepwise regression indicated that muscle size and quality influenced speed and power in men. In women, vastus lateralis asymmetry negatively affected PVJP (MT: r = –0.73; FL: r = –0.60) and MVJP (MT: r = –0.76; FL: r = –0.64), while asymmetrical ECHO (VL) and FL (RF) positively influenced MVJP (r = 0.55) and 30M (r = 0.57), respectively. Thigh muscle architecture appears to influence jumping power and sprinting speed, though the effect may vary by gender in recreationally-active adults. Appropriate assessment of these ultrasound variables in men and women prior to training may provide a more specific exercise prescription. Key points The manner in which thigh muscle architecture affects jumping power and sprinting speed varies by gender. In men, performance is influenced by the magnitude of muscle size and architecture. In women, asymmetrical muscle size and architectural asymmetry significantly influence performance. To develop effective and precise exercise prescription for the improvement of jumping power and/or sprinting speed, muscle architecture assessment prior to the onset of a training program is advised. PMID:25435784

  12. Volumetric muscle loss.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Brian F; Hsu, Joseph R

    2011-01-01

    Prevention of infection, as well as bone covering and healing, is paramount in the management of limb injury with associated muscle injury. Volumetric muscle loss (VML) is the traumatic or surgical loss of skeletal muscle with resultant functional impairment. No standardized evaluation protocol exists for the characterization and quantification of VML. Clinical photographs and video recordings, range of motion measurements, manual muscle strength testing, and isokinetic muscle function testing may prove to be useful in documenting VML. Current treatment options include functional free muscle transfer and the use of advanced bracing designs. Advances in powered bracing and regenerative medicine may one day provide additional therapeutic options. Further research on VML is warranted. PMID:21304045

  13. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  14. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Congenital heart surgery - discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation - discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair - discharge; Tetralogy of Fallot repair - discharge; Coarctation of the aorta repair - discharge; ...

  15. Lung surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Thoracotomy - discharge; Lung tissue removal - discharge; Pneumonectomy - discharge; Lobectomy - discharge; Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - ...

  16. Ultrastructure of heart muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, J R; Waugh, R A

    1978-01-01

    The ultrastructure of cardiac muscle is described. In the course of the descriptions advantage has been taken of comparative anatomy, in order to elucidate the relationships between structure and function. Physiologic parameters are discussed in a comparative manner including information from skeletal muscles fibers that often provide a well-studied point of departure. The descriptions of the ultrastructure of cardiac muscle are illustrated by a few electron photomicrographs to give a general overview. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. PMID:363414

  17. Muscle Changes in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Siparsky, Patrick N.; Kirkendall, Donald T.; Garrett, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle physiology in the aging athlete is complex. Sarcopenia, the age-related decrease in lean muscle mass, can alter activity level and affect quality of life. This review addresses the microscopic and macroscopic changes in muscle with age, recognizes contributing factors including nutrition and changes in hormone levels, and identifies potential pharmacologic agents in clinical trial that may aid in the battle of this complex, costly, and disabling problem. Level of Evidence: Level 5. PMID:24427440

  18. Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine Trauma and Post Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4860 Y Street, 1700 Sacramento, CA 95817 P: 916.734.2700 F: 916

  19. Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine Trauma and Post______________________________: This letter is to welcome you to the University of California, Davis Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

  20. Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Adult Reconstructive Surgery Foot and Ankle Surgery Hand, Upper Extremity and Microvascular Surgery Oncology Orthopaedic Research Pediatric Surgery Spine Surgery Sports Medicine Trauma and Post OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4860 Y Street, Suite 3800 Sacramento, CA 95817 P: 916

  1. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  2. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  3. Impact of Different Body Positions on Bioelectrical Activity of the Pelvic Floor Muscles in Nulliparous Continent Women

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Sobota, Grzegorz; Kwa?na, Krystyna; B?aszczak, Edward; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053). Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs. PMID:25793212

  4. Functional variation of neck muscles and their relation to feeding style in Tyrannosauridae and other large theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Snively, Eric; Russell, Anthony P

    2007-08-01

    Reconstructed neck muscles of large theropod dinosaurs suggest influences on feeding style that paralleled variation in skull mechanics. In all examined theropods, the head dorsiflexor m. transversospinalis capitis probably filled in the posterior dorsal concavity of the neck, for a more crocodilian- than avian-like profile in this region. The tyrannosaurine tyrannosaurids Daspletosaurus and Tyrannosaurus had relatively larger moment arms for latero-flexion by m. longissimus capitis superficialis and m. complexus than albertosaurine tyrannosaurids, and longer dorsiflexive moment arms for m. complexus. Areas of dorsiflexor origination are significantly larger relative to neck length in adult Tyrannosaurus rex than in other tyrannosaurids, suggesting relatively large muscle cross-sections and forces. Tyrannosaurids were not particularly specialized for neck ventro-flexion. In contrast, the hypothesis that Allosaurus co-opted m. longissimus capitis superficialis for ventro-flexion is strongly corroborated. Ceratosaurus had robust insertions for the ventro-flexors m. longissimus capitis profundus and m. rectus capitis ventralis. Neck muscle morphology is consistent with puncture-and-pull and powerful shake feeding in tyrannosaurids, relatively rapid strikes in Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus, and ventroflexive augmentation of weaker jaw muscle forces in the non tyrannosaurids. PMID:17654673

  5. Comparison and reproducibility of sEMG during manual muscle testing on land and in water.

    PubMed

    Silvers, W Matthew; Dolny, Dennis G

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) compare the sEMG recordings from maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), and (2) examine the reproducibility of sEMG recordings from MVCs for selected lower extremity muscles derived from manual muscle testing (MMT) on dry land, and in water prior to and following aquatic treadmill running. Twelve healthy recreational male runners participated. The selected muscles were: M. quadriceps-vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF), M. biceps femoris (BF), M. tibialis anterior (TA) and the M. gastrocnemius caput mediale (GAS) of the right leg. The MVC testing conditions were: dry land, underwater prior to (Water 1) and following an aquatic exercise trial (Water 2). For each muscle, a one-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to compare MVC scores between testing conditions, and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and typical error (CV%) were calculated to determine the reproducibility and precision of MVC scores, respectively, between conditions. For all muscles, no significant differences were observed between land and water MVC scores (p=0.88-0.97), and high reliability (ICC=0.96-0.98) and precision (CV%=7.4-12.6%) were observed between MVC conditions. Under MMT conditions it appears that comparable MVC sEMG values were achieved on land and in water and the integrity of the EMG recordings were maintained during water immersion. Future studies using sEMG waterproofing procedures should conduct MVC testing in water for data normalization and perform post-exercise verification of sEMG signal integrity. PMID:20965128

  6. Lower Extremity Muscle Activity During a Women’s Overhand Lacrosse Shot

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Brianna M.; Mercer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe lower extremity muscle activity during the lacrosse shot. Participants (n=5 females, age 22±2 years, body height 162.6±15.2 cm, body mass 63.7±23.6 kg) were free from injury and had at least one year of lacrosse experience. The lead leg was instrumented with electromyography (EMG) leads to measure muscle activity of the rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and medial gastrocnemius (GA). Participants completed five trials of a warm-up speed shot (Slow) and a game speed shot (Fast). Video analysis was used to identify the discrete events defining specific movement phases. Full-wave rectified data were averaged per muscle per phase (Crank Back Minor, Crank Back Major, Stick Acceleration, Stick Deceleration). Average EMG per muscle was analyzed using a 4 (Phase) × 2 (Speed) ANOVA. BF was greater during Fast vs. Slow for all phases (p<0.05), while TA was not influenced by either Phase or Speed (p>0.05). RF and GA were each influenced by the interaction of Phase and Speed (p<0.05) with GA being greater during Fast vs. Slow shots during all phases and RF greater during Crank Back Minor and Major as well as Stick Deceleration (p<0.05) but only tended to be greater during Stick Acceleration (p=0.076) for Fast vs. Slow. The greater muscle activity (BF, RF, GA) during Fast vs. Slow shots may have been related to a faster approach speed and/or need to create a stiff lower extremity to allow for faster upper extremity movements. PMID:25114727

  7. Reduction in pulmonary function after CABG surgery is related to postoperative inflammation and hypercortisolemia

    PubMed Central

    Roncada, Gert; Dendale, Paul; Linsen, Loes; Hendrikx, Marc; Hansen, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function is significantly reduced in the acute phase after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Because pulmonary function partly depends on respiratory muscle strength, we studied whether reductions in pulmonary function are related to postoperative alterations in circulatory factors that affect muscle protein synthesis. Methods: Slow vital capacity (SVC) was assessed in 22 subjects before and 9 ± 3 days after CABG surgery. Blood testosterone, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), growth hormone, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), glucose, insulin, c-peptide, c-reactive protein (CRP) content, and free androgen index, cortisol/testosterone ratio, HOMA-IR index were assessed before surgery and during the first three days after surgery. Intubation, surgery time and cumulative chest tube drainage were measured. Correlations between changes in SVC and blood parameters after surgery or subject characteristics were studied. This was a prospective observational study. Results: After CABG surgery SVC decreased by 37 ± 18% (P < 0.01). Free androgen index, blood SHBG, testosterone and IGF-1 content decreased, while HOMA-IR index, cortisol/testosterone ratio, blood growth hormone, insulin and CRP content increased (P < 0.0025) in the first three days after surgery. Decrease in SVC was independently (P < 0.05) related to higher preoperative SVC (SC ? = 0.66), and greater increase in blood cortisol (SC ? = 0.54) and CRP (SC ? = 0.37) content after surgery. Conclusions: Larger reductions in pulmonary function after CABG surgery are present in patients experiencing greater postoperative increases in blood CRP and cortisol levels. Decrements in pulmonary function after CABG surgery are, at least in part, thus related to alterations in circulatory factors that affect muscle protein synthesis. PMID:26379888

  8. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration after an acute rotator cuff repair in a sheep model

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Tammy; Liu, Xuhui; Easley, Jeremiah T.; Ravishankar, Bharat; Puttlitz, Christian; Feeley, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are the most common tendon injury seen in orthopedic patients. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration of the muscle are crucial factors that dictate the outcome following rotator cuff surgery. Though less studied in humans, rotator cuff muscle fibrosis has been seen in animal models as well and may influence outcomes as well. The purpose of this study was to determine if the rotator cuff would develop muscle changes even in the setting of an acute repair in a sheep model. We hypothesized that fatty infiltration and fibrosis would be present even after an acute repair six months after initial surgery. Methods twelve female adult sheep underwent an acute rotator cuff tear and immediate repair on the right shoulder. The left shoulder served as a control and did not undergo a tear or a repair. Six months following acute rotator cuff repairs, sheep muscles were harvested to study atrophy, fatty infiltration, and fibrosis by histological analysis, western blotting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results the repair group demonstrated an increase expression of muscle atrophy, fatty infiltration, and fibrosis related genes. Significantly increased adipocytes, muscle fatty infiltration, and collagen deposition was observed in rotator cuff muscles in the tendon repair group compared to the control group. Conclusions rotator cuff muscle undergoes degradation changes including fatty infiltration and fibrosis even after the tendons are repair immediately after rupture. Level of Evidence Basic Science Study. PMID:26261789

  9. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  10. Penile enlargement surgery.

    PubMed

    Alter, G J

    1998-06-01

    Aesthetic surgery to improve the appearance of the penis, scrotum, and pubic region has successfully evolved. Penile lengthening is performed by releasing the suspensory ligament of the penis followed by use of penile weights. Girth is increased by wrapping a dermal-fat graft around the penile circumference. The choice of surgery is determined by the patient's anatomy and desires. PMID:9623619

  11. Corpus Uteri Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Corpus Uteri C540–C559 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) [SEER Note: Do not code dilation and curettage (D&C) as Surgery of Primary Site for invasive cancers] Codes 00 None; no surgery

  12. Laparoscopic Surgery - What Is It?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... because the instruments are placed so closely together. “Robotic surgery” or “robotic-assisted surgery” is a newer variation on minimally ... remainder of the operation is usually performed laparoscopically. Robotic surgery is gaining popularity primarily for rectal operations ...

  13. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Home For Patients Search FAQs Surgery ... Incontinence FAQ166, July 2014 PDF Format Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Special Procedures What is stress urinary ...

  14. Limited-Access Heart Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not have to be split open. What is robotic-assisted heart surgery? In yet another kind of ... perform videoscopic surgery with even greater precision. In robotic-assisted surgery, surgeons make several small incisions in ...

  15. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in ... heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  16. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J.; Talbot, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A trophy of skeletal muscle; muscle a trophy associated with manned space flight; the nature, causes, and mechanisms of muscle atrophy associated with space flight, selected physiological factors, biochemical aspects, and countermeasures are addressed.

  17. Skeletal Muscular system Know muscle

    E-print Network

    Houde, Peter

    Skeletal Muscular system Objectives Know muscle Group or compartment Location Function Origin through space includes skeletal striated muscle every cell innervated (neuropathy or denervation atrophy) (levels of severity: neuropraxia, axonotmesis, neurotmesis) Origin ­ stationary point of muscle attachment

  18. [Circulatory support by an electrically stimulated muscle flap. Experimental experiences].

    PubMed

    Girsch, W; Koller, R; Lanmüller, H; Seitelberger, R; Rab, M; Huber, L; Schima, H; Stöhr, H G; Losert, U M; Wolner, E

    1996-03-01

    Functional electrical stimulation of the latissimus dorsi muscle flap for circulatory assistance extends the traditional concept of using this flap for reconstructive procedures into the field of cardiac surgery. It requires a transformed muscle which is able to contract for long periods of time without fatigue. Two main groups of experiments have been carried out in sheep. In six sheep the latissimus dorsi muscle (MLD) was transformed into a fatigue-resistant muscle by the means of multichannel stimulation of the supplying motor nerve. After that, stimulation of MLD at a frequency of 70 contractions per minute could be performed continuously without significant muscle fatigue. The loss of maximal force caused by the conditioning procedure was about one third of the initial force. In a second series of acute experiments the MLD was used for cardiomyoplasty. The muscle was divided into two parts which were wrapped around the heart in two different forms. The resting tension of the muscle was preserved. EKG-synchronous stimulation resulted in an increase in left ventricular pressure between 12 and 53%. The increase in arterial pressure was between 10,6 and 58%. PMID:8647534

  19. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  20. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 ?m; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 ?N at 1000 V.

  1. [Anesthesia ambulatory one-day surgery].

