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Sample records for red cell proteins

  1. Dysferlin and Other Non-Red Cell Proteins Accumulate in the Red Cell Membrane of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pesciotta, Esther N.; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a congenital anemia usually caused by diverse mutations in ribosomal proteins. Although the genetics of DBA are well characterized, the mechanisms that lead to macrocytic anemia remain unclear. We systematically analyzed the proteomes of red blood cell membranes from multiple DBA patients to determine whether abnormalities in protein translation or erythropoiesis contribute to the observed macrocytosis or alterations in the mature red blood cell membrane. In depth proteome analysis of red cell membranes enabled highly reproducible identification and quantitative comparisons of 1100 or more proteins. These comparisons revealed clear differences between red cell membrane proteomes in DBA patients and healthy controls that were consistent across DBA patients with different ribosomal gene mutations. Proteins exhibiting changes in abundance included those known to be increased in DBA such as fetal hemoglobin and a number of proteins not normally found in mature red cell membranes, including proteins involved in the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. Most striking was the presence of dysferlin in the red blood cell membranes of DBA patients but absent in healthy controls. Immunoblot validation using red cell membranes isolated from additional DBA patients and healthy controls confirmed a distinct membrane protein signature specific to patients with DBA. PMID:24454878

  2. Regulation of red cell membrane protein interactions: implications for red cell function.

    PubMed

    Takakuwa, Y

    2001-03-01

    This article presents new insights into the molecular mechanism for regulating red cell membrane protein interactions that are responsible for erythrocyte membrane mechanical properties. For various skeletal proteins, structure-function correlations of protein 4.1R have been studied in detail. Kinetic analysis with the resonant mirror detection method has determined the nature of 4.1R interactions with various binding partners such as band 3, glycophorin C, and p55, and their binding sites. More importantly, calmodulin (CaM) binds to 4.1R in a Ca2+-independent manner to modulate the 4.1R interactions in the presence of Ca2+ at microM. Crystal structure of the 30-kD domain of 4.1R has a cloverleaf-like architecture with three lobes, each of which contains a binding region specific for binding partners. CaM binds to the grooves situated in two regions between the three lobes, possibly leading to conformational changes of the three lobes with a consequent alteration in the capacity of 4.1R to bind to its partners. The present findings on erythrocyte 4.1R should provide a basis for better understanding the membrane functions of nonerythroid cells. PMID:11224681

  3. Detection of IgG sensitization of red cells with /sup 125/I staphylococcal protein A

    SciTech Connect

    Yam, P.; Petz, L.D.; Spath, P.

    1982-06-01

    Most cases of immune hemolytic anemia are associated with a positive direct antiglobulin test. However, in some cases, the antiglobulin test is not sensitive enough to detect low levels of red-cell bound antibodies. This report describes a method using radiolabelled purified staphylococcal protein A which is capable of detecting IgG sensitization of red cells beyond the threshold of serologic techniques. It is less cumbersome than previously described methods and does not require antibody purification procedures. Its effectiveness was demonstrated for the detection of red-cell alloantibodies and in evaluation of patients with acquired hemolytic anemias associated with a negative direct antiglobulin test.

  4. Red Light-Regulated Reversible Nuclear Localization of Proteins in Mammalian Cells and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hannes M; Juillot, Samuel; Herbst, Kathrin; Samodelov, Sophia L; Müller, Konrad; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Römer, Winfried; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc; Strähle, Uwe; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-09-18

    Protein trafficking in and out of the nucleus represents a key step in controlling cell fate and function. Here we report the development of a red light-inducible and far-red light-reversible synthetic system for controlling nuclear localization of proteins in mammalian cells and zebrafish. First, we synthetically reconstructed and validated the red light-dependent Arabidopsis phytochrome B nuclear import mediated by phytochrome-interacting factor 3 in a nonplant environment and support current hypotheses on the import mechanism in planta. On the basis of this principle we next regulated nuclear import and activity of target proteins by the spatiotemporal projection of light patterns. A synthetic transcription factor was translocated into the nucleus of mammalian cells and zebrafish to drive transgene expression. These data demonstrate the first in vivo application of a plant phytochrome-based optogenetic tool in vertebrates and expand the repertoire of available light-regulated molecular devices. PMID:25803699

  5. The exported Plasmodium berghei protein IBIS1 delineates membranous structures in infected red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Ingmundson, Alyssa; Nahar, Carolin; Brinkmann, Volker; Lehmann, Maik J; Matuschewski, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Summary The importance of pathogen-induced host cell remodelling has been well established for red blood cell infection by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Exported parasite-encoded proteins, which often possess a signature motif, termed Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) or host-targeting (HT) signal, are critical for the extensive red blood cell modifications. To what extent remodelling of erythrocyte membranes also occurs in non-primate hosts and whether it is in fact a hallmark of all mammalian Plasmodium parasites remains elusive. Here we characterize a novel Plasmodium berghei PEXEL/HT-containing protein, which we term IBIS1. Temporal expression and spatial localization determined by fluorescent tagging revealed the presence of IBIS1 at the parasite/host interface during both liver and blood stages of infection. Targeted deletion of the IBIS1 protein revealed a mild impairment of intra-erythrocytic growth indicating a role for these structures in the rapid expansion of the parasite population in the blood in vivo. In red blood cells, the protein localizes to dynamic, punctate structures external to the parasite. Biochemical and microscopic data revealed that these intra-erythrocytic P. berghei-induced structures (IBIS) are membranous indicating that P. berghei, like P. falciparum, creates an intracellular membranous network in infected red blood cells. PMID:22329949

  6. Synthesis and assembly of membrane skeletal proteins in mammalian red cell precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Hanspal, M.; Palek, J.

