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Sample records for recurrent rectal carcinoma

  1. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  2. [A Case of Rectal Carcinoma with Recurrence around the Drainage Site Complicated by Fournier's Gangrene].

    PubMed

    Abe, Kaoru; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Saki; Soma, Daiki; Yagi, Ryoma; Miura, Kohei; Tatsuda, Kumiko; Tajima, Yosuke; Okamura, Takuma; Nakano, Mae; Nakano, Masato; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    A 71-year-old woman diagnosed with Fournier's gangrene caused by penetration of a rectal carcinoma was referred to our hospital. Emergency drainage and sigmoid colostomy were performed. Pathological examination of a biopsy sample showed moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. Abdominoperineal resection with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and hysterectomy was performed with curative intent after 4 courses of chemotherapy with S-1 and oxaliplatin. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was StageⅡ (pT4bN0M0). The patient received tegafur/uracil and Leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy. Seven months after the curative operation, partial pneumonectomy was performed for the recurrence of the rectal carcinoma in the right lung. Eight months after pneumonectomy, recurrent tumors were observed in the right lung and subcutaneous fat layer of the right buttock along the drainage site. The tumor in the right buttock was excised along with part of the gluteus maximus, and partial pneumonectomy was then performed. Three years and 6 months after the emergency drainage, the patient is alive with no evidence of recurrence. After drainage for rectal carcinoma complicated by Fournier's gangrene, the possibility of recurrence around the drainage site should be considered. PMID:26805341

  3. Local recurrence after curative resection for rectal carcinoma: The role of surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jung-A; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Local recurrence of rectal cancer is difficult to treat, may cause severe and disabling symptoms, and usually has a fatal outcome. The aim of this study was to document the clinical nature of locally recurrent rectal cancer and to determine the effect of surgical resection on long-term survival.A retrospective review was conducted of the prospectively collected medical records of 2485 patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent radical resection between September 1994 and December 2008.In total, 147 (5.9%) patients exhibited local recurrence. The most common type of local recurrence was lateral recurrence, whereas anastomotic recurrence was the most common type in patients without preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Tumor location with respect to the anal verge significantly affected the local recurrence rate (P < 0.001), whereas preoperative CCRT did not affect the local recurrence rate (P = 0.433). Predictive factors for surgical resection of recurrent rectal cancer included less advanced tumor stage (P = 0.017, RR = 3.840, 95% CI = 1.271-11.597), axial recurrence (P < 0.001, RR = 5.772, 95% CI = 2.281-14.609), and isolated local recurrence (P = 0.006, RR = 8.679, 95% CI = 1.846-40.815). Overall survival after diagnosis of local recurrence was negatively influenced by advanced pathologic tumor stage (P = 0.040, RR = 1.867, 95% CI = 1.028-3.389), positive CRM (P = 0.001, RR = 12.939, 95% CI = 2.906-57.604), combined distant metastases (P = 0.001, RR = 2.086, 95% CI = 1.352-3.218), and nonsurgical resection of recurrent tumor (P < 0.001, RR = 4.865, 95% CI = 2.586-9.153).In conclusion, the clinical outcomes of local recurrence after curative resection of rectal cancer are diverse. Surgical resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer should be considered as an initial treatment, especially in patients with less advanced tumors and axial recurrence. PMID:27399067

  4. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for recurrent locally advanced rectal or rectosigmoid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, C.G.; Shellito, P.C.; Tepper, J.E.; Eliseo, R.; Convery, K.; Wood, W.C. )

    1991-03-15

    A multimodality approach of moderate-dose to high-dose preoperative radiation therapy, surgical resection, and intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IORT) has been used for patients with locally recurrent rectal or rectosigmoid carcinoma. The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival for 30 patients undergoing this treatment program were 26% and 19%, respectively. The most important factor predicting a favorable outcome was complete resection with negative pathologic resection margins. The determinant local control and disease-free survival for 13 patients undergoing complete resection were 62% and 54%, respectively, whereas for 17 patients undergoing partial resection these figures were 18% and 6%, respectively. There did not appear to be a difference in local control or survival based on the original surgical resection (abdominoperineal resection versus low anterior resection). However, the likelihood of obtaining a complete resection after preoperative radiation therapy was higher in patients who had previously undergone a low anterior resection than patients undergoing prior abdominoperineal resection. For the 30 patients undergoing external beam irradiation, resection, and IORT, the most significant toxicities were soft tissue or sacral injury and pelvic neuropathy. Efforts to further improve local control are directed toward the concurrent use of chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil with and without leucovorin) as radiation dose modifiers during external beam irradiation and the use of additional postoperative radiation therapy.

  5. Combined radiation therapy, mitomycin C, and 5-fluorouracil for locally recurrent rectal carcinoma: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wong, C S; Cummings, B J; Keane, T J; Dobrowsky, W; O'Sullivan, B; Catton, C N

    1991-10-01

    Twenty-two patients underwent combined radiation therapy (XRT), mitomycin C (MMC), and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) for rectal carcinoma, locally recurrent following either abdominoperineal or anterior resections. All patients presented with symptomatic unresectable pelvic cancer. The protocol XRT doses were 45-50 Gy/20/4-6 weeks. Chemotherapy consisted of MMC 10 mg/m2 on day 1, and 5FU 15 mg/kg/day on days 1, 2, and 3 of XRT, both given by intravenous bolus injection. Only 2 of 22 patients remained NED at 5 years following treatment. All but four patients eventually experienced progression of pelvic disease. Ten of 22 patients were unable to complete the treatment protocol because of excessive acute hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity. Five patients developed neutropenic sepsis, one of whom died. Combined XRT, MMC, and 5FU as used in this study had no apparent advantage over XRT alone in terms of pelvic disease or survival, and produced significant toxicity. PMID:1938526

  6. Perineal herniation of an ileal neobladder following radical cystectomy and consecutive rectal resection for recurrent bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neumann, P A; Mehdorn, A S; Puehse, G; Senninger, N; Rijcken, E

    2016-04-01

    Secondary perineal herniation of intraperitoneal contents represents a rare complication following procedures such as abdominoperineal rectal resection or cystectomy. We present a case of a perineal hernia formation with prolapse of an ileum neobladder following radical cystectomy and rectal resection for recurrent bladder cancer. Following consecutive resections in the anterior and posterior compartment of the lesser pelvis, the patient developed problems emptying his neobladder. Clinical examination and computed tomography revealed perineal herniation of his neobladder through the pelvic floor. Through a perineal approach, the hernial sac could be repositioned, and via a combination of absorbable and non-absorbable synthetic mesh grafts, the pelvic floor was stabilised. Follow-up review at one year after hernia fixation showed no signs of recurrence and no symptoms. In cases of extensive surgery in the lesser pelvis with associated weakness of the pelvic compartments, meshes should be considered for closure of the pelvic floor. Development of biological meshes with reduced risk of infection might be an interesting treatment option in these cases. PMID:26985818

  7. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy with particular reference to the treatment of rectal carcinomas--primary and recurrent

    SciTech Connect

    Sischy, B.

    1986-11-01

    Radiation therapy is being used alone or in combination with surgery with increasing frequency in the treatment of colorectal malignancies. Preoperative or postoperative irradiation may be offered to patients with marginally resectable lesions who are at high risk for local recurrence. Dose levels required for cure, however, may be such that the complications are unacceptable. The use of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has increased the possibility of a higher local control rate and possible cure. The ability to increase the therapeutic ratio between local control and complications using IORT is achieved only with close interaction between the surgeon and radiation oncologist. Furthermore, intraoperative radiation therapy may be offered for patients with recurrent rectal tumors. The technique of intraoperative radiation therapy will be described briefly and recent results regarding colorectal cancers from larger centers will be reviewed. It appears from many reports that the three-to-five-year results for marginally resectable disease are approximately 50 percent and for recurrent disease, approximately 40 percent. The incidence of complications following intraoperative radiation therapy does not appear to increase as a result of this aggressive treatment modality. The number of centers offering this modality is increasing rapidly.

  8. [Integrated treatments of rectal carcinoma (review)].

    PubMed

    Gennari, Leandro; Doci, Roberto; Rossetti, Carlo; Bagnoli, Pietro; Eboli, Marco; Brocchi, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    We have reviewed the international literature regarding the treatment of rectal carcinoma. Over the last decades the evolution of treatment methods has led to a drastic fall in the incidence of local recurrences which has gone from a wide range (15-40%) to a much lower figure (10%). This favourable result has been reached also due to improvement in surgical techniques (total mesorectal excision) and to the use of an association of preoperative radio and chemotherapy. However, the drugs and dosage of these as well as of the RT still have to be defined. In our experience the integrated treatment has brought a downstaging of the T in 60% of cases and of the N in 15%. PMID:12613323

  9. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Posttreatment TNM staging is a prognostic indicator of survival and recurrence in tethered or fixed rectal carcinoma after preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Alexander K.P. . E-mail: alexc@cancerboard.ab.ca; Wong, Alfred; Jenken, Daryl; Heine, John; Buie, Donald; Johnson, Douglas

    2005-03-01

    significant prognosticators of disease-specific survival and relapse-free survival. pCR Stage T4 disease was a strong predictor of local recurrence. The 5-year local control rate was 98% for pCR T0-T2, 89% for pCR T3, and 65% for pCR T4 disease (p = 0.00044). In multivariate analysis, the pCR TNM stage was the most statistically significant independent predictor of survival (p = 0.003) and relapse-free survival (p < 0.001). Conclusion: For patients who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer, the pCR TNM stage was a strong prognosticator of recurrence and survival. It can be used to identify high-risk patients for additional postoperative therapy.

  11. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer. PMID:14605930

  12. Prostatic carcinoma: rectal bleeding after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, A.R.; Steckel, R.J.

    1981-06-01

    A 64-year-old man had a prostatic nodule on routine physical examination; per-rectal needle biopsies revealed a single focus of well differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient had no history of urinary obstruction or of bowel difficulties. Accordingly, this was clinical stage II carcinoma of the prostate. The patient chose to receive external radiation therapy and was given small-field rotational treatment to a dose of 7000 rad (70 Gy) at a rate of 800 rad (8 Gy) weekly. Late in treatment, he experienced transitory diarrhea with flatulence, but this cleared with completion of treatment. Twenty months later he began to note frequent soft bowel movements, occasionally with red blood. At sigmoidoscopy 24 months after completion of treatment, the rectal mucosa was noted to be friable with minimal bleeding, presumably the result of radiation proctitis.

  13. Advantages of the Papillon protocol in the preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Klimberg, V S; Langston, J D; Maners, A; Gocio, J C; Hutchins, L F; Lang, N P; Westbrook, K C; Broadwater, J R

    1992-11-01

    Standard treatment for advanced rectal carcinoma currently includes surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Although there are theoretic advantages to preoperative irradiation, it is often not performed because of the prolonged delay of surgery and the purported increase in perioperative complications. A pilot study was undertaken at our institution to evaluate a treatment protocol advocated by Dr. Papillon that offers a shorter treatment time and less patient morbidity than conventional preoperative therapy for rectal carcinoma. Twenty patients with rectal cancer underwent the preoperative regimen that consisted of 3,000 cGy delivered in 10 fractions over 12 days with concomitant 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin-C. Complications were acceptable. Local recurrence was lower than in most reported trials, and survival rates were comparable. Additional benefits of the protocol include lower radiation morbidity to the patient and a decreased delay between diagnosis and surgery. PMID:1443366

  14. [Evaluation of safe resection margins in rectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Hovorková, E; Hadži-Nikolov, D; Ferko, A; Örhalmi, J; Chobola, M; Ryška, A

    2014-02-01

    The fact that surgically well performed total mesorectal excision with negative circumferential resection margin represents one of the most important prognostic factors in colorectal carcinoma is already well known. These parameters significantly affect the incidence of local tumour recurrence as well as distant metastasis, and are thus related to the duration of patient survival. The surgeons task is to perform mesorectal excision as completely as possible, i.e., to remove the rectum with an intact cylinder of mesorectal fat. The approach of the pathologist to evaluation of total mesorectal excision specimens differs greatly from that of resection specimens from other parts of the large bowel. Besides evaluation of the usual parameters for colon cancer staging, it is essential to assess certain additional factors specific to rectal carcinomas, namely tumour distance from circumferential (radial) resection margins and the quality of the mesorectal excision. In order to accurately evaluate these parameters, knowledge of a wide range of clinical data is indispensable (results of preoperative imaging, intraoperative findings). For objective evaluation of these parameters it is necessary to introduce standardized procedures for resection specimen processing and macro and microscopic examination. This approach is based mainly on standardized macroscopic photo-documentation of the integrity of the mesorectal surface. Parallel transverse sections of the resection specimens are made with targeted tissue sampling for histological examination. It is essential to have close cooperation between surgeons and pathologists within a multidisciplinary team enabling mutual feedback. PMID:24702293

  15. Hyperthermotherapy for postoperative local recurrences of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, M; Hizuta, A; Iwagaki, H; Makihata, E; Asaumi, J; Nishikawa, K; Gao, X S; Nakagawa, T; Togami, I; Takeda, Y

    1993-08-01

    Between November 1984 and August 1992 we used hyperthermotherapy in six cases of local recurrence of rectal cancer. Hyperthermotherapy was performed on the average 8.7 times (range: 3-18) for each patient for 60 min each. All patients underwent combined radiotherapy and received a mean radiation dose of 42.5 Gy (range: 9-60 Gy). Five patients underwent heating within 1 h after irradiation and one patient simultaneously with the irradiation. Four patients underwent combined chemotherapy and two patients immunotherapy. Before the treatment all patients had painful lesions, but pain decreased posttherapeutically in five patients. Performance status improved in two patients. High carcinoembryonic antigen levels prior to the therapy in four patients decreased in all cases after treatment. Posttherapeutical computed tomograms revealed only minor response or no changes. After the treatment, four patients died of exacerbations of recurrent tumors and one patient of distant metastases. The patient who underwent simultaneous radiohyperthermotherapy is presently alive, in August 1992, 38 months after initiation of the treatment. The 50% survival time after initiation of the treatment was 25 months (range: 10-38 months). Hyperthermotherapy combined with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy was useful for the alleviation of pain in patients who developed local recurrence after surgery, and improved survival after recurrences can be expected. PMID:8213219

  16. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  17. FXYD-3 expression in relation to local recurrence of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arbman, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Edler, David; Syk, Erik; Hallbook, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In a previous study, the transmembrane protein FXYD-3 was suggested as a biomarker for a lower survival rate and reduced radiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy. The purpose of preoperative irradiation in rectal cancer is to reduce local recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of FXYD-3 as a biomarker for increased risk for local recurrence of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in surgical specimens from a cohort of patients with rectal cancer who developed local recurrence (n = 48). The cohort was compared to a matched control group without recurrence (n = 81). Results Weak FXYD-3 expression was found in 106/129 (82%) of the rectal tumors and strong expression in 23/129 (18%). There was no difference in the expression of FXYD-3 between the patients with local recurrence and the control group. Furthermore there was no difference in FXYD-3 expression and time to diagnosis of local recurrence between patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and those without. Conclusion Previous findings indicated that FXYD-3 expression may be used as a marker of decreased sensitivity to radiotherapy or even overall survival. We were unable to confirm this in a cohort of rectal cancer patients who developed local recurrence. PMID:27104167

  18. Radiographic findings in recurrent parathyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, A.G.; Doppman, J.L.; Marx, S.J.; Brennan, M.F.; Spiegel, A.; Aurback, G.D.

    1982-03-01

    Seven cases of recurrent parathyroid carcinoma were reviewed. Subperiosteal resorption was seen in 6, pulmonary nodules in 4, renal calculi in 5, brown tumors in 5, and pancreatic calcifications in 1. Angiography was performed in 5 patients, showing 1 definite and 2 probable cervical recurrences, 1 mediastinal lesion, and 1 case of possible bone metastases. Venous sampling for parathyroid hormone was carried out in 4 patients and suggested residual disease in 2; in addition, there were 1 false and 1 true negative. CT was performed in 4 patients and was useful in delineating metastatic pulmonary nodules, cervical recurrence, and hepatic metastases. The radiographic approach to recurrent parathryoid carcinoma and the use of CT and angiography are discussed.

  19. Prognostic factors for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Colecchia, Antonio; Schiumerini, Ramona; Cucchetti, Alessandro; Cescon, Matteo; Taddia, Martina; Marasco, Giovanni; Festi, Davide

    2014-01-01

    The recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma, the sixth most common neoplasm and the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, represents an important clinical problem, since it may occur after both surgical and medical treatment. The recurrence rate involves 2 phases: an early phase and a late phase. The early phase usually occurs within 2 years after resection; it is mainly related to local invasion and intrahepatic metastases and, therefore, to the intrinsic biology of the tumor. On the other hand, the late phase occurs more than 2 years after surgery and is mainly related to de novo tumor formation as a consequence of the carcinogenic cirrhotic environment. Since recent studies have reported that early and late recurrences may have different risk factors, it is clinically important to recognize these factors in the individual patient as soon as possible. The aim of this review was, therefore, to identify predicting factors for the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma, by means of invasive and non-invasive methods, according to the different therapeutic strategies available. In particular the role of emerging techniques (e.g., transient elastography) and biological features of hepatocellular carcinoma in predicting recurrence have been discussed. In particular, invasive methods were differentiated from non-invasive ones for research purposes, taking into consideration the emerging role of the genetic signature of hepatocellular carcinoma in order to better allocate treatment strategies and surveillance follow-up in patients with this type of tumor. PMID:24876717

  20. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz de Nova, Jose Luis; Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  1. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  2. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Jo; Boland, Patrick J.; Meredith, Dennis S.; Lis, Eric; Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji; Yamada, Yoshiya J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  3. [A Case of Lateral Lymph Node Recurrence Five-Years after Curative Surgery for Rectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Kiyotaka; Miyake, Masakazu; Uemura, Mamoru; Miyazaki, Michihiko; Ikeda, Masataka; Maeda, Sakae; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Hama, Naoki; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Omiya, Hideyasu; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Hirao, Motohiro; Takami, Koji; Nakamori, Shoji; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2015-11-01

    A 62-year-old woman had undergone laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer in February 2008. The pathological diagnosis was pT2, pN0, M0, pStageⅠ. At her request, she took UFT for 5 years as adjuvant chemotherapy. A CT examination revealed lateral lymph node swelling in January 2014. She was referred to our hospital after a diagnosis of lateral lymph node recurrence. She was administered 6 courses of FOLFIRI plus Cmab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy, after which the tumor size reduced by 62%. The treatment effect was rated as a PR. Laparoscopic right intrapelvic lymph node dissection was performed in July 2014, and the pathological diagnosis was recurrence of rectal cancer in the lateral lymph nodes. We report a case of dissection of lymph node recurrence 5 years after curative surgery for rectal cancer, along with a literature review. PMID:26805111

  4. Natural history of recurrences in endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SORBE, BENGT; JURESTA, CHRISTIAN; AHLIN, CECILIA

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the natural history of endometrial cancer recurrences with regard to predictive and prognostic factors. Between 1990 and 1999, 100 patients were treated for recurrences of endometrial carcinoma (all FIGO stages). Overall, 90 tumors were of endometrioid type. A total of 82 patients were treated with surgery, 41 patients received adjuvant external irradiation and 91 patients received vaginal brachytherapy. The median time to recurrence (TTR) was 32 months. The recurrences were treated using a combination of high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external pelvic irradiation in 35 cases. In addition, 44 patients were treated with chemotherapy and 21 patients received other types of therapy. The complete remission rate was 29% and the overall response rate was 44%. Among patients treated with radiotherapy, the response rate was 88% and, for those treated with chemotherapy, the rate was 33%. The local control of vaginal recurrences treated with combined radiotherapy was 93%. In 45 patients (45%) a second recurrence was identified and a third recurrence occurred in 12 patients. The overall five-year survival rate was 44%. Age, FIGO grade, nuclear grade, TTR and response to treatment were found to be independent and significant prognostic factors for overall survival rate. Locoregional recurrences were associated with a generalized extra-pelvic disease in 63% of the cases. PMID:25202413

  5. [A Case of Rectal Stenosis For Gastric Cancer Recurrence Effectively Treated with a Colonic Stent].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yutaka; Ebihara, Ken; Kato, Fumitaka; Makari, Yoichi; Mikami, Johta; Kawase, Tomono; Hamakawa, Takuya; Tsukamoto, Yuki; Fujimori, Masaki; Gobaru, Aya; Mitsudo, Daichi; Yabuta, Takamasa; Nakata, Ken; Tsujie, Masaki; Kitamura, Shinji; Ohzato, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 70s underwent distal gastrectomy and D1 dissection with Roux-en-Y reconstruction in March 2009 for advanced gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis. He was diagnosed with signet-ring cell carcinoma, Stage Ⅳ(T4a, N3a, H0, P1, CY1, M1) and R2. Seventeen cycles of S-1 plus CDDP were administered from April 2009 to December 2010 and 19 cycles of S-1 monotherapy were administered from January 2011 to March 2014. He developed peritoneal recurrence with serum tumor marker elevation in May 2014. Stenosis of the common bile duct, hydronephrosis, and rectal stenosis in Ra-Rs was observed in June 2014. A bile duct stent and a double J catheter was inserted. A colonic stent (NitiTM, 22 mm×6 cm) was also inserted. He could eat after the surgery and was discharged from the hospital. We suggest that a colonic stent is an effective treatment for colon stenosis due to peritoneal metastasis from gastric cancer. PMID:26805139

  6. Conservative surgery for low rectal carcinoma after high-dose radiation. Functional and oncologic results.

    PubMed Central

    Rouanet, P; Fabre, J M; Dubois, J B; Dravet, F; Saint Aubert, B; Pradel, J; Ychou, M; Solassol, C; Pujol, H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Using a prospective, nonrandomized study, the authors evaluated the morbidity and functional and oncologic results of conservative surgery for cancer of the lower third of the rectum after high-dose radiation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Colo-anal anastomosis has made sphincter conservation for low rectal carcinoma technically feasible. The limits to conservative surgery currently are oncologic rather than technical. Adjuvant radiotherapy has proven its benefit in terms of regional control, with a dose relationship. METHODS: Since June 1990, 27 patients with distal rectal adenocarcinoma were treated by preoperative radiotherapy (40 + 20 Gy delivered with three fields) and curative surgery. The mean distance from the anal verge was 47 mm (27-57 mm), and none of the tumors were fixed (15 T2, 12 T3). RESULTS: Mortality and morbidity were not increased by high-dose preoperative radiation. Twenty-one patients underwent conservative surgery (78%-17 total proctectomies and colo-anal anastomoses, 4 trans-anal resections). After colo-anal anastomosis, all patients with colonic pouch had good results; two patients had moderate results and one patient had poor results after straight colo-anal anastomosis. With a mean follow-up of 24 months, the authors noted 1 postoperative death, 2 disease-linked deaths, 1 controlled regional recurrence, 2 evolutive patients with pulmonary metastases, and 21 disease-free patients. CONCLUSIONS: These first results confirm the possibility of conservative surgery for low rectal carcinoma after high-dose radiation. A prospective, randomized trial could be induced to determine the real role of the 20 Gy boost on the sphincter-saving decision. PMID:7826163

  7. Proteomic analysis of colon and rectal carcinoma using standard and customized databases

    PubMed Central

    Slebos, Robbert J.C.; Wang, Xia; Wang, Xaojing; Zhang, Bing; Tabb, David L.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding proteomic differences underlying the different phenotypic classes of colon and rectal carcinoma is important and may eventually lead to a better assessment of clinical behavior of these cancers. We here present a comprehensive description of the proteomic data obtained from 90 colon and rectal carcinomas previously subjected to genomic analysis by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Here, the primary instrument files and derived secondary data files are compiled and presented in forms that will allow further analyses of the biology of colon and rectal carcinoma. We also discuss new challenges in processing these large proteomic datasets for relevant proteins and protein variants. PMID:26110064

  8. Management of recurrent and metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Asbun, H J; Hughes, K S

    1993-02-01

    When metastatic or recurrent disease from colorectal carcinoma is detected, the surgeon must decide whether a patient is a candidate for resection. Although long-term survival after resection is not optimal, the relegation of patients to nonresective treatment means denying them the only chance for cure currently available. When isolated disease involving the liver, lung, or region of the primary carcinoma is documented, curative resection must be considered. Symptomatic patients may also obtain maximal palliation from resection, diversion, or a bypass procedure. Chemotherapy for the treatment of recurrent disease is palliative and probably should be considered only within clinical trials. Future alternative methods of treatment or new chemotherapeutic regimens need to be studied to improve survival and quality of life. PMID:8426994

  9. Technical feasibility of laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or recurrent rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akiyoshi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the oncologic safety of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. Recently, large randomized clinical trials showed that laparoscopic surgery was not inferior to open surgery, as evidenced by survival and local control rates. However, patients with T4 tumors were excluded from these trials. Technological advances in the instrumentation and techniques used by laparoscopic surgery have increased the use of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. High-definition, illuminated, and magnified images obtained by laparoscopy may enable more precise laparoscopic surgery than open techniques, even during extended surgery for T4 or locally recurrent rectal cancer. To date, the quality of evidence regarding the usefulness of laparoscopy for extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision has been low because most studies have been uncontrolled series, with small sample sizes, and long-term data are lacking. Nevertheless, laparoscopic extended surgery for rectal cancer, when performed by specialized laparoscopic colorectal surgeons, has been reported safe in selected patients, with significant advantages, including a clear visual field and less blood loss. This review summarizes current knowledge on laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or locally recurrent rectal cancer. PMID:26811619

  10. What operation for recurrent rectal prolapse after previous Delorme’s procedure? A practical reality

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad A; Afridi, Faryal G; Artioukh, Dmitri Y

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience with perineal repair (Delorme’s procedure) of rectal prolapse with particular focus on treatment of the recurrence. METHODS: Clinical records of 40 patients who underwent Delorme’s procedure between 2003 and 2014 were reviewed to obtain the following data: Gender; duration of symptoms, length of prolapse, operation time, ASA grade, length of post-operative stay, procedure-related complications, development and treatment of recurrent prolapse. Analysis of post-operative complications, rate and time of recurrence and factors influencing the choice of the procedure for recurrent disease was conducted. Continuous variables were expressed as the median with interquartile range (IQR). Statistical analysis was carried out using the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: Median age at the time of surgery was 76 years (IQR: 71-81.5) and there were 38 females and 2 males. The median duration of symptoms was 6 mo (IQR: 3.5-12) and majority of patients presented electively whereas four patients presented in the emergency department with irreducible rectal prolapse. The median length of prolapse was 5 cm (IQR: 5-7), median operative time was 100 min (IQR: 85-120) and median post-operative stay was 4 d (IQR: 3-6). Approximately 16% of the patients suffered minor complications such as - urinary retention, delayed defaecation and infected haematoma. One patient died constituting post-operative mortality of 2.5%. Median follow-up was 6.5 mo (IQR: 2.15-16). Overall recurrence rate was 28% (n = 12). Recurrence rate for patients undergoing an urgent Delorme’s procedure who presented as an emergency was higher (75.0%) compared to those treated electively (20.5%), P value 0.034. Median time interval from surgery to the development of recurrence was 16 mo (IQR: 5-30). There were three patients who developed an early recurrence, within two weeks of the initial procedure. The management of the recurrent prolapse was as follows: No further intervention (n = 1

  11. Local Recurrence in Rectal Cancer: Anatomic Localization and Effect on Radiation Target

    SciTech Connect

    Syk, Erik Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nilsson, Per J.; Glimelius, Bengt

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the sites of local recurrence after total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer in an effort to optimize the radiation target. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients with recurrence after abdominal resection for rectal cancer were identified from a population-based consecutive cohort of 2,315 patients who had undergone surgery by surgeons trained in the total mesorectal excision procedure. A total of 99 cross-sectional imaging studies were retrieved and re-examined by one radiologist. The clinical records were examined for the remaining patients. Results: Evidence of residual mesorectal fat was identified in 50 of the 99 patients. In 83 patients, local recurrence was identified on the imaging studies. All recurrences were within the irradiated volume if the patients had undergone preoperative radiotherapy or within the same volume if they had not. The site of recurrence was in the lower 75% of the pelvis, anatomically below the S1-S2 interspace for all patients. Only 5 of the 44 recurrences in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge were in the lowest 20% of the pelvis. Six recurrences involved the lateral lymph nodes. Conclusion: These data suggest that a lowering of the upper limit of the clinical target volume could be introduced. The anal sphincter complex with surrounding tissue could also be excluded in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge.

  12. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Progressive, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cyst Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-04

    Recurrent Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

  13. Surgery for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Satish K; Heriot, Alexander G; Lynch, Andrew Craig

    2016-06-01

    Rectal cancer can recur locally in up to 10% of the patients who undergo definitive resection for their primary cancer. Surgical salvage is considered appropriate in the curative setting as well as select cases with palliative intent. Disease-free survival following salvage resection is dependent upon achieving an R0 resection margin. A clear understanding of applied surgical anatomy, appropriate preoperative planning, and a multidisciplinary approach to aggressive soft tissue, bony, and vascular resection with appropriate reconstruction is necessary. Technical tips, tricks, and pitfalls that may assist in managing these cancers are discussed and the roles of additional boost radiation and intraoperative radiation therapy in the management of such cancers are also discussed. PMID:27247536

  14. Total sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer – A case report featuring technical details and potential pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Melich, George; Weber, Michael; Stein, Barry; Minutolo, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo O.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Total sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer is controversial. However, recent publications suggest encouraging outcomes with high sacral resections. We present the first case report describing technical aspects, potential pitfalls and treatment of complications associated with total sacrectomy performed as a treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. PRESENTATION OF CASE A fifty-three year old man was previously treated at another institution with a low anterior resection (LAR) followed by chemo-radiation and left liver tri-segmentectomy for metastatic rectal cancer. Three years following the LAR, the patient developed a recurrence at the site of colorectal anastomosis, manifesting clinically as a contained perforation, forming a recto-cutaneous fistula through the sacrum. Abdomino-perineal resection (APR) and complete sacrectomy were performed using an anterior–posterior approach with posterior spinal instrumented fusion and pelvic fixation using iliac crest bone graft. Left sided vertical rectus abdominis muscle flap and right sided gracilis muscle flap were used for hardware coverage and to fill the pelvic defect. One year after the resection, the patient remains disease free and has regained the ability to move his lower limbs against gravity. DISCUSSION The case described in this report features some formidable challenges due to the previous surgeries for metastatic disease, and the presence of a recto-sacral cutaneous fistula. An approach with careful surgical planning including considerationof peri-operative embolization is vital for a successful outcome of the operation. A high degree of suspicion for pseudo-aneurysms formation due infection or dislodgement of metallic coils is necessary in the postoperative phase. CONCLUSION Total sacrectomy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer with acceptable short-term outcomes is possible.A detailed explanation to the patient of the possible complications and expectations including the concept of a

  15. Delorme's Procedure for Complete Rectal Prolapse: A Study of Recurrence Patterns in the Long Term

    PubMed Central

    Placer, Carlos; Enriquez-Navascués, Jose M.; Timoteo, Ander; Elorza, Garazi; Borda, Nerea; Gallego, Lander; Saralegui, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The objective of this study was to determine the recurrence rate and associated risk factors of full-thickness rectal prolapse in the long term after Delorme's procedure. Patients and Methods. The study involved adult patients with rectal prolapse treated with Delorme's surgery between 2000 and 2012 and followed up prospectively in an outpatient unit. We assessed epidemiological data, Wexner constipation and incontinence score, recurrence patterns, and risk factors. Data were analyzed by univariate and multivariate studies and follow-up was performed according to Kaplan-Meier technique. The primary outcome was recurrence. Results. A total of 42 patients, where 71.4% (n = 30) were women, with a median age of 76 years (IQR 66 to 86), underwent Delorme's surgery. The median follow-up was 85 months (IQR 28 to 132). There was no mortality, and morbidity was 9.5%. Recurrence occurred in five patients (12%) within 14 months after surgery. Actuarial recurrence at five years was 9.9%. According to the univariate analysis, constipation and concomitant pelvic floor repair were the only factors found to be associated with recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed no statistically significant differences among variables studied. Kaplan-Meier estimate revealed that constipation was associated with a higher risk of recurrence (log-rank test, p = 0.006). Conclusions. Delorme's procedure is a safe technique with an actuarial recurrence at five years of 9.9%. The outcomes obtained in this study support the performance of concomitant postanal repair and levatorplasty to reduce recurrences. Also, severe constipation is associated with a higher recurrence rate. PMID:26783557

  16. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  17. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Recurrent Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  18. [Complete response in a case of anastomotic recurrence of rectal cancer treated with S-1 monotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kabashima, Akira; Kitagawa, Dai; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kondo, Naoko; Teramoto, Seiichi; Saito, Genkichi; Funahashi, Tomoru; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman underwent a low anterior resection for rectal cancer in 2002.A n anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed in July 2011.S he rejected the possibility of colostomy as radical surgery.Chemotherapy consisting of capecitabine+ oxaliplatin (XELOX) or folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX6) + bevacizumab were not possible because of high costs. In view of the lower costs and the potential for ambulation, S-1 monotherapy was started. After 3 months, a reduction in the recurrent lesion was observed.After 19 months, the recurrent lesion revealed a scar, which was judged by biopsy to be Group 1.We had achieved a pathological complete response (CR).The standard treatment for recurrent colon cancer is surgical resection or multidrug chemotherapy. However, in view of a patient's quality of life (QOL), S-1 monotherapy may be considered as a potential therapy. PMID:25731306

  19. Photodynamic therapy in patients with recurrent gynecological carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Heinz; Mueller, Elisabeth; Kostron, Herwig

    1993-03-01

    Patients with recurrent gynecological carcinomas have a poor prognosis with a median survival time of 3 - 6 months. Four patients with recurrent vulva carcinomas, one patient with a recurrent breast cancer, and one with a recurrent cervical carcinoma underwent PDT after parenteral or topical sensitization with Photosan 3. Of those patients two women made a complete recovery with no evidence of disease 27 and 24 months after. One patient responded partially with two recurrences which were retreated twice after topical sensitization, she has survived 16 months. The remaining patients showed partial response and died 3 and 8 months after PDT. The energy delivered by an argon-dye-laser ranged between 225 and 750 J/cm2. Photosan 3 was given intravenously at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight and was tolerated without any allergic reaction. A response rate of nearly 50% in recurrent gynecological malignancies encourages us to pursue PDT in gynecological diseases.

  20. Rectal cancer. Treatment advances that reduce recurrence rates and lengthen survival.

    PubMed

    Sexe, R; Miedema, B W

    1993-07-01

    The risk of malignant disease arising in rectal mucosa is high. Surgery is the most effective form of treatment but results in cure in only 50% of patients. Adjuvant preoperative radiation therapy reduces the likelihood of local recurrence but does not improve survival rates. Fluorouracil is the most effective agent for adjuvant chemotherapy and slightly improves survival when given after surgery. Combining radiation therapy with chemotherapy appears to have a synergistic effect, and recent studies show that providing this combination after surgery improves survival. Future trends in the treatment of rectal cancer are expected to include expanded use of local excision to preserve anal sphincter function, preoperative use of a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy, perioperative use of chemotherapy combined with immunostimulating therapy, and use of tumor antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:8321771

  1. Techniques and Outcome of Surgery for Locally Advanced and Local Recurrent Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Renehan, A G

    2016-02-01

    Locally advanced primary rectal cancer is variably defined, but generally refers to T3 and T4 tumours. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment for these tumours but there is a high-risk for local recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2011) guidelines recommend that patients with these tumours be considered for preoperative chemoradiotherapy and this is the starting point for any discussion, as it is standard care. However, there are many refinements of this pathway and these are the subject of this overview. In surgical terms, there are two broad settings: (i) patients with tumours contained within the mesorectal envelope, or in the lower rectum, limited to invading the sphincter muscles (namely some T2 and most T3 tumours); and (ii) patients with tumours directly invading or adherent to pelvic organs or structures, mainly T4 tumours - here referred to as primary rectal cancer beyond total mesorectal excision (PRC-bTME). Major surgical resection using the principles of TME is the mainstay of treatment for the former. Where anal sphincter sacrifice is indicated for low rectal cancers, variations of abdominoperineal resection - referred to as tailored excision - including the extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE), are required. There is debate whether or not plastic reconstruction or mesh repair is required after these surgical procedures. To achieve cure in PRC-bTME tumours, most patients require extended multivisceral exenterative surgery, carried out within specialist multidisciplinary centres. The surgical principles governing the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer (RRC) parallel those for PRC-bTME, but typically only half of these patients are suitable for this type of major surgery. Peri-operative morbidity and mortality are considerable after surgery for PRC-bTME and RRC, but unacceptable levels of variation in clinical practice and outcome exist globally. To address this, there are now major efforts to standardise

  2. The Clinical Understaging of Recurrent Glottic Carcinoma after Radiation Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, Moustafa; Moubayed, Sami P.; Likhterov, Ilya; Urken, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recurrent glottic squamous cell carcinomas following radiation therapy for early staged tumors are oftentime early staged tumors. Management of these early stage recurrences presents a dilemma for the head and neck surgeon. Difficulties in appropriate tumor mapping, preoperative analysis, and poor understanding of the virulent pathologic nature of the recurrence may impede surgical decision-making. Methods. This is a single surgeon case report, presenting a patient with rapid recurrence following salvage transoral resection for an early stage recurrence, necessitating a total laryngectomy. Results. A review of the literature was performed, identifying studies that expound on the pathologic behavior of radiation recurrent disease. Conclusions. Radiation recurrent glottic squamous cell carcinoma has a distinct pathologic behavior and aggressive nature. Disease virulence, coupled with difficulty in appropriate staging and preoperative tumor mapping, should guide the surgeon when deciding the surgical management in the salvage setting. PMID:26989544

  3. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Posterior high sacral segmental disconnection prior to anterior en bloc exenteration for recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, K G M; Solomon, M J; Austin, K K S; Lee, P J; Stalley, P

    2016-06-01

    This article describes a novel technique for en bloc resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer that invades the high sacral bone (above S3). The involved segment of the sacrum is mobilised with osteotomes during an initial posterior approach before an anterior abdominal phase where the segment of sacral bone is delivered with the specimen. This allows en bloc resection of the involved sacrum while preserving uninvolved distal and contralateral sacral bone and nerve roots. The goal is to obtain a clear bony margin and offer a chance of cure while improving functional outcomes by maintaining pelvic stability and minimising neurological deficit. PMID:27000857

  5. Oxaliplatin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent Solid Tumors That Have Not Responded to Previous Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Hepatoblastoma; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer

  6. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Yuka; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Tadanobu; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer. PMID:26668568

  7. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yuka; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Tadanobu; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer. PMID:26668568

  8. Evaluation of a rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xin-Mei; Tang, Guang-Yu; Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Zhou, Bi

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To establish a rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model for the study of rectal carcinoma. METHODS: A suspension of VX2 cells was injected into the rectum wall under the guidance of X-ray fluoroscopy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to observe tumor growth and metastasis at different phases. Pathological changes and spontaneous survival time of the rabbits were recorded. RESULTS: Two weeks after VX2 cell implantation, the tumor diameter ranged 4.1-5.8 mm and the success implantation rate was 81.8%. CT scanning showed low-density foci of the tumor in the rectum wall, while enhanced CT scanning demonstrated asymmetrical intensification in tumor foci. MRI scanning showed a low signal of the tumor on T1-weighted imaging and a high signal of the tumor on T2-weighted imaging. Both types of signals were intensified with enhanced MRI. Metastases to the liver and lung could be observed 6 wk after VX2 cell implantation, and a large area of necrosis appeared in the primary tumor. The spontaneous survival time of rabbits with cachexia and multiple organ failure was about 7 wk after VX2 cell implantation. CONCLUSION: The rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model we established has a high stability, and can be used in the study of rectal carcinoma. PMID:19418587

  9. A common variant in MTHFR influences response to chemoradiotherapy and recurrence of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nikas, Jason B; Lee, Janet T; Maring, Elizabeth D; Washechek-Aletto, Jill; Felmlee-Devine, Donna; Johnson, Ruth A; Smyrk, Thomas C; Tawadros, Patrick S; Boardman, Lisa A; Steer, Clifford J

    2015-01-01

    An important determinant of the pathogenesis and prognosis of various diseases is inherited genetic variation. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variations at a single base position, have been identified in both protein-coding and noncoding DNA sequences, but the vast majority of millions of those variants are far from being functionally understood. Here we show that a common variant in the gene MTHFR [rs1801133 (C>T)] not only influences response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer, but it also influences recurrence of the disease itself. More specifically, patients with the homozygous ancestral (wild type) genotype (C/C) were 2.91 times more likely (291% increased benefit) to respond to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy {95% CI: [1.23, 6.89]; P=0.0150} and 3.25 times more likely (325% increased benefit) not to experience recurrence of the disease {95% CI: [1.37, 7.72]; P=0.0079} than patients with either the heterozygous (C/T) or the homozygous mutation (T/T) genotype. These results identify MTHFR as an important genetic marker and open up new, pharmacogenomic strategies in the treatment and management of rectal cancer. PMID:26693073

  10. Effect of particle beam radiotherapy on locally recurrent rectal cancer: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    MOKUTANI, YUKAKO; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; TAKAHASHI, HIDEKAZU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC); however, it often necessitates invasive procedures that may lead to major complications. Particle beam radiotherapy (RT), including carbon ion RT (C-ion RT) and proton beam RT, is a promising new modality that exhibits considerable efficacy against various types of human cancer. C-ion RT reportedly offers a therapeutic alternative for LRRC. In the present study, we describe three cases of LRRC treated by particle beam RT. In all the cases, LRRC was diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography imaging. No serious adverse effects were observed during RT. One patient experienced re-recurrence of LRRC, but survived for 6 years following particle beam RT; the second patient remains recurrence-free after a 2-year follow-up; and the third patient has developed recurrence at different sites in the pelvis but, to date, has survived for 4 years following particle beam RT. Therefore, LRRC was controlled by particle beam RT in two of the three cases, suggesting that particle beam RT is a safe alternative treatment for patients with LRRC. PMID:26171176

  11. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Na'ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Fridman, Eran; Gil, Ziv

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC. PMID:26886954

  12. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Na’ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Fridman, Eran; Gil, Ziv

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC. PMID:26886954

  13. Elevated Platelet Count as Predictor of Recurrence in Rectal Cancer Patients Undergoing Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    The impact of systemic inflammatory response (SIR) on prognostic and predictive outcome in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not been fully investigated. This retrospective study enrolled 89 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and for whom platelet (PLT) counts and SIR status [neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR)] were available. Both clinical values of PLT and SIR status in rectal cancer patients were investigated. Elevated PLT, NLR, PLR, and pathologic TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were associated with significantly poor overall survival (OS). Elevated PLT, NLR, and ypN(+) were shown to independently predict OS. Elevated PLT and ypN(+) significantly predicted poor disease-free survival (DFS). Elevated PLT was identified as the only independent predictor of DFS. PLT counts are a promising pre-CRT biomarker for predicting recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer. PMID:25692418

  14. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  15. N-glycomic profiling as a tool to separate rectal adenomas from carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kaprio, Tuomas; Satomaa, Tero; Heiskanen, Annamari; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; Mustonen, Harri; Hagström, Jaana; Carpen, Olli; Saarinen, Juhani; Haglund, Caj

    2015-02-01

    All human cells are covered by glycans, the carbohydrate units of glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. Most glycans are localized to cell surfaces and participate in events essential for cell viability and function. Glycosylation evolves during carcinogenesis, and therefore carcinoma-related glycan structures are potential cancer biomarkers. Colorectal cancer is one of the world's three most common cancers, and its incidence is rising. Novel biomarkers are essential to identify patients for targeted and individualized therapy. We compared the N-glycan profiles of five rectal adenomas and 18 rectal carcinomas of different stages by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were deparaffinized, and glycans were enzymatically released and purified. We found differences in glycosylation between adenomas and carcinomas: monoantennary, sialylated, pauci-mannose, and small high-mannose N-glycan structures were more common in carcinomas than in adenomas. We also found differences between stage I-II and stage III carcinomas. Based on these findings, we selected two glycan structures: pauci-mannose and sialyl Lewis a, for immunohistochemical analysis of their tissue expression in 220 colorectal cancer patients. In colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of sialyl Lewis a, and in advanced colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of pauci-mannose. In conclusion, by mass spectrometry we found several carcinoma related glycans, and we demonstrate a method of transforming these results into immunohistochemistry, a readily applicable method to study biomarker expression in patient samples. PMID:25452313

  16. N-glycomic Profiling as a Tool to Separate Rectal Adenomas from Carcinomas*

    PubMed Central

    Kaprio, Tuomas; Satomaa, Tero; Heiskanen, Annamari; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Deelder, André M.; Mustonen, Harri; Hagström, Jaana; Carpen, Olli; Saarinen, Juhani; Haglund, Caj

    2015-01-01

    All human cells are covered by glycans, the carbohydrate units of glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. Most glycans are localized to cell surfaces and participate in events essential for cell viability and function. Glycosylation evolves during carcinogenesis, and therefore carcinoma-related glycan structures are potential cancer biomarkers. Colorectal cancer is one of the world's three most common cancers, and its incidence is rising. Novel biomarkers are essential to identify patients for targeted and individualized therapy. We compared the N-glycan profiles of five rectal adenomas and 18 rectal carcinomas of different stages by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were deparaffinized, and glycans were enzymatically released and purified. We found differences in glycosylation between adenomas and carcinomas: monoantennary, sialylated, pauci-mannose, and small high-mannose N-glycan structures were more common in carcinomas than in adenomas. We also found differences between stage I–II and stage III carcinomas. Based on these findings, we selected two glycan structures: pauci-mannose and sialyl Lewis a, for immunohistochemical analysis of their tissue expression in 220 colorectal cancer patients. In colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of sialyl Lewis a, and in advanced colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of pauci-mannose. In conclusion, by mass spectrometry we found several carcinoma related glycans, and we demonstrate a method of transforming these results into immunohistochemistry, a readily applicable method to study biomarker expression in patient samples. PMID:25452313

  17. Preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis: A multicentric phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo . E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G.; Gambacorta, M. Antonietta; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Doglietto, G. Battista; Coco, Claudio; De Paoli, Antonino; Rossi, Carlo; Di Russo, Annamaria; Valvo, Francesca; Bolzicco, Giampaolo; Dalla Palma, Maurizio

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and total mesorectal excision for rectal carcinoma has significantly lowered the incidence of local recurrence. However, a new problem is represented by the patient with locally recurrent cancer who has received previous irradiation to the pelvis. In these patients, local recurrence is very often not easily resectable and reirradiation is expected to be associated with a high risk of late toxicity. The aim of this multicenter phase II study is to evaluate the response rate, resectability rate, local control, and treatment-related toxicity of preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically proven pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinoma, with the absence of extrapelvic disease or bony involvement and previous pelvic irradiation with doses {<=}55 Gy; age {>=}18 years; performance status (PS) (Karnofsky) {>=}60, and who gave institutional review board-approved written informed consent were treated by preoperative chemoradiation. Radiotherapy was delivered to a planning target volume (PTV2) including the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus a 4-cm margin, with a dose of 30 Gy (1.2 Gy twice daily with a minimum 6-h interval). A boost was delivered, with the same fractionation schedule, to a PTV1 including the GTV plus a 2-cm margin (10.8 Gy). During the radiation treatment, concurrent chemotherapy was delivered (5-fluorouracil, protracted intravenous infusion, 225 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 7 days per week). Four to 6 weeks after the end of chemoradiation, patients were evaluated for tumor resectability, and, when feasible, surgical resection of recurrence was performed between 6-8 weeks from the end of chemoradiation. Adjuvant chemotherapy was prescribed to all patients, using Raltitrexed, 3 mg/square meter (sm), every 3 weeks, for a total of 5 cycles. Patients were staged using the computed tomography (CT)-based F

  18. Utility of CT in detecting postpneumonectomy carcinoma recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, H.S.; Aronberg, D.J.; Sagel, S.S.; Emami, B.

    1984-03-01

    After pneumonectomy for bronchogenic carcinoma, detection of recurrent disease in the ipsilateral hemithorax or mediastinum is often difficult. The authors discuss the utility of CT in the evaluation of 18 postpneumonectomy patients who had developed new clinical symptoms. In six patients without documented tumor recurrence, CT demonstrated a normal postpneumonectomy appearance. In the other 12, CT confirmed the clinical impression of recurrent neoplasm (10 prospectively, two retrospectively), which appeared either as enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes or as a soft-tissue mass projecting into the normal near-water-density postpneumonectomy space. In only five of these patients were plain chest radiographs suggestive of recurrence (two prospectively, three retrospectively). The accurate assessment of the presence and extent of recurrent neoplasm by CT was important in planning radiotherapy in eight patients.

  19. Correlation of digital rectal examination, prostate specific antigen, and transrectal ultrasound in prostate carcinoma in African Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, R. I.; Sibley, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    Since there is general agreement that screening for prostate cancer should be carried out, at least for high-risk individuals, there should be little debate that African-American men should be screened. Current screening guidelines include the two most cost-effective methods of early detection, digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen. The use of transrectal ultrasound and guided biopsy improves the yield. This article reports on the findings of 50 African-American patients with prostatic carcinoma diagnosed by sonographically guided biopsy in a single, community urology practice. Overall, prostate specific antigen was elevated in 94%, digital rectal examination was positive in 60%, and transrectal ultrasound was positive in 78%. A focal hypoechoic lesion was demonstrated in 58%. When the site of tumor, as specified in the pathology report, was correlated with the findings on digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound, both digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound were positive in 45%. Transrectal ultrasound was positive when digital rectal examination was negative in 30%. Digital rectal examination was positive when ultrasound was not in 14%. Random biopsy revealed areas of carcinoma that were not detected by digital rectal examination nor ultrasound in 40%. We conclude that even though random biopsy significantly improves the detection of prostate carcinoma, sonographic guidance is beneficial to systematically biopsy the gland and to avoid omission of characteristic lesions during random samplings. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9170832

  20. Rare Presentation of Gastroesophageal Carcinoma with Rectal Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Karki, Niraj; Sapkota, Binita; Niazi, Masooma; Remy, Prospere

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Gastroesophageal carcinoma with rectal metastasis Symptoms: Bloating • constipation • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy • flexible sigmoidoscopy • lower endoscopic ultrasound Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Gastroesophageal cancers, previously considered rare, are rapidly increasing worldwide. We present here a unique case of gastroesophageal carcinoma with metastasis to the rectum. Case Report: A 60-year-old female patient presented with constipation, bloating, and weight loss of 4-month duration. She had undergone sleeve gastrectomy 6 years before. Endoscopies performed revealed a friable-looking mucosa in the lower esophagus and a polypoid rectal mass. Histopathological examination from both the esophageal and rectal lesions revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemistry stain from both specimens was positive for CK7 supporting the gastric site primary with metastasis to the rectum. Further evaluation also revealed metastasis to bone and malignant pleural effusion. Chemotherapy with palliative intent was initiated. Conclusions: Colorectal metastasis is commonly seen from cancers of the breast, stomach, melanoma, kidney, prostate, and ovaries. However, colorectal metastasis from gastroesophageal cancer has never been reported in the medical literature. Diagnosis relies on histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor. Treatment depends on the tumor stage. Tumors with widespread metastatic disease are candidates for palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27558656

  1. Efficacy of Immunohistochemical Staining in Differentiating a Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Poorly Differentiated Rectal Cancer: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Sairafi; Han, Yoon Dae; Jang, Mi; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    A rectal carcinoma, including primary an adenosquamous and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is a very rare disease, accounting for 0.025% to 0.20% of all large-bowel malignant tumors. Because SCCs have a higher mortality than adenosquamous carcinomas, determining whether the primary rectal cancer exhibits an adenomatous component or a squamous component is important. While differentiating between these 2 components, especially in poorly differentiated rectal cancer, is difficult, specific immunohistochemical stains enable accurate diagnoses. Here, we report the use of immunohistochemical stains to distinguish between the adenomatous and the squamous components in 2 patients with low rectal cancer, a 58-year-old man and a 73-year-old woman, who were initially diagnosed using the histopathologic results for a poorly differentiated carcinoma. These data suggest that using these immunohistochemical stains will help to accurately diagnose the type of rectal cancer, especially for poorly differentiated carcinomas, and will provide important information to determine the proper treatment for the patient. PMID:27626026

  2. Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma in a patient with rectal laterally spreading tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, MIN; YIN, LINGDI; YAO, YULING; WANG, LEI; XU, GUIFANG; ZHANG, XIAOQI; LV, YING; SUN, QI; FAN, XIANGSHAN; ZOU, XIAOPING

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma (LELGC) is a rare neoplasm of the stomach that accounts for 1–4% of all gastric cancer cases. It is characterized by the presence of a lymphoid stroma with cells arranged primarily in micro alveolar, thin trabecular and primitive tubular patterns or isolated cells. In the present study, the case of a 50-year-old male patient with LELGC and rectal laterally spreading tumor is presented. Following endoscopic submucosal dissection, a diagnosis of carcinoma was reached and the patient underwent total radical gastrectomy. The postoperative pathological stage was IA T1bN0cM0 according to the Tumor-Node-Metastasis classification of gastric carcinoma, and the patient recovered well. The present case is reported to summarize the endoscopic and pathological characteristics of LELGC. PMID:27073504

  3. Rectal Cancer: Mucinous Carcinoma on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Poor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberholzer, Katja; Menig, Matthias; Kreft, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Junginger, Theodor; Heintz, Achim; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Hoetker, Andreas M.; Hansen, Torsten; Dueber, Christoph; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To assess response of locally advanced rectal carcinoma to chemoradiation with regard to mucinous status and local tumor invasion found at pretherapeutic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients were included in this prospective study of patients with advanced mrT3 and mrT4 carcinomas. Carcinomas were categorized by MRI as mucinous (mucin proportion >50% within the tumor volume), and as nonmucinous. Patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation consisting of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and 5-fluorouracil on Days 1 to 5 and Days 29 to 33. Therapy response was assessed by comparing pretherapeutic MRI with histopathology of surgical specimens (minimum distance between outer tumor edge and circumferential resection margin = CRM, T, and N category). Results: A mucinous carcinoma was found in 21 of 88 patients. Pretherapeutic mrCRM was 0 mm (median) in the mucinous and nonmucinous group. Of the 88 patients, 83 underwent surgery with tumor resection. The ypCRM (mm) at histopathology was significantly lower in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (p {<=} 0.001). Positive resection margins (ypCRM {<=} 1 mm) were found more frequently in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous ones (p {<=} 0.001). Treatment had less effect on local tumor stage in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (for T downsizing, p = 0.012; for N downstaging, p = 0.007). Disease progression was observed only in patients with mucinous carcinomas (n = 5). Conclusion: Mucinous status at pretherapeutic MRI was associated with a noticeably worse response to chemoradiation and should be assessed by MRI in addition to local tumor staging to estimate response to treatment before it is initiated.

  4. Synchronous ipsilateral carcinoma of the accessory mammary gland and primary lymphoma of the breast with subsequent rectal carcinoma: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Akihiro; Kasai, Hide; Koyama, Yoshinori; Koide, Naohiko; Iijima, Akihiro; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kumeda, Shigeyoshi

    2014-01-01

    A case of synchronous carcinoma of the accessory mammary gland and primary breast lymphoma with subsequent rectal carcinoma has not been reported previously. We present a very rare case of primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the left breast diagnosed simultaneously with invasive lobular carcinoma of the left axillary accessory mammary gland and rectal adenocarcinoma. An 82-year-old Japanese woman presented with two palpable masses on the left chest wall. She was given a diagnosis of suspected breast malignant tumor and axillary accessory mammary gland. She underwent excision of the axillary accessory mammary gland and left mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection. Histopathological examination revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the breast and invasive lobular carcinoma of the axillary accessory mammary gland with lymph nodes metastasis. Three months after the surgery, primary rectal adenocarcinoma was also detected by F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Hartmann's operation was performed, since which time the patient has been doing well. PMID:25217973

  5. Incidence and mortality of anastomotic dehiscence requiring reoperation after rectal carcinoma resection.

    PubMed

    Cong, Zhi-jie; Hu, Liang-hao; Xing, Jun-jie; Bian, Zheng-qian; Fu, Chuan-gang; Yu, En-da; Li, Zhao-shen; Zhong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Anastomotic dehiscence (AD) requiring reoperation is the most severe complication following anterior rectal resection. We performed a systematic review on studies that describe AD requiring reoperation and its subsequent mortality after anterior resection for rectal carcinoma. A systematic search was performed on published literature. Data on the definition and rate of AD, the number of ADs requiring reoperation, the mortality caused by AD, and the overall postoperative mortality were pooled and analyzed. A total of 39 studies with 24,232 patients were analyzed. The studies varied in incidence and definition of AD. Systematic review of the data showed that the overall rate of AD was 8.6%, and the rate of AD requiring reoperation was 5.4%. The postoperative mortality caused by AD was 0.4%, and the overall postoperative mortality was 1.3%. We found considerable risk and mortality for AD requiring reoperation, which largely contributed to the overall postoperative mortality. PMID:24670019

  6. Pathologic Assessment of Rectal Carcinoma after Neoadjuvant Radio(chemo)therapy: Prognostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hav, Monirath; Libbrecht, Louis; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Geboes, Karen; Pattyn, Piet; Cuvelier, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radio(chemo)therapy is increasingly used in rectal cancer and induces a number of morphologic changes that affect prognostication after curative surgery, thereby creating new challenges for surgical pathologists, particularly in evaluating morphologic changes and tumour response to preoperative treatment. Surgical pathologists play an important role in determining the many facets of rectal carcinoma patient care after neoadjuvant treatment. These range from proper handling of macroscopic specimens to accurate microscopic evaluation of pathological features associated with patients' prognosis. This review presents the well-established pathological prognostic indicators and discusses challenging features in order to provide both surgical pathologists and treating physicians with a checklist that is useful in a neoadjuvant setting. PMID:26509160

  7. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  8. Evaluation of Rectal Dose During High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, Rajib Lochan; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri; Rao, Ramakrishna; Muralidhar, Kanaparthy R.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2011-01-01

    High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix often results in high doses being delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) such as the rectum and bladder. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine and closely monitor the dose delivered to these OARs. In this study, we measured the dose delivered to the rectum by intracavitary applications and compared this measured dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectal reference point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). To measure the dose, we inserted a miniature (0.1 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber into the rectum of 86 patients undergoing radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. The response of the miniature chamber modified by 3 thin lead marker rings for identification purposes during imaging was also characterized. The difference between the TPS-calculated maximum dose and the measured dose was <5% in 52 patients, 5-10% in 26 patients, and 10-14% in 8 patients. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured dose. Our study indicates that it is possible to measure the rectal dose for cervical carcinoma patients undergoing HDR-ICBT. We also conclude that the dose delivered to the rectum can be reasonably predicted by the TPS-calculated dose.