    PubMed

    Darvas, K; Janecskó, M; Vimláti, L; Borsodi, M

    1999-09-12

    The spreading of the cost-benefit attitude is a considerable help in the progress of the one day surgery. The patient selection, the preoperative patient preparations and the preoperative examination has done in the anaestesiologic ambulance. Aims of ambulatory anaesthesia are to achieve sedation, hypnosis, analgesia, amnesia and muscle relaxation during the operation, to preserve preoperative mental and physiologic state, analgesia and to make early postoperative nourishing possible. Besides personnel and equipment of anaesthesia and reanimation, monitoring of circulation, respiration and neuromuscular transmission is needed. Anaesthetic methods: local, regional and general anaesthesia or sedation. Ways of general anaesthesia are intravenous, inhalation or combined. Intravenous anaesthetic drugs (barbiturates, ketamine, etomidate, midazolam, propofol and eltanolon) can be used in monotherapy or in combination with each other or opioids (morphine, alfentanil, fentanyl, sufentanil, remifentanil). Among inhalatic agents N2O isoflurane, desflurane, sevoflurane are advisable. Recommended non depolarising muscle relaxants are the short-acting atracurium, mivacurium, vecuronium and rocuronium. Methods for loco-regional anaesthesia are infiltration, peripheral nerve blockade, epidural and intradural anaesthesia which can be used with additional vigil sedation. Blockades with local analgetics, intraoperative opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, sedatives, pre-emptiv analgesia and patient controlled analgesia can be used for postoperative pain relief. Besides the patient and intervention type selection the adequate perioperative anaesthesiologic work and the prudent specifications of leaving conditions is the most important terms of the safety of one-day surgery and anaesthesia. PMID:10513449

  2. [Functional tendon repair in orthopedic tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Dominkus, M; Sabeti, M; Kotz, R

    2005-06-01

    Large defects of functional soft tissue structures, e.g., extensor mechanism, ligaments, muscles, and joint capsule, may occur in tumor surgery or revision surgery following conventional joint replacement. Reconstruction can be performed using biological grafts such as free or pedicled tendon-muscle flaps, allografts, or synthetic material. Prerequisites for synthetic material are good biologic tolerance with fibroblastic ingrowth, mechanical resistance to fatigue, and a maximum of tension force with a minimum of elongation. In this study we used a nonresorbable band of longitudinal polyester fibers with a minimal rupture level of 4000 N and an elongation rate less than 7% of its original length. The shape of the band was designed for universal use with 40 cm length and 6 cm width. Its primary indication was augmentation or complete reconstruction of the extensor mechanism of the knee joint after large extra-articular tumor resections in primary bone tumors. Furthermore, its use for hip joint capsule reconstruction in luxation, coverage of megaprostheses of the humerus, and augmentation after biological reconstruction of tendons achieved excellent results. PMID:15883785

  3. Core Muscle Activity during TRX Suspension Exercises with and without Kinesiology Taping in Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: Implications for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Tam, Y. T.; Macfarlane, Duncan J.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Chan, Eleanor W. Y.; Guo, X.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of kinesiology taping (KT) and different TRX suspension workouts on the amplitude of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the core muscles among people with chronic low back pain (LBP). Each participant (total n = 21) was exposed to two KT conditions: no taping and taping, while performing four TRX suspension exercises: (1) hamstring curl, (2) hip abduction in plank, (3) chest press, and (4) 45-degree row. Right transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrAIO), rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and superficial lumbar multifidus (LMF) activity was recorded with surface EMG and expressed as a percentage of the EMG amplitude recorded during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the respective muscles. Hip abduction in plank increased TrAIO, RA, and LMF EMG amplitude compared with other TRX positions (P < 0.008). Only the hamstring curl was effective in inducing a high EMG amplitude of LMF (P < 0.001). No significant difference in EMG magnitude was found between the taping and no taping conditions overall (P > 0.05). Hip abduction in plank most effectively activated abdominal muscles, whereas the hamstring curl most effectively activated the paraspinal muscles. Applying KT conferred no immediate benefits in improving the core muscle activation during TRX training in adults with chronic LBP. PMID:26185520

  4. Regional Myosin Heavy Chains Distribution in Selected Paraspinal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Regev, Gilad J.; Kim, Choll W.; Thacker, Bryan E.; Tomiya, Akihito; Garfin, Steven R.; Ward, Samuel R.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study with repeated measures design. Objective To compare the myosin heavy chain isoform distribution within and between paraspinal muscles and to test the theory that fiber type gradients exist as a function of paraspinal muscle depth. Summary of Background Data There is still uncertainty regarding the fiber type distributions within different paraspinal muscles. It has been previously proposed that deep fibers of the multifidus muscle may contain a higher ratio of type I to type II fibers, because, unlike superficial fibers, they primarily stabilize the spine, and may therefore have relatively higher endurance. Using a minimally invasive surgical approach, utilizing tubular retractors that are placed within anatomic inter-muscular planes, it was feasible to obtain biopsies from the multifidus, longissimus, iliocostalis and psoas muscles at specific predefined depths. Methods Under an IRB approved protocol, muscle biopsies were obtained from 15 patients who underwent minimally invasive spinal surgery, using the posterior paramedian (Wiltse) approach or the minimally invasive lateral approach. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform distribution was analyzed using SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Since multiple biopsies were obtained from each patient, MyHC distribution was compared using both within- and between-muscle repeated measures analyses. Results The fiber type distribution was similar among the posterior paraspinal muscles and was composed of relatively high percentage of type I (63%), compared to type IIA (19%) and type IIX (18%) fibers. In contrast, the psoas muscle was found to contain a lower percentage of type I fibers (42%) and a higher percentage of type IIA (33%) and IIX fibers (26%; P<0.05). No significant difference was found for fiber type distribution among three different depths of the multifidus and psoas muscles. Conclusion Fiber type distribution between the posterior paraspinal muscles is consistent and is composed of relatively high percentage of type I fibers, consistent with a postural function. The psoas muscle, on the other hand, is composed of a higher percentage of type II fibers such as in the appendicular muscles. Our data do not support the idea of a fiber type gradient as a function of depth for any muscle studied. PMID:20461040

  5. Transoral robotic thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clark, James H.; Kim, Hoon Yub

    2015-01-01

    There is currently significant demand for minimally invasive thyroid surgery; however the majority of proposed surgical approaches necessitate a compromise between minimal tissue dissection with a visible cervical scar or extensive tissue dissection with a remote, hidden scar. The development of transoral endoscopic thyroid surgery however provides an approach which is truly minimally invasive, as it conceals the incision within the oral cavity without significantly increasing the amount of required dissection. The transoral endoscopic approach however presents multiple technical challenges, which could be overcome with the incorporation of a robotic operating system. This manuscript summarizes the literature on the feasibility and current clinical experience with transoral robotic thyroid surgery. PMID:26425456

  6. Principles of Pituitary Surgery.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Christopher J; Nyquist, Gurston G; Farag, Alexander A; Rosen, Marc R; Evans, James J

    2016-02-01

    Since the description of a transnasal approach for treatment of pituitary tumors, transsphenoidal surgery has undergone continuous development. Hirsch developed a lateral endonasal approach before simplifying it to a transseptal approach. Cushing approached pituitary tumors using a transsphenoidal approach but transitioned to the transcranial route. Transsphenoidal surgery was not "rediscovered" until Hardy introduced the surgical microscope. An endoscopic transsphenoidal approach for pituitary tumors has been reported and further advanced. We describe the principles of pituitary surgery including the key elements of surgical decision making and discuss the technical nuances distinguishing the endoscopic from the microscopic approach. PMID:26614830

  7. Transoral robotic thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Clark, James H; Kim, Hoon Yub; Richmon, Jeremy D

    2015-10-01

    There is currently significant demand for minimally invasive thyroid surgery; however the majority of proposed surgical approaches necessitate a compromise between minimal tissue dissection with a visible cervical scar or extensive tissue dissection with a remote, hidden scar. The development of transoral endoscopic thyroid surgery however provides an approach which is truly minimally invasive, as it conceals the incision within the oral cavity without significantly increasing the amount of required dissection. The transoral endoscopic approach however presents multiple technical challenges, which could be overcome with the incorporation of a robotic operating system. This manuscript summarizes the literature on the feasibility and current clinical experience with transoral robotic thyroid surgery. PMID:26425456

  8. Caring for muscle spasticity or spasms

    MedlinePLUS

    High muscle tone - care; Increased muscle tension - care; Upper motor neuron syndrome - care; Muscle stiffness - care ... Muscle spasticity, or spasms, causes your muscles to become stiff or rigid. It can also cause exaggerated, ...

  9. Muscles and their myokines.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2011-01-15

    In the past, the role of physical activity as a life-style modulating factor has been considered as that of a tool to balance energy intake. Although it is important to avoid obesity, physical inactivity should be discussed in a much broader context. There is accumulating epidemiological evidence that a physically active life plays an independent role in the protection against type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, dementia and even depression. For most of the last century, researchers sought a link between muscle contraction and humoral changes in the form of an 'exercise factor', which could be released from skeletal muscle during contraction and mediate some of the exercise-induced metabolic changes in other organs such as the liver and the adipose tissue. We have suggested that cytokines or other peptides that are produced, expressed and released by muscle fibres and exert autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects should be classified as 'myokines'. Given that skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the human body, our discovery that contracting skeletal muscle secretes proteins sets a novel paradigm: skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ producing and releasing myokines, which work in a hormone-like fashion, exerting specific endocrine effects on other organs. Other myokines work via paracrine mechanisms, exerting local effects on signalling pathways involved in muscle metabolism. It has been suggested that myokines may contribute to exercise-induced protection against several chronic diseases. PMID:21177953

  10. What to Expect during Heart Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What To Expect During Heart Surgery Heart surgery is done in a hospital, ... surgery, takes about 3–6 hours. Traditional Open-Heart Surgery For this type of surgery, you'll ...

  11. STRUCTURE OF SKELETAL MUSCLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Structure of an Individual Muscle Fiber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    E-print Network

    Cooper, Robin L.

    STRUCTURE OF SKELETAL MUSCLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Structure of an Individual Muscle Fiber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 The Connective Tissue System within the Muscle Belly

  12. Tennis elbow surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sitting position and how you use equipment at work. Wearing elbow splints or braces to rest your muscles and tendons. Getting shots of steroid medicine, such as cortisone. This is done by your doctor.

  13. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... heart muscle caused by poor blood flow. Coronary Angiography Coronary angiography (an-jee-OG-rah-fee) is a test ... of CT scan is called a coronary CT angiography, or CTA. A cardiac CT scan can show ...

  14. Skeletal muscle-smooth muscle interaction: an unusual myoelastic system.

    PubMed

    Hikida, R S; Peterson, W J

    1983-09-01

    The serratus superficialis metapatagialis (SSM) of pigeons is a skeletal muscle with unusual properties. It lies between the ribs and the trailing edge of the wing, where it is attached to the skin by a system of smooth muscles having elastic tendons. Wing movements during flight induce marked changes in this muscle's length. The SSM inserts onto the deep fascia, and at its termination the skeletal muscle contains large numbers of microtubules. Many myofibrils attach to leptomeric organelles, which then attach to the terminal end of the skeletal muscle fiber. The deep fascia next connects to the dermis of the skin by bundles of smooth muscles that have elastic tendons at both ends. This system allows large movements of the muscle while preventing its fibers from overstretching. The movements and presumed forces acting at this muscle make the presence of sensory receptors such as muscle spindles unlikely. Spindles are absent in this muscle. PMID:6227753

  15. A new dimension in endo surgery: Micro endo surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pecora, Gabriele Edoardo; Pecora, Camilla Nicole

    2015-01-01

    There is an immense difference between tradizional Endodontic Surgery and Micro-Endo Surgery. Microsurgical techniques made possible and accessible results,that were unimaginable before. Under microscopic control,the operative techniques reached continous changes,allowing a better precision and quality standards. The dramatic evolution from Endo Surgery to Micro-Endo Surgery has enlarged the horizon of therapeutic options. Illumination and magnification through the Microscope has fundamentally and radically changed the way endo surgery can be performed. PMID:25657519

  16. Oxygen supply-consumption balance in the thigh muscles during exhausting knee-extension exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Kazumi; Homma, Sachiko; Kagaya, Atsuko

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in muscle oxygenation between the individual muscles involved in an exhaustive knee-extension exercise. Eight active women performed exercise by extending the knee joint from 90 degree(s) to 30 degree(s) (60 extensions min-1) at 20%, 30%, and 40% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Changes in oxy-((Delta) HbO2), deoxy-((Delta) Hb), and total ((Delta) HbT) hemoglobin concentrations, and oxygen saturation ((Delta) SO2NIRS equals HbO2/HbT) in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles were measured with a spatially resolved near-infrared spectrometer. The (Delta) SO2NIRS in the VL and RF decreased rapidly from the pre-exercise control value (VL: 75.6 +/- 0.9%; RF: 81.6 +/- 1.6%) at the onset of exercise at three different intensities, although no significant difference in (Delta) SO2NIRS was found between the two muscles at this time. However, the (Delta) SO2NIRS decreased more rapidly thereafter and reached a lower value at exhaustion in the VL than in the RF. The difference in (Delta) SO2NIRS between the VL (-10.3 +/- 1.7%) and RF (-4.0 +/- 1.0%) was significant (p < 0.05) when exercise intensity was 30% MVC. When the decreases in (Delta) HbO2 and (Delta) HbT (p < 0.05) were compared at different exercise intensities; the values at 30% and 40% MVC were significantly lower ((Delta) HbO2: p LS 0.01; (Delta) HbT: p < 0.05) than those at 20% MVC in the VL, but there was no significant difference in any of the parameters in the RF, or in (Delta) Hb in the VL. These results suggest that the muscle oxidative response to exhaustive knee- extension exercise differed between the VL and RF muscles. At exhaustion, oxygen saturation decreased to a lower level in the VL than in the RF, and an intensity-dependence differences in muscle oxygenation parameters was observed at 30% MVC in the VL but not in the RF muscles.

  17. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Physical therapy may begin in the recovery room right after your surgery . A machine gently exercises your leg ... cartilage grow. You will need to go to physical therapy and do exercises at home for 3 to ...

  18. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer care team right away. Reconstructive or breast implant surgery After having a mastectomy (or certain breast- ... Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To ...

  19. Orthognathic Surgery: General Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Khechoyan, David Y.

    2013-01-01

    Orthognathic surgery is a unique endeavor in facial surgery: a patient's appearance and occlusal function can be improved significantly, impacting the patient's sense of self and well-being. Successful outcomes in modern orthognathic surgery rely on close collaboration between the surgeon and the orthodontist across all stages of treatment, from preoperative planning to finalization of occlusion. Virtual computer planning promotes a more accurate analysis of dentofacial deformity and preoperative planning. It is also an invaluable aid in providing comprehensive patient education. In this article, the author describes the general surgical principles that underlie orthognathic surgery, highlighting the sequence of treatment, preoperative analysis of dentofacial deformity, surgical execution of the treatment plan, and possible complications. PMID:24872758

  20. American Board of Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Training & Certification Toggle navigation arrow About Certification Dates & Fees Taking a Computer Exam International Training For Residency & ... CME Repository About MOC Exams Exam Information Dates & Fees Taking a Computer Exam General Surgery About the ...

  1. Expectations of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... reduce the pressure in your nose. Avoid strenuous exercise for the first 2 weeks after surgery. Also ...

  2. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as using a rowing machine, twisting, or lifting weights.) DO NOT drive for at least 4 to 6 weeks after your surgery. The twisting movements needed to turn the steering wheel may pull on your incision. Expect to take ...

  3. Breast augmentation surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a change in the shape of your breast, hardening of breast tissue, or some pain. Emotional risks ... starting 5 days after surgery. Massaging helps reduce hardening of the capsule that surrounds the implant. Ask ...

  4. Brain Tumor Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The surgical removal of a portion of the skull. Doing so allows the neurosurgeon to find the ... much of it as possible. The piece of skull that was removed is replaced following surgery. Craniectomy: ...

  5. Aortic valve surgery - open

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have this type of valve. Biological, made of human or animal tissue. These valves may last 10 ... surgery Infection of the new valve Kidney failure Memory loss and loss of mental clarity, or "fuzzy ...

  6. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Opportunities Login Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Version Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic ... 2015 CME Credits Healthy Sooner: Patient Information Contact SAGES Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons 11300 ...

  7. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... carried out for the condition of carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a neuropathy where the median nerve gets ... of the hand. The surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome consists of a release of the transverse carpal ...

  8. Sculptures honour wartime surgery.

    PubMed

    2014-11-18

    The Florence Nightingale Museum has marked the centenary of the first world war with a display of life-size sculptures of soldiers from different wars who had reconstructive surgery after experiencing appalling facial injuries. PMID:25388690

  9. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Eyeglasses IOLs Refractive Surgery & LASIK Sunglasses Living EyeSmart About Ophthalmologists Adults Under 40 Adults 40 to 60 Adults Over 60 Babies, Children & Teenagers Computer Usage Diabetes Diet & Nutrition Eye Injuries Eye ...

  10. Spine surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in your back where nerve roots leave your spinal column Laminectomy -- surgery to remove the lamina, two small ... to take pressure off your spinal nerves or spinal column Spinal fusion -- the fusing of two bones together ...

  11. Robotic Surgery in Arthroplasty

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home AAOS Now 2013 December research AAOS Now Robotic Surgery in Arthroplasty Share By: Karthikeyan E. Ponnusamy, ... E. Ponnusamy, MD, and S. Raymond Golish, MD, PhD Robotic assistance is a relatively new technology for unicompartmental ( ...

  12. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The nasal endoscope is a small, lighted metal telescope placed into the nostril. The endoscope allows the ... sinus surgery involves the use of a small telescope (nasal endoscope) that is inserted through the nostril ...