    1987-09-01

    The synthesis of membrane skeletal proteins in avian nucleated red cells has been the subject of extensive investigation, whereas little is known about skeletal protein synthesis in bone marrow erythroblasts and peripheral blood reticulocytes in mammals. To address this question, we have isolated nucleated red cell precursors and reticulocytes from spleens and from the peripheral blood, respectively, of rats with phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia and pulse-labeled them with (/sup 35/S)methionine. Pulse-labeling of nucleated red cell precursors shows that the newly synthesized alpha- and beta-spectrins are present in the cytosol, with a severalfold excess of alpha-spectrin over beta-spectrin. However, in the membrane-skeletal fraction, newly synthesized alpha- and beta-spectrins are assembled in stoichiometric amounts, suggesting that the association of alpha-spectrin with the membrane skeleton may- be rate-limited by the amount of beta-spectrin synthesized, as has been shown recently in avian erythroid cells. Pulse-chase experiments in the rat nucleated red cell precursors show that the newly synthesized alpha- and beta-spectrin of the cytosol turn over coordinately and extremely rapidly. In contrast, in the membrane-skeletal fraction, the newly synthesized polypeptides of spectrin are stable. In contrast to nucleated erythroid cells, in reticulocytes the synthesis of alpha- and beta-spectrins is markedly diminished compared with the synthesis and assembly of proteins comigrating with bands 2.1 and 4.1 on SDS gels. Thus, in nucleated red cell precursors, the newly synthesized spectrin may be attached to the plasma membrane before proteins 2.1 and 4.1 are completely synthesized and incorporated in the membrane.

  7. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M−1cm−1, mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths. PMID:26648024

  8. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging.

    PubMed

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M(-1)cm(-1), mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths. PMID:26648024

  9. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  10. [Contribution of immunochemical methods to the study of human red-cell membrane proteins].

    PubMed

    Garbarz, M; Dhermy, D; Boivin, P

    1982-09-01

    Together with the classical technics of biochemical analysis, immunological methods have led to differentiate, characterize the main red-cell membrane proteins and to better understand their organization. Immunological methods were particularly involved in the study of: 1) the membrane skeletal proteins, specially spectrin which localization in the membrane, structure and functions have been specified; 2) the principal integral proteins, glycophorin and protein band 3, the transmembrane orientation of which has been corroborated by topographic immunological mapping of their cytoplasmic domain; 3) the anchor chain protein, linking the membrane skeleton to the transmembrane proteins. These methods could further help to a better understanding of the membrane structure. Two kinds of work can be considered using monoclonal antibodies provided by the hybridoma method: 1) the purification by immunoabdsorbent technics, of quantitatively minor membrane proteins, would allow to study their structure and functions; 2) an immunological mapping with monoclonal antibodies specific against each of the skeleton proteins, of membrane preparations observed in electronic microscopy, would permit to visualize the real architecture of these different proteins in the red-cell membrane. PMID:6291170

  11. [Contribution of immunochemical methods to the study of human red-cell membrane proteins (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Garbarz, M; Dhermy, D; Boivin, P

    1982-02-01

    Together with the classical technics of biochemical analysis, immunological methods have led to differentiate, characterize the main red-cell membrane. proteins and to better understand their organization. Immunological methods were particularly involved in the study of: 1) the membrane skeletal proteins, specially spectrin which localization in the membrane, structure and functions have been specified; 2) the principal integral proteins, glycophorin and protein band 3, the transmembrane orientation of which has been corroborated by topographic immunological mapping of their cytoplasmic domain; 3) the anchor chain protein, linking membrane skeleton to the transmembrane proteins. These methods could further help to a better understanding of the membrane structure. Two kinds of work can be considered using monoclonal antibodies provided by the hybridoma method : 1) the purification by immunoadsorbent technics, of quantitatively minor membrane proteins, would allow to study their structure and functions ; 2) an immunological mapping with monoclonal antibodies specific against each of the skeleton proteins, of membrane preparations observed in electronic microscopy, would permit to visualize the real architecture of these different proteins in the red-cell membrane PMID:6211648

  12. Microfluidic cell sorter for use in developing red fluorescent proteins with improved photostability

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lloyd M.; Lubbeck, Jennifer L.; Dean, Kevin M.; Palmer, Amy E.; Jimenez, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic cytometer for mammalian cells that rapidly measures the irreversible photobleaching of red fluorescent proteins expressed within each cell and achieves high purity (>99%) selection of individual cells based on these measurements. The selection is achieved by using sub-millisecond timed control of a piezo-tilt mirror to steer a focused 1064-nm laser spot for optical gradient force switching following analysis of the fluorescence signals from passage of the cell through a series of 532-nm laser beams. In transit through each beam, the fluorescent proteins within the cell undergo conversion to dark states, but the microfluidic chip enables the cell to pass sufficiently slowly that recovery from reversible dark states occurs between beams, thereby enabling irreversible photobleaching to be quantified separately from the reversible dark-state conversion. The microfluidic platform achieves sorting of samples down to sub-millilitre volumes with minimal loss, wherein collected cells remain alive and can subsequently proliferate. The instrument provides a unique first tool for rapid selection of individual mammalian cells on the merits of photostability and is likely to form the basis of subsequent lab-on-a-chip platforms that combine photobleaching with other spectroscopic measurements for on-going research to develop advanced red fluorescent proteins by screening of genetic libraries. PMID:23636097

  13. Cell-to-Cell Trafficking of Macromolecules through Plasmodesmata Potentiated by the Red Clover Necrotic Mosaic Virus Movement Protein.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, T.; Giesman-Cookmeyer, D.; Ding, B.; Lommel, S. A.; Lucas, W. J.