  9. Focal adhesion kinase: predictor of tumour response and risk factor for recurrence after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha; Fernández-Aceñero, Maria Jesús; Borrero-Palacios, Aurea; Del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Martínez-Useros, Javier; Marín-Arango, Juan Pablo; Caramés, Cristina; Vega-Bravo, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Remírez, María; Cruz-Ramos, Marlid; Manzarbeitia, Félix; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Rectal cancer represents about 30% of colorectal cancers, being around 50% locally advanced at presentation. Chemoradiation (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision is the standard of care for these locally advanced stages. However, it is not free of adverse effects and toxicity and the complete pathologic response rate is between 10% and 30%. This makes it extremely important to define factors that can predict response to this therapy. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression has been correlated with worse prognosis in several tumours and its possible involvement in cancer radio- and chemosensitivity has been suggested; however, its role in rectal cancer has not been analysed yet. To analyse the association of FAK expression with tumour response to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer. This study includes 73 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving standard neoadjuvant CRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Focal adhesion kinase protein levels were immunohistochemically analysed in the pre-treatment biopsies of these patients and correlated with tumour response to CRT and patients survival. Low FAK expression was significantly correlated with local and distant recurrence (P = 0.013). Low FAK expression was found to be a predictive marker of tumour response to neoadjuvant therapy (P = 0.007) and patients whose tumours did not express FAK showed a strong association with lower disease-free survival (P = 0.01). Focal adhesion kinase expression predicts neoadjuvant CRT response in rectal cancer patients and it is a clinically relevant risk factor for local and distant recurrence. PMID:27171907

  10. Obesity: is there an increase in perioperative complications in those undergoing elective colon and rectal resection for carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Blee, Thomas H; Belzer, G Eric; Lambert, Pamela J

    2002-02-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that obese and overweight patients undergoing elective resection for colon and rectal cancer have longer operative times, increased intraoperative blood loss, and more postoperative complications compared with normal-weight individuals. Our study cohorts included all patients undergoing elective first-time colon resection for proven colorectal carcinoma. Patients undergoing resection for recurrent disease or for emergent indications such as obstruction, perforation, or hemorrhage and those who underwent an additional surgical procedure at the time of colon resection were excluded from analysis. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing resection for colorectal carcinoma during a 30-month period. One hundred fifty-three consecutive patients were identified. Body Mass Index was calculated for each patient. Each patient was labeled as normal, overweight, or obese on the basis of World Health Organization criteria. Estimated intraoperative blood loss, duration of surgery, and postoperative complications were recorded for each patient. Comparisons of continuous variables were made using one- or two-way analysis of variance testing. Comparisons of discrete variables were made with chi-square testing. Level of confidence was defined as P < 0.05. Forty-eight normal, 54 overweight, and 51 obese patients were identified. The type of colon resection, age range, and premorbid conditions were well matched between groups. There was no statistical difference in intraoperative blood loss between groups. The operative times were statistically longer in obese and overweight groups compared with the normal group. No statistical differences existed in postoperative complications between groups. We conclude that obese and overweight patients undergoing resection for colorectal carcinoma when compared with normal-weight patients have similar intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications but longer operative times

  11. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for locally recurrent breast carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlen, Johannes; Stern, Josef; Graschew, Georgi; Kaus, Michael R.; Herfarth, Christian

    1995-03-01

    Locally recurrent breast carcinoma and skin metastasisses on the chest wall can be difficult to treat. Conventional treatments like radiation-, chemo- and hormonal therapy have shown poor results in these patients. In comparison to this, PDT has some advantages and less side effects. We can observe a tumor accumulation of a systemic applied photosensitizer (PS). The PS can be stimulated by light of a wavelength of 630 nm and a phototoxic effect in the tumor occurs. We treated 7 patients with locally recurrent breast carcinoma 15 times with PDT. The intravenous application of the PS (Photofrin II, 1.5 mg/kg BW) was done 24 - 96 hours before local laser light radiation. The light source was an Ar-Dye laser with a wavelength of 630 nm. Due to a local tumor necrosis we observed a tumor reduction in each case. In 5 patients we saw a complete local remission with a good cosmetic result. Side effects were rare. All patients suffered from pain in the treated area. No major phototoxicity effects were seen. PDT can induce complete local tumor remissions in patients with cutaneous metastasisses after locally recurrent breast carcinoma. In absence of other metastasisses PDT is possibly a curative treatment. One of the major advantages of this treatment are the rare side effects, rare complications and the possible repetition of the PDT.

  12. Learning curve of endorectal ultrasonography in preoperative staging of rectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LIU, ZUO-LIANG; ZHOU, TONG; LIANG, XIAO-BO; MA, JUN-JIE; ZHANG, GUANG-JUN

    2014-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal carcinoma is essential for optimal treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and learning curve of endorectal ultrasonography (ERUS) in the preoperative staging of rectal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients with rectal carcinoma who underwent preoperative ERUS followed by curative surgery at the Shanxi Province Tumor Hospital between January, 2007 and March, 2010. The patients were divided into three groups, namely A, B and C, depending on whether the examination was performed between January and December, 2007, between January and December, 2008 or between January, 2009 and March, 2010, respectively. Five physicians with no prior experience in ERUS performed the examinations. We compared the ERUS staging with the pathological findings using the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification. The accuracy of ERUS in T and N staging after each additional consecutive 20 patients was calculated for physicians D, E and F. A total of 319 patients underwent ERUS prior to surgery. There were 38 patients in group A, 135 in group B and 146 in group C. Two of the five physicians performed only 47 of the 319 examinations, whereas the remaining 272 patients were examined by physicians D (n=162), E (n=64) and F (n=46). The overall accuracy in assessing the extent of rectal wall invasion (T) was 67%, with 16% of the cases overstaged and 17% understaged and the accuracy in assessing nodal involvement (N) was 66%, with 11% of the cases overstaged and 23% understaged. The total T and N staging accuracy of physicians D, E and F was 75 and 72%; 59 and 59%; and 50 and 52%, respectively. For physicians D, E and F, the accuracy of T and N staging after each additional 20 patients was calculated and the curve of the accuracy reached a plateau after physician D completed 80 cases. Therefore, ERUS is a valuable tool for assessing the depth of tumor invasion and it appears that after ~80 cases a physician may

  13. Learning curve of endorectal ultrasonography in preoperative staging of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuo-Liang; Zhou, Tong; Liang, Xiao-Bo; Ma, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Guang-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal carcinoma is essential for optimal treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and learning curve of endorectal ultrasonography (ERUS) in the preoperative staging of rectal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients with rectal carcinoma who underwent preoperative ERUS followed by curative surgery at the Shanxi Province Tumor Hospital between January, 2007 and March, 2010. The patients were divided into three groups, namely A, B and C, depending on whether the examination was performed between January and December, 2007, between January and December, 2008 or between January, 2009 and March, 2010, respectively. Five physicians with no prior experience in ERUS performed the examinations. We compared the ERUS staging with the pathological findings using the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification. The accuracy of ERUS in T and N staging after each additional consecutive 20 patients was calculated for physicians D, E and F. A total of 319 patients underwent ERUS prior to surgery. There were 38 patients in group A, 135 in group B and 146 in group C. Two of the five physicians performed only 47 of the 319 examinations, whereas the remaining 272 patients were examined by physicians D (n=162), E (n=64) and F (n=46). The overall accuracy in assessing the extent of rectal wall invasion (T) was 67%, with 16% of the cases overstaged and 17% understaged and the accuracy in assessing nodal involvement (N) was 66%, with 11% of the cases overstaged and 23% understaged. The total T and N staging accuracy of physicians D, E and F was 75 and 72%; 59 and 59%; and 50 and 52%, respectively. For physicians D, E and F, the accuracy of T and N staging after each additional 20 patients was calculated and the curve of the accuracy reached a plateau after physician D completed 80 cases. Therefore, ERUS is a valuable tool for assessing the depth of tumor invasion and it appears that after ~80 cases a physician may

  14. Clinicopathological analysis of recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Zieliński, Tomasz; Antoszewski, Bogusław; Sporny, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm of the eyelids and surrounding structures, usually developing in the area of the lower lid and medial canthus. Invasive forms of BCC are connected with a high risk of recurrence, often due to incomplete excision of these lesions. Aim Clinical and pathological analysis of recurrent BCCs of the eyelids and surrounding structures. Material and methods We present clinical and pathological analysis including immunohistochemical reaction to Ki-67 antigen of 19 patients (11 women, 8 men) operated for recurrent BCCs of the eyelids in 2000–2012. Results In most cases, recurrences were present on the lower lid and in the medial canthus. In 15 patients the histopathological type did not change and in 4 cases it transformed into more invasive forms. The values of Ki-67 index for primary BCCs ranged between 1% and 20%, and for relapsing lesions between 11% and 48%. Conclusions Proper clinical and pathological evaluation to determine the risk of relapse in BCCs of the eyelids and surrounding structures should include the analysis of prognostic factors, in particular location and size, histopathological type and radicalness of surgical treatment of primary BCCs. Clinical and pathological analysis of patients with recurrent BCC of the eyelids and surrounding structures should be combined with the evaluation of proliferation index Ki-67, which is essential for prognosis and choice of the appropriate therapeutic method. PMID:26985178

  15. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  16. Oxaliplatin Plus Dual Inhibition of Thymidilate Synthase During Preoperative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Carcinoma: Long-Term Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella; Scott, Nigel; Marone, Pietro; Aloi, Luigi; Sandomenico, Claudia; Lastoria, Secondo; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo Rosario; Scala, Dario; Iodice, Giovanni; Budillon, Alfredo; Comella, Pasquale

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of oxaliplatin (OXA) plus dual inhibition of thymidilate synthase during preoperative pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in patients with poor prognosis for rectal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Sixty-three patients with the following characteristics, a clinical (c) stage T4, cN1-2, or cT3N0 of {<=}5 cm from the anal verge and/or with a circumferential resection margin (CRM) of {<=}5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging), received three biweekly courses of chemotherapy with OXA, 100 mg/m{sup 2}; raltitrexed (RTX), 2.5 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), 900 mg/m{sup 2} (31 patients) or 800 mg/m{sup 2} (32 patients); levo-folinic acid (LFA), 250 mg/m{sup 2} on day 2, during pelvic RT (45 Gy). Pathologic response was defined as complete pathological response (ypCR), major (tumor regression grade(TRG) 2 to 3, with ypCRM-ve and ypN-ve) or minor or no response (TRG4 to -5, or ypCRM+ve, or ypN+ve). Adjuvant 5-FU/LFA regimen was given in cases of cT4, ypN+ve, or ypCRM+ve. Results: Overall, neutropenia (40%) and diarrhea (13%) were the most common grade {>=}3 toxicities, and tolerability was better with a 5-FU dose reduction. No significant difference in pathologic response was seen according 5-FU dosage: overall, a ypCR was obtained in 24 (39%) patients, and a major response in 20 (32%) patients. The 5-year probability of freedom from recurrence was 80% (95% confidence interval, 68%-92%); it was 56% for the minor/no response group, while it was around 90% for both the ypCR and the major response group. Conclusions: OXA, RTX, and 5-FU/LFA administered during pelvic RT produced promising early and long-term results in rectal carcinoma patients with poor prognosis. The postoperative treatment strategy applied in our study supports the risk-adapted approach in postoperative management.

  17. Endoluminal loco-regional resection by TEM after R1 endoscopic removal or recurrence of rectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Quaresima, Silvia; Balla, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo; Bruzzone, Paolo; Ursi, Pietro; Lezoche, Emanuele; Paganini, Alessandro M

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endoluminal loco-regional resection (ELRR) by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) after R1 endoscopic resection or local recurrence of early rectal cancer after operative endoscopy. Material and methods Twenty patients with early rectal cancer were enrolled, including patients with incomplete endoscopic resection, or complete endoscopic resection of a tumor with unfavorable prognostic factors (group A, ten patients), and local recurrence after endoscopic removal (group B, ten patients). At admission, histology after endoscopic polypectomy was: TisR1(4), T1R0G3(1), T1R1(5) in group A, and TisR0(8), T1R0(2) in group B. All patients underwent ELRR by TEM with nucleotide-guided mesorectal excision (NGME). Results Mean operative time was 150 minutes. Complications occurred in two patients (10%). Definitive histology was: moderate dysplasia(4), pT0N0(3), pTisN0(5), pT1N0(6), pT2N0(2). Mean number of lymph-nodes was 3.1. Mean follow-up was 79.5 months. All patients are alive and disease-free. Conclusions ELRR by TEM after R1 endoscopic resection of early rectal cancer or for local recurrence after operative endoscopy is safe and effective. It may be considered as a diagnostic procedure, as well as a curative treatment option, instead of a more invasive TME. PMID:26882538

  18. [Rectal mucosa metastasis in recurrent prostate cancer : (68)Ga-PSMA-PET/CT allows targeted salvage radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Düwel, C; Blümel, C; Westenfelder, K; Wagner-Thiessen, E; Becker, A; Gschwend, J E; Eiber, M; Maurer, T

    2016-08-01

    This article presents for the first time a case of rectal mucosa metastasis of recurrent prostate cancer that was diagnosed with (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT. After histological confirmation, the patient was treated with salvage radiotherapy. This case report underlines the specificity and efficacy of PSMA-based PET imaging. In case of biochemical relapse, it can be used even at low PSA levels to detect prostate cancer metastases that might also be in atypical locations. Thus, (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT may allow new options for salvage therapy. PMID:27385310

  19. [A case of surgical approach to the recurrence of the para-aortic lymph nodes after resection of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Hiroki; Ota, Hirofumi; Fujie, Yujirou; Shimizu, Kaori; Ogino, Takayuki; Toyoda, Yasuhiro; Yoshioka, Akiko; Yoshioka, Setsuko; Hojou, Shigeyuki; Endo, Wakio; Kakutani, Aki; Maeura, Yoshiichi

    2009-11-01

    A 63-year-old female diagnosed as rectal cancer underwent low anterior resection and received adjuvant chemotherapy (folinate/tegafur/uracil therapy). After 6 months, lymph node metastasis was confirmed by an elevation of the tumor marker (CEA) and a FDG-PET image. After administration of 37 courses of mFOLFOX6 therapy, surgical excision was performed to the lymph node recurrence, because it was difficult to continue mFOLFOX6 therapy with grade 3 neuropathy. After 8 months from the last operation, no lymph node metastasis was appeared in the para-aortic area. PMID:20037371

  20. Recurrent sebaceous carcinoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Yong-Baek; Park, Jun-Won; Oh, Won-Seok; Kim, Eun-Ok; Lim, Byoung-Yong; Kim, Dae-Yong

    2010-07-01

    A 1.5-year-old intact male African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was presented with a firm, non-movable subcutaneous mass on ventral chest area. Microscopically, the tumor was un-encapsulated, invasive up to the muscle layer, and composed of highly pleomorphic polygonal cells arranged in variably-sized lobules. The neoplastic cells had abundant cytoplasm with vacuolation and a large pleomorphic nucleus with prominent nucleoli. Mitotic figures were frequently observed with atypical mitoses. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were strongly positive for cytokeratin, but negative for vimentin. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of sebaceous carcinoma was made. Three months after the surgery, a recurrent mass was found at the surgical site. On necropsy, the mass has penetrated the underlying intercostal musculature, without metastasis to distant organs. This is the first report of a sebaceous carcinoma in an African hedgehog. PMID:20215722

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Jen, Yee-Min; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Chang, Li-Ping; Chen, Chang-Ming; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  2. Rare Presentation of Gastroesophageal Carcinoma with Rectal Metastasis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Karki, Niraj; Sapkota, Binita; Niazi, Masooma; Remy, Prospere

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal cancers, previously considered rare, are rapidly increasing worldwide. We present here a unique case of gastroesophageal carcinoma with metastasis to the rectum. CASE REPORT A 60-year-old female patient presented with constipation, bloating, and weight loss of 4-month duration. She had undergone sleeve gastrectomy 6 years before. Endoscopies performed revealed a friable-looking mucosa in the lower esophagus and a polypoid rectal mass. Histopathological examination from both the esophageal and rectal lesions revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemistry stain from both specimens was positive for CK7 supporting the gastric site primary with metastasis to the rectum. Further evaluation also revealed metastasis to bone and malignant pleural effusion. Chemotherapy with palliative intent was initiated. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal metastasis is commonly seen from cancers of the breast, stomach, melanoma, kidney, prostate, and ovaries. However, colorectal metastasis from gastroesophageal cancer has never been reported in the medical literature. Diagnosis relies on histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor. Treatment depends on the tumor stage. Tumors with widespread metastatic disease are candidates for palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27558656

  3. Could preoperative short-course radiotherapy be the treatment of choice for localized advanced rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Ciria, Juan Pablo; Eguiguren, Mikel; Cafiero, Sergio; Uranga, Intza; Diaz de Cerio, Ivan; Querejeta, Arrate; Urraca, Jose Maria; Minguez, Julian; Guimon, Elena; Puertolas, Jose Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in northern Europe for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, but its role in the era of advanced imaging techniques is uncertain. Here, we reviewed articles and abstracts on SCRT published from 1974 through 2013 with the goal of identifying patients who might be best suited for short-course RT. We included relevant articles comparing surgery with or without preoperative radiation published before and after the advent of total mesorectal excision. We also analyzed two randomized trials directly comparing short-course RT with conventionally fractionated chemoradiation (the Polish Colorectal Study Group and the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group) that compared short-course RT with conventional chemoradiotherapy. We conclude from our review that short-course RT can be generally applied for operable rectal cancer and produces high rates of pelvic control with acceptable toxicity; it reduces local recurrence rates but does not increase overall survival. SCRT seems to be best used for tumors considered "low risk," i.e., those that are >5 cm from the anal margin, without circumferential margin involvement, and involvement of fewer than 4 lymph nodes. Whether sequential chemotherapy can further improve outcomes remains to be seen, as does the best time for surgery (immediately or 6-8 weeks after RT). We further recommend that selection of patients for short-course RT should be based on findings from magnetic resonance imaging or transrectal ultrasonography. PMID:25535578

  4. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With High Risk Primary or Recurrent Gynecologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Cervical Carcinoma; Ovarian Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Vulvar Carcinoma; Uterine Corpus Cancer; Vulvar Carcinoma; Peritoneal Neoplasms

  5. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  6. Clonal Origin of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Recurrence After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenglu; Gong, Weihua; Shou, Dawei; Zhang, Luzhou; Gu, Xiangqian; Wang, Yuliang; Teng, Dahong; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to determine whether patterns of tumor clonal origin in pluri-nodular hepatocellular carcinoma (PNHC) could serve as an indicator of tumor recurrence following liver transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Tumor tissue samples from 60 PNHC patients who underwent liver transplantation were examined. The diagnosis of patients conformed to the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) standards for pluri-nodular hepatocellular carcinoma. We performed loss of heterozygosity tests at multiple microsatellite sites to determine the clonal origins of the tumors. Clinical information, pathological data, preoperative serum alpha-feto protein (AFP) and postoperative follow-ups were obtained and correlations between the clonal origin of the tumor, tumor-free survival, pathological characteristics, and AFP levels in serum were studied. RESULTS A total of 165 tumor nodules were collected. Tumor clonal origins were identified as intrahepatic metastasis (IM; 41.67%), multicentric occurrence (MO; 55%) or unidentified (3.33%). Three-year tumor-free survival for the IM group was 48% compared to 75.76% in the MO group (p<0.05), while the occurrence of microscopic tumor thrombus was 100% and 3.03% (p<0.05) for these groups, respectively. The degree of tumor differentiation was 80% for the IM group and 18.18% for the MO group (p<0.05), while the mean AFP concentration for these groups was 226.80 μg/L (2.78-3000 μg/L) and 24.59 μg/L (1.16-531. 30 μg/L; p<0.05), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Clonal origin patterns can serve as important indicators to predict the recurrence of PNHC following liver transplantation. Taken together with pathological characteristics and preoperative serum AFP levels, the risk of recurrence can be established in advance. PMID:27487734

  7. Role of hepatectomy for recurrent or initially unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Yoji; Shimada, Kazuaki; Nara, Satoshi; Esaki, Minoru; Kosuge, Tomoo

    2014-01-01

    As a result of donor shortage and high postoperative morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation, hepatectomy is the most widely applicable and reliable option for curative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Because intrahepatic tumor recurrence is frequent after loco-regional therapy, repeated treatments are advocated provided background liver function is maintained. Among treatments including local ablation and transarterial chemoembolization, hepatectomy provides the best long-term outcomes, but studies comparing hepatectomy with other nonsurgical treatments require careful review for selection bias. In patients with initially unresectable HCC, transarterial chemo-or radio-embolization, and/or systemic chemotherapy can down-stage the tumor and conversion to resectable HCC is achieved in approximately 20% of patients. However, complete response is rare, and salvage hepatectomy is essential to help prolong patients’ survival. To counter the short recurrence-free survival, excellent overall survival is obtained by combining and repeating different treatments. It is important to recognize hepatectomy as a complement, rather than a contraindication, to other nonsurgical treatments in a multidisciplinary approach for patients with HCC, including recurrent or unresectable tumors. PMID:25544870

  8. Management of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Chok, Kenneth Sh

    2015-05-18

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of deaths in patients with hepatitis B or C, and its incidence has increased considerably over the past decade and is still on the rise. Liver transplantation (LT) provides the best chance of cure for patients with HCC and liver cirrhosis. With the implementation of the MELD exception system for patients with HCC waitlisted for LT, the number of recipients of LT is increasing, so is the number of patients who have recurrence of HCC after LT. Treatments for intrahepatic recurrence after transplantation and after other kinds of surgery are more or less the same, but long-term cure of posttransplant recurrence is rarely seen as it is a "systemic" disease. Nonetheless, surgical resection has been shown to be effective in prolonging patient survival despite the technical difficulty in resecting graft livers. Besides surgical resection, different kinds of treatment are also in use, including transarterial chemoembolization, radiofrequency ablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation, and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Targeted therapy and modulation of immunosuppressants are also adopted to treat the deadly disease. PMID:26052403

  9. Intratumoral PV701 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Unresectable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  10. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Recurrence Patterns in Rectal Cancer: The Cranial Border in Hypofractionated Preoperative Radiotherapy Can Be Lowered

    SciTech Connect

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Kusters, Miranda; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Martijn, Hendrik; Beets, Geerard L.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether and where the radiotherapy (RT) clinical target volume (CTV) could be reduced in short-course preoperative treatment of rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Patients treated in the Dutch total mesorectal excision trial, with a local recurrence were analyzed. For 94 (25 who underwent radiation therapy 69 who did not) of 114 patients with a local recurrence, the location of the recurrence was placed in a three-dimensionalthree (3D) model. The data in the 3D model were correlated to the clinical trial data to distinguish a group of patients eligible for CTV reduction. Effects of CTV reduction on dose to the small bowel was tested retrospectively in a dataset of 8 patients with three-field conformal plans and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT). Results: The use of preoperative RT mainly reduces anastomotic, lateral, and perineal recurrences. In patients without primary nodal involvement, no recurrences were found cranially of the S2-S3 interspace, irrespective of the delivery of RT. In patients without primary nodal involvement and a negative circumferential resection margin (CRM), only one recurrence was found cranial to the S2-S3 interspace. With a cranially reduced CTV to the S2-S3 interspace, over 60% reduction in absolute small bowel exposure at dose levels from 15 to 35 Gy could be achieved with three-field conventional RT, increasing to 80% when IMRT is also added. Conclusions: The cranial border of the CTV can safely be lowered for patients without expected nodal or CRM involvement, yielding a significant reduction of dose to the small bowel. Therefore, a significant reduction of acute and late toxicity can be expected.

  11. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  12. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  13. Diagnosis of Pediatric Nasopharynx Carcinoma after Recurrent Adenoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Güven

    2013-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal soft tissue is most commonly adenoid hypertrophy in children. Although rare, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) does occur in children. Nasal obstruction, serous otitis media, hearing problems, and tinnitus are common signs and symptoms of all nasal diseases. For this reason, the majority of NPC presents with advanced disease at the time of the diagnosis. This paper reported 7-year-old boy who was admitted to the hospital for adenoidectomy. He had recurrent adenoidectomy operation due to nasal obstruction. NPC had been diagnosed suspecting the hard mass in the nasopharynx during the operation. Adenoidectomy is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in ENT practice and NPC is unlikely to be considered in the differential diagnosis. Surgeon should be careful about signs and symptoms that alert suspicion. PMID:24392236

  14. Real-time monitoring of tumor response to preoperative radiochemotherapy for rectal carcinoma by nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Wang, Xingfu; Jiang, Weizhong; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-03-01

    The continuing advancement of nonlinear optical imaging techniques has opened many new windows in biological exploration. In this work, the nonlinear optical microscopy, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), was extended to probe tumor response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal carcinoma. It was found that MPM has the ability of direct visualization of histopathologic changes in rectal carcinoma following preoperative RCT including stromal fibrosis, colloid response and residual tumors. Our results also showed the capability of MPM using the quantitative analyses of images to quantify these changes. This work may provide the groundwork for further exploration into the application of multiphoton-based endoscopy in a clinical setting.

  15. [A patient with recurrent rectal cancer in whom pulmonary metastasis disappeared by FOLFOX 4 therapy].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Minoru; Ono, Seigo; Nakayama, Yoshimi; Nitta, Shingo; Ishiyama, Shun; Shinjou, Kunihiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Ishibiki, Yoshirou; Urao, Masahiko; Kojima, Kuniaki

    2007-11-01

    We performed FOLFOX 4 therapy in a patient with lung metastasis (a 62-year-old woman) after surgery for rectal cancer and observed both normalization of tumor markers and disappearance of the metastasis. Low anterior resection was performed for progressive rectal cancer, and treatment with UFT and folinate was started one month after surgery. However, tumor markers increased after 2 months of treatment and CT scans showed metastases to both lungs. FOLFOX 4 therapy was started, and tumor markers became normal after four courses, while the lung metastases disappeared after 10 courses. The dosage of FOLFOX 4 was reduced after three courses due to neutropenia and diarrhea. This treatment appeared to be effective for the inhibition of lung metastasis associated with colorectal cancer. PMID:18030029

  16. Sunitinib, Cetuximab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  17. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  18. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  19. High dose rate intraluminal irradiation in recurrent endobronchial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Seagren, S.L.; Harrell, J.H.; Horn, R.A.

    1985-12-01

    Palliative therapy for previously irradiated patients with symptomatic recurrent endobronchial malignancy is a difficult problem. We have had the opportunity to treat 20 such patients with high dose rate (50-100 rad/min) endobronchial brachytherapy. Eligible patients had received previous high dose thoracic irradiation (TDF greater than or equal to 90), a performance status of greater than or equal to 50, and symptoms caused by a bronchoscopically defined and implantable lesion. The radiation is produced by a small cobalt-60 source (0.7 Ci) remotely afterloaded by cable control. The source is fed into a 4 mm diameter catheter which is placed with bronchoscopic guidance; it may oscillate if necessary to cover the lesion. A dose of 1,000 rad at 1 cm from the source is delivered. We have performed 22 procedures in 20 patients, four following YAG laser debulking. Most had cough, some with hemoptysis. Eight had dyspnea secondary to obstruction and three had obstructive pneumonitis. In 12, symptoms recurred with a mean time to recurrence of 4.3 months (range 1-9 months). Eighteen patients were followed-up and reexamined via bronchoscope 1-2.5 months following the procedure; two were lost to follow-up. All had at least 50 percent clearance of tumor, and six had complete clearance; most regressions were documented on film or videotape. In six, the palliation was durable. The procedure has been well tolerated with no toxicity. We conclude that palliative endobronchial high dose rate brachytherapy is a useful palliative modality in patients with recurrent endobronchial symptomatic carcinoma.

  20. [A Case of Rectal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma with Metachronous Liver Metastasis Treated with Multimodality Therapy].

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yohei; Shimizu, Hisashi; Naganuma, Atsushi; Aiba, Masaaki; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Tetsushi; Ogawa, Akira; Osamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    A 6 2-year-old woman visited our hospital with a complaint of anal bleeding and was diagnosed with rectal cancer. She underwent low anterior resection and D3 lymphadenectomy. The pathological diagnosis was shown as follows: Ra, Circ, type 2, por1, pSS, ly3, v1, pN2, pStage III b, and KRAS wild type. UFT/UZEL with polysaccharide K(PSK)was initiated as adjuvant chemotherapy after the operation. However, multiple liver metastases were found on CT after 3 courses of UFT/UZEL with PSK, and pathological reexamination revealed that the primary tumor was a neuroendocrine carcinoma. She underwent chemotherapy with CBDCA combined with CPT-11, but bone marrow suppression was observed after 4 courses of the treatment. As second-line chemotherapy, FOLFOX4 plus panitumumab(Pmab)was administered. Although the disease remained stable through 10 courses of FOLFOX4 plus Pmab, Grade 3 peripheral neuropathy was observed. Hence, FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab(Bmab)was administered as third-line chemotherapy. Twenty-eight courses of FOLFIRI plus Bmab were administered, and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization(TACE)was performed during chemotherapy. However, her general condition worsened after the therapies, and she died 2 years 3 months after the initial chemotherapy. PMID:27539046

  1. Management of late radiation-induced rectal injury after treatment of carcinoma of the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Wilson, E.J.; Hope-Stone, H.F.; Mann, C.V.

    1987-06-01

    Sixty-one of 1418 (4.3 per cent) patients treated with radiation for carcinoma of the uterus from 1963 to 1983 had significant radiation-induced complications of the intestine develop which required a surgical opinion considering further management. Ninety-three per cent of these complications involved the rectum. Florid proctitis resolved within two years of onset in 33 per cent of the patients who were managed conservatively while 22 per cent of the patients died of disseminated disease within the same time period. Surgical treatment was eventually necessary in 39 per cent of the patients who were initially treated conservatively for radiation induced proctitis. Rectal excision with coloanal sleeve anastomosis produced a satisfactory result in eight of 11 patients with severe radiation injury involving the rectum. The incidence of radiation-induced and malignant rectovaginal fistula were similar (1 per cent), but disease-induced symptoms tended to occur earlier after primary treatment (a median of eight months) compared with radiation-induced symptoms (a median of 16 months).

  2. Autofluorescence imaging in recurrent oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Martin; Fuss, Juliana; Derman, Mehmet Ali; Kreppel, Matthias; Neugebauer, Jörg; Rothamel, Daniel; Drebber, Uta; Zoeller, Joachim E

    2016-03-01

    The survival of patients with oral cancer is decreased by locoregional recurrence after an initial multimodal treatment. In order to identify lesions in the oral cavity for a possible recurrence, clinical evaluation as well as MRI or CT scanning is advised. The evaluation of mucosa lesions is hampered by changes related to radio- and chemotherapy as well as reconstruction with tissue flaps. Several techniques for easier identification of tissue abnormalities in the oral cavity have been advocated as adjuncts in order to facilitate identification. Especially methods using altered tissue fluorescence have gained much interest during the last decade. The aim of our prospective study was to evaluate fluorescence properties of undiagnosed mucosa lesions with the VELscope device in patients with multimodal treated oral cancer prior to histological confirmation. In total, 41 patients with a history of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) (19 females and 22 males) with undiagnosed mucosa lesions where included in the study. After clinical evaluation, examination and documentation using the VELscope® device were performed. Then, an incisional biopsy was performed. An autofluorescence loss indicating a malignant or dysplastic mucosa condition could be detected in six patients (14.6 %); however, only one OSCC and one SIN revealed a complete autofluorescence loss. In four patients, OSCC was present in lesions with retained autofluorescence. Sensitivity and specificity for the VELscope® examination to identify malignant oral lesions by autofluorescence were 33.3 and 88.6 %, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 33.3 and 88.6 %, respectively. No statistical correlation between gender and lesion appearance versus autofluorescence loss could be detected. In contrast to mucosa lesions in patients with no prior treatment, the autofluorescence evaluation with the VELscope reveals no additional information in our analysis. Accordingly, invasive biopsies

  3. Cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuyo; Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Iizuka, Junpei; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Tomita, Eri; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-03-01

    Although local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy is sometimes reported, cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with hemodialysis who developed cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma accompanied by acquired cystic disease of the kidney in the retroperitoneal space after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy. A cystic tumor of 5.1 cm in diameter occurred in the left retroperitoneal space 15 months after left laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, and enlarged to 7.2 cm in diameter with enhanced mass along the wall of the cyst 36 months after surgery. The cystic tumor was removed and showed local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma on pathological examination. PMID:23909823

  4. MDCT imaging following nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: Protocol optimization and patterns of tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Coquia, Stephanie F; Johnson, Pamela T; Ahmed, Sameer; Fishman, Elliot K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the common and uncommon sites of renal cell carcinoma recurrence throughout the body by examining their appearances on computerized tomography (CT). CT imaging protocols will be discussed. The sites of recurrence have been categorized into 4 groups: chest and mediastinum, abdomen and pelvis, musculoskeletal, and neurological. For each site of recurrence, a representative CT image correlate with discussion is provided. The unique CT appearance of renal cell carcinoma recurrence and how it can be used in lesion detection will be discussed. Renal cell carcinoma recurrences are hypervascular like the primary tumor, which can aid in not only lesion detection but also in some cases, differentiation from other primary tumors. Through CT case review of various sites of recurrence, lesions are shown to be easily seen on arterial phase while sometimes being nearly inconspicuous on venous or delayed phases. Coronal and sagittal reconstructions can also improve diagnostic sensitivity. CT is the most commonly used imaging tool for surveillance of renal cell carcinoma recurrence after nephrectomy. Knowledge of sites of recurrence as well as the utility of arterial phase imaging and multiplanar reconstructions will aid in optimizing detection of disease recurrence. PMID:24349648

  5. A Phase Ib/II Study of BYL719 and Cetuximab in Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (RM HNSCC) Patients Who Are Resistant or Ineligible/Intolerant to Platinum-based Chemotherapy.; Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  6. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  7. [Long-Term Successful Management of Recurrent Rectal Cancer in the Predialysis State with FOLFIRI Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Koike, Naoto; Takeuchi, Toshiaki; Fujii, Takayuki; Ohshima, Yuji; Arita, Seiji; Isaka, Naohide; Shinozaki, Eiji

    2015-11-01

    A 71-year-old man with predialysis terminal renal insufficiency experienced peritoneal dissemination 1.5 years after low anterior resection for advanced rectal cancer. He received FOLFIRI therapy (70% dose); he achieved partial response (PR) under computed tomography and stable disease (SD) was maintained over a long term. Although Grade 3 myelosuppression was occasionally noted, he was treated with FOLFIRI for 2 years without other severe complications and without requiring the initiation of hemodialysis. After the initiation of hemodialysis, FOLFIRI treatment was continued for 1 year until progressive disease (PD). He received mFOLFOX6 as second-line therapy for 6 months, followed by LV-5-FU and a molecular targeting agent. These treatments prolonged his survival for 1 year and 8 months. FOLFIRI can be administered as an effective first-line therapy even for patients with predialysis terminal renal impairment without major renal damage. FOLFOX and molecular targeting agents should be made available and prolonged survival can be expected for advanced colorectal cancer patients with terminal renal disease after the initiation of hemodialysis. PMID:26602405

  8. Embolization for Treatment of Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Secondary to Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kobak, Jeff; Gandras, Eric J. Fleury, Linwald; Macura, Jerzy; Shams, Joseph

    2006-12-15

    Massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to metastatic renal cell carcinoma involving the jejunum is rare but has been previously described in the medical literature. Treatment options for metastatic renal cell carcinoma are limited, but transcatheter arterial embolization can be performed to control gastrointestinal hemorrhage either alone or prior to surgical resection. We describe a case of successful transcatheter arterial embolization for control of massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma invading the jejunum and review the literature. Arteriography provided both the diagnosis of recurrent disease and the means of therapy.

  9. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  10. Clinical analysis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after living-donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Gun Hyung; Hong, Tae Ho; You, Young Kyoung; Kim, Dong Goo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluated patterns and outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). METHODS: From 2001 to 2014, 293 patients underwent LDLT for HCC at our transplant center. We retrospectively reviewed 54 (18.4%) patients with HCC recurrence after LDLT. We evaluated patterns and outcomes of HCC recurrence after LDLT, with particular attention to the Milan criteria at transplantation, treatments for HCC-recurrent patients, and factors related to survival after HCC recurrence. Furthermore, we evaluated the efficacy of combination treatment of sorafenib and an mTOR inhibitor. RESULTS: The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates after HCC recurrence were 41.1%, 20.5%, and 15.4%, respectively. The median time interval between LDLT and HCC recurrence was 6.5 mo. Although recurrence rates according to the Milan criteria at LDLT were significantly different, HCC recurrence patterns and survival rates after HCC recurrence were not significantly different between the two groups. Time to recurrence < 12 mo (P = 0.048), multiple recurrences at HCC recurrence (P = 0.038), and palliative treatment for recurrent tumors (P = 0.003) were significant independent prognostic factors for poor survival after HCC recurrence in a multivariate analysis. The combination treatment of sorafenib and sirolimus showed survival benefits in the palliative treatment group (P = 0.005). CONCLUSION: Curative treatment for recurrent HCC after LDLT is the most important factor in survival rates after HCC recurrence and combination treatments of sorafenib and an mTOR inhibitor could have survival benefits in patients with HCC recurrence after LT in the palliative treatment group. PMID:27433092

  11. Expect the unexpected: Endometriosis mimicking a rectal carcinoma in a post-menopausal lady

    PubMed Central

    Jakhmola, C. K.; Kumar, Ameet; Sunita, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Altered bowels habits along with rectal mass in an elderly would point toward a rectal cancer. We report an unusual case of a post-menopausal lady who presented with these complaints. We had difficulties in establishing a pre-operative diagnosis. With a tentative diagnosis of a rectal cancer/gastrointestinal stromal tumor, she underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection. On histopathology, this turned out to be endometriosis. Bowel endometriosis is an uncommon occurrence. That it occurred in a post-menopausal lady was a very unusual finding. We discuss the case, its management, and the relevant literature. PMID:27073315

  12. An analysis of survival and treatment failure following abdominoperineal and sphincter-saving resection in Dukes' B and C rectal carcinoma. A report of the NSABP clinical trials. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.

    PubMed Central

    Wolmark, N; Fisher, B

    1986-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resections for rectal carcinoma are being performed with decreasing frequency in favor of sphincter-saving resections. It remains, however, to be unequivocally demonstrated that sphincter preservation has not resulted in compromised local disease control, disease-free survival, and survival. Accordingly, it is the specific aim of this endeavor to compare local recurrence, disease-free survival, and survival in patients with Dukes' B and C rectal cancer undergoing curative abdominoperineal resection or sphincter-saving resection. For the purpose of this study, 232 patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and 181 subjected to sphincter-saving resections were available for analysis from an NSABP randomized prospective clinical trial designed to ascertain the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in rectal carcinoma (protocol R-01). The mean time on study was 48 months. Analyses were carried out comparing the two operations according to Dukes' class, the number of positive nodes, and tumor size. The only significant differences in disease-free survival and survival were observed for the cohort characterized by greater than 4 positive nodes and were in favor of patients treated with sphincter-saving resections. A patient undergoing sphincter-saving resection was 0.62 times as likely to sustain a treatment failure as a similar patient undergoing abdominoperineal resection (p = 0.07) and 0.49 times as likely to die (p = 0.02). The inability to demonstrate an attenuated disease-free survival and survival for patients treated with sphincter-saving resection was in spite of an increased incidence of local recurrence (anastomotic and pelvic) observed for the latter operation when compared to abdominoperineal resection (13% vs. 5%). A similar analysis evaluating the length of margins of resection in patients undergoing sphincter-preserving operations indicated that treatment failure and survival were not significantly different in patients whose distal resection

  13. Adjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy After Simultaneous Surgical Resection of Rectal Cancer With Liver Metastases: Analysis of Prognosis and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho Jung; Yu, Chang Sik; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Kang, Byung Woog; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the outcomes of adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after simultaneous surgical resection in rectal cancer patients with liver metastases (LM). Materials and Methods: One hundred and eight patients receiving total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer and surgical resection for LM were reviewed. Forty-eight patients received adjuvant CRT, and 60 were administered CT alone. Recurrence patterns and prognosis were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were compared between the CRT and CT groups. The inverse probability of the treatment-weighted (IPTW) method based on the propensity score was used to adjust for selection bias between the two groups. Results: At a median follow-up period of 47.7 months, 77 (71.3%) patients had developed recurrences. The majority of recurrences (68.8%) occurred in distant organs. By contrast, the local recurrence rate was only 4.7%. Median DFS and OS were not significantly different between the CRT and CT groups. After applying the IPTW method, we observed no significant differences in terms of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.347; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.759-2.392; p = 0.309) and OS (HR, 1.413; CI, 0.752-2.653; p = 0.282). Multivariate analyses showed that unilobar distribution of LM and normal preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level (<6 mg/mL) were significantly associated with longer DFS and OS. Conclusions: The local recurrence rate after simultaneous resection of rectal cancer with LM was relatively low. DFS and OS rates were not different between the adjuvant CRT and CT groups. Adjuvant CRT may have a limited role in this setting. Further prospective randomized studies are required to evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment in these patients.

  14. Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  15. Cytokeratin 20 expression by non-invasive transitional cell carcinomas: potential for distinguishing recurrent from non-recurrent disease.

    PubMed

    Harnden, P; Allam, A; Joyce, A D; Patel, A; Selby, P; Southgate, J

    1995-08-01

    Although approximately 50% of patients with non-invasive (Ta) papillary transitional cell carcinoma show no recurrence of their disease, current histopathological approaches cannot distinguish this sub-group from those patients in whom the disease will recur. In this 5 year retrospective study, we have shown that cytokeratin 20 (CK20) was expressed in 19 of 29 (65.5%) of non-invasive papillary tumours of grades 1 or 2. CK20 expression patterns were predictive of disease non-recurrence in a sub-group of eight patients, representing 51.7% of patients with non-recurrent disease. In normal bladder mucosa, CK20 expression was restricted to the terminally-differentiated superficial cell. In eight CK20-positive tumours which showed no recurrence at 5 years, CK20 expression was either restricted to, or most intense in, the luminal cells of the papillae. This pattern of expression was not seen in any of the 15 tumours from the recurrent group. Disruption of normal CK20 expression was highly significantly correlated with recurrent tumours. These results suggest that changes in the expression of differentiation-associated antigens, such as CK20, may be useful in predicting benign versus malignant behaviour and may, therefore, be useful in defining treatment strategies. PMID:8835265

  16. Selection Criteria for the Radical Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Mansel Leigh; Harris, Dean; Davies, Mark; Lucas, Malcolm; Drew, Peter; Beynon, John

    2011-01-01

    There are over 14,000 newly diagnosed rectal cancers per year in the United Kingdom of which between 50 and 64 percent are locally advanced (T3/T4) at presentation. Pelvic exenterative surgery was first described by Brunschwig in 1948 for advanced cervical cancer, but early series reported high morbidity and mortality. This approach was later applied to advanced primary rectal carcinomas with contemporary series reporting 5-year survival rates between 32 and 66 percent and to recurrent rectal carcinoma with survival rates of 22–42%. The Swansea Pelvic Oncology Group was established in 1999 and is involved in the assessment and management of advanced pelvic malignancies referred both regionally and UK wide. This paper will set out the selection, assessment, preparation, surgery, and outcomes from pelvic exenterative surgery for locally advanced primary rectal carcinomas. PMID:22312517

  17. Treatment for Advanced and Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma: Combined Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Rauh-Hain, J. Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Women with recurrent or advanced endometrial cancer constitute a heterogeneous group of patients. Depending on previous treatment, women with recurrent endometrial cancer may be appropriate candidates for surgery, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, or chemotherapy. Women with advanced stage disease at presentation may also be appropriate candidates for systemic and local therapies. We review the treatment options available to treat recurrent and locally advanced endometrial cancer. Treatment choice depends largely on the localization of disease, the patient’s performance status and previous treatment history, as well the tumor’s hormonal receptor status. Radiation therapy is appropriate for isolated vaginal recurrences in patients with no previous history of radiation therapy. Patients with recurrent low-grade tumors overexpressing estrogen and progesterone receptors may be treated with progestin therapy. Systemic therapy is appropriate for patients with disseminate recurrences or advanced stage disease at presentation, or for those with receptor-negative tumors. We review all these different treatment strategies available to patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. PMID:20660059

  18. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. Metastatic recurrence to a solitary lymph node four years after hepatic lobectomy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Caparelli, Michael L; Roberts, Nathan J; Braverman, Timothy S; Stevens, Robert M; Broun, Edward R; Allamaneni, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a patient that developed recurrent metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to a suprapancreatic lymph node four years after being treated for primary HCC via complete left hepatectomy. Metastatic HCC was proven by pathologic confirmation. The report addresses the role of surgical resection as a treatment modality for recurrent HCC to solitary lymph nodes. The role of biological chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment is also addressed.

  20. Metastatic recurrence to a solitary lymph node four years after hepatic lobectomy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Caparelli, Michael L; Roberts, Nathan J; Braverman, Timothy S; Stevens, Robert M; Broun, Edward R; Allamaneni, Shyam

    2016-08-18

    This report describes a patient that developed recurrent metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to a suprapancreatic lymph node four years after being treated for primary HCC via complete left hepatectomy. Metastatic HCC was proven by pathologic confirmation. The report addresses the role of surgical resection as a treatment modality for recurrent HCC to solitary lymph nodes. The role of biological chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment is also addressed. PMID:27621765

  1. Managements of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de’Angelis, Nicola; Landi, Filippo; Carra, Maria Clotilde; Azoulay, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy (survival) and safety of treatments for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in liver transplantation (LT) patients. METHODS: Literature search was performed on available online databases without a time limit until January 2015. Clinical studies describing survival after HCC recurrence in LT patients were retrieved for a full-text evaluation. A total of 61 studies were selected: 13 case reports, 41 retrospective case series, and 7 retrospective comparative studies. RESULTS: Based on all included studies, the mean HCC recurrence rate was 16% of all LTs for HCC. A total of 1021 LT patients experienced HCC recurrence. The median time from LT to HCC recurrence was 13 mo (range 2-132 mo). The majority of patients (67%) presented with HCC extra-hepatic recurrences, involving lung, bone, adrenal gland, peritoneal lymph nodes, and rarely the brain. Overall survival after HCC recurrence was 12.97 mo. Surgical resection of localized HCC recurrence and Sorafenib for controlling systemic spread of HCC recurrence were associated with the higher survival rates (42 and 18 mo, respectively). However, Sorafenib, especially when combined with mTOR, was frequently associated with severe side effects that required dose reduction or discontinuation CONCLUSION: Management of recurrent HCC in LT patients is challenging and associated with poor prognosis independently of the type of treatment. PMID:26494973

  2. Protrusion of hepatocellular carcinoma is a predictor of early recurrence in hepatectomy patients after spontaneous rupture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Rim; Choi, Gyu-Seong; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Kim, Sung Joo; Joh, Jae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The factors related to early-onset tumor recurrence in patients with spontaneously ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy remain unclear. The aims of the present study were to compare characteristics between early and late recurrence groups in spontaneously ruptured HCC patients who received curative hepatectomy and to identify risk factors for mortality. Methods We selected 19 patients who had been diagnosed with spontaneously ruptured HCC and who were treated with curative liver resection between 1998 and 2013. The 19 patients were divided into 2 groups: the early recurrence group of patients who experienced tumor recurrence within 12 months after hepatectomy, and the late recurrence group of patients who experienced recurrence after 12 months or who did not experience recurrence. Results The median tumor size was 7.4 cm, and there were no cases of postoperative mortality. Patient survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 78.9%, 58.6%, and 58.6%, respectively. The incidence of tumor protrusion in the early recurrence group was higher than that in the late recurrence group (100% vs. 30%, respectively, P = 0.003). There were no statistically significant differences in other factors between the 2 groups. Multivariate analysis showed that greater than 30% protrusion of the tumor was a predictor of patient survival. Conclusion The results from the present study suggests that spontaneously ruptured HCC patients with protrusion should be frequently monitored after hepatectomy in order to achieve early detection of tumor recurrence and improve survival. PMID:27433460

  3. Identification of Predictive Markers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Carcinomas by Proteomic Isotope Coded Protein Label (ICPL) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Croner, Roland S.; Sevim, Müzeyyen; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Jo, Peter; Ghadimi, Michael; Schellerer, Vera; Brunner, Maximillian; Geppert, Carol; Rau, Tilman; Stürzl, Michael; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Matzel, Klaus E.; Hohenberger, Werner; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) is an established procedure in stage union internationale contre le cancer (UICC) II/III rectal carcinomas. Around 53% of the tumours present with good tumor regression after nCRT, and 8%–15% are complete responders. Reliable selection markers would allow the identification of poor or non-responders prior to therapy. Tumor biopsies were harvested from 20 patients with rectal carcinomas, and stored in liquid nitrogen prior to therapy after obtaining patients’ informed consent (Erlangen-No.3784). Patients received standardized nCRT with 5-Fluoruracil (nCRT I) or 5-Fluoruracil ± Oxaliplatin (nCRT II) according to the CAO/ARO/AIO-04 protocol. After surgery, regression grading (Dworak) of the tumors was performed during histopathological examination of the specimens. Tumors were classified as poor (Dworak 1 + 2) or good (Dworak 3 + 4) responders. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) for tumor enrichment was performed on preoperative biopsies. Differences in expressed proteins between poor and good responders to nCRT I and II were identified by proteomic analysis (Isotope Coded Protein Label, ICPL™) and selected markers were validated by immunohistochemistry. Tumors of 10 patients were classified as histopathologically poor (Dworak 1 or 2) and the other 10 tumor samples as histopathologically good (Dworak 3 or 4) responders to nCRT after surgery. Sufficient material in good quality was harvested for ICPL analysis by LCM from all biopsies. We identified 140 differentially regulated proteins regarding the selection criteria and the response to nCRT. Fourteen of these proteins were synchronously up-regulated at least 1.5-fold after nCRT I or nCRT II (e.g., FLNB, TKT, PKM2, SERINB1, IGHG2). Thirty-five proteins showed a complete reciprocal regulation (up or down) after nCRT I or nCRT II and the rest was regulated either according to nCRT I or II. The protein expression of regulated proteins such as PLEC1, TKT, HADHA and TAGLN was

  4. Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in rectal cancer cells is associated with early local recurrence and reduced survival time.

    PubMed

    Shabo, Ivan; Olsson, Hans; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Svanvik, Joar

    2009-10-15

    Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in breast cancer cells is recently shown to be related to early distant recurrence and shortened survival. In this study, 163 patients with rectal cancer, included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial and followed up for a median of 71 months, were examined for the expression of CD163 in the primary tumors. The cancer cells expressed CD163 in the primary tumors in 23% (n = 32) of the patients. In pretreatment biopsies from 101 patients, 10 had CD163-positive cancers and these patients had earlier local recurrence (p < 0.044) and reduced survival time (p < 0.045) compared with those with CD163-negative tumors. When studying surgical specimens from 61 patients randomized to preoperative irradiation (5 x 5 Gy delivered in 1 week), it was found that 31% were CD163 positive whereas the corresponding figure was only 17% for 78 patients who were nonirradiated (p < 0.044), which tentatively may be consistent with X-rays inducing fusion. In CD163-positive tumors there was a reduced apoptotic activity as measured with the Termina deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) technique (p = 0.018). There tended also to be an increased proliferation activity measured as an expression of Ki-67 non significant (NS). It is concluded that primary rectal cancers may express CD-163, and this phenotypic macrophage trait is related to early local recurrence, shorter survival time and reduced apoptosis. Furthermore, the expression of CD163 is more common after irradiation. PMID:19582880

  5. Possible recurrence of keratocyst in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Tarakji, Bassel; Baroudi, Kusai; Hanouneh, Salah; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Naser; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    This review will highlight some current areas of difficulty or controversy in diagnosis and treatment of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) has significant growth capacity and recurrence potential and is occasionally indicative of the NBCCS. The objective of this study is to clarify the causes of the recurrence of OKC in NBCCS. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface, searching for articles relating to the cause of recurrence of keratocyst in NBCCS written in English. This study has described the previous and the current outcomes of the treatment of OKC (recurrent cause). A protocol was then agreed to search for the possible causes of keratocyst recurrence in NBCCS. The general treatment of other manifestation of NBCCS has excluded from this study. Studies describing cohort, case series and miscellaneous clinical reports were retrieved and evaluated from 2010 to 2012. PMID:24966720

  6. Rectal Motion in Patients Receiving Preoperative Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, James D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sampson, Elliott; Bayley, Andrew; Scott, Sandra; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Timothy; Cummings, Bernard; Dinniwell, Robert; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the movement of rectum, mesorectum, and rectal primary during a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer had a planning CT scan with rectal contrast before commencement of preoperative chemoradiation. The scan was repeated during Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of chemoradiation. The rectal primary (gross tumor volume), rectum, mesorectum, and bladder were contoured on all four scans. An in-house biomechanical model-based deformable image registration technique, Morfeus, was used to measure the three-dimensional spatial change in these structures after bony alignment. The required planning target volume margin for this spatial change, after bone alignment, was also calculated. Results: Rectal contrast was found to introduce a systematic error in the position of all organs compared with the noncontrast state. The largest change in structures during radiotherapy was in the anterior and posterior directions for the mesorectum and rectum and in the superior and inferior directions for the gross tumor volume. The planning target volume margins required for internal movement for the mesorectum based on the three scans acquired during treatment are 4 mm right, 5 mm left, 7 mm anterior, and 6 mm posterior. For the rectum, values were 8 mm right, 8 mm left, 8 mm anterior, and 9 mm posterior. The greatest movement of the rectum occurred in the upper third. Conclusions: Contrast is no longer used in CT simulation. Assuming bony alignment, a nonuniform margin of 8 mm anteriorly, 9 mm posteriorly, and 8 mm left and right is recommended.

  7. The influence of neoadjuvant therapy for the prognosis in patients with rectal carcinoma: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Peng, Yu; Wang, Lin-Ang; Wei, Xi; Li, Meng-Xia; Qing, Yi; Xia, Wei; Cheng, Ming; Zi, Dan; Li, Chun-Xue; Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Rectal cancer, defined as a cancerous lesion of the colon distal to the rectosigmoid junction, is the fourth most common cancer cause of death globally. There were 474 patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgery between October 2007 and May 2013 enrolled in our center. Patients were respectively categorized by neoadjuvant therapy. This study aimed to explore the predictive factors that affected the Progression-free survival and overall survival of the patients with rectal cancer. Clinical characteristics of patients were compared with the groups and potential prognostic factors were analyzed by SPSS 19.0. In our study, neoadjuvant therapy increased the anus-retained rate (64.4 vs 53.4 % P = 0.016) and remission rate in the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group (62.6 vs 34.8 %; P = 0.000). The neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy, more operative duration, anus retained and micturition damaged are positive prognostic factors of PFS to patients. Poor differentiation, the tumor of ulcer, invasive, and pT4 stage, contributed the poor factors for PFS of patients (P < 0.05). Additionally, the patients with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy underwent the better prognosis of OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy cannot increase PFS of the patients who accepted neoadjuvant therapy after surgery get pCR, but can improve OS. The anus-retained and neoadjuvant radiotherapy, duration of surgery in rectal cancer have the positive correlation. Micturition damaged and neoadjuvant radiotherapy were positively correlated as well. In conclusion, adjuvant chemotherapy does not improve the PFS of patients with pCR to neoadjuvant therapy, but is good for OS. Further prospective and large population-based clinical studies are needed to establish clinical guidelines for the use of neoadjuvant therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. PMID:26449827

  8. Bortezomib Followed by the Addition of Doxorubicin at Disease Progression in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (Cancer) of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  9. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S.; Dehnad, Homan; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Braunius, Weibel; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured ('volumetric approach') and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The COM model is practical and specific for recurrence assessment. Most

  10. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  11. Recurrent Stage I endometrial carcinoma: results of treatment and prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, L.R.; Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.