  13. Department of Surgery Reunion Gala

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    Department of Surgery Reunion Gala Report A celebration of over 40 years of the Department of Surgery October25th&26th2013 #12;October25th2013:Wine&Cheese Surgery Reunion Gala Weekend: Wine & Cheese On Friday October 25, 2013 the Surgery Reunion Gala weekend kicked off with a wine and cheese event

  14. Saccade related gamma-band activity in intracerebral EEG: dissociating neural from ocular muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Jerbi, Karim; Freyermuth, Samson; Dalal, Sarang; Kahane, Philippe; Bertrand, Olivier; Berthoz, Alain; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe

    2009-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that transient increases in scalp electroencephalography (EEG) gamma band power (above 30 Hz) can be due to miniature eye movements. Although, these findings do not raise doubts about the widely established role of gamma range neural synchrony, it does call for caution when it comes to interpreting high frequency scalp EEG data. By contrast, gamma-band activity detected with intracerebral EEG (iEEG) is assumed to be immune to such miniature saccade artefacts. Here, we show for the first time, that while this is indeed largely the case, intracerebral recordings in the temporal pole of implanted patients can be contaminated by saccadic eye muscle artefacts resulting in typical high gamma-band power increases. By analyzing data from multiple depth electrodes, we show that this artefact is confined to the pole of the temporal lobe because of its immediate vicinity to extraocular muscles (rectus lateralis). For other brain structures, our analysis shows that the use of stereotactic EEG with a bipolar montage provides a robust and convenient tool to explore the functional role of gamma synchronization in humans with high anatomical accuracy during a wide range of cognitive processes, including oculomotor behaviour. PMID:19234780

  15. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  16. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J. (editor); Talbot, J. M. (editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  17. Core Muscle Activity, Exercise Preference, and Perceived Exertion during Core Exercise with Elastic Resistance versus Machine

    PubMed Central

    Vinstrup, Jonas; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Calatayud, Joaquin; Andersen, Lars L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate core muscle activity, exercise preferences, and perceived exertion during two selected core exercises performed with elastic resistance versus a conventional training machine. Methods. 17 untrained men aged 26–67 years participated in surface electromyography (EMG) measurements of five core muscles during torso-twists performed from left to right with elastic resistance and in the machine, respectively. The order of the exercises was randomized and each exercise consisted of 3 repetitions performed at a 10?RM load. EMG amplitude was normalized (nEMG) to maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC). Results. A higher right erector spinae activity in the elastic exercise compared with the machine exercise (50% [95% CI 36–64] versus 32% [95% CI 18–46] nEMG) was found. By contrast, the machine exercise, compared with the elastic exercise, showed higher left external oblique activity (77% [95% CI 64–90] versus 54% [95% CI 40–67] nEMG). For the rectus abdominis, right external oblique, and left erector spinae muscles there were no significant differences. Furthermore, 76% preferred the torso-twist with elastic resistance over the machine exercise. Perceived exertion (Borg CR10) was not significantly different between machine (5.8 [95% CI 4.88–6.72]) and elastic exercise (5.7 [95% CI 4.81–6.59]). Conclusion. Torso-twists using elastic resistance showed higher activity of the erector spinae, whereas torso-twist in the machine resulted in higher activity of the external oblique. For the remaining core muscles the two training modalities induced similar muscular activation. In spite of similar perceived exertion the majority of the participants preferred the exercise using elastic resistance. PMID:26557405

  18. Photobiomodulation in laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Rong, Dong-Liang; Huang, Jin; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Laser surgery provides good exposure with clear operating fields and satisfactory preliminary functional results. In contrast to conventional excision, it was found that matrix metalloproteinases and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases -1 mRNA expression is higher, myofibroblasts appeared and disappeared slower in laser excision wounds. It has been suggested that the better anatomical and functional results achieved following laser cordectomy may be explained by the fact that such procedures result in better, more rapid healing processes to recover vocal cord for early glottic tumors and better. In this paper, the role of photobiomodulation in laser surgery will be discussed by the cultured monolayer normal human skin fibroblast model of the photobiomodulation of marginal irradiation of high intensity laser beam, the photobiomodulation related to the irradiated tissue, the biological information model of photobiomodulation and the animal models of laser surgery. Although high intensity laser beam is so intense that it destroys the irradiated cells or tissue, its marginal irradiation intensity is so low that there is photobiomodulation on non-damage cells to modulate the regeneration of partly damaged tissue so that the surgery of laser of different parameters results in different post-surgical recovery. It was concluded that photobiomodulation might play an important role in the long-term effects of laser surgery, which might be used to design laser surgery.

  19. Cardioprotection during cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hausenloy, Derek J.; Boston-Griffiths, Edney; Yellon, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. For a large number of patients with CHD, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery remains the preferred strategy for coronary revascularization. Over the last 10 years, the number of high-risk patients undergoing CABG surgery has increased significantly, resulting in worse clinical outcomes in this patient group. This appears to be related to the ageing population, increased co-morbidities (such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension, stroke), concomitant valve disease, and advances in percutaneous coronary intervention which have resulted in patients with more complex coronary artery disease undergoing surgery. These high-risk patients are more susceptible to peri-operative myocardial injury and infarction (PMI), a major cause of which is acute global ischaemia/reperfusion injury arising from inadequate myocardial protection during CABG surgery. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are required to protect the heart in this high-risk patient group. In this article, we review the aetiology of PMI during CABG surgery, its diagnosis and clinical significance, and the endogenous and pharmacological therapeutic strategies available for preventing it. By improving cardioprotection during CABG surgery, we may be able to reduce PMI, preserve left ventricular systolic function, and reduce morbidity and mortality in these high-risk patients with CHD. PMID:22440888

  20. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B.; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  1. Cardiac surgery 2014 reviewed.

    PubMed

    Doenst, Torsten; Strüning, Constanze; Moschovas, Alexandros; Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Valchanov, Ilija; Kirov, Hristo; Diab, Mahmoud; Faerber, Gloria

    2015-12-01

    For the year 2014, more than 17,000 published references can be found in Pubmed when entering the search term "cardiac surgery". The last year has been characterized by a vivid discussion in the fields where classic cardiac surgery and modern interventional techniques overlap. Specifically, there have been important contributions in the field of coronary revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery as well as in the fields of interventional valve therapy. Here, the US core valve trial with the first demonstration of a survival advantage at 1 year with transcatheter valves compared to surgical aortic valve replacement or the 5-year outcome of the SYNTAX trial with significant advantages for bypass surgery has been the landmark. However, in addition to these most visible publications, there have been several highly relevant and interesting contributions. This review article will summarize the most pertinent publications in the fields of coronary revascularization, surgical treatment of valve disease, heart failure (i.e., transplantation and ventricular assist devices) and aortic surgery. This condensed summary will provide the reader with "solid ground" for up-to-date decision-making in cardiac surgery. PMID:26404007

  2. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  3. [Denervation of mimic muscles during endoscopic lifting of the upper part of face].

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, V D; Tkach, O S

    2013-08-01

    Endoscopic lifting of the upper part of face carry out in 28 patients Chemical or surgical denervation had been done for decreasing of mimic muscles activity. Medical glue with folic acid had been used for tissues fixation. Use of medical glue in conjunction with preliminary chemical denervation of mimic muscles with botulin toxin application decreases surgery duration, prevents complications and increases satisfaction of patients. PMID:24171296

  4. Muscle metabolism and activation heterogeneity by combined 31P chemical shift and T2 imaging, and pulmonary O2 uptake during incremental knee-extensor exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T.; Howe, Franklyn A.; Whipp, Brian J.; Ward, Susan A.; McIntyre, Dominick J.; Ladroue, Christophe; Griffiths, John R.; Kemp, Graham J.

    2013-01-01

    The integration of skeletal muscle substrate depletion, metabolite accumulation, and fatigue during large muscle-mass exercise is not well understood. Measurement of intramuscular energy store degradation and metabolite accumulation is confounded by muscle heterogeneity. Therefore, to characterize regional metabolic distribution in the locomotor muscles, we combined 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chemical shift imaging, and T2-weighted imaging with pulmonary oxygen uptake during bilateral knee-extension exercise to intolerance. Six men completed incremental tests for the following: 1) unlocalized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and 2) spatial determination of 31P metabolism and activation. The relationship of pulmonary oxygen uptake to whole quadriceps phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) was inversely linear, and three of four knee-extensor muscles showed activation as assessed by change in T2. The largest changes in [PCr], [inorganic phosphate] ([Pi]) and pH occurred in rectus femoris, but no voxel (72 cm3) showed complete PCr depletion at exercise cessation. The most metabolically active voxel reached 11 ± 9 mM [PCr] (resting, 29 ± 1 mM), 23 ± 11 mM [Pi] (resting, 7 ± 1 mM), and a pH of 6.64 ± 0.29 (resting, 7.08 ± 0.03). However, the distribution of 31P metabolites and pH varied widely between voxels, and the intervoxel coefficient of variation increased between rest (?10%) and exercise intolerance (?30–60%). Therefore, the limit of tolerance was attained with wide heterogeneity in substrate depletion and fatigue-related metabolite accumulation, with extreme metabolic perturbation isolated to only a small volume of active muscle (<5%). Regional intramuscular disturbances are thus likely an important requisite for exercise intolerance. How these signals integrate to limit muscle power production, while regional “recruitable muscle” energy stores are presumably still available, remains uncertain. PMID:23813534

  5. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-10-20

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  6. Anatomical Research of the Three-dimensional Route of the Thoracodorsal Nerve, Artery, and Veins in Latissimus Dorsi Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nagahiro; Watanabe, Koichi; Koga, Noriyuki; Rikimaru, Hideaki; Saga, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Moriyoshi; Tabira, Yoko; Yamaki, Koh-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle flap has been widely used in facial reanimation surgery. However, there are no standards to what degree the muscle flap may be safely thinned because the three-dimensional positional relationship of thoracodorsal artery, vein, and nerve inside the LD muscle is poorly understood. Methods: From 18 formalin-fixed cadavers, we made 36 transparent specimens of LD muscles using a newly developed decoloration technique. In 26 specimens, nerve staining (Sihler’s staining method) and silicone rubber (Microfil) injection to the thoracodorsal artery were performed, and the relationship of the artery and the vein was examined in 10 specimens. Results: The thoracodorsal artery and vein always ran parallel in a deeper layer compared to the nerve. The thoracodorsal nerve constantly existed in a deeper layer than half (50%) of the muscle in the range of use of the muscle flap in facial reanimation surgery. Conclusions: The thoracodorsal nerves ran in a shallower layer, and the depth to the nerve in the muscle flap in actual facial reanimation surgery is safe enough to avoid damage to the nerves. The LD muscle may be thinned to half its original thickness safely. PMID:25289214

  7. Pharyngoesophageal diverticulum: a delayed complication of anterior cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haijun; Yuan, Wen; Johnson, Jared S; Chen, Huajiang; Chen, Deyu

    2011-07-01

    Pharyngoesophageal diverticulum after anterior cervical spine surgery is a rarely reported but potentially life-threatening complication. A case report of pharyngoesophageal diverticulum 7 years after anterior cervical spine surgery is presented. The patient suffered from dysphagia, odynophagia, recurrent fever, weight loss, and also an impressive bulging in the neck with swallowing. After careful examination and preparation, he underwent revision surgery via an open procedure, had the implants removed, pouch excised, and esophagus reconstructed reinforced by a sternohyoid muscle flap as well as an omohyoid muscle flap. The post-operative period was uneventful, and he experienced a satisfactory recovery. At last follow up, 2.5 years post surgery, the patient remained symptom free. Upon review of the literature, only six such previous reports with seven cases were found. Diagnostic tools, possible mechanism, correlative factors and treatment are discussed. This patient was fortunate that although his symptoms developed long after the initial anterior cervical operation and the pouch grew impressively large almost perforating, he still recovered well. It again proves the necessity of long-term X-ray follow up, and also reminds the surgeons to be alert of the possibility of esophageal injury even when the esophageal symptoms are mild and occur long after the initial operation. PMID:20927556

  8. [Minimal invasive surgery: historical review, current status and perspective].

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Stienen, Martin N; Corniola, Marco V; Schaller, Karl

    2014-10-29

    Lumbar spine surgery has been performed for decades using the so-called «dorsal open approach». Although established as a safe and effective procedure, it is associated to some extent with extensive collateral damage in the area of the operative field. For over ten years, minimal-invasive spine surgery (MISS) techniques, which are considerably less destructive and less traumatic, have earned their place as valuable and at times superior to the established dorsal open approach. Advantages include smaller skin incisions, less soft tissue and muscle damage, less peri-operative blood loss, lower infection rates, earlier postoperative return to function or work as well as shorter hospital stays. All these advantages, however, have to be carefully balanced against the potential disadvantages of MISS techniques, notably reduced orientation, steep learning curves, and increased radiation exposure from repeated imaging for guidance. This article gives an overview about the evolution and current role of MISS in lumbar spine surgery. PMID:25351695

  9. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation. PMID:15532311

  10. Innovation in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Riskin, Daniel J.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gertner, Michael; Krummel, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the field of surgical innovation from a historical perspective, applying new findings from research in technology innovation. Background: While surgical innovation has a rich tradition, as a field of study it is embryonic. Only a handful of academic centers of surgical innovation exist, all of which have arisen within the last 5 years. To this point, the field has not been well defined, nor have future options to promote surgical innovation been thoroughly explored. It is clear that surgical innovation is fundamental to surgical progress and has significant health policy implications. A process of systematically evaluating and promoting innovation in surgery may be critical in the evolving practice of medicine. Methods: A review of the academic literature in technology innovation was undertaken. Articles and books were identified through technical, medical, and business sources. Luminaries in surgical innovation were interviewed to develop further relevance to surgical history. The concepts in technology innovation were then applied to innovation in surgery, using the historical example of surgical endoscopy as a representative area, which encompasses millennia of learning and spans multiple specialties of care. Results: The history of surgery is comprised largely of individual, widely respected surgeon innovators. While respecting individual accomplishments, surgeons as a group have at times hindered critical innovation to the detriment of our profession and patients. As a clinical discipline, surgery relies on a tradition of research and attracting the brightest young minds. Innovation in surgery to date has been impressive, but inconsistently supported. Conclusion: A body of knowledge on technology innovation has been developed over the last decade but has largely not been applied to surgery. New surgical innovation centers are working to define the field and identify critical aspects of surgical innovation promotion. It is our responsibility as a profession to work to understand innovation in surgery, discover, translate, and commercialize advances to address major clinical problems, and to support the future of our profession consistently and rationally. PMID:17060760

  11. Surgery without interventions?

    PubMed

    Guiraudon, G M

    1998-11-01

    Cardiac surgeons took to the heart and claimed an exclusive privilege to intervene. The task of cardiologists was to identify "candidates" and feed the Great Surgical Machine. Recently catheter surgery has developed and fell into the hands of cardiologists, who became interventionists. Cardiac surgeons are concerned about losing interventions and their identify. The analysis of the current situation implies a revisitation of old concepts: surgery, intervention, therapy, patients, invasiveness etc ... etc ... and a review of our therapeutic philosophy. Therapeutic plans comprise three interrelated components: the target, the bullet (therapeutic agent), and the gun (the way of delivering the bullet on target). This description characterizes surgery as a way of delivering. If side effects are effects that do not affect the target, surgical procedures are mostly side effects, with significant morbidity. Future surgical rationales should reconcile target-specific therapy and minimal collateral damages: Minimal Surgery! or to use a new buzz, less invasiveness. Cardiac surgery has focused too much on surgical practice and neglected the rest of cardiology, missing opportunities for new researches, new rationales, and new techniques. Surgeons must become again Renaissance Men, involved in the entire field of cardiology, with a special skill in surgical techniques. Cardiac surgeons should no longer confine their practice to the delivering end. This end does not, any more, justify the means. PMID:9825311

  12. Operative management of idiophatic myositis ossificans of lateral pterygoid muscle

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luis Eduardo; Doetzer, Andrea; Camejo, Flavio; Bosio, Jose