    1993-12-01

    Direct evidence is presented for cell-to-cell trafficking of macromolecules via plasmodesmata in higher plants. The fluorescently labeled 35-kD movement protein of red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) trafficked rapidly from cell to cell when microinjected into cowpea leaf mesophyll cells. Furthermore, this protein potentiated rapid cell-to-cell trafficking of RCNMV RNA, but not DNA. Electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the 35-kD movement protein does not unfold the RCNMV RNA molecules. Thus, if unfolding of RNA is necessary for cell-to-cell trafficking, it may well involve participation of endogenous cellular factors. These findings support the hypothesis that trafficking of macromolecules is a normal plasmodesmal function, which has been usurped by plant viruses for their cell-to-cell spread. PMID:12271056

  14. Wherever I may roam: protein and membrane trafficking in P. falciparum-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Deponte, Marcel; Hoppe, Heinrich C; Lee, Marcus C S; Maier, Alexander G; Richard, Dave; Rug, Melanie; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude M

    2012-12-01

    Quite aside from its immense importance as a human pathogen, studies in recent years have brought to light the fact that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is an interesting eukaryotic model system to study protein trafficking. Studying parasite cell biology often reveals an overrepresentation of atypical cell biological features, possibly driven by the parasites' need to survive in an unusual biological niche. Malaria parasites possess uncommon cellular compartments to which protein traffic must be directed, including secretory organelles such as rhoptries and micronemes, a lysosome-like compartment referred to as the digestive vacuole and a complex (four membrane-bound) plastid, the apicoplast. In addition, the parasite must provide proteins to extracellular compartments and structures including the parasitophorous vacuole, the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane, the Maurer's clefts and both cytosol and plasma membrane of the host cell, the mature human red blood cell. Although some of these unusual destinations are possessed by other cell types, only Plasmodium parasites contain them all within one cell. Here we review what is known about protein and membrane transport in the P. falciparum-infected cell, highlighting novel features of these processes. A growing body of evidence suggests that this parasite is a real "box of tricks" with regards to protein traffic. Possibly, these tricks may be turned against the parasite by exploiting them as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:23043991

  15. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; et al

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of themore » intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.« less

  16. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.

  17. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivón, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies. PMID:25313043

  18. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    PubMed Central

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects. PMID:24614613

  19. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  20. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows.

    PubMed

    Brust, M; Aouane, O; Thiébaud, M; Flormann, D; Verdier, C; Kaestner, L; Laschke, M W; Selmi, H; Benyoussef, A; Podgorski, T; Coupier, G; Misbah, C; Wagner, C

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects. PMID:24614613

  1. Strengths and Weaknesses of Recently Engineered Red Fluorescent Proteins Evaluated in Live Cells Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Day, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The scientific community is still looking for a bright, stable red fluorescent protein (FP) as functional as the current best derivatives of green fluorescent protein (GFP). The red FPs exploit the reduced background of cells imaged in the red region of the visible spectrum, but photophysical short comings have limited their use for some spectroscopic approaches. Introduced nearly a decade ago, mCherry remains the most often used red FP for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other single molecule techniques, despite the advent of many newer red FPs. All red FPs suffer from complex photophysics involving reversible conversions to a dark state (flickering), a property that results in fairly low red FP quantum yields and potential interference with spectroscopic analyses including FCS. The current report describes assays developed to determine the best working conditions for, and to uncover the shortcoming of, four recently engineered red FPs for use in FCS and other diffusion and spectroscopic studies. All five red FPs assayed had potential shortcomings leading to the conclusion that the current best red FP for FCS is still mCherry. The assays developed here aim to enable the rapid evaluation of new red FPs and their smooth adaptation to live cell spectroscopic microscopy and nanoscopy. PMID:24129172

  2. Conformational changes in human red cell membrane proteins induced by sugar binding.

    PubMed

    Janoshazi, A; Kifor, G; Solomon, A K

    1991-09-01

    We have previously shown that the human red cell glucose transport protein and the anion exchange protein, band 3, are in close enough contact that information can be transmitted from the glucose transport protein to band 3. The present experiments were designed to show whether information could be transferred in the reverse direction, using changes in tryptophan fluorescence to report on the conformation of the glucose transport protein. To see whether tryptophan fluorescence changes could be attributed to the glucose transport protein, we based our experiments on procedures used by Helgerson and Carruthers [Helgerson, A. L., Carruthers, A., (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262:5464-5475] to displace cytochalasin B (CB), the specific D-glucose transport inhibitor, from its binding site on the inside face of the glucose transport protein, and we showed that these procedures modified tryptophan fluorescence. Addition of 75 mM maltose, a nontransportable disaccharide which also displaces CB, caused a time-dependent biphasic enhancement of tryptophan fluorescence in fresh red cells, which was modulated by the specific anion exchange inhibitor, DBDS (4,4'-dibenzamido-2,2'-stilbene disulfonate). In a study of nine additional disaccharides, we found that both biphasic kinetics and DBDS effects depended upon specific disaccharide conformation, indicating that these two effects could be attributed to a site sensitive to sugar conformation. Long term (800 sec) experiments revealed that maltose binding (+/- DBDS) caused a sustained damped anharmonic oscillation extending over the entire 800 sec observation period. Mathematical analysis of the temperature dependence of these oscillations showed that 2 microM DBDS increased the damping term activation energy, 9.5 +/- 2.8 kcal mol-1 deg-1, by a factor of four to 39.7 +/- 5.1 kcal mol-1 deg-1, providing strong support for the view that signalling between the glucose transport protein and band 3 goes in both directions. PMID:1744899

  3. Protein area occupancy at the center of the red blood cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Allison D.; Engelman, Donald M.