    1985-06-01

    Recurrences of clinical Stage I endometrial carcinoma after initial treatment are rare. They are nonetheless a serious complication, uniformly associated with poor outcome. Between 1969-1980, 20 patients with clinical Stage I endometrial carcinoma were treated for recurrent tumor at the time of first relapse. Nonpapillary adenocarcinoma represented 70% of the primary tumors and papillary adenocarcinoma, 30%. The median time to recurrence after completion of primary treatment was 9.5 mo. The vagina was the site of relapse in 65% of patients, the abdomen in 20%, the pelvis in 10% and the lung in 5%. Ninety-five percent of recurrences were treated with curative intent. Complications were seen in three patients, small bowel obstruction (2 pts) and vaginal vault necrosis (1 pt); however, these patients responded effectively to conservative treatment. The review suggests that: (1) Histology and site of relapse are important prognosticators of treatment outcome; (2) Long term survival may be achieved in vaginal recurrences with aggressive local treatment; and (3) There may be a role for multimodality ovarian type treatment in overall management of recurrent papillary adenocarcinoma, a cell type that appears to exhibit a tendency towards extrapelvic spread refractory to definitive loco-regional treatment.

  12. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Meerten, Esther van; Rothbarth, Joost; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de; Burger, Jacobus W.A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  13. Morbidity and Mortality Following Short Course Preoperative Radiotherapy in Rectal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Farshid; Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Samiei, Farhad; Aghili, Mahdi; Haddad, Peiman; Gholami, Somayeh; Nabavi, Mansoureh

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morbidity and mortality in patients with operable stage II and III rectal cancers within one or two months after surgery, who has been treated pre-operatively with short course radiotherapy. Twenty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, consecutively referred to the Cancer Institute of Imam Khomeini Hospital from March 2009 to March 2010, were selected for the study after staging by endorectal ultrasound and CT of abdomen, pelvis, and chest; and if they had inclusion criteria for short course schedule, they were treated with radiotherapy alone at 2500 cGy for 5 sessions, and then they were referred to the surgical service for operation one week later. They were visited there by a surgeon unaware of the research who completed a questionnaire about pre-operative, operative, and post-operative complications. Of 28 patients, 25 patients underwent either APR or LAR surgery with TME. One patient developed transient anal pain grade I and one patient had dysuria grade I; they were improved in subsequent follow-up. Short course schedule can be performed carefully in patients with staged rectal cancer without concerning about serious complications. This shorter treatment schedule is cost-effective and would be more convenient for patients due to fewer trips to the hospital and the main treatment, i.e. operating the patient, will be done with the shortest time the following diagnosis. PMID:26615375

  14. Prognostic Significance of Microvessel Density Determining by Endoglin in Stage II Rectal Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martinovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Drazen; Martinovic, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Background. The role of endoglin in the Dukes B rectal cancer is still unexplored. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of endoglin (CD105) in resected rectal cancer and to evaluate the relationship between microvessels density (MVD), clinicopathological factors, and survival rates. Methods. The study included 95 primary rectal adenocarcinomas, corresponding to 67 adjacent and 73 distant normal mucosa specimens from surgical resection samples. Tumor specimens were paraffin-embedded and immunohistochemical staining for the CD105 endothelial antigen was performed to count CD105-MVD. For exact measurement of the CD105-MVD used a computer-integrated system Alphelys Spot Browser 2 was used. Results. The intratumoral CD105-MVD was significantly higher compared with corresponding adjacent mucosa (P < 0.0001) and distant mucosa specimens (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the CD105-MVD according to patients age, gender, tumor location, grade of differentiation, histological type, depth of tumor invasion, and tumor size. The overall survival rate was significantly higher in the low CD105-MVD group of patients than in the high CD105-MVD group of patients (log-rank test, P = 0.0406). Conclusion. CD105-assessed MVD could help to identify patients with possibility of poor survival in the group of stage II RC. PMID:26089870

  15. Results of radiotherapy in recurrent endometrial carcinoma: A retrospective analysis of 51 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kuten, A.; Grigsby, P.W.; Perez, C.A.; Fineberg, B.; Garcia, D.M.; Simpson, J.R.

    1989-07-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed of 51 patients with locoregional recurrence of endometrial carcinoma, treated by radiotherapy between 1959 and 1986. There were 17 patients (33%) with isolated vaginal recurrence, 12 patients (24%) with vaginal recurrence with pelvic extension, 7 patients (14%) with pelvic recurrence only, and 15 patients (29%) with simultaneous locoregional and distant failure. Eighty percent of the recurrences occurred within 3.5 years from primary treatment; time to relapse was shorter in patients with advanced-stage, high-grade malignancy at original diagnosis. Locoregional control was achieved in 18 patients (35%). Complete tumor regression in the vagina, irrespective of extravaginal pelvic disease status or distant metastasis, occurred in 28 of 34 patients with vaginal involvement (82%). The 5- and 10-year overall actuarial survivals for all patients were 18 and 12.5%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year progression-free survivals of patients with isolated vaginal recurrences were 40% and 29%, respectively; the 5-year progression-free survival of patients with vaginal recurrence with pelvic extension was 20%. There were no survivors beyond 1.5 years among patients with pelvic recurrence (p = 0.02). All patients with simultaneous locoregional and distant failure were dead by 3.5 years. Stage at original diagnosis, time to relapse from primary treatment, histologic pattern, and grade of malignancy were prognosticators of survival. Five patients (10%) developed a total of ten radiation-related sequelae.

  16. Surgical Management of Local Recurrences of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Acar, Ömer; Şanlı, Öner

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection either in the form of radical nephrectomy or in the form of partial nephrectomy represents the mainstay options in the treatment of kidney cancer. In most instances, resecting the tumor bearing kidney or the tumor itself provides durable cancer specific survival rates. However, recurrences may rarely develop in the renal fossa or remnant kidney. Despite its rarity, locally recurrent RCC is a challenging condition in terms of the possible management options and relatively poor prognosis. If technically feasible, wide surgical excision and ensuring negative surgical margins are the most effective treatment options. Repeat surgeries (completion nephrectomy, excision of locally recurrent tumor, or repeat partial nephrectomy) may often be complicated, and perioperative morbidity is a major concern. Open approach has been extensively applied in this context and 5-year cancer specific survival rates have been reported to be around 50%. The roles of minimally invasive surgical options (laparoscopic and robotic approach) and nonsurgical alternatives (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation) have yet to be described. In selected patients, surgical resection may have to be complemented with (neo)adjuvant radiotherapy or medical treatment. PMID:26925458

  17. Surgical Management of Local Recurrences of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Ömer; Şanlı, Öner

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection either in the form of radical nephrectomy or in the form of partial nephrectomy represents the mainstay options in the treatment of kidney cancer. In most instances, resecting the tumor bearing kidney or the tumor itself provides durable cancer specific survival rates. However, recurrences may rarely develop in the renal fossa or remnant kidney. Despite its rarity, locally recurrent RCC is a challenging condition in terms of the possible management options and relatively poor prognosis. If technically feasible, wide surgical excision and ensuring negative surgical margins are the most effective treatment options. Repeat surgeries (completion nephrectomy, excision of locally recurrent tumor, or repeat partial nephrectomy) may often be complicated, and perioperative morbidity is a major concern. Open approach has been extensively applied in this context and 5-year cancer specific survival rates have been reported to be around 50%. The roles of minimally invasive surgical options (laparoscopic and robotic approach) and nonsurgical alternatives (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation) have yet to be described. In selected patients, surgical resection may have to be complemented with (neo)adjuvant radiotherapy or medical treatment. PMID:26925458

  18. Frequency, Risk Factors and Survival Associated with an Intrasubsegmental Recurrence after Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shiina, Shuichiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Kondo, Yuji; Masuzaki, Ryota; Nakagawa, Hayato; Asaoka, Yoshinari; Goto, Tadashi; Otomo, Kuni; Omata, Masao; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Background In the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), hepatic resection has the advantage over radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in terms of systematic removal of a hepatic segment. Methods We enrolled 303 consecutive patients of a single naïve HCC that had been treated by RFA at The University of Tokyo Hospital from 1999 to 2004. Recurrence was categorized as either intra- or extra-subsegmental as according to the Couinaud's segment of the original nodule. To assess the relationship between the subsegments of the original and recurrent nodules, we calculated the kappa coefficient. We assessed the risk factors for intra- and extra-subsegmental recurrence independently using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression. We also assessed the impact of the mode of recurrence on the survival outcome. Results During the follow-up period, 201 patients in our cohort showed tumor recurrence distributed in a total of 340 subsegments. Recurrence was categorized as exclusively intra-subsegmental, exclusively extra-subsegmental, and simultaneously intra- and extra-subsegmental in 40 (20%), 110 (55%), and 51 (25%) patients, respectively. The kappa coefficient was measured at 0.135 (95% CI, 0.079–0.190; P<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that of the tumor size, AFP value and platelet count were all risk factors for both intra- and extra-subsegmental recurrence. Of the patients in whom recurrent HCC was found to be exclusively intra-subsegmental, extra-subsegmental, and simultaneously intra- and extra-subsegmental, 37 (92.5%), 99 (90.8%) and 42 (82.3%), respectively, were treated using RFA. The survival outcomes after recurrence were similar between patients with an exclusively intra- or extra-subsegmental recurrence. Conclusions The effectiveness of systematic subsegmentectomy may be limited in the patients with both HCC and chronic liver disease who frequently undergo multi-focal tumor recurrence. PMID:23593129

  19. Noninvasive Fibrosis Marker Can Predict Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun Ah; Kim, Jeong-Han; Hwang, Young; Choi, Hong Seok; Ko, Soon Young; Choe, Won Hyeok; Kwon, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Tumor recurrence after curative therapy is common for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As fibrosis and chronic inflammation contribute to the progression of HCC, we aimed to identify the predictive value of inflammatory and fibrosis markers for HCC recurrence after curative therapy using radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with HCC treated with RFA between October 2005 and September 2013. The median duration of follow-up was 40 months (4–95 months). Inflammatory and fibrosis markers and demographic and clinical data were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards model using univariate and multivariate analyses and longitudinal analysis. Results: A total of 98 patients were included for analysis. There were 54 cases of HCC recurrence (55.1%). The aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI; 2.3 ± 1.8 vs. 1.3 ± 1.4, P = 0.018) was significantly higher in the recurrence group than in the recurrence-free group. In multivariate analysis, APRI (hazard ratio, 2.64; confidence interval, 1.488–4.714; P = 0.001) was an independent risk factor for tumor recurrence. In particular, patients with APRI >1.38 showed a higher recurrence rate than patients with APRI ≤1.38 (P < 0.001). Longitudinal analysis showed persistently higher APRI values when assessed 12 months after RFA in patients who developed recurrence during follow-up than those who remained recurrence-free. Conclusions: These findings show that a high APRI value is associated with HCC recurrence after RFA. Therefore, APRI could play an important role in predicting HCC recurrence after RFA. PMID:26831608

  20. [Efficacy of Sorafenib for Extrahepatic Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Liver Resection].

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Hideki; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Kakisaka, Tatsuhiko; Orimo, Tatsuya; Wakayama, Kenji; Shimada, Shingo; Tsuruga, Yosuke; Kamachi, Hirofumi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2015-11-01

    Sorafenib is the first molecularly targeted drug recommended as a treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Herein, we report the efficacy of sorafenib for extrahepatic recurrence of HCC. From September 2004 to March 2015, 47 patients who were diagnosed with recurrent HCC after liver resection were treated with sorafenib. The overall response rate was 17.5% (complete response: CR 1, partial response: PR 6, stable disease: SD 17, progressive disease: PD 13, SD beyond PD 3), and the disease control rate was 67.5%. The median time to disease progression, including extrahepatic recurrence, was significantly better than in the group with only intrahepatic metastasis (p=0.034). Therefore, sorafenib might be an effective treatment for extrahepatic recurrence of HCC. PMID:26805075

  1. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  2. Predictive Factor of Local Recurrence after Balloon-Occluded TACE with Miriplatin (MPT) in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Abe, Satoshi; Inoue, Ryousuke; Sugano, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Yuhsuke; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Nemoto, Takeo; Takeda, Keiko; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Miriplatin (MPT) is a novel platinum complex used in TACE that shows promise for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, rapid washout has been reported in some cases. Therefore, various methods of administration with MPT have been attempted to increase its therapeutic efficacy. One hopeful method is balloon-occluded TACE (B-TACE), but the therapeutic efficacy of B-TACE with MPT has not been evaluated. Aim To investigate the treatment outcomes and factors involved in local recurrence after B-TACE with MPT in HCC. Methods This study included 51 patients (55 nodules) with HCC lesions equal or less than 5 cm in diameter who underwent B-TACE with MPT between January 2012 and June 2013. Local recurrence after B-TACE with MPT and factors associated with local recurrence were evaluated. Results The overall local recurrence rate was 11.1% at 6 months and 26.2% at 12 months. The local recurrence rate did differ significantly depending on CT values immediately after B-TACE with MPT. Multivariate analysis also showed that the CT value after B-TACE with MPT was the only factor related to local recurrence after B-TACE. Conclusions B-TACE with MPT achieves relatively good local control of HCC. The plain CT value immediately after B-TACE with MPT is a predictive factor for local recurrence. In patients with unsatisfactory CT values, locoregional therapy or additional treatment is required. PMID:25047920

  3. Genome-wide identification of differential methylation between primary and recurrent hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chenghua; Lu, Zheming; Yang, Liu; Gao, Yanhong; Liu, Wei; Gu, Liankun; Yang, Chen; Wilson, James; Zhang, Zhiqian; Xing, Baocai; Deng, Dajun; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2016-07-01

    A biomarker capable of clinically predicting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence has not previously been established. Here genome-wide differential methylation between primary and recurrent HCC cell lines (Hep-11 and Hep-12) from the same patient was characterized. The HCC samples from two independent cohorts, complete with follow-up data, were used to validate the feasibility of the selected methylation biomarkers in predicting HCC prognosis. A methylation array assay identified 30 candidate genes or intergenic-fragments with an absolute methylation fold-change >2.0 between these cell lines; 22 candidates were hypomethylated in Hep-12 cells relative to Hep-11 cells. Bisulfite sequencing confirmed these results. Most importantly, classification of tumors by LINE-2 methylation level was significantly associated with HCC recurrence in both cohorts (P < 0.02). Similarly, MAD1L1 and LINC00682 methylation levels also correlated with HCC recurrence. Survival analysis showed that a combined baseline LINE-2, MAD1L1, and LINC00682 methylation signature was significantly associated with short recurrence-free survival in patients from both cohorts. A synergic effect was observed between these markers on both recurrence-free survival (P < 0.010) and overall survival (P < 0.040). In conclusion, low levels of LINE-2, MAD1L1, and LINC00682 methylation were associated with recurrence and decreased overall survival in HCC patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26138747

  4. PARP Inhibitors for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma: Current Treatment Options and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J.; Braicu, E. I.; Chekerov, R.

    2016-01-01

    More than simply a promising management option, PARP inhibitors can be regarded as a milestone in the development of personalised treatment of recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Their mechanism of action, known as “synthetic lethality”, is dependent on functional differences of the DNA repair mechanisms of healthy cells and tumour cells; cells that repair DNA damage less efficiently are particularly sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Olaparib, licensed for use this year, is the best-studied PARP inhibitor used for treatment of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSC). The efficacy of PARP inhibitors appears to be increased when used in combination with other treatments. PMID:26941449

  5. Durable control of locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma using stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, Jillian; Breau, Rodney H; Scheida, Nicola; Malone, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is generally poorly responsive to conventional radiation doses, and patients with inoperable local recurrence have limited therapeutic options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an increasingly available technology that allows delivery of a radiation schedule providing doses far more biologically effective against cancer cells than conventional radiotherapy. We present a case where durable disease control was achieved using SBRT in a patient with inoperable locally recurrent RCC who presented 18 years from original nephrectomy. The patient remains asymptomatic with no evidence of active disease 30 months following SBRT. This case highlights the need to reconsider the role of therapies with continuing advances in technology. PMID:25199199

  6. A comparison of the risk factors of intrahepatic recurrence, early recurrencen, and multiple recurrences after resection for single nodular hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyun Joon; Shin, Woo Young; Ahn, Seung-Ik

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Intrahepatic recurrence is one of the most important causes of compromised prognosis after surgical resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This retrospective study was designed to identify and compare the risks of recurrence, early recurrence and multiple recurrences in a single patient population. Methods A series of 92 consecutive patients, who received resection for single nodular HCC at our institute from January 2007 to December 2013, were enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into recurrent and non-recurrent groups; the recurrent group was further divided into subgroups by applying two criteria: early and late recurrence (with a cutoff of 18 months), and single and multiple (≥2) recurrence. The potential risk factors were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. The subgroup analysis was performed to determine the effects of different cut-off values on the analysis. Results 41 recurrences (44.6%) occurred during a mean follow-up of 42.4 months. The Child-Pugh score, and the portal vein invasion were found to be independent risk factors of recurrence, but differentiation was the only independent risk factor of early recurrence. The serum alpha-fetoprotein, tumor size, tumor necrosis, and hemorrhage were found to be the risk factors of multiple recurrences according to the univariate analysis, but lacked significance according to the multivariate analysis. When the cutoffs for early and multiple recurrences were changed to ≤10 months and >3 nodules, respectively, different risk factors were identified. Conclusions Our results implicated that different factors can predict the recurrence, timing, and multiplicity of an HCC recurrence. Further studies should be conducted to prove the complex relationships between tumor burden, invasiveness, and underlying liver cirrhosis for initial tumors, and the timing and multiplicity of recurrent HCC. PMID:26379729

  7. Significance of platelet count and platelet-based models for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qing; Zhang, Jing-Yao; Xu, Xin-Sen; Song, Si-Dong; Qu, Kai; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Yan-Yan; Miao, Run-Chen; Liu, Su-Shun; Dong, Ya-Feng; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effects of platelet count (PLT) and 11 platelet-based indices on postoperative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 172 HCC patients who were treated by partial hepatectomy. Preoperative data, including laboratory biochemical results, were used to calculate the 11 indices included in the analysis. We performed receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine the optimal cut-off values for predicting recurrence. Cumulative rates of HCC recurrence were calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and differences were analyzed by log-rank tests. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of recurrence, early recurrence (within one year after surgery), and late recurrence in HCC. To obtain better prognostic models, PLT-based indices were analyzed separately after being expressed as binary and continuous variables. Two platelet-unrelated, validated HCC prognostic models were included in the analyses as reference indices. Additional analyses were performed after patients were stratified based on hepatitis B virus infection status, cirrhosis, and tumor size to investigate the significance of platelets in different subgroups. RESULTS: In the study cohort, 44.2% (76/172) of patients experienced HCC recurrence, and 50.6% (87/172) died during a median follow-up time of 46 mo. PLT and five of the 11 platelet-related models were significant predisposing factors for recurrence (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that, among the clinical parameters, presence of ascites, PLT ≥ 148 × 109/L, alkaline phosphatase ≥ 116 U/L, and tumor size ≥ 5 cm were independently associated with a higher risk of HCC recurrence (P < 0.05). Independent and significant models included the aspartate aminotransferase/PLT index, fibrosis index based on the four factors, fibro-quotient, aspartate aminotransferase/PLT/γ-glutamyl transpeptidase/alpha-fetoprotein index, and the PLT

  8. Recurrent CDK1 overexpression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, K; Kiwerska, K; Szaumkessel, M; Bodnar, M; Kostrzewska-Poczekaj, M; Marszalek, A; Janiszewska, J; Bartochowska, A; Jackowska, J; Wierzbicka, M; Grenman, R; Szyfter, K; Giefing, M; Jarmuz-Szymczak, M

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we analyzed the expression profile of four genes (CCNA2, CCNB1, CCNB2, and CDK1) in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) cell lines and tumor samples. With the application of microarray platform, we have shown the overexpression of these genes in all analyzed LSCC samples in comparison to non-cancer controls from head and neck region. We have selected CDK1 for further analysis, due to its leading role in cell cycle regulation. It is a member of the Ser/Thr protein kinase family of proven oncogenic properties. The results obtained for CDK1 were further confirmed with the application of reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) technique, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The observed upregulation of CDK1 in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma has encouraged us to analyze for genetic mechanisms that can be responsible this phenomenon. Therefore, with the application of array-CGH, sequencing analysis and two methods for epigenetic regulation analysis (DNA methylation and miRNA expression), we tried to identify such potential mechanisms. Our attempts to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for observed changes failed as we did not observe significant alterations neither in the DNA sequence nor in the gene copy number that could underline CDK1 upregulation. Similarly, the pyrosequencing and miRNA expression analyses did not reveal any differences in methylation level and miRNA expression, respectively; thus, these mechanisms probably do not contribute to elevation of CDK1 expression in LSCC. However, our results suggest that alteration of CDK1 expression on both mRNA and protein level probably appears on the very early step of carcinogenesis. PMID:26912061

  9. Impact of Margin Status on Local Recurrence After Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Stephanie K.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Duggan, Margaret M.; Golshan, Mehra; Pochebit, Stephen; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Bellon, Jennifer R.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the rate of local recurrence according to the margin status for patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated by mastectomy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-five consecutive women who underwent mastectomy with or without radiation therapy for DCIS from 1998 to 2005 were included in this retrospective analysis. Only patients with pure DCIS were eligible; patients with microinvasion were excluded. The primary endpoint was local recurrence, defined as recurrence on the chest wall; regional and distant recurrences were secondary endpoints. Outcomes were analyzed according to margin status (positive, close (≤2 mm), or negative), location of the closest margin (superficial, deep, or both), nuclear grade, necrosis, receptor status, type of mastectomy, and receipt of hormonal therapy. Results: The primary cohort consisted of 142 patients who did not receive postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). For those patients, the median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.6-13.0 years). Twenty-one patients (15%) had a positive margin, and 23 patients (16%) had a close (≤2 mm) margin. The deep margin was close in 14 patients and positive in 6 patients. The superficial margin was close in 13 patients and positive in 19 patients. One patient experienced an isolated invasive chest wall recurrence, and 1 patient had simultaneous chest wall, regional nodal, and distant metastases. The crude rates of chest wall recurrence were 2/142 (1.4%) for all patients, 1/21 (4.8%) for those with positive margins, 1/23 (4.3%) for those with close margins, and 0/98 for patients with negative margins. PMRT was given as part of the initial treatment to 3 patients, 1 of whom had an isolated chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: Mastectomy for pure DCIS resulted in a low rate of local or distant recurrences. Even with positive or close mastectomy margins, the rates of chest wall recurrences were so low that PMRT is likely not warranted.

  10. Predictors of Recurrent Ductal Carcinoma In Situ after Breast-Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Yeon; Kang, Guhyun; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Gwak, Geumhee; Shin, Young-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local recurrence is a major concern in patients who have undergone surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The present study assessed whether the expression levels of hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67, as well as resection margin status, tumor grade, age at diagnosis, and adjuvant hormonal therapy and radiotherapy (RT) are associated with recurrence in women with DCIS. Methods In total, 111 patients with DCIS were included in the present study. The invasive and noninvasive recurrence events were recorded. The clinicopathological features; resection margins; administration of hormonal therapy and RT; expression statuses of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2; Ki-67 expression; and molecular subtypes were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the risk factors for recurrence. Results Recurrence was noted in 27 of 111 cases (24.3%). Involvement of resection margins, low tumor grade, high Ki-67 expression, and RT were independently associated with an increase in the recurrence rate (p<0.05, Pearson chi-square test). The recurrence rate was not significantly associated with patient age; ER, PR, and HER2 statuses; molecular subtype; and hormonal therapy. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that the involvement of resection margins, low tumor grade, high Ki-67 index, and the absence of adjuvant RT were independently associated with increased recurrence in patients with DCIS. Future studies should be conducted in a larger cohort of patients to further improve the identification of patients at high-risk for DCIS recurrence. PMID:27382395

  11. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma as a mixed hepatoblastoma after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dumortier, J; Bizollon, T; Chevallier, M; Ducerf, C; Baulieux, J; Scoazec, J; Trepo, C

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Hepatoblastoma is an exceptional cause of primary malignant liver tumour in the adult.
PATIENT—The case is reported of an adult patient transplanted for alcoholic cirrhosis complicated by multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma in whom a recurrence in the form of a mixed hepatoblastoma invading the whole transplanted liver developed three months after liver transplantation.
METHODS—Complete clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical data were reviewed.
RESULTS—The recurrent tumour invaded the whole liver. The major component was a mixed hepatoblastoma, with an epithelial component expressing cytokeratin and a mesenchymal component expressing vimentin. The tumour also contained a minor hepatocarcinomatous component expressing α fetoprotein. The rapid growth of the tumour prevented any attempt at treatment. Although direct evidence is lacking, the most likely hypothesis to explain the observations is a marked phenotypic change in the initial malignant population at recurrence.
CONCLUSION—This case supports a possible filiation between hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatoblastoma in adults.


Keywords: hepatoblastoma; hepatocellular carcinoma; liver; transplantation PMID:10486376

  12. Curative Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma: Rates and Patterns of Postoperative Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Neda; Margonis, Georgios Antonios; Kim, Yuhree; Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Wang, Tracy S.; Evans, Douglas B.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Poultsides, George A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and patterns of recurrence after curative-intent surgery for ACC. Methods Patients who underwent curative-intent resection for ACC between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 13 academic institutions participating in the United States ACC study group. Patients with metastasis or an R2 margin were excluded. Patterns and rates of recurrence were determined and classified as locoregional and distant recurrence. Results A total of 180 patients with a median age of 52 years (interquartile range 43–61) were identified. Most patients underwent open surgery (n = 111, 64.5 %) and had an R0 resection margin (n = 117, 75.0 %). At last followup, 116 patients (64.4 %) had experienced recurrence (locoregional only, n = 41, 36.3 %; distant only, n = 51, 45.1 %; locoregional and distant, n = 21, 18.6 %). Median time to recurrence was 18.8 months. Several factors were associated with locoregional recurrence, including left-sided ACC location (odds ratio [OR] 2.71, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.06–6.89) and T3/T4 disease (reference T1/T2, OR 3.04, 95 % CI 1.19–7.80) (both p < 0.05). Distant recurrence was associated with larger tumor size (OR 1.11, 95 % CI 1.01–1.24) and T3/T4 disease (reference T1/T2, OR 5.23, 95 % CI 1.70–16.10) (both p < 0.05). Patients with combined locoregional and distant recurrence had worse survival (3- and 5-year survival: 39.5, 19.7 %) versus patients with distant-only (3- and 5-year survival 55.1, 43.3 %) or locoregional-only recurrence (3- and 5-year survival 81.4, 64.1 %) (p = 0.01). Conclusions Nearly two-thirds of patients experienced disease recurrence after resection of ACC. Although a subset of patients experienced recurrence with locoregional disease only, many patients experienced recurrence with distant disease as a component of recurrence and had a poor prognosis. PMID:26282907

  13. Impact of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after liver transplantation in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiang-Qian; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Teng, Da-Hong; Sun, Ji-San; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary neoplasm of the liver and is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Liver transplantation (LT) has become one of the best curative therapeutic options for patients with HCC, although tumor recurrence after LT is a major and unaddressed cause of mortality. Furthermore, the factors that are associated with recurrence are not fully understood, and most previous studies have focused on the biological properties of HCC, such as the number and size of the HCC nodules, the degree of differentiation, the presence of hepatic vascular invasion, elevated serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein, and the tumor stage outside of the Milan criteria. Thus, little attention has been given to factors that are not directly related to HCC (i.e., “non-oncological factors”), which have emerged as predictors of tumor recurrence. This review was performed to assess the effects of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after LT. The identification of these factors may provide new research directions and clinical strategies for the prophylaxis and surveillance of tumor recurrence after LT, which can help reduce recurrence and improve patient survival. PMID:26973413

  14. Squamous-cell carcinoma arising in a non-irradiated child with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Simma, B; Burger, R; Uehlinger, J; Ghelfi, D; Hof, E; Dangel, P; Briner, J; Fanconi, S

    1993-09-01

    We describe a patient with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) associated with human papilloma virus (HPV), who developed a fatal squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. At the age of 1 year he presented with hoarseness, dyspnoea and inspiratory stridor but the diagnosis of RRP was made only 1 year later. At the age of 4 years he was tracheostomized because of upper airway obstruction. In spite of multiple surgical excisions and topic treatment with 5-fluorouracil the papillomata extended to the lung parenchyma. At the age of 16 years he developed a squamous-cell carcinoma of the lung and died 4 months later. Transformation to pulmonary carcinoma is a rare complication in non-irradiated patients with lung papillomatosis. We found only 11 similar cases in the literature. PMID:8223815

  15. [Intravesical Recurrence of Small Cell Carcinoma of the Ureter: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Norichika; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Arai, Hiroki; Honda, Masahito; Yoshida, Kyotaro

    2016-02-01

    A 63-year-old man who presented with asymptomatic gross hematuria was referred to our hospital. Left ureteral tumor (cT3N0M0) was diagnosed and left nephroureterectomy was performed. Pathological examination revealed urothelial carcinoma and small cell carcinoma with local invasion (pT3). The patient was treated with three cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin. Three months after the chemotherapy, cystoscopy showed an intravesical recurrence of the tumor. Transurethral resection was performed and histopathological examination revealed small cell carcinoma (pT1). We recommended a cystectomy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy with etoposide and carboplatin according to the standard care of small cell carcinoma of bladder. However, the patient refused to undergo cystectomy and desired to preserve his bladder. Therefore, after two cycles of chemotherapy with etoposide and carboplatin, transurethral resection was performed to examine the presence of the residual tumor instead of immediate cystectomy. Because of no residual tumor, another two cycles of chemotherapy were added instead of a cystectomy. There is no evidence of recurrence seven months after the chemotherapy. PMID:27018413

  16. Recurrent AAV2-related insertional mutagenesis in human hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nault, Jean-Charles; Datta, Shalini; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Franconi, Andrea; Mallet, Maxime; Couchy, Gabrielle; Letouzé, Eric; Pilati, Camilla; Verret, Benjamin; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Balabaud, Charles; Calderaro, Julien; Laurent, Alexis; Letexier, Mélanie; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Calvo, Fabien; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are liver tumors related to various etiologies, including alcohol intake and infection with hepatitis B (HBV) or C (HCV) virus. Additional risk factors remain to be identified, particularly in patients who develop HCC without cirrhosis. We found clonal integration of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) in 11 of 193 HCCs. These AAV2 integrations occurred in known cancer driver genes, namely CCNA2 (cyclin A2; four cases), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase; one case), CCNE1 (cyclin E1; three cases), TNFSF10 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 10; two cases) and KMT2B (lysine-specific methyltransferase 2B; one case), leading to overexpression of the target genes. Tumors with viral integration mainly developed in non-cirrhotic liver (9 of 11 cases) and without known risk factors (6 of 11 cases), suggesting a pathogenic role for AAV2 in these patients. In conclusion, AAV2 is a DNA virus associated with oncogenic insertional mutagenesis in human HCC. PMID:26301494

  17. Radiotherapy for recurrent small cell carcinoma of the ovary: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Callegaro-Filho, Donato; Burke, Thomas W; Eifel, Patricia J; Ramirez, Pedro T; Euscher, Elizabeth E; Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    •Small cell carcinoma of the ovary is a rare and aggressive malignant tumor.•No effective treatment for recurrent disease has yet been described.•Patients with recurrent disease may respond to salvage surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy or a combination of these modalities. PMID:26076089

  18. [A Case of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Patient Undergoing FOLFOX6 plus Panitumumab Therapy for Unresectable Recurrent Rectal Cancer with a Rapidly Progressive Course].

    PubMed

    Kato, Kuniyuki; Michishita, Yoshihiro; Oyama, Kenichi; Hatano, Yoshiaki; Nozawa, Tatsuru; Ishibashi, Masahisa; Konda, Ryuichiro; Sasaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old male patient began FOLFOX6 plus panitumumab treatment for unresectable recurrent rectal cancer. He developed thrombocytopenia after 2 courses of treatment and therefore a platelet transfusion was performed. The day after transfusion, the patient developed jaundice and hematuria. His lactate dehydrogenase levels had increased and a peripheral blood smear review revealed the presence of schistocytes. Anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies were present, and there was a reduction in ADAMTS13 activity. The patient was diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and treated with a plasma exchange. The day after the plasma exchange, his clinical condition rapidly worsened and he died. Thrombocytopenia due to chemotherapy often appears as myelosuppression. If conditions such as jaundice, indirect bilirubinemia, or hematuria appear during the course of chemotherapy, this condition must be considered as a differential diagnosis. PMID:26809542

  19. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Gastric Remnant Carcinoma and Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma in Qingdao of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuzhen; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Han, Lu; Liu, Song; Luo, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a subset of gastric carcinoma which was defined as EBV associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC). The proportion of EBVaGC in gastric remnant carcinoma (GRC) which occurs in the intact stomach five or more years after gastric surgery for benign disease is significantly higher than that in conventional gastric carcinoma (CGC). The infection of EBV in recurrent gastric carcinoma (RGC) with local anastomotic recurrence is poorly understood. Methods 53 cases of GRC and 58 cases of RGC were analyzed for the presence of EBV, and the variants of EBV Encoded RNAs (EBER), EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) and Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) gene in both groups were investigated. Results Thirteen (24.5%) out of 53 GRC cases and 3 (5.2%) out of 58 RGC cases were identified as EBVaGCs. In 17 paired RGC cases, only one case was classified as EBVaGC in both times specimen. Another one case was identified as EBVaGC in the primary gastroectomy specimen while the recurrent gastric cancer was not. The third EBVaGC in RGC was identified while the primary gastric cancer was not EBVaGC. In GRC and RGC cases, type 1, type F, EB-6m, V-val subtype, del-LMP1 were predominant type or variants, accounting for 10(76.9%) and 2(66.7%), 13(100%) and 3(100%), 13(100%) and 3(100%), 9(69.2%) and 3(100%), 12(92.3%) and 3(100%), respectively. However, Type C was the predominant type in GRC accounting for 9(69.2%) cases while type D was the predominant one accounting for 2(66.7%) cases in RGC. Conclusions The prevalence of EBVaGc in GRC and RGC was significantly different. The distributions of these variants were similar to each other in the two groups which indicated that there were no more aggressive EBV variants in EBVaGC in GRC compared with that in RGC. PMID:26859565

  20. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma with rapid growth after spontaneous regression

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tomoki; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Watanabe, Tadashi; Noda, Masao; Fuji, Nobuaki; Minami, Masahito; Itoh, Yoshito; Okanoue, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    We report an 80-year-old man who presented with sponta- neous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). He complained of sudden right flank pain and low-grade fever. The level of protein induced by vitamin K antagonist (PIVKA)-II was 1137 mAU/mL. A computed tomography scan in November 2000 demonstrated a low-density mass located in liver S4 with marginal enhancement and a cystic mass of 68 mm × 55 mm in liver S6, with slightly high density content and without marginal enhancement. Angiography revealed that the tumor in S4 with a size of 25 mm × 20 mm was a typical hypervascular HCC, and transarterial chemoembolization was performed. However, the tumor in S6 was hypovascular and atypical of HCC, and thus no therapy was given. In December 2000, the cystic mass regressed spontaneously to 57 mm × 44 mm, and aspiration cytology revealed bloody fluid, and the mass was diagnosed cytologically as class I. The tumor in S4 was treated successfully with a 5 mm margin of safety around it. The PIVKA-II level normalized in February 2001. In July 2001, the tumor regressed further but presented with an enhanced area at the posterior margin. In November 2001, the enhanced area extended, and a biopsy revealed well-differentiated HCC, although the previous tumor in S4 disappeared. Angiography demonstrated two tumor stains, one was in S6, which was previously hypovascular, and the other was in S8. Subsequently, the PIVKA-II level started to rise with the doubling time of 2-3 wk, and the tumor grew rapidly despite repeated transarterial embolization with gel foam. In February 2003, the patient died of bleeding into the peritoneal cavity from the tumor that occupied almost the entire right lobe. Considering the acute onset of the symptoms, we speculate that local ischemia possibly due to rapid tumor growth, resulted in intratumoral bleeding and/or hemorrhagic necrosis, and finally spontaneous regression of the initial tumor in S6. PMID:15484326

  1. A recurrent pattern of chromosomal aberrations and immunophenotypic appearance defines anal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Heselmeyer, K.; du Manoir, S.; Blegen, H.; Friberg, B.; Svensson, C.; Schröck, E.; Veldman, T.; Shah, K.; Auer, G.; Ried, T.

    1997-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the anus are rare neoplasias that account for about 3% of large bowel tumours. Infections with human papillomaviruses are frequently detected in these cancers, suggesting that pathogenic pathways in anal carcinomas and in carcinomas of the uterine cervix are similar. Little is known regarding recurrent chromosomal aberrations in this subgroup of squamous cell carcinomas. We have applied comparative genomic hybridization to identify chromosomal gains and losses in 23 cases of anal carcinomas. A non-random copy number increase of chromosomes 17 and 19, and chromosome arm 3q was observed. Consistent losses were mapped to chromosome arms 4p, 11q, 13q and 18q. A majority of the tumours were aneuploid, and most of them showed increased proliferative activity as determined by staining for Ki-67 antigen. p53 expression was low or undetectable, and expression of p21/WAF-1 was increased in most tumours. Sixteen cancers were satisfactorily tested for the presence of HPV by consensus L1-primer polymerase chain reaction; nine were HPV positive, of which eight were positive for HPV 16. Images Figure 2 PMID:9374370

  2. Chemoradiotherapy of Anal Carcinoma: Survival and Recurrence in an Unselected National Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Anne Gry; Guren, Marianne G.; Wanderas, Eva H.; Frykholm, Gunilla; Tveit, Kjell M.; Wilsgaard, Tom; Dahl, Olav; Balteskard, Lise

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results, elucidate whether national guidelines were followed, and identify areas demanding further treatment optimization. Methods and Material: Between July 2000 and June 2007, 328 patients were treated with curatively intended chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal region, according to national treatment guidelines based on tumor stage. Results: Complete response after CRT was obtained in 87% of patients, rising to 93% after salvage surgery. Chemotherapy, elective irradiation of the groin and salvage surgery were performed to a lesser extent in elderly patients, mainly because of frailty and comorbidity. Recurrence occurred in 24% of the patients, resulting in a 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) of 79% and 74%, respectively. Locoregional recurrences dominated, most commonly in the primary tumor site. Recurrence was treated with curative intent in 45% of the cases. The 3- and 5-year overall survival were 79% and 66%, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were 84% and 75%, respectively. The risk of adverse outcome increased significantly with more locally advanced tumors and for male gender in multivariable analyses for RFS and CSS. Conclusions: The treatment results are in accordance with similar cohorts. The primary treatment control rate was high, but there was a significant risk of locoregional recurrence in advanced tumors. The loyalty to national guidelines was broad, although individual adjustments occurred. However, caution to avoid toxicity must not lead to inadequate treatment. Male gender seems to have inferior outcome.

  3. Impact of immunosuppressant therapy on early recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Kim, Yul Hee; Kim, Hyang Sook; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Byung Koo; Kim, Hyeyoung; Choi, Young Rok; Hong, Geun; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The most commonly used immunosuppressant therapy after liver transplantation (LT) is a combination of tacrolimus and steroid. Basiliximab induction has recently been introduced; however, the most appropriate immunosuppression for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients after LT is still debated. Methods Ninety-three LT recipients with HCC who took tacrolimus and steroids as major immunosuppressants were included. Induction with basiliximab was implemented in 43 patients (46.2%). Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) was added to reduce the tacrolimus dosage (n=28, 30.1%). The 1-year tacrolimus exposure level was 7.2 ± 1.3 ng/mL (mean ± SD). Results The 1- and 3-year recurrence rates of HCC were 12.9% and 19.4%, respectively. Tacrolimus exposure, cumulative steroid dosages, and MMF dosages had no impact on HCC recurrence. Induction therapy with basiliximab, high alpha fetoprotein (AFP; >400 ng/mL) and protein induced by vitamin K absence/antagonist-II (PIVKA-II; >100 mAU/mL) levels, and microvascular invasion were significant risk factors for 1-year recurrence (P<0.05). High AFP and PIVKA-II levels, and positive 18fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron-emission tomography findings were significantly associated with 3-year recurrence (P<0.05). Conclusions Induction therapy with basiliximab, a strong immunosuppressant, may have a negative impact with respect to early HCC recurrence (i.e., within 1 year) in high-risk patients. PMID:25032186

  4. Preventive effect of regional radiotherapy with phosphorus-32 glass microspheres in hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Ming; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Ren-Xiang; Peng, You-Yuan; Liu, Ping-Guo; Wu, Guo-Yang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the preventive effects of phosphorus-32 glass microspheres (P32-GMS) in the recurrence of massive hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) after tumor resection. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with massive HCCs received local P32-GMS implantation after liver tumors were removed, while the other 38 patients with massive HCCs were not treated with P32-GMS after hepatectomies. The radioactivity of the blood, urine and liver were examined. The complications, HCC recurrence and overall survival rates in the patients were analyzed. RESULTS: P32-GMS implanted in the liver did not cause systemic absorption of P32. There were no significant differences of postoperative complications between the patients with and without P32-GMS treatment. The short-term (six months and 1 year) and long-term (2, 3 and over 3 years) recurrence rates in patients who received P32-GMS radiotherapy were significantly decreased, and the overall survival rates in this group were significantly improved. CONCLUSION: P32-GMS implantation in the liver can significantly decrease the postoperative recurrence and improve the overall survival in HCCs patients after hepatectomy. This therapy may provide an innovative method in prevention of HCC recurrence after operation. PMID:18203282

  5. [Prediction and preventive strategies for recurrence after surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Jia, H L; Qin, L X

    2016-05-20

    Many advances have been achieved in the clinical and basic studies on metastasis and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) over the past 20 years. The achievements mainly include the following aspects: (1) a group of molecules related to metastasis and recurrence including osteopontin have been identified, and multi-molecular predictive models for metastasis have been established and optimized; (2) it has been found that the imbalance of immune response in tumor microenvironment is important in promoting metastasis and can be used to predict metastasis and recurrence; (3) it has been found and confirmed that interferon can prevent postoperative recurrence, and patients with a lower miR-26a expression level can achieve greater benefits; (4) the breakthroughs in liquid biopsy and immunotherapy bring a promising future for the prediction, prevention, and treatment of HCC metastasis and recurrence. However, these predictive models still need to be validated by multi-center studies, and the effects of adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization and targeted therapy with sorafenib still need further evaluation. PMID:27470884

  6. Pelvic recurrence of stage 1a well-differentiated endometrial carcinoma after 13 years: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Annie; Nguyen, Long; Kalir, Tamara; Chuang, Linus

    2016-01-01

    A great majority of endometrial carcinoma recurrences are observed in high-risk patients and within the first 3 years of treatment. The relapse of endometrial carcinoma occurring more than 10 years after initial treatment has rarely been described. Initially diagnosed and treated for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage 1a, grade 1 adenocarcinoma, our patient presented 13 years later with an isolated pelvic recurrence, demonstrating, to our knowledge, the longest disease-free interval with recurrence in the pelvis reported in literature. After surgical resection, the patient is being considered for enrollment in a clinical trial. Despite favorable prognostic features, it is possible to observe the recurrence of endometrial carcinoma even 5 years after surveillance and remission. Successful salvage therapies are available but may depend upon early diagnosis. PMID:27026780

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Sufang; Lin Shaojun; Tham, Ivan W.K.; Pan Jianji; Lu Jun; Lu, Jiade J.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  8. Genetic landscape of metastatic and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Matthew L.; Goh, Gerald; Chiosea, Simion I.; Bauman, Julie E.; Freilino, Maria L.; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Lin; Diergaarde, Brenda B.; Gooding, William E.; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lifton, Richard P.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recurrence and/or metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and these events pose the greatest threats to long-term survival. We set out to identify genetic alterations that underlie recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. METHODS. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on genomic DNA extracted from fresh-frozen whole blood and patient-matched tumor pairs from 13 HNSCC patients with synchronous lymph node metastases and 10 patients with metachronous recurrent tumors. Mutational concordance within and between tumor pairs was used to analyze the spatiotemporal evolution of HNSCC in individual patients and to identify potential therapeutic targets for functional evaluation. RESULTS. Approximately 86% and 60% of single somatic nucleotide variants (SSNVs) identified in synchronous nodal metastases and metachronous recurrent tumors, respectively, were transmitted from the primary index tumor. Genes that were mutated in more than one metastatic or recurrent tumor, but not in the respective primary tumors, include C17orf104, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 3 (ITPR3), and discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (DDR2). Select DDR2 mutations have been shown to confer enhanced sensitivity to SRC-family kinase (SFK) inhibitors in other malignancies. Similarly, HNSCC cell lines harboring endogenous and engineered DDR2 mutations were more sensitive to the SFK inhibitor dasatinib than those with WT DDR2. CONCLUSION. In this WES study of patient-matched tumor pairs in HNSCC, we found synchronous lymph node metastases to be genetically more similar to their paired index primary tumors than metachronous recurrent tumors. This study outlines a compendium of somatic mutations in primary, metastatic, and/or recurrent HNSCC cancers, with potential implications for precision medicine approaches. FUNDING. National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore

  9. The Characteristics of Recurrent Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma after Radical Nephroureterectomy without Bladder Cuff Excision

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Minyong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate oncological outcomes based on bladder cuff excision (BCE) during radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) for upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) and to provide clinical evidence of tumor recurrence in patients without BCE. Materials and Methods We retrospectively collected data of 372 consecutive patients who underwent RNU at our institution from May 1989 through October 2010. After excluding some data, we reviewed 336 patients for the analysis. Results Of the patients who underwent RNU with BCE (n=279, 83.0%) and without BCE (n=57, 17.0%), patients without BCE had poorer cancer-specific and overall survival rates. Among 57 patients without BCE, 35 (61.4%) experienced tumor recurrence. Recurrence at the remnant ureter resulted in poor oncological outcomes compared to those in patients with bladder recurrence, but better outcomes were observed compared to recurrence at other sites. No significant predictors for tumor recurrence at the remnant ureter were identified. In patients without BCE, pathological T stage [hazard ratio (HR), 5.73] and lymphovascular invasion (HR, 3.65) were independent predictors of cancer-specific survival, whereas age (HR, 1.04), pathological T stage (HR, 5.11), and positive tumor margin (HR, 6.50) were independent predictors of overall survival. Conclusion Patients without BCE had poorer overall and cancer-specific survival after RNU than those with BCE. Most of these patients experienced tumor recurrence at the remnant ureter and other sites. Patients with non-organ confined UTUC after RNU without BCE may be considered for adjuvant chemotherapy with careful follow-up. PMID:25683984

  10. Local excision for selected colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, M A; Goldberg, S M

    1989-07-01

    In summary, local excision is a useful tool in the management of selected colorectal carcinomas. The advent of the fibreoptic colonoscope has revised the concept of local excision when dealing with carcinoma-containing polyps of the colon. The clinician now has the means of locally excising certain carcinomas which would have required laparotomy in the not so distant past. In dealing with carcinoma of the rectum, local excision is not advocated for all rectal carcinomas. In fact, when the previously discussed tumour related factors are considered, local excision should be the ultimate procedure in less than 5% of operations performed for rectal carcinomas. However, when appropriately used, local excision provides a less morbid alternative to more radical procedures without compromising patient survival rates or local recurrence rates. PMID:2692739

  11. Gene expression analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma survival and recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xu; Lamperska, Katarzyna; Golusinski, Paweł; Schork, Nicholas J.; Luczewski, Lukasz; Kolenda, Tomasz; Golusinski, Wojciech; Masternak, Michal M.

    2015-01-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas represent about 90 % of all head and neck cancers, ranking the sixth most common human cancer. Approximately 450,000 of new cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are diagnosed every year. Unfortunately, because of diagnosis at the advanced stages and early metastasis to the lymph nodes, the HNSCC is associated with very high death rate. Identification of signature biomarkers and molecularly targeted therapies could provide more effective and specific cancer treatment, prevent recurrence, and increase survival rate. We used paired tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples to screen with RT² Profiler™ PCR Array Human Cancer PathwayFinderTM. Total of 20 up-regulated genes and two down-regulated genes were screened out. Out of 22 genes, 12 genes were subsequently validated to be significantly altered in the HNSCC; the samples were from all 41 patients. Five year survival and recurrence selected genes that could represent the biomarkers of survival and recurrence of the disease. We believe that comprehensive understanding of the unique genetic characteristics of HNSCC could provide novel diagnostic biomarkers and meet the requirement for molecular-targeted therapy for the HNSCC. PMID:25575813

  12. Gene expression analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma survival and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xu; Lamperska, Katarzyna; Golusinski, Paweł; Schork, Nicholas J; Luczewski, Lukasz; Kolenda, Tomasz; Golusinski, Wojciech; Masternak, Michal M

    2015-01-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas represent about 90 % of all head and neck cancers, ranking the sixth most common human cancer. Approximately 450,000 of new cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are diagnosed every year. Unfortunately, because of diagnosis at the advanced stages and early metastasis to the lymph nodes, the HNSCC is associated with very high death rate. Identification of signature biomarkers and molecularly targeted therapies could provide more effective and specific cancer treatment, prevent recurrence, and increase survival rate. We used paired tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples to screen with RT² Profiler™ PCR Array Human Cancer PathwayFinderTM . Total of 20 up-regulated genes and two down-regulated genes were screened out. Out of 22 genes, 12 genes were subsequently validated to be significantly altered in the HNSCC; the samples were from all 41 patients. Five year survival and recurrence selected genes that could represent the biomarkers of survival and recurrence of the disease. We believe that comprehensive understanding of the unique genetic characteristics of HNSCC could provide novel diagnostic biomarkers and meet the requirement for molecular-targeted therapy for the HNSCC. PMID:25575813

  13. Sialomucins at resection margin and likelihood of recurrence in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Habib, N A; Dawson, P M; Bradfield, J W; Williamson, R C; Wood, C B

    1986-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation of colonic epithelium is accompanied by changes in surface carbohydrate, notably an increased secretion of sialomucins at the expense of the normally predominant sulphomucins. In a multicentre prospective trial the correlation between the presence of sialomucins at the resection margin and the subsequent development of local recurrence was studied in 250 patients who had undergone "curative" resection for colorectal carcinoma with a mean follow up period of 14 months. Nineteen of 70 patients (27.1%) with a sialomucin predominant pattern at either resection margin developed local recurrence compared with 15 of 180 patients (8.3%) with a mixed or sulphomucin predominant pattern (p less than 0.01). Increased sialomucin staining at the resection margins was associated with reduced survival in these patients (p less than 0.01). At a mean of 14 months of follow up 153 patients (85%) were alive in the sulphomucin group and 53 patients (76%) were alive in the sialomucin group. Regression analysis predicted five year survivals of 32.8% and 18.9% for the sulphomucin and sialomucin groups respectively. Abnormal mucus production at the resection margin in patients treated for colorectal carcinoma appears to identify those with a higher risk of local recurrence and reduced survival. PMID:3092899

  14. Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  15. Treatment of Recurrent Bronchial Carcinoma: The Role of High-Dose-Rate Endoluminal Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hauswald, Henrik; Stoiber, Eva; Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Grehn, Christian; Becker, Heinrich D.; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: This study's aim was to assess outcome and toxicity of high-dose-rate endoluminal brachytherapy (HDREB) for recurrent bronchial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From 1987 to 2005, 41 patients were treated with HDREB for symptomatic recurrent bronchial carcinoma. All patients had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 56 Gy (range, 30-70 Gy). The median HDREB dose applied was 15 Gy (range, 5-29 Gy). The median time interval between primary EBRT and reirradiation was 9 months (range, 2-54 months). Results: After a median follow-up of 6.7 months, the 6-, 12-, and 24-month overall survival rates were 58%, 18%, and 7%, respectively. The median overall survival time was 6.7 months. Local remission was achieved in 73% of patients (n = 30). A total of 24% of patients (n = 10) showed no response or progressive disease within 8 weeks after treatment. In 1 patient, treatment response was not documented. The 6-, 12-, and 24-month local control rates were 38%, 17%, and 3%, respectively. The median local progression-free survival time was 4 months (range, 1-23 months). Prognostic factors were a total dose of >=15 Gy of HDREB (p = 0.029) and a Karnofsky performance score of >=80% (p = 0.0012). The cause of death was locoregional progression in 27% of patients (n = 11), distant metastases in 24% of patients (n = 10), fatal hemorrhage in 15% of patients (n = 6), and other causes in 29% of patients (n = 12). None of the patients with locally controlled disease showed grade 3 or 4 late effects. Conclusions: Palliative treatment of symptomatic, locally recurrent bronchial carcinoma with HDREB can effectively relieve symptoms in the majority of patients while causing only few complications. Still, time to progression is short.

  16. Recurrent TERT promoter mutations in urothelial carcinoma and potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kurtis, Boaz; Zhuge, Jian; Ojaimi, Caroline; Ye, Fei; Cai, Dongming; Zhang, David; Fallon, John T; Zhong, Minghao

    2016-04-01

    Increased telomerase activity is associated with almost all types of advanced human cancers with unknown molecular mechanism(s). Two recurrent point mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-the key subunit of telomerase-have recently been identified in melanoma as well as a small sample of bladder cancer cell lines. However, the incidence and clinical-pathological significance of these mutations in urothelial carcinoma have not been well established yet. We collected 86 specimens of urothelial carcinoma including upper and lower urinary tract: high grade and low grade, invasive and noninvasive, and primary and metastatic. We also included some matched benign urothelium and common benign bladder lesions: cystitis, nephrogenic adenoma, and inverted papilloma. In addition, we collected urine samples for urothelial carcinoma workup; blood samples from patients underwent cystectomy with extensive lymphovascular invasion. All specimens were subject to polymerase chain reaction amplification and bidirectional Sanger sequencing for the TERT promoter mutations: C228T and C250T. We found that 64 (74%) of 86 carcinoma samples harbored 1 of the 2 TERT promoter mutations (C228T, n = 54; C250T, n = 10); the incidences were roughly equal regardless of site of origin, histologic grade, and invasive status. All matched benign and benign lesion samples showed wild-type sequence. These TERT promoter mutations are the most common genetic alterations in urothelial carcinoma and are not associated with tumor locations, grade, or invasiveness. Importantly, the feasibility of detecting these mutations in urine samples may provide a novel method to detect urothelial carcinoma in urine. PMID:27040924

  17. Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition After Spontaneous Regression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shi-zhong; Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Wei-sheng; Dong, Jia-hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most malignant cancers and ranks as the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. However, some patients with untreated HCC can experience spontaneous regression, a rare phenomenon that has been observed in various malignancies. Here, we report a unique case with untreated HCC, who first underwent a spontaneous cancer regression after the spontaneous clearing of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection from the liver as evidenced by hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) seroconversion; then developed the recurrent HCC with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) after 14 years. We hypothesized that a strengthened immune system in response to HBV infection may have led to immune-mediated spontaneous cancer regression. The later recurrence of HCC may suggest the host's immune system was no longer able to contain HCC since aging and other chronic diseases may have significantly weakened the immune surveillance. PMID:26181539

  18. Left Lobe Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Lipiodol-TAE via the Left Internal Mammary Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kanetsuki, Ichiro; Hori, Akira; Ohshiro, Kiyoshi; Nishi, Hirokazu; Yasutani, Tadashi; Sueyoshi, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    1997-09-15

    A multinodular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was treated with seven transarterial interventions via the hepatic artery over a 2-year, 5-month period before the eighth angiography showed a recurrent HCC in the anterior portion of the left hepatic lobe. The left internal mammary artery (IMA) was feeding the tumor. This was successfully treated with Lipiodol-transcatheter arterial embolization using a coaxial system via a branch of the left IMA. No complications resulted from the procedure. The left IMA should be considered as a possible feeding artery to an HCC occurring in the anterior portion of the left hepatic lobe.

  19. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Endometrial Adenoacanthoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

  20. Early recognition of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma utilizing gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Jeffers, L.J.; Reddy, K.R.; Heiba, S.; Schiff, E.R.

    1988-05-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is a valuable test together with other screening tests such as alpha feto-protein (AFP) and other imaging modalities in following up recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Three patients were followed in our institution for intervals varying from 2-24 mo after successful resection of uninodular localized hepatomas. In the first patient, gallium scan showed abnormal localized activity while the computed tomography (CT) scan and the magnetic resonance imaging were negative. Liver function tests and AFP were also normal and the patient was operated upon only on the basis of the gallium scan. The second patient had a follow-up gallium scan 2 mo after the first operation that showed an area of increased activity along the inferior aspect of the right lobe. A CT scan done after that showed no evidence of recurrence, but subsequently became positive when repeated 4 mo later. The third patient had abnormal simultaneous gallium scan and CT scan demonstrating a recurrence in the left adrenal gland while both AFP and carcinoembryonic antigen were normal. This has led us to consider every patient a candidate for a baseline and follow-up gallium scan for evaluation for recurrence following HCC.

  1. Hematospermia and Cloacogenic Transitional Cell Carcinoma: A Twist on Significance and Meaning

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, Alex M.; Clement, Jessica M.; Forouhar, Faripour; Taylor, John A.

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old gentleman presented with recurrent hematospermia. Further history revealed recent onset of constipation and difficulty voiding. Rectal examination revealed a firm, polypoid mass and colonoscopy showed suspicious, ulcerated lesions of the rectal mucosa with narrowing of the rectal vault. Pathology demonstrated transitional cell carcinoma of the rectum. While transitional cell carcinoma is a common genitourinary cancer, its presence in the anus and rectum is exceedingly rare. Furthermore, hematospermia is generally not associated with malignancy. This case is a remarkable example of two pathologic processes presenting in rare form and underscores the value of a thorough investigation of hematospermia when associated with other clinical symptoms. PMID:26977332

  2. Case report and review of the literature: Rectal linitis plastica secondary to the lipoid cell variant of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Victor A.; Ott, Michael; Tweedie, Edward J.; Izawa, Jonathan I.