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Myositis ossificans (MO) is characterized as heterotopic bone formation within muscle. MO rarely occurs in the head and neck region. Excision of the heterotopic bone is the standard treatment. This report summarizes a case of a 12-year old female with MO involving the lateral pterygoid muscle. The heterotopic bone was excised using an intraoral incision. Despite intensive physical therapy, the operation failed as evidenced by new bone formation in the area within three weeks of the operation. PRESENTATION OF CASE A twelve years old female patient presenting with mouth opening of 10 mm, no facial asymmetry, and no jaw joint pain or other symptoms. Computer tomography (CT) exam was requested and revealed calcification of the left lateral pterygoid muscle. No other masticatory or head muscles showed any signs of calcification. The calcified muscle was completely removed beyond the ossified segment and a 35 mm mouth opening was achieved immediately after the procedure. One month after total bone structure removal (first surgery) the patient could not open her mouth anymore due to a significant calcified mass. DISCUSSION The surgical technique used in this case avoided invasive gap arthroplasty to access lateral pterygoid muscle and anaesthetic scarring formation, by using an intraorally incision accessing the muscle directly. The authors of these study did not see any relation with the condylar dislocation that the patient had five years prior to the pathology, and they could not find any real cause for the myositis ossificans of lateral pterygoid muscle. CONCLUSION The outcome of the surgical procedure was not successful, perhaps due to the expression of the disease, indicating the need to further physiologic and genetic studies to elucidate the aetiology of MO as well as to provide directions to an adequate treatment choice for such cases. PMID:25290385

  13. Robotic facelift thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bomeli, Steven R.; Duke, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for thyroid surgery have advanced dramatically over the past two decades, driven by a better understanding of thyroid physiology, anatomy, and perioperative management strategies. Improvements in surgical technology have permitted surgeons to perform minimally invasive surgery associated with less dissection, decreased pain, smaller anterior cervical incisions, and most importantly a faster recovery. The advent of robotic surgical technology has allowed the development of remote access thyroidectomy for select patients who wish to avoid a visible cervical incision completely. The robotic facelift thyroidectomy (RFT) approach also offers the advantage of outpatient surgery without the need for postoperative drainage. A growing body of evidence supports the safety and efficacy of the approach, and as a result the technique is now being performed at several centers around the world. PMID:26425453

  14. Robotic transaxillary thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Rabinovics, Naomi; Aidan, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Recent technological advances have led to a rapid progress in endocrine surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive techniques in thyroid surgery, robot-assisted transaxillary thyroid surgery (RATS) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches. Its main advantages are improved cosmetic outcome, avoiding cervical incisions, increased patient satisfaction, improved visualization, arms articulations, eliminating surgeon's natural tremor, thereby increasing precision. The main disadvantages are longer operative time, and increased cost compared to conventional thyroidectomy, as well as potential injuries to the brachial plexus, skin flap, esophagus, and trachea. Large-scale studies, mainly from South-Korea, have proved that in skilled hands, RATS is a safe alternative to conservative thyroidectomy and should be presented to patients with aesthetic concerns. As with any new emerging technique, careful patient selection is crucial, and further evidence must be sought to confirm its indications. PMID:26425452

  15. Cosmetic Facial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    Canadians have committed themselves to a healthier lifestyle, and many are seeking to look as well as they feel. For patients with realistic expectations, modern techniques of cosmetic facial surgery can enhance appearance and be of psychological benefit. Today most procedures can be done under local anesthesia on an out-patient basis. Facial contour defects can be improved by means of procedures such as rhinoplasty, mentoplasty, otoplasty and malarplasty. Facial rejuvenation surgery to decrease the signs of aging includes the forehead lift, eyebrow and eyelid lift, rhytidectomy, liposuction and chemical peeling. Newer controversial trends in cosmetic facial surgery include collagen implantation and fat transfer for contour defects, and eyelid tattooing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263984

  16. Robotic aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease. PMID:21979124

  17. Psychopharmacology and Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Roerig, James L; Steffen, Kristine

    2015-11-01

    Currently, it has been demonstrated that psychotropic drugs, particularly antidepressants, are frequently prescribed for patients who seek bariatric surgery. Many bariatric surgery patients have a history of a mood disorder. Unlike medications for diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia, which are generally reduced and at times discontinued, postsurgery antidepressants use is only slightly reduced. The Roux-en-Y procedure is most frequently associated with alteration in drug exposure. Medication disintegration, dissolution, absorption, metabolism and excretion have been found to be altered in postbariatric patients, although data are sparse at this time. This paper will review the current evidence regarding the effect of bariatric surgery on drug treatment including mechanism of interference as well as the extent of changes identified to date. Data will be presented as controlled trials followed by case series and reports. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. PMID:26338011

  18. Robotic transaxillary thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovics, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to a rapid progress in endocrine surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive techniques in thyroid surgery, robot-assisted transaxillary thyroid surgery (RATS) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches. Its main advantages are improved cosmetic outcome, avoiding cervical incisions, increased patient satisfaction, improved visualization, arms articulations, eliminating surgeon’s natural tremor, thereby increasing precision. The main disadvantages are longer operative time, and increased cost compared to conventional thyroidectomy, as well as potential injuries to the brachial plexus, skin flap, esophagus, and trachea. Large-scale studies, mainly from South-Korea, have proved that in skilled hands, RATS is a safe alternative to conservative thyroidectomy and should be presented to patients with aesthetic concerns. As with any new emerging technique, careful patient selection is crucial, and further evidence must be sought to confirm its indications. PMID:26425452

  19. Robotic facelift thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Bomeli, Steven R; Duke, William S; Terris, David J

    2015-10-01

    Techniques for thyroid surgery have advanced dramatically over the past two decades, driven by a better understanding of thyroid physiology, anatomy, and perioperative management strategies. Improvements in surgical technology have permitted surgeons to perform minimally invasive surgery associated with less dissection, decreased pain, smaller anterior cervical incisions, and most importantly a faster recovery. The advent of robotic surgical technology has allowed the development of remote access thyroidectomy for select patients who wish to avoid a visible cervical incision completely. The robotic facelift thyroidectomy (RFT) approach also offers the advantage of outpatient surgery without the need for postoperative drainage. A growing body of evidence supports the safety and efficacy of the approach, and as a result the technique is now being performed at several centers around the world. PMID:26425453

  20. Muscle Injuries in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Delos, Demetris; Maak, Travis G.; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Muscle injuries are extremely common in athletes and often produce pain, dysfunction, and the inability to return to practice or competition. Appropriate diagnosis and management can optimize recovery and minimize time to return to play. Evidence Acquisition: Contemporary papers, both basic science and clinical medicine, that investigate muscle healing were reviewed. A Medline/PubMed search inclusive of years 1948 to 2012 was performed. Results: Diagnosis can usually be made according to history and physical examination for most injuries. Although data are limited, initial conservative management emphasizing the RICE principles and immobilization of the extremity for several days for higher grade injuries are typically all that is required. Injection of corticosteroids may clinically enhance function after an acute muscle strain. Additional adjunctive treatments (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, platelet-rich plasma, and others) to enhance muscle healing and limit scar formation show promise but need additional data to better define their roles. Conclusion: Conservative treatment recommendations will typically lead to successful outcomes after a muscle injury. There is limited evidence to support most adjunctive treatments. PMID:24459552

  1. Muscle wasting in cancer.

    PubMed

    Johns, N; Stephens, N A; Fearon, K C H

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscle loss appears to be the most significant clinical event in cancer cachexia and is associated with a poor outcome. With regard to such muscle loss, despite extensive study in a range of models, there is ongoing debate as to whether a reduction in protein synthesis, an increase in degradation or a combination of both is the more relevant. Each model differs in terms of key mediators and the pathways activated in skeletal muscle. Certain models do suggest that decreased synthesis accompanied by enhanced protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) is important. Murine models tend to involve rapid development of cachexia and may represent more acute muscle atrophy rather than the chronic wasting observed in humans. There is a paucity of human data both at a basic descriptive level and at a molecular/mechanism level. Progress in treating the human form of cancer cachexia can only move forwards through carefully designed large randomised controlled clinical trials of specific therapies with validated biomarkers of relevance to underlying mechanisms. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. PMID:23770121

  2. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  3. The Immediate Effects on Inter-rectus Distance of Abdominal Crunch and Drawing-in Exercises During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period.

    PubMed

    Mota, Patrícia; Pascoal, Augusto Gil; Carita, Ana Isabel; Bø, Kari

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Longitudinal descriptive exploratory study. Objectives To evaluate in primigravid women the immediate effect of drawing-in and abdominal crunch exercises on inter-rectus distance (IRD), measured at 4 time points during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. Background There is scant knowledge of the effect of different abdominal exercises on IRD in pregnant and postpartum women. Methods The study included 84 primiparous participants. Ultrasound images were recorded with a 12-MHz linear transducer, at rest and during abdominal drawing-in and abdominal crunch exercises, at 3 locations on the linea alba. The IRD was measured at 4 time points: gestational weeks 35 to 41, 6 to 8 weeks postpartum, 12 to 14 weeks postpartum, and 24 to 26 weeks postpartum. Separate 2-way, repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were performed for each exercise (drawing-in and abdominal crunch) and each measurement location to evaluate the immediate effects of exercises on IRD at each of the 4 time points. Similarly, 2-way ANOVAs were used to contrast the effects of the 2 exercises on IRD. Results Performing the drawing-in exercise caused a significant change in width of the IRD at 2 cm below the umbilicus, narrowing the IRD by a mean of 3.8 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2, 6.4 mm) at gestational weeks 35 to 41, and widening the IRD by 3.0 mm (95% CI: 1.4, 4.6 mm) at 6 to 8 weeks postpartum, by 1.8 mm (95% CI: 0.6, 3.1 mm) at 12 to 14 weeks postpartum, and by 2.5 mm (95% CI: 1.4, 3.6 mm) at 24 to 26 weeks postpartum (P<.01). Performing the abdominal crunch exercise led to a significant narrowing of the IRD (P<.01) in all 3 locations at all 4 time points, with the exception of 2 cm below the umbilicus at postpartum weeks 24 to 26. The average amount of narrowing varied from 1.6 to 20.9 mm, based on time and location. Conclusion Overall, there was a contrasting effect of the 2 exercises, with the abdominal crunch exercise consistently producing a significant narrowing of the IRD. In contrast, the drawing-in exercise generally led to a small widening of the IRD. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(10):781-788. Epub 24 Aug 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5459. PMID:26304639

  4. The Relationship Between Lower Limb Bone and Muscle in Military Recruits, Response to Physical Training, and Influence of Smoking Status

    PubMed Central

    Puthucheary, Zudin; Kordi, Mehdi; Rawal, Jai; Eleftheriou, Kyriacos I.; Payne, John; Montgomery, Hugh E.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between bone and skeletal muscle mass may be affected by physical training. No studies have prospectively examined the bone and skeletal muscle responses to a short controlled exercise-training programme. We hypothesised that a short exercise-training period would affect muscle and bone mass together. Methods: Femoral bone and Rectus femoris Volumes (RFVOL) were determined by magnetic resonance imaging in 215 healthy army recruits, and bone mineral density (BMD) by Dual X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA) and repeated after 12 weeks of regulated physical training. Results: Pre-training, RFVOL was smaller in smokers than non-smokers (100.9 ± 20.2 vs. 108.7 ± 24.5, p = 0.018; 96.2 ± 16.9 vs. 104.8 ± 21.3, p = 0.002 for dominant/non-dominant limbs), although increases in RFVOL with training (of 14.2 ± 14.5% and 13.2 ± 15.6%] respectively, p < 0.001) were independent of prior smoking status. Pre-training RFVOL was related to bone cortical volume (r2 = 0.21 and 0.30, p < 0.001 for dominant and non-dominant legs), and specifically to periosteal (r2 = 0.21 and 0.23, p < 0.001) volume. Pre-training dominant RFVOL was independently associated with Total Hip BMD (p < 0.001). Training-related increases in RFVOL and bone volumes were related. Whilst smokers demonstrated lower muscle mass than non-smokers, differences were abolished with training. Training-related increases in muscle mass were related to increases in periosteal bone volume in both dominant and non-dominant legs. PMID:25792356

  5. Shoulder muscle forces during driving: Sudden steering can load the rotator cuff beyond its repair limit

    PubMed Central

    Pandis, Petros; Prinold, Joe A.I.; Bull, Anthony M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Driving is one of the most common everyday tasks and the rotator cuff muscles are the primary shoulder stabilisers. Muscle forces during driving are not currently known, yet knowledge of these would influence important clinical advice such as return to activities after surgery. The aim of this study is to quantify shoulder and rotator cuff muscle forces during driving in different postures. Methods A musculoskeletal modelling approach is taken, using a modified driving simulator in combination with an upper limb musculoskeletal model (UK National Shoulder Model). Motion data and external force vectors were model inputs and upper limb muscle and joint forces were the outputs. Findings Comparisons of the predicted glenohumeral joint forces were compared to in vivo literature values, with good agreement demonstrated (61 SD 8% body weight mean peak compared to 60 SD 1% body weight mean peak). High muscle activation was predicted in the rotator cuff muscles; particularly supraspinatus (mean 55% of the maximum and up to 164 SD 27 N). This level of loading is up to 72% of mean failure strength for supraspinatus repairs, and could therefore be dangerous for some cases. Statistically significant and large differences are shown to exist in the joint and muscle forces for different driving positions as well as steering with one or both hands (up to 46% body weight glenohumeral joint force). Interpretation These conclusions should be a key consideration in rehabilitating the shoulder after surgery, preventing specific upper limb injuries and predicting return to driving recommendations. PMID:26139549

  6. [Ambulatory surgery: safety, quality].

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, L

    2001-01-01

    Demands related to regulation of Ambulatory surgery in France and to expectations of the patients implies that we can be able to proof that ambulatory organization guarantees total patient care with optimal safety conditions; and that detection of unexpected events is the first step in a larger approach to continue quality improvement and minimize risks for patients. To achieve these goals, we suggest a list of means based on international ambulatory surgery definitions, including clinical indicators, frequent asked questions and measurement of patient satisfaction. PMID:11717824

  7. [Ambulatory surgery: safety, quality].

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, L

    2001-09-01

    Demands related to regulation of ambulatory surgery in France and to expectations of the patients imply that we can be able to proof that ambulatory organization guarantees total patient care with optimal safety conditions and that detection of unexpected events is the first step in a larger approach to continue quality improvement and minimize risks for patients. To achieve these goals, we suggest a list of means based on international ambulatory surgery definitions, including clinical indicators, frequent asked questions and measurement of patient satisfaction. PMID:11676245

  8. Avian Soft Tissue Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2016-01-01

    Basic surgical instrumentation for avian soft tissue surgery includes soft tissue retractors, microsurgical instrumentation, surgical loupes, and head-mounted lights. Hemostasis is fundamental during the surgical procedures. The indications, approach, and complications associated with soft tissue surgeries of the integumentary (digit constriction repair, feather cyst excision, cranial wound repair, sternal wound repair, uropygial gland excision), gastrointestinal (ingluviotomy, crop biopsy, crop burn repair, celiotomy, coelomic hernia and pseudohernia repair, proventriculotomy, ventriculotomy, enterotomy, intestinal resection and anastomosis, cloacoplasty, cloacopexy), respiratory (rhinolith removal, sinusotomy, tracheotomy, tracheal resection and anastomosis, tracheostomy, pneumonectomy) and reproductive (ovocentesis, ovariectomy, salpingohysterectomy, cesarean section, orchidectomy, vasectomy, phallectomy) systems are reviewed. PMID:26611927

  9. Surgery in Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Chai, Norin

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian surgery has been especially described in research. Since the last decade, interest for captive amphibians has increased, so have the indications for surgical intervention. Clinicians should not hesitate to advocate such manipulations. Amphibian surgeries have no overwhelming obstacles. These patients heal well and tolerate blood loss more than higher vertebrates. Most procedures described in reptiles (mostly lizards) can be undertaken in most amphibians if equipment can be matched to the patients' size. In general, the most difficult aspect would be the provision of adequate anesthesia. PMID:26611925

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Satellite Cells from Rat Head Branchiomeric Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A.D.T.G.; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosis and defective muscle regeneration can hamper the functional recovery of the soft palate muscles after cleft palate repair. This causes persistent problems in speech, swallowing, and sucking. In vitro culture systems that allow the study of satellite cells (myogenic stem cells) from head muscles are crucial to develop new therapies based on tissue engineering to promote muscle regeneration after surgery. These systems will offer new perspectives for the treatment of cleft palate patients. A protocol for the isolation, culture and differentiation of satellite cells from head muscles is presented. The isolation is based on enzymatic digestion and trituration to release the satellite cells. In addition, this protocol comprises an innovative method using extracellular matrix gel coatings of millimeter size, which requires only low numbers of satellite cells for differentiation assays. PMID:26274878