    2008-01-01

    In the Fluid Mosaic Model for biological membrane structure, proposed by Singer and Nicolson in 1972, the lipid bilayer is represented as a neutral two-dimensional solvent in which the proteins of the membrane are dispersed and distributed randomly. The model portrays the membrane as dominated by a membrane lipid bilayer, directly exposed to the aqueous environment, and only occasionally interrupted by transmembrane proteins. This view is reproduced in virtually every textbook in biochemistry and cell biology, yet some critical features have yet to be closely examined, including the key parameter of the relative occupancy of protein and lipid at the center of a natural membrane. Here we show that the area occupied by protein and lipid at the center of the human red blood cell (RBC) plasma membrane is at least ≈23% protein and less than ≈77% lipid. This measurement is in close agreement with previous estimates for the RBC plasma membrane and the recently published measurements for the synaptic vesicle. Given that transmembrane proteins are surrounded by phospholipids that are perturbed by their presence, the occupancy by protein of more than ≈20% of the RBC plasma membrane and the synaptic vesicle plasma membrane implies that natural membrane bilayers may be more rigid and less fluid than has been thought for the past several decades, and that studies of pure lipid bilayers do not fully reveal the properties of lipids in membranes. Thus, it appears to be the case that membranes may be more mosaic than fluid, with little unperturbed phospholipid bilayer. PMID:18287056

  4. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen to the body’s tissues in exchange for carbon dioxide, which is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts ...

  5. The variant STEVOR protein of Plasmodium falciparum is a red cell binding protein important for merozoite invasion and rosetting

    PubMed Central

    Niang, Makhtar; Bei, Amy Kristine; Madnani, Kripa Gopal; Pelly, Shaaretha; Dankwa, Selasi; Kanjee, Usheer; Gunalan, Karthigayan; Amaladoss, Anburaj; Yeo, Kim Pin; Bob, Ndeye Sakha; Malleret, Benoit; Duraisingh, Manoj; Preiser, Peter Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Variant surface antigens play an important role in the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. To date, intensive work has mainly focused on the role in parasite virulence of the P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) encoded by the var multigene family. Two other multigene families coding for STEVOR and RIFIN have recently also been shown to be expressed in the invasive merozoite as well as on the surface of the infected erythrocyte, implicating them as potential parasite virulence factors. Here we report that STEVOR is an erythrocyte-binding protein recognizing Glycophorin C on the red blood cell (RBC) surface. STEVOR expression on the RBC leads to PfEMP1-independent rosette formation, while antibodies targeting STEVOR in the merozoite can effectively inhibit invasion. Our results suggest a novel role of STEVOR in enabling infected erythrocytes at the schizont stage to bind uninfected erythrocytes to form rosettes, thereby protecting released merozoites from immune detection. PMID:25011110

  6. Deciphering the Nuclear Import Pathway for the Cytoskeletal Red Cell Protein 4.1R

    PubMed Central

    Gascard, Philippe; Nunomura, Wataru; Lee, Gloria; Walensky, Loren D.; Krauss, Sharon Wald; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Chasis, Joel A.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    1999-01-01

    The erythroid membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1 is the prototypical member of a genetically and topologically complex family that is generated by combinatorial alternative splicing pathways and is localized at diverse intracellular sites including the nucleus. To explore the molecular determinants for nuclear localization, we transfected COS-7 cells with epitope-tagged versions of natural red cell protein 4.1 (4.1R) isoforms as well as mutagenized and truncated derivatives. Two distant topological sorting signals were required for efficient nuclear import of the 4.1R80 isoform: a basic peptide, KKKRER, encoded by alternative exon 16 and acting as a weak core nuclear localization signal (4.1R NLS), and an acidic peptide, EED, encoded by alternative exon 5. 4.1R80 isoforms lacking either of these two exons showed decreased nuclear import. Fusion of various 4.1R80 constructs to the cytoplasmic reporter protein pyruvate kinase confirmed a requirement for both motifs for full NLS function. 4.1R80 was efficiently imported in the nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized COS-7 cells in the presence of recombinant Rch1 (human importin α2), importin β, and GTPase Ran. Quantitative analysis of protein–protein interactions using a resonant mirror detection technique showed that 4.1R80 bound to Rch1 in vitro with high affinity (KD = 30 nM). The affinity decreased at least 7- and 20-fold, respectively, if the EED motif in exon 5 or if 4.1R NLS in exon 16 was lacking or mutated, confirming that both motifs were required for efficient importin-mediated nuclear import of 4.1R80. PMID:10359596

  7. Near infrared light induces post-translational modifications of human red blood cell proteins.

    PubMed

    Walski, Tomasz; Dyrda, Agnieszka; Dzik, Małgorzata; Chludzińska, Ludmiła; Tomków, Tomasz; Mehl, Joanna; Detyna, Jerzy; Gałecka, Katarzyna; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Komorowska, Małgorzata

    2015-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that near infrared (NIR) light exerts beneficial effects on cells. Its usefulness in the treatment of cancer, acute brain injuries, strokes and neurodegenerative disorders has been proposed. The mechanism of the NIR action is probably of photochemical nature, however it is not fully understood. Here, using a relatively simple biological model, human red blood cells (RBCs), and a polychromatic non-polarized light source, we investigate the impact of NIR radiation on the oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hb), and anion exchanger (AE1, Band 3). The exposure of intact RBCs to NIR light causes quaternary transitions in Hb, dehydration of proteins and decreases the amount of physiologically inactive methemoglobin, as detected by Raman spectroscopy. These effects are accompanied by a lowering of the intracellular pH (pHi) and changes in the cell membrane topography, as documented by atomic force microscopy (AFM). All those changes are in line with our previous studies where alterations of the membrane fluidity and membrane potential were attributed to NIR action on RBCs. The rate of the above listed changes depends strictly on the dose of NIR light that the cells receive, nonetheless it should not be considered as a thermal effect. PMID:26329012