    2012-01-01

    The overall 5-year survival of patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UC) is about 78%; however, there are some rare subtypes. One of these is the lipoid cell subtype, which bears a very poor prognosis. Another rare disease entity with a poor prognosis is metastasis to the lower gastrointestinal tract in the form of secondary linitis plastica of the rectum. We describe an extremely rare and unique case of rectal linitis plastica secondary to the rare lipoid cell variant of UC. PMID:23282659

  3. Prognostic factors and survival in patients with metastatic or recurrent carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Eralp, Y; Saip, P; Sakar, B; Kucucuk, S; Aydiner, A; Dincer, M; Aslay, I; Topuz, E

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the impact of various prognostic factors on survival in patients with recurrent carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Fifty-two patients who were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy for recurrent or metastatic disease were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-seven patients (90%) had received pelvic radiation as primary treatment. Out of 45 evaluable patients, two (4.4%) had complete response (CR), three (6.7%) had a continuous CR after additional surgical treatment and irradiation. Five patients (11.1%) had partial response (PR). The majority of patients had progressive response to treatment (22 patients, 48.9%). After a median follow-up period of 19 months, 31 patients (60%) had died. Progression-free survival after initial diagnosis was observed to have a significant association with response to chemotherapy for recurrent disease (Fisher two-sided P = 0.027). The median survival duration for relapsed disease was 11.8 months. Those with a longer disease-free interval ( 8 months vs. recurrence and response to chemotherapy had a tendency for a longer survival duration after relapse by univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that progressive response to chemotherapy (P = 0.002, HR = 4.6) and recurrence within the previously irradiated field (P = 0.04, HR = 2.7) were significant independent prognostic factors for a shorter time to progression after recurrence. Furthermore, advanced stage at presentation (P = 0.001, HR = 3.0) and a short disease-free interval after primary treatment (<8 months, P = 0.003, HR = 3.4) were determined as independent prognostic factors with a significant negative influence on progression-free survival and overall survival from initial diagnosis, respectively. The use of toxic and expensive combinations for the treatment of recurrent cervical cancer patients should be well balanced against potential hazards. Based on our data, less toxic regimens

  4. Recurrence pattern in patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma: The implications of clinicopathological variables

    PubMed Central

    Sameh, Wael M.; Hashad, Mohammed M.; Eid, Ahmed A.; Abou Yousif, Tamer A.; Atta, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recurrence rates for patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (LARCC) remain high. To date the predictors of recurrence in those patients remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to assess the relapse pattern in those patients and identify predictors for recurrence. Patients and methods We evaluated retrospectively 112 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for LARCC (T3–T4N0M0) between January 2000 and December 2010. Clinical and pathological data were collected from hospital medical records and compiled into a computerized database. Studied variables were age, mode of presentation, Tumour-Node-Metastasis (TNM) stage, Fuhrman nuclear grade, histological subtype, tumour size, venous thrombus level, collecting-system invasion and sarcomatoid differentiation. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results Patients were followed for a mean and median follow-up of 33 and 24 months, respectively, after surgery. During the follow-up, recurrences (distant and/or local) were recorded in 58 patients, representing 52% of the cohort. The mean and median times to recurrence were 25 and 13 months, respectively. Sites of recurrence were multiple in 36 patients (62%), lung only in 14 (24%), and local in eight (14%). RFS rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 50%, 43% and 34%, respectively, while the median RFS was 23.7 months. Using univariate analysis, RFS after nephrectomy was significantly shorter in patients aged <70 years, symptomatic at presentation, with larger tumours, higher nuclear grade, collecting-system invasion, and/or sarcomatoid differentiation. After multivariate analysis, T-stage, nuclear grade and sarcomatoid differentiation retained their power as independent predictors of RFS (P = 0.032, <0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions For patients with LARCC, T-stage, grade and sarcomatoid differentiation independently dictate the

  5. Association between clinical features, treatment, and recurrence rate of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the palate: a 10-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Reza; Aliabadi, Ehsan; Maleki, Mohammad Javad; Barouj, Mehrdad Dehghanpour

    2016-07-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is both invasive and clinically unpredictable, and our aim was to evaluate the factors that affect its recurrence in the palate. We retrospectively studied 38 patients who had ACC of the palate treated surgically, and the outcome measure was recurrence during the mean (SD) followup time of 55 (18) months. Age, sex, T-stage, bony involvement, duration of follow up, histological type, perineural invasion, and surgical margins were all recorded. Results showed no association between recurrence, and age or histopathological types. However, T-stage (p=0.001), sex (p=0.04), and bony and perineural involvement (p=0.01 in each case) were significantly associated with recurrent tumour. Close superior and posterior margins (< 2mm) were also associated with recurrence (p=0.001 in each case). Large tumours with bony and perineural involvement, together with close superior and posterior surgical margins, had a higher risk of recurrence. PMID:27094499

  6. A Case of Orbital Myiasis in Recurrent Eyelid Basal Cell Carcinoma Invasive into the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Triptesh Raj; Shrestha, Gulshan Bahadur; Sitaula, Ranju Kharel; Shah, Dev Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Orbital myiasis is the infestation of the orbital tissues by fly larvae or maggots. Compromise of periorbital tissues by malignant disease, surgery, ischemia, or infection may predispose the patient to orbital myiasis. Case Report. A 73-year-old male patient with neglected recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid invasive into the orbit presented with complaints of intense itching and crawling sensation with maggots wriggling and falling from the wound of left orbit. The patient improved following manual removal of the maggots along with oral Ivermectin treatment. Recurrence of the basal cell carcinoma was confirmed by punch biopsy from the wound and extended exenteration of the orbit followed by reconstructive surgery was done. Conclusion. Orbital myiasis is a rare and preventable ocular morbidity that can complicate the malignancies resulting in widespread tissue destruction. The broad spectrum antiparasitic agent, Ivermectin, can be used as noninvasive means to treat orbital myiasis. In massive orbital myiasis and those associated with malignancies, exenteration of the orbit must be seriously considered. PMID:27595028

  7. A Case of Orbital Myiasis in Recurrent Eyelid Basal Cell Carcinoma Invasive into the Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gulshan Bahadur; (Sitaula), Ranju Kharel; Shah, Dev Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Orbital myiasis is the infestation of the orbital tissues by fly larvae or maggots. Compromise of periorbital tissues by malignant disease, surgery, ischemia, or infection may predispose the patient to orbital myiasis. Case Report. A 73-year-old male patient with neglected recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid invasive into the orbit presented with complaints of intense itching and crawling sensation with maggots wriggling and falling from the wound of left orbit. The patient improved following manual removal of the maggots along with oral Ivermectin treatment. Recurrence of the basal cell carcinoma was confirmed by punch biopsy from the wound and extended exenteration of the orbit followed by reconstructive surgery was done. Conclusion. Orbital myiasis is a rare and preventable ocular morbidity that can complicate the malignancies resulting in widespread tissue destruction. The broad spectrum antiparasitic agent, Ivermectin, can be used as noninvasive means to treat orbital myiasis. In massive orbital myiasis and those associated with malignancies, exenteration of the orbit must be seriously considered. PMID:27595028

  8. Combining Clinical, Pathology, and Gene Expression Data to Predict Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Augusto; Hoshida, Yujin; Battiston, Carlo; Tovar, Victoria; Sia, Daniela; Alsinet, Clara; Cornella, Helena; Liberzon, Arthur; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Kumada, Hiromitsu; Thung, Swan N.; Bruix, Jordi; Newell, Philippa; April, Craig; Fan, Jian-Bing; Roayaie, Sasan; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Schwartz, Myron E.; Llovet, Josep M.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims In approximately 70% of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated by resection or ablation, disease recurs within 5 years. Although gene expression signatures have been associated with outcome, there is no method to predict recurrence based on combined clinical, pathology, and genomic data (from tumor and cirrhotic tissue). We evaluated gene expression signatures associated with outcome in a large cohort of patients with early-stage (BCLC 0/A), single-nodule HCC and heterogeneity of signatures within tumor tissues. Methods We assessed 287 HCC patients undergoing resection and tested genome-wide expression platforms using tumor (n=287) and adjacent non-tumor, cirrhotic tissue (n=226). We evaluated gene expression signatures with reported prognostic ability generated from tumor or cirrhotic tissue in 18 and 4 reports, respectively. In 15 additional patients, we profiled samples from the center and periphery of the tumor, to determine stability of signatures. Data analysis included Cox modeling and random survival forests to identify independent predictors of tumor recurrence. Results Gene expression signatures that were associated with aggressive HCC were clustered, as well as those associated with tumors of progenitor cell origin and those from non-tumor, adjacent, cirrhotic tissues. On multivariate analysis, the tumor-associated signature “G3-proliferation” (hazard ratio [HR]=1.75, P=0.003) and an adjacent “poor-survival” signature (HR=1.74, P=0.004) were independent predictors of HCC recurrence, along with satellites (HR=1.66, P=0.04). Samples from different sites in the same tumor nodule were reproducibly classified. Conclusions We developed a composite prognostic model for HCC recurrence, based on gene expression patterns in tumor and adjacent tissues. These signatures predict early and overall recurrence in patients with HCC, and complement findings from clinical and pathology analyses. PMID:21320499

  9. Human thyreoglobulin (HTG) for the diagnosis of recurrent differentiated thyroid carcinoma: Evaluation by ROC - analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Laubenbacher, C.; Schrafstetter, C.; Senekowitsch, R.

    1995-05-01

    The value of hTg-measurements are still discussed controversially. Also, there are no tables with sensitivity/specificity pairs for different cutoffs, since valuable information is lost by presenting only one sensitivity/specificity pair. Therefore, we wanted to determine these values for hTg by a ROC-analysis. Inclusion criteria were: (a) differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary or follicular), (b) no thyroid-rest after primary therapy (e.g. no detectable hTg and nc iodine accumulating foci in iodine-whole body scan), (c) no detectable hTg- antibodies, (d) an observation period of at least 1 year, hTg was determined by TG-RIA and hTg-antibodies by IMMUtest anti-Tg. Recurrence was proven by iodine-whole-body scans under maximal endogenous TSH-stimulation or by histology. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for different hTg-cutoffs. During 10/80 and 10/89 93 patients met these criteria. There were 71 female and 22 male with a mean age of 48.6 {plus_minus} 16.3 years. 51 patients had papillary carcinomas, 42 patients follicular carcinomas. The observation period was 78.4 {plus_minus} 40.9 months. In these 93 patients there were 16 recurrences during the observation period. Sensitivity/specificity pairs for different cutoffs are given. These sensitivity/specificity pairs avoid the reduction of the original continuous data to a Yes/No decision. The knowledge of these data and of the ROC-curve could improve the intuitive rating of a laboratory result by the physician.

  10. Role of plasma EBV DNA levels in predicting recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a western population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinomas can be cured by the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In Eastern countries, plasma levels of viral Epstein-Barr deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are accurate in predicting recurrence, but few data are available in Western populations. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between viral Epstein-Barr DNA copy numbers in plasma and the response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival in a cohort of Western patients with stage IIb-IVb nasopharyngeal cancer. Methods We evaluated plasma samples from 36 consecutive patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. EBV copy numbers were determined after DNA extraction using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results Circulating Epstein-Barr virus DNA levels were measured before treatment, at the end of concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy, and during the follow-up period. Pre-treatment levels significantly correlated with the initial stage and probability of relapse. Their increase was 100% specific and 71.3% sensitive in detecting loco-regional or metastatic recurrence (an overall accuracy of 94.4%). Three-year progression-free and overall survival were respectively 78.2% and 97.1%. Conclusions The results of this study confirm that patients from a Western country affected by loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma have high plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA levels at diagnosis. The monitoring of plasma levels is sensitive and highly specific in detecting disease recurrence and metastases. PMID:22646734

  11. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, Veliparib, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. Smaller grafts do not imply early recurrence in recipients transplanted for hepatocellular carcinoma: A Chinese experience.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenhua; Zhong, Xun; Zhou, Jie; Xiang, Jie; Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Min; Wu, Jian; Jiang, Wenshi; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Liver graft size has long been a critical issue in adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). We analyzed China Liver Transplant Registry data (January 2007-December 2009), identifying 295 patients who underwent LDLT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The recipients were divided into two groups: A, graft-to-recipient body weight ratio (GRWR) ≤ 0.8% (n = 56); B, GRWR > 0.8% (n = 239). We evaluated donor, recipient, and operative factors and analyzed survival outcome and the risk factors affecting overall and recurrence survival. As a result, the overall survival rates of group B were significantly higher than that of group A (p = 0.009); the corresponding tumor-free survival rates did not differ significantly (p = 0.133). The overall survival rates among the 151 recipients who met the Hangzhou criteria did not differ significantly (p = 0.953), nor did the corresponding tumor-free survival rates (p = 0.893). Multivariate analysis determined that GRWR was a significant risk factor for poor survival but not for early recurrence. In conclusion, small grafts may predict poorer survival outcome but do not indicate earlier HCC recurrence in recipients transplanted for HCC, and survival outcome with smaller grafts is merely acceptable in selected recipients. PMID:27225666

  13. Successful multimodal treatment for aggressive metastatic and recurrent fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Okur, Arzu; Eser, Eylem Pinar; Yilmaz, Güldal; Dalgiç, Aydin; Akdemir, Ümit Özgür; Oğuz, Aynur; Karadeniz, Ceyda; Akyol, Gülen; Demiroğullari, Billur; Boyunağa, Öznur; Pinarli, Faruk Güçlü

    2014-07-01

    Fibrolamellar variant of hepatocellular carcinoma (FLHCC) does not have a favorable prognosis than conventional HCC, and there is no difference regarding the response to chemotherapy and the degree of surgical resectability. FLHCC commonly recurs after complete surgical resection, and there is a high rate of lymph node metastases. Herein, we report a 12-year-old girl with metastatic FLHCC with multiple recurrences aggressively treated with surgery, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic agents. She is in complete remission after 4 years and 2 months after the diagnosis of metastatic FLHCC. The standard treatment of FLHCC is excision of the primary tumor and its metastases. Chemotherapy for FLHCC is controversial, and it has been suggested that cytoreductive chemotherapy was ineffective and adjuvant chemotherapy did not improve survival. Our patient with multiple recurrences was successfully treated with surgery, first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and doxorubicin, second-line chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil/interferon-α combination, and adjuvant antiangiogenic agents like cyclophosphamide and thalidomide. As FLHCC patients have no underlying liver disease, they can tolerate higher doses of chemotherapy compared with conventional HCC patients. We support the use of repeated aggressive surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy, which provided complete remission in our patient with metastatic and recurrent FLHCC. PMID:24608073

  14. Smaller grafts do not imply early recurrence in recipients transplanted for hepatocellular carcinoma: A Chinese experience

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenhua; Zhong, Xun; Zhou, Jie; Xiang, Jie; Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Min; Wu, Jian; Jiang, Wenshi; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Liver graft size has long been a critical issue in adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). We analyzed China Liver Transplant Registry data (January 2007–December 2009), identifying 295 patients who underwent LDLT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The recipients were divided into two groups: A, graft-to-recipient body weight ratio (GRWR) ≤ 0.8% (n = 56); B, GRWR > 0.8% (n = 239). We evaluated donor, recipient, and operative factors and analyzed survival outcome and the risk factors affecting overall and recurrence survival. As a result, the overall survival rates of group B were significantly higher than that of group A (p = 0.009); the corresponding tumor-free survival rates did not differ significantly (p = 0.133). The overall survival rates among the 151 recipients who met the Hangzhou criteria did not differ significantly (p = 0.953), nor did the corresponding tumor-free survival rates (p = 0.893). Multivariate analysis determined that GRWR was a significant risk factor for poor survival but not for early recurrence. In conclusion, small grafts may predict poorer survival outcome but do not indicate earlier HCC recurrence in recipients transplanted for HCC, and survival outcome with smaller grafts is merely acceptable in selected recipients. PMID:27225666

  15. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function.

    PubMed

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-08-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27621572

  16. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27621572

  17. Toward automatic segmentation and quantification of tumor and stroma in whole-slide images of H and E stained rectal carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geessink, Oscar G. F.; Baidoshvili, Alexi; Freling, Gerard; Klaase, Joost M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2015-03-01

    Visual estimation of tumor and stroma proportions in microscopy images yields a strong, Tumor-(lymph)Node- Metastasis (TNM) classification-independent predictor for patient survival in colorectal cancer. Therefore, it is also a potent (contra)indicator for adjuvant chemotherapy. However, quantification of tumor and stroma through visual estimation is highly subject to intra- and inter-observer variability. The aim of this study is to develop and clinically validate a method for objective quantification of tumor and stroma in standard hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained microscopy slides of rectal carcinomas. A tissue segmentation algorithm, based on supervised machine learning and pixel classification, was developed, trained and validated using histological slides that were prepared from surgically excised rectal carcinomas in patients who had not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Whole-slide scanning was performed at 20× magnification. A total of 40 images (4 million pixels each) were extracted from 20 whole-slide images at sites showing various relative proportions of tumor and stroma. Experienced pathologists provided detailed annotations for every extracted image. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using cross-validation by testing on 1 image at a time while using the other 39 images for training. The total classification error of the algorithm was 9.4% (SD = 3.2%). Compared to visual estimation by pathologists, the algorithm was 7.3 times (P = 0.033) more accurate in quantifying tissues, also showing 60% less variability. Automatic tissue quantification was shown to be both reliable and practicable. We ultimately intend to facilitate refined prognostic stratification of (colo)rectal cancer patients and enable better personalized treatment.

  18. Dynamic modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) and intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) for the treatment of rectal and breast carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Matthew Julian

    The ultimate goal of any treatment of cancer is to maximize the likelihood of killing the tumor while minimizing the chance of damaging healthy tissues. One of the most effective ways to accomplish this is through radiation therapy, which must be able to target the tumor volume with a high accuracy while minimizing the dose delivered to healthy tissues. A successful method of accomplishing this is brachytherapy which works by placing the radiation source in very close proximity to the tumor. However, most current applications of brachytherapy rely mostly on the geometric manipulation of isotropic sources, which limits the ability to specifically target the tumor. The purpose of this work is to introduce several types of shielded brachytherapy applicators which are capable of targeting tumors with much greater accuracy than existing technologies. These applicators rely on the modulation of the dose profile through a high-density tungsten alloy shields to create anisotropic dose distributions. Two classes of applicators have been developed in this work. The first relies on the active motion of the shield, to aim a highly directional radiation profile. This allows for very precise control of the dose distribution for treatment, achieving unparalleled dose coverage to the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. This technique has been given the moniker of Dynamic Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT). The second class of applicators, designed to reduce treatment complexity uses static applicators. These applicators retain the use of the tungsten shield, but the shield is motionless during treatment. By intelligently designing the shield, significant improvements over current methods have been demonstrated. Although these static applicators fail to match the dosimetric quality of DMBT applicators the simplified setup and treatment procedure gives them significant appeal. The focus of this work has been to optimize these shield designs, specifically for the treatment of rectal and

  19. Laparoscopic Resection of Recurrence from Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Liver Transplantation: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kazaryan, Airazat M.; Pomianowska, Ewa; Abildgaard, Andreas; Line, Pål-Dag; Bjørnbeth, Bjørn Atle; Edwin, Bjørn; Røsok, Bård Ingvald

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after liver transplantation (LT) indicates a poor prognosis. Surgery is considered the only curative option for selected patients with HCC recurrence following LT. Traditionally, the preference is given to the open approach. Methods. In this report, we present two cases of laparoscopic resections (LR) for recurrent HCC after LT, performed at Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet. Results. Both procedures were executed without intraoperative and postoperative adverse events. Whereas one of the patients had a recurrence one year after LR, the other patient did not have any sign of disease during 3-year follow-up. Conclusions. We argue that, in selected cases, patients with HCC recurrence following LT may benefit from LR due to its limited tissue trauma and timely start of subsequent treatment if curative resection cannot be obtained. In patients with relatively favorable prognosis, LR facilitates postoperative recovery course and avoids unnecessary laparotomy. PMID:27034867

  20. Combinations of biomarkers and Milan criteria for predicting hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaiteerakij, Roongruedee; Zhang, Xiaodan; Addissie, Benyam D; Mohamed, Essa A; Harmsen, William S; Theobald, Paul J; Peters, Brian E; Balsanek, Joseph G; Ward, Melissa M; Giama, Nasra H; Moser, Catherine D; Oseini, Abdul M; Umeda, Naoki; Venkatesh, Sudhakar; Harnois, Denise M; Charlton, Michael R; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Satomura, Shinji; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia; Snyder, Melissa R; Therneau, Terry M; Roberts, Lewis R

    2015-05-01

    Growing evidence suggests that pretransplant alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) predicts outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with liver transplantation. We aimed to determine whether pretransplant AFP, Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3), and des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin (DCP) predicted HCC recurrence after transplantation. A retrospective cohort study of 313 HCC patients undergoing transplantation between 2000 and 2008 was conducted, and 48 (15.3%) developed recurrence during a median follow-up of 90.8 months. The 127 patients with available serum drawn before transplantation were included; they included 86 without recurrence and 41 with recurrence. Serum was tested for AFP, AFP-L3%, and DCP in a blinded fashion with the μTASWako i30 immunoanalyzer. All biomarkers were significantly associated with HCC recurrence. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 3.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9-6.7; P < 0.0001] for DCP ≥ 7.5 ng/mL and 2.8 (95% CI, 1.4-5.4; P = 0.002) for AFP ≥ 250 ng/mL. The HR increased to 5.2 (95% CI, 2.3-12.0; P < 0.0001) when AFP ≥ 250 ng/mL and DCP ≥7.5 ng/mL were considered together. When they were combined with the Milan criteria, the HR increased from 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4-4.7; P = 0.003) for outside the Milan criteria to 8.6 (95% CI, 3.0-24.6; P < 0.0001) for outside the Milan criteria and AFP ≥ 250 ng/mL and to 7.2 (95% CI, 2.8-18.1; P < 0.0001) for outside the Milan criteria and DCP ≥7.5 ng/mL. Our findings suggest that biomarkers are useful for predicting the risk of HCC recurrence after transplantation. Using both biomarkers and the Milan criteria may be better than using the Milan criteria alone in optimizing the decision of liver transplantation eligibility. PMID:25789635

  1. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  2. Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  3. Depsipeptide in Unresectable Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-29

    Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  4. Retreatment of recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck by afterloading interstitial 192Ir implant

    SciTech Connect

    Emami, B.; Marks, J.E.

    1983-10-01

    From January 1975 to December 1980, 25 patients with persistent or recurrent carcinomas of the head and neck were retreated for palliation at the Division of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. These patients had all undergone extensive previous treatment by surgery and/or radiation. All were retreated with 192Ir interstitial implant with or without external radiation and/or surgical excision. Of 25 patients, 13 had complete response (CR) and 6 had partial response for a follow-up period of 1 to 7 years. Of 13 patients with CR, 6 are alive with no evidence of disease (NED) and two died NED. Detailed results are presented and the new strategy for such patients is discussed.

  5. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of thyroid gland with local recurrence: ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland (PSCCT) is a rare malignancy that presents with advanced disease and poor prognosis. It is difficult to diagnose PSCCT in its early stage because of its rarity and lack of typical imaging findings. We experienced an elderly woman with PSCCT confirmed by surgery. Although preoperative fine-needle aspiration revealed no malignancy, surgical resection was performed because the ultrasonogram showed diffuse microcalcifications, which suggested malignancy, and clinically, the mass grew rapidly to compress the trachea. Local tumor recurrence was noted at 3 months after surgery. Surgical resection or repeat biopsy should be considered if a cytologically benign thyroid mass shows imaging or clinical features of malignancy. PMID:24936508

  6. Mediastinal mass diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound as recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma in a post-liver transplantation patient

    PubMed Central

    Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Tunsupon, Pichapong; Kheir, Fayez; Salerno, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We presented a rare case of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplant manifested as an isolated mediastinal mass. Methods: A 62-year-old man was referred for evaluation of atypical chest pain and abnormal finding of a computed tomography of the chest. He had history of chronic hepatitis C liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma underwent orthotopic liver transplant as a curative treatment three years earlier. Results: The computed tomography of the chest demonstrated paratracheal mediastinal lymphadenopathy. He subsequently underwent endobronchial ultrasound with transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). The right paratracheal lymph node station 4R was sampled. Rapid on-site cytology evaluation demonstrated recurrent metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. Conclusion: Pulmonologist should be cognizant of diagnostic utility of EBUS-TBNA in this clinical setting as more transplant patients on immunosuppressive medications with enlarged mediastinal lymphadenopathy of unknown origin will be referred for further evaluation. PMID:27489713

  7. Recurrent renal cell carcinoma manifesting as a large intrathoracic fibrotic mass: A case report

    PubMed Central

    KIM, JI HYUN; JEONG, JAE HOON; PARK, SUNG-HYUN; JEONG, JIN SEON; RYU, YOUNG-JOON; SONG, SEO-YOUNG

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) have a strong tendency to metastasize, and the most common sites are the lungs, bones and liver. Late recurrence is another feature of the RCC, with lesions appearing ≥10 years after surgical treatment. However, fibrosis has rarely been associated with the disease. The present study reports a case of recurrent RCC that manifested as a fibrotic mass within the thorax. A 48-year-old man presented with dyspnea that had persisted for 3 days. The patient had undergone a right radical nephrectomy for stage II clear cell carcinoma of the kidney 6 years previously. The patient was a current smoker, with a smoking history of 20 pack-years. Chest radiography showed pleural effusion in the right thorax with an egg-sized mass shadow within the right upper lung (RUL) field. Computed tomography (CT) showed a main mass, 7 cm in diameter, within the RUL, with heterogeneous enhancement and multiple nodules of various sizes in the lungs, suggestive of primary lung cancer or metastatic RCC. A CT-guided percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy was obtained from the main mass, but histology revealed dense fibrous tissue without any malignant cells. Positron emission tomography-CT demonstrated an irregular hypermetabolic RUL mass, with a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 5.0, along the right pleura, and small pulmonary nodules (SUV, 2.0). Ultrasound-guided biopsy was attempted for a smaller hypermetabolic pleural nodule and the result was clear cell adenocarcinoma, consistent with the previous renal histology. The present study describes the case, along with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:27313703

  8. Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer or Recurrent Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  9. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hypervascular Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Rate and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomonori Ishimaru, Hideki; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka; Matsuoka, Yohjiro; Daikoku, Manabu; Honda, Sumihisa; Koshiishi, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To analyze local recurrence-free rates and risk factors for recurrence following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. One hundred and nine nodules treated by RFA and 173 nodules treated by TACE were included. Hypovascular nodules were excluded from this study. Overall local recurrence-free rates of each treatment group were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The independent risk factors of local recurrence and the hazard ratios were analyzed using Cox's proportional-hazards regression model. Based on the results of multivariate analyses, we classified HCC nodules into four subgroups: central nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm and peripheral nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm. The local recurrence-free rates of these subgroups for each treatment were also calculated. Results. The overall local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p = 0.013). The 24-month local recurrence-free rates in the RFA and TACE groups were 60.0% and 48.9%, respectively. In the RFA group, the only significant risk factor for recurrence was tumor size >2 cm in greatest dimension. In the TACE group, a central location was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. In central nodules that were {<=}2 cm, the local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p < 0.001). In the remaining three groups, there was no significant difference in local recurrence-free rate between the two treatment methods. Conclusion. A tumor diameter of >2 cm was the only independent risk factor for local recurrence in RFA treatment, and a central location was the only independent risk factor in TACE treatment. Central lesions measuring {<=}2 cm should be treated by RFA.

  10. Iodine-125 prostate implants for recurrent carcinomas after external beam irradiation: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Goffinet, D.R.; Martinez, A.; Freiha, F.; Pooler, D.M.; Pistenma, D.A.; Cumes, D.; Bagshaw, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    Fourteen patients with locally recurrent prostate carcinomas after external beam irradiation received /sup 125/I seed implants at Stanford between 1975 and 1979. Clinical local control was obtained in 11 of the 14 patients for follow-up periods of 6 to 36 months. Eight remain without evidence of disease, but 2 of the 3 patients whose pelvic lymph nodes were involved by carcinoma have developed distant metastases. Complications, consisting of either cystoproctitis, urinary incontinence, or the development of a vesicorectal fistula occurred in 4 of the 14 patients. These complications were noted only in those patients who had implantation of high intensity /sup 125/I seeds (>0.50 mCi) into large prostatic volumes (greater than or equal to 50cc). No complications occurred in patients who received lower intensity /sup 125/I seed implants in smaller prostatic volumes. We conclude that /sup 125/I seed implants may be used in a second attempt to obtain local control after a local relapse following external beam irradiation, if the use of high intensity /sup 125/I sources and/or the implantation of large prostate volumes are avoided.

  11. Cetuximab in combination with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of recurrent and/or metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Ou, Xiaomin; Shen, Chunying; Hu, Chaosu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of cetuximab in the combined treatment for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (R/M NPC). Between March 2007 and November 2011, a total of 30 R/M NPC patients treated with comprehensive therapy including cetuximab were retrospectively enrolled. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered in recurrent disease with a median dose of 60 Gy. Chemotherapy regimens included TP/TPF (docetaxel 60-75 mg/m d1+DDP 25 mg/m d1-3±5-FU 500 mg/m/day with 120-h infusion), GP (gemcitabine 1.0 g/m d1, d8+DDP 25 mg/m d1-3), and PC (paclitaxel 60 mg/m/week d1+carboplatin AUC 2/week d1). Acute and late toxicities were documented by the radiation oncologists. The median age of the patients was 44 years (range 26-62). A total of 21 patients (70%) achieved response (CR+PR). The median survival time, time to progression, and 2-year overall survival were 23.6, 12.2 months, and 53.3%, respectively. Cetuximab appears to be effective and well tolerated when combined with chemoradiation therapy for the treatment of R/M NPC. PMID:26352217

  12. [A recurrent case of lipid-secreting carcinoma of the breast successfully treated with capecitabine].

    PubMed

    Suto, Ryuichiro; Miyamoto, Syungo; Kaneda, Yoshikazu; Zenpo, Nobuya; Kurata, Satoru; Nakayasu, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Toshiaki

    2008-09-01

    We herein report a recurrent case of lipid-secreting carcinoma of the breast which was successfully treated with capecitabine. A 50-year-old female underwent a pectoralis-preserving mastectomy for left breast cancer in December 2002. The clinical staging of the disease was T2N1M0 (stage II B) and ER (-), PgR(-), HER2 (1+). Microscopic examinations revealed solid alveolar proliferation in the majority of the tumor cells, which had an abundant foamy cytoplasm. A variable amount of neutral lipid was also identified in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells by Sudan III staining. After the operation, the patient received two courses of systemic chemotherapy using docetaxel (60 mg/m(2)). In March 2004, she was diagnosed to have a recurrence in the thoracic wall. She received radiotherapy (total 50 Gy radiation), but it proved to be ineffective. In June 2004, treatment using capecitabine (2,400 mg/day) was therefore attempted. Two courses of the treatment resulted in a complete response of the tumor. The above patient has since continued to show a complete response with capecitabine for over 3.5 years. PMID:18799920

  13. A Global Risk Score (GRS) to Simultaneously Predict Early and Late Tumor Recurrence Risk after Resection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Dekervel, Jeroen; Popovic, Dusan; van Malenstein, Hannah; Windmolders, Petra; Heylen, Line; Libbrecht, Louis; Bulle, Ashenafi; De Moor, Bart; Van Cutsem, Eric; Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris; van Pelt, Jos

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma can arise from the primary tumor (“early recurrence”) or de novo from tumor formation in a cirrhotic environment (“late recurrence”). We aimed to develop one simple gene expression score applicable in both the tumor and the surrounding liver that can predict the recurrence risk. METHODS: We determined differentially expressed genes in a cell model of cancer aggressiveness. These genes were first validated in three large published data sets of hepatocellular carcinoma from which we developed a seven-gene risk score. RESULTS: The gene score was applied on two independent large patient cohorts. In the first cohort, with only tumor data available, it could predict the recurrence risk at 3 years after resection (68 ± 10% vs 35 ± 7%, P = .03). In the second cohort, when applied on the tumor, this gene score predicted early recurrence (62 ± 5% vs 37 ± 4%, P < .001), and when applied on the surrounding liver tissue, the same genes also correlated with late recurrence. Four patient classes with each different time patterns and rates of recurrence could be identified based on combining tumor and liver scores. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, our gene score remained significantly associated with recurrence, independent from other important cofactors such as disease stage (P = .007). CONCLUSIONS: We developed a Global Risk Score that is able to simultaneously predict the risk of early recurrence when applied on the tumor itself, as well as the risk of late recurrence when applied on the surrounding liver tissue. PMID:27084430

  14. [Monoclonal antibodies (MIB 1, PC 10, 486p and p53) as prognostic factors for recurrent urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Hake, R; Vorreuther, R; Borchmann, P; Lukowsky, S; Thiele, J; Fischer, R

    1993-01-01

    Using an immunohistochemical method expression of PCNA, Ki-67, 486p and p53 antigen was investigated in paraffin sections of 119 patients with primary transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. The purpose of this study was to detect recurring G1 and G2 bladder tumours compared with non-recurrent tumours. A relative large fraction of labelled cells for PCNA and Ki-67 was found in recurring G1 and G2 carcinomas. Moreover, recurrent transitional cell carcinomas showed a more positive staining pattern for 486p and p53, in contrast to non-recurrent carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry of these four antigens seems to yield additional information about the possibility of recurrence in G1 and G2 bladder carcinomas, thus allowing early, i.e. more aggressive, therapy. PMID:7511288

  15. Severe Hypoglycemia Caused by Recurrent Sarcomatoid Carcinoma in the Pelvic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chao; Fan, Chuan Wen; Yu, Yong Yang; Wang, Cun; Yang, Lie; Li, Yuan; Mo, Xian Ming; Zhou, Zong Guang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) is a paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by persistent, severe hypoglycemia in different tumor types of mesochymal or epithelial origin; however, NICTH is infrequently induced by sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC). Despite some sarcomatoid and epithelioid characteristics in few cases of malignancies from epithelium, NICTH induced by recurrent SC in pelvic cavity in this report is extremely rare. We report a case in which NICTH caused by recurrence and pulmonary metastases from SC in the pelvic cavity, and the computed tomography scan revealed multiple pelvic masses and multiple large masses in the pulmonary fields. During the treatment of intestinal obstruction, the patient presented paroxysmal loss of consciousness and sweating. Her glucose even reached 1.22 mmol/L while the serum glycosylated hemoglobin was normal and previous history of diabetes or use of oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin denied. The laboratory examination showed that the low level of insulin, C-peptide, and growth hormone levels in the course of hypoglycemic episodes suggesting to the diagnosis of hypoglycemia induced by nonislet cell tumor, and the decreased levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGFBP3 and the high expression of big IGF-II in the serum further confirmed the diagnosis of NICTH. Because of the widely pelvic recurrence and pulmonary metastases were unresected, the patient was discharged from the hospital after 2 weeks treatment with dexamethasone and glucose and unfortunately died 1 week later. NICTH caused by SC in the pelvic cavity is extremely rare case in clinical. The aim of this report was to present the importance to examine big IGF-II expression in patient's serum in order to reach the diagnosis of NICTH in cases of intractable cancer-associated hypoglycemia. PMID:26496258

  16. Analysis of Risk Factors Contributing to Recurrence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Chinese Patients Who Underwent Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Jiao, De; Liu, Baoguo; Sun, Shanping

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is a very common endocrine malignancy, with a rate of total thyroidectomy reported to be up to 27.8%. However, studies analyzing the risk factors that contribute to recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) after total thyroidectomy in China are still scarce. Material/Methods A total of 536 patients with PTC who underwent total thyroidectomy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into 2 groups: patients with no recurrent tumor were included in group 1 and patients with tumor recurrence were included in group 2. Results Of 536 patients, 65 patients (12.1%) developed a recurrence of PTC, and 471 patients (87.9%) did not have a recurrence. Univariate analysis indicated that male sex, age ≥50 years, tumor ≥1 cm, poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, bilaterality, and multifocality may be related to PTC recurrence. Additionally, the results of the logistic regression analysis indicated that male sex, age ≥50 years, primary tumor ≥1 cm, poor dedifferentiation of the tumor, lymph node metastasis, and multifocality may be independent factors contributing to PTC recurrence. Conclusions Male sex, age more than 50 years, primary tumor larger than 1 cm, poor dedifferentiation of the primary tumor, lymph node metastasis, and multifocality were found to increase the risk of PTC recurrence in patients who underwent total thyroidectomy. Additionally, it is necessary to use strictly aggressive and extensive surgery, as well as close monitoring, after the operation. PMID:27084873

  17. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  18. Expression of p27 and PTEN and clinical characteristics in early laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and their correlation with recurrence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Quan; Liang, Zhen; Wu, Meng; Sun, Yu-Man; Liu, Hong-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma is a common malignant tumor of otolaryngeal region. At present, effective treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma still depends on surgery and radiotherapy. In recent years, application of CO2 laser resection in the treatment of stage T1 glottic carcinoma can remove the tumor completely and reduce the injury of laryngeal tissues. But recurrence still happened in some postoperative patients. Here, we selected 131 patients to compare the therapeutic effects of CO2 laser resection and traditional split laryngeal surgery on the early laryngeal cancer, examined the expression of p27 and PTEN by immunohistochemistry in early laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma tissues in correlation to clinical outcome. After two years follow-up 14/85 (16.5%) of CO2 laser treatment group presented with local recurrence (recurrent group), while that of split laryngeal surgery group was 6/46 (13.0%). There was no statistical significance in recurrence rate between the two groups (P>0.05). 10 of all the 111 (9.0%) non-recurrent patients did not follow the doctor's advice to quit smoking after the operation, while 12 in the 20 (60.0%) recurrent patients did not; the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.01). The positive rates of p27 were 80.2% (105/131) and 43.5% (57/131), and that of PTEN were 83.2% (109/131) and 48.9% (64/131) in the cancer adjacent tissues (negative surgical margin tissues) and in laryngeal carcinoma tissues, respectively (P<0.001). The expression rates of p27 and PTEN in laryngeal carcinoma tissues of the recurrent group were 20.0% (4/20), 10.0% (2/20) and that in non recurrent group were 47.7% (53/111) and 55.9% (62/111), respectively, with a significant difference (P<0.001). In addition, the expression of p27 and PTEN in tumor resected marginal tissues of the recurrence group was 50.0% (10/20), 40.0% (8/20) and that in non recurrence group was 85.6% (95/111) and 91.0% (101/111), respectively; the

  19. Usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in recurrent basal cell carcinoma: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ayala, S; Perlaza, P; Puig, S; Prats, E; Vidal-Sicart, S

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the case of a patient with left periorbital infiltrating basal cell carcinoma treated with surgical excision in October 2010. Surgery included orbital exenteration and reconstruction using skin graft and radiotherapy. In May 2013 a MR imaging showed a mass in the left orbital fossa, suggesting a recurrence in the graft. A basal cell carcinoma recurrence with perineural invasion was confirmed in the biopsy. On (18)F-FDG PET/CT performed, a hypermetabolic activity was observed in the left periorbital area with extension to surrounding sinus and bones. The use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma has not been fully explored due to the rarity of this entity. This case demonstrates the usefulness of this technique to determine the extent of non-melanocytic recurrent skin tumors, and its value in the staging and treatment control, supporting the incorporation of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the management of advanced basal cell carcinoma. PMID:26522004

  20. Treatment of recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery: carotid reconstruction with ePTFE graft.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang-bo; Li, Jing-jia; Chen, Yue-hong; Shu, Chang; Tang, Qing-lai; Yang, Xin-ming

    2011-12-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the carotid artery using expanded polytetraflouroethylene (ePTFE) in patients with recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery. Ten patients, who had recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery, received carotid artery resection and reconstruction with ePTFE, tissue defects were repaired by pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. Results show that eight patients did not present any vascular and neurologic complications. One patient presented slight hemiparesis, another patient developed wound infection and pharyngocutaneous fistula. The mean follow-up period was 33.1 ± 16.0 months. The 2-year survival rate was 50% (5/10), and there was one patient who survived for 60 months without locoreginal recurrence or distant metastasis. En bloc resection of tumor and involved carotid-associated ePTFE reconstruction provide effective improvement in the locoregional control of the recurrent head and neck carcinoma. The pedicle pectoralis major myocutaneous flap can provide not only wound bed with affluent blood supply for the vascular grafts, but also reparation of skin or the tissue defects of oropharynx and hypopharynx. PMID:21400255

  1. Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 overexpression and amplification in metastatic and recurrent high grade or type 2 endometrial carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Rina; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Ishii, Risa; Owaki, Akiko; Torii, Yutaka; Oe, Shuko; Hirasawa, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Udagawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2 overexpression or gene amplification is more common in high-grade or type 2 endometrial carcinomas. We assessed the discordance of HER-2 expression between primary and metastatic or recurrent endometrial carcinomas. Materials and methods Thirty-six primary, along with 14 metastatic and five recurrent tumors (matched to primaries), pathologically confirmed as high-grade or type 2 endometrial carcinomas, were submitted for immunohistochemistry (IHC) for HER-2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed when the tumors showed HER-2 overexpression (≥2+ IHC score). The results of the IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization assays were compared between the primary and metastatic or recurrent tumors. The relationships between HER-2 expression and clinicopathological factors or prognosis were investigated. Results HER-2 overexpression and HER-2 amplification (a ratio of HER-2 copies to chromosome 17 [CEP17] copies ≥2.2) were detected in 33.3% (twelve of 36 patients) and 5.6% (two of 36 patients) of primary tumors, respectively. HER-2 overexpression was not associated with clinicopathological factors or prognosis. In 19 tumor specimens obtained from metastatic or recurrent tumors, HER-2 overexpression and HER-2 amplification were detected in 57.9% (eleven patients) and 15.8% (three patients), respectively. HER-2 overexpression tended to predict a worse prognosis. Conclusion HER-2 expression in metastatic or recurrent tumors was more frequent than in matched primary high-grade or type 2 endometrial carcinomas. Trastuzumab in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy may represent an alternative therapeutic option for these tumors. PMID:23950654

  2. Cytoreduction and intraperitoneal heated chemotherapy for the treatment of endometrial carcinoma recurrent within the peritoneal cavity.

    PubMed

    Helm, C W; Toler, C R; Martin, R S; Gordinier, M E; Parker, L P; Metzinger, D S; Edwards, R P

    2007-01-01

    Our experience with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPHC) in conjunction with surgical resection for endometrial cancer recurrent within the abdominal cavity was reviewed. Eligible patients underwent exploratory laparotomy with the aim of resecting disease to < or =5 mm maximum dimension followed immediately by intraperitoneal perfusion of cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) heated to 41-43 degrees C (105.8-109.4 degrees F) for 1.5 h. Data for analysis was extracted from retrospective chart review. Five patients underwent surgery and IPHC between September 2002 and January 2005 for abdomino-pelvic recurrence. Original stage and histology were 1A papillary serous (1), 1C endometrioid with clear cell features (1), and 1B endometrioid (3). Mean age was 61 (41-75) years, mean prior laparotomies were 1.4 (1-2), and mean chemotherapy agent exposure was 1.6 (0-4). Mean time from initial treatment to surgery and IPHC was 47 (29-66) months. Mean length of surgery was 9.8 (7-11) h after which three patients had no residual disease and two had < or =5 mm disease. The mean duration of hospital stay was 12.6 (6-20) days. Postoperative surgical complications included wound infection with septicemia in one patient. Mean maximum postoperative serum creatinine was 1.02 (0.6-1.70) mg/dL. There was no ototoxicity or neuropathy and no perioperative mortality. No patients have been lost to follow-up. Two are living disease free at 28 and 32 m and two are living with disease at 12 and 36 m. One patient died at 3 m without evidence of cancer. Two patients who had no residual macroscopic disease at the end of surgery are alive at 32 and 36 m. The combination of IPHC with surgery for recurrent endometrial carcinoma is relatively well tolerated. The unexpectedly long survival seen in this cohort supports a phase II trial of IPHC with cisplatin for recurrent endometrial cancer. PMID:17291254

  3. Sphenoid sinus mucocoele and cranial nerve palsies in a patient with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: may mimic local recurrence.

    PubMed

    Wong, C S; Luk, S H; Leung, T W; Yuen, K K; Sze, W K; Tung, S Y

    2001-01-01

    We report the case history of a patient with a sphenoid sinus mucocoele detected by computed tomography and medical resonance imaging. The patient had a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which was treated by radiotherapy more than 10 years previously. He presented with bilateral twelfth and sixth cranial nerve palsies. Local tumour recurrence was suspected. Further investigations showed that the cranial nerve palsies were caused by radiation damage and the sphenoid sinus mucocoele was an incidental finding. Sphenoid sinus mucocoele is a possible rare late complication of radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:11716228

  4. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR is a marker for hepatocellular carcinoma progression and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    GAO, JIAN-ZHI; LI, JIA; DU, JING-LI; LI, XIAO-LEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression level of HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its association with various clinicopathological characteristics, and to further explore the molecular mechanisms of HOTAIR function in HCC. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression level of HOTAIR in 60 paired fresh HCC samples and adjacent normal liver tissue samples. The association between HOTAIR expression and clinicopathological parameters was analyzed. Lentivirus-mediated HOTAIR-specific small hairpin RNA vectors were transfected into HepG2 cells. Cell proliferation and invasion in vitro were examined by MTT and Transwell assays, respectively. A xenograft model was used to analyze the tumorigenesis of liver cancer cells in vivo. In addition, semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to detect the expression level of Wnt/β-catenin signaling molecules under the condition of HOTAIR inhibition. The results revealed that the expression level of HOTAIR in HCC tissues was higher than that in adjacent non-cancerous tissues. HOTAIR expression was significantly associated with poor tumor differentiation (P=0.002), metastasis (P=0.002) and early recurrence (P=0.001). In vitro, the inhibition of HOTAIR in liver cancer cells resulted in the suppression of cell proliferation and invasion. HOTAIR depletion significantly inhibited the rate of growth of liver cancer cells in vivo. Furthermore, the expression levels of Wnt and β-catenin were downregulated when HOTAIR expression was suppressed. In conclusion, HOTAIR is important in the progression and recurrence of HCC, partly through the regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Targeting HOTAIR may be a novel therapeutic strategy for HCC. PMID:26998078

  5. Does autologous blood transfusion during liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma increase risk of recurrence?

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Raphael LC; Pantanali, Carlos Andrés; Haddad, Luciana; Rocha Filho, Joel Avancini; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Andraus, Wellington

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze outcomes in patients who underwent liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and received autologous intraoperative blood salvage (IBS). METHODS: Consecutive HCC patients who underwent LT were studied retrospectively and analyzed according to the use of IBS or not. Demographic and surgical data were collected from a departmental prospective maintained database. Statistical analyses were performed using the Fisher’s exact test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test to examine covariate differences between patients who underwent IBS and those who did not. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models were developed to evaluate recurrence and death, and survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared by the log-rank test. RESULTS: Between 2002 and 2012, 158 consecutive patients who underwent LT in the same medical center and by the same surgical team were identified. Among these patients, 122 (77.2%) were in the IBS group and 36 (22.8%) in the non-IBS group. The overall survival (OS) and recurrence free survival (RFS) at 5 years were 59.7% and 83.3%, respectively. No differences in OS (P = 0.51) or RFS (P = 0.953) were detected between the IBS and non-IBS groups. On multivariate analysis for OS, degree of tumor differentiation remained as the only independent predictor. Regarding patients who received IBS, no differences were detected in OS or RFS (P = 0.055 and P = 0.512, respectively) according to the volume infused, even when outcomes at 90 d or longer were analyzed separately (P = 0.518 for both outcomes). CONCLUSION: No differences in RFS or OS were detected according to IBS use. Trials addressing this question are justified and should be designed to detect small differences in long-term outcomes. PMID:26981190

  6. Salvage Treatment With Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Patients With Recurrent Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jung Ae; Gwak, Geum Yeon; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the rates of tumor response and local control in patients with recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) as a salvage treatment and to evaluate treatment-related toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2009, a total of 20 patients with recurrent small HCC were treated with hypofractionated RT after the failure of previous treatment. The eligibility criteria for hypofractionated RT were as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to critical organs, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that would be irradiated with 50% of prescribed dose. The RT dose was 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The tumor response was determined by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. Results: The median follow-up period after RT was 22 months. The overall survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 100% and 87.9%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved in seven of 20 lesions (35%) evaluated by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. In-field local control was achieved in 85% of patients. Fourteen patients (70%) developed intra-hepatic metastases. Six patients developed grade 1 nausea or anorexia during RT, and two patients had progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Conclusions: The current study showed a favorable outcome with respect to hypofractionated RT for small HCC. Partial liver irradiation with 50 Gy in 10 fractions is considered tolerable without severe complications.

  7. ERAS protocol in laparoscopic surgery for colonic versus rectal carcinoma: are there differences in short-term outcomes?

    PubMed

    Pędziwiatr, Michał; Pisarska, Magdalena; Kisielewski, Michał; Major, Piotr; Mydlowska, Anna; Rubinkiewicz, Mateusz; Winiarski, Marek; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Most of the studies concerning enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols in colorectal surgery include heterogeneous groups of patients undergoing open or laparoscopic surgery, both due to colonic and rectal cancer, thus creating a potential bias. The data investigating the differences between patients operated for either colonic or rectal cancer are sparse. The aim of the study was to compare short-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for colonic and rectal cancer with ERAS protocol. The analysis included consecutive prospectively registered patients operated for a colorectal cancer between January 2012 and September 2015. Patients were divided into two groups (colon vs. rectum). The measured outcomes were: length of stay (LOS), complication rate, readmission rate, compliance with ERAS protocol elements and recovery parameters (tolerance of early oral diet, mobilization and time to first flatus). Group 1 (colon) consisted of 150 patients and Group 2 (rectum) of 82 patients. Patients in Group 1 (150 patients) were discharged home earlier than in Group 2 (82 patients)-median LOS 4 versus 5 days, respectively. There was no statistical difference in complication rate (27.3 vs. 36.6 %) and readmissions (7.3 vs. 6.1 %). Compliance with the protocol was 86.9 and 82.6 %, respectively. However, in Group 1, the following procedures were used less frequently: bowel preparation (24 vs. 78.3 %) and postoperative drainage (23.3 vs. 71.0 %). There were no differences in recovery parameters between the groups. Univariate logistic regression showed that the type of surgery, drainage and stoma creation significantly prolonged LOS. In a multivariate logistic regression model, only a bowel preparation and drainage were shown to be significant. Although functional recovery and high compliance with ERAS protocol are possible irrespective of the type of surgery, laparoscopic rectal resections are associated with a longer LOS. PMID:27154634

  8. Comparison of metabolic and receptor imaging in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma with histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Adams, S; Baum, R P; Hertel, A; Schumm-Draeger, P M; Usadel, K H; Hör, G

    1998-09-01

    Early diagnosis of metastases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) provides the optimal condition for curative outcome. The aim of this study was to appraise the detection of metastases in patients with recurrent MTC using [111In-DTPA-d-Phe1]-pentetreotide and pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid [99mTc(V)-DMSA] in comparison with histopathological findings. Eighteen MTC patients with persistently elevated tumour marker (calcitonin, carcinoembryonic antigen) levels underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using [111In-DTPA-d-Phe1]-pentetreotide (222 MBq) with early (4 h after injection) and delayed (24 h) whole-body scans and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging. Metabolic whole-body and SPET imaging using 500 MBq 99mTc(V)-DMSA was performed 4 h after injection. Metabolic and receptor imaging revealed 51 sites of focal accumulation in the 18 patients investigated. Comparison with histological findings revealed that metabolic and receptor imaging had a sensitivity of 84% for the diagnosis of MTC. Using [111In-DTPA-d-Phe1]-pentetreotide, SPET discovered four lymph node metastases in two patients in whom planar views had previously identified only one lymph node metastasis, and provided no new information in the other 16 patients. In comparison, SPET studies [using 99mTc(V)-DMSA] additionally localized eight lymph node metastases in four patients and confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic metastases (n=5) in another patient in whom conventional imaging modalities and planar views had previously detected only three liver metastases. Overall, lesion detection sensitivities for 99mTc(V)-DMSA and [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide were 69% and 29%, respectively. Five surgically removed foci were adjudged false-positive with respect to MTC metastases. False-positve results were caused by lymphadenitis, an enchondroma and a pheochromocytoma (histologically proven). The smallest lesion identified by metabolic imaging was a 6 mm in diameter lymph node

  9. [Endoluminal echography in rectal cancer--preoperative staging and postoperative control].

    PubMed

    Tankova, L; Kadnian, Kh; Draganov, V; Damianov, D; Damianov, N; Penchev, P; Gegova, A

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic potential of endoluminal echography and the pitfalls sources in the preoperative staging and postoperative follow-up in patients with rectal cancer. 245 patients with rectal carcinoma are evaluated during 10 years period (Jan. 1993-Jan. 2002 years). 96 patients are monitored in the early and late postoperative periods for the early detection of local recurrence as well as for the anorectal physiology assessment after low anterior rectal resection or coloanal anastomosis. Lineal transducer UST-657-5MHz (Aloka 620) and 10MHz miniprobe are applied. The accuracy for T-staging is 84% and for N-staging is 82%. The local recurrence is detected in 21 patients, on average 12.6 months after curative surgery. The local recurrence is more often in cases of lymph node involvement as well as if some specific echographic features for extramural vascular invasion are present. Endoluminal echography provides individual therapeutic management and postoperative control in patients with rectal cancer. PMID:15641546

  10. Recurrence and survival following resection of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma of the lung--The Lung Cancer Study Group experience.