  11. The Role of Immediate Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Reconstruction for Thyroid Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Yumoto, Eiji; Minoda, Ryosei; Kodama, Narihiro

    2010-01-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) is one of the most serious problems in conducting surgery for thyroid cancer. Different treatments are available for the management of UVFP including intracordal injection, type I thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and laryngeal reinnervations. The effects of immediate recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) reconstruction during thyroid cancer surgery with or without UVFP before the surgery were evaluated with videostroboscopic, aerodynamic, and perceptual analyses. All subjects experienced postoperative improvements in voice quality. Particularly, aerodynamic analysis showed that the values for all patients entered normal ranges in both patients with and without UVFP before surgery. Immediate RLN reconstruction has the potential to restore a normal or near-normal voice by returning thyroarytenoid muscle tone and bulk seen with vocal fold denervation. Immediate RLN reconstruction is an efficient and effective approach to the management of RLN resection during surgery for thyroid cancer. PMID:20628531

  12. Recent advances in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Chan, Chien-Pin; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted and new technical innovation, procedures and evidence based knowledge are persistently emerging. This review documents recent major advancements in laparoscopic surgery. A PubMed search was made in order to identify recent advances in this field. We reviewed the recent data on randomized trials in this field as well as papers of systematic review. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, followed by laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Although bile duct injuries are relatively uncommon (0.15%-0.6%), intraoperative cholangiography still plays a role in reducing the cost of litigation. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is the most commonly performed laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in the USA, and laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the treatment of choice for intractable gastroesophageal reflux disease. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that laparoscopic gastric and colorectal cancer resection are safe and oncologically correct procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has also been widely developed in hepatic, pancreatic, gynecological and urological surgery. Recently, SILS and robotic surgery have penetrated all specialties of abdominal surgery. However, evidence-based medicine has failed to show major advantages in SILS, and the disadvantage of robotic surgery is the high costs related to purchase and maintenance of technology. Laparoscopic surgery has become well developed in recent decades and is the choice of treatment in abdominal surgery. Recently developed SILS techniques and robotic surgery are promising but their benefits remain to be determined. PMID:23126424

  13. Artificial muscles on heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 ?W when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  14. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Hibner, Micha?; Marianowski, Piotr; Szymusik, Iwona; Wielgós, Miros?aw

    2012-12-01

    Introduction of robotic surgery in the first decade of the 21 century was one of the biggest breakthroughs in surgery since the introduction of anesthesia. For the first time in history the surgeon was placed remotely from the patient and was able to operate with the device that has more degrees of freedom than human hand. Initially developed for the US Military in order to allow surgeons to be removed from the battlefield, surgical robots quickly made a leap to the mainstream medicine. One of the first surgical uses for the robot was cardiac surgery but it is urology and prostate surgery that gave it a widespread popularity Gynecologic surgeons caught on very quickly and it is estimated that 31% of hysterectomies done in the United States in 2012 will be done robotically. With over half a million hysterectomies done each year in the US alone, gynecologic surgery is one of the main driving forces behind the growth of robotic surgery Other applications in gynecology include myomectomy oophorectomy and ovarian cystectomy resection of endometriosis and lymphadenectomy Advantages of the surgical robot are clearly seen in myomectomy The wrist motion allows for better more precise suturing than conventional "straight stick" laparoscopy The strength of the arms allow for better pulling of the suture and the third arm for holding the suture on tension. Other advantage of the robot is scaling of the movements when big movement on the outside translates to very fine movement on the inside. This enables much more precise surgery and may be important in the procedures like tubal anastomosis and implantation of the ureter Three-dimensional vision provides excellent depth of field perception. It is important for surgeons who are switching from open surgeries and preliminary evidence shows that it may allow for better identification of lesions like endometriosis. Another big advantage of robotics is that the surgeon sits comfortably with his/her arms and head supported. This results in much less fatigue and therefore increases precision and potentially may decrease the number of medical errors. The eyes of the surgeon are directed at where the hands should be, which is more natural, allows for a more natural body position and mimics open surgery Robot also enables better teaching, especially when two consoles are used. The surgeon and the student may be either sharing the instruments with two consoles or switching between one another. In a situation where the student operates, the surgeon can use the telestation to teach. Robotic simulator attached to one of the consoles allows students to practice after hours. In summary surgical robot is a great tool, especially in gynecology but also in urology cardiac surgery general surgery and laryngology The device will evolve and most likely with time will eliminate laparoscopy PMID:23488297

  15. Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery.

    E-print Network

    1/ 17 Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Simon;2/ 17 Spines, backbones and orthopedic surgery. Motivation #12;2/ 17 Spines, backbones and orthopedic motion with a near critical drift towards an absorbing barrier at the origin. #12;3/ 17 Spines, backbones

  16. [Contribution of ambulatory digestive surgery].

    PubMed

    Sales, J P

    2000-10-01

    In France, ambulatory surgery is controlled by specific regulations which outline the organization of the facilities. It is practiced less in France than in other countries, but specific governmental incentive policies have been instituted. The characteristic feature of digestive surgery is the high occurrence of post-operative nausea and vomiting due to the peritoneal incision. New surgical procedures and anesthetic regimens allow ambulatory care in children and adults. But the choice of ambulatory care is based on the patient's characteristics more than on surgical procedure and follows well-known selection criteria. The procedures concerned in general surgery are groin hernia repair, proctologic surgery, and subcutaneous tissue surgery. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy and neck surgery in increasing numbers of patients on an ambulatory basis is the first step before expanding ambulatory surgical procedures toward major surgery. Physicians must have a thorough knowledge of ambulatory surgery as an organizational concept. PMID:11033485

  17. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MIDCAB; Robot assisted coronary artery bypass; RACAB; Keyhole heart surgery ... To perform this surgery: The heart surgeon will make a 3- to 5-inch-long surgical cut in the left part of your chest between your ribs ...

  18. Getting yourself healthy before surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at risk of bleeding during surgery. Medicines includes aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve), and other drugs. Ask your doctor which medicines you should still take on the day of your surgery.

  19. Infant open heart surgery (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia. ... During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia.

  20. Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2. Wilson ST, Thomas HI, Randall SB. Bariatric surgery in adolescents: recent national trends in use and in-hospital outcome . Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine . ... prepared they are for the surgery and the lifestyle changes they will need to ...

  1. Congenital bilateral agenesis of the tibialis anterior muscles: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Htwe, Ohnmar; Swarhib, M; Pei, Tan Sook; Naicker, Amaramalar Selvi; Das, S

    2012-01-01

    Congenital bilateral agenesis of the tibialis anterior muscles is a rare condition. We present a case of congenital absence of bilateral tibialis anterior muscles in a 6-year-old boy who presented with an abnormal gait. He was previously diagnosed to have bilateral congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) deformity for which he underwent corrective surgery two times. However, he still had a residual foot problem and claimed to have difficulty in walking. On examination, he walked with a high stepping gait and muscle power of both lower limbs was 5/5 on the medical research council scale (MRCS) except for both ankle dorsiflexors and long toe extensors. The sensation was intact. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) study of both legs revealed that tibialis anterior muscles were not visualized on both sides suggestive of agenesis of the tibialis anterior muscles. The rest of the muscles appeared mildly atrophied. The electrophysiological study showed normal motor and sensory conduction in both upper and lower limbs. Electromyographic (EMG) study of the vastus medialis was within normal limit and no response could be elicited for EMG of tibialis anterior muscles suggesting possible absence of tibialis anterior muscles, bilaterally. The patient underwent split tibialis posterior tendon transfer to achieve a balanced and functional foot and was well on discharge. The present case describes the normal anatomy and embryology of tibialis anterior muscles as well as possible causes of its agenesis along with its clinical implications. PMID:22990563

  2. Liver Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Ducts C220–C221 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 10 Local tumor destruction, NOS 11 Photodynamic

  3. Surgery on Nullhomologous Tori

    E-print Network

    Fintushel, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    By studying the example of smooth structures on CP^2#3(-CP^2) we illustrate how surgery on a single embedded nullhomologous torus can be utilized to change the symplectic structure, the Seiberg-Witten invariant, and hence the smooth structure on a 4-manifold.

  4. Pharynx Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Pharynx Tonsil C090–C099, Oropharynx C100–C109, Nasopharynx C110–C119 Pyriform Sinus C129, Hypopharynx C130–C139, Pharynx C140 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery

  5. Lung Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Lung C340–C349 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 19 Local tumor destruction or excision, NOS Unknown whether a specimen was

  6. Kidney Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Kidney, Renal Pelvis, and Ureter Kidney C649, Renal Pelvis C659, Ureter C669 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 10 Local tumor

  7. Bladder Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Bladder C670–C679 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 10 Local tumor destruction, NOS 11 Photodynamic therapy (PDT) 12

  8. Stomach Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Stomach C160–C169 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 10 Local tumor destruction, NOS 11 Photodynamic therapy (PDT) 12 Electrocautery;

  9. Chair of surgery.

    PubMed

    Scott-Conner, Carol; Hooks, Mary

    2010-10-01

    There are several essential qualities required for success as a chair of surgery. These include determination and resilience, thoughtful planning, superb organization skills, a balance of hard (accounting, management and finance) and soft skills (interpersonal including faculty development), and careful execution is absolutely essential as is a commitment to maintaining momentum. PMID:20887845

  10. Remote access thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Mohamed, Hossam Eldin; Kadi, Abida; Walvekar, Rohan R.

    2015-01-01

    Robot assisted thyroid surgery has been the latest advance in the evolution of thyroid surgery after endoscopy assisted procedures. The advantage of a superior field vision and technical advancements of robotic technology have permitted novel remote access (trans-axillary and retro-auricular) surgical approaches. Interestingly, several remote access surgical ports using robot surgical system and endoscopic technique have been customized to avoid the social stigma of a visible scar. Current literature has displayed their various advantages in terms of post-operative outcomes; however, the associated financial burden and also additional training and expertise necessary hinder its widespread adoption into endocrine surgery practices. These approaches offer excellent cosmesis, with a shorter learning curve and reduce discomfort to surgeons operating ergonomically through a robotic console. This review aims to provide details of various remote access techniques that are being offered for thyroid resection. Though these have been reported to be safe and feasible approaches for thyroid surgery, further evaluation for their efficacy still remains. PMID:26425450

  11. Parotid Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Parotid and Other Unspecified Glands Parotid Gland C079, Major Salivary Glands C080–C089 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY

  12. Esophagus Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Esophagus C150–C159 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 10 Local tumor destruction, NOS 11 Photodynamic therapy (PDT) 12

  13. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... DO NOT place it directly on the dressing. Ice helps keep swelling down. Your sutures (stitches) will be removed about 1 week after surgery. Keep your bandage and your wound clean and dry . Ask your doctor if it is ok to ...

  14. Anus Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Anus C210–C218 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) [SEER Note: Do not code infrared coagulation as treatment.] Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 10 Local tumor

  15. Breast Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Breast C500–C509 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 19 Local tumor destruction, NOS No specimen was sent to pathology for

  16. Dutch surgery in Japan.

    PubMed

    van Gulik, Thomas M; Nimura, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    An isolation policy was adopted in feudal Japan from 1639 to 1853 owing to the fear of foreign influence. During those 200 years of isolation, all foreigners were withheld from the country with the exception of the Dutch, who were permitted to establish a trading post on a small island in the Bay of Nagasaki, called Decima. Western culture and science reached the Japanese exclusively through the Dutch on Decima. Health care on Decima was provided by Dutch barber-surgeons, who introduced Western surgical practice in Japan. Official interpreters were the only Japanese allowed on Decima. It was from among these interpreters that the first Japanese surgeons arose who, having mastered the Dutch language, translated several Dutch anatomic and surgical texts. Genpaku Sugita translated a Dutch anatomy textbook into Japanese, which was completed in 1774. This book, entitled Kaitai Shinsho [New Book on Anatomy], was the first Western scientific monograph to be translated entirely into Japanese. Several Dutch surgical schools were founded through which Dutch surgery, known in Japan as "surgery of the red-haired" was propagated. According to the custom of the surgical guilds in Holland, certificates were granted to Japanese apprentices who had completed their training in Dutch surgery. About 60 Dutch surgeons had served on Decima up to 1850, providing the basis for surgery to develop in Japan. Among them, Philipp Franz von Siebold was an exceptional scholar who also had a great impact in making Japanese culture known to the Western world. PMID:15599736

  17. Antibiotics before surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaatz, B

    1996-01-01

    The antimicrobial era (along with greater surgical skill and precision) has brought us relative safety for procedures that previously were fraught with danger. Civil War amputation surgeries, for example, had an extraordinarily high incidence of infections and mortality. Staying aware of and avoiding the small, but real, risks associated with surgical antibiotic prophylaxis will help sustain the advances we enjoy today. PMID:8650524

  18. Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... smile just the right look. Long Teeth/Exposed Roots Sometimes gum recession causes the tooth root to become exposed, which makes your teeth look ... including periodontal diseases. Gum graft surgery and other root coverage procedures are designed to cover exposed roots, ...

  19. Never Events in Surgery.

    PubMed

    Makar, Adel; Kodera, Ahmed; Bhayani, Sam B

    2015-12-01

    Never events such as wrong-site surgery are still somewhat prevalent in urology and may have serious adverse consequences for the patient, surgeon, and institution. By embracing a safety culture and improving mindfulness, urologists can minimize these events via system improvement. PMID:26162234

  20. Larynx Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Larynx C320–C329 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 10 Local tumor destruction, NOS 11 Photodynamic therapy (PDT) 12 Electrocautery;

  1. Remote access thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Parisha; Mohamed, Hossam Eldin; Kadi, Abida; Kandil, Emad; Walvekar, Rohan R

    2015-10-01

    Robot assisted thyroid surgery has been the latest advance in the evolution of thyroid surgery after endoscopy assisted procedures. The advantage of a superior field vision and technical advancements of robotic technology have permitted novel remote access (trans-axillary and retro-auricular) surgical approaches. Interestingly, several remote access surgical ports using robot surgical system and endoscopic technique have been customized to avoid the social stigma of a visible scar. Current literature has displayed their various advantages in terms of post-operative outcomes; however, the associated financial burden and also additional training and expertise necessary hinder its widespread adoption into endocrine surgery practices. These approaches offer excellent cosmesis, with a shorter learning curve and reduce discomfort to surgeons operating ergonomically through a robotic console. This review aims to provide details of various remote access techniques that are being offered for thyroid resection. Though these have been reported to be safe and feasible approaches for thyroid surgery, further evaluation for their efficacy still remains. PMID:26425450

  2. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. PMID:24628672

  3. Cataract Surgery in Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Murthy, Somashiela; Ganesh, Sudha K.; Phaik, Chee Soon; Sangwan, Virender; Biswas, Jyotimai

    2012-01-01

    Cataract surgery in uveitic eyes is often challenging and can result in intraoperative and postoperative complications. Most uveitic patients enjoy good vision despite potentially sight-threatening complications, including cataract development. In those patients who develop cataracts, successful surgery stems from educated patient selection, careful surgical technique, and aggressive preoperative and postoperative control of inflammation. With improved understanding of the disease processes, pre- and perioperative control of inflammation, modern surgical techniques, availability of biocompatible intraocular lens material and design, surgical experience in performing complicated cataract surgeries, and efficient management of postoperative complications have led to much better outcome. Preoperative factors include proper patient selection and counseling and preoperative control of inflammation. Meticulous and careful cataract surgery in uveitic cataract is essential in optimizing the postoperative outcome. Management of postoperative complications, especially inflammation and glaucoma, earlier rather than later, has also contributed to improved outcomes. This manuscript is review of the existing literature and highlights the management pearls in tackling complicated cataract based on medline search of literature and experience of the authors. PMID:22518338

  4. Ovary Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Ovary C569 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 17 Local tumor destruction, NOS No specimen sent to pathology from surgical event

  5. Active vs. inactive muscle (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may lose 20 to 40 percent of their muscle -- and, along with it, their strength -- as they ... have found that a major reason people lose muscle is because they stop doing everyday activities that ...

  6. Eye muscle repair - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ... The extraocular muscles of the eye (external to the eyeball) control the positioning of the eyes. They coordinate of the eye ...