  8. Merozoite surface proteins in red blood cell invasion, immunity and vaccines against malaria

    PubMed Central

    Beeson, James G.; Drew, Damien R.; Boyle, Michelle J.; Feng, Gaoqian; Fowkes, Freya J.I.; Richards, Jack S.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria accounts for an enormous burden of disease globally, with Plasmodium falciparum accounting for the majority of malaria, and P. vivax being a second important cause, especially in Asia, the Americas and the Pacific. During infection with Plasmodium spp., the merozoite form of the parasite invades red blood cells and replicates inside them. It is during the blood-stage of infection that malaria disease occurs and, therefore, understanding merozoite invasion, host immune responses to merozoite surface antigens, and targeting merozoite surface proteins and invasion ligands by novel vaccines and therapeutics have been important areas of research. Merozoite invasion involves multiple interactions and events, and substantial processing of merozoite surface proteins occurs before, during and after invasion. The merozoite surface is highly complex, presenting a multitude of antigens to the immune system. This complexity has proved challenging to our efforts to understand merozoite invasion and malaria immunity, and to developing merozoite antigens as malaria vaccines. In recent years, there has been major progress in this field, and several merozoite surface proteins show strong potential as malaria vaccines. Our current knowledge on this topic is reviewed, highlighting recent advances and research priorities. PMID:26833236

  9. Merozoite surface proteins in red blood cell invasion, immunity and vaccines against malaria.

    PubMed

    Beeson, James G; Drew, Damien R; Boyle, Michelle J; Feng, Gaoqian; Fowkes, Freya J I; Richards, Jack S

    2016-05-01

    Malaria accounts for an enormous burden of disease globally, with Plasmodium falciparum accounting for the majority of malaria, and P. vivax being a second important cause, especially in Asia, the Americas and the Pacific. During infection with Plasmodium spp., the merozoite form of the parasite invades red blood cells and replicates inside them. It is during the blood-stage of infection that malaria disease occurs and, therefore, understanding merozoite invasion, host immune responses to merozoite surface antigens, and targeting merozoite surface proteins and invasion ligands by novel vaccines and therapeutics have been important areas of research. Merozoite invasion involves multiple interactions and events, and substantial processing of merozoite surface proteins occurs before, during and after invasion. The merozoite surface is highly complex, presenting a multitude of antigens to the immune system. This complexity has proved challenging to our efforts to understand merozoite invasion and malaria immunity, and to developing merozoite antigens as malaria vaccines. In recent years, there has been major progress in this field, and several merozoite surface proteins show strong potential as malaria vaccines. Our current knowledge on this topic is reviewed, highlighting recent advances and research priorities. PMID:26833236

  10. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Namrata; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Vahishta, R K; Sehgal, Rakesh; Verma, Anita K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Background Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs) and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells). Methods Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections. Results The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene expression and cellular activity depending on the degree of iron saturation of lactoferrin. A significant increase (P<0.05) in production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic activity, and Toll-like receptor expression was observed in host cells incubated with iron-saturated lactoferrin when compared with an untreated control group. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) change in percentage viability in the different groups of host cells treated, and no downregulation of survivin gene expression was found at 48 hours post-incubation. Upregulation of the Toll-like receptor and downregulation of the P-gp gene confirmed the immunomodulatory potential of lactoferrin protein. Conclusion The present study

  11. Proteomic analysis of ERK1/2-mediated human sickle red blood cell membrane protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In sickle cell disease (SCD), the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK1/2 is constitutively active and can be inducible by agonist-stimulation only in sickle but not in normal human red blood cells (RBCs). ERK1/2 is involved in activation of ICAM-4-mediated sickle RBC adhesion to the endothelium. However, other effects of the ERK1/2 activation in sickle RBCs leading to the complex SCD pathophysiology, such as alteration of RBC hemorheology are unknown. Results To further characterize global ERK1/2-induced changes in membrane protein phosphorylation within human RBCs, a label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis was applied to sickle and normal RBC membrane ghosts pre-treated with U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, the upstream kinase of ERK1/2, in the presence or absence of recombinant active ERK2. Across eight unique treatment groups, 375 phosphopeptides from 155 phosphoproteins were quantified with an average technical coefficient of variation in peak intensity of 19.8%. Sickle RBC treatment with U0126 decreased thirty-six phosphopeptides from twenty-one phosphoproteins involved in regulation of not only RBC shape, flexibility, cell morphology maintenance and adhesion, but also glucose and glutamate transport, cAMP production, degradation of misfolded proteins and receptor ubiquitination. Glycophorin A was the most affected protein in sickle RBCs by this ERK1/2 pathway, which contained 12 unique phosphorylated peptides, suggesting that in addition to its effect on sickle RBC adhesion, increased glycophorin A phosphorylation via the ERK1/2 pathway may also affect glycophorin A interactions with band 3, which could result in decreases in both anion transport by band 3 and band 3 trafficking. The abundance of twelve of the thirty-six phosphopeptides were subsequently increased in normal RBCs co-incubated with recombinant ERK2 and therefore represent specific MEK1/2 phospho-inhibitory targets mediated via ERK2. Conclusions These findings

  12. Modeling of band-3 protein diffusion in the normal and defective red blood cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Zhang, Yihao; Ha, Vi; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-04-13

    We employ a two-component red blood cell (RBC) membrane model to simulate lateral diffusion of band-3 proteins in the normal RBC and in the RBC with defective membrane proteins. The defects reduce the connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton (vertical connectivity), or the connectivity of the membrane skeleton itself (horizontal connectivity), and are associated with the blood disorders of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) respectively. Initially, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton limits band-3 lateral mobility by measuring the band-3 macroscopic diffusion coefficients in the normal RBC membrane and in a lipid bilayer without the cytoskeleton. Then, we study band-3 diffusion in the defective RBC membrane and quantify the relation between band-3 diffusion coefficients and percentage of protein defects in HE RBCs. In addition, we illustrate that at low spectrin network connectivity (horizontal connectivity) band-3 subdiffusion can be approximated as anomalous diffusion, while at high horizontal connectivity band-3 diffusion is characterized as confined diffusion. Our simulations show that the band-3 anomalous diffusion exponent depends on the percentage of protein defects in the membrane cytoskeleton. We also confirm that the introduction of attraction between the lipid bilayer and the spectrin network reduces band-3 diffusion, but we show that this reduction is lower than predicted by the percolation theory. Furthermore, we predict that the attractive force between the spectrin filament and the lipid bilayer is at least 20 times smaller than the binding forces at band-3 and glycophorin C, the two major membrane binding sites. Finally, we explore diffusion of band-3 particles in the RBC membrane with defects related to vertical connectivity. We demonstrate that in this case band-3 diffusion can be approximated as confined diffusion for all attraction levels between the spectrin network and the lipid bilayer