    PubMed Central

    Grover, F L; Piantadosi, S

    1989-01-01

    Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) of the lung is a controversial form of adenocarcinoma with varying presentations. The 1977 to 1988 Lung Study Group experience with this tumor was reviewed to more precisely define the incidence of recurrence and survival of surgically resected and staged patients, to determine the incidence of BAC in the adenocarcinoma population, and to evaluate the impact of age, sex, smoking, and chronic lung-disease history on the incidence of BAC. Of 1635 patients reviewed, 235 patients had pure BAC. It was found that resectable BAC presents at an earlier disease stage than does adenocarcinoma; BAC occurs more frequently in older patients and in those without smoking history or chronic lung disease than adenocarcinoma; BAC patients have less weight loss, brain recurrences, and recurrences without second primaries than adenocarcinoma; survival and recurrence-free survival are better for BAC than for non-BAC adenocarcinoma and large-cell carcinoma; early BAC survival is better than squamous-cell survival but after 2 years is equivalent; T1-N0 BAC patients have recurrence and survival rates similar to squamous-cell survival rates and better than non-BAC adeno survival rates; T1-N1/T2-N0 and Stage 2 and 3 BAC recurs more frequently than either squamous-cell or non-BAC adenocarcinoma; stage 2 and 3 BAC has a higher mortality rate than does squamous-cell carcinoma or non-BAC adenocarcinoma; BAC is a favorable prognostic factor when adjusted for extent of disease and age; and BAC's better prognosis is a result of presenting at an earlier stage of disease and because it appears to be less aggressive than other adenocarcinomas even after adjustment for extent of disease and other known prognostic factors. It is concluded that early diagnosis and resection are particularly important for patients with BAC. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Figs. 7A and B. Fig. 8. PMID:2543339

  11. Systemic Therapy for Metastatic or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Colevas, A Dimitrios

    2015-05-01

    This article summarizes the systemic treatment options for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, with an emphasis on recommendations based on phase II and III comparison trials of commercially available agents. Many single-agent and combination regimens have activity against these cancers, but improvement in overall survival remains a challenge, and median survivals in this population with best available therapy remain less than 1 year. The major recent advancement has been the introduction of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, with mixed success. Although single-agent treatment with methotrexate, paclitaxel, docetaxel, or 5-fluorouracil remains one standard for many patients, the use of cisplatin- or carboplatin-based multidrug regimens that include cetuximab has become more popular, primarily based on one randomized study demonstrating a modest survival improvement of approximately 3 months associated with the addition of cetuximab. The burdensome adverse event profile of multidrug regimens makes appropriate patient selection for such aggressive treatment challenging, and consideration should include factors such as need for palliation, performance status of the patients, history of prior treatment, convenience, and cost. Genetically targeted and immunologically mediated treatments are promising but remain experimental. Given the worrisome prognosis for these patients, innovative clinical trials are a good option for many patients and deserve support. PMID:26158134

  12. Emerging and Mechanism-Based Therapies for Recurrent or Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Natalie J.; Bhatia, Shailender; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Iyer, Jayasri G.; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer with a disease-specific mortality of approximately 40 %. The association of MCC with a recently discovered polyomavirus, combined with the increased incidence and mortality of MCC among immunocompromised patients, highlight the importance of the immune system in controlling this cancer. Initial management of MCC is summarized within the NCCN guidelines and in recently published reviews. The high rate of recurrent and metastatic disease progression in MCC, however, presents a major challenge in a cancer that lacks mechanism-based, disease-specific therapies. Traditional treatment approaches have focused on cytotoxic chemotherapy that, despite frequent initial efficacy, rarely provides durable responses and has high morbidity among the elderly. In addition, the immunosuppressive nature of chemotherapy is of concern when treating a virus-associated cancer for which survival is unusually tightly linked to immune function. With a median survival of 9.6 months after development of an initial metastasis (n=179, described herein), and no FDA-approved agents for this cancer, there is an urgent need for more effective treatments. We review diverse management options for patients with advanced MCC, with a focus on emerging and mechanism-based therapies, some of which specifically target persistently expressed viral antigens. These treatments include single-dose radiation and novel immunotherapies, some of which are in clinical trials. Due to their encouraging efficacy, low toxicity, and lack of immune suppression, these therapies may offer viable alternatives to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:23436166

  13. Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  14. The role of HPV status in recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof; Camille, Nadia; Gupta, Vishal; Bakst, Richard; Teng, Marita; Miles, Brett; Genden, Eric; Sikora, Andrew; Posner, Marshall

    2014-12-01

    Although the prognostic role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is well established, its prognostic and/or predictive role in recurrent/metastatic settings remains to be defined. Despite epidemic growth of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma, a low recurrence rate in HPV-positive patients results in a small number of patients entering clinical trials for recurrent and/or metastatic SCCHN. The consequent lack of statistical power and also significant data contamination by misclassification of HPV-positive patients leads to premature study conclusions. Even emerging data from the analysis of 2 randomized trials, SPECTRUM and EXTREME, do not provide enough evidence for any HPV-based therapeutic strategy. Many upcoming studies for locally advanced disease, including the ones with de-escalated strategies, will have an increasing number of patients with HPV. Optimal HPV testing strategies for reliable patient selection and HPV-driven therapeutic approaches will be essential. Here, we comprehensively review the existing data regarding HPV status and prognostic or predictive outcomes in recurrent/metastatic settings and discuss current promising studies and future directions that may help in the design of upcoming trials. PMID:25674839

  15. Pathological complete response following neoadjuvant radiotherapy and intraperitoneal perfusion chemotherapy for recurrent colon carcinoma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    BIAN, XINYU; LIU, BAORUI; YANG, YANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a 28-year-old male who was diagnosed with sigmoid colon carcinoma and exhibited local recurrence following radical surgery and 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary surgery consisted of a partial sigmoidectomy and bladder repair. At 8 months post-chemotherapy, the patient was referred to Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital (Nanjing, China) due to local recurrence at the anastomotic site, which was confirmed by colonoscopy and total abdominal computed tomography. Synchronous intensity modulation radiation therapy and intraperitoneal (IP) perfusion chemotherapy with irinotecan (100 mg/m2) was administered. Following treatment, the object efficacy evaluation revealed a complete response and a second resection of the remaining sigmoid colon was performed. The post-operative results showed a pathological complete response. This case indicated that a combination of therapies, including radiotherapy, IP perfusion chemotherapy and surgery, may be beneficial and effective in patients with recurrent colon cancer. PMID:27073546

  16. The Relationship Between Serum Interleukin-6 and the Recurrence of Hepatitis B Virus Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Tao; Wang, Bin; Wang, Shu-yun; Deng, Biao; Qu, Lei; Qi, Xiao-sheng; Wang, Xiao-liang; Deng, Gui-long; Sun, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to assess whether preoperative serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) can predict recurrence of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The association between preoperative IL-6 levels and HCC recurrence following curative hepatectomy in 146 patients with chronic HBV infection was determined. Patients were divided into groups based on the presence or absence of HCC recurrence. Serum IL-6 levels were compared between groups, and the association between serum IL-6 level and greatest tumor dimension was also analyzed. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was used to define the optimal cutoff value for predicting recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. The OS and RFS rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Out of 146 patients, 80 (54.8%) patients were documented as having HCC recurrence during the follow-up period. After adjusting for potential confounders, serum IL-6 levels were significantly associated with HCC recurrence, and a saturation effect existed with serum IL-6 levels up to 3.7 pg/mL. In addition, patients with preoperative serum IL-6 levels over 3.1 pg/mL had lower RFS and OS rates (P < 0.01). There was no significant correlation between preoperative serum IL-6 levels and maximal tumor dimension (r = 0.0003, P = 0.84). Elevated serum levels of IL-6 were significantly associated with an increased risk of HBV-associated HCC recurrence suggesting that preoperative IL-6 serum level is potential biomarker for early prediction of HBV-associated HCC recurrence.

  17. Peri-Transplant Change in AFP Level: a Useful Predictor of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Recurrence Following Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Tae; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Yi, Nam-Joon; Choi, Young Rok; Kim, Hyeyoung; Suh, Suk-Won; Jeong, Jae Hong; Lee, Jeong-Moo; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2016-07-01

    Pretransplant alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a useful tumor marker predicting recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Little is known, however, about the relationship between changes in AFP concentration and prognosis. This study investigated the clinical significance of change in peri-transplant AFP level as a predictor of HCC recurrence. Data from 125 HCC patients with elevated pretransplant AFP level who underwent liver transplantation (LT) between February 2000 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with AFP normalization within 1 month after LT were classified into the rapid normalization group (n = 97), with all other patients classified into the non-rapid normalization group (n = 28). Tumor recurrence was observed in 17 of the 97 patients (17.5%) with rapid normalization; of these, 11 patients had high AFP levels and six had normal levels at recurrence. In contrast, tumor recurrence was observed in 24 of the 28 patients (85.7%) without rapid normalization, with all 24 having high AFP levels at recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that non-rapid normalization (harzard ratio [HR], 4.41, P < 0.001), sex (HR, 3.26, P = 0.03), tumor size (HR, 1.15, P = 0.001), and microvascular invasion (HR, 2.65, P = 0.005) were independent risk factors for recurrence. In conclusion, rapid normalization of post-LT AFP level at 1 month is a useful clinical marker for HCC recurrence. Therefore, an adjuvant strategy and/or intensive screening are needed for patients who do not show rapid normalization. PMID:27366001

  18. Analysis of 30 patients with persistent or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix within one year after concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shi-Ping; Yang, Jia-Xin; Cao, Dong-Yan; Shen, Keng

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the recurrence sites, risk factors, and prognosis of patients with persistent or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix within one year after undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods Clinical data of 30 patients with persistent or recurrent SCC of the cervix within one year after CCRT between July 2006 and July 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. These data were compared with those of 35 SCC cases with no signs of recurrence after complete remission. These 35 patients were treated during the same period (between 2006 and 2011) and selected randomly. Results Among these 30 patients, 25 exhibited distant metastases of which 14 were observed within 6 months after CCRT. Univariate analysis showed higher incidence of pelvic or para-aortic lymphadenectasis and SCC-ag >10 ng/mL in the group with persistent or recurrent disease before treatment (P<0.01). Multivariate analysis by logistic regression revealed that the pre-therapeutic pelvic or para-aortic lymph node enlargement and SCC-ag >10 ng/mL were the independent risk factors. Palliative chemotherapy was the main treatment option for patients with persistent or recurrent disease. The 2-year survival rate was 21.7%, and the median survival time was 17 months. Conclusion Patients with persistent or recurrent SCC of the cervix after CCRT exhibited a high rate of distant metastasis with poor prognosis. The pre-therapeutic pelvic or para-aortic lymph node enlargement and SCC-ag >10 ng/mL were identified as the independent risk factors for persistent or recurrent SCC within 1 year after CCRT. PMID:24349833

  19. Impact of stem cell marker expression on recurrence of TACE-treated hepatocellular carcinoma post liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Liver transplantation is the most effective therapy for cirrhosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its utility is limited by post-transplant tumor recurrence. Use of the Milan, size-based criteria, has reduced recurrence rate to less than 10% but many patients remain ineligible. Reduction of tumor size with local therapies has been used to “downstage” patients to allow them to qualify for transplantation, but the optimal criteria to predict tumor recurrence in these latter patients has not been established. The existence of a progenitor cell population, sometimes called cancer stem cells (CSCs), has been proposed to be one mechanism accounting for the chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to determine if transcatheter arterial chemoemolization (TACE) treated tumors have increased CSC marker expression and whether these markers could be used to predict tumor recurrence. Methods Formalin fixed specimens were obtained from 39 HCC liver explants (23 with no treatment and 16 after TACE). Immunohistochemical staining was performed for EpCAM, CD44, CD90, and CD133. Staining for each marker was scored 0–3 by evaluating the number and intensity of positive tumor cells in 5 hpf of tumor in each specimen. Results TACE treated tumors displayed greater necrosis and fibrosis than non-TACE treated samples but there were no differences in morphology between the viable tumor cells of both groups. In TACE treated specimens, the staining of both EpCAM and CD133 was greater than in non-TACE specimens but CD44 and CD90 were the same. In the TACE group, the presence of high EpCAM staining was associated with tumor recurrence. Four of ten EpCAM high patients recurred while 0 of 6 EpCAM low patients recurred (P = 0.040). None of the other markers predicted recurrence. Conclusion High pre-transplant EpCAM staining predicted HCC recurrence. This suggests that the abundance of tumor cells with

  20. Meta-analysis of elective surgical complications related to defunctioning loop ileostomy compared with loop colostomy after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hong Zhi; Nasier, Dilidan; Liu, Bing; Gao, Hua; Xu, Yi Ke

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Defunctioning loop ileostomy (LI) and loop colostomy (LC) are used widely to protect/treat anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. However, it is not known which surgical approach has a lower prevalence of surgical complications after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma (LARRC). Methods We conducted a literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases to identify studies published between 1966 and 2013 focusing on elective surgical complications related to defunctioning LI and LC undertaken to protect a distal rectal anastomosis after LARRC. Results Five studies (two randomized controlled trials, one prospective non-randomized trial, and two retrospective trials) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Outcomes of 1,025 patients (652 LI and 373 LC) were analyzed. After the construction of a LI or LC, there was a significantly lower prevalence of sepsis (p=0.04), prolapse (p=0.03), and parastomal hernia (p=0.02) in LI patients than in LC patients. Also, the prevalence of overall complications was significantly lower in those who received LIs compared with those who received LCs (p<0.0001). After closure of defunctioning loops, there were significantly fewer wound infections (p=0.006) and incisional hernias (p=0.007) in LI patients than in LC patients, but there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of overall complications. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that a defunctioning LI may be superior to LC with respect to a lower prevalence of surgical complications after LARRC. PMID:26274752

  1. Everolimus and Letrozole in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor Positive Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  3. Nomograms for predicting survival and recurrence in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma. An international collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    Ganly, Ian; Amit, Moran; Kou, Lei; Palmer, Frank L.; Migliacci, Jocelyn; Katabi, Nora; Yu, Changhong; Kattan, Michael W.; Binenbaum, Yoav; Sharma, Kanika; Naomi, Ramer; Abib, Agbetoba; Miles, Brett; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Godballe, Christian; Mücke, Thomas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Fliss, Dan; Eckardt, André M.; Chiara, Copelli; Sesenna, Enrico; Ali, Safina; Czerwonka, Lukas; Goldstein, David P.; Gil, Ziv; Patel, Snehal G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the rarity of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), information on outcome is based upon small retrospective case series. The aim of our study was to create a large multiinstitutional international dataset of patients with ACC in order to design predictive nomograms for outcome. Methods ACC patients managed at 10 international centers were identified. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were recorded and an international collaborative dataset created. Multivariable competing risk models were then built to predict the 10 year recurrence free probability (RFP), distant recurrence free probability (DRFP), overall survival (OS) and cancer specific mortality (CSM). All predictors of interest were added in the starting full models before selection, including age, gender, tumor site, clinical T stage, perineural invasion, margin status, pathologic N-status, and M-status. Stepdown method was used in model selection to choose predictive variables. An external dataset of 99 patients from 2 other institutions was used to validate the nomograms. Findings Of 438 ACC patients, 27.2% (119/438) died from ACC and 38.8% (170/438) died of other causes. Median follow-up was 56 months (range 1–306). The nomogram for OS had 7 variables (age, gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, margin status, pathologic N-status and M-status) with a concordance index (CI) of 0.71. The nomogram for CSM had the same variables, except margin status, with a concordance index (CI) of 0.70. The nomogram for RFP had 7 variables (age, gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, margin status, pathologic N status and perineural invasion) (CI 0.66). The nomogram for DRFP had 6 variables (gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, pathologic N-status, perineural invasion and margin status) (CI 0.64). Concordance index for the external validation set were 0.76, 0.72, 0.67 and 0.70 respectively. Interpretation Using an international collaborative database we have created the first nomograms which

  4. Differentiating the impact of anatomic and non-anatomic liver resection on early recurrence in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background For Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with hepatectomy, the extent of the resection margin remains controversial and data available on its effect on early tumor recurrence are very few and contradictory. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of the type of resection (anatomic versus non-anatomic) on early intra-hepatic HCC recurrence in patients with solitary HCC and preserved liver function. Methods Among 53 patients with similar clinico-pathologic data who underwent curative liver resection for HCC between 2000 and 2006, 28 patients underwent anatomic resection of at least one liver segment and 25 patients underwent limited resection with a margin of at least 1 cm. Results After a close follow-up period of 24 months, no difference was detected in recurrence rates between the anatomic (35.7%) and the non-anatomic (40%) groups in either univariate (p = 0.74) and multivariate (p = 0.65) analysis. Factors contributing to early recurrence were tumor size (p = 0.012) and tumor stage including vascular invasion (p = 0.009). Conclusion The choice of the type of resection for HCC should be based on the maintenance of adequate hepatic reserve. The type of resection (anatomic vs non-anatomic) was found not to be a risk factor for early tumor recurrence. PMID:20497548

  5. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Carboplatin Followed By Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  6. Early-phase circulating miRNAs predict tumor recurrence and survival of hepatocellular carcinoma patients after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    NG, Kevin Tak-Pan; Lo, Chung Mau; Wong, Nathalie; Li, Chang Xian; Qi, Xiang; Liu, Xiao Bing; Geng, Wei; Yeung, Oscar Wai-Ho; Ma, Yuen Yuen; Chan, See Ching; Man, Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Post-liver transplantation tumor recurrence is a major challenge for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recipients. We aimed to identify early-phase circulating microRNAs after liver transplantation for predicting tumor recurrence and survival of HCC recipients. Circulating microRNA profiles at early-phase (2-hour after portal vein reperfusion) after liver transplantation were compared between HCC recipients with (n=4) and without tumor recurrence (n=8) by microarray analyses. Candidate microRNAs were validated in 62 HCC recipients by quantitative RT-PCR. The prognostic values of microRNAs for tumor recurrence and survival were examined. Simulated in vitro ischemia-reperfusion injury models were employed to characterize the possible mechanism of up-regulation of circulating microRNAs. Our results showed that up-regulation of circulating miR-148a, miR-1246 or miR-1290 at early-phase was significantly associated with HCC recurrence after liver transplantation. Among them, miR-148a (p=0.030) and miR-1246 (p=0.009) were significant predictors of HCC recurrence. MiR-1246 was an independent predictor of overall (p=0.023) and disease-free survival (p=0.020) of HCC recipients. The level of early-phase circulating miR-1246 was positively correlated with serum AST and ALT levels in HCC recipients after liver transplantation. The expression of hepatic miR-1246 was positively correlated with TNFα mRNA. In vitro experiments indicated that injury-induced activation and differentiation of macrophages significantly elevated the expression and secretion of miR-1246. In conclusion, early-phase circulating miR-1246 is an indicator of hepatic injury and a novel prognostic biomarker for tumor recurrence and survival of HCC recipients after liver transplantation. PMID:26918346

  7. Predictors of Intravesical Recurrence After Radical Nephroureterectomy for Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: An Inflammation-Based Prognostic Score

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yang Hyun; Seo, Young Ho; Chung, Seung Jun; Hwang, Insang; Yu, Ho Song; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Jung, Seung Il; Kang, Taek Won; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung; Hwang, Jun Eul; Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Geun Soo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Systemic inflammatory responses, which are defined in terms of the Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), have been reported to be independent predictors of unfavorable outcomes in various human cancers. We assessed the utility of the GPS as a predictor of intravesical recurrence after radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) in upper urinary tract carcinoma (UTUC). Materials and Methods We collected data for 147 UTUC patients with no previous history of bladder cancer who underwent RNU from 2004 to 2012. Associations between perioperative clinicopathological variables and intravesical recurrence were analyzed by using univariate and multivariate Cox regression models. Results Overall, 71 of 147 patients (48%) developed intravesical recurrence, including 21 patients (30%) diagnosed with synchronous bladder tumor. In the univariate analysis, performance status, diabetes mellitus (DM), serum albumin, C-reactive protein, GPS, and synchronous bladder tumor were associated with intravesical recurrence. In the multivariate analysis, performance status (hazard ratio [HR], 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-3.85; p=0.001), DM (HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.21-3.41; p=0.007), cortical thinning (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.08-3.71; p=0.026), and GPS (score of 1: HR, 6.86; 95% CI, 3.69-12.7; p=0.001; score of 2: HR, 5.96; 95% CI, 3.10-11.4; p=0.001) were independent predictors of intravesical recurrence. Conclusions Our results suggest that the GPS as well as performance status, DM, and cortical thinning are associated with intravesical recurrence after RNU. Thus, more careful follow-up, coupled with postoperative intravesical therapy to avoid bladder recurrence, should be considered in these patients. PMID:25045443

  8. Detection rate of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Treglia, Giorgio; Villani, Maria Felicia; Giordano, Alessandro; Rufini, Vittoria

    2012-12-01

    Several studies evaluated the diagnostic performance of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in detecting recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with conflicting results. Aim of our study is to meta-analyze published data about this topic. A comprehensive computer literature search of studies published in PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Embase databases through December 2011 and regarding FDG PET or PET/CT in patients with suspected recurrent MTC was carried out. Pooled detection rate (DR) on a per patient-based analysis was calculated to measure the diagnostic performance of FDG PET and PET/CT in this setting. A sub-analysis considering PET device used, serum calcitonin, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), calcitonin doubling time (CTDT), and CEA doubling time (CEADT) values was also performed. Twenty-four studies comprising 538 patients with suspected recurrent MTC were included. DR of FDG PET or PET/CT in suspected recurrent MTC on a per patient-based analysis was 59 % (95 % confidence interval: 54-63 %). Heterogeneity between the studies was revealed. DR increased in patients with serum calcitonin ≥ 1,000 ng/L (75 %), CEA ≥ 5 ng/ml (69 %), CTDT <12 months (76 %), and CEADT <24 months (91 %). In patients with suspected recurrent MTC FDG PET and PET/CT are associated with a non-optimal DR since about 40 % of suspected recurrent MTC remain usually unidentified. However, FDG PET and PET/CT could modify the patient management in a certain number of recurrent MTC because these methods are often performed after negative conventional imaging studies. DR of FDG PET and PET/CT increases in patients with higher calcitonin and CEA values and lower CTDT and CEADT values, suggesting that these imaging methods could be very helpful in patients with more aggressive disease. PMID:22527889

  9. Recurrent myoepithelial carcinoma of the submandibular gland treated by rAd-p53 combined with radiotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Chen, Xiangxun; Wang, Hongyan; Shi, Qingming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the case of a patient with recurrent myoepithelial carcinoma of the submandibular gland without progression for five years following treatment. A 71-year-old male patient presented to hospital with a painless swelling in the region of the right submandibular gland, and received a radical neck dissection on January 29, 2008. A nodule of ~7×4×2 cm was identified at the site of the right submandibular gland, and the pathological results revealed a diagnosis of myoepithelial carcinoma of the right submandibular gland with no lymph node metastasis. However, this case developed local recurrence with wide-spread metastasis in the lungs. Between April and October 2008, the patient underwent several treatment regimens and demonstrated no improvement following 6 cycles of chemotherapy. From then on, the patient was treated with recombinant adenoviral-p53 (rAd-p53) combined with radiotherapy using a 6 millivolt medical linear accelerator. The foci were relieved and the cancer demonstrated no signs of progression during the 5-year follow-up. rAd-p53 combined with radiotherapy was useful for treating myoepithelial carcinoma of the submandibular gland.

  10. [Survival after Sorafenib Treatment for Advanced Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Tumor Thrombus in the Inferior Vena Cava].

    PubMed

    Matoba, Hideaki; Seta, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    A 72-year-old man with chronic viral hepatitis type B undergoing surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma was found to have a recurrent tumor in the left liver with peritoneal dissemination near the inferior vena cava(IVC)and tumor thrombus in the IVC. For this patient diagnosed with Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) classification stage C hepatocellular carcinoma, we initiated 800 mg/body sorafenib. Two weeks after the initiation of sorafenib, the patient experienced grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, after which, the dose of sorafenib was reduced to 400 mg/body. After 1 year, CT showed an enlarged tumor in the left liver and multiple metastases to the lung. However, no remarkable difference was observed in the peritoneal dissemination and the tumor thrombus. He has been receiving sorafenib for 19 months with a good quality of life. Sorafenib can be provided on an outpatient basis and it may facilitate long-term survival for patients with advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma with IVC tumor thrombus. This clinical condition is very rare, and the standard treatment for it still has not been established. PMID:26805098

  11. Clinical experience with radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies in the detection of colorectal and ovarian carcinoma recurrence and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pinkas, L; Robins, P D; Forstrom, L A; Mahoney, D W; Mullan, B P

    1999-08-01

    A retrospective study was carried out to determine the diagnostic value of OncoScint CR/OV immunoscintigraphy in assessing patients with suspected recurrence of carcinoma of the colon and ovary. The scintigraphic results of 31 patients were compared with surgical and histopathological findings, conventional radiological examinations and clinical disease outcome over an average 3-year follow-up. Detected lesions were divided by location into hepatic or extrahepatic and the latter group was classified as local recurrence at the resection site, pelvic or abdominal regional lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease. The combined sensitivity and accuracy of immunoscintigraphy in the detection of extra-hepatic disease was significantly higher than that of cross-sectional radiological imaging (87% and 83% vs 44% and 53% respectively) with equal specificity of 74%. Scintigraphy identified 14 (36%) of 39 extra-hepatic malignant lesions not diagnosed by conventional radiological techniques and influenced therapeutic planning in 8 (26%) of 31 patients studied. In the liver, conventional imaging had a significantly higher detection rate than immunoscintigraphy (sensitivity 93% vs 28%). In conclusion, these results show that OncoScint scintigraphy is a sensitive method for the detection of local recurrence and extra-hepatic metastases in colorectal and ovarian carcinoma and has an important role in the therapeutic decision-making process. PMID:10451876

  12. Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  13. Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro; Gómez-Espí, Marina; Blanco, Jose; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

  14. Diazepam Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Diazepam rectal gel is used in emergency situations to stop cluster seizures (episodes of increased seizure activity) in people who are taking other medications to treat epilepsy (seizures). Diazepam is in ...

  15. Risk Factors and Post-Resection Independent Predictive Score for the Recurrence of Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Ronnie Tung-Ping; Fong, Daniel Yee-Tak; Chui, Ada Hang-Wai; Seto, Wai-Kay; Fung, James Yan-Yue; Chan, Albert Chi-Yan; Yuen, John Chi-Hang; Tiu, Randal; Choi, Olivia; Lai, Ching-Lung; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2016-01-01

    Background Independent risk factors associated with hepatitis B (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after resection remains unknown. An accurate risk score for HCC recurrence is lacking. Methods We prospectively followed up 200 patients who underwent liver resection for HBV-related HCC for at least 2 years. Demographic, biochemical, tumor, virological and anti-viral treatment factors were analyzed to identify independent risk factors associated with recurrence after resection and a risk score for HCC recurrence formulated. Results Two hundred patients (80% male) who underwent liver resection for HBV-related HCC were recruited. The median time of recurrence was 184 weeks (IQR 52–207 weeks) for the entire cohort and 100 patients (50%) developed HCC recurrence. Stepwise Cox regression analysis identified that one-month post resection HBV DNA >20,000 IU/mL (p = 0.019; relative risk (RR) 1.67; 95% confidence interval (C.I.): 1.09–2.57), the presence of lymphovascular permeation (p<0.001; RR 2.69; 95% C.I.: 1.75–4.12), microsatellite lesions (p<0.001; RR 2.86; 95% C.I.: 1.82–4.51), and AFP >100ng/mL before resection (p = 0.021; RR 1.63; 95% C.I.: 1.08–2.47) were independently associated with HCC recurrence. Antiviral treatment before resection (p = 0.024; RR 0.1; 95% C.I.: 0.01–0.74) was independently associated with reduced risk of HCC recurrence. A post-resection independent predictive score (PRIPS) was derived and validated with sensitivity of 75.3% and 60.6% and specificity of 55.7% and 79.2%, to predict the 1- and 3-year risks for the HCC recurrence respectively with the hazard ratio of 2.71 (95% C.I.: 2.12–3.48; p<0.001). The AUC for the 1- and 3-year prediction were 0.675 (95% C.I.: 0.6–0.78) and 0.746 (95% C.I.: 0.69–0.82) respectively. Conclusion Several tumor, virological and biochemical factors were associated with a higher cumulative risk of HCC recurrence after resection. PRIPS was derived for more accurate risk assessment

  16. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  17. Feasibility and Clinical Value of CT-guided (125)I Brachytherapy for Bilateral Lung Recurrences from Colorectal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guobao; Zhang, Fujun; Yang, Bin; Xue, Jingbing; Peng, Sheng; Zhong, Zhihui; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Mingjian; Gao, Fei

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To prospectively evaluate the feasibility and clinical value of computed tomography (CT)-guided iodine 125 ((125)I) brachytherapy to treat bilateral lung recurrences from colorectal carcinoma. Materials and Methods This study was approved by Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center Institutional Review Board and all patients provided informed written consent. Seventy-two patients with bilateral lung recurrences from colorectal carcinoma were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. Thirty-three were percutaneously treated with CT-guided (125)I brachytherapy (group A) and the other 39 were only given symptomatic and supportive treatments (group B). Follow-up contrast agent-enhanced CT scans were reviewed and efficacy of treatment was evaluated. (125)I brachytherapy was considered a success if it achieved the computerized treatment planning system criteria 1 month after procedure. Analyses included Kaplan-Meier, Mantel-Cox log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results In group A, 37 (125)I brachytherapy procedures were performed in 33 patients with 126 lung metastatic lesions and the success rate was 87.9% (29 of 33 patients). The local control rate of 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months was 75.8%, 51.5%, 33.3%, 24.2%, and 9.1%, respectively. A small amount of pulmonary hematoma occurred in five patients, and six patients presented with pneumothorax with pulmonary compression of 30%-40%. No massive bleeding or radiation pneumonitis occurred. The mean overall survival (OS) of group A was significantly longer than that of group B, and (125)I brachytherapy was an independent factor that affected the OS (group A, 18.8 months; group B, 8.6 months; hazard ratio, 0.391 [95% confidence interval: 0.196, 0.779]; P = .008). Conclusion CT-guided (125)I brachytherapy is feasible and safe for the treatment of bilateral lung recurrences from colorectal carcinoma. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26406550

  18. Development of combined thymic carcinoma and thymoma in an extrathymic lesion during long follow-up for recurrent thymoma

    PubMed Central

    OHUE, YASUHIRO; MATSUOKA, SHUNICHIRO; KUMEDA, HIROTAKA; AGATSUMA, HIROYUKI; HYOUGOTANI, AKIRA; TOISHI, MASAYUKI; SHIINA, TAKAYUKI; YOSHIDA, KAZUO; SHINGU, KUNIHIKO; FUKUSHIMA, TOSHIROU; KOIZUMI, TOMONOBU

    2016-01-01

    The present study reported a rare case of combined thymic squamous cell carcinoma and thymoma exhibiting a mass on the left chest wall. The patient underwent thoracotomy for invasive thymoma 15 years previously, however, suffered a relapse in the left intrathoracic space. Radiotherapy, chemotherapy and partial resection, as secondary surgery for the intrathoracic mass, were performed. The histological findings in the resected specimens revealed type B3 thymoma. As the patient developed a left chest wall mass and pain in 2013, the mass was resected. The histological findings indicated two separate components composed of type B3 thymoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistological findings revealed that the thymoma cells were positive for CD5, while the thymic carcinoma cells were negative for CD5. Several reports have demonstrated the coexistence of thymic carcinoma and thymoma in the primary thymus, however, the development of a combined tumor in an extrathymic lesion is extremely rare. The present case had a long follow-up for recurrent thymoma. The present case indicated that the development and/or coexistence of malignant components in the thymoma must be taken into consideration for the treatment and/or management of patients with thymoma and that a pre-existence of CD5 expression in thymoma and the lost change may be associated with the process of malignant transformation. PMID:26893849

  19. Whole exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in BRCA2 and FAT genes in acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Shoko; Ameri, Mitra; Kuboki, Yuko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Hatori, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Sugiyama, Masanori; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Michio; Shibata, Noriyuki; Shimizu, Kyoko; Shiratori, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, its molecular features are poorly known. We studied a total of 11 acinar cell carcinomas, including 3 by exome and 4 by target sequencing. Exome sequencing revealed 65 nonsynonymous mutations and 22 indels with a mutation rate of 3.4 mutations/Mb per tumor, on average. By accounting for not only somatic but also germline mutations with loss of the wild-type allele, we identified recurrent mutations of BRCA2 and FAT genes. BRCA2 showed somatic or germline premature termination mutations, with loss of the wild-type allele in 3 of 7 tumors. FAT1, FAT3, and FAT4 showed somatic or germline missense mutations in 4 of 7 tumors. The germline FAT mutations were with loss of the wild-type allele. Loss of BRCA2 expression was observed in 5 of 11 tumors. One patient with a BRCA2-mutated tumor experienced complete remission of liver metastasis following cisplatinum chemotherapy. In conclusion, acinar cell carcinomas show a distinct mutation pattern and often harbor somatic or germline mutations of BRCA2 and FAT genes. This result may warrant assessment of BRCA2 abrogation in patients with the carcinoma to determine their sensitivity to chemotherapy. PMID:25743105

  20. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  1. Interval Between Hysterectomy and Start of Radiation Treatment Is Predictive of Recurrence in Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, Richard; Hanna, Rabbie K.; Jacobsen, Gordon; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to improve local control in patients with endometrial carcinoma. We analyzed the impact of the time interval between hysterectomy and RT initiation in patients with endometrial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board-approved study, we identified 308 patients with endometrial carcinoma who received adjuvant RT after hysterectomy. All patients had undergone hysterectomy, oophorectomy, and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation from 1988 to 2010. Patients' demographics, pathologic features, and treatments were compared. The time interval between hysterectomy and the start of RT was calculated. The effects of time interval on recurrence-free (RFS), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Following univariate analysis, multivariate modeling was performed. Results: The median age and follow-up for the study cohort was 65 years and 72 months, respectively. Eighty-five percent of the patients had endometrioid carcinoma. RT was delivered with high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone (29%), pelvic RT alone (20%), or both (51%). Median time interval to start RT was 42 days (range, 21-130 days). A total of 269 patients (74%) started their RT <9 weeks after undergoing hysterectomy (group 1) and 26% started ≥9 weeks after surgery (group 2). There were a total of 43 recurrences. Tumor recurrence was significantly associated with treatment delay of ≥9 weeks, with 5-year RFS of 90% for group 1 compared to only 39% for group 2 (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, RT delay of ≥9 weeks (P<.001), presence of lymphovascular space involvement (P=.001), and higher International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade (P=.012) were independent predictors of recurrence. In addition, RT delay of ≥9 weeks was an independent significant predictor for worse DSS and OS (P=.001 and P=.01, respectively). Conclusions: Delay in administering adjuvant RT after hysterectomy was

  2. Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma arising in a neglected pilonidal sinus: report of a case and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Eryılmaz, Ramazan; Bilecik, Tuna; Okan, İsmail; Özkan, Orhan Veli; Çoşkun, Aytekin; Şahin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare complication observed mainly in chronic, recurrent and untreated primary pilonidal disease. It is associated with poor prognosis, and its recurrence rate after surgery is high. Here we present a patient diagnosed with SCC arising from a neglected pilonidal sinus. A 44-year-old male, who is a heavy truck driver, applied to the hospital with chronic discharge from sacrococcygeal region. He had symptoms of the disease with multiple recurrent abscesses and spontaneous drainage for 10 years. The patient underwent cyst excision and the defect was left open for secondary healing. One year later, the patient was admitted to the hospital with a mass of 3 x 3 cm in the same area. Re-excision and a sigmoid colostomy were performed. The patient died after two years. This case study illustrates that since SCC is a fatal complication of recurrent and long-standing pilonidal sinus, the proper treatment of this disease should be carried out as soon as the diagnosis is established. To this end, we believe, that all pilonidal sinus lesions should be sent for pathologic examination. PMID:24600504

  3. Long non-coding RNA MALAT-1 overexpression predicts tumor recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ming-chun; Yang, Zhe; Zhou, Lin; Zhu, Qian-qian; Xie, Hai-yang; Zhang, Feng; Wu, Li-ming; Chen, Lei-ming; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2012-09-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1(MALAT1), a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), is up-regulated in many solid tumors and associated with cancer metastasis and recurrence. However, its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of MALAT1 by quantitative real-time PCR in 9 liver cancer cell lines and 112 HCC cases including 60 cases who received liver transplantation (LT) with complete follow-up data. Moreover, small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to inhibit MALAT1 expression to investigate its biological role in tumor progression. We found that MALAT1 was up-regulated in both cell lines and clinical tissue samples. Patients with high expression level of MALAT1 had a significantly increased risk of tumor recurrence after LT, particularly in patients who exceeded the Milan criteria. On multivariate analysis, MALAT1 was an independent prognostic factor for predicting HCC recurrence (hazard ratio, 3.280, P = 0.003).In addition, inhibition of MALAT1 in HepG2 cells could effectively reduce cell viability, motility, invasiveness, and increase the sensitivity to apoptosis. Our data suggest that lncRNA MALAT1 play an important role in tumor progression and could be a novel biomarker for predicting tumor recurrence after LT and serve as a promising therapeutic target. PMID:21678027

  4. Inferior vena cava tumor thrombus that directly infiltrated from paracaval lymph node metastases in a patient with recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we present the case of a patient with recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who had paracaval lymph node (LN) metastases with an inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombus after a hepatectomy. A 65-year-old man with chronic hepatitis B virus infection received an extended anterior segmentectomy because of two hepatic tumors, located in segments 7 and 8. Histological examination of both resected specimens showed mostly moderately differentiated HCC with some poorly differentiated areas, and liver cirrhosis (A2/F4). Because the patient had an elevated α-fetoprotein serum level, abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed. Abdominal CT revealed a 9-mm-diameter recurrent tumor in hepatic segment 3 and paracaval LN metastases with an IVC tumor thrombus at 8 months after the first operation. The patient received transcatheter arterial chemoembolization as treatment for the intrahepatic recurrence, following resection of the paracaval LN metastases and removal of the IVC tumor thrombus. In this case, the paracaval LN metastases had directly infiltrated the IVC via the lumbar veins, resulting in an IVC tumor thrombus, which usually develops from an intrahepatic tumor via the hepatic vein. The development of an IVC tumor thrombus with HCC recurrence, as in this case, is very rare, and based on a PubMed search, we believe this report may be the first to describe this condition. PMID:23915104

  5. Recurrent High-Grade Invasive Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of Larynx: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    King, Whitney; Ko, Stephen; Miller, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    Recurrent invasive high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx is a rare occurrence. These tumors have been commonly associated with salivary gland tumors, most commonly the parotid gland. The patient usually presents with the following symptoms: hoarseness (if larynx is involved), or changes in voice character, sore throat, cough, odynophagia, dysphagia, otalgia, difficulty breathing, weight loss, lymphadenopathy. Here we present a case of a recurrent invasive high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of larynx and hypopharynx. The patient was a 67-year-old male that originally presented in 2006. At that time he underwent a wide field laryngectomy, right thyroid lobectomy, and biopsy of the right digastric node. He was a clinical stage III, pT3N0M0. No adjuvant radiation therapy was given at that time. The patient remained asymptomatic until February 2014, when he presented with dysphagia and neck swelling. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography showed evidence of recurrence. The patient was treated with definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy. Treatment for this disease is gathered by scattered case reports. If surgery is a possibility it is considered as first line therapy. Post-surgical radiation is then offered. However, in this case the recurrent tumor was located near the carotid artery, and thus surgery was not a possibility. Therefore, concurrent chemotherapy and radiation with IMRT and weekly cis-platinum was given. While the optimum combination of treatment has not yet been established because of the rarity of this cancer's location site, the current patient appeared to have an excellent response from the definitive IMRT and chemotherapy treatment. PMID:27441076

  6. Recurrent High-Grade Invasive Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of Larynx: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    King, Whitney; Ko, Stephen; Miller, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent invasive high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx is a rare occurrence. These tumors have been commonly associated with salivary gland tumors, most commonly the parotid gland. The patient usually presents with the following symptoms: hoarseness (if larynx is involved), or changes in voice character, sore throat, cough, odynophagia, dysphagia, otalgia, difficulty breathing, weight loss, lymphadenopathy. Here we present a case of a recurrent invasive high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of larynx and hypopharynx. The patient was a 67-year-old male that originally presented in 2006. At that time he underwent a wide field laryngectomy, right thyroid lobectomy, and biopsy of the right digastric node. He was a clinical stage III, pT3N0M0. No adjuvant radiation therapy was given at that time. The patient remained asymptomatic until February 2014, when he presented with dysphagia and neck swelling. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography showed evidence of recurrence. The patient was treated with definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy. Treatment for this disease is gathered by scattered case reports. If surgery is a possibility it is considered as first line therapy. Post-surgical radiation is then offered. However, in this case the recurrent tumor was located near the carotid artery, and thus surgery was not a possibility. Therefore, concurrent chemotherapy and radiation with IMRT and weekly cis-platinum was given. While the optimum combination of treatment has not yet been established because of the rarity of this cancer’s location site, the current patient appeared to have an excellent response from the definitive IMRT and chemotherapy treatment. PMID:27441076

  7. Increased matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and reduced tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 expression correlate with angiogenesis and early postoperative recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu-Lu; Wu, Yang; Huang, Da-Wei; Tang, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI)-2 are known to influence tumor angiogenesis and progression. This work aimed to describe the levels of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 expression associated with tumor angiogenesis and early postoperative recurrence in patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Expression of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 in carcinoma tissues and paracarcinomatous tissues was assayed by immunostaining. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34 in tumor tissues was also assayed by immunostaining. The correlations of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 with VEGF, microvessel density (MVD), and early postoperative recurrence were analyzed. The results showed that MMP-2 expression was significantly increased (P < 0.05) and TFPI-2 expression was significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in carcinoma tissues compared with paracarcinomatous tissues. MMP-2 expression was positively correlated with VEGF (r = 0.594, P < 0.001) and MVD (r = 0.432, P < 0.001) in carcinoma tissues. TFPI-2 expression was negatively correlated with VEGF (r = -0.654, P < 0.001) and MVD (r = -0.360, P < 0.001) in carcinoma tissues. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that up-regulated MMP-2 and down-regulated TFPI-2 were independent predictors of early postoperative recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the combination of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 was a reliable predictive model of early recurrence. We conclude that increased MMP-2 expression and reduced TFPI-2 expression are closely linked to angiogenesis and early postoperative recurrence of pancreatic carcinoma. Immunohistochemical assay of MMP-2 and TFPI-2 may be useful for predicting early relapse of pancreatic carcinoma after surgery. PMID:26807187

  8. Oncologic Outcomes of Stage IVB or Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma Patients Treated With Chemotherapy at Siriraj Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ruengkhachorn, Irene; Leelaphatanadit, Chairat; Therasakvichya, Suwanit; Hunnangkul, Saowalak

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine response rate and survival outcomes of chemotherapeutic treatment in stage IVB, persistent, or recurrent cervical carcinoma patients. Methods Medical records of stage IVB or persistent or recurrent cervical carcinoma patients who received chemotherapy from January 2006 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with neuroendocrine carcinoma and patients who received only 1 cycle of chemotherapy were excluded. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, chemotherapeutic agents, and response rate were reported. Factors associated with overall response rate from the first-round chemotherapeutic treatment were analyzed using χ2 test. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model were used for survival analysis. Results Of 286 cervical carcinoma patients, 47 patients had stage IVB and 239 patients had persistent or recurrent disease. One hundred sixty-nine patients (59.1%) had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A majority of disease sites (38.8%) had both local and distant metastases. Overall response rate for first-round chemotherapeutic treatment was 37.8%, with 23.1% of patients having a complete response and 14.7% of patients having a partial response. Regarding disease response, 32.2% of patients had stable disease and 30% had disease progression. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for first-round chemotherapeutic treatment were 11.6 (range, 0.7–108.3) months and 5.6 (range, 0.7–102.2) months, respectively. Patients with distant metastasis had a shorter OS duration with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.09 to 2.90; P = 0.02. Patients with a body mass index of 25 kg/m2 or more had a longer PFS duration than those with a normal body mass index (adjusted HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55–0.94; P = 0.018). Patients with non-SCC had a longer PFS duration than that of patients with SCC (adjusted HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60–0.99; P = 0.041). Conclusions Response rates

  9. Nomograms to Predict Recurrence-Free and Overall Survival After Curative Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuhree; Margonis, Georgios A.; Prescott, Jason D.; Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Wang, Tracy S.; Evans, Douglas B.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed I.; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Poultsides, George A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but aggressive endocrine tumor, and the prognostic factors associated with long-term outcomes after surgical resection remain poorly defined. OBJECTIVES To define clinicopathological variables associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) after curative surgical resection of ACC and to propose nomograms for individual risk prediction. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Nomograms to predict RFS and OS after surgical resection of ACC were proposed using a multi-institutional cohort of patients who underwent curative-intent surgery for ACC at 13 major institutions in the United States between March 17, 1994, and December 22, 2014. The dates of our study analysis were April 15, 2015, to May 12, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The discriminative ability and calibration of the nomograms to predict RFS and OS were tested using C statistics, calibration plots, and Kaplan-Meier curves. RESULTS In total, 148 patients who underwent surgery for ACC were included in the study. The median patient age was 53 years, and 65.5% (97 of 148) of the patients were female. One-third of the patients (35.1% [52 of 148]) had a functional tumor, and the median tumor size was 11.2 cm. Most patients (77.7% [115 of 148]) underwent R0 resection, and 8.8% (13 of 148) of the patients had N1 disease. Using backward stepwise selection of clinically important variables with the Akaike information criterion, the following variables were incorporated in the prediction of RFS: tumor size of at least 12 cm (hazard ratio [HR], 3.00; 95% CI, 1.63–5.70; P < .001), positive nodal status (HR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.47–15.50; P = .01), stage III/IV (HR, 1.80; 95% CI, 0.95–3.39; P = .07), cortisol-secreting tumor (HR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.27–4.48; P = .01), and capsular invasion (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.02–3.74; P = .04). Factors selected as predicting OS were tumor size of at least 12 cm (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.00–3.17; P = .05), positive

  10. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Application in Response Prediction before, during, and after Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy in Primary Rectal Cancer Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; De Felice, Francesca; Magnante, Anna Lisa; Rengo, Marco; Redler, Adriano; Laghi, Andrea; Raffetto, Nicola; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Our interest was to monitor treatment response using ADC value to predict response of rectal tumour to preoperative radiochemotherapy. Materials and Methods. Twenty-two patients were treated with long course of radiochemotherapy, followed by surgery. Patients were examined by diffusion-weighted imaging MRI at three-time points (prior, during, and after radiochemotherapy) and were classified as responders and nonresponders. Results. A statistical significant correlation was found between preradiochemotherapy ADC values and during treatment ADC values, in responders (F = 21.50, P value <0.05). An increase in ADC value during treatment was predictive of at least a partial response. Discussion. Response of tumour to neoadjuvant therapy cannot be easily evaluated, and such capability might be of great importance in clinical practice, because the number of irradiated and operated patients may be superior to the number of who will really benefit from this multimodal treatment. A reliable prediction of the final clinical TN stage would allow radiotherapist to adapt multidisciplinary approach to a less invasive management, sparing surgical procedure in responder patients or even allowing an early surgery in nonresponders, which would significantly reduce radiochemotherapy related toxicity. Conclusion. Early evaluation of response during neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy treatment shows great promise to predict tumour response. PMID:23936841

  11. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  12. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  13. Prognosis in patients with local recurrence after definitive irradiation for prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Schellhammer, P.F.

    1989-06-15

    Of 414 patients with Stage A2-C disease, all with a minimum follow-up period of 3 years, who have been definitively irradiated by external beam therapy or iodine-125 (I-125) implantation for biopsy-proven prostatic adenocarcinoma, 83 patients (20%) have experienced local recurrences. The incidence of distant metastasis was significantly higher in patients with local tumor recurrence (56 of 83; 68%), as compared with those with local control (64 of 331; 19%; P less than 0.001). This difference remained significant within each tumor grade and stage. Subsequently, survival in patients with local recurrence was significantly shorter than in those with local tumor control (66% vs. 89% at 5 years; P = 0.001). Of the 83 patients with local tumor recurrence, 56 had local recurrence and distant metastasis, and 27 had local failure alone, with a median follow-up of 76 months for the latter group. Fifteen of 83 patients with local recurrence (18%) developed major complications secondary to local disease. Three of the 83 (4%) patients were known to die of prostatic recurrence alone and another 11 of 83 (13%) as a result of some combination of local and distant disease. Therefore, in reference to the entire group of definitively irradiated patients, only 0.72% expired solely of complications associated with local tumor recurrence and an additional 2.7% expired of a combination of both local and distant disease.

  14. Mutational landscape of gingivo-buccal oral squamous cell carcinoma reveals new recurrently-mutated genes and molecular subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arindam; Biswas, Nidhan K.; Amin, Kishore; Kowtal, Pradnya; Kumar, Shantanu; Das, Subrata; Sarin, Rajiv; Majumder, Partha P.; Bagchi, I; Bairagya, B. B.; Basu, A.; Bhan, M. K.; Chaturvedi, P.; Das, D.; D'Cruz, A.; Dhar, R.; Dutta, D.; Ganguli, D.; Gera, P.; Gupta, T.; Mahapatra, S.; Mujawar, M. H. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Nair, S.; Nikam, S.; Nobre, M.; Patil, A.; Patra, S.; Rama-Gowtham, M.; Rao, T. S.; Roy, B.; Roychowdhury, B.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar-Roy, N.; Sutradhar, D.

    2013-01-01

    Gingivo-buccal oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC-GB), an anatomical and clinical subtype of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is prevalent in regions where tobacco-chewing is common. Exome sequencing (n=50) and recurrence testing (n=60) reveals that some significantly and frequently altered genes are specific to OSCC-GB (USP9X, MLL4, ARID2, UNC13C and TRPM3), while some others are shared with HNSCC (for example, TP53, FAT1, CASP8, HRAS and NOTCH1). We also find new genes with recurrent amplifications (for example, DROSHA, YAP1) or homozygous deletions (for example, DDX3X) in OSCC-GB. We find a high proportion of C>G transversions among tobacco users with high numbers of mutations. Many pathways that are enriched for genomic alterations are specific to OSCC-GB. Our work reveals molecular subtypes with distinctive mutational profiles such as patients predominantly harbouring mutations in CASP8 with or without mutations in FAT1. Mean duration of disease-free survival is significantly elevated in some molecular subgroups. These findings open new avenues for biological characterization and exploration of therapies. PMID:24292195

  15. PI-88 inhibits postoperative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma via disrupting the surge of heparanase after liver resection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bo-Yi; Wang, Zheng; Hu, Jie; Liu, Wei-Feng; Shen, Zao-Zhuo; Zhang, Xin; Yu, Lei; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Phosphomannopentaose sulfate (PI-88), an effective inhibitor of heparanase (HPSE), exhibited anti-recurrence and anti-metastasis activity in preliminary clinical trials of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, the underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Our aim was to reveal the mechanism by which PI-88 inhibits recurrence and intrahepatic metastasis. A tissue microarray containing samples from 352 HCC patients was used to determine HPSE expression. We performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect plasma levels of HPSE in 40 HCC patients. We also used quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemical staining to assess HPSE expression of HCC cell lines and tissues. The in vitro effects of PI-88 were examined by cell proliferation and migration assays. In vivo PI-88 activity was assessed using murine orthotopic HCC models. Intratumoral HPSE was an independent prognostic marker for postsurgical overall survival (P = 0.001) and time to recurrence (P < 0.001) of HCC patients with hepatectomy. Elevated levels of HPSE were detected both in postsurgical plasma of HCC patients and an orthotopic mouse model after hepatectomy. PI-88 inhibited tumor recurrence and metastasis after liver resection in the mouse model. In vitro expression of HPSE was up-regulated by overexpression of early growth response 1 (EGR1), which is induced after hepatectomy. Up-regulation of HPSE enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to PI-88 and the inhibitive effect of PI-88 on cell proliferation and migration. Our data show that PI-88 effectively inhibits postoperative recurrence and intrahepatic metastasis of HCC, providing an experimental basis for the clinical application of PI-88 in HCC patients who have undergone hepatectomy. PMID:26415733

  16. Cholecystectomy is associated with higher risk of early recurrence and poorer survival after curative resection for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Wang, Shu-Kang; Zhi, Xu-Ting; Zhou, Jian; Dong, Zhao-Ru; Zhang, Zong-Li; Sun, Hui-Chuan; Ye, Qing-Hai; Fan, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Although cholecystectomy has been reported to be associated with increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the association between cholecystectomy and prognosis of HCC patients underwent curative resection has never been examined. Through retrospective analysis of the data of 3933 patients underwent curative resection for HCC, we found that cholecystectomy was an independent prognostic factor for recurrence-free survival (RFS) of patients at early stage (BCLC stage 0/A) (p = 0.020, HR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.04–1.59), and the 1-, 3-, 5-year RFS rates for patients at early stage were significantly worse in cholecystectomy group than in non-cholecystectomy group (80.5%, 61.8%, 52.0% vs 88.2%, 68.8%, 56.8%, p = 0.033). The early recurrence rate of cholecystectomy group was significantly higher than that of non-cholecystectomy group for patients at early stage (59/47 vs 236/333, p = 0.007), but not for patients at advanced stage (BCLC stage C) (p = 0.194). Multivariate analyses showed that cholecystectomy was an independent risk factor for early recurrence (p = 0.005, HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.13–2.03) of early stage HCC, but not for late recurrence (p = 0.959). In conclusion, cholecystectomy is an independent predictor for early recurrence and is associated with poorer RFS of early stage HCC. Removal of normal gallbladder during HCC resection may be avoided for early stage patients. PMID:27320390

  17. Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Lymph Node Recurrence After Radical Surgery of Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jincheng; Kong Cheng; Tao Hua

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the outcomes of patients with lymph node recurrence after radical surgery of esophageal cancer, when given radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1996 and December 2005, the data from 73 patients with lymph node recurrence after radical surgery of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were separated into two groups: radiochemotherapy (RC, 31 patients) and radiotherapy alone (RA, 42 patients). Patients in the RC group received at least two cycles of 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. Results: The median duration of follow-up was 11 months (range, 2-48). The overall survival rate for all patients was 46.7% and 4.7% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. The median overall survival time was 9 months (95% confidence interval, 6.96-11.04) and 17 months (95% confidence interval, 13.61-20.39) for RA and RC groups, respectively. The survival rate at 1 and 3 years was 62.5% and 10.5% in the RC group and 33.8% and 0% in the RA group (p = .0049, log-rank test; hazard ratio for death, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.92). Acute toxicities were more frequent in the RC group than in the RA group. No significant differences were found in the late toxicity profiles between the two groups. Conclusion: The results of the present retrospective analysis suggest that RC should be considered an effective and well-tolerated treatment of patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and postoperative lymph node recurrence.

  18. Expression of X-linked Inhibitor-of-apoptosis Protein in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Promotes Metastasis and Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ying-Hong; Ding, Wen-Xing; Zhou, Jian; He, Jun-Yi; Xu, Yang; Gambotto, Andrew; Rabinowich, Hannah; Fan, Jia; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Despite significantly improved diagnosis and treatment in recent years, the long-term therapeutic effect is compromised by the frequent recurrence and metastasis, of which the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Our initial studies in established HCC cell lines with different metastatic capabilities indicated a correlation of metastasis with the resistance to apoptosis and therefore the ability to survive in stressed conditions. Subsequent investigation revealed that increased expression of X-linked inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein (XIAP) was correlated with the resistance to apoptosis and enhanced invasiveness in vitro, which could contribute to increased metastatic foci in vivo. Furthermore, we found that nearly 90% of clinical samples from advanced HCC patients expressed high levels of XIAP. Patients with XIAP-positive tumors had a significantly increased risk to relapse, which was resulted from metastasis, following total liver resection and orthotopic liver transplantation. Indeed, XIAP expression could be an independent prognostic factor for predicting disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate of these patients. XIAP expression was also highly correlated with advanced cases that exceeded the Milan criteria and could be a prognostic factor for disease-free survival in these patients as well. Conclusion: our studies have revealed an important molecule in controlling HCC metastasis, defined a biomarker that can be utilized to predict HCC recurrence and patient survival following treatment, and suggest that XIAP can be a molecular target subject to intervention to reduce metastasis and recurrence. PMID:18666224

  19. Recurrent carcinoma in situ of the vagina following split-thickness skin graft vaginoplasty.

    PubMed

    Gallup, D G; Castle, C A; Stock, R J

    1987-01-01

    A patient who developed squamous cell carcinoma in situ in a split-thickness skin graft neovagina is presented. This is the third reported case in the English literature of a patient previously treated for carcinoma in situ of the vagina who later developed an identical lesion in the graft. Management of this neoplasm is discussed, and follow-up for patients with neovaginas is emphasized. PMID:3539716

  20. Bisacodyl Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal bisacodyl is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation. It also is used to empty the bowels before surgery and certain medical procedures. Bisacodyl is in a class of medications called stimulant laxatives. It works by increasing activity of the intestines ...

  1. Bisacodyl Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal bisacodyl is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation. It also is used to empty the bowels before surgery and certain medical procedures. Bisacodyl is in a class of medications called stimulant laxatives. It works by increasing activity of the intestines to cause a bowel movement.

  2. Rectal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... the best treatment. How to Prepare for the Test The health care provider does a rectal exam and collects the ... vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your health care provider about the meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Mean Abnormal results may ...

  3. Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Other Stereotactic Techniques for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Shiris Wai Sum; Wu, Vincent Wing Cheung; Kam, Michael Koon Ming; Leung, Sing Fai; Yu, Brian Kwok Hung; Ngai, Dennis Yuen Kan; Wong, Simon Chun Fai; Chan, Anthony Tak Cheung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients can be salvaged by reirradiation with a substantial degree of radiation-related complications. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is widely used in this regard because of its rapid dose falloff and high geometric precision. The aim of this study was to examine whether the newly developed intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) has any dosimetric advantages over three other stereotactic techniques, including circular arc (CARC), static conformal beam (SmMLC), and dynamic conformal arc (mARC), in treating locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography images of 32 patients with locally recurrent NPC, previously treated with SRT, were retrieved from the stereotactic planning system for contouring and computing treatment plans. Treatment planning of each patient was performed for the four treatment techniques: CARC, SmMLC, mARC, and IMSRT. The conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV) and doses to the organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue were compared. Results: All four techniques delivered adequate doses to the PTV. IMSRT, SmMLC, and mARC delivered reasonably conformal and homogenous dose to the PTV (CI <1.47, HI <0.53), but not for CARC (p < 0.05). IMSRT presented with the smallest CI (1.37) and HI (0.40). Among the four techniques, IMSRT spared the greatest number of OARs, namely brainstem, temporal lobes, optic chiasm, and optic nerve, and had the smallest normal tissue volume in the low-dose region. Conclusion: Based on the dosimetric comparison, IMSRT was optimal for locally recurrent NPC by delivering a conformal and homogenous dose to the PTV while sparing OARs.

  4. AB064. Diagnostic ureteroscopy for upper tract urothelial carcinoma is independently associated with intravesical recurrence after radical nephroureterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei; Su, Xiao-Hong; Xiong, Geng-Yan; Li, Xue-Song; Zhou, Li-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of diagnostic ureteroscopy on intravesical recurrence in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) after radical nephroureterectomy (RNU). Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 664 patients who were treated with RNU for UTUC from June 2000 to December 2011, excluding those who had concomitant/prior bladder tumors. Of the 664 patients, 81 underwent diagnostic ureteroscopy (URS). We analyzed the impact of diagnostic ureteroscopy on intravesical recurrence (IVR) using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the independent risk factors. Results The median follow-up time was 48 months [interquartile range (IQR): 31–77 months]. Patients who underwent ureteroscopy were more likely to have a small (P<0.01), early-staged (P=0.019), multifocality (p=0.035) and ureteral tumor (P<0.001). IVR occurred in 223 patients during follow-up within a median of 17 months (IQR: 7–33). Patients without preoperative ureteroscopy have a statistically significant better 2-year [(79.3±0.02)% vs. (71.4±0.02)%, P<0.001] and 5-year intravesical recurrence-free survival rates [(64.9±0.05)% vs. (44.3±0.06)%, P<0.001] than patients who underwent ureteroscopy. In multivariate analysis, the diagnostic ureteroscopy (P=0.006), multiple tumors (P=0.001), tumor size <3 cm (P=0.008), low-grade (P=0.022) and pN0 stage tumor (P=0.045) were independent predictors of IVR. Conclusions Diagnostic ureteroscopy is independently associated with intravesical recurrence after radical nephroureterectomy.