  7. Effects of a 10-week resistance exercise program on soccer kick biomechanics and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Manolopoulos, Evaggelos; Katis, Athanasios; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos; Kalapotharakos, Vasileios; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a resistance exercise program on soccer kick biomechanics. Twenty male amateur soccer players were divided in the experimental group (EG) and the control group (CG), each consisting of 10 players. The EG followed a 10-week resistance exercise program mainly for the lower limb muscles. Maximal instep kick kinematics, electromyography, and ground reaction forces (GRFs) as well as maximum isometric leg strength were recorded before and after training. A 2-way analysis of variance showed significantly higher ball speed values only for the EG (26.14 ± 1.17 m·s vs. 27.59 ± 1.49 m·s before and after training, respectively), whereas no significant differences were observed for the CG. The EG showed a decline in joint angular velocities and an increase in biceps femoris electromyography of the swinging leg during the backswing phase followed by a significant increase in segmental and joint velocities and muscle activation of the same leg during the forward swing phase (p < 0.05). The EG also showed significantly higher vertical GRFs and rectus femoris and gastrocnemius activation of the support leg (p < 0.05). Similarly, maximum and explosive isometric force significantly increased after training only for the EG (p < 0.05). These results suggest that increases in soccer kicking performance after a 10-week resistance training program were accompanied by increases in maximum strength and an altered soccer kick movement pattern, characterized by a more explosive backward-forward swinging movement and higher muscle activation during the final kicking phase. PMID:23539080

  8. Effects of electrical stimulation and voluntary exercise on muscle oxygenation assessed by NIRS.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kazuto; Hara, Taketaka; Oshima, Yoshitake; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Shigeo

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of low-frequency ES (electric stimulation) to muscle oxygenation level by NIRS (near infrared spectroscopy) from comparing with V-Ex (voluntary exercise). Ten subjects performed ES and V-Ex test in supine position on a bed with 90 degrees flexion of the right knee joint and fixation of the right ankle to the end of the bed with a strap. NIRS probe was placed on middle point of the vastus lateralis, and four electrodes were placed across the motor point of the rectus femoris and vastus lateralis. Stimulation voltage was started at 20 V (20 Hz, pulse duration: 200 micros, duty-cycle: 1s-1s), and then was increased at a rate of 3 V/30 s until maximal tolerance level. V-Ex (isometric knee extension) was performed with same posture as in ES, and exercise pattern was set at a 1-s contraction and 1-s relaxation cycle. Exercise intensity was started at 5% MVC (maximal voluntary contraction) and was increased at a rate of 5% MVC/30 sec until exhaustion. In ES and V-Ex, tissue oxygenation index was decreased with decrease in O2Hb (oxy-hemoglobin) and increase in HHb (deoxyhemoglobin), and muscle oxygenation levels at the end of test were very alike. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure in ES and V-Ex increased significantly, however, the degree of change in ES was significantly lower than V-Ex. Blood lactate was significantly increased in both tests. Adrenaline and noradrenaline were significantly increased in V-Ex, even though they showed no change in ES. These results lead us to believe that ES is an effective technique activated muscle hypoxia and glycolytic pathway metabolism with low stress on respiratory, circulatory and sympathetic nervous systems. PMID:17330394

  9. Electromyographic Control of a Hands-Free Electrolarynx Using Neck Strap Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubert, Heather L.; Stepp, Cara E.; Zeitels, Steven M.; Gooey, John E.; Walsh, Michael J.; Prakash, S. R.; Hillman, Robert E.; Heaton, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Three individuals with total laryngectomy were studied for their ability to control a hands-free electrolarynx (EL) using neck surface electromyography (EMG) for on/off and pitch modulation. The laryngectomy surgery of participants was modified to preserve neck strap musculature for EMG-based EL control (EMG-EL), with muscles on one side…

  10. 2015 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    2015 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR Dr. MichaelW. Neumeister June 25th 2015 McGill University Division of Plastic Surgery #12;PROGRAM THURSDAY, JUNE 25th 2015 7:30 am OSLER AMPHITHEATRE ­ MONTREAL-102 Research Presentations ­ Residents & Graduate Students in Plastic Surgery 10:15 am Coffee Break 10:30 am

  11. Thurston norm and cosmetic surgeries

    E-print Network

    Ni, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Two Dehn surgeries on a knot are called cosmetic if they yield homeomorphic manifolds. For a null-homologous knot with certain conditions on the Thurston norm of the ambient manifold, if the knot admits cosmetic surgeries, then the surgery coefficients are equal up to sign.

  12. Muscle Activation During Exercise in Severe Acute Hypoxia: Role of Absolute and Relative Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Losa-Reyna, José; González-Izal, Miriam; Perez-Suarez, Ismael; Calle-Herrero, Jaime; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Torres-Peralta, Rafael, José Losa-Reyna, Miriam González-Izal, Ismael Perez-Suarez, Jaime Calle-Herrero, Mikel Izquierdo, and José A.L. Calbet. Muscle activation during exercise in severe acute hypoxia: Role of absolute and relative intensity. High Alt Med Biol 15:472–482, 2014.—The aim of this study was to determine the influence of severe acute hypoxia on muscle activation during whole body dynamic exercise. Eleven young men performed four incremental cycle ergometer tests to exhaustion breathing normoxic (FIo2=0.21, two tests) or hypoxic gas (FIo2=0.108, two tests). Surface electromyography (EMG) activities of rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VL), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) were recorded. The two normoxic and the two hypoxic tests were averaged to reduce EMG variability. Peak Vo2 was 34% lower in hypoxia than in normoxia (p<0.05). The EMG root mean square (RMS) increased with exercise intensity in all muscles (p<0.05), with greater effect in hypoxia than in normoxia in the RF and VM (p<0.05), and a similar trend in VL (p=0.10). At the same relative intensity, the RMS was greater in normoxia than in hypoxia in RF, VL, and BF (p<0.05), with a similar trend in VM (p=0.08). Median frequency increased with exercise intensity (p<0.05), and was higher in hypoxia than in normoxia in VL (p<0.05). Muscle contraction burst duration increased with exercise intensity in VM and VL (p<0.05), without clear effects of FIo2. No significant FIo2 effects on frequency domain indices were observed when compared at the same relative intensity. In conclusion, muscle activation during whole body exercise increases almost linearly with exercise intensity, following a muscle-specific pattern, which is adjusted depending on the FIo2 and the relative intensity of exercise. Both VL and VM are increasingly involved in power output generation with the increase of intensity and the reduction in FIo2. PMID:25225839

  13. Human Smooth Muscle Autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Gabbiani, Giulio; Ryan, Graeme B.; Lamelin, Jean-Pierre; Vassalli, Pierre; Majno, Guido; Bouvier, Claude A.; Cruchaud, André; Lüscher, Ernst F.

    1973-01-01

    When human serum containing smooth muscle autoantibodies (SMA) is incubated with extracts containing thrombosthenin (the contractile material of platelets) or thrombosthenin-A (the actin-like moiety of thrombosthenin), it loses its ability to bind to smooth muscle. Such binding is also diminished when SMA serum is incubated with lysed platelets; this effect is not seen if the SMA serum is incubated with intact platelets. The incubation of other autoantibodies (such as antimitochondrial or antinuclear antibodies) with thrombosthenin does not affect their binding to the specific antigens. It appears that SMA is directed against the actin fraction of thrombosthenin—ie, SMA is an antiactin antibody. Hence the name of antiactin autoantibody (AAA) seems more appropriate than smooth muscle autoantibody (SMA). A study of the distribution of antiactin autoantibody binding in rat, rabbit and man shows that several “nonmuscular” structures contain actin under normal conditions; these include megakaryocytes and platelets, normal rat hepatocytes, the brush borders of renal tubules, the periphery of epithelial cells of the intestine, polymorphs and lymphocytes in lymph nodes (but not thymic cortical lymphocytes). In addition, certain cell types (such as granulation tissue fibroblasts, cultivated fibroblasts, hepatocytes or regenerating liver and epidermal cells growing over a skin wound) can reversibly acquire a massive network of actin-containing microfilaments resembling those in smooth muscle. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6 PMID:4125700

  14. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  15. CHAPTER VIn THE ADDUCTOR MUSCLE

    E-print Network

    CHAPTER VIn THE ADDUCTOR MUSCLE ---------------- ---- ------- TABLE I8.-Relative weight of the adductor muscle of six adult C. virginica (4- to 5 inches in height) during the spawning season (August the attachment of the larva. Shortly after the metamorphosis of the larva the posterior adductor muscle develops

  16. THE EFFECT OF TEAR SIZE AND NERVE INJURY ON ROTATOR CUFF MUSCLE FATTY DEGENERATION IN A RODENT ANIMAL MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. Mike; Galatz, Leesa M.; Lim, Chanteak; Havlioglu, Necat; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Background Irreversible muscle changes following rotator cuff tears is a well-known negative prognostic factor after shoulder surgery. Currently, little is known about the pathomechanism of fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles after chronic cuff tears. Hypothesis/Purpose The purposes of this study were: 1) to develop a rodent animal model of chronic rotator cuff tears that can reproduce fatty degeneration of the cuff muscles seen clinically, 2) to describe the effects of tear size and concomitant nerve injury on muscle degeneration, and 3) to evaluate the changes in gene expression of relevant myogenic and adipogenic factors following rotator cuff tears using the animal model. Methods Rotator cuff tears were created in rodents with and without transection of the suprascapular nerve. The supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles were examined 2, 8, and 16 weeks after injury for histological evidence of fatty degeneration and expression of myogenic and adipogenic genes. Results Histological analysis revealed adipocytes, intramuscular fat globules, and intramyocellular fat droplets in the tenotomized and neurotomized supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. Changes increased with time and were most severe in the muscles with combined tenotomy and neurotomy. Adipogenic and myogenic transcription factors and markers were upregulated in muscles treated with tenotomy or tenotomy combined with neurotomy compared to normal muscles. Conclusions The present study describes a rodent animal model that produces fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles similar to human muscles after chronic cuff tears. The severity of changes was associated with tear size and concomitant nerve injury. PMID:21831663

  17. Atrophy, inducible satellite cell activation, and possible denervation of supraspinatus muscle in injured human rotator-cuff muscle.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, Deanna; Leiter, Jeff R S; Macek, Bryce; Davidson, Michael J; MacDonald, Peter B; Anderson, Judy E

    2015-09-15

    The high frequency of poor outcome and chronic pain after surgical repair of shoulder rotator-cuff injury (RCI) prompted this study to explore the potential to amplify muscle regeneration using nitric oxide (NO)-based treatment. After preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biopsies of supraspinatus and ipsilateral deltoid (as a control) were collected during reparative surgery for RCI. Muscle fiber diameter, the pattern of neuromuscular junctions observed with alpha-bungarotoxin staining, and the ?:? subunit ratio of acetylcholine receptors in Western blots were examined in tandem with experiments to determine the in vitro responsiveness of muscle satellite cells to activation (indicated by uptake of bromodeoxyuridine, BrdU) by the NO-donor drug, isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN). Consistent with MRI findings of supraspinatus atrophy (reduced occupation ratio and tangent sign), fiber diameter was lower in supraspinatus than in deltoid. ISDN induced a significant increase over baseline (up to 1.8-fold), in the proportion of BrdU+ (activated) Pax7+ satellite cells in supraspinatus, but not in deltoid, after 40 h in culture. The novel application of denervation indices revealed a trend for supraspinatus muscle to have a higher ?:? subunit ratio than deltoid (P = 0.13); this ratio inversely with both occupancy ratio (P < 0.05) and the proportion of clusters at neuromuscular junctions (P = 0.05). Results implicate possible supraspinatus denervation in RCI and suggest NO-donor treatment has potential to promote growth in atrophic supraspinatus muscle after RCI and improve functional outcome. PMID:26135801

  18. Nerve-muscle interactions during flight muscle development in Drosophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, J. J.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    During Drosophila pupal metamorphosis, the motoneurons and muscles differentiate synchronously, providing an opportunity for extensive intercellular regulation during synapse formation. We examined the existence of such interactions by developmentally delaying or permanently eliminating synaptic partners during the formation of indirect flight muscles. When we experimentally delayed muscle development, we found that although adult-specific primary motoneuron branching still occurred, the higher order (synaptic) branching was suspended until the delayed muscle fibers reached a favourable developmental state. In reciprocal experiments we found that denervation caused a decrease in the myoblast pool. Furthermore, the formation of certain muscle fibers (dorsoventral muscles) was specifically blocked. Exceptions were the adult muscles that use larval muscle fibers as myoblast fusion targets (dorsal longitudinal muscles). However, when these muscles were experimentally compelled to develop without their larval precursors, they showed an absolute dependence on the motoneurons for their formation. These data show that the size of the myoblast pool and early events in fiber formation depend on the presence of the nerve, and that, conversely, peripheral arbor development and synaptogenesis is closely synchronized with the developmental state of the muscle.

  19. Penile Rehabilitation after Pelvic Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is the most common complication after pelvic radical surgery. Rehabilitation programs are increasingly being used in clinical practice but there is no high level of evidence supporting its efficacy. The principle of early penile rehabilitation stems from animal studies showing early histological and molecular changes associated with penile corporal hypoxia after cavernous nerve injury. The concept of early penile rehabilitation was developed in late nineties with a subsequent number of clinical studies supporting early pharmacologic penile rehabilitation. These studies included all available phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernosal injection and intraurethral use of prostaglandin E1 and to lesser extent vacuum erectile devices. However, these studies are of small number, difficult to interpret, and often with no control group. Furthermore, no studies have proven an in vivo derangement of endothelial or smooth muscle cell metabolism secondary to a prolonged flaccid state. The purpose of the present report is a synthetic overview of the literature in order to analyze the concept and the rationale of rehabilitation program of erectile dysfunction following radical pelvic surgery and the evidence of such programs in clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on penile rehabilitation programs after radical cystoprostatectomy, radical prostatectomy, and rectal cancer treatment. Future perspectives are also analyzed. PMID:25785286

  20. Penile rehabilitation after pelvic cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is the most common complication after pelvic radical surgery. Rehabilitation programs are increasingly being used in clinical practice but there is no high level of evidence supporting its efficacy. The principle of early penile rehabilitation stems from animal studies showing early histological and molecular changes associated with penile corporal hypoxia after cavernous nerve injury. The concept of early penile rehabilitation was developed in late nineties with a subsequent number of clinical studies supporting early pharmacologic penile rehabilitation. These studies included all available phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernosal injection and intraurethral use of prostaglandin E1 and to lesser extent vacuum erectile devices. However, these studies are of small number, difficult to interpret, and often with no control group. Furthermore, no studies have proven an in vivo derangement of endothelial or smooth muscle cell metabolism secondary to a prolonged flaccid state. The purpose of the present report is a synthetic overview of the literature in order to analyze the concept and the rationale of rehabilitation program of erectile dysfunction following radical pelvic surgery and the evidence of such programs in clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on penile rehabilitation programs after radical cystoprostatectomy, radical prostatectomy, and rectal cancer treatment. Future perspectives are also analyzed. PMID:25785286

  1. Basic technical considerations in reattachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, V E; Zhong-Wei, C; Beasley, R W

    1981-10-01

    Replantation surgery offers a rewarding challenge for one to apply basic biologic and functional concepts to deal with an infinite variety of amputation problems. Although there is an obvious requirement for technical skill, there is no place for stereotype procedures. Often the exact plan of treatment cannot be determined until debridement is completed, so by taking on the responsibility to manage these problems one must have not only fine technical skills but also a thorough knowledge and comprehensive experience in hand surgery, Upper limb amputations are complex and difficult compound hand injuries involving not only the vascular system but the bone, tendon, nerve, muscle, and skin as well. To entertain the concept that upper limb amputations are simply microvascular problems is indicative of a complete lack of comprehension of the realities of the situation. Every hand surgeon must add the ability to perform microsurgical techniques to his or her technical armamentarium, but to endorse the concept of a microsurgeon is bad for medicine and counter to both reality and concerned patient care. PMID:7322516