  13. Age-related changes in red blood cell complement regulatory proteins and susceptibility to severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Waitumbi, John N; Donvito, Béatrice; Kisserli, Aymric; Cohen, Jacques H M; Stoute, José A

    2004-09-15

    Severe malaria-associated anemia and cerebral malaria are life-threatening complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Red blood cell (RBC) complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both. We sought to determine whether there are age-related changes in the expression of CRPs that could explain the susceptibility to severe malaria-associated anemia in young children and the susceptibility to cerebral malaria in older children and adults. In cross-sectional surveys in malaria-endemic and -nonendemic areas of Kenya and in Reims, France, the level of RBC CRPs was lowest in young children and increased into adulthood. In case-control studies, patients with cerebral malaria and matched control subjects had higher levels of RBC CRPs than did patients with severe anemia and matched control subjects, especially during convalescence. We conclude that RBC CRP levels vary with age and that the lower levels of these proteins in young children in areas of high transmission, such as western Kenya, may place these children at greater risk of severe malaria-associated anemia than cerebral malaria. PMID:15319870

  14. Red fluorescent turn-on ligands for imaging and quantifying G protein-coupled receptors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, Iuliia A; Kreder, Rémy; Valencia, Christel; Villa, Pascal; Mendre, Christiane; Mouillac, Bernard; Mély, Yves; Hibert, Marcel; Bonnet, Dominique; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2014-02-10

    Classical fluorescence-based approaches to monitor ligand-protein interactions are generally hampered by the background signal of unbound ligand, which must be removed by tedious washing steps. To overcome this major limitation, we report here the first red fluorescent turn-on probes for a G protein-coupled receptor (oxytocin receptor) at the surface of living cells. The peptide ligand carbetocin was conjugated to one of the best solvatochromic (fluorogenic) dyes, Nile Red, which turns on emission when reaching the hydrophobic environment of the receptor. We showed that the incorporation of hydrophilic octa(ethylene glycol) linker between the pharmacophore and the dye minimized nonspecific interaction of the probe with serum proteins and lipid membranes, thus ensuring receptor-specific turn-on response. The new ligand was successfully applied for background-free imaging and quantification of oxytocin receptors in living cells. PMID:24449564

  15. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen ... hemocytoblasts give rise to all of the formed elements in blood. If a hemocytoblast commits to becoming ...

  16. A study of membrane protein defects and alpha hemoglobin chains of red blood cells in human beta thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rouyer-Fessard, P.; Garel, M.C.; Domenget, C.; Guetarni, D.; Bachir, D.; Colonna, P.; Beuzard, Y. )

    1989-11-15

    The soluble pool of alpha hemoglobin chains present in blood or bone marrow cells was measured with a new affinity method using a specific probe, beta A hemoglobin chain labeled with ({sup 3}H)N-ethylmaleimide. This pool of soluble alpha chains was 0.067 {plus minus} 0.017% of hemoglobin in blood of normal adult, 0.11 {plus minus} 0.03% in heterozygous beta thalassemia and ranged from 0.26 to 1.30% in homozygous beta thalassemia intermedia. This elevated pool of soluble alpha chains observed in human beta thalassemia intermedia decreased 33-fold from a value of 10% of total hemoglobin in bone marrow cells to 0.3% in the most dense red blood cells. The amount of insoluble alpha chains was measured by using the polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in urea and Triton X-100. In beta thalassemia intermedia the amount of insoluble alpha chains was correlated with the decreased spectrin content of red cell membrane and was associated with a decrease in ankyrin and with other abnormalities of the electrophoretic pattern of membrane proteins. The loss and topology of the reactive thiol groups of membrane proteins was determined by using ({sup 3}H)N-ethylmaleimide added to membrane ghosts prior to urea and Triton X-100 electrophoresis. Spectrin and ankyrin were the major proteins with the most important decrease of thiol groups.

  17. Chemical modification of membrane proteins in relation to inhibition of anion exchange in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zaki, L; Fasold, H; Schuhmann, B; Passow, H

    1975-12-01

    Mono-, di-, and trisulfonic acids, including 4,4'-diacetamido stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DAS) and 2-(4'-amino phenyl)-6-methylbenzene thiazol-3',7-disulfonic acid (APMB) produce a reversible inhibition of sulfate equilibrium exchange in human red cells. A study of the sidedness of the action of a number of these sulfonic acids in red cell ghosts revealed that some, like DAS, inhibit only at the outer membrane surface while others, like APMB, inhibit at either surface. This finding suggests that at least two different types of membrane sites are involved in the control of anion permeability. The nature of the anion permeability controlling sites in the outer cell surface was investigated by studying the effects of DAS on the inhibition by dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) of anion equilibrium exchange and on the binding of DNFB to the proteins of the red blood cell membrane. After exposure to DNFB in the presence of DAS for a certain period of time, there was a reduction of both the inhibitory effect of DNFB on sulfate exchange and the binding of DNFB to the protein in band 3 of SDS polyacrylamide gel electropherograms (nomenclature of Steck, J. Cell. Biol., 62: 1, '74). Since binding to other membrane proteins was not affected, this observation supports the assumption that the protein in band 3 plays some role in anion transport. In accordance with the absence of an inhibitory effect at the inner membrane surface, internal DAS does not affect DNFB binding to the protein in band 3. DAS protected the anion exchange system not only against inhibition by DNFB but also by m-isothiocyanato benzene sulfonic acid. In contrast to DAS, the equally inhibitory phlorizin does not reduce the rate of dinitrophenylation of the protein in band 3. This suggests that either not all inhibitors of anion exchange exert their action by a combination with sites on the protein in band 3 or that in spite of the described evidence this protein is not involved in the control of anion movements