  5. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  6. Comparative Long-term Study of a Large Series of Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma. Loco-Regional Recurrence, Metastasis, and Survival.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Antonio; Lain, Josep María; Chabrera, Carol; García Font, Marc; Fraile, Manel; Barco, Israel; Torras, Merçe; Reñe, Asumpta; González, Sonia; González, Clarissa; Piqueras, Mercedes; Veloso, Enrique; Cirera, Lluís; Pessarrodona, Antoni; Giménez, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to compare histologic and immunohistochemical features, surgical treatment and clinical course, including disease recurrence, distant metastases, and mortality between patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) or invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). We included 1,745 patients operated for 1,789 breast tumors, with 1,639 IDC (1,600 patients) and 145 patients with ILC and 150 breast tumors. The median follow-up was 76 months. ILC was significantly more likely to be associated with a favorable phenotype. Prevalence of contralateral breast cancer was slightly higher for ILC patients than for IDC patients (4.0% versus 3.2%; p = n.s). ILC was more likely multifocal, estrogen receptor positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 (HER2) negative, and with lower proliferative index compared to IDC. Considering conservative surgery, ILC patients required more frequently re-excision and/or mastectomy. Prevalence of stage IIB and III stages were significantly more frequent in ILC patients than in IDC patients (37.4% versus 25.3%, p = 0.006). Positive nodes were significantly more frequent in the ILC patients (44.6% versus 37.0%, p = 0.04). After adjustment for tumor size and nodal status, frequencies of recurrence/metastasis, disease-free and specific survival were similar among patients with IDC and patients with ILC. In conclusion, women with ILC do not have worse clinical outcomes than their counterparts with IDC. Management decisions should be based on individual patient and tumor biologic characteristics rather than on lobular versus ductal histology. PMID:26190560

  7. Phase I/II Trial Evaluating Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Salvaging Treatment of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lin; Hu, Jiyi; Guan, Xiyin; Gao, Jing; Lu, Rong; Lu, Jiade J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiation therapy is the mainstay strategy for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Intensity-modulated X-ray therapy (IMXT) alone is the current standard for stage I and II NPC. For stage III and IV A/B diseases, concurrent chemotherapy should be provided in addition to IMXT. However, optimal treatment for locally recurrent NPC after previous definitive dose of radiotherapy is lacking. Various techniques including brachytherapy, IMXT, stereotactic radiosurgery or radiotherapy (SRS or SBRT) have been used in the management of locally recurrent NPC. Due to the inherent limitation of these techniques, i.e., limited range of irradiation or over-irradiation to surrounding normal tissues, moderate efficacy has been observed at the cost of severe toxicities. Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) offers potential physical and biological advantages over photon and proton radiotherapy. Due to the inverted dose profile of particle beams and their greater energy deposition within the Bragg peak, precise dose delivery to the target volume(s) without exposing the surrounding organs at risk to extra doses is possible. In addition, CIRT provides an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as compared to photon and proton radiotherapy. Such advantages may translate to improved outcomes after irradiation in terms of disease control in radio-resistant and previously treated, recurrent malignancies. It is therefore reasonable to postulate that recurrent NPC after high-dose radiotherapy could be more resistant to re-irradiation using photons. Reports on the treatment of radio-resistant malignancies in the head and neck region such as melanoma, sarcoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) have demonstrated superior local control rates from CIRT as compared to photon irradiation. Thus patients with recurrent NPC are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological effectiveness of carbon ions. As effective retreatment strategy is lacking for locally recurrent NPC

  8. 125-iodine reimplantation for locally progressive prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, K.E.; Nori, D.; Morse, M.J.; Sogani, P.C.; Whitmore, W.F.; Fuks, Z. )

    1990-09-01

    We treated 13 patients with a second 125-iodine implant for local recurrence of prostatic carcinoma. All patients had biopsy proved palpable recurrence without evidence of distant metastases. Full doses of irradiation were used (median matched peripheral dose 170 Gy.). Six patients had complete regression of palpable recurrence, 2 had partial regression, 2 had no apparent response and 3 were unevaluable for local response. Actuarial freedom from local disease progression at 5 years was 51%. Despite a relatively high rate of local disease control the actuarial rate of distant metastases reached 100% at 6 years after reimplantation. There were 2 severe rectal complications and 4 instances of mild to moderate urinary incontinence among the 13 patients. Local regression of recurrent prostatic carcinoma may be achieved with 125-iodine reimplantation but most patients still had distant metastases.

  9. The Molecular Basis of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiller, Michelle; Boostrom, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The majority of rectal carcinomas are sporadic in nature, and relevant testing for driver mutations to guide therapy is important. A thorough family history is necessary and helpful in elucidating a potential hereditary predilection for a patient's carcinoma. The adequate diagnosis of a heritable tendency toward colorectal carcinoma alters the management of a patient disease and permits the implementation of various surveillance algorithms as preventive measures. PMID:25733974

  10. Recurrent spinal metastasis of a sporadic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid after radiation therapy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Bendix, Christopher; Santacroce, Antonio; Gierga, Kristin; Floeth, Frank W; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Penalonzo, Marco Antonio; Eicker, Sven Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic Medullary Carcinoma of the Thyroid is a relatively uncommon entity and at the time of diagnosis, most already present loco-regional metastasis. Therapy should be aggressive to reduce recurrence and mortality. Follow-up period should continue lifelong and should also include calcium/pentagastrin infusion test, as well as 6-month interval diagnostic imaging. PMID:26783427

  11. Preoperative Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI and Simultaneous Treatment of Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma Prolonged Recurrence-Free Survival of Progressed Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients after Hepatic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Masanori; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Amemiya, Hidetake; Maki, Akira; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Sano, Katsuhiro; Motosugi, Utaroh; Fujii, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether preoperative gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) and simultaneous treatment of suspected early hepatocellular carcinoma (eHCC) at the time of resection for progressed HCC affected patient prognosis following hepatic resection. Methods. A total of 147 consecutive patients who underwent their first curative hepatic resection for progressed HCC were enrolled. Of these, 77 patients underwent EOB-MRI (EOB-MRI (+)) before hepatic resection and the remaining 70 patients did not (EOB-MRI (−)). Suspected eHCCs detected by preoperative imaging were resected or ablated at the time of resection for progressed HCC. Results. The number of patients who underwent treatment for eHCCs was significantly higher in the EOB-MRI (+) than in the EOB-MRI (−) (17 versus 6; P = 0.04). Recurrence-free survival (1-, 3-, and 5-year; 81.4, 62.6, 48.7% versus 82.1, 41.5, 25.5%, resp., P < 0.01), but not overall survival (1-, 3-, and 5-year; 98.7, 90.7, 80.8% versus 97.0, 86.3, 72.4%, resp., P = 0.38), was significantly better in the EOB-MRI (+). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that preoperative EOB-MRI was one of the independent factors significantly correlated with better recurrence-free survival. Conclusions. Preoperative EOB-MRI and simultaneous treatment of eHCC prolonged recurrence-free survival after hepatic resection. PMID:24701029

  12. [A 23-year delayed locoregional recurrence of breast carcinoma following mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Etou, Hidehiro; Suzuki, Gen; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Chiyoko; Hattori, Chikayuki; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2008-02-01

    A 77-year-old woman who underwent a right modified radical mastectomy 23 years ago with no further adjuvant treatment presented with a right chest wall mass (3 x 4 x 2 cm) at the scar. She had no symptoms nor metastasis. The laboratory data were normal including tumor marker. The mass was diagnosed as compatible with a local recurrence tumor from the previous breast cancer on the ultrasonography and chest CT. After obtaining her informed consent for the therapy, we performed 60 Gy/30 fr radiotherapy on the recurrent tumor on her right chest wall with concurrent oral chemo-endocrine therapy. The first regimens were tamoxifen 20 mg/day and 5'-DFUR 600 mg/day, followed by toremifene 80 mg/day and 5'-DFUR 600 mg/day, and then the tumor disappeared. But three years later, we found tumor regrowth. We changed the regimen, giving 5'-DFUR 1,200 mg/day and cyclophosphamide 100 mg/day for 2 weeks followed by a 1-week drug-free period, then added 10 Gy/5 fr radiotherapy and hyperthermia twice a week. Final regimens were anastrozole 1 mg/day and capecitabine 900 mg/day. The recurrent tumor decreased and the disease stabilized. After these therapies, she had very good quality of life. We recommend radiation and/or hyperthermia with concurrent oral chemo-endocrine therapy as useful for the delayed recurrence of elderly breast cancer after a modified radical mastectomy. PMID:18281775

  13. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  14. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  15. Rectal Cancer, Version 2.2015.

    PubMed

    Benson, Al B; Venook, Alan P; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chan, Emily; Chen, Yi-Jen; Cooper, Harry S; Engstrom, Paul F; Enzinger, Peter C; Fenton, Moon J; Fuchs, Charles S; Grem, Jean L; Grothey, Axel; Hochster, Howard S; Hunt, Steven; Kamel, Ahmed; Kirilcuk, Natalie; Leong, Lucille A; Lin, Edward; Messersmith, Wells A; Mulcahy, Mary F; Murphy, James D; Nurkin, Steven; Rohren, Eric; Ryan, David P; Saltz, Leonard; Sharma, Sunil; Shibata, David; Skibber, John M; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Stoffel, Elena M; Stotsky-Himelfarb, Eden; Willett, Christopher G; Gregory, Kristina M; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Rectal Cancer begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, posttreatment surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and survivorship. The NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant new data from publications and abstracts, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points from the 2015 NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were perioperative therapy options and surveillance for patients with stage I through III disease. PMID:26085388

  16. Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, María José; Lopez-Martin, Ana; Hitt, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. PMID:26927178

  17. Recurrent adult choroid plexus carcinoma treated with high-dose chemotherapy and syngeneic stem cell (bone marrow) transplant.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Thomas A; Parikh, Jigarkumar; Sharma, Suash; Giller, Cole A; Sterling, Kristen; Kapoor, Suraj; Pirkle, Christen; Jillella, Anand

    2013-12-01

    Choroid plexus carcinomas (CPCs) are rare epithelial central nervous system tumors. CPC occurs mainly in infants and young children, comprising ≈ 1 to 4% of all pediatric brain neoplasms. There is very limited information available regarding tumor biology and CPC treatment due to its rarity. There have been various case reports and meta-analyses of reported cases with CPC. Surgical resection is often challenging but remains a well-established treatment option. Chemotherapy is often reserved for recurrent or refractory cases, but the goal of treatment is usually palliative. We present a case of recurrent, adult CPC with disseminated leptomeningeal involvement treated with salvage chemotherapy including high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide; once a remission was achieved, this response was consolidated with a syngeneic stem cell (bone marrow) transplant after a preparative regimen of high-dose chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide, and thiotepa. Although the patient tolerated the transplant well and remained disease-free for 12 months, she subsequently succumbed to relapsed disease 18 months posttransplant. We believe that this is the first report of using syngeneic stem cell transplant in CPC to consolidate a remission achieved by salvage chemotherapy. PMID:23427033

  18. Salvage living-donor liver transplantation for liver failure following definitive radiation therapy for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, T; Fujimoto, Y; Hatano, E; Nishida, H; Ogawa, K; Mori, A; Okajima, H; Kaido, T; Nakamura, A; Nagamatsu, H; Uemoto, S

    2015-04-01

    A 57-year-old man with a history of hepatitis B virus infection was referred to our hospital for living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Five years earlier, right lobectomy had been performed for solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with bile duct tumor thrombus in segments 5 and 6 in the liver. Two years later, transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation were performed for recurrent HCC. Two years after those local therapies, another recurrent HCC was treated with transhepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with cisplatin and conventional radiation therapy (RT) with 60 Gy in 20 fractions, because the tumor was contiguous to the trunk of the portal vein. After the completion of RT, symptoms due to liver failure and severe infection caused by multiple liver abscesses developed despite the administration of antibiotics and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage. Therefore, LDLT was performed with the use of a right lobe graft donated by his wife. Vascular anastomosis was successfully performed with the use of normal procedures. The patient recovered uneventfully, and has since been doing well for 34 months, with no evidence of vascular complications. However, the degree of injury to the anastomotic vessels caused by definitive RT before LDLT remains unclear, whereas the safety and efficacy of some forms of RT as a bridge to deceased-donor LT have been reported. Salvage LDLT is effective for patients with liver failure after multidisciplinary treatment including radiation, while carefully taking radiation-induced vessel injury as a potential late complication into consideration, especially in LDLT cases. PMID:25891735

  19. Recurrent acute-onset Cushing's syndrome 6 years after removal of a thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma: from ectopic ACTH to CRH.

    PubMed

    Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Asa, Sylvia L; Arola, Johanna; Sane, Timo

    2013-03-01

    We describe a rare case of ectopic Cushing's syndrome that recurred 6 years after resection of a thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma. We discuss reasons for the differing clinical presentations, management, hormone profiles, as well as immunopathology. A 41-year-old male developed acute-onset Cushing's syndrome. Clinical presentation and laboratory results were compatible with ectopic adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) production. Computerized tomography (CT) showed a 3.6 cm thymic tumor which was successfully resected. Plasma ACTH (P-ACTH) normalized the first postoperative day. Histopathology demonstrated a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with diffuse positivity for ACTH and focal corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) reactivity in a few scattered cells. The patient was in remission for 6 years. He then again presented with acute-onset Cushing's syndrome. Fluorine-labeled dihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) PET/CT showed local uptake in the mediastinum and he underwent repeat resection. However, P-ACTH remained increased (613 ng/l) and 24-h urinary cortisol was 36,720 nmol, suggesting incomplete tumor removal or metastatic spread. Metyrapone treatment was initiated but then withdrawn because the patient spontaneously recovered and cortisol metabolism gradually normalized within 3 weeks. Histopathology demonstrated a recurrent neuroendocrine carcinoma with the same features as the previous lesion but this time CRH was strongly positive in more numerous cells. Normalization of P-ACTH after primary surgery was compatible with ectopic ACTH production. However, the delayed fall in P-ACTH and serum cortisol is compatible with ectopic CRH production and stimulation of pituitary ACTH secretion, which gradually resolved. Although ectopic CRH production is very rare, the unusual dynamics illustrated here should raise the possibility of CRH production by a neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:23233312

  20. Local-regional recurrence after surgery without postoperative irradiation for carcinomas of the major salivary glands: Implications for adjuvant therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Granchi, Phillip J.; Garcia, Joaquin; Bucci, M. Kara; Fu, Karen K.; Eisele, David W. . E-mail: deisele@ohns.ucsf.edu

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To determine factors predictive of local-regional recurrence (LRR) after surgery alone for carcinomas of the major salivary glands in an attempt to evaluate the potential role of postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 207 patients with carcinomas of the major salivary glands were treated with definitive surgery without postoperative radiation therapy. Histology was: 67 mucoepidermoid (32%), 50 adenoid cystic (24%), 34 acinic cell (16%), 23 malignant mixed (11%), 16 adenocarcinoma (8%), 6 oncocytic (3%), 6 myoepithelial (3%), and 5 other (2%). Distribution of pathologic T-stage was: 54 T1 (26%), 83 T2 (40%), 46 T3 (22%), and 24 T4 (12%). Sixty patients (29%) had microscopically positive margins. Median follow-up was 6.1 years (range, 0.5-18.7 years). Results: The 5-year and 10-year estimates of local-regional control were 86% and 74%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazard model identified pathologic lymph node metastasis (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8; p = 0.001), high histologic grade (HR, 4.2; p = 0.003), positive margins (HR, 2.6; p = 0.03), and T3-4 disease (HR, 2.0; p = 0.04) as independent predictors of LRR. The presence of any one of these factors was associated with 10-year local-regional control rates of 37% to 63%. Conclusion: Lymph node metastasis, high tumor grade, positive margins, and T3-4 stage predict for significant rates of LRR after surgery for carcinomas of the major salivary glands. Postoperative radiation therapy should be considered for patients with these disease characteristics.

  1. Copanlisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  2. KRAS (but not BRAF) mutations in ovarian serous borderline tumor are associated with recurrent low-grade serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Yvonne T.; Deavers, Michael T.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Kwan, Suet-Yan; Kuo, Eric; Malpica, Anais; Mok, Samuel C.; Gershenson, David M.; Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2014-01-01

    BRAF and KRAS mutations in ovarian serous borderline tumors (OSBTs) and ovarian low-grade serous carcinomas (LGSCs) have been previously described. However, whether those OSBTs would progress to LGSCs or those LGSCs were developed from OSBT precursors in previous studies is unknown. Therefore, we assessed KRAS and BRAF mutations in tumor samples from 23 recurrent LGSC patients with known initial diagnosis of OSBT. Paraffin blocks from both OSBT and LGSC samples were available for 5 patients, and either OSBT or LGSC were available for another 18 patients. Tumor cells from paraffin-embedded tissues were dissected out for mutation analysis by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Sanger sequencing. Tumors that appeared to have wild-type KRAS by conventional PCR–Sanger sequencing were further analyzed by full COLD (coamplification at lower denaturation temperature)-PCR and deep sequencing. Full COLD-PCR was able to enrich the amplification of mutated alleles. Deep sequencing was performed with the Ion Torrent personal genome machine (PGM). By conventional PCR–Sanger sequencing, BRAF mutation was detected only in one patient and KRAS mutations were detected in 10 patients. Full COLD-PCR deep sequencing detected low-abundance KRAS mutations in eight additional patients. Three of the five patients with both OSBT and LGSC samples available had the same KRAS mutations detected in both OSBT and LGSC samples. The remaining two patients had only KRAS mutations detected in their LGSC samples. For patients with either OSBT or LGSC samples available, KRAS mutations were detected in 7 OSBT samples and 6 LGSC samples. To our surprise, patients with the KRAS G12V mutation appeared to have shorter survival times. In summary, KRAS mutations are very common in recurrent LGSC, while BRAF mutations are rare. The findings indicate that recurrent LGSC can arise from proliferation of OSBT tumor cells with or without detectable KRAS mutations. PMID:24549645

  3. Branched-chain amino acids suppress the cumulative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma under conditions of insulin-resistance

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIJI, HITOSHI; NOGUCHI, RYUICHI; NAMISAKI, TADASHI; MORIYA, KEI; KITADE, MITSUTERU; AIHARA, YOSUKE; DOUHARA, AKITOSHI; YAMAO, JUNICHI; FUJIMOTO, MASAO; TOYOHARA, MASAHISA; MITORO, AKIRA; SAWAI, MASAYOSHI; YOSHIDA, MOTOYUKI; MORIOKA, CHIE; UEJIMA, MASAKAZU; UEMURA, MASAHITO; FUKUI, HIROSHI

    2013-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) reportedly inhibit the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis and obesity that is frequently associated with insulin resistance (IR). We previously reported that BCAAs exert a chemopreventive effect against HCC under IR conditions in rats. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of BCAAs on the cumulative recurrence of HCC under IR conditions in the clinical practice. BCAA granules (Livact®, 12 g/day) were administered for 60 months following the local curative therapy for HCC, and several indices were determined. Treatment with BCAAs markedly inhibited the cumulative recurrence of HCC in patients with a high IR index [homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-IR >2.5], but not in patients with HOMA-IR of ≤2.5. BCAA also improved the HOMA-IR, and the inhibitory effect was observed regardless of the serum albumin (Alb) levels. Similarly, BCAA treatment revealed a marked suppressive effect in patients with high fasting insulin [immune reactive insulin (IRI) >15 U/ml], but not with IRI of ≤15. BCAA treatment did not result in differences in HCC recurrence in patients with high and low glucose levels [fasting blood sugar (FBS) >110 and ≤110, respectively]. Furthermore, serum levels of the soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (sVEGFR2) were significantly inhibited along with these clinical effects. Our findings indicate that the inhibitory effect of BCAAs was achieved, at least partly, by coordinated effects of anti-angiogenesis and IR improvement. Since BCAAs are widely and safely used in clinical practice to treat patients with chronic liver diseases, BCAAs may represent a new strategy for secondary chemoprevention for HCC patients with IR. Moreover, our findings suggest that sVEGFR2 may be a useful clinical predictive marker for BCAA treatment under IR conditions. PMID:23708326

  4. Branched-chain amino acids suppress the cumulative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma under conditions of insulin-resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoshiji, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Ryuichi; Namisaki, Tadashi; Moriya, Kei; Kitade, Mitsuteru; Aihara, Yosuke; Douhara, Akitoshi; Yamao, Junichi; Fujimoto, Masao; Toyohara, Masahisa; Mitoro, Akira; Sawai, Masayoshi; Yoshida, Motoyuki; Morioka, Chie; Uejima, Masakazu; Uemura, Masahito; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) reportedly inhibit the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis and obesity that is frequently associated with insulin resistance (IR). We previously reported that BCAAs exert a chemopreventive effect against HCC under IR conditions in rats. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of BCAAs on the cumulative recurrence of HCC under IR conditions in the clinical practice. BCAA granules (Livact®, 12 g/day) were administered for 60 months following the local curative therapy for HCC, and several indices were determined. Treatment with BCAAs markedly inhibited the cumulative recurrence of HCC in patients with a high IR index [homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-IR >2.5], but not in patients with HOMA-IR of ≤2.5. BCAA also improved the HOMA-IR, and the inhibitory effect was observed regardless of the serum albumin (Alb) levels. Similarly, BCAA treatment revealed a marked suppressive effect in patients with high fasting insulin [immune reactive insulin (IRI)>15 U/ml], but not with IRI of ≤15. BCAA treatment did not result in differences in HCC recurrence in patients with high and low glucose levels [fasting blood sugar (FBS)>110 and ≤110, respectively]. Furthermore, serum levels of the soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (sVEGFR2) were significantly inhibited along with these clinical effects. Our findings indicate that the inhibitory effect of BCAAs was achieved, at least partly, by coordinated effects of anti-angiogenesis and IR improvement. Since BCAAs are widely and safely used in clinical practice to treat patients with chronic liver diseases, BCAAs may represent a new strategy for secondary chemoprevention for HCC patients with IR. Moreover, our findings suggest that sVEGFR2 may be a useful clinical predictive marker for BCAA treatment under IR conditions. PMID:23708326

  5. Multivariate Analysis of Para-Aortic Lymph Node Recurrence After Definitive Radiotherapy for Stage IB-IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Uterine Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, C.-J.; Chen, H.-C.; Fang, F.-M.; Huang, Y.-J.; Wang, C.-Y.; Hsu, H.-C.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the pretreatment risk factors of para-aortic lymph node (PALN) recurrence after primary radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 1992 and January 2006, the data from 758 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix were retrospectively analyzed. No patient had undergone PALN radiotherapy as their initial treatment. PALN recurrence was diagnosed by computed tomography. PALN relapse-free status was determined clinically or radiographically. We analyzed the actuarial rates of PALN recurrence using Kaplan-Meier curves. Multivariate analyses were performed with Cox regression models. Results: Of the 758 patients, 38 (5%) and 42 (6%) had isolated and nonisolated PALN recurrences after a median follow-up of 50 months (range, 2-159 months), respectively. The 3-year and 5-year overall survival rate after PALN recurrence was 35% and 28%, respectively. A squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) level >40 ng/mL (p <0.001), advanced parametrial involvement (score 4-6; p = 0.002), and the presence of pelvic lymphadenopathy (p = 0.007) were independent factors associated with PALN relapse on multivariate analysis. The 5-year PALN recurrence rate in patients with a SCC-Ag level >40 ng/mL, SCC-Ag level of 20-40 ng/mL, parametrial score of 4-6, pelvic lymphadenopathy, and no risk factors was 57%, 22%, 34%, 37%, and 9%, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix and a high SCC-Ag level, pelvic lymphadenopathy, or advanced PM involvement were predisposed to PALN recurrence after definitive radiotherapy. More intensive follow-up schedules are suggested for early detection and salvage in high-risk patients.

  6. Nuclear Expression of Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Is Associated with Recurrence of Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinomas: Role of Viral Protein in Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Kyu Ho; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays well-known roles in tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in infected patients. However, HBV-associated protein status in tumor tissues and the relevance to tumor behavior has not been reported. Our study aimed to examine the expression of HBV-associated proteins in HCC and adjacent nontumorous tissue and their clinicopathologic implication in HCC patients. Methods: HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV core antigen (HBcAg), and HBV X protein (HBx) were assessed in 328 HBV-associated HCCs and in 155 matched nontumorous tissues by immunohistochemistry staining. Results: The positive rates of HBsAg and cytoplasmic HBx staining in tumor tissue were lower than those in nontumorous tissue (7.3% vs. 57.4%, p < .001; 43.4% vs. 81.3%, p < .001). Conversely, nuclear HBx was detected more frequently in tumors than in nontumorous tissue (52.1% vs. 30.3%, p < .001). HCCs expressing HBsAg, HBcAg, or cytoplasmic HBx had smaller size; lower Edmondson-Steiner (ES) nuclear grade, pT stage, and serum alpha-fetoprotein, and less angioinvasion than HCCs not expressing HBV-associated proteins. Exceptionally, nuclear HBx-positive HCCs showed higher ES nuclear grade and more frequent large-vessel invasion than did nuclear HBx-negative HCCs. In survival analysis, only nuclear HBx-positive HCCs had shorter disease-free survival than nuclear HBx-negative HCCs in pT1 and ES nuclear grade 1–2 HCC subgroup (median, 126 months vs. 35 months; p = .015). Conclusions: Our data confirmed that expression of normal HBV-associated proteins generally decreases in tumor cells in comparison to nontumorous hepatocytes, with the exception of nuclear HBx, which suggests that nuclear HBx plays a role in recurrence of well-differentiated and early-stage HCCs. PMID:27086597

  7. [A case of locoregional recurrence of gastric carcinoma that was treated using pancreaticoduodenectomy].

    PubMed

    Tokoro, Yukinari; Kametaka, Hisashi; Seike, Kazuhiro; Kamiya, Junichirou; Fukada, Takaomi; Makino, Hironobu; Koyama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    A 71-year-old man underwent distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer in November 2011. The corresponding pathological diagnosis was of well differentiated adenocarcinoma, pT4a(SE), N1(2/15), H0, P0,M0, pStage IIIA. TS-1 was administered as an adjuvant therapy for one year from the second month after the operation. During the 16th month after the operation, we found an elevated tumor marker level and locoregional recurrence near the pancreas head and the abdominal wall upon computed tomography. We could not find any other suspected tumor recurrence using positron-emission tomography and computed tomography. We performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy and transverse colon merger resection in June 2013. Although the tumor marker was again found to be elevated during the second month after the metastasectomy, chemotherapy was continued because obstructive jaundice and gastrointestinal obstruction were prevented by the operation. PMID:25731508

  8. Capecitabine and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-01

    Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  9. Priapism secondary to penile metastasis of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Chan; Lee, Wook Hyun; Kang, Min Kyu; Park, Suk Young

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic penile carcinoma is rare and usually originates from genitourinary tumors. The presenting symptoms or signs have been described as nonspecific except for priapism. Rectal adenocarcinoma is a very unusual source of metastatic penile carcinoma. We report a case of metastatic penile carcinoma that originated from the rectum. Symptomatic improvement occurred with palliative radiotherapy. PMID:19725161

  10. Autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine suppressed re-recurrence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma following 29 unsuccessful treatments with extensive conventional therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Inui, Toshio; Ohno, Tadao

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine after primary resection has been shown to suppress the recurrence of hepatitis B virus-associated HCC, but the effect of this treatment on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related disease has not yet been clarified. Here, we report a case of a patient with repeat recurrent HCC that was associated with HCV who had endured 29 episodes of HCC recurrence despite a variety of therapy using conventional methods. Finally, treatment with a single course of autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine resulted in suppression of potential further re-recurrence of HCC for more than 43 months without any additional treatment. PMID:22789008

  11. Phase I Study of Cetuximab With RO4929097 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-15

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  12. MV-NIS Infected Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  13. Joint Effect of Urinary Total Arsenic Level and VEGF-A Genetic Polymorphisms on the Recurrence of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Mei; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Huang, Shu-Pin; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Chen, Wei-Jen; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    The results of our previous study suggested that high urinary total arsenic levels were associated with an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Germline genetic polymorphisms might also affect cancer risk and clinical outcomes. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, but the combined effect of these factors on RCC remains unclear. In this study, we explored the association between the VEGF-A -2578C>A, -1498T>C, -1154G>A, -634G>C, and +936C>T gene polymorphisms and RCC. We also evaluated the combined effects of the VEGF-A haplotypes and urinary total arsenic levels on the prognosis of RCC. This case-control study was conducted with 191 RCC patients who were diagnosed with renal tumors on the basis of image-guided biopsy or surgical resections. An additional 376 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. Concentrations of urinary arsenic species were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotyping was investigated using fluorescent-based TaqMan allelic discrimination. We observed no significant associations between VEGF-A haplotypes and RCC risk. However, the VEGF-A ACGG haplotype from VEGF-A -2578, -1498, -1154, and -634 was significantly associated with an increased recurrence of RCC (OR = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.03–10.91). Urinary total arsenic level was significantly associated with the risk of RCC in a dose-response manner, but it was not related to the recurrence of RCC. The combination of high urinary total arsenic level and VEGF-A risk haplotypes affected the OR of RCC recurrence in a dose-response manner. This is the first study to show that joint effect of high urinary total arsenic and VEGF-A risk haplotypes may influence the risk of RCC recurrence in humans who live in an area without obvious arsenic exposure. PMID:26701102

  14. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without WEE1 Inhibitor MK-1775 in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  15. Patients treated with radical prostatectomy with positive digital rectal examination findings in the intermediate-risk group are prone to PSA recurrence

    PubMed Central

    FURUBAYASHI, NOBUKI; NEGISHI, TAKAHITO; URA, SHINTARO; MUTAGUCHI, JUN; TAGUCHI, KENICHI; SHIMOKAWA, MOTOTSUGU; NAKAMURA, MOTONOBU

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the possibility of performing radical prostatectomy (RP) alone to achieve a radical cure for prostate cancer in the intermediate-risk group. Samples were collected from 638 Japanese patients who underwent antegrade RP between August 1998 and May 2013; subsequently, 157 patients were excluded. According to the D'Amico criteria, the low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups comprised 107, 222 and 152 patients, respectively. The 5-year prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure-free survival rates in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 96.5, 88.9 and 72.6%, respectively (P<0.001; degrees of freedom=2). In the intermediate-risk group, the difference in PSA failure-free survival between the 0rectal examination findings, and are not considered to be likely to achieve a complete cure with RP surgery alone. In summary, for patients meeting these criteria in the intermediate-risk group, RP surgery alone is likely to be insufficient, and other additional treatments may be considered subsequent to RP. PMID:27313711

  16. Evaluation of pretreatment serum interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha as a potential biomarker for recurrence in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brailo, Vlaho; Vidovic-Juras, Danica; Vucicevic-Boras, Vanja; Milenovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes 3 percent of all cancers with predominant occurrence in middle aged and elderly males. Tumour recurrence worsens disease prognosis and decreases quality of life in patients with OSCC. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) have been suggested to play a certain role in variety of tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of pretreatment serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels on tumour recurrence in patients with OSCC in order to identify potential biomarkers for the early detection of disease recurrence. Material and Methods The patients with newly diagnosed OSCC were treated and followed from the first visit from November 2006 until January 2008. Serum IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were measured. The records of the patients were re-examined in July 2012 and data were recorded about cancer characteristics and tumour recurrence. Disease free survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Serum IL-6 was shown as an independent risk factor for tumour recurrence. Conclusions Pretreatment serum IL-6 concentration may be a useful biomarker for identification of OSCC patients with increased risk of the disease recurrence. Key words: Serum IL-6, serum TNF-α, oral cancer, recurrence. PMID:25858079

  17. TNFAIP8 overexpression: a potential predictor of lymphatic metastatic recurrence in pN0 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma after Ivor Lewis esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenguo; Liu, Xiangyan; Song, Jee Hoon; Cheng, Yulan; Liu, Yu; Jia, Yang; Meltzer, Stephen J; Wang, Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a poor prognosis due to high lymphatic metastatic recurrence rates after Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. We sought to investigate the correlation between tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) expression and postoperative lymphatic recurrence in patients with pN0 ESCC. One hundred twenty-two patients with pN0 ESCC undergoing Ivor Lewis esophagectomy were enrolled in this study. TNFAIP8 overexpression was found in 73 (59.8 %) tumor specimens. The 3-year lymphatic metastatic recurrence rate among TNFAIP8-overexpressing patients was significantly higher than in TNFAIP8-negative patients (p = 0.003). Multivariate Cox regression identified TNFAIP8 overexpression as an independent risk factor for lymphatic recurrence (p = 0.048). TNFAIP8 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were significantly higher in patients with lymphatic recurrence than in patients without tumor recurrence (p = 0.019). Stable silencing of TNFAIP8 expression in ESCC-derived cells (Eca109) reduced proliferation, motility, and invasion and induced apoptosis. In addition, transient silencing of TNFAIP8 expression decreased cell motility and invasion and increased apoptosis in a second ESCC-derived cell line (KYSE150). Taken together, these findings suggest that TNFAIP8 overexpression is a potential biomarker to identify pN0 ESCC patients at higher risk of lymphatic recurrence who may benefit from adjuvant therapy. PMID:26886285

  18. Endoscopic mucosal resection of large rectal adenomas in the era of centralization: Results of a multicenter collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Barendse, RM; Musters, GD; Fockens, P; Bemelman, WA; de Graaf, EJ; van den Broek, FJ; van der Linde, K; Schwartz, MP; Houben, MH; van Milligen de Wit, AW; Witteman, BJ; Winograd, R

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of large rectal adenomas is largely being centralized. We assessed the safety and effectiveness of EMR in the rectum in a collaboration of 15 Dutch hospitals. Methods Prospective, observational study of patients with rectal adenomas >3 cm, resected by piecemeal EMR. Endoscopic treatment of adenoma remnants at 3 months was considered part of the intervention strategy. Outcomes included recurrence after 6, 12 and 24 months and morbidity. Results Sixty-four patients (50% male, age 69 ± 11, 96% ASA 1/2) presented with 65 adenomas (diameter 46 ± 17 mm, distance ab ano 4.5 cm (IQR 1–8), 6% recurrent lesion). Sixty-two procedures (97%) were technically successful. Histopathology revealed invasive carcinoma in three patients (5%), who were excluded from effectiveness analyses. At 3 months’ follow-up, 10 patients showed adenoma remnants. Recurrence was diagnosed in 16 patients during follow-up (recurrence rate 25%). Fifteen of 64 patients (23%) experienced 17 postprocedural complications. Conclusion In a multicenter collaboration, EMR was feasible in 97% of patients. Recurrence and postprocedural morbidity rates were 25% and 23%. Our results demonstrate the outcomes of EMR in the absence of tertiary referral centers. PMID:25452845

  19. Sorafenib treatment for recurrent stage T1 bilateral renal cell carcinoma in patients with Von Hippel- Lindau disease: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung Hwa; Yu, Young Dong; Kang, Moon Hyung; Park, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is associated with multiple recurrences and a young age at diagnosis. Therefore the primary goal of treatment is to stabilize the disease, minimizing the surgical resection and preserving the renal function in the patients with VHL who have developing RCC nodules after initial treatment. This is the first case report of VHL disease, with long-term stable disease, treated with a half dose of sorafenib after surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation for multiple recurrent stage T1 masses. We discuss the efficacy and safety of low-dose sorafenib treatment and review RCC in a patient with VHL disease. PMID:26425233

  20. Adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiation for carcinoma of the uterine cervix: pattern of cancer recurrence in patients undergoing elective radiation following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A.H.; Tong, D.Y.; Figge, D.C.; Tamimi, H.K.; Greer, B.E.; Elder, S.J.

    1984-02-01

    Thirty-seven patients with invasive cervical cancer have been referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients at high-risk for tumor recurrence were selected for adjuvant pelvic irradiation because of adverse risk factors identified on pathological study of the hysterectomy specimen. All patients were treated because of possible residual, microscopic carcinoma. Fourteen patients (38%) developed recurrent cancer, of whom 10 (27%) manifested initial failure within the irradiated volume. Possible explanations for this observation are discussed.

  1. Management of Recurrent Rectourethral Fistula by York Mason Posterior Transrectal Transsphincteric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yetişir, Fahri; Şarer, A. Ebru; Acar, H. Zafer; Parlak, Omer; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Karalova, Gulen

    2015-01-01

    Rectourethral fistula (RUF) may develop after ureterovesical and rectal intervention or radiation therapy (RT) rarely, but it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The patient will typically present with pneumaturia, faecaluria, and urinary drainage from the rectum. Diagnosis can be easily done with digital rectal examination, cystography, and urethrocystoscopy. Conservative supportive management of RUF does not appear to be successful in most patients, and management with surgical intervention remains the best treatment option. Several surgical techniques have been described including transabdominal, transanal, transperineal, combined abdominoperineal, anterior and posterior transsphincteric, transsacral, laparoscopic, robotic, and endoscopic minimally invasive approaches. There have been very few data about treatment of recurrent RUF. We would like to report the management of recurrent RUF following transurethral resection of prostate and RT for prostate carcinoma in an immunosuppressed, 75-year-old patient by York Mason posterior transrectal transsphincteric approach. PMID:26770864

  2. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  3. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  4. Predictors for local invasive recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xining; Dai, Hongji; Liu, Ben; Song, Fengju

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of mammographic screening has considerably increased the detection rate of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which has a high probability of recurrence. We carried out a meta-analysis to evaluate the predictive factors including biomarkers, tumor characteristics, and modes of detection on the risk of local invasive recurrence (LIR) following DCIS. Searches were performed in PubMed and EMBASE up to 8 July 2014. Risk estimates (hazard ratios, odds ratios, and relative risks) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were extracted to calculate the strength of the associations between predictive factors and the risk of LIR after treatment of DCIS. STATA 12.0 was used to combine results in this meta-analysis. A total of 18 articles were included in the analysis. Pooled risk estimates and 95% CIs were 1.36 (1.04–1.69) for the positive margin, 1.38 (1.12–1.63) for the nonscreening detection method, 1.04 (0.84–1.24) for high nuclear grade 1, 1.32 (0.98–1.66) for intermediate nuclear grade 2, 1.18 (0.98–1.37) for comedonecrosis, 1.00 (0.92–1.08) for large tumor size, 1.34 (0.82–1.87) for multifocality, 0.74 (0.36–1.12) for estrogen receptor-positive tumors, 0.89 (0.47–1.31) for progesterone receptor-positive tumors, and 1.25 (0.7–1.81) for HER2/neu-positive tumors. Positive margin and non-screening-detected cancers were associated with a higher risk of LIR following DCIS. These predictive factors, after further validation, could be considered to tailor treatment for individual patients. PMID:25714649

  5. Nuclear β-Catenin Induces an Early Liver Progenitor Phenotype in Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Promotes Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Zulehner, Gudrun; Mikula, Mario; Schneller, Doris; van Zijl, Franziska; Huber, Heidemarie; Sieghart, Wolfgang; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Waldhör, Thomas; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Beug, Hartmut; Mikulits, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β cooperates with oncogenic Ras to activate nuclear β-catenin during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition of hepatocytes, a process relevant in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study we investigated the role of β-catenin in the differentiation of murine, oncogene-targeted hepatocytes and in 133 human HCC patients scheduled for orthotopic liver transplantation. Transforming growth factor-β caused dissociation of plasma membrane E-cadherin/β-catenin complexes and accumulation of nuclear β-catenin in Ras-transformed, but otherwise normal hepatocytes in p19ARF−/− mice. Both processes were inhibited by Smad7-mediated disruption of transforming growth factor-β signaling. Overexpression of constitutively active β-catenin resulted in high levels of CK19 and M2-PK, whereas ablation of β-catenin by axin overexpression caused strong expression of CK8 and CK18. Therefore, nuclear β-catenin resulted in dedifferentiation of neoplastic hepatocytes to immature progenitor cells, whereas loss of nuclear β-catenin led to a differentiated HCC phenotype. Poorly differentiated human HCC showed cytoplasmic redistribution or even loss of E-cadherin, suggesting epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Analysis of 133 HCC patient samples revealed that 58.6% of human HCC exhibited strong nuclear β-catenin accumulation, which correlated with clinical features such as vascular invasion and recurrence of disease after orthotopic liver transplantation. These data suggest that activation of β-catenin signaling causes dedifferentiation to malignant, immature hepatocyte progenitors and facilitates recurrence of human HCC after orthotopic liver transplantation. PMID:20008139

  6. Outcome of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy on Local Recurrence and Distant Metastasis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Reza; Garajei, Ata; Shafie, Ehsan; Jamshidi, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCH) is controversial in the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of NCH on OSCC prognosis. Materials and Method In this retrospective cohort study, 94 patients were studied in two groups. The patients in group 1 received NCH before the surgery, and those in group 2 underwent resection without any chemotherapy prior to surgery. The employed NCH agents consisted of cisplatin in combination with 5-fluorouracil in two treatment courses. Tumor size, lymph node involvement, age, and follow-up time were considered as variable factors of the study. Local recurrence (LR) and distant metastasis (DM) were outcomes of the study. Results Comparison of LR and DM in various tumor sizes demonstrated no significant difference between the two groups (p> 0.05). Analysis of the data did not show any statistically significant difference between the groups for LR in subjects with N0, N1 and N2. Each one-year increase in age was associated with 10% increase in the hazard ratio (HR) (HR distance metastasis Y/N = 1.10, p= 0.05). In the same analysis, when considering LR as a dependent factor, LR risk in N2 was 3 times more than in N1 (p= 0.02). LR risk in N3 was 5 times more than in N1 [HR local recurrence (p= 0.006). Conclusion Based on our results, neoadjuvant chemotherapy with combination of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil may not improve prognosis of OSCC. However, further studies are suggested to assess other neoadjuvant chemotherapy protocols in OSCC patients. PMID:27602396

  7. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes are linked to aggressive local recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, Shuichi; Shimada, Mitsuo; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Imura, Satoru; Morine, Yuji; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Takasu, Chie; Saito, Yu; Yamada, Shinichiro

    2016-05-28

    We reported that poor prognoses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are owing to up-regulation of expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and epithelial cell adhesion molecule. We investigated aggressive progression in residual liver tumors (RLTs) after RFA to focus on expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes and miRNAs. Ten patients with recurrent HCC post-RFA who underwent hepatectomy (RFA group) and 78 patients with HCC without prior RFA (non-RFA group) were enrolled. We examined expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, Twist, vimentin, and Snail-1 mRNAs in tumor tissues, and expression of miR-34a and miR-200c. Expression of TGF-β, Twist and Snail-1 in the RFA group was significantly higher than that in the non-RFA group (P < 0.05); vimentin expression in the RFA group was higher than that in the non-RFA group (P = 0.07). Expression of miR-200c and miR-34a in the RFA group was significantly lower than that in the non-RFA group (miR-200c: P = 0.04; miR-34a: P < 0.01). Increased expression of EMT markers through down-regulation of miRNA expression in RLTs after RFA may be related to poor prognoses of HCC patients with aggressive local recurrence after RFA. PMID:26940140

  8. Computed Tomographic-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Recurrent or Residual Hepatocellular Carcinomas around Retained Iodized Oil after Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Young Hwan; Kim, Hyun Beom; Kim, Min Ju

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the clinical efficacy, safety, and risk factors influencing local tumor progression, following CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of recurrent or residual hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), around iodized oil retention. Materials and Methods Sixty-four patients (M : F = 51 : 13, 65.0 ± 8.2 years old) with recurrent or residual HCC (75 index tumors, size = 14.0 ± 4.6 mm) had been treated by CT-guided RFA, using retained iodized oil as markers for targeting. The technical success, technique effectiveness rate and complications of RFA were then assessed. On pre-ablative and immediate follow-up CT after RFA, we evaluated the size of enhancing index tumors and iodized oil retention, presence of abutting vessels, completeness of ablation of iodized oil retention, and the presence of ablative margins greater than 5 mm. Also, the time interval between transarterial chemoembolization and RFA was assessed. The cumulative local tumor progression rate was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Cox proportional hazards model was adopted, to clarify the independent factors affecting local tumor progression. Results The technical success and technique effectiveness rate was 100% and 98.7%, respectively. Major complications were observed in 5.6%. The cumulative rates of local tumor progression at 1 and 2 years were 17.5% and 37.5%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, partial ablation of the targeted iodized oil retention was the sole independent predictor of a higher local tumor progression rate. Conclusion CT-guided RFA of HCC around iodized oil retention was effective and safe. Local tumor progression can be minimized by complete ablation of not only index tumors, but targeted iodized oil deposits as well. PMID:24043966

  9. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status. PMID:27097629

  10. Simultaneous removal of a tumour of the right atrium and inferior vena cava and coronary bypass-grafting in a patient with recurrent clear renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzyk, Edward; Głuszek, Stanisław; Michta, Kamil; Kot, Marta; Wożakowska-Kapłon, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cardiac tumours are the most common malignant cardiac tumours. In the early stages they are usually asymptomatic, but their consequences can be very serious, and the prognosis is poor. We present a patient with recurrent renal cell carcinoma as a tumour of the right atrium and the vena cava inferior in whom cancerous masses were removed with simultaneously coronary artery bypass-grafting. PMID:26855653

  11. Post-operative urothelial recurrence in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma managed by radical nephroureterectomy with an ipsilateral bladder cuff: Minimal prognostic impact in comparison with non-urothelial recurrence and other clinical indicators

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHARA, KIYOSHI; INAMOTO, TERUO; KOMURA, KAZUMASA; WATSUJI, TOSHIKAZU; AZUMA, HARUHITO

    2013-01-01

    Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is a rare disease, and novel prognostic factors for patients who have undergone a radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) for UTUC have been studied intensely. To the best of our knowledge, the prognostic value of urothelial recurrence in patients with UTUC has not been previously described in studies. The present study compared the prognostic value of urothelial and non-urothelial recurrence in patients with UTUC of the kidney and ureter managed by surgery. The inclusion criteria consisted of a diagnosis of non-metastatic UTUC (any T stage, N0–1 and M0) and receipt of an RNU with an ipsilateral bladder cuff as the primary treatment. Of the 153 patients that were screened for the study, comprehensive clinical and pathological data was available for 103 patients, who were consequently included in the analysis. Overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) times were estimated. A multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox regression model. The median follow-up period was 29 months (interquartile range, 14–63 months). The patient population was comprised of 71 males (68.9%) and 32 females (31.1%). A total of 32 patients (31.1%) showed non-urothelial recurrence, while 38 patients (36.9%) exhibited urothelial recurrence and 33 patients (32.0%) exhibited no recurrence. When comparing the risk parameters between the non-urothelial recurrence categories, the factors of pathological grade, microvascular invasion, lymphatic invasion and pT classification showed significant differences. However, there were no significant differences between the urothelial recurrence categories. No significant difference was observed between the OS and CSS times within the urothelial recurrence categories (P=0.3955 and P=0.05891, respectively), but significant differences were identified in the non-urothelial recurrence categories (P<0.0001 and P<0.0001, respectively). Among the other relevant descriptive pre

  12. Lack of Adjuvant Radiotherapy May Increase Risk of Retropharyngeal Node Recurrence in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck after Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Blakaj, Dukagjin M.; Shourbaji, Rania A.; Glanzman, Jonathan; Patel, Shyamal; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has increased in popularity in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. However, TORS does not address the neck or retropharyngeal nodes (RPN). In the current report, we highlight the impact of the lack of adjuvant radiotherapy on RPN recurrence after TORS. Materials and Methods. A 58-year-old Caucasian male presented with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck of unknown primary. He was offered radiotherapy as a definitive management for clinical stage T0N2aM0, stage IVA, but he opted to left neck dissection. Follow-up PET-CT scan revealed recurrence in the left base of tongue and right level II lymph node. He was offered radiotherapy which he declined and opted to TORS and right neck dissection. Follow-up PET-CT scan showed recurrence in left RPN for which he underwent salvage concurrent chemoradiotherapy to 70 Gy. Results. After a followup of 9 months from the date of salvage chemoradiotherapy completion, the patient is with no evidence of disease. Conclusions. TORS followed by adjuvant radiotherapy seems reasonable in the context of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck due to the odds of RPN involvement. Further reports are warranted to optimize post-TORS adjuvant treatment. PMID:23840995

  13. [Therapy of recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma : highlights of the ASCO Meeting 2014].

    PubMed

    Zeller, N; Busch, C-J; Schafhausen, P; Knecht, R; Möckelmann, N

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (R/M-HNSCC) requires exceptional interdisciplinary cooperation within the treatment team, as many factors need to be taken into account to come to an adequate treatment decision. Most of these patients need to be treated in a palliative concept, as comorbidities and prior oncologic treatment limit the treatment options. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in combination with platinum and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) may be considered as standard. However, survival rates are poor and new therapeutic approaches and substances are therefore tested continuously. At the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in 2014, numerous studies on first- and second-line treatment of R/M-HNSCC were presented. A selection is discussed in this paper, including a report about the combined therapy of cetuximab with established chemotherapies, new results from protocols including small molecules and investigations of mTOR inhibitors. PMID:25298331

  14. Prediction and prophylaxis of hepatocellular carcinoma occurrence and postoperative recurrence in chronic hepatitis B virus-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Han, Xue; Ding, Yi-Bo; Yin, Jian-Hua; Cao, Guang-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and highly fatal malignancies worldwide. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of HCC. High HBV replication rate and related non-resolving inflammation are the major risk factors of HCC occurrence and postoperative recurrence. Early prophylactic options are effective in reducing HCC occurrence and improving survival. Therefore, it is important to identify HBV-infected patients who are at a higher risk of developing HCC and HBV-HCC patients who are more likely to relapse after surgery, thus providing them with more precise prophylactic strategies. Several prediction models of HCC occurrence have been constructed, with satisfactory predictive accuracy and discriminatory ability. However, there is a lack of consensus for their clinical implementation. Several staging systems have been proposed for HCC prognosis. However, the accuracy of these staging systems based on demographic characteristics and clinical measurements needs to be further improved, possibly by systematically incorporating viral and inflammatory factors. Since antiviral treatments are effective in promoting liver function reserve, reducing HCC occurrence and prolonging postoperative survival in some HBV-infected subjects, it is very important to identify subgroups of HBV-infected patients who would most benefit from antiviral treatment. PMID:27547000

  15. Exome sequencing reveals recurrent REV3L mutations in cisplatin-resistant squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kie Kyon; Jang, Kang Won; Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Han Sang; Kim, Sung-Moo; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Kim, Hye Ryun; Yun, Hwan Jung; Ahn, Myung Ju; Park, Keon Uk; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; McPherson, John R.; Zhang, Shenli; Rhee, Je-Keun; Vettore, André L.; Das, Kakoli; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Kim, Joo Hang; Koh, Yoon Woo; Kim, Se Hun; Choi, Eun Chang; Teh, Bin Tean; Rozen, Steven G.; Kim, Tae-Min; Tan, Patrick; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Dacomitinib, an irreversible pan-HER inhibitor, had shown modest clinical activity in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) patients. Therefore, validated predictive biomarkers are required to identify patients most likely to benefit from this therapeutic option. To characterize the genetic landscape of cisplatin-treated SCCHN genomes and identify potential predictive biomarkers for dacomitinib sensitivity, we performed whole exome sequencing on 18 cisplatin-resistant metastatic SCCHN tumors and their matched germline DNA. Platinum-based chemotherapy elevated the mutation rates of SCCHN compared to chemotherapy-naïve SCCHNs. Cisplatin-treated SCCHN genomes uniquely exhibited a novel mutational signature characterized by C:G to A:T transversions at CCR sequence contexts that may have arisen due to error-prone translesional synthesis. Somatic mutations in REV3L, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ involved in translesional synthesis, are significantly enriched in a subset of patients who derived extended clinical benefit to dacomitinib (P = 0.04). Functional assays showed that loss-of-function of REV3L dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of SCCHN cells to dacomitinib by the loss of both translesion synthesis and homologous recombination pathways. Our data suggest that the ‘platinum’ mutational signature and inactivation of REV3L may inform treatment options in patients of recurrent SCCHN. PMID:26790612

  16. Prediction and prophylaxis of hepatocellular carcinoma occurrence and postoperative recurrence in chronic hepatitis B virus-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yan; Han, Xue; Ding, Yi-Bo; Yin, Jian-Hua; Cao, Guang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and highly fatal malignancies worldwide. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of HCC. High HBV replication rate and related non-resolving inflammation are the major risk factors of HCC occurrence and postoperative recurrence. Early prophylactic options are effective in reducing HCC occurrence and improving survival. Therefore, it is important to identify HBV-infected patients who are at a higher risk of developing HCC and HBV-HCC patients who are more likely to relapse after surgery, thus providing them with more precise prophylactic strategies. Several prediction models of HCC occurrence have been constructed, with satisfactory predictive accuracy and discriminatory ability. However, there is a lack of consensus for their clinical implementation. Several staging systems have been proposed for HCC prognosis. However, the accuracy of these staging systems based on demographic characteristics and clinical measurements needs to be further improved, possibly by systematically incorporating viral and inflammatory factors. Since antiviral treatments are effective in promoting liver function reserve, reducing HCC occurrence and prolonging postoperative survival in some HBV-infected subjects, it is very important to identify subgroups of HBV-infected patients who would most benefit from antiviral treatment. PMID:27547000

  17. Recurrence of renal cell carcinoma diagnosed using contralateral adrenal biopsy with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    TANIMOTO, AZUSA; TAKEUCHI, SHINJI; YAEGASHI, HIROSHI; KOTANI, HIROSHI; KITAI, HIDENORI; NANJO, SHIGEKI; EBI, HIROMICHI; YAMASHITA, KANAME; MOURI, HISATSUGU; OHTSUBO, KOUSHIRO; IKEDA, HIROKO; YANO, SEIJI

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old female in whom a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) lesion was resected 19 years previously presented to our hospital with cognitive dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed nodules in the brain, lung, adrenal gland and a pelvic osteolytic lesion. To identify the primary cancer site, the present study performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of the left adrenal lesion. Consequently, the pathological findings of the tissue obtained by EUS-FNA were similar to those of the previous nephrectomy specimen, revealing that the adrenal lesion was the recurrence of RCC. The majority of the metastatic lesions in the patient were reduced in size by the multiple kinase inhibitor, pazopanib. Contralateral adrenal metastasis of RCC is rare and the use of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions remains to be elucidated. This is a rare case of adrenal lesion, diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Therefore, EUS-FNA is considered to be a useful diagnostic modality of adrenal metastases from unidentified primary tumor types. PMID:27073657

  18. Hepatic cancer stem cell marker granulin-epithelin precursor and β-catenin expression associate with recurrence in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Phyllis F.Y.; Cheung, Tan To; Yip, Chi Wai; Ng, Linda W.C.; Fung, Sze Wai; Lo, Chung Mau; Fan, Sheung Tat; Cheung, Siu Tim

    2016-01-01

    Granulin-epithelin precursor (GEP) has been demonstrated to confer enhanced cancer stem-like cell properties in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line models in our previous studies. Here, we aimed to examine the GEP-expressing cells in relation to the stem cell related molecules and stem-like cell properties in the prospective HCC clinical cohort. GEP protein levels were significantly higher in HCCs than the paralleled non-tumor liver tissues, and associated with venous infiltration. GEPhigh cells isolated from clinical HCC samples exhibited higher levels of stem cell marker CD133, pluripotency-associated signaling molecules β-catenin, Oct4, SOX2, Nanog, and chemodrug transporter ABCB5. In addition, GEPhigh cells possessed preferential ability to form colonies and spheroids, and enhanced in vivo tumor-initiating ability while their xenografts were able to be serially subpassaged into secondary mouse recipients. Expression levels of GEP and pluripotency-associated genes were further examined in the retrospective HCC cohort and demonstrated significant correlation of GEP with β-catenin. Notably, HCC patients with high GEP and β-catenin levels demonstrated poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, GEP-positive HCC cells directly isolated from clinical specimens showed β-catenin elevation and cancer stem-like cell properties. PMID:26942873

  19. Optimizing Treatment for Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, Jennifer; Gurland, Brooke

    2016-09-01

    Rectal prolapse is associated with debilitating symptoms and leads to both functional impairment and anatomic distortion. Symptoms include rectal bulge, mucous drainage, bleeding, incontinence, constipation, tenesmus, as well as discomfort, pressure, and pain. The only cure is surgical. The optimal surgical repair is not yet defined though laparoscopic rectopexy with mesh is emerging as a more durable approach. The chosen approach should be individually tailored, taking into account factors such as presence of pelvic floor defects and coexistence of vaginal prolapse, severe constipation, surgical fitness, and whether the patient has had a previous prolapse procedure. Consideration of a multidisciplinary approach is critical in patients with concomitant vaginal prolapse. Surgeons must weigh their familiarity with each approach and should have in their armamentarium both perineal and abdominal approaches. Previous barriers to abdominal procedures, such as age and comorbidities, are waning as minimally invasive approaches have gained acceptance. Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is one such approach offering relatively low morbidity, low recurrence rates, and good functional improvement. However, proficiency with this procedure may require advanced training. Robotic rectopexy is another burgeoning approach which facilitates suturing in the pelvis. Successful rectal prolapse surgeries improve function and have low recurrence rates, though it is important to note that correcting the prolapse does not assure functional improvement. PMID:27582654

  20. NM23-H1 immunostaining is inversely associated with tumour staging but not overall survival or disease recurrence in colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, P. Y.; Cao, X.; Eu, K. W.; Seow-Choen, F.