  2. Improved functional recovery of denervated skeletal muscle after temporary sensory nerve innervation.

    PubMed

    Bain, J R; Veltri, K L; Chamberlain, D; Fahnestock, M

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged muscle denervation results in poor functional recovery after nerve repair. The possible protective effect of temporary sensory innervation of denervated muscle, prior to motor nerve repair, has been examined in the rat. Soleus and gastrocnemius muscles were denervated by cutting the tibial nerve, and the peroneal nerve was then sutured to the transected distal tibial nerve stump either immediately or after two, four or six months. In half of the animals with delayed repair, the saphenous (sensory) nerve was temporarily attached to the distal nerve stump. Muscles were evaluated three months after the peroneal-to-tibial union, and were compared with each other, with unoperated control muscles and with untreated denervated muscles. After four to six months of sensory "protection", gastrocnemius muscles weighed significantly more than unprotected muscles, and both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles exhibited better preservation of their structure, with less fiber atrophy and connective tissue hyperplasia. The maximum compound action potentials were significantly larger in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles following sensory protection, irrespective of the delay in motor nerve union. Isometric force, although less than in control animals and in those with immediate nerve repair, remained reasonably constant after sensory protection, while in unprotected muscles there was a progressive and significant decline as the period of denervation lengthened. We interpret these results as showing that, although incapable of forming excitable neuromuscular junctions, sensory nerves can nevertheless exert powerful trophic effects on denervated muscle fibers. We propose that these findings indicate a useful strategy for improving the outcome of peripheral nerve surgery. PMID:11246164

  3. Muscle-Specific Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Deletion Induces Muscle Capillary Rarefaction Creating Muscle Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Jeffrey S.; Lantier, Louise; Hasenour, Clinton M.; James, Freyja D.; Bracy, Deanna P.; Wasserman, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle insulin resistance is associated with a reduction in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) action and muscle capillary density. We tested the hypothesis that muscle capillary rarefaction critically contributes to the etiology of muscle insulin resistance in chow-fed mice with skeletal and cardiac muscle VEGF deletion (mVEGF?/?) and wild-type littermates (mVEGF+/+) on a C57BL/6 background. The mVEGF?/? mice had an ?60% and ?50% decrease in capillaries in skeletal and cardiac muscle, respectively. The mVEGF?/? mice had augmented fasting glucose turnover. Insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose disappearance was blunted in mVEGF?/? mice. The reduced peripheral glucose utilization during insulin stimulation was due to diminished in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscle insulin action and signaling. The decreased insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was independent of defects in insulin action at the myocyte, suggesting that the impairment in insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was due to poor muscle perfusion. The deletion of VEGF in cardiac muscle did not affect cardiac output. These studies emphasize the importance for novel therapeutic approaches that target the vasculature in the treatment of insulin-resistant muscle. PMID:23002035

  4. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma has resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgical procedures. Endoscopic surgery offers patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, and surgical robots have enhanced the ability and precision of surgeons. Consequently, technological advances have facilitated totally endoscopic robotic cardiac surgery, which has allowed surgeons to operate endoscopically rather than through a median sternotomy during cardiac surgery. Thus, repairs for structural heart conditions, including mitral valve plasty, atrial septal defect closure, multivessel minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting (MIDCAB), and totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), can be totally endoscopic. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery as minimally invasive cardiac surgery is reviewed. PMID:26134073

  5. Corneoplastique™: Art of vision surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gulani, Arun C

    2014-01-01

    Corneoplastique incorporates the entire spectrum of Vision corrective surgery including Lasik, premium cataract surgery, corneal surgery, ocular surface surgery and the full range of anterior segment surgery itself in manipulating the optics of every eye towards unaided emmetropia to define each and every eye surgeon as a “Vision Corrective Surgeon”. This concept of approaching each case individually and designing vision therewith enables surgeons to correct not only virgin eyes but also approach complex cases and complications with the goal of 20/20 vision. Armed with this holistic approach, eye surgeons can use minimally invasive, aesthetically pleasing and visually focused surgery in single or staged process aiming for each patient's Best Vision Potential (BVP) raising eye surgery itself then to an Art! PMID:24492495

  6. An Implanted, Stimulated Muscle Powered Piezoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Gustafson, Kenneth; Kilgore, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A totally implantable piezoelectric generator system able to harness power from electrically activated muscle could be used to augment the power systems of implanted medical devices, such as neural prostheses, by reducing the number of battery replacement surgeries or by allowing periods of untethered functionality. The features of our generator design are no moving parts and the use of a portion of the generated power for system operation and regulation. A software model of the system has been developed and simulations have been performed to predict the output power as the system parameters were varied within their constraints. Mechanical forces that mimic muscle forces have been experimentally applied to a piezoelectric generator to verify the accuracy of the simulations and to explore losses due to mechanical coupling. Depending on the selection of system parameters, software simulations predict that this generator concept can generate up to approximately 700 W of power, which is greater than the power necessary to drive the generator, conservatively estimated to be 50 W. These results suggest that this concept has the potential to be an implantable, self-replenishing power source and further investigation is underway.

  7. Cataract Surgery Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA-McGannon cataract surgery tool is a tiny cutter-pump which liquefies and pumps the cataract lens material from the eye. Inserted through a small incision in the cornea, the tool can be used on the hardest cataract lens. The cutter is driven by a turbine which operates at about 200,000 revolutions per minute. Incorporated in the mechanism are two passages for saline solutions, one to maintain constant pressure within the eye, the other for removal of the fragmented lens material and fluids. Three years of effort have produced a design, now being clinically evaluated, with excellent potential for improved cataract surgery. The use of this tool is expected to reduce the patient's hospital stay and recovery period significantly.

  8. Controversies in amputation surgery.

    PubMed

    Pinzur, Michael S; Pinto, Marco A Guedes de Souza; Schon, Lew C; Smith, Douglas G

    2003-01-01

    Amputation surgery should be the first step in the rehabilitation of a patient with a nonfunctional limb, rather than the final step in treatment. When faced with a difficult decision regarding lower extremity amputation compared with attempted limb reconstruction, expectations for a reasonable outcome must be determined. After reasonable goals have been set, the surgery should be directed toward interfacing with a prosthetic limb. Current surgical techniques of lower extremity amputation, paying special attention to transosseous versus disarticulation amputation, help to optimize prosthetic limb fitting and functional rehabilitation. With the evolution of end-bearing amputation levels, there is resurgent interest in the bone bridging technique of Johann Ertl and interest in a new pneumatic immediate postoperative prosthetic limb fitting system. PMID:12690870

  9. Minor surgery in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Krupa, Debra T.; Stonestreet, Robert; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to investigate and demonstrate equipment and techniques proposed for minor surgery on Space Station Freedom (SSF). The objectives are: (1) to test and evaluate methods of surgical instrument packaging and deployment; (2) to test and evaluate methods of surgical site preparation and draping; (3) to evaluate techniques of sterile procedure and maintaining sterile field; (4) to evaluate methods of trash management during medical/surgical procedures; and (4) to gain experience in techniques for performing surgery in microgravity. A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed on March 30, 1990 with the goal of investigating and demonstrating surgical equipment and techniques under consideration for use on SSF. The flight followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola.

  10. Surgical Excision of Orbital Cysticercosis Lodged in Superior Oblique Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Juan; Zhao, Hong; Lin, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ocular cysticercosis refers to parasitic infections in humans. Most cases were treated by medicine. The case we reviewed was rarely reported with successful surgical intervention treatment. This case report describes a patient with cysticercosis existing in superior oblique tendon. The main symptom of the patient was recurring history of painless orbital swelling and double vision in upgaze. Ocular motility examination revealed a restriction of the right eye in levoelevation. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan of the orbit revealed the presence of a well-defined hypodense cystic lesion within the right superior oblique muscle. The patient was diagnosed with orbital space-occupying mass with acquired Brown syndrome. Surgical exploration of the superior oblique muscle was performed, and the cyst was removed from the eye and confirmed by histopathological examination. After surgery, an ocular motility examination revealed orthotropia in the primary position and downgaze, with mild restriction in levoelevation. Surgical removal could substitute for medical therapy when the cysticercosis is lodged in the superior oblique muscle, although, prior to surgery, important factors, such as patient requirements, surgical skills of the surgeon, and cyst placement, should be considered. PMID:26222841

  11. Laparoscopy in General Surgery

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Patrick J.; Anderson, Dawn L.

    1992-01-01

    After a period of rather slow initial acceptance by general surgeons, laparoscopy and video endoscopic surgery have suddenly burst on to the surgical scene. Almost overnight many of the surgical procedures once requiring a large incision are now being performed through small punctures. This article describes some of the more common procedures and discusses the merits and difficulties associated with these innovations. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21221367

  12. Surgery of the Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical procedures on the trachea have only been undertaken within the past 50 years. Knowing the unique blood supply of the trachea and how to reduce tension on any anastomosis are key to a successful outcome. Tracheal conditions requiring surgery usually present with shortness of breath on exertion, and preoperative evaluation involves computed tomography and rigid bronchoscopy. Tracheal resection and reconstruction can be safely performed with excellent outcomes by following a well-described technique. PMID:26290833

  13. Pediatric Sleep Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sulman, Cecille G.

    2014-01-01

    Adenotonsillectomy is the most common surgery performed for sleep disordered breathing with good outcomes. Children with obesity, craniofacial disorders, and neurologic impairment are at risk for persistent sleep apnea after adenotonsillectomy. Techniques exist to address obstructive lesions of the palate, tongue base, or craniofacial skeleton in children with persistent sleep apnea. Children with obstructive sleep apnea have a higher rate of peri-operative complications. PMID:24926473

  14. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd’s partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger’s disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  15. Common surgery, uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-10-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd's partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger's disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  16. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and the right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentry tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, corridor procedure and Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25-30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom on which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:14764186

  17. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, the corridor procedure, and the maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, and the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25 to 30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom upon which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:15028063

  18. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and the right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentry tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, corridor procedure and Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25-30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom on which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:23570110

  19. Percutaneous Nephroscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With the development of techniques for percutaneous access and equipment to disintegrate calculi, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery is currently used by many urologists and is the procedure of choice for the removal of large renal calculi and the management of diverticula, intrarenal strictures, and urothelial cancer. Although it is more invasive than shock wave lithotripsy and retrograde ureteroscopic surgery, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery has been successfully performed with high efficiency and low morbidity in difficult renal anatomies and patient conditions. These advantages of minimal invasiveness were rapidly perceived and applied to the management of ureteropelvic junction obstruction, calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis, and urothelial cancer. The basic principle of endopyelotomy is a full-thickness incision of the narrow segment followed by prolonged stenting and drainage to allow regeneration of an adequate caliber ureter. The preferred technique for a calyceal diverticulum continues to be debated. Excellent long-term success has been reported with percutaneous, ureteroscopic, and laparoscopic techniques. Each approach is based on the location and size of the diverticulum. So far, percutaneous ablation of the calyceal diverticulum is the most established minimally invasive technique. Infundibular stenosis is an acquired condition usually associated with inflammation or stones. Reported series of percutaneously treated infundibular stenosis are few. In contrast with a calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis is a more difficult entity to treat with only a 50-76% success rate by percutaneous techniques. Currently, percutaneous nephroscopic resection of transitional cell carcinoma in the renal calyx can be applied in indicated cases. PMID:20495691

  20. Spare-Part Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yeong Pin; Lahiri, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    The authors discuss the use of scavenged tissue for reconstruction of an injured limb, also referred to as “spare-part surgery.” It forms an important part of overall reconstructive strategy. Though some principles can be laid down, there is no “textbook” method for the surgeon to follow. Successful application of this strategy requires understanding of the concept, accurate judgment, and the ability to plan “on-the-spot,” as well as knowledge and skill to improvise composite flaps from nonsalvageable parts. Requirements for limb reconstruction vary from simple solutions such as tissue coverage, which include skin grafts or flaps to more complex planning as in functional reconstruction of the hand, where the functional importance of individual digits as well as the overall prehensile function of the hand needs to be addressed right from the time of primary surgery. The incorporation of the concept of spare-part surgery allows the surgeon to carry out primary reconstruction of the limb without resorting to harvest tissue from other regions of the body. PMID:24872768

  1. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  2. Relationship Between Intensity of Quadriceps Muscle Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Strength Recovery After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Balter, Jaclyn E.; Wolfe, Pamela; Eckhoff, Donald G.; Schwartz, Robert S.; Schenkman, Margaret; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can facilitate the recovery of quadriceps muscle strength after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), yet the optimal intensity (dosage) of NMES and its effect on strength after TKA have yet to be determined. Objective The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the intensity of NMES application was related to the recovery of quadriceps muscle strength early after TKA. A secondary objective was to quantify quadriceps muscle fatigue and activation immediately after NMES to guide decisions about the timing of NMES during rehabilitation sessions. Design This study was an observational experimental investigation. Methods Data were collected from 30 people who were 50 to 85 years of age and who received NMES after TKA. These people participated in a randomized controlled trial in which they received either standard rehabilitation or standard rehabilitation plus NMES to the quadriceps muscle to mitigate strength loss. For the NMES intervention group, NMES was applied 2 times per day at the maximal tolerable intensity for 15 contractions beginning 48 hours after surgery over the first 6 weeks after TKA. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation training intensity and quadriceps muscle strength and activation were assessed before surgery and 3.5 and 6.5 weeks after TKA. Results At 3.5 weeks, there was a significant association between NMES training intensity and a change in quadriceps muscle strength (R2=.68) and activation (R2=.22). At 6.5 weeks, NMES training intensity was related to a change in strength (R2=.25) but not to a change in activation (R2=.00). Furthermore, quadriceps muscle fatigue occurred during NMES sessions at 3.5 and 6.5 weeks, whereas quadriceps muscle activation did not change. Limitations Some participants reached the maximal stimulator output during at least 1 treatment session and might have tolerated more stimulation. Conclusions Higher NMES training intensities were associated with greater quadriceps muscle strength and activation after TKA. PMID:22652985

  3. Muscle strength and hypertrophy occur independently of protein supplementation during short-term resistance training in untrained men.

    PubMed

    Boone, Carleigh H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Beyer, Kyle S; Fukuda, David H; Hoffman, Jay R

    2015-08-01

    Short-term resistance training has consistently demonstrated gains in muscular strength, but not hypertrophy. Post-resistance training protein ingestion is posited to augment the acute anabolic stimulus, thus potentially accelerating changes in muscle size and strength. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of 4 weeks of resistance training with protein supplementation on strength and muscle morphology changes in untrained men. Participants (mean ± SD; N = 18; age, 22.0 ± 2.5 years; body mass index, 25.1 ± 5.4 kg·m(-2)) were randomly assigned to a resistance training + protein group (n = 9; whey (17 g) + colostrum (3 g) + leucine (2 g)) or a resistance training + placebo group (n = 9). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength in the leg press (LP) and leg extension (LE) exercises, maximal isometric knee extensor strength (MVIC), and muscle morphology (thickness (MT), cross-sectional area (CSA), pennation angle) of the dominant rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) was assessed before and after training. Participants performed LP and LE exercises (3 × 8-10; at 80% 1RM) 3 days/week for 4 weeks. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Four weeks of resistance training resulted in significant increases in LP (p < 0.001), LE (p < 0.001), MVIC (p < 0.001), RF MT (p < 0.001), RF CSA (p < 0.001), VL MT (p < 0.001), and VL CSA (p < 0.001). No between-group differences were observed. Although nutrition can significantly affect training adaptations, these results suggest that short-term resistance training augments muscle strength and size in previously untrained men with no additive benefit from postexercise protein supplementation. PMID:26154345

  4. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  5. [Myokines - muscle tissue hormones].