  18. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  19. Protein Structure-Function Correlation in Living Human Red Blood Cells Probed by Isotope Exchange-based Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sreekala; Mitra, Gopa; Muralidharan, Monita; Mathew, Boby; Mandal, Amit K

    2015-12-01

    To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms of various biological events, it is important to study the structure-function correlation of proteins within cells. Structural probes used in spectroscopic tools to investigate protein conformation are similar across all proteins. Therefore, structural studies are restricted to purified proteins in vitro and these findings are extrapolated in cells to correlate their functions in vivo. However, due to cellular complexity, in vivo and in vitro environments are radically different. Here, we show a novel way to monitor the structural transition of human hemoglobin upon oxygen binding in living red blood cells (RBCs), using hydrogen/deuterium exchange-based mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS). Exploiting permeability of D2O across cell membrane, the isotope exchange of polypeptide backbone amide hydrogens of hemoglobin was carried out inside RBCs and monitored using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). To explore the conformational transition associated with oxygenation of hemoglobin in vivo, the isotope exchange kinetics was simplified using the method of initial rates. RBC might be considered as an in vivo system of pure hemoglobin. Thus, as a proof-of-concept, the observed results were correlated with structural transition of hemoglobin associated with its function established in vitro. This is the first report on structural changes of a protein upon ligand binding in its endogenous environment. The proposed method might be applicable to proteins in their native state, irrespective of location, concentration, and size. The present in-cell approach opens a new avenue to unravel a plethora of biological processes like ligand binding, folding, and post-translational modification of proteins in living cells. PMID:26531244

  20. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting.

    PubMed

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Lam, Amy J; Kim, Bongjae B; Jacobs, Conor L; Howe, Elizabeth S; Davidson, Michael W; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude. PMID:26879144

  1. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting

    PubMed Central

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Lam, Amy J.; Kim, Bongjae B.; Jacobs, Conor L.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Davidson, Michael W.; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude. PMID:26879144

  2. A haemolytic syndrome associated with the complete absence of red cell membrane protein 4.2 in two Tunisian siblings.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, A; Pothier, B; Marechal, J; Ducluzeau, M T; Morle, L; Alloisio, N; Feo, C; Ben Abdeladhim, A; Fattoum, S; Delaunay, J

    1990-07-01

    We report on the complete absence of protein 4.2 in two Tunisian siblings. The propositus presented with a haemolytic anaemia that evolved in an intermittent fashion until she was cured by splenectomy. Her red cells had a normal morphology, as well as normal deformability upon osmotic gradient ektacytometry. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis failed to reveal any protein 4.2. Using anti-protein 4.2 polyclonal antibodies. Western blots were also unable to detect protein 4.2. Preparation of inside out vesicles resulted in no detectable loss of ankyrin. The propositus's sister presented with a haemolytic anaemia but had not undergone splenectomy; she showed the same biochemical features. The two cases presented of missing protein 4.2 are the first ones to be described outside the Japanese population. Considered as homozygotes for some defect that must alter the protein 4.2 gene itself, they exemplify a unique syndrome pertaining neither to elliptocytosis nor to spherocytosis, at least not closely. The parents, who are first cousins and whom we regarded as heterozygotes, were clinically and morphologically normal; they had a normal content of protein 4.2. Therefore, the 4.2 (-) haemolytic anaemia appears as entirely recessive. PMID:2386772

  3. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  4. Effect of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Reiniger, I W; de Oliveira, J F; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Bernardo-Filho, M

    1999-08-01

    Peumus boldus is used in popular medicine in Brazil. The influence of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with 99mTc was studied. Stannous chloride and 99mTc pertechnetate were incubated with blood and a tincture of Peumus boldus. Aliquots of plasma and blood cells were isolated from the mixture and treated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). After separation, analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions showed a rapid uptake of the radioactivity by blood cells in the presence of the drug, whereas there was a slight decrease in the amount of 99mTc radioactivity in the TCA-insoluble fraction of plasma. PMID:10376326

  5. Spectroscopic Analysis of Red Fluorescent Proteins and Development of a Microfluidic Cell Sorter for the Generation of Improved Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbeck, Jennifer L.

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) launched the development of a wide variety of fluorescent protein (FP) mutants whose spectral and photophysical diversity revolutionized in vivo imaging. The excitation and emission spectra of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), in particular, have been ideally tuned to a window optically favorable for in vivo work. However, their quantum yields, photostabilities and fluorescence intermittency properties require improvement if they are to be broadly employed for low-copy or single-molecule measurements. Attempts to engineer improved RFPs often result in optimization of one photophysical property at the expense of others. We developed a microfluidic-based cytometer for screening HeLa cell-based genetic RFP-libraries simultaneously on the basis of fluorescence lifetime (a proxy for quantum yield), photostability, and brightness. Ten 532 nm excitation beams interrogate each cell in flow. The first is electro-optically modulated (30 MHz) to enable lifetime measurement with phase fluorimetry. The remaining beams act as a pulse sequence for isolating the irreversible photobleaching time constant. Optical-force switching is employed to sort cells based on any combination of the photophysical parameters. Screening with this instrument enables identification of regions of the structure that synergistically affect quantum yield and photostability and the sorting capability provides a new tool for accelerating the development of next generation RFPs.

  6. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury. PMID:27251171

  7. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). ... abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in this photomicrograph.

  8. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in this photomicrograph.