    1998-01-01

    The NM23-H1 gene product has been recently identified as a potential metastasis suppressor. Studies on breast carcinomas have shown an inverse correlation between NM23-H1 status and stage of carcinogenesis and overall survival. However, in colorectal cancer, conflicting data have been reported. This study aimed to investigate whether NM23-H1 immunostaining is correlated with tumour stage, overall survival, disease recurrence, tumour differentiation, age and sex in colorectal carcinomas for the Singapore population using chi-square analysis. The staining was performed on 141 paraffin-embedded surgical specimens collected between 1991 and 1992 using a monoclonal anti-NM23-H1 antibody. Follow-up of patients was until time of death or for 5 years. There was a very significant inverse association between tumour staging and NM23-H1 status (P = 0.0004). However, NM23-H1 expression was not significantly correlated to overall 5-year survival, disease recurrence, tumour differentiation, age or sex. Thus, although NM23-H1 may be involved in suppressing metastasis, NM23-H1 immunohistochemistry has no prognostic value in colorectal cancer. This is the first report of a significant inverse association of NM23-H1 status with tumour staging in colorectal cancer which showed no correlation with overall survival or disease recurrence. Our result thus cautions against the practice of equating an inverse relation of genetic markers with tumour staging to survival or disease recurrence. Images Figure 1 PMID:9569056

  1. Five human tumour cell lines derived from a primary squamous carcinoma of the tongue, two subsequent local recurrences and two nodal metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Easty, D. M.; Easty, G. C.; Carter, R. L.; Monaghan, P.; Pittam, M. R.; James, T.

    1981-01-01

    Five tumour cell lines have been derived from a primary squamous carcinoma of the tongue, from 2 subsequent local recurrences, and from 2 lymph-node metastases--all from the same patient. While the cell lines shared many morphological and biochemical characteristics, those derived from recurrences and metastases appeared to be less differentiated, were less well organized in culture, and displayed fewer desmosomes and tonofilaments than cells in the primary tumour line. A recurrent line showing greatest morphological divergence from the primary tumour line also demonstrated the greatest differences at the ultrastructural level, in increased production of plasminogen activator and in the composition of cell-surface glycoproteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7284233

  2. Long-term survival with repeated resections of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma in a non-cirrhotic liver: case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Hadjittofi, Christopher; Koti, Rahul S.; Konstantinidou, Sofia K.; Davidson, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    A healthy and asymptomatic 55-year-old woman underwent a complete (R0) non-anatomical resection of an incidentally detected solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a non-cirrhotic liver. Six years following the initial R0 non-anatomical resection, intrahepatic recurrence was diagnosed and the patient underwent a second R0 non-anatomical resection. At 12.5 years following the initial resection, a further intrahepatic recurrence was diagnosed, which was once again completely resected by left lateral hepatectomy. This represents one of the longest reported periods between initial resection and HCC recurrence, following repeated R0 resections in the absence of cirrhosis. The appropriate surveillance period and genetic testing protocol for such cases remains to be established. PMID:27127765

  3. Recurrent intestinal mucinous borderline tumors of the ovary: a report of 5 cases causing problems in diagnosis, including distinction from mucinous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Irving, Julie A; Clement, Philip B

    2014-03-01

    Intestinal mucinous borderline tumors (IMBTs) of the ovary are generally associated with a highly favorable outcome and rarely recur. We describe 5 cases of IMBT initially treated by cystectomy or by salpingo-oophorectomy that was likely incomplete, with subsequent recurrences. Three cases were received in consultation, and in each of these, the clinical and intraoperative findings were worrisome for mucinous carcinoma, and diagnostic difficulty was encountered by the referring pathologist. The patient age ranged from 28 to 69 (median 53) yrs. All tumors were clinically Stage I at presentation; in at least 3 cases, extensive adhesiolysis was required during their removal. A pathologic diagnosis of IMBT was made in 4 cases; the remaining tumor was inadequately sampled (3 blocks from a 7.5-cm tumor showed predominantly benign to focally borderline mucinous epithelium). A total of 8 recurrences, all as IMBT, developed at mean follow-up of 26 (range, 6-102) mo; 6 of these occurred within ≤2 yr. In 4 cases, removal of recurrent tumor required an extensive operation because of bowel and/or vaginal involvement. Residual ovarian stroma was identified in all recurrences. There was no evidence of invasive mucinous carcinoma, pseudomyxoma peritonei, or a primary tumor elsewhere (including appendix) in any of the cases. Our findings indicate that patients with IMBTs who undergo cystectomy or oophorectomy requiring adhesiolysis are at increased risk of recurrence, which may occur early, be multiple, and potentially require extensive resection if sites such as bowel or vagina are involved. Recurrences of IMBT that develop in this setting likely represent regrowth of incompletely resected IMBT, or arise within residual ovarian tissue. This is the first detailed clinicopathologic study of such cases. PMID:24487471

  4. Reliable detection of human papillomavirus in recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis and associated carcinoma of archival tissue.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel; Heinkele, Thomas; Rudack, Claudia

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP) is, although benign, a challenging disease for both, the patient and the treating physician. Maximum disease control with minimum intervention is considered to be the gold standard. However, patients have to undergo repeating surgical interventions. Human papillomavirus (HPV), mainly so called low risk types, are thought to be responsible for the development of RLP. But, there is still some controversy over the true prevalence of HPV and the virus-specific molecular diagnostic of choice. Therefore archival tissue samples from 44 patients with RLP at laryngeal site, out of which eight developed laryngeal cancer, was screened for presence of HPV through various molecular approaches. Results from these different methodologies were compared between each other and with patient's characteristics. The overall detection rates of HPV with the various methods used in this study were: HPV16 E6/E7 PCR: 0%; GP5+/6+ PCR: 4.5%; CDKN2A/p16 immunohistochemistry: 6.8%; in-situ hybridization for low and high risk HPV types: 52.3%; HPV6/11 L1 PCR: 72.7% and HPV6/11 E6 PCR: 79.5%. Disease progression showed no apparent dependence of the detected HPV type or clinical variables like age at diagnosis, sex, or additional drug application (Cidofovir and Bevacizumab). In conclusion, the broad-spectrum PCRs alone or in combination with immunohistochemistry of CDKN2A/p16 and in-situ hybridization are unsuitable for HPV detection in RLP. Based on the findings presented in this study the type specific PCRs targeting the E6 open reading frame are clearly superior in detection of HPV in this tumor entity. PMID:25650265

  5. Impact of lymphovascular invasion on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Nan; Xie, Linguo; Chen, Tao; Xing, Chen; Liu, Xiaoteng; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Zhonghua; Xu, Hao; Wu, Zhouliang; Hu, Hailong; Wu, Changli

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) on recurrence and progression rates in patients with pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder after transurethral resection. Methods This retrospective study was performed with 155 patients with newly diagnosed pT1 urothelial carcinoma of bladder who were treated with transurethral resection of bladder tumor at our institution from January 2006 to January 2010. The presence or absence of LVI was examined by pathologists. Chi-square test was performed to identify the correlations between LVI and other clinical and pathological features. Kaplan–Meier method was used to estimate the recurrence-free survival (RFS) and progression-free survival curves and difference was determined by the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictive factors through a Cox proportional hazards analysis model. Results LVI was detected in a total of 34 patients (21.9%). While LVI was associated with high-grade tumors (P<0.001) and intravesical therapy (P=0.009). Correlations with age (P=0.227), sex (P=0.376), tumor size (P=0.969), tumor multiplicity (P=0.196), carcinoma in situ (P=0.321), and smoking (P=0.438) were not statistically significant. There was a statistically significant tendency toward higher recurrence rate and shorter RFS time in LVI-positive patients. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in progression rate between the two groups. Moreover, multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that LVI, tumor size, and smoking were independent prognostic predictors of recurrence. The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) were 2.042 (1.113–3.746, P=0.021), 1.817 (1.014–3.256, P=0.045), and 2.079 (1.172–3.687, P=0.012), respectively. Conclusion The presence of LVI in transurethral resection of bladder tumor specimens is significantly associated with higher recurrence rate and shorter RFS time in patients with newly

  6. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental. PMID:23584263

  7. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery in the management of rectal wall endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Banky, Balazs; Saleki, Mahsa; Gill, Talvinder S

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with known history of endometriosis was referred to colorectal outpatient clinic from gynaecology with a history of intermittent rectal bleeding and no associated bowel symptoms. Flexible sigmoidoscopy in concordance with pelvic MRI revealed a 3×2×2 cm sessile lesion in the anterior rectal wall. The lesion was also palpable as a firm mass on digital rectal examination. From the gynaecological point of view no intra-abdominal exploration was required; the sole rectal wall lesion was removed with the minimally invasive surgical technique of transanal endoscopic microsurgery. Full thickness rectal wall excision sample was reported to be histologically complete and confirmed endometriosis. No recurrence was detected at endoscopic follow-up at 6 months. The patient remained symptom free. Therefore, we demonstrated a case of minimally invasive removal of a rectal wall large endometriosis nodule in a fertile woman with a complete, symptomatic, uneventful recovery. PMID:27495176

  8. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma in Ireland: Pre-operative alpha-fetoprotein predicts tumour recurrence in a 14-year single-centre national experience

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Donal B; Burke, John P; Hegarty, John; McCormick, Aiden P; Nolan, Niamh; Hoti, Emir; Maguire, Donal; Geoghegan, Justin; Traynor, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the results of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Ireland over a 14-year period. METHODS: Cases of HCC receiving OLT between January 1995 and September 2009 in the Irish Liver Transplant Unit were reviewed from a prospectively maintained database. Outcome measures included overall and recurrence free survival, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumour pathological features. RESULTS: On explant pathology, 57 patients had HCC. The median follow-up time was 42.7 mo. The overall 1, 3 and 5 years survival was 87.7%, 72.1% and 72.4%. There was no difference in survival when compared to patients undergoing OLT without malignancy. The tumour recurrence rate was 14%. The Milan criteria were exceeded in 32% of cases but this did not predict overall survival or recurrence. On multivariate analysis pre-operative AFP > 100 ng/mL was an independent risk factor for recurrence (RR = 5.2, CI: 1.1-24.3, P = 0.036). CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing OLT for HCC had excellent survival even when conventional listing criteria were exceeded. Pre-operative AFP predicts recurrence independent of tumour size and its role in selection criteria should be investigated in larger studies. PMID:27358785

  9. Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Hans . E-mail: hchrist@gwdg.de; Hermann, Robert Michael; Martin, Alexios; Florez, Rodrigo; Kahler, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Hille, Andrea; Steiner, Wolfgang; Hess, Clemens F.; Pradier, Olivier

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 2000, 37 patients with advanced local recurrences (23 local and 14 locoregional recurrences) of HNSCC without distant metastases were treated in curative intent with organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (before 1994 split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum, after 1994 conventional radiotherapy). Initial therapy of the primary (8.1% oral cavity, 35.1% oropharynx, 13.5% hypopharynx, and 43.3% larynx) before relapse was organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery without any adjuvant therapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 124 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 21.3%, the loco-regional control rate 48.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage of original primary tumor (Stage I/II vs. Stage III/IV), and patient age (<58 years vs. {>=}58 years) showed statistically significant impact on prognosis. In laryngeal cancer, larynx preservation rate after treatment for recurrent tumor was 50% during follow-up. Conclusion: Our data show that organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients who have advanced recurrence after transoral laser surgery and is an alternative to radical treatment.

  10. Olaparib and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  11. Phase II clinical and exploratory biomarker study of dacomitinib in recurrent and/or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Song; Kim, Sung-Moo; Kim, Hyunki; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Sun, Jong-Mu; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kwon, Nak-Jung; Yun, Hwan Jung; Kim, Hoon-Gu; Chung, Ik-Joo; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Dae Joon; Lee, Chang-Geol; Hur, Jin; Chung, Hyunsoo; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Hye Ryun; Moon, Yong Wha; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Joo Hang; Paik, Soonmyung; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical activity, safety and predictive biomarkers of dacomitinib, an irreversible pan-HER inhibitor, in patients with recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (R/M-ESCC). Patients, whose diseases were not amenable to curative treatment and had progressed on platinum-based chemotherapy, were treated with dacomitinib 45mg/day. The primary endpoint was objective response rate by RECISTv 1.1. Predictive biomarker analyses included the characterization of somatic mutations and gene expression using the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel and Nanostring nCounter, and investigation of their relationship with clinical outcomes. Of the 48 evaluable patients, 6 (12.5%) achieved partial responses and 29 (60.4%) had stable disease. The median response duration was 7.1 months. The median progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was 3.3 months (95% CI, 2.4-4.3 months) and 6.4 months (95% CI, 4.4-8.4 months). Adverse events were mostly grade 1-2. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that ERBB signaling pathway is significantly enriched in patients with PFS ≥4 months (n = 12) than PFS < 4 months (n = 21) (p < 0.001). Upregulation of ERBB signaling pathway was significantly associated with longer PFS (5.0 vs. 2.9 months, P = 0.016) and OS (10.0 vs. 4.8 months, P = 0.022). The most frequent mutations were TP53 (61%) followed by CDKN2A (8%), MLH1 (8%), FLT3 (8%) and EGFR (8%). Dacomitinib demonstrated clinical efficacy with manageable toxicity in platinum-failed R/M-ESCC. Screening of ERBB pathway-related gene expression profiles may help identify patients who are most likely benefit from dacomitinib. PMID:26462025

  12. Does Establishing a Safety Margin Reduce Local Recurrence in Subsegmental Transarterial Chemoembolization for Small Nodular Hepatocellular Carcinomas?

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun; Hur, Saebeom

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a safety margin may affect local tumor recurrence (LTR) in subsegmental chemoembolization. Materials and Methods In 101 patients with 128 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) nodules (1-3 cm in size and ≤ 3 in number), cone-beam CT-assisted subsegmental lipiodol chemoembolization was performed. Immediately thereafter, a non-contrast thin-section CT image was obtained to evaluate the presence or absence of intra-tumoral lipiodol uptake defect and safety margin. The effect of lipiodol uptake defect and safety margin on LTR was evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to indentify determinant factors of LTR. Results Of the 128 HCC nodules in 101 patients, 49 (38.3%) nodules in 40 patients showed LTR during follow-up period (median, 34.1 months). Cumulative 1- and 2-year LTR rates of nodules with lipiodol uptake defect (n = 27) and those without defect (n = 101) were 58.1% vs. 10.1% and 72.1% vs. 19.5%, respectively (p < 0.001). Among the 101 nodules without a defect, the 1- and 2-year cumulative LTR rates for nodules with complete safety margin (n = 52) and those with incomplete safety margin (n = 49) were 9.8% vs. 12.8% and 18.9% vs. 19.0% (p = 0.912). In multivariate analyses, ascites (p = 0.035), indistinct tumor margin on cone-beam CT (p = 0.039), heterogeneous lipiodol uptake (p = 0.023), and intra-tumoral lipiodol uptake defect (p < 0.001) were determinant factors of higher LTR. Conclusion In lipiodol chemoembolization, the safety margin in completely lipiodolized nodule without defect will not affect LTR in small nodular HCCs. PMID:26357501

  13. Radioactive iodine ablation may not decrease the risk of recurrence in intermediate-risk papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seo Ki; Woo, Jung-Woo; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Inhye; Choe, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Jee Soo

    2016-05-01

    The use of radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation in patients with intermediate-risk papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) who show microscopic extrathyroidal extension (ETE), regional lymph node (LN) metastasis, tumors with aggressive histology, or vascular invasion has been debated due to the lack of data regarding long-term prognosis in this risk group. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to resolve the controversy surrounding the prognostic benefit of RAI ablation, especially in intermediate-risk PTC patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 8297 intermediate-risk PTC patients who underwent primary total thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection at the Thyroid Cancer Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea, between January 1997 and June 2015. Of these 8297 patients, 7483 (90.2%) received RAI ablation. After adjusting for clinicopathological characteristics, RAI ablation did not significantly decrease the risk of loco-regional recurrence (LRR) (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.852, P 0.413). Moreover, RAI ablation did not decrease the risk of LRR even in intermediate-risk PTC patients with aggressive features such as BRAF positivity (adjusted HR 0.729, P 0.137), tumor size >1 cm (adjusted HR 0.762, P 0.228), multifocality (adjusted HR 1.032, P 0.926), ETE (adjusted HR 0.870, P 0.541), and regional LN metastasis (adjusted HR 0.804, P 0.349). Furthermore, high-dose RAI ablation (>100 mCi) did not significantly decrease the risk of LRR (adjusted HR 0.942, P 0.843). Therefore, RAI ablation in intermediate-risk PTC patients should be considered on the basis of tailored risk restratification. PMID:26917553

  14. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  15. Pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level is a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node recurrence in addition to squamous cell carcinoma antigen following definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To identify pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels as a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node (PALN) recurrence following concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for cervical cancer. Methods From March 1995 to January 2008, 188 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix were analyzed retrospectively. No patient received PALN irradiation as the initial treatment. CEA and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) were measured before and after radiotherapy. PALN recurrence was detected by computer tomography (CT) scans. We analyzed the actuarial rates of PALN recurrence by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Multivariate analyses were carried out with Cox regression models. We stratified the risk groups based on the hazard ratios (HR). Results Both pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL and SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 8.838), SCC-Ag levels ≥ 40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 12.551), and SCC-Ag levels of 10-40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 4.2464) were significant factors for PALN recurrence. The corresponding 5-year PALN recurrence rates were 51.5%, 84.8%, and 27.5%, respectively. The 5-year PALN recurrence rate for patients with both low (< 10 ng/mL) SCC and CEA was only 9.6%. CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL or SCC-Ag levels ≥ 10 ng/mL at PALN recurrence were associated with overall survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL were also associated with survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Conclusions Pretreatment CEA ≥ 10 ng/mL is an additional risk factor of PALN relapse following definitive CCRT for SCC of the uterine cervix in patients with pretreatment SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL. More comprehensive examinations before CCRT and intensive follow-up schedules are suggested for early detection and salvage in patients with SCC-Ag or CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL. PMID:22289572

  16. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck treated by surgery with or without postoperative radiation therapy: Prognostic features of recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Bucci, M. Kara . E-mail: mkbucci@mdanderson.org; Weinberg, Vivian; Garcia, Joaquin; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Schechter, Naomi R.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Fu, Karen K.; Eisele, David W.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: This study sought to review a single-institution experience with the management of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 140 patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with definitive surgery. Ninety patients (64%) received postoperative radiation to a median dose of 64 Gy (range, 54-71 Gy). Distribution of T stage was: 26% T1, 28% T2, 20% T3, and 26% T4. Seventy-eight patients (56%) had microscopically positive margins. Median follow-up was 66 months (range, 7-267 months). Results: The 5- and 10-year rate estimates of local control were 88% and 77%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazards model identified T4 disease (p = 0.0001), perineural invasion (p = 0.008), omission of postoperative radiation (p = 0.007), and major nerve involvement (p = 0.02) as independent predictors of local recurrence. Radiation dose lower than 60 Gy (p = 0.0004), T4 disease (p 0.005), and major nerve involvement (p = 0.02) were predictors of local recurrence among those treated with surgery and postoperative radiation. The 10-year overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival were 64% and 66%, respectively. Conclusion: Combined-modality therapy with surgery followed by radiation to doses in excess of 60 Gy should be considered the standard of care for adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck.

  17. Positive intratumoral chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 8 expression predicts high recurrence risk of post-operation clear-cell renal cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; An, Huimin; Zhu, Yu; Xu, Le; Zhang, Weijuan; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 8 (CCR8) could drive cancer progress through recruiting certain immune cells. Recent evidences revealed the chemotaxis of CCR8+ human malignant tumor cells towards lymph node, and a significantly increased CCR8 expression in renal carcinomas patients. To assess the clinical association between CCR8 expression and the risk of post-surgery recurrence in patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), we detected intratumoral CCR8 expression in 472 post-nephrectomy ccRCC patients retrospectively enrolled. Positive CCR8 staining tumor cell occurred in 26.1% (123 of 472) non-metastatic ccRCC cases, and the positive expression was associated with increased risks of recurrence (Log-Rank P < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, CCR8 expression was identified as an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.008) and entered into a newly-built nomogram together with T stage, Fuhrman grade, tumor size, necrosis and lymphovascular invasion. Calibration curves showed optimal agreement between predictions and observations, while its C-index was higher than that of Leibovich score for predicting recurrence-free survival (RFS) of localised RCC patients (0.854 vs 0.836, respectively; P = 0.044). The practical prognostic nomogram model may help clinicians in decision making and design of clinical studies. PMID:26716905

  18. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  19. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab and/or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  20. Elesclomol Sodium and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  1. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride or Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  3. Trametinib With or Without GSK2141795 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  4. Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma with Synchronous Tumor Growth in Azygoesophageal Recess and Duodenum: A Rare Cause of Anemia and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Vootla, Vamshidhar R.; Kashif, Muhammad; Niazi, Masooma; Nayudu, Suresh K.

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has potential to present with distant metastasis several years after complete resection. The common sites of metastases include the lungs, bones, liver, renal fossa, and brain. RCCs metastasize rarely to the duodenum, and duodenal metastasis presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleed is infrequently reported in literature. We present a case of synchronous presentation of duodenal and azygoesophageal metastasis manifesting as acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, four years after undergoing nephrectomy for RCC. The patient underwent further workup and was treated with radiation. The synchronous presentation is rare and stresses the importance of searching for recurrence of RCC in patients presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26640732

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy as a Bridge to Transplantation and for Recurrent Disease in the Transplanted Liver of a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mazloom, Ali; Hezel, Aram F.; Katz, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Despite orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), recurrent HCC is a major cause of morbidity. In this case report, we evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a bridge to OLT and for recurrence in the transplanted liver of a patient with HCC. A 52-year-old male with a history of chronic hepatitis C presented with a 1.7-cm liver lesion radiographically consistent with HCC, which was subsequently treated with a course of SBRT to 50 Gy in 5 fractions followed by OLT in 2009. The patient had a 2.2-cm recurrence in the transplanted liver in 2012, which was treated with SBRT to 62.5 Gy in 5 fractions. He tolerated the course of radiotherapy well with no significant radiation-related toxicity and remains in complete remission approximately 1 year after SBRT. SBRT is a safe and effective modality for the treatment of recurrent HCC in the transplanted liver of the same patient initially treated with SBRT as a bridge to OLT. PMID:24575010

  6. A phase II evaluation of lapatinib in the treatment of persistent or recurrent epithelial ovarian or primary peritoneal carcinoma: A gynecologic oncology group study☆

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Agustin A.; Sill, Michael W.; Lankes, Heather A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Mannel, Robert S.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Carolla, Robert L.; Liepman, Marcia K.; Spirtos, Nick M.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Leslie, Kimberly K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Activation and dimerization of the ERBB family play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer. We conducted a phase II trial to evaluate the activity and tolerability of lapatinib in patients with recurrent or persistent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and to explore the clinical value of expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR), phosphorylated EGFR, HER-2/neu, and Ki-67, and the presence of EGFR mutations. Methods Eligible patients had recurrent or persistent EOC or primary peritoneal carcinoma, measurable disease, and up to 2 prior chemotherapy regimens for recurrent disease. Patients were treated with lapatinib 1500 mg/day. The primary endpoint of efficacy was 6-month progression free survival (PFS). Results Twenty-five of 28 patients were eligible and evaluable for analysis of efficacy and toxicity. Two (8.0%) were alive and progression-free at 6 months. No objective responses were observed. There were 1 grade 4 toxicity (fatigue) and few grade 3 toxicities. Associations between Ki-67 with prior platinum-free interval, PFS, and a polymorphism in EGFR were suggested. Conclusions Lapatinib has minimal activity in recurrent ovarian cancer. Ki-67 expression may be associated with prior PFS and a polymorphism in EGFR exon 20 (2361G>A, Q787Q). PMID:22037316

  7. Continued observation of the natural history of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ reaffirms proclivity for local recurrence even after more than 30 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Melinda E; Schuyler, Peggy A; Simpson, Jean F; Page, David L; Dupont, William D

    2015-05-01

    Opportunities to study the natural history of ductal carcinoma in situ are rare. A few studies of incompletely excised lesions in the premammographic era, retrospectively recognized as ductal carcinoma in situ, have demonstrated a proclivity for local recurrence in the original site. The authors report a follow-up study of 45 women with low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ treated by biopsy only, recognized retrospectively during a larger review of surgical pathology diagnoses and original histological slides for 26 539 consecutive breast biopsies performed at Vanderbilt, Baptist and St Thomas Hospitals in Nashville, TN from 1950 to 1989. Long-term follow-up was previously reported on 28 of these women. Sixteen women (36%) developed invasive breast carcinoma, all in the same breast and quadrant as their incident ductal carcinoma in situ. Eleven invasive breast carcinomas were diagnosed within 10 years of the ductal carcinoma in situ biopsy. Subsequent cases were diagnosed at 12, 23, 25, 29 and 42 years. Seven women, including one who developed invasive breast cancer 29 years after her ductal carcinoma in situ biopsy, developed distant metastasis, resulting in death 1-7 years postdiagnosis of invasive breast carcinoma. The natural history of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ may extend more than four decades, with invasive breast cancer developing at the same site as the index lesion. This protracted natural history differs markedly from that of patients with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ or any completely delimited ductal carcinoma in situ excised to negative margins. This study reaffirms the importance of complete margin evaluation in women treated with breast conservation for ductal carcinoma in situ as well as balancing recurrence risk with possible treatment-related morbidity for older women. PMID:25502729

  8. Temsirolimus With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer Who Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-22

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  9. Olaparib or Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib Compared With Standard Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Platinum-Sensitive Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Tumor; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib or Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Platinum-Resistant or -Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-13

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Successful hemostasis of intractable rectal variceal bleeding using variceal embolization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Seung Up

    2015-02-28

    Portal hypertension causes portosystemic shunting along the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in gastrointestinal varices. Rectal varices and their bleeding is a rare complication, but it can be fatal without appropriate treatment. However, because of its rarity, no established treatment strategy is yet available. In the setting of intractable rectal variceal bleeding, a transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt can be a treatment of choice to enable portal decompression and thus achieve hemostasis. However, in the case of recurrent rectal variceal bleeding despite successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt, alternative measures to control bleeding are required. Here, we report on a patient with liver cirrhosis who experienced recurrent rectal variceal bleeding even after successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt and was successfully treated with variceal embolization. PMID:25741168

  12. Prognostic significance of carcinoembryonic antigen in colorectal carcinoma. Serum levels before and after resection and before recurrence.

    PubMed

    Chu, D Z; Erickson, C A; Russell, M P; Thompson, C; Lang, N P; Broadwater, R J; Westbrook, K C

    1991-03-01

    The use of carcinoembryonic antigen was evaluated in 425 patients with a mean follow-up of 48 months. The preoperative and postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen levels were predictive of recurrence and survival independent of the tumor stage. In a multivariate regression analysis of age, location, tumor stage, and preoperative and postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen levels, the latter three factors were significant prognostic variables with respect to the adjusted survival. Recurrent disease was found in 42% of patients, excluding patients with stage IV disease. The carcinoembryonic antigen level at recurrence was greater than 5 ng/mL in 79% of the patients and in 89% of the intra-abdominal recurrences. Carcinoembryonic antigen level at recurrence was not predictive of postrecurrence survival except in the subgroup of locoregional disease. The life span in patients with liver and lung metastases was not influenced by carcinoembryonic antigen level at recurrence. Preoperative and postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen levels can indicate a poorer prognostic group of patients with colorectal cancer who may benefit from adjuvant treatment. The carcinoembryonic antigen at recurrence can be used effectively to diagnose intra-abdominal recurrences and project survival after development of local/regional disease. PMID:1998473

  13. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  14. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  15. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  16. Donor miR-196a-2 polymorphism is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after liver transplantation in a Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Ling, Qi; Wang, Jianguo; Xie, Haiyang; Wei, Xuyong; Lu, Di; Hu, Qichao; Zhang, Xuanyu; Wu, Liming; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-02-01

    Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of death after liver transplantation (LT). We aim to evaluate the association of donor and recipient single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the risk of HCC recurrence after LT. A total of 155 adult patients who underwent primary LT for HCC were enrolled. Ten SNPs associated with HCC susceptibility were genotyped. Patients who received donor livers with the rs11614913 homozygous CC variant presented significantly higher recurrence rates of HCC (41.7 vs. 15.3%, p = 0.009) and lower cumulative tumor-free survival (p = 0.005) than those who received TT wild-type donor livers. The donor rs11614913 genetic variant was an independent risk factor for HCC recurrence (odds ratio = 2 per each C allele, p < 0.05) and could significantly improve the predictive abilities of clinical models (Milan, UCSF and Hangzhou criteria). Donor livers homozygous for rs11614913 CC were associated with a higher miR-196a expression than TT (p = 0.002). In a lentiviral infection of mouse liver and orthotopic mouse model of HCC, the liver miR-196a overexpression group showed a significantly larger tumor size than the control group (p = 0.001). There is a close association between the tumor size and expression of miR-196a in the liver (r = 0.693, p = 0.001). In conclusion, the donor miR-196a-2 rs11614913 polymorphism is associated with HCC recurrence after LT and improves the predictive value of clinical models. The overexpression of miR-196a in the liver might provide a tumor-favorable environment for the development of HCC. PMID:26365437

  17. Overexpression of IFITM3 predicts the high risk of lymphatic metastatic recurrence in pN0 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma after Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yang; Zhang, Miao; Jiang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Zhiping; Huang, Shiting

    2015-01-01

    Background. Recent studies have shown that the aberrant expression of IFITM3 is implicated in the lymph node metastasis of many malignancies. Our research aimed to investigate the expression of IFITM3 in pathological N0 (pN0) esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its relationship with lymph node metastatic recurrence. Methods. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to examine the expression profile of IFITM3 in 104 pairs of samples. Each pair consisted of ESCC tissue and its adjacent normal mucosa (ANM). This aberrant expression was verified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with 20 tumor specimens with strong immunostaining and their mucosal tissues. In addition, 20 samples of low expression tissues and their ANMs were evaluated. Moreover, the correlations between the IFITM3 expression level and the clinicopathological variables, recurrence risk and overall survival (OS) of patients were analyzed. Results. Both IHC and RT-PCR demonstrated that the IFITM3 expression level was significantly higher in tumor tissue than in ANM. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation of IFITM3 expression with the T status of esophageal cancer (p = 0.015). In addition, IFITM3 overexpression was demonstrated to be not only an important risk factor of lymphatic metastatic recurrence but a significant prognostic factor in pN0 ESCC (p < 0.005). Conclusions. Even pN0 ESCC patients will still experience lymphatic metastatic recurrence. The IFITM3 gene could be a predictor of lymphatic metastatic recurrence in pN0 ESCC after Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy. PMID:26539332

  18. Elevation of circulating big endothelin-1: an independent prognostic factor for tumor recurrence and survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Wenjie; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Jinsheng; Shen, Yi; Lin, Lesheng; Li, Jian

    2008-01-01

    Background Endothelin(ET) axis plays a key role in many tumor progression and metastasis via various mechanisms such as angiogenesis, mediating extracellular matrix degradation and inhibition of apoptosis. However, there is limited information regarding the clinical significance of plasma big ET-1 levels in esophageal cancer patients. Circulating plasma big ET-1 levels were measured in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma(ESCC) to evaluate the value of ET-1 as a biomarker for predicting tumor recurrence and patients survival. Methods Preoperative plasma big ET-1 concentrations were measured by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) in 108 ESCC patients before surgery, and then again at 1,2,3,10 and 30 days after curative radical resection for ESCC. The association between preoperative plasma big ET-1 levels and clinicopathological features, tumor recurrence and patient survival, and their changes following surgery were evaluated. Results The preoperative plasma big ET-1 levels in ESCC patients were significantly higher than those in controls. And there was a significant association between plasma big ET-1 levels and disease stage, as well as invasion depth of the tumor and lymph node status. Furthermore, plasma big ET-1 levels decreased significantly after radical resection of the primary tumor and patients with postoperative recurrence had significantly higher plasma big ET-1 levels than that of patients without recurrence. Finally, the survival rate of patients with higher plasma big ET-1 concentrations (>4.3 pg/ml) was significantly lower than that of patients with lower level (≤ 4.3 pg/ml). Multivariate regression analysis showed that plasma big ET-1 level is an independent prognostic factor for survival in patients with ESCC. Conclusion Plasma big ET-1 level in ESCC patients may reflect malignancy and predict tumor recurrence and patient survival. Therefore, the preoperative plasma big ET-1 levels may be a clinically useful biomarker for

  19. Reduced folate and serum vitamin metabolites in patients with rectal carcinoma: an open-label feasibility study of pemetrexed with folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Odin, Elisabeth A.; Carlsson, Göran U.; Kurlberg, Göran K.; Björkqvist, Hillevi G.; Tångefjord, Maria T.; Gustavsson, Bengt G.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this single-center, open-label, phase II study were to evaluate (a) the feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant administration of pemetrexed with oral folic acid and vitamin B12 (FA/B12) in newly diagnosed patients with resectable rectal cancer and (b) intracellular and systemic vitamin metabolism. Patients were treated with three cycles of pemetrexed (500 mg/m2, every 3 weeks) and FA/B12 before surgery. The reduced folates tetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate were evaluated from biopsies in tumor tissue and in adjacent mucosa. Serum levels of homocysteine, cystathionine, and methylmalonic acid were also measured. All 37 patients received three cycles of pemetrexed; 89.2% completed their planned dosage within a 9-week feasibility time frame. Neither dose reductions nor study drug-related serious adverse events were reported. Reduced folate levels were significantly higher in tumor tissue compared with adjacent mucosa at baseline. After FA/B12 administration, tissue levels of reduced folates increased significantly and remained high during treatment in both tumor and mucosa until surgery. Serum levels of cystathionine increased significantly compared with baseline after FA/B12 administration, but then decreased, fluctuating cyclically during pemetrexed therapy. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels decreased significantly after FA/B12 administration, and remained below baseline levels during the study. These results indicate that administration of three neoadjuvant cycles of single-agent pemetrexed, every 3 weeks, with FA/B12 in patients with resectable rectal cancer is feasible and tolerable. Tissue and serum vitamin metabolism results demonstrate the influence of pemetrexed and FA/B12 on vitamin metabolism and warrant further study. PMID:26825869

  20. Reduced folate and serum vitamin metabolites in patients with rectal carcinoma: an open-label feasibility study of pemetrexed with folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation.

    PubMed

    Stoffregen, Clemens C; Odin, Elisabeth A; Carlsson, Göran U; Kurlberg, Göran K; Björkqvist, Hillevi G; Tångefjord, Maria T; Gustavsson, Bengt G

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this single-center, open-label, phase II study were to evaluate (a) the feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant administration of pemetrexed with oral folic acid and vitamin B12 (FA/B12) in newly diagnosed patients with resectable rectal cancer and (b) intracellular and systemic vitamin metabolism. Patients were treated with three cycles of pemetrexed (500 mg/m, every 3 weeks) and FA/B12 before surgery. The reduced folates tetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate were evaluated from biopsies in tumor tissue and in adjacent mucosa. Serum levels of homocysteine, cystathionine, and methylmalonic acid were also measured. All 37 patients received three cycles of pemetrexed; 89.2% completed their planned dosage within a 9-week feasibility time frame. Neither dose reductions nor study drug-related serious adverse events were reported. Reduced folate levels were significantly higher in tumor tissue compared with adjacent mucosa at baseline. After FA/B12 administration, tissue levels of reduced folates increased significantly and remained high during treatment in both tumor and mucosa until surgery. Serum levels of cystathionine increased significantly compared with baseline after FA/B12 administration, but then decreased, fluctuating cyclically during pemetrexed therapy. Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels decreased significantly after FA/B12 administration, and remained below baseline levels during the study. These results indicate that administration of three neoadjuvant cycles of single-agent pemetrexed, every 3 weeks, with FA/B12 in patients with resectable rectal cancer is feasible and tolerable. Tissue and serum vitamin metabolism results demonstrate the influence of pemetrexed and FA/B12 on vitamin metabolism and warrant further study. PMID:26825869

  1. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  2. The prognostic value of the tumour marker Cyfra 21-1 in carcinoma of head and neck and its role in early detection of recurrent disease

    PubMed Central

    Doweck, I; Barak, M; Uri, N; Greenberg, E

    2000-01-01

    This study examines a new tumour marker, Cyfra 21-1, as a prognostic marker in predicting the survival of H&N cancer patients, and its correlation with clinical outcome during prolonged follow up of these patients. The study included 67 patients with primary detection of carcinoma of H&N. The survival of these patients was evaluated in correlation with the disease stage and Cyfra 21-1 levels at initial diagnosis. 38 patients were followed clinically and with serial assays for at least 12 months, or until recurrence was diagnosed. Cyfra 21-1 levels were determined periodically, using an Elisa kit. Patients with Cyfra 21-1 < 1.5 ng ml–1had a higher survival rate compared to patients with Cyfra 21-1 ≥ 1.5 ng ml–1(63% vs. 20%, respectively). The risk ratio of Ln(Cyfra 21-1) is 1.62 (P = 0.028). In a Cox regression model that included the disease stage and Ln(Cyfra 21-1), Ln(Cyfra 21-1) was preferred as the main parameter for predicting patients survival. In 83% of the 12 patients with recurrent or residual disease, Cyfra 21-1 was elevated before or during clinical detection of the recurrence. Cyfra 21-1 was found to be a prognostic marker for carcinoma of H&N, unrelated to the stage of the disease. Elevated levels of Cyfra 21-1 without clinical evidence of disease can be attributed to the marker's mean lead-time as compared to the clinical appearance of the disease. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11104568

  3. Development of TRAIL Resistance by Radiation-Induced Hypermethylation of DR4 CpG Island in Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Cheol; Lee, Won Hyeok; Min, Young Joo; Cha, Hee Jeong; Han, Myung Woul; Chang, Hyo Won; Kim, Sun-A; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There are limited therapeutic options for patients with recurrent head and neck cancer after radiation therapy failure. To assess the use of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a salvage chemotherapeutic agent for recurrent cancer after radiation failure, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant cumulative irradiation on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Methods and Materials: Using a previously established HN3 cell line from a laryngeal carcinoma patient, we generated a chronically irradiated HN3R isogenic cell line. Viability and apoptosis in HN3 and HN3R cells treated with TRAIL were analyzed with MTS and PI/annexin V-FITC assays. Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to determine the underlying mechanism of TRAIL resistance. DR4 expression was semiquantitatively scored in a tissue microarray with 107 laryngeal cancer specimens. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing for DR4 were performed for genomic DNA isolated from each cell line. Results: HN3R cells were more resistant than HN3 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis because of significantly reduced levels of the DR4 receptor. The DR4 staining score in 37 salvage surgical specimens after radiation failure was lower in 70 surgical specimens without radiation treatment (3.03 ± 2.75 vs 5.46 ± 3.30, respectively; P<.001). HN3R cells had a methylated DR4 CpG island that was partially demethylated by the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Conclusion: Epigenetic silencing of the TRAIL receptor by hypermethylation of a DR4 CpG island might be an underlying mechanism for TRAIL resistance in recurrent laryngeal carcinoma treated with radiation.

  4. Role of antiviral therapy in reducing recurrence and improving survival in hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma following curative resection (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZUO, CHAOHUI; XIA, MAN; WU, QUNFENG; ZHU, HAIZHEN; LIU, JINGSHI; LIU, CHEN

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide, with the majority of cases associated with persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus infection. In particular, chronic HBV infection is a predominant risk factor for the development of HCC in Asian and African populations. Hepatic resection, liver transplantion and radiofrequency ablation are increasingly used for the curative treatment of HCC, however, the survival rate of HCC patients who have undergone curative resection remains unsatisfactory due to the high recurrence rate. HCC is a complex disease that is typically resistant to the most commonly used types of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; therefore, the development of novel treatment strategies is required to improve the survival rate of this disease. A high viral load of HBV DNA is the most important correctable risk factor for HCC recurrence, for example nucleos(t)ide analogs improve the outcome following curative resection of HBV-associated HCC, and interferon-α exhibits antitumor activity against various types of cancer via direct inhibitory effects on tumor cells, anti-angiogenesis, enhanced immunogenicity of tumors, immunomodulatory effects and liver dysfunction. In the present review, antiviral treatment for HBV-associated HCC is described as a strategy to reduce recurrence and improve survival. PMID:25624883

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced and fat suppressed magnetic resonance imaging in suspected recurrent carcinoma of the breast: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Kerslake, R W; Fox, J N; Carleton, P J; Imrie, M J; Cook, A M; Bowsley, S J; Horsman, A

    1994-12-01

    20 women with suspected recurrent breast cancer who had undergone previous breast-conserving operations were investigated using dynamic contrast-enhanced gradient echo (GRE) and fat suppressed spin echo (SE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Histologically confirmed recurrent tumour was readily recognized on dynamic GRE scans by virtue of rapid, early and avid enhancement. Benign scars enhanced more slowly and reached lower magnitudes of enhancement. Fat suppressed SE images, which were typically acquired 10 min after contrast administration, were sensitive for the detection of tumour recurrence but lacked specificity. Early scanning after contrast administration offers the best prospects for distinguishing tumour recurrence from benign scarring. The criteria used to distinguish these two entities are highly dependent on the scan technique and the time at which images are obtained post-contrast. PMID:7874413

  6. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  7. Inflammation-based scores do not predict post-transplant recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients within Milan criteria.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Ioanna; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel; Wijewantha, Hasitha; Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; De Luca, Laura; Manousou, Pinelopi; Fatourou, Evangelia; Pieri, Giulia; Papastergiou, Vassilios; Davies, Neil; Yu, Dominic; Luong, TuVinh; Dhillon, Amar Paul; Thorburn, Douglas; Patch, David; O'Beirne, James; Meyer, Tim; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2014-11-01

    Increased preoperative inflammation scores, such as neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and inflammation-based index (IBI) have been related to post-transplant HCC recurrence. We evaluated the association between inflammation-based scores (NLR, PLR, IBI) and post-LT HCC recurrence as well as tumor necrosis after transarterial embolization. 150 consecutive patients who underwent transplantation for HCC within the Milan criteria between 1996 and 2010 were included; data regarding inflammatory markers, patient and tumor characteristics were analyzed. NLR, PLR, and IBI were not significantly associated with post-LT HCC recurrence or worse overall survival. Increased NLR and PLR were associated with complete tumor necrosis in the subset of patients who received preoperative transarterial embolization (P < 0.05). Cox regression analysis revealed that absence of neoadjuvant transarterial therapy (OR = 4.33, 95% CI = 1.28-14.64; P = 0.02) and no fulfillment of the Milan criteria in the explanted liver (OR = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.08-10.35; P = 0.04) were independently associated with post-LT HCC recurrence inflammation-based scores did not predict HCC recurrence post-LT in our group of patients. NLR and PLR were associated with better response to TAE, as this was recorded histologically in the explanted liver. Histological fulfillment of the Milan criteria and absence of neoadjuvant transarterial treatment were significantly associated with post-LT HCC recurrence. PMID:25088400

  8. Trebananib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-10

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrioid Stromal Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  9. A Retrospective Analysis of Incidence and Its Associated Risk Factors of Upper Urinary Tract Recurrence following Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer with Transitional Cell Carcinoma: The Significance of Local Pelvic Recurrence and Positive Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Han; Yang, Hyung-Kook; Lee, Jung Hoon; Lee, Eun-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to examine the incidence and risk factors of upper urinary tract recurrence (UUTR) following radical cystectomy (RC) in bladder cancer and to evaluate its relationship with neobladder (Neo) or ileal conduit (IC). Materials and Methods All clinicopathologic parameters and perioperative parameters of 311 patients who underwent RC with either Neo or IC by a single surgeon from 1999 to 2012 were retrospectively included in this study. Patients with a history of renal surgery, concomitant UUTR, or a histopathology of non-transitional cell carcinoma were excluded. For statistical analyses of predictive risk factors of UUTR, a multivariate analysis was performed with known risk factors of UUTR, including type of urinary diversion with significance defined as P < 0.05. Results During the median follow-up period of 53 months, 143 (46.0%) IC and 168 (54.0%) Neo were performed, resulting in 11 (3.5%) cases of UUTR (Neo 7 and IC 4) after RC and all patients then underwent nephroureterectomy. No significant differences in incidence and overall survival in UUTR were observed according different types of urinary diversion (p = 483), and the prognosis for survival of Neo was insignificantly better than that of IC (5-year overall survival 78% vs 74%, respectively, p>0.05). Higher number of positive lymph nodes (HR 9.03) and the presence of pelvic local recurrence (HR 7286.08) were significant predictive factors of UUTR (p<0.05). Conclusion This study reports a UUTR rate of 3.5%, and positive lymph nodes and presence of local recurrence at the pelvis as important risk factors. No significant differences in incidence and survival were observed between Neo and IC. PMID:24798444

  10. Treatment Results of Postoperative Radiotherapy on Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Coexistence of Multiple Minor Risk Factors Results in Higher Recurrence Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). Materials and Methods: This study included 302 OSCC patients who were treated by radical surgery and PORT. Indications for PORT include Stage III or IV OSCC according to the 2002 criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer, the presence of perineural invasion or lymphatic invasion, the depth of tumor invasion, or a close surgical margin. Patients with major risk factors, such as multiple nodal metastases, a positive surgical margin, or extracapsular spreading, were excluded. The prescribed dose of PORT ranged from 59.4 to 66.6Gy (median, 63Gy). Results: The 3-year overall and recurrence-free survival rates were 73% and 70%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that differentiation, perineural invasion, lymphatic invasion, bone invasion, location (hard palate and retromolar trigone), invasion depths {>=}10mm, and margin distances {<=}4mm were significant prognostic factors. The presence of multiple significant factors of univariate analysis correlated with disease recurrence. The 3-year recurrence-free survival rates were 82%, 76%, and 45% for patients with no risk factors, one or two risk factors, and three or more risk factors, respectively. After multivariate analysis, the number of risk factors and lymphatic invasion were significant prognostic factors. Conclusion: PORT may be an adequate adjuvant therapy for OSCC patients with one or two risk factors of recurrence. The presence of multiple risk factors and lymphatic invasion correlated with poor prognosis, and more aggressive treatment may need to be considered.

  11. High b-Value Diffusion MRI to Differentiate Recurrent Tumors from Posttreatment Changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Single Center Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Acampora, Angela; Manzo, Gaetana; Fenza, Giacomo; Busto, Giuseppina; Serino, Antonietta; Manto, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Recently DW-MR Imaging has shown promising results in distinguishing between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSSC). Aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performances of DWI at high b-value (b = 2000 s/mm2) compared to standard b-value (b = 1000 s/mm2) and ADCratio values (ADCratio = ADC2000/ADC1000 × 100) to differentiate recurrent tumors from posttreatment changes after treatment of HSNCC. 20 patients (16 M, 4 F) underwent MR Imaging between 2 and 16 months (mean 7) after treatment. Besides morphological sequences, we performed single-shot echo-planar DWI at b = 1000 s/mm2 and b = 2000 s/mm2, and corresponding ADC maps were generated (ADC1000 and ADC2000, resp.). By considering contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as references, ROIs were drawn in order to evaluate mean ADC1000, ADC2000, and ADCratio. The mean ADC1000 and ADC2000 in recurrent tumors were significantly lower than those in posttreatment changes (P = 0.001 and P = 0.016, resp.). Moreover, the mean ADCratio between the two groups showed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.002). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ADCratio were 82.0%, 100%, and 90%, respectively, by considering an optimal cutoff value of 65.5%. ADCratio is a promising value to differentiate between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in HNSCC and may be more useful than ADC1000 and ADC2000. PMID:27376081

  12. Higher LPA2 and LPA6 mRNA Levels in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Are Associated with Poorer Differentiation, Microvascular Invasion and Earlier Recurrence with Higher Serum Autotaxin Levels.

    PubMed

    Enooku, Kenichiro; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Kurano, Makoto; Sato, Masaya; Kudo, Hiroki; Maki, Harufumi; Koike, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) commonly develops in patients with liver fibrosis; in these patients, the blood levels of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its generating enzyme autotaxin (ATX) increase with the liver fibrosis stage. We aimed to examine the potential relevance of ATX and LPA in HCC. Fifty-eight HCC patients who underwent surgical treatment were consecutively enrolled in the study. Among the LPA receptors in HCC, higher LPA2 mRNA levels correlated with poorer differentiation, and higher LPA6 mRNA levels correlated with microvascular invasion, which suggested a higher malignant potential of HCC with increased LPA2 and LPA6 expression. In patients with primary HCC, neither LPA2 nor LPA6 mRNA levels were associated with recurrence. However, when serum ATX levels were combined for analysis as a surrogate for plasma LPA levels, the cumulative intra-hepatic recurrence rate was higher in patients in whom both serum ATX levels and LPA2 or LPA6 mRNA levels were higher than the median. However, the mRNA level of phosphatidic acid-selective phospholipase A1ɑ, another LPA-generating enzyme, in HCC patients was not associated with pathological findings or recurrence, even in combination with the expression of LPA receptors. Higher LPA2 mRNA levels were associated with poorer differentiation, and higher LPA6 levels were associated with microvascular invasion in HCC; both became a risk factor for recurrence after surgical treatment when combined with increased serum ATX levels. ATX and LPA receptors merit consideration as therapeutic targets of HCC. PMID:27583415

  13. Treatment of advanced, recurrent, resistant to previous treatments basal and squamous cell skin carcinomas with a synergistic formulation of interferons. Open, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Aggressive non-melanoma skin cancer (deeply infiltrating, recurrent, and morphea form lesions) are therapeutically challenging because they require considerable tissue loss and may demand radical disfiguring surgery. Interferons (IFN) may provide a non-surgical approach to the management of these tumors. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of a formulation containing IFNs-α and -γ in synergistic proportions on patients with recurrent, advanced basal cell (BCC) or squamous cell skin carcinomas (SCSC). Methods Patients with extensive, recurrent, resistant to other procedures BCC or SCSC received the IFN formulation peri- and intralesionally, three times per week for 3 weeks. They had been previously treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Thirteen weeks after the end of treatment, the original lesion sites were examined for histological evidence of remaining tumor. Results Sixteen elder (median 70 years-old) patients were included. They beared 12 BCC and 4 SCSC ranging from 1.5 to 12.5 cm in the longest dimension. At the end of treatment 47% CR (complete tumor elimination), 40% PR (>30% tumor reduction), and 13% stable disease were obtained. None of the patients relapsed during the treatment period. The median duration of the response was 38 months. Only one patient with complete response had relapsed until today. Principal adverse reactions were influenza-like symptoms well known to occur with interferon therapy, which were well tolerated. Conclusion The peri- and intralesional combination of IFNs-α and -γ was safe and showed effect for the treatment of advanced, recurrent and resistant to previous treatments of BCC and SCSC in elder patients. This is the first report of such treatment in patients with advance non-melanoma skin cancer. The encouraging result justifies further confirmatory trials. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials RPCEC00000052. PMID:19643007

  14. Long-Term Outcomes After Maximal Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Recurrent or Locoregionally Advanced Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Choo, Richard; Davis, Brian J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Leibovich, Bradley C.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of a multimodality therapy combining maximal surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) for patients with locoregionally (LR) recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy or LR advanced primary RCC. Methods and Materials: From 1989 through 2005, a total of 22 patients with LR recurrent (n = 19) or LR advanced primary (n = 3) RCC were treated with this multimodality approach. The median patient age was 63 years (range 46-78). Twenty-one patients (95%) received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 4,500 cGy (range, 4,140-5,500). Surgical resection was R0 (negative margins) in 5 patients (23%) and R1 (residual microscopic disease) in 17 patients (77%). The median IOERT dose delivered was 1,250 cGy (range, 1,000-2,000). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) and relapse patterns were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 9.9 years (range, 3.6-20 years). The OS and DFS at 1, 5, and 10 years were 91%, 40%, and 35% and 64%, 31%, and 31%, respectively. Central recurrence (within the IOERT field), LR relapse (tumor bed or regional lymph nodes), and distant metastases at 5 years were 9%, 27%, and 64%, respectively. Mortality within 30 days of surgery and IOERT was 0%. Five patients (23%) experienced acute or late National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTCAE) Version 4 Grade 3 to 5 toxicities. Conclusions: In patients with LR recurrent or LR advanced primary RCC, a multimodality approach of perioperative EBRT, maximal surgical resection, and IOERT yielded encouraging results. This regimen warrants further investigation.

  15. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paly, Jonathan J.; Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Biggs, Peter J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Roeder, Falk; Martínez-Monge, Rafael; Whitson, Jared; Calvo, Felipe A.; Fastner, Gerd; Sedlmayer, Felix; Wong, William W.; Ellis, Rodney J.; Haddock, Michael G.; Choo, Richard; Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  16. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for incarcerated rectal prolapse (Altemeier’s procedure)

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Arslan, Ergin; Börekçi, Hasan; Aytekin, Faruk Önder; Külah, Bahadır; Banlı, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Perineal procedures have higher recurrence and lower mortality rates than abdominal alternatives for the treatment of rectal prolapse. Presence of incarceration and strangulation also influences treatment choice. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy is one of the treatment options in patients with incarceration and strangulation, with low mortality and acceptable recurrence rates. This operation can be performed especially to avoid general anesthesia in old patients with co-morbidities. We aimed to present perineal rectosigmoidectomy and diverting loop colostomy in a patient with neurological disability due to spinal trauma and incarcerated rectal prolapse. PMID:27528816

  17. Which Patients With Rectal Cancer Do Not Need Radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Joye, Ines; Haustermans, Karin

    2016-07-01

    According to current guidelines, the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer patients is preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Improvements in surgical techniques, imaging modalities, chemotherapy regimens, and radiotherapy delivery have reduced local recurrence rates to less than 10%. The current challenge in rectal cancer treatment lies in the prevention of distant metastases, which still occur in more than 25% of the patients. The decrease in local recurrence rates, the need for more effective systemic treatments, and the increased awareness of treatment-induced toxicity raise the question as to whether a more selective use of radiotherapy is advocated. PMID:27238471

  18. Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage I Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage II Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin

  19. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of

  20. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  1. Recurrent verrucous carcinoma of the urinary bladder after transurethral resection followed by intravesical mitomycin, and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Masroor; Qureshi, Asim; Nasir, Humaira

    2016-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a locally invasive, non-metastasising well differentiated variant of squamous cell carcinoma. It is very rare in the urinary bladder and mostly associated with schistosomiasis. It has a characteristic multilobular appearance with small surface projections on contrast cystogram. Owing to its bland cytology, it is a challenging diagnosis. We report a case of VC of the bladder-unrelated to schistosomiasis and involving the prostate-that recurred after transurethral resection of the tumour and prostate followed by six doses of intravesical mitomycin. To the best of our knowledge, no such case has been reported from Pakistan. PMID:27307433

  2. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Bevacizumab After Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Pembrolizumab, Bevacizumab, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-02

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  4. [Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with multiple liver metastases successfully treated by cetuximab/CPT-11 chemotherapy followed by curative resection - a case report].

    PubMed

    Tani, Keigo; Seyama, Yasuji; Inada, Kentaro; Matsuoka, Yujiro; Takahashi, Masamichi; Tanizawa, Tohru; Warabi, Masahiro; Nasu, Keiichi; Wada, Ikuo; Maeshiro, Tsuyoshi; Miyamoto, Sachio; Umekita, Nobutaka

    2014-11-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent laparoscopy-assisted partial resection of the rectum to treat rectal cancer diagnosed in September 2011 at a previous hospital. Lymph node dissection was not performed and the vertical margin was positive. When multiple liver tumors were detected 10 months later, the patient was referred to our hospital. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed local recurrence of the rectal cancer, lymph node metastasis, and 9 liver metastases, which had a maximum diameter of 10 cm, and where curative resection would have been difficult. The rectal cancer expressed epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and wild type K-ras gene, and we initiated cetuximab/irinotecan (CPT-11) chemotherapy. After 2 courses of chemotherapy, the liver tumors had markedly decreased in size and anterior resection of the rectum with regional lymph node dissection was performed. The pathological diagnosis of the rectal tumor was mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma ( MANEC). Extended right hepatectomy was performed four months later. The liver tumors were also diagnosed as metastases of MANEC of the rectum. The therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy was assessed as Grade 1b. The patient is alive without recurrence 34 months since the initial rectal surgery and 15 months after the liver resection. Thus, an anti-EGFR antibody agent might be effective against MANEC of the colon and rectum. PMID:25731451

  5. Secondary external-beam radiotherapy and hyperthermia for local recurrence after 125-iodine implantation in adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I.; Kapp, D.S.; Bagshaw, M.A. )

    1991-03-01

    At Standford, six patients underwent a course of external radiotherapy after local recurrence following 125-iodine implantation. Four of the six patients also received concomitant hyperthermia. Four patients were initially managed with hormonal manipulation at time of local relapse and subsequently received external beam radiotherapy with or without hyperthermia. The hyperthermia was non-invasively induced using an annular phased array radiative electromagnetic system. Treatment was well tolerated, and none of the patients experienced severe rectal or bladder complications. Three patients are free from disease; one patient experience local-regional recurrence based on biopsy; one recurred in the bladder, was treated with cystoprostatectomy and subsequently succumbed to metastatic disease; and one patient died of presumed metastatic disease. External-beam irradiation with concurrent hyperthermia can be safely delivered to treat locally recurrent prostatic carcinoma after 125-iodine implantation.

  6. Unusual presentation of metastatic sebaceous carcinoma and its response to chemotherapy: is genotyping a right answer for guiding chemotherapy in rare tumours?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, V.; Xu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma is a rare malignant tumour of skin. It commonly occurs in the head and neck region. The standard of care for localized disease is wide local excision followed by radiotherapy. Occasionally, sebaceous carcinoma can be associated with Muir–Torre syndrome, which is characterized by sebaceous lesions and carcinomas in the visceral organs. Metastatic sebaceous carcinoma is even rarer, with very little evidence about the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic disease. Here, we report a case of recurrent sebaceous carcinoma metastatic to the rectum (initially mimicking rectal cancer and Muir–Torre syndrome) in which the disease responded to multiple lines of chemotherapy. We also review the available literature on chemotherapy in this disease and discuss the role of tumour profiling and genotype-guided selection of chemotherapeutics in such rare tumours. PMID:26300682

  7. Preoperative Chemoembolization in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undergoing Liver Transplantation: Influence of Emergent Versus Elective Procedures on Patient Survival and Tumor Recurrence Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Stockland, A. H.; Walser, E. M. Paz-Fumagalli, R.; McKinney, J. M.; May, G. R.