    PubMed

    Stránská, Zuzana; Sva?ina, Št?pán

    2015-04-01

    Physical inactivity is demonstrably related to the manifestation of chronic diseases which significantly modify the quality and prognosis of life in a negative way. The benefits of exercise are surely mediated by many pathophysiological mechanisms interrelated in varying degrees, which have not yet been fully examined in their complexity. In the late 20th century it was positively proven that a working striated muscle really regulates the metabolic and physiological response in the other organs. These involve several hundred substances with autocrine, paracrine and endocrine effects. These proteins and peptides, if released into the blood stream, substantially affect the metabolism of distant organs. They were classified as "myokines" (cytokines produced by myocytes). The identified myokines include e.g. IL4, IL6, IL7, IL15, myostatin, LIF (leukemia inhibitory factor), BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor), FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2), FGF21, FSTL1 (follistatin-related protein 1), irisin, EPO (erythropoetin) and BAIBA (?-aminoisobutyric acid). Myokines have first of all an immunoregulatory role in the human body. Another important effect of myokines is, coincidentally also in the interaction with adipose tissue, the regulation of energy homeostasis. They also affect the growth of muscle fibres and their regeneration, stimulate angiogenesis, they are involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism and have a proven effect on lipids. Considering their diverse function, myokines present a prospective therapeutic goal in the treatment of disorders of muscle growth and regeneration as well as obesity. Another recent research moves toward uncovering of the "myokine resistance" as a result of long-term muscle inactivity and its association with chronic subclinical inflammation. PMID:25894270

  6. Linear artificial molecular muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Flood, Amar H; Bonvallet, Paul A; Vignon, Scott A; Northrop, Brian H; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Jeppesen, Jan O; Huang, Tony J; Brough, Branden; Baller, Marko; Magonov, Sergei; Solares, Santiago D; Goddard, William A; Ho, Chih-Ming; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2005-07-13

    Two switchable, palindromically constituted bistable [3]rotaxanes have been designed and synthesized with a pair of mechanically mobile rings encircling a single dumbbell. These designs are reminiscent of a "molecular muscle" for the purposes of amplifying and harnessing molecular mechanical motions. The location of the two cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings can be controlled to be on either tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) or naphthalene (NP) stations, either chemically ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) or electrochemically (cyclic voltammetry), such that switching of inter-ring distances from 4.2 to 1.4 nm mimics the contraction and extension of skeletal muscle, albeit on a shorter length scale. Fast scan-rate cyclic voltammetry at low temperatures reveals stepwise oxidations and movements of one-half of the [3]rotaxane and then of the other, a process that appears to be concerted at room temperature. The active form of the bistable [3]rotaxane bears disulfide tethers attached covalently to both of the CBPQT(4+) ring components for the purpose of its self-assembly onto a gold surface. An array of flexible microcantilever beams, each coated on one side with a monolayer of 6 billion of the active bistable [3]rotaxane molecules, undergoes controllable and reversible bending up and down when it is exposed to the synchronous addition of aqueous chemical oxidants and reductants. The beam bending is correlated with flexing of the surface-bound molecular muscles, whereas a monolayer of the dumbbell alone is inactive under the same conditions. This observation supports the hypothesis that the cumulative nanoscale movements within surface-bound "molecular muscles" can be harnessed to perform larger-scale mechanical work. PMID:15998079

  7. [Precise thoracic surgery: new era of minimally invasive surgery].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Precise surgery is based on the integrated application of modern science and technology and integrated innovation of surgical technology revolution features. It is built in high-end digital medical bases. The purpose of precise surgery is to achieve accurate lesion resection, minimize injury, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of surgery. In this paper we forward new concept of precise thoracic surgery. An overview was made on the development of precise surgery with great support of virtual reality technology, augmented reality technology and image acquisition technology. Finally the paper illustrated the prospect of precise of thoracic surgery from the following aspects: preoperative planning, the choice of surgical approach, precise tumor localization, postoperative immediate 3-dimension multi modality imaging evaluation. PMID:26654300

  8. Effects of low level laser in the morphology of the skeletal muscle fiber during compensatory hypertrophy in plantar muscle of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terena, Stella Maris Lins; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Kalil, Sandra; Alves, Agnelo Neves; Mesquita Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli

    2015-06-01

    The hypertrophy is known as an increase the cross-sectional area of the muscle as a result of a muscular work against an overload, and it is compensatory because the overload is induced by functional elimination of synergistic muscles. The importance of study the compensatory hypertrophy is understand how this process can be influenced by the irradiation with regard to the weight and muscle cross-sectional area, to assist in the rehabilitation process and the effectiveness functional return. The aim was evaluate the effects of low-level laser irradiation on morphological aspects of muscle tissue, comparing the weight and cross-sectional area in rat skeletal muscle. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, hypertrophy group without irradiation (right plantar muscle) and hypertrophy group and irradiation (left plantar muscle), both analyzed after 7 and 14 days. The irradiation was performed daily immediately after the surgery. The parameters were: ? = 780nm, beam spot of 0.04 cm2, output power of 40mW, power density of 1W/cm2, energy density of 10J / cm2 and 10s exposure time with a total energy of 3.2 J. The results revealed that low level laser irradiation an increase the weight of the plantaris muscle after 7 and 14 days with a difference of 7.06% and 11.51% respectively. In conclusion, low level laser irradiation has an effect on compensatory hypertrophy to produce increased muscle weight and promoted an increase in cross-sectional area of muscle fibers in the compensatory hypertrophy model after 14 days with parameters cited above.

  9. Orbital nerve seath myxoma with extraocular muscle involvement: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Uña, Ignacio; Troyano-Rivas, Juan A; González-García, Cristina; Chícharo-de-Freitas, Reinaldo; Ortiz-Zapata, Juan J; Ortega-Medina, Luis; Toledano-Fernández, Nicolás; García-Feijoo, Julián

    2015-07-01

    A 66-year-old woman with breast cancer presented with a painless mass in the left orbit. MRI revealed a well-defined intraconal mass in the temporal quadrant of the orbit. Fifteen months later, a further MRI indicated the mass had grown, displacing the left optic nerve and making contact with the lateral rectus muscle, suggesting its possible intramuscular origin. Despite the clinical and radiological characteristics of the lesion and its slow growth, a PET/CT study was developed because of the history of malignant disease. No metabolic activity of the mass or malignant lesion in other locations was observed. After surgical excision, histopathological examination revealed an abundant myxoid matrix with few spindle-shaped cells and no signs of malignancy. The cells were immunopositive for CD34, positive for S-100 protein, and negative for EMA, actin, and CD57. A diagnosis was made of a nerve sheath myxoma. The orbital location of these tumors is extremely rare. PMID:24475917

  10. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15·2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US$6·2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery-eg, pathology and imaging-are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning. PMID:26427363

  11. Interaction between Muscle and Bone

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The clinical significance of sarcopenia and osteoporosis has increased with the increase in the population of older people. Sarcopenia is defined by decreased muscle mass and impaired muscle function, which is related to osteoporosis independently and dependently. Numerous lines of clinical evidence suggest that lean body mass is positively related to bone mass, which leads to reduced fracture risk. Genetic, endocrine and mechanical factors affect both muscle and bone simultaneously. Vitamin D, the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis and testosterone are physiologically and pathologically important as endocrine factors. These findings suggest the presence of interactions between muscle and bone, which might be very important for understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of sarcopenia and osteoporosis. Muscle/bone relationships include two factors: local control of muscle to bone and systemic humoral interactions between muscle and bone. As a putative local inducer of muscle ossification, we found Tmem119, a parathyroid hormone-responsive osteoblast differentiation factor. Moreover, osteoglycin might be one of the muscle-derived humoral bone anabolic factors. This issue may be important for the development of novel drugs and biomarkers for osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Further research will be necessary to clarify the details of the linkage of muscle and bone. PMID:24707465

  12. Evaluation of upper body muscle activity during cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waye, A. B.; Krygiel, R. G.; Susin, T. B.; Baptista, R.; Rehnberg, L.; Heidner, G. S.; de Campos, F.; Falcão, F. P.; Russomano, T.

    2013-09-01

    Performance of efficient single-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is vital to maintain cardiac and cerebral perfusion during the 2-4 min it takes for deployment of advanced life support during a space mission. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in upper body muscle activity during CPR performance at terrestrial gravity (+1Gz) and in simulated microgravity (?G). Muscle activity of the triceps brachii, erector spinae, rectus abdominis and pectoralis major was measured via superficial electromyography in 20 healthy male volunteers. Four sets of 30 external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed on a mannequin. Microgravity was simulated using a body suspension device and harness; the Evetts-Russomano (ER) method was adopted for CPR performance in simulated microgravity. Heart rate and perceived exertion via Borg scores were also measured. While a significantly lower depth of ECCs was observed in simulated microgravity, compared with +1Gz, it was still within the target range of 40-50 mm. There was a 7.7% decrease of the mean (±SEM) ECC depth from 48 ± 0.3 mm at +1Gz, to 44.3 ± 0.5 mm during microgravity simulation (p < 0.001). No significant difference in number or rate of compressions was found between the two conditions. Heart rate displayed a significantly larger increase during CPR in simulated microgravity than at +1Gz, the former presenting a mean (±SEM) of 23.6 ± 2.91 bpm and the latter, 76.6 ± 3.8 bpm (p < 0.001). Borg scores were 70% higher post-microgravity compressions (17 ± 1) than post +1Gz compressions (10 ± 1) (p < 0.001). Intermuscular comparisons showed the triceps brachii to have significantly lower muscle activity than each of the other three tested muscles, in both +1Gz and microgravity. As shown by greater Borg scores and heart rate increases, CPR performance in simulated microgravity is more fatiguing than at +1Gz. Nevertheless, no significant difference in muscle activity between conditions was found, a result that is favourable for astronauts, given the inevitable muscular and cardiovascular deconditioning that occurs during space travel.

  13. Muscle Activation During Side-Step Cutting Maneuvers in Male and Female Soccer Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Ashley M; Padua, Darin A; Troy Blackburn, J; Prentice, William E; Hirth, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    Context: Female soccer athletes are at greater risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than males. Sex differences in muscle activation may contribute to the increased incidence of ACL injuries in female soccer athletes. Objective: To examine sex differences in lower extremity muscle activation between male and female soccer athletes at the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I level during 2 side-step cutting maneuvers. Design: Cross-sectional with 1 between-subjects factor (sex) and 2 within-subjects factors (cutting task and phase of contact). Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty males (age = 19.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 176.5 ± 5.5 cm, mass = 74.6 ± 6.0 kg) and 20 females (age = 19.8 ± 1.1 years, height = 165.7 ± 4.3 cm, mass = 62.2 ± 7.2 kg). Intervention(s): In a single testing session, participants performed the running-approach side-step cut and the box-jump side-step cut tasks. Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyographic activity of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, medial hamstrings, lateral hamstrings, gluteus medius, and gluteus maximus was recorded for each subject. Separate mixed-model, repeated-measures analysis of variance tests were used to compare the dependent variables across sex during the preparatory and loading contact phases of each cutting task. Results: Females displayed greater vastus lateralis activity and quadriceps to hamstrings coactivation ratios during the preparatory and loading phases, as well as greater gluteus medius activation during the preparatory phase only. No significant differences were noted between the sexes for muscle activation in the other muscles analyzed during each task. Conclusions: The quadriceps-dominant muscle activation pattern observed in recreationally active females is also present in female soccer athletes at the Division I level when compared with similarly trained male soccer athletes. The relationship between increased quadriceps activation and greater incidence of noncontact ACL injury in female soccer athletes versus males requires further study. PMID:18345337

  14. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form of control is to determine which of the many growth factors that can alter satellite cell behavior in vitro are at work in vivo. Little work has been done to determine what controls are at work after a regeneration response has been initiated. It seems likely that, after injury, growth factors are liberated through proteolytic activity and initiate an activation process whereby cells enter into a proliferative phase. After myofibers are formed, it also seems likely that satellite cell behavior is regulated through diffusible factors arising from the fibers rather than continuous control by circulating factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

  15. Robotic surgery of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Daniel; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery is one of the most challenging and complex fields in general surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has become the standard of care for many intra-abdominal pathologies the overwhelming majority of pancreatic surgery is performed in an open fashion. This is attributed to the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas, its intimate relationship to major vasculature and the complexity of reconstruction in the case of pancreatoduodenectomy. Herein, we describe the application of robotic technology to minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. The unique capabilities of the robotic platform have made the minimally invasive approach feasible and safe with equivalent if not better outcomes (e.g., decreased length of stay, less surgical site infections) to conventional open surgery. However, it is unclear whether the robotic approach is truly superior to traditional laparoscopy; this is a key point given the substantial costs associated with procuring and maintaining robotic capabilities. PMID:25356035

  16. Robotic surgery of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Daniel; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-10-28

    Pancreatic surgery is one of the most challenging and complex fields in general surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has become the standard of care for many intra-abdominal pathologies the overwhelming majority of pancreatic surgery is performed in an open fashion. This is attributed to the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas, its intimate relationship to major vasculature and the complexity of reconstruction in the case of pancreatoduodenectomy. Herein, we describe the application of robotic technology to minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. The unique capabilities of the robotic platform have made the minimally invasive approach feasible and safe with equivalent if not better outcomes (e.g., decreased length of stay, less surgical site infections) to conventional open surgery. However, it is unclear whether the robotic approach is truly superior to traditional laparoscopy; this is a key point given the substantial costs associated with procuring and maintaining robotic capabilities. PMID:25356035

  17. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery-2014.

    PubMed

    Kearns, James T; Gundeti, Mohan S

    2014-07-01

    We seek to provide a background of the current state of pediatric urologic surgery including a brief history, procedural outcomes, cost considerations, future directions, and the state of robotic surgery in India. Pediatric robotic urology has been shown to be safe and effective in cases ranging from pyeloplasty to bladder augmentation with continent urinary diversion. Complication rates are in line with other methods of performing the same procedures. The cost of robotic surgery continues to decrease, but setting up pediatric robotic urology programs can be costly in terms of both monetary investment and the training of robotic surgeons. The future directions of robot surgery include instrument and system refinements, augmented reality and haptics, and telesurgery. Given the large number of children in India, there is huge potential for growth of pediatric robotic urology in India. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery has been established as safe and effective, and it will be an important tool in the future of pediatric urologic surgery worldwide. PMID:25197187

  18. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery-2014

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, James T.; Gundeti, Mohan S.

    2014-01-01

    We seek to provide a background of the current state of pediatric urologic surgery including a brief history, procedural outcomes, cost considerations, future directions, and the state of robotic surgery in India. Pediatric robotic urology has been shown to be safe and effective in cases ranging from pyeloplasty to bladder augmentation with continent urinary diversion. Complication rates are in line with other methods of performing the same procedures. The cost of robotic surgery continues to decrease, but setting up pediatric robotic urology programs can be costly in terms of both monetary investment and the training of robotic surgeons. The future directions of robot surgery include instrument and system refinements, augmented reality and haptics, and telesurgery. Given the large number of children in India, there is huge potential for growth of pediatric robotic urology in India. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery has been established as safe and effective, and it will be an important tool in the future of pediatric urologic surgery worldwide. PMID:25197187

  19. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  20. Blood-aqueous barrier integrity in patients with Graves’ Ophthalmopathy (GO), before and after rehabilitative surgery

    PubMed Central

    K?ysik, Anna; Kozakiewicz, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to analyze aqueous flare and it’s correlations in patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy, undergoing orbital decompression, extra-ocular muscle and eyelid surgery. Prospective interventional case series. Materials and Methods 48 eyes of 27 patients(20 female and 7 male, aged 54.4±5.7), undergoing surgical treatment for GO. 18 eyes of 9 patients (aged 55.3±3.6) undergoing orbital decompression. 19 eyes of 11 patients (aged 54.7±5.6) undergoing extraocular muscle surgery and 13 eyes of 7 patients (aged 53.9±4.9) undergoing eyelid surgery and control group (34 patients aged 53.9±5.1). Laser flare analysis, and clinical assessment was performed before surgery and 1 day, 7 days and 3 months following surgery. Results Aqueous flare was significantly higher in patients with GO (14.03 ± 8.45), before intervention than in the control group (7.89 ± 3.56) (p<0.001), and correlated with Clinical Activity Score and intraocular pressure. In the patients undergoing orbital decompression, flare increased from 17.77±10.63 pc/ms to 38.32±13.56 pc/ms on the first day, and 41.31±17.19 pc/ms on the seventh day and returned to 16.01±8.58 pc/ms in 3 months. In patients undergoing extra-ocular muscle surgery flare increased from 13.05±6.50pc/ms to 23.04±11.53 pc/ms (p<0.001) on the first day, and returned to 18.02±14.09pc/ms on the seventh day. Eyelid surgery did not change flare values. Conclusions Orbital decompression disrupts blood-aqueous barrier. The integrity of blood-aqueous barrier returns to pre-operative status within three months. Extraocular muscle surgery mildly affects blood aqueous barrier integrity, and the effect subsides within seven days. Eyelid surgery does not affect blood-aqueous barrier. PMID:25679415