    2007-09-15

    Our purpose was to compare the recurrence rate and survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who had elective transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), immediate preoperative TACE, or no treatment prior to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). A total of 132 patients with HCC had TACE prior to OLT. Eighteen patients had no TACE before OLT and functioned as a control group. The urgent group included 35 patients embolized less than 24 h before OLT and the elective group included 97 patients embolized greater than 1 day before transplantation. These groups were compared with regard to tumor staging, hepatic synthetic function, and post-TACE tumor necrosis and survival and recurrence rates.Patients were followed for a mean of 780 days post OLT (1-2912 days). The tumor staging was similar between groups but the Childs-Pugh score in the urgent and untreated group was significantly higher than that of the other groups. The degree of necrosis at explant was also significantly different between the two treated groups, with an average 35% necrosis in the patients embolized less than 24 h before OLT vs 77% in the elective group (p < 0.002). Recurrence rate in the urgent group was 8 of 35 (23%) in a median of 580 days, 20 of 97 (21%) in a median of 539 days in the elective group, and 2 of 18 (11%) in a median of 331 days in the no-TACE group. Survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 91%, 80%, and 72% in the elective group, 79%, 58%, and 39% in the urgent group, and 69%, 61%, and 41% in the no-TACE group, respectively. The urgent and no-TACE groups had significantly worse survival compared with the other groups; however, the tumor recurrence rates were statistically the same among all three groups. TACE within 24 h of OLT causes an average of 35% necrosis and elective TACE increases necrosis further to 77%. Despite this difference, the tumor recurrence rate in the three groups is equivalent and no different from that in the group that received no treatment before OLT

  8. Role of immunosuppression and tumor differentiation in predicting recurrence after liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: A multicenter study of 412 patients

    PubMed Central

    Decaens, Thomas; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Bresson-Hadni, Solange; Meyer, Carole; Gugenheim, Jean; Durand, Francois; Bernard, Pierre-Henri; Boillot, Olivier; Compagnon, Philippe; Calmus, Yvon; Hardwigsen, Jean; Ducerf, Christian; Pageaux, Georges Philippe; Dharancy, Sébastien; Chazouillères, Olivier; Cherqui, Daniel; Duvoux, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess pre-orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) factors that could be evaluated pre-operatively or controlled post-operatively associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence and disease-free survival after liver transplantation (LT). METHODS: Four hundred and twelve patients transplanted for HCC between 1988 and 1998 in 14 French centers, who survived the postoperative period were studied. Kaplan Meier estimates were calculated for 24 variables potentially associated with recurrence of HCC. Uni- and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify independent predictors of recurrence. RESULTS: Overall 5-year disease-free survival was 57.1%. By univariate analysis, variables associated with disease-free survival were: presence of cirrhosis (P = 0.001), etiology of liver disease (P = 0.03), α fetoprotein level (< 200, 200 to 2000, or > 2000; P < 0.0001), γ-GT activity (N, N to 2N or > 2N; P = 0.02), the number of nodules (1, 2-3 or ≥ 4; P = 0.02), maximal diameter of the largest nodule (< 3 cm, 3 to 5 cm or > 5 cm; P < 0.0001), the sum of the diameter of the nodules (< 3 cm, 3 to 5 cm, 5 to 10 cm or >10 cm; P < 0.0001), bi-lobar location (P = 0.01), preoperative portal thrombosis (P < 0.0001), peri-operative treatment of the tumor (P = 0.002) and chemoembolization (P = 0.03), tumor differentiation (P = 0.01), initial type of calcineurin inhibitor (P = 0.003), the use of antilymphocyte antibodies (P = 0.02), rejection episodes (P = 0.003) and period of LT (P < 0.0001). By multivariate analysis, 6 variables were independently associated with HCC recurrence: maximal diameter of the largest nodule (P < 0.0001), time of LT (P < 0.0001), tumor differentiation (P < 0.0001), use of anti-lymphocyte antibody (ATG) or anti-CD3 antibody (OKT3) (P = 0.005), preoperative portal thrombosis (P = 0.06) and the number of nodules (P = 0.06). CONCLUSION: This study identifies immunosuppression, through the use of ATG or OKT3, as a predictive factor of tumor

  9. Effects of loco regional treatments before living donor liver transplantation on overall survival and recurrence-free survival in South Korean patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Na, Gun H.; Kim, Eun Y.; Hong, Tae H.; You, Young K.; Kim, Dong G.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the effects of pre-transplant locoregional treatment on survival in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), and the most accurate method for predicting survival after LDLT in patients who received pre-transplant locoregional treatment. Methods From December 2003 to December 2012, 234 patients underwent LDLT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at our transplant center. We retrospectively reviewed 86 patients newly diagnosed with HCC and who received pre-transplant locoregional treatments at our hospital. Results Of the 33 patients with HCC initially beyond the Milan criteria, 12 experienced successful down-staging after locoregional treatments, and the 5-year recurrence-free survival was 81.8%, which was comparable to those in patients with HCC initially within the Milan criteria. A bad responder according to the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) [HR, 4.874 (1.059–22.442), p = 0.042], and increased AFP levels [HR 4.002 (1.540–10.397), p = 0.004] during pre-transplant locoregional treatments were independent risk factors for HCC recurrence after LDLT in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Liver transplantation may be considered after successful down-staging in patients with HCC initially beyond the Milan criteria. The mRECIST and serum AFP level changes are better selection criteria for LDLT in patients who have received locoregional treatments. PMID:26776857

  10. A Phase II Evaluation of Motesanib (AMG 706) in the Treatment of Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube and Primary Peritoneal Carcinomas: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Schilder, RJ; Sill, MW; Lankes, HA; Gold, MA; Mannel, RS; Modesitt, SC; Hanjani, P; Bonebrake, AJ; Sood, AK; Godwin, AK; Hu, W; Alpaugh, RK

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and their receptors have a critical role in stimulating the growth of ovarian cancer cells. Motesanib is a small molecule inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases including VEGF receptors 1-3, as well as c-KIT and platelet-derived growth factor which are related to the VEGF family. Patients and Methods Twenty-two eligible patients with recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal carcinoma were treated with an oral daily dose of 125 mg of motesanib. Peripheral blood was analyzed for circulating tumor cells (CTC) and circulating endothelial cells/circulating endothelial progenitors (CEC/CEP), VEGF levels and cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA). Results The study was abruptly halted after four patients developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. One patient had a partial response and seven patients had stable disease at the time they were removed from study treatment. Twelve of the 22 patients (50%) had indeterminate responses at trial closure. Early closure without clinical efficacy data precludes meaningful correlative studies. Conclusions The serious central nervous system toxicity observed in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer precluded full examination of this agent in this population. There were no clear cut explanations for the high incidence of this known class effect in the study population compared with patients with other cancers. PMID:23321064

  11. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Hydrochloride in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Fatigue; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Pain; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  12. Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 in Treating Patients With Recurrent and Metastatic Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  13. Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma Treated With Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashii, Haruko; Ohkawa, Ayako; Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Tabuchi, Keiji; Wada, Tetsuro; Hara, Akira; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients (13 men, 4 women) with unresectable carcinomas of the NCPS who underwent PBT at University of Tsukuba between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. The patients' median age was 62 years (range, 30-83 years). The tumors were located in the nasal cavity in 3 patients, the frontal sinus in 1, the ethmoid sinus in 9, and the maxillary sinus in 4. The clinical stage was Stage IVA in 5 cases, IVB in 10, and recurrent in 2. The tumors were deemed unresectable for medical reasons in 16 patients and because of refusal at a previous hospital 4 months earlier in 1 patient. All the patients received PBT irradiation dose of 22-82.5 GyE and a total of 72.4-89.6 GyE over 30-64 fractions (median 78 GyE over 36 fractions) with X-ray, with attention not exceeding the delivery of 50 GyE to the optic chiasm and brainstem. Results: The overall survival rate was 47.1% at 2 years and 15.7% at 5 years, and the local control rate was 35.0% at 2 years and 17.5% at 5 years. Invasion of the frontal or sphenoid sinus was a prognostic factor for overall survival or local control. Late toxicity of more than Grade 3 was found in 2 patients (brain necrosis in 1 and ipsilateral blindness in 1); however, no mortal adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy enabled a reduced irradiation dose to the optic chiasm and brainstem, enabling the safe treatment of unresectable carcinomas in the NCPS. Superior or posterior extension of the tumor influenced patient outcome.

  14. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for the Complete Resection of the Rectal Remnant Mucosa in a Patient With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Koyu; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman underwent prophylactic subtotal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) 18 years ago. She underwent 5 transanal endoscopic microsurgeries for rectal remnant polyps, and was referred for the treatment of rectal remnant polyp recurrence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed to remove multiple polypoid lesions that circumferentially extended throughout the rectal remnant with lesions spreading onto the anastomotic site. The rectal remnant mucosa was resected in 2 pieces without complication. Specimens showed high-grade adenoma but no malignancy. Follow-up colonoscopy showed no recurrence. PMID:27144195

  15. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for the Complete Resection of the Rectal Remnant Mucosa in a Patient With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Naoki; Akiyama, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Koyu; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    A 47-year-old woman underwent prophylactic subtotal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) 18 years ago. She underwent 5 transanal endoscopic microsurgeries for rectal remnant polyps, and was referred for the treatment of rectal remnant polyp recurrence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed to remove multiple polypoid lesions that circumferentially extended throughout the rectal remnant with lesions spreading onto the anastomotic site. The rectal remnant mucosa was resected in 2 pieces without complication. Specimens showed high-grade adenoma but no malignancy. Follow-up colonoscopy showed no recurrence. PMID:27144195

  16. Reirradiation With Cetuximab in Locoregional Recurrent and Inoperable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Feasibility and First Efficacy Results

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian; Hambek, Markus; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with a prospective protocol of external beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable, recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 and June 2010, 18 patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were enrolled. Acute and late toxicity from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT and every 3 months thereafter. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after completion of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 9.4 (range: 3.85-31.7) months and for patients alive 30.4 (range: 15.7-31.7) months. Acute toxicity was generally mild or moderate. Five patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. Late toxicity occurred as grade 3 trismus in five and as grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation in one patient, respectively. Overall response rate was 47%. Median overall and progression-free survival for all patients was 8.38 months and 7.33 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 44% at 1 year, with a 1 year local control rate of 33%. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of our preliminary data Re-RT combined with cetuximab for recurrent and inoperable SCCHN is feasible and the integration of newer targeted agents seems to be less toxic compared to conventional chemotherapy with encouraging response rates at least for a subset of patients.

  17. High Levels of Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase and Indocyanine Green Retention Rate at 15 min as Preoperative Predictors of Tumor Recurrence in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Peipei; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Wang, Zhigang; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Arita, Junichi; Tang, Wei; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the preoperative independent risk factors associated with survival and recurrence for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who underwent hepatic resection. In total, 384 consecutive patients who underwent curative hepatic resection for single primary HCC were studied. Predictive factors associated with 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were assessed using a univariate log-rank test and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) > 100 U/L was identified as a preoperative independent risk factor affecting 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival whereas GGT > 50 U/L and indocyanine green retention 15 min (ICG-R15) > 10% were identified as preoperative independent risk factors affecting 1-, 3-, and 5-year RFS. The 384 patients studied had a 1-, 3-, and 5-year RFS rate of 72.8%, 43.3%, and 27%, respectively. Patients with GGT > 50 U/L had a 1-, 3-, and 5-year RFS rate of 64.5%, 36.0%, and 21.7%. These patients had lower survival rates than did patients with GGT ≤ 50 U/L (P < 0.05). Patients with GGT > 50 U/L and ICG-R15 > 10% had a 1-, 3-, and 5-year RFS rate of 62.4%, 29.5%, and 14.1%, respectively. These patients had lower survival rates than did patients in the other 2 groups with different levels of GGT and ICG (P < 0.05, respectively). The same was also true for patients with a tumor < 5 cm in size. Combined information in the form of high levels of GGT and ICG-R15 is a preoperative predictor that warrants full attention when evaluating tumor recurrence postoperatively. PMID:26020384

  18. SU-E-J-265: Feasibility Study of Texture Analysis for Prognosis of Local Tumor Recurrence Within 5-Years for Pharyngeal-Laryngeal Carcinoma Patients Received Radiotherapy Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W; Tu, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas (PLC) are among the top leading cancers in Asian populations. Typically the tumor may recur and progress in a short period of time if radiotherapy fails to deliver a successful treatment. Here we used image texture features extracted from images of computed tomography (CT) planning and conducted a retrospective study to evaluate whether texture analysis is a feasible approach to predict local tumor recurrence for PLC patients received radiotherapy treatment. Methods: CT planning images of 100 patients with PLC treated by radiotherapy at our facility between 2001 and 2010 are collected. These patients were received two separate CT scans, before and mid-course of the treatment delivery. Before the radiotherapy, a CT scanning was used for the first treatment planning. A total of 30 fractions were used in the treatment and patients were scanned with a second CT around the end of the fifteenth delivery for an adaptive treatment planning. Only patients who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy and RapidArc were selected. Treatment planning software of Eclipse was used. The changes of texture parameters between two CT acquisitions were computed to determine whether they were correlated to the local tumor recurrence. The following texture parameters were used in the preliminary assessment: mean, variance, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, energy, entropy, inverse difference moment, cluster shade, inertia, cluster prominence, gray-level co-occurrence matrix, and gray-level run-length matrix. The study was reviewed and approved by the committee of our institutional review board. Results: Our calculations suggested the following texture parameters were correlated with the local tumor recurrence: skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and inertia (p<0.0.05). Conclusion: The preliminary results were positive. However some works remain crucial to be completed, including addition of texture parameters for different image

  19. Phase II study of gemcitabine plus S-1 chemotherapy in recurrent and metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, PeiJian; Ou, XueQing; Liao, Hai; Liu, YuMeng; Wang, SiYang; Cheng, ZhiBin; Lin, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: No standard salvage regimen has been established for patients with recurrent and metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and disease progression after prior platinum-based chemotherapy. This phase II study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus S-1 (GS) chemotherapy as a remedial regimen in this setting. Methods: In this multicenter phase II study, 49 patients with recurrent and metastatic NPC who failed previous platinum-based chemotherapy received gemcitabine (1.0 g/m2 on days 1 and 8) plus oral S-1 chemotherapy (twice daily from day 1 to 14). Each cycle was repeated every 3 weeks for two cycles at least. The dose of S-1 was determined according to the body surface area (BSA): 40 mg twice a day for BSA <1.25 m2; 50 mg twice a day for 1.25 m2 ⩽ BSA <1.5 m2; and 60 mg twice a day for BSA ⩾1.5 m2. Results: Treatment was generally well-tolerated. A total of seven patients (14.3%) had grade 3 toxicities and the main toxicity was myelosuppression, whereas the nonhematology adverse events were minimal. There were 3 complete responses (6.4%), 17 partial responses (36.2%), and the overall response rate was 42.6% (95% confidence interval: 27.3–61.2). Median time to progression was 5.8 months and median survival was 14.8 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 64% and 30%, respectively. Conclusions: Gemcitabine plus S-1 offers a satisfactory clinical activity and an acceptable safety profile for recurrent and metastatic NPC patients after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:27239233

  20. Cell biological factors in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast-relationship to ipsilateral local recurrence and histopathological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ringberg, A; Anagnostaki, L; Anderson, H; Idvall, I; Fernö, M

    2001-08-01

    All cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed from 1987 to 1991 in the Southern Health Care Region of Sweden, and operated upon with breast conserving treatment (BCT) with (n=66) or without (n=121) postoperative radiation (RT) were clinically followed, morphologically re-evaluated and analysed for cell biological factors (immunohistochemical assays or DNA flow cytometry). Median age at diagnosis was 58 years (range 29--83 years) and median follow-up was 62 months. Oestrogen (ER)- and progesterone receptor (PR)-negativity, c-erbB-2 overexpression, low bcl-2 expression, p53 accumulation, DNA non-diploidy and high Ki67, were strongly associated with high grade DCIS, and comedo-type necrosis. In contrast, significant associations to growth pattern (not diffuse versus diffuse) were seen only for c-erbB-2 and PgR. There was also a strong relationship between the cell biological factors, and a summary cell biological index based on principal component analysis was introduced (CBI-7). In the group that had not received postoperative RT, 31 ipsilateral local recurrences occurred (13 invasive, 18 DCIS). Ipsilateral recurrence-free interval (IL-RFI) was in univariate analyses significantly, or almost significantly, shorter for patients showing p53 accumulation, high Ki67 or low bcl-2, compared with patients with normal p53, low Ki67 and high bcl-2. The prognostic importance of the remaining cell biological factors was less pronounced. On the other hand, the index CBI-7, was a strong predictor for recurrence. PMID:11506959

  1. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  2. Cetuximab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-26

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  3. Cisplatin With or Without WEE1 Inhibitor MK-1775 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-04

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  4. [Rectal prolapse revealing a tumor: The role of abdominal ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Bequet, E; Stiennon, L; Lhomme, A; Piette, C; Hoyoux, C; Rausin, L; Guidi, O

    2016-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is rare in children and usually benign. However, there are various diseases that can be associated with it, such as cystic fibrosis or other causes of increased abdominal pressure. Here, we review the various underlying conditions that pediatricians or pediatric gastroenterologists should consider in the case of rectal prolapse. We report on three cases of children with a rectal prolapse and intra-abdominal tumors. Current recommendations and practice do not include a systematic check via abdominal imaging in cases of rectal prolapse. However, in some situations, imaging is indicated to detect a possible expansive process. Thus, in the presence of recurrent prolapse or of associated urinary or neurological signs, imaging is justified so as to allow for an early diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms. Given its lack of radiation exposure and good sensitivity in children, ultrasound imaging is the first choice. PMID:27265581

  5. Evidence-based treatment of patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIANG; YANG, JIE; QIAN, QUN

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a worldwide disease whose incidence has increased significantly. Evidence-based medicine is a category of medicine that optimizes decision making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. Evidence-based medicine can be used to formulate a reasonable treatment plan for newly diagnosed rectal cancer patients. The current review focuses on the application of evidence-based treatment on patients with rectal cancer. The relationship between perioperative blood transfusion and recurrence of rectal cancer after surgery, the selection between minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and traditional laparotomy, choice of chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer prior to surgery, selection between stapled and hand-sewn methods for colorectal anastomosis during rectal cancer resection, and selection between temporary ileostomy and colostomy during the surgery were addressed. Laparoscopy is considered to have more advantages but is time-consuming and has high medical costs. In addition, laparoscopic rectal cancer radical resection is preferred to open surgery. In radical resection surgery, use of a stapling device for anastomosis can reduce postoperative anastomotic fistula, although patients should be informed of possible anastomotic stenosis. PMID:26998054

  6. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  7. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  8. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  9. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or significant rectal bleeding. Laser or infrared coagulation and sclerotherapy (injection of medicine directly into the ... or if symptoms persist despite rubber band ligation, coagulation or sclerotherapy. What are anal fissures? Tears that ...

  10. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 99. Read More Colon cancer Prostate cancer Update Date 11/1/2015 Updated by: ... Health Topics Anal Disorders Enlarged Prostate (BPH) Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Prostate Diseases Rectal Disorders Browse the ...

  11. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  12. Lin28B Is an Oncofetal Circulating Cancer Stem Cell-Like Marker Associated with Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yih-Jyh; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Chang, Yu-Chung; Yen, Chia-Jui; Huang, Hsuan-Pang; Chuang, Yun-Pei; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chao, Anning; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Shih-Huang; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2013-01-01

    By using an expressed sequence tag bioinformatic algorithm, we identified that Lin28 homolog B (Lin28B) may have an oncofetal expression pattern which may facilitate detecting cancer cells in adults. It is also reported to be a potential marker for cancer stem cells. Therefore, we sought to verify oncofetal-stemness characters of Lin28B and test its potential as a circulating cancer stem cell-like marker in adult HCC patients. Lin28B mRNA was examined in a panel of fetal tissue, adult tissue and tumors. Lin28B was over-expressed or knocked down in HepG2 cells to evaluate its potential as a stem cell-like marker. RT-qPCR for Lin28B was performed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HCC receiving surgery (n=96) and non-HCC controls (n=60) and analyzed its clinical significance. Lin28B showed an oncofetal expression pattern. Its overexpression could upregulate stemness markers (OCT4, Nanog and SOX2) and enhance tumorsphere formation in vitro. Lin28B knockdown had opposite effects. Circulating Lin28B was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 3 cases (5%) of non-HCC controls and 32 cases (33.3%) of HCC patients. In HCC patients, circulating Lin28B was associated with high tumor grade (P=0.046), large size (P=0.005), high AJCC stage (P=0.044) and BCLC stage (P=0.017). Circulating Lin28B was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Circulating Lin28B separated early stage HCC into 2 recurrence-free survival curves (P=0.003). In multivariate analysis, circulating Lin28B was an independent variable associated with early recurrence (P=0.045) and recurrence in early stage HCC (P=0.006). In conclusion, the oncofetal gene Lin28B is a potential oncofetal cancer-stem-cell-like circulating tumor cell marker that correlates with HCC recurrence after hepatectomy. Circulating Lin28B could refine early AJCC stages. Our finding supports the possible use of a TNMC (C for circulating tumor cells) staging system in HCC

  13. Lin28B is an oncofetal circulating cancer stem cell-like marker associated with recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Lin, Yih-Jyh; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Chang, Yu-Chung; Yen, Chia-Jui; Huang, Hsuan-Pang; Chuang, Yun-Pei; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chao, Anning; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Shih-Huang; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2013-01-01

    By using an expressed sequence tag bioinformatic algorithm, we identified that Lin28 homolog B (Lin28B) may have an oncofetal expression pattern which may facilitate detecting cancer cells in adults. It is also reported to be a potential marker for cancer stem cells. Therefore, we sought to verify oncofetal-stemness characters of Lin28B and test its potential as a circulating cancer stem cell-like marker in adult HCC patients. Lin28B mRNA was examined in a panel of fetal tissue, adult tissue and tumors. Lin28B was over-expressed or knocked down in HepG2 cells to evaluate its potential as a stem cell-like marker. RT-qPCR for Lin28B was performed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HCC receiving surgery (n=96) and non-HCC controls (n=60) and analyzed its clinical significance. Lin28B showed an oncofetal expression pattern. Its overexpression could upregulate stemness markers (OCT4, Nanog and SOX2) and enhance tumorsphere formation in vitro. Lin28B knockdown had opposite effects. Circulating Lin28B was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 3 cases (5%) of non-HCC controls and 32 cases (33.3%) of HCC patients. In HCC patients, circulating Lin28B was associated with high tumor grade (P=0.046), large size (P=0.005), high AJCC stage (P=0.044) and BCLC stage (P=0.017). Circulating Lin28B was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Circulating Lin28B separated early stage HCC into 2 recurrence-free survival curves (P=0.003). In multivariate analysis, circulating Lin28B was an independent variable associated with early recurrence (P=0.045) and recurrence in early stage HCC (P=0.006). In conclusion, the oncofetal gene Lin28B is a potential oncofetal cancer-stem-cell-like circulating tumor cell marker that correlates with HCC recurrence after hepatectomy. Circulating Lin28B could refine early AJCC stages. Our finding supports the possible use of a TNMC (C for circulating tumor cells) staging system in HCC

  14. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Cancer or Nasal Natural Killer T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma

  15. Vorinostat in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Solid Tumors and HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    HIV Infection; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  17. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  18. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  19. Talazoparib and HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Metastatic Advanced Solid Tumor or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  20. Multi-institutional study of radiation therapy for isolated para-aortic lymph node recurrence in uterine cervical carcinoma: 84 subjects of a population of more than 5,000

    SciTech Connect

    Niibe, Yuzuru . E-mail: joe-n@hkg.odn.ne.jp; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Michimoto, Koichi; Takayama, Makoto; Yamauchi, Chikako; Kataoka, Masaaki; Suzuki, Kazunori; Ii, Noriko; Uno, Takashi; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Higuchi, Keiko; Yamazaki, Hideya; Tokumaru, Sunao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Most patients who had any recurrent sites of cancer have been considered to be in their last stage of life. However, recent advances of clinical research reveal some patients achieve long-term survival even in recurrence. Furthermore, for patients who had only one recurrent region, radiation therapy could play an important role. As for uterine cervical carcinoma, the most common recurrent site other than the pelvis is the para-aortic lymph nodes. Thus we conducted the current study. Patients and Methods: Between 1994 and 2003, more than 5,000 uterine cervical carcinoma patients were treated with curative intended treatments at 13 Japanese hospitals. Of these patients, 84 developed para-aortic lymph node recurrence as the only site of initial tumor progression. These patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy. Radiation therapy protocol was as follows: 1.7-2.0 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week, and the mean total dose was 50.8 Gy (25-60 Gy). Results: Three- and 5-year overall survival rates of all patients were 49.5% and 31.3%, respectively. Stratified by symptom sign, 3-year overall survival rate of symptom positive was 27.6% and those of the negative was 56.1% (p = 0.018). Three-year overall survival rates of the total dose {>=}51 Gy and that of {<=}50 Gy were 58.0% and 42.8%, respectively (p = 0.07). As for morbidity, no patients received Grade 3 or greater late toxicity. Conclusions: The current study suggested that radiation therapy for isolated para-aortic lymph node recurrence in uterine cervical carcinoma could have a significant impact on survival.

  1. Clinical effect of meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorine based photodynamic therapy in recurrent carcinoma of the ovary: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Wierrani, F; Fiedler, D; Grin, W; Henry, M; Dienes, E; Gharehbaghi, K; Krammer, B; Grünberger, W

    1997-03-01

    This article addresses the use of meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin-based photodynamic therapy (m-THPC-PDT) to treat recurrent gynaecologic malignancies of the ovary. Photodynamic therapy is an experimental approach in the treatment of neoplasms and results indicate it is a highly tissue selective, relatively simple intervention with few side effects, therefore reducing the overall burden on the patient. Of the three patients involved in the initial study, two were treated solely with photodynamic therapy by laparoscopy, and one underwent additional palliative debulking surgery of metastatic tumours. After a post-operative period of more than two years all three women remained free of relapses. PMID:9091020

  2. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating gamma delta T cells in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Liang; Li, Ke; Li, Rui; Liu, Hui-Min; Sun, Rui; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the regulatory effect of Vδ1 T cells and the antitumor activity of Vδ2 T cells in rectal cancer. METHODS: Peripheral blood, tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues from 20 rectal cancer patients were collected. Naïve CD4 T cells from the peripheral blood of rectal cancer patients were purified by negative selection using a Naive CD4+ T Cell Isolation Kit II (Miltenyi Biotec). Tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues were minced into small pieces and digested in a triple enzyme mixture containing collagenase type IV, hyaluronidase, and deoxyribonuclease for 2 h at room temperature. After digestion, the cells were washed twice in RPMI1640 and cultured in RPMI1640 containing 10% human serum supplemented with L-glutamine and 2-mercaptoethanol and 1000 U/mL of IL-2 for the generation of T cells. Vδ1 T cells and Vδ2 T cells from tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues were expanded by anti-TCR γδ antibodies. The inhibitory effects of Vδ1 T cells on naïve CD4 T cells were analyzed using the CFSE method. The cytotoxicity of Vδ2 T cells on rectal cancer lines was determined by the LDH method. RESULTS: The percentage of Vδ1 T cells in rectal tumor tissues from rectal cancer patients was significantly increased, and positively correlated with the T stage. The percentage of Vδ2 T cells in rectal tumor tissues from rectal cancer patients was significantly decreased, and negatively correlated with the T stage. After culture for 14 d with 1 μg/mL anti-TCR γδ antibodies, the percentage of Vδ1 T cells from para-carcinoma tissues was 21.45% ± 4.64%, and the percentage of Vδ2 T cells was 38.64% ± 8.05%. After culture for 14 d, the percentage of Vδ1 T cells from rectal cancer tissues was 67.45% ± 11.75% and the percentage of Vδ2 T cells was 8.94% ± 2.85%. Tumor-infiltrating Vδ1 T cells had strong inhibitory effects, and tumor-infiltrating Vδ2 T cells showed strong cytolytic activity. The inhibitory effects of Vδ1 T cells from para-carcinoma

  3. Gefitinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  4. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-17

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  5. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  6. [A Case of Anal Canal Carcinoma with Inguinal Lymph Node Metastasis Treated with Laparoscopic Abdominoperineal Resection].

    PubMed

    Tonooka, Toru; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kainuma, Osamu; Soda, Hiroaki; Cho, Akihiro; Saito, Hiroshige; Arimitsu, Hidehito; Yanagibashi, Hiroo; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Chibana, Tomofumi; Tokoro, Yukinari; Nagata, Matsuo

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of anal canal cancer with inguinal lymph node metastasis treated with laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection combined with inguinal lymph node dissection. A 52-year-old woman was diagnosed with anal squamous carcinoma after excision of an anal canal tumor. Further examination revealed right inguinal lymph node metastasis. Chemoradiotherapy was administered but was discontinued because of serious adverse events. We therefore performed laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection combined with inguinal lymph node dissection. The pathological findings revealed residual squamous cell carcinoma at the lymphatic vessels in the rectal wall and lymph nodes, including the right inguinal region. Therapeutic effect of Grade 1a was achieved in spite of interruption of the chemoradiotherapy. She was discharged 17 days after the operation, and no recurrence was observed for 11 months. Radical resection was performed for the anal canal squamous cell carcinoma with the metastasis to the right inguinal lymph node, even after interruption of the chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26805350

  7. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Atezolizumab and/or Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Integrated analysis of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma identifies key variants and pathways linked to risk habits, HPV, clinical parameters and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Neeraja; Gupta, Saurabh; Palve, Vinayak; Varghese, Linu; Pattnaik, Swetansu; Jain, Prach; Khyriem, Costerwell; Hariharan, Arun; Dhas, Kunal; Nair, Jayalakshmi; Pareek, Manisha; Prasad, Venkatesh; Siddappa, Gangotri; Suresh, Amritha; Kekatpure, Vikram; Kuriakose, Moni; Panda, Binay

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinomas (OTSCC) are a homogeneous group of tumors characterized by aggressive behavior, early spread to lymph nodes and a higher rate of regional failure. Additionally, the incidence of OTSCC among younger population (<50yrs) is on the rise; many of whom lack the typical associated risk factors of alcohol and/or tobacco exposure. We present data on single nucleotide variations (SNVs), indels, regions with loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and copy number variations (CNVs) from fifty-paired oral tongue primary tumors and link the significant somatic variants with clinical parameters, epidemiological factors including human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor recurrence. Apart from the frequent somatic variants harbored in TP53, CASP8, RASA1, NOTCH and CDKN2A genes, significant amplifications and/or deletions were detected in chromosomes 6-9, and 11 in the tumors. Variants in CASP8 and CDKN2A were mutually exclusive. CDKN2A, PIK3CA, RASA1 and DMD variants were exclusively linked to smoking, chewing, HPV infection and tumor stage. We also performed a whole-genome gene expression study that identified matrix metalloproteases to be highly expressed in tumors and linked pathways involving arachidonic acid and NF-k-B to habits and distant metastasis, respectively. Functional knockdown studies in cell lines demonstrated the role of CASP8 in a HPV-negative OTSCC cell line. Finally, we identified a 38-gene minimal signature that predicts tumor recurrence using an ensemble machine-learning method. Taken together, this study links molecular signatures to various clinical and epidemiological factors in a homogeneous tumor population with a relatively high HPV prevalence. PMID:26834999

  9. A Retrospective Comparison of Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for the Reirradiation of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yazici, Gozde; Yildiz, Ferah; Gurkaynak, Murat; Zorlu, Faruk; Yildiz, Demet; Hosal, Sefik; Gullu, Ibrahim; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We assessed therapeutic outcomes of reirradiation with robotic stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LRNPC) patients and compared those results with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with or without brachytherapy (BRT). Methods and Materials: Treatment outcomes were evaluated retrospectively in 51 LRNPC patients receiving either robotic SBRT (24 patients) or CRT with or without BRT (27 patients) in our department. CRT was delivered with a 6-MV linear accelerator, and a median total reirradiation dose of 57 Gy in 2 Gy/day was given. Robotic SBRT was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Patients in the SBRT arm received 30 Gy over 5 consecutive days. We calculated actuarial local control and cancer-specific survival rates for the comparison of treatment outcomes in SBRT and CRT arms. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 was used for toxicity evaluation. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months for all patients. Two-year actuarial local control rates were 82% and 80% for SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.6). Two-year cancer-specific survival rates were 64% and 47% for the SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.4). Serious late toxicities (Grade 3 and above) were observed in 21% of patients in the SBRT arm, whereas 48% of patients had serious toxicity in the CRT arm (p = 0.04). Fatal complications occurred in three patients (12.5%) of the SBRT arm, and four patients (14.8%) of the CRT arm (p = 0.8). T stage at recurrence was the only independent predictor for local control and survival. Conclusion: Our robotic SBRT protocol seems to be feasible and less toxic in terms of late effects compared with CRT arm for the reirradiation of LRNPC patients.

  10. Rectal Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    The last few years have seen important progress in demonstrating the efficacy of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, vaginal microbicides, and treatment as prevention as effective strategies for reducing the risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV infection. There has also been significant progress in the development of rectal microbicides. Preclinical non-human primate studies have demonstrated that antiretroviral microbicides can provide significant protection from rectal challenge with SIV or SHIV. Recent Phase 1 rectal microbicide studies have characterized the safety, acceptability, compartmental pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmaco-dynamics (PD) of both UC781 and tenofovir gels. The tenofovir gel formulation used in vaginal studies was not well tolerated in the rectum and newer rectal-specific formulations have been developed and evaluated in Phase 1 studies. The PK/PD data generated in these Phase 1 studies may reduce the risk of advancing ineffective candidate rectal microbicides into late stage development. Tenofovir gel is currently poised to move into Phase 2 evaluation and it is possible that a Phase 2B/3 effectiveness study with this product could be initiated in the next 2–3 years. PMID:23612991

  11. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. Intramuscular and rectal therapies of acute seizures.

    PubMed

    Leppik, Ilo E; Patel, Sima I

    2015-08-01

    The intramuscular (IM) and rectal routes are alternative routes of delivery for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) when the intravenous route is not practical or possible. For treatment of acute seizures, the AED used should have a short time to maximum concentration (Tmax). Some AEDs have preparations that may be given intramuscularly. These include the benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam, and midazolam) and others (fosphenytoin, levetiracetam). Although phenytoin and valproate have parenteral preparations, these should not be given intramuscularly. A recent study of prehospital treatment of status epilepticus evaluated a midazolam (MDZ) autoinjector delivering IM drug compared to IV lorazepam (LZP). Seizures were absent on arrival to the emergency department in 73.4% of the IM MDZ compared to a 63.4% response in LZP-treated subjects (p < 0.001 for superiority). Almost all AEDs have been evaluated for rectal administration as solutions, gels, and suppositories. In a placebo-controlled study, diazepam (DZP) was administered at home by caregivers in doses that ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 mg/kg. Diazepam was superior to placebo in reduced seizure frequency in children (p < 0.001) and in adults (p = 0.02) and time to recurrent seizures after an initial treatment (p < 0.001). Thus, at this time, only MZD given intramuscularly and DZP given rectally appear to have the properties required for rapid enough absorption to be useful when intravenous routes are not possible. Some drugs cannot be administered rectally owing to factors such as poor absorption or poor solubility in aqueous solutions. The relative rectal bioavailability of gabapentin, oxcarbazepine, and phenytoin is so low that the current formulations are not considered to be suitable for administration by this route. When administered as a solution, diazepam is rapidly absorbed rectally, reaching the Tmax within 5-20 min in children. By contrast, rectal administration of lorazepam is relatively slow, with a Tmax of 1-2h

  13. Recurrent Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma with Pleural Metastasis Diagnosed by Effusion Cytology: A Report of Cases with Clinicopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Reid I; Sumida, Lauren C; Lum, Christopher AK

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is typically an indolent disease characterized by slow growth and a favorable prognosis. In rare instances, this disease may metastasize to the pleura and manifest as a malignant pleural effusion. We report 3 female patients of Japanese/Okinawan ancestry with a history of PTC who presented with hydrothorax. Cytologic examination in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining enabled a definitive diagnosis of metastatic PTC. Molecular analysis of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways demonstrated the presence of the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF)V600E mutation in 2 of our 3 patients, with the absence of any other clinically significant mutations in all cases. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular and environmental mechanisms involved in this aggressive manifestation of PTC. PMID:25755913

  14. Brivanib Alaninate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  15. Detection of Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Cirrhotic Liver after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization: Value of Quantitative Color Mapping of the Arterial Enhancement Fraction of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Ho; Klotz, Ernst; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Kyung Won; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the additional diagnostic value of color mapping of the hepatic arterial enhancement fraction (AEF) for detecting recurrent or residual hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Materials and Methods Seventy-six patients with 126 HCCs, all of whom had undergone previous TACE, and subsequently, underwent follow-up multiphasic liver CT scans, were included in this study. Quantitative color maps of the AEF of the whole liver were created, by using prototype software with non-rigid registration. The AEF was defined as the ratio of the attenuation increment during the arterial phase to the attenuation increment during the portal phase. Two radiologists independently analyzed the two image sets at a two-week interval, i.e., the multiphasic CT image set and the second image set of the AEF color maps and the CT images. The additional diagnostic value of the AEF color mapping was determined, by the use of the jackknife-alternative free-response receiver-operating-characteristic analysis. The sensitivity and positive predictive values for detecting HCCs of each image set were also evaluated and compared. Results The reader-averaged figures of merit were 0.699 on the initial interpretation of the MDCT image set, and 0.831 on the second interpretation of the combined image set; the difference between the two interpretations was significant (p value < 0.001). The mean sensitivity for residual or recurrent HCC detection increased from 62.7% on the initial analysis to 82.1% on the second analysis using the AEF color maps (p value < 0.001). The mean positive predictive value for HCC detection was 74.5% on the initial analysis using MDCT, and 71.6% on the second analysis using AEF color mapping. Conclusion Quantitative color mapping of the hepatic AEF may have the possibility to increase the diagnostic performance of MDCT for the detection of recurrent or residual HCC without the potential risk

  16. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  17. Phase II Study of Gemcitabine and Docetaxel Combination in Patients with Previously Treated Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Kafri, Zyad; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Sukari, Ammar; Yoo, George; Jacobs, John; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Mulrenan, Heather; Smith, Daryn; Kucuk, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the safety and efficacy of gemcitabine and docetaxel (GEMDOC) in previously treated patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods. Patients with advanced SCCHN previously pretreated with one or two lines of palliative chemotherapy were treated with gemcitabine and docetaxel until disease progression. Results. Thirty-six patients were enrolled, and 29 were response evaluable. 16 (55%) experienced clinical benefit (response or stable disease). Six (21%) patients achieved partial response (PR), none achieved complete response (CR), and the overall response rate (ORR) was 21% (95% CI: 0.10–0.38). Ten (28%) patients had stable disease. The median response duration (RD) for the 6 PR patients was 3.2 months (80% CI: 2.0–6.1 months). Median overall survival was 4.2 months (95% CI: 2.4–7.0 months). Among the 33 treated patients: 13 (39%) patients had grade 3-4 anemia, 10 (30%) had grade 3-4 neutropenia. Conclusion. The study drugs were relatively safe, and the clinical benefit (PR + SD) rate was 55%. However, the efficacy objective for this regimen was not met. Given the good safety profile, further investigation of this regimen with the addition of a targeted agent may lead to better efficacy. PMID:22655205

  18. Phase II Study of Gemcitabine and Docetaxel Combination in Patients with Previously Treated Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Kafri, Zyad; Heilbrun, Lance K; Sukari, Ammar; Yoo, George; Jacobs, John; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Mulrenan, Heather; Smith, Daryn; Kucuk, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the safety and efficacy of gemcitabine and docetaxel (GEMDOC) in previously treated patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods. Patients with advanced SCCHN previously pretreated with one or two lines of palliative chemotherapy were treated with gemcitabine and docetaxel until disease progression. Results. Thirty-six patients were enrolled, and 29 were response evaluable. 16 (55%) experienced clinical benefit (response or stable disease). Six (21%) patients achieved partial response (PR), none achieved complete response (CR), and the overall response rate (ORR) was 21% (95% CI: 0.10-0.38). Ten (28%) patients had stable disease. The median response duration (RD) for the 6 PR patients was 3.2 months (80% CI: 2.0-6.1 months). Median overall survival was 4.2 months (95% CI: 2.4-7.0 months). Among the 33 treated patients: 13 (39%) patients had grade 3-4 anemia, 10 (30%) had grade 3-4 neutropenia. Conclusion. The study drugs were relatively safe, and the clinical benefit (PR + SD) rate was 55%. However, the efficacy objective for this regimen was not met. Given the good safety profile, further investigation of this regimen with the addition of a targeted agent may lead to better efficacy. PMID:22655205

  19. Galectin-1 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Local Recurrence and Survival After Definitive Radiation Therapy for Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Chanchien, Chan-Chao; Lin, Hao; Wang, Chung-Chi; Wang, Chong-Jong; Huang, Chao-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of galectin-1 in patients with cervical cancer after definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 154 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma. Patients underwent curative-intent radiation therapy. Paraffin-embedded tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry staining for galectin-1. The rates of cancer-specific survival (CSS), local recurrence (LR), and distant metastasis were compared among patient tissue samples with no, weak, and strong galectin-1 expression. The Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazard model with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Results: The areas under the curve for the intracellular expression scores of galectin-1 for both LR and CSS were significantly higher than those for stromal expression. There were no significant differences in the demographic data, such as stage and serum tumor markers, between patients with and without intracellular expression of galectin-1 in cancer tissue samples. Using multivariate analyses, the hazard ratios of LR and CSS were 2.60 (95% CI 1.50-4.52) (P=.001) and 1.94 (95% CI 1.18-3.19) (P=.010), respectively. Conclusion: Galectin-1 is an independent prognostic factor associated with LR and CSS in stage I-II cervical cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy. Further studies targeting galectin-1 may improve the local control of cervical cancer.

  20. [An effective case of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy based on biochemical modulation for hepatic recurrence of non-functioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Nishijima, K; Ohta, T; Elnemr, A; Yi, S; Ninomiya, I; Kitagawa, H; Fushida, S; Nishimura, G; Fujimura, T; Kayahara, M; Shimizu, K; Miwa, K

    2000-10-01

    A 55-year-old man had a metastasis in segment 3 of the liver 5 months after surgery for non-functioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. The metastatic lesion increased in size in a short period, and other liver micro-metastases that could not be detected by imaging may exist, so hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy was scheduled for 3 months. The patient underwent hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy of 5-fluorouracil (250 mg/day/body for 5 days/week) and adriamycin (10 mg/day/body for 2 days/week) and cisplatin (10 mg/day/body for 5 days/week) and he was put on Leucovorin 30 mg/day as a biochemical modulator of 5-FU and tamoxifen 40 mg/day as a biochemical modulator of ADM. A total 6,000 mg of 5-FU, 100 mg of ADM and 240 mg of CDDP had been administered, until hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy was discontinued because of complicated gastric ulcer. Three months later, the size of the metastatic liver tumor was reduced remarkably and no other metastasis was detected on CT scan, so he underwent partial hepatectomy of the metastatic lesion. No recurrence was found and he has survived in good physical condition during the follow-up period of 5 months after the second operation. PMID:11086447

  1. Are cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency prognostic factors for local recurrence in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast?

    PubMed

    Idvall, I; Anderson, H; Ringberg, A; Fernö, M

    2003-08-01

    There is still no generally accepted histopathological classification system for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Nuclear grade, with or without other histopathological parameters (i.e. comedo-type necrosis and cellular polarisation), has been demonstrated to yield prognostic information. A detailed method for the evaluation of the mitotic frequency in DCIS, based on an approach by Contesso, was used in this study. We also investigated if cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency were important for the ipsilateral local recurrence-free interval (IL-RFI) in 121 DCIS patients who had been operated upon with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) without radiotherapy. Both cellular polarisation and the mitotic frequency were associated with histopathological and cellular biological factors (in previous evaluations), and were of borderline significance for IL-RFI in the univariate analyses. However, when nuclear grade was included in the multivariate analyses (with or without the growth pattern), neither cellular polarisation nor the mitotic frequency were of any independent prognostic value. PMID:12888365

  2. Minimally invasive surgery for rectal cancer: Are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Bradley J; Makhija, Rohit

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic colon surgery for select cancers is slowly evolving as the standard of care but minimally invasive approaches for rectal cancer have been viewed with significant skepticism. This procedure has been performed by select surgeons at specialized centers and concerns over local recurrence, sexual dysfunction and appropriate training measures have further hindered widespread acceptance. Data for laparoscopic rectal resection now supports its continued implementation and widespread usage by expeienced surgeons for select patients. The current controversies regarding technical approaches have created ambiguity amongst opinion leaders and are also addressed in this review. PMID:21412496

  3. Molecular, Pathologic and MRI Investigation of the Prognostic and Redictive Importance of Extramural Venous Invasion in Rectal Cancer (MARVEL) Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-26

    Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Diseases; Colorectal Neoplasms; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases

  4. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  5. [Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for resectable lower rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takase, Shiro; Kamigaki, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishimura, Hideki; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2009-11-01

    To suppress local recurrence and preserve sphincter function, we performed preoperative chemoradiotherapy( CRT) of rectal cancer. Sixteen patients with lower advanced rectal cancer received tegafur/uracil/calcium folinate+RT followed by curative resection with lateral lymph node dissection 2-8 weeks later. The male/female ratio was found to be 11:5 (41-75 years old) and the CRT was feasible for all patients. There were 11-PR and 5-SD according to RECIST criteria, and lower isotope accumulation was observed for all primary tumors in FDG-PET study. After CRT, all patients received R0 curative resection (11 APR, 2 LAR, 1 Hartmann and 1 ISR). On pathological study, 3 patients showed complete response. Surgical complications including pelvic infection, delayed a wound healing and deep venous thrombosis, etc. In conclusion, preoperative CRT of advanced rectal cancer could potentially be useful for local control and sphincter saving, however, it is necessary to manage specific surgical complications due to radiation. PMID:20037306

  6. Rectal prolapse repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... the anus. This is called rectal prolapse. Update Date 7/30/2014 Updated by: Jon A. Daller, MD, PhD, Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ...

  7. The oncofetal protein IMP3 is an indicator of early recurrence and poor outcome in mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Elshafey, Mohamed R.; Ahmed, Rehab A.; Mourad, Mohamed I; Gaballah, Essam T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is the most common primary malignancy of the salivary glands. Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3) is an important prognostic factor in some cancers and a tool that differentiates between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. This study aimed to identify a relationship between the expression of IMP3 and the outcome of salivary gland MEC, as well as to differentiate MEC from pleomorphic adenoma (PA). Methods:Tissue specimens from 70 cases of salivary gland MEC, 40 cases of PA, and 10 cases with normal salivary gland were examined immunohistochemically for IMP3. The association among the expression of IMP3, clinicopathological characteristics and patient's survival was assessed. Results:IMP3 was present in 51.4% of MEC but absent in PA and normal salivary gland tissues. IMP3 expression was associated with age > 60 years, submandibular gland tumors, tumor size > 4 cm, high-grade tumors, lymph node metastasis, involvement of surgical margins, perineural invasion, distant metastasis, advanced TNM stage, tumor relapse, and death ( P<0.05). Increased expression of IMP3, tumors of the submandibular gland, and lymph node metastasis were independent prognostic factors of -free survival (DFS). In addition, IMP3 was a strong predictor of overall survival (OS) together with distant metastasis and intermediate and high-grade tumors. Conclusions:IMP3 expression is highly important in evaluating the outcome of MEC. IMP3 can be used to differentiate MEC from PA of salivary glands. PMID:27458536

  8. Study to Determine Adequate Margins in Radiotherapy Planning for Esophageal Carcinoma by Detailing Patterns of Recurrence After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Button, Michael R. Morgan, Carys A.; Croydon, Elizabeth S.; Roberts, S. Ashley; Crosby, Thomas D.L.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the adequacy of radiotherapy (RT) margins by studying the relapse patterns after definitive chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study assessing the first site of disease relapse after definitive chemoradiotherapy that included four 3-weekly cycles of cisplatin and continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, with conformal RT (50 Gy in 25 fractions) concurrent with Cycles 3 and 4. The RT planning target volume was the endoscopic ultrasonography/computed tomography-defined gross tumor volume with 1.5-cm lateral and 3-cm superoinferior margins. Results: A total of 145 patients were included. Their average age was 65.4 years, 45% had adenocarcinoma, 61% had lower third esophageal tumors, and 75% had Stage III-IVA disease. After RT, of 142 patients, 85 (60%) had evidence of relapse at a median follow-up of 18 months. The relapse was local (within the RT field) in 55; distant (metastatic) in 13, and a combination of local and distant in 14. The local relapse rates were not influenced by tumor stage, lymph node status, or disease length. Three patients developed a relapse in regions adjacent to the RT fields; however, it is unlikely that larger field margins would have been clinically acceptable or effective in these cases. The median overall survival was 15 months. Conclusion: The gross tumor volume-planning target volume margins in this study appeared adequate. Future efforts to improve outcomes using definitive chemoradiotherapy should be directed toward reducing the high rates of in-field and distant relapses.

  9. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Cancer or Other Salivary Gland Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-10

    High-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor

  10. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Childhood Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Ewing Sarcoma; Hepatoblastoma; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma; Recurrent Hepatoblastoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Relapsed Solid Neoplasm; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor

  11. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  12. [Tubular rectum and colon resection. A new operative method for the removal of large adenomas and low-risk carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Gall, F P

    1982-08-01

    A new operative method for the removal of large sessile tubular or villous adenomas and small early carcinomas of the low risk type by a "tubular" colonic or rectal resection is described. The term "tubular" applies to a short segmental resection of the colon or rectum with complete preservation of the mesocolon or mesorectum and the marginal or superior hemorrhoidal artery. This tubular resection has been used by us since 1981 in 11 patients (7 adenomas, 3 adenocarcinomas and one carcinoid). There was no suture line leakage. No lethality and so far no recurrence. The advantages of this new operative technique over conventional methods are discussed in detail. PMID:7128268

  13. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  14. Continuous-Course Reirradiation With Concurrent Carboplatin and Paclitaxel for Locally Recurrent, Nonmetastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head-and-Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Kharofa, Jordan; Choong, Nicholas; Wang, Dian; Firat, Selim; Schultz, Christopher; Sadasiwan, Chitra; Wong, Stuart

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy and toxicity of continuous-course, conformal reirradiation with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin for the treatment of locally recurrent, nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) in a previously irradiated field. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with continuous course-reirradiation with concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel at the Medical College of Wisconsin and the Clement J. Zablocki VA from 2001 through 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included in the analysis had prior radiation at the site of recurrence of at least 45 Gy. The analysis included patients who received either intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) or three-dimensional conformal RT techniques. All patients received weekly concurrent carboplatin (AUC2) and paclitaxel (30-50 mg/m{sup 2}). Results: Thirty-eight patients with nonmetastatic SCCHN met the entry criteria for analysis. The primary sites at initial diagnosis were oropharyngeal or laryngeal in most patients (66%). Median reirradiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 54-70 Gy). Acute toxicity included Grade 2 neutropenia (5%), Grade 3 neutropenia (15%), and Grade 1/2 thrombocytopenia (8%). No deaths occurred from hematologic toxicity. Chemotherapy doses held (50%) was more prevalent than radiation treatment break (8%). Sixty-eight percent of patients required a gastrostomy tube in follow-up. Significant late toxicity was experienced in 6 patients (16%): 1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 pharyngocutaneous fistula, 3 with osteoradionecrosis, and 1 patient with a lingual artery bleed. Patients treated with three-dimensional conformal RT had more frequent significant late toxicites than patients treated with intensity-modulated RT (44% and 7% respectively, p < 0.05). The median time to progression was 7 months and progression-free rates at 1, 2, and 5 years was 44%, 34%, and 29% respectively. The median overall survival was 16 months. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 54

  15. Genome-wide semiquantitative microsatellite analysis of human hepatocellular carcinoma: discrete mapping of smallest region of overlap of recurrent chromosomal gains and losses.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takafumi; Nishida, Naoshi; Komeda, Toshiki; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Ikai, Iwao; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2006-05-01

    Recurrent chromosomal gains at 1q, 6p, 8q, and 17q, or losses at 1p, 4q, 6q, 8p, 9p, 13q, 16q, and 17p are common features of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). For precise determination of the shortest region of overlap (SRO), 49 HCC obtained at the time of surgery or autopsy were subjected to comprehensive microsatellite analysis by using 400 markers distributed at almost equal distances throughout the 22 autosomes and X chromosomes. Each allele showing imbalance was subjected to comparative duplex polymerase chain reaction using a retained allele as an internal control to determine whether the imbalance was the result of chromosomal gain or loss. The following SRO of recurrent chromosomal gains and losses were determined: -1p36.22 approximately p36.33, D1S450-D1S2893, 5.0 mega-base pairs (Mbp); +1q23.3 approximately q25.3, D1S2878-D1S2619, 16.9 Mbp; -4q21.2 approximately q24, D4S2964-D4S1572, 23.0 Mbp; -6q23.3 approximately qter, D6S292-qter, 34.7 Mb; -8p22 approximately p23.1, D8S549-D8S550, 4.8 Mbp; +8q12.2 approximately q24.13, D8S260-D8S514, 61.8 Mbp; -13q13.3 approximately q22.1, D13S218-D13S156, 35.6 Mbp; -16q22.1 approximately qter, D16S503-qter, 26.7 Mbp; and -17p12 approximately pter, D17S921-pter, 14.2 Mbp. Contrary to our initial expectations, many HCC showed major deletions or additions of chromosome arms, so that a number of genes were included in the SRO. Although some putative oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes mapped in these SRO may be important, relative copy number changes of numerous other genes may affect pathogenesis of HCC. PMID:16682288

  16. Details of out-field regional recurrence after involved-field irradiation with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Jinming; Li, Minghuan; Zhu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of out-field regional recurrence after involved-field irradiation (IFI) in definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (LA-ESCC) and identify the possible risk factors. Patients and methods Eighty patients with LA-ESCC who received CCRT with IFI between January 2003 and January 2009 at the Shandong Cancer Hospital were recruited and analyzed. Imaging scans demonstrating first sites of failure were compared with original computed tomography-based radiation treatment plans, and failure patterns were defined as in-field, outfield regional (failures in initially uninvolved regional nodes), and distant failures. Results After a median follow-up time of 52.6 months, 24 patients had evidence of out-field regional failure, 43 patients had evidence of in-field failure, and 33 patients had the evidence of distant failure. Multivariate analysis revealed that out-field regional failure was associated with clinical tumor status (T4 vs T1–3, odds ratio [OR] =6.547, P=0.002), tumor length (>8 cm vs ≤8 cm, OR =4.130, P=0.036), response to CCRT (complete response vs no complete response, OR =2.646, P=0.035), and in-field failure (no in-field failure vs in-field failure, OR =1.32, P=0.016). Survival analyses indicated that, compared to in-field failure or distant failure alone group, out-field regional failure alone group tended to have longer overall (P=0.006) and progression-free survival (P=0.164). Conclusion Our data suggested that the predominant failure pattern after IFI was not out-field regional failure, which also did not influence survival significantly, and that out-field regional failure did not shorten the time to disease recurrence, which also did not influence survival significantly. In addition, out-field regional failure was likely to appear later than in-field and distant failures. The relatively advanced local disease followed by poor

  17. Soy Isoflavones in Preventing Head and Neck Cancer Recurrence in Patients With Stage I-IV Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  18. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  19. Pembrolizumab and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer or Salivary Gland Cancer That Is Metastatic and/or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharynx Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  20. Cisplatin/Tegafur/Uracil/Irinotecan Triple Combination Therapy for Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, San-Chi; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Cisplatin/tegafur/uracil/irinotecan triple combination therapy shows moderate response, especially in patients without previous chemoradiotherapy within the 6 months before this combination therapy. Toxicity is tolerable, and quality of life is improved in responders. Background. The prognosis is poor in recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (R/M HNSCC). Triple combination therapy may increase tumor response. Methods. This phase I/II prospective trial first determined the dose-limiting toxicity and recommended dose of irinotecan with cisplatin and tegafur/uracil (UFUR) in phase I. Irinotecan was supplied at doses of 40, 50, 60, and 70 mg/m2 by using a standard 3+3 design. Doses of cisplatin and UFUR were held stable. In phase II, the recommended dose of irinotecan was administered intravenously (i.v.) over 90 min on day 1, with cisplatin 50 mg/m2 i.v. over 60 min also on day 1, and oral UFUR 200 mg twice a day for 5 days every 2 weeks a cycle. Results. In the phase I portion, 14 patients were enrolled, and the dose level of irinotecan at 60 mg/m2 was defined as the recommended dose for the phase II portion of the study. Among 43 patients enrolled in the phase II portion, complete response was seen in 2 patients (4.7%) and partial response in 10 patients (23.3%), and the disease control rate was 39.5%. In a subgroup analysis of patients whose prior chemoradiotherapy was more than 6 months earlier, a response rate of 40.7% and disease control rate of 59.3% were observed. Conclusion. Cisplatin/UFUR/irinotecan triple combination therapy is tolerated and effective for selected patients. Individualized choice of treatment will influence prognosis and quality of life in R/M HNSCC patients. PMID:27091418