  9. Interactions between Plasmodium falciparum skeleton-binding protein 1 and the membrane skeleton of malaria-infected red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Donna W.; Blanc, Lionel; Hale, John; Guo, Xinhua; Pei, Xinhong; Herrmann, Susann; Hanssen, Eric G.; Coppel, Ross L.; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Cooke, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    During development inside red blood cells (RBCs), Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites export proteins that associate with the RBC membrane skeleton. These interactions cause profound changes to the biophysical properties of RBCs that underpin the often severe and fatal clinical manifestations of falciparum malaria. P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is one such exported parasite protein that plays a major role in malaria pathogenesis since its exposure on the parasitised RBC surface mediates their adhesion to vascular endothelium and placental syncytioblasts. En route to the RBC membrane skeleton, PfEMP1 transiently associates with Maurer's clefts (MCs), parasite-derived membranous structures in the RBC cytoplasm. We have previously shown that a resident MC protein, skeleton-binding protein 1 (SBP1), is essential for the placement of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface and hypothesised that the function of SBP1 may be to target MCs to the RBC membrane. Since this would require additional protein interactions, we set out to identify binding partners for SBP1. Using a combination of approaches, we have defined the region of SBP1 that binds specifically to defined subdomains of two major components of the RBC membrane skeleton, protein 4.1R and spectrin. We show that these interactions serve as one mechanism to anchor MCs to the RBC membrane skeleton, however, while they appear to be necessary, they are not sufficient for the translocation of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface. The N-terminal domain of SBP1 that resides within the lumen of MCs clearly plays an essential, but presently unknown role in this process. PMID:25883090

  10. Selective Chemokine Receptor Usage by Central Nervous System Myeloid Cells in CCR2-Red Fluorescent Protein Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Kelsey; Mizutani, Makiko; Cotleur, Anne C.; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Charo, Israel F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Monocyte subpopulations distinguished by differential expression of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 are difficult to track in vivo, partly due to lack of CCR2 reagents. Methodology/Principal Findings We created CCR2-red fluorescent protein (RFP) knock-in mice and crossed them with CX3CR1-GFP mice to investigate monocyte subset trafficking. In mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CCR2 was critical for efficient intrathecal accumulation and localization of Ly6Chi/CCR2hi monocytes. Surprisingly, neutrophils, not Ly6Clo monocytes, largely replaced Ly6Chi cells in the central nervous system of these mice. CCR2-RFP expression allowed the first unequivocal distinction between infiltrating monocytes/macrophages from resident microglia. Conclusion/Significance These results refine the concept of monocyte subsets, provide mechanistic insight about monocyte entry into the central nervous system, and present a novel model for imaging and quantifying inflammatory myeloid populations. PMID:21060874

  11. A Fluorogenic Red Fluorescent Protein Heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Spencer C.; Abdelfattah, Ahmed S.; Ding, Yidan; Campbell, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The expanding repertoire of genetically encoded biosensors constructed from variants of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) enable the imaging of a variety of intracellular biochemical processes. To facilitate the imaging of multiple biosensors in a single cell, we undertook the development of a dimerization-dependent red fluorescent protein (ddRFP) that provides an alternative strategy for biosensor construction. An extensive process of rational engineering and directed protein evolution led to the discovery of a ddRFP with a Kd of 33 μM and a 10-fold increase in fluorescence upon heterodimer formation. We demonstrate that the dimerization-dependent fluorescence of ddRFP can be used for detection of a protein-protein interaction in vitro, imaging of the reversible Ca2+-dependent association of calmodulin and M13 in live cells, and imaging of caspase-3 activity during apoptosis. PMID:22444590

  12. Pf155/RESA protein influences the dynamic microcirculatory behavior of ring-stage Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez-Silva, Monica; Park, Yongkeun; Huang, Sha; Bow, Hansen; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Deplaine, Guillaume; Lavazec, Catherine; Perrot, Sylvie; Bonnefoy, Serge; Feld, Michael S.; Han, Jongyoon; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra

    2012-08-01

    Proteins exported by Plasmodium falciparum to the red blood cell (RBC) membrane modify the structural properties of the parasitized RBC (Pf-RBC). Although quasi-static single cell assays show reduced ring-stage Pf-RBCs deformability, the parameters influencing their microcirculatory behavior remain unexplored. Here, we study the dynamic properties of ring-stage Pf-RBCs and the role of the parasite protein Pf155/Ring-Infected Erythrocyte Surface Antigen (RESA). Diffraction phase microscopy revealed RESA-driven decreased Pf-RBCs membrane fluctuations. Microfluidic experiments showed a RESA-dependent reduction in the Pf-RBCs transit velocity, which was potentiated at febrile temperature. In a microspheres filtration system, incubation at febrile temperature impaired traversal of RESA-expressing Pf-RBCs. These results show that RESA influences ring-stage Pf-RBCs microcirculation, an effect that is fever-enhanced. This is the first identification of a parasite factor influencing the dynamic circulation of young asexual Pf-RBCs in physiologically relevant conditions, offering novel possibilities for interventions to reduce parasite survival and pathogenesis in its human host.

  13. Marked increase in rat red blood cell membrane protein glycosylation by one-month treatment with a cafeteria diet

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Laia; Baron, Cristian; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Remesar, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Glucose, an aldose, spontaneously reacts with protein amino acids yielding glycosylated proteins. The compounds may reorganize to produce advanced glycosylation products, which regulatory importance is increasingly being recognized. Protein glycosylation is produced without the direct intervention of enzymes and results in the loss of function. Glycosylated plasma albumin, and glycosylated haemoglobin are currently used as index of mean plasma glucose levels, since higher glucose availability results in higher glycosylation rates. In this study we intended to detect the early changes in blood protein glycosylation elicited by an obesogenic diet. Experimental Design. Since albumin is in constant direct contact with plasma glucose, as are the red blood cell (RBC) membranes, we analyzed their degree or glycosylation in female and male rats, either fed a standard diet or subjected to a hyper-energetic self-selected cafeteria diet for 30 days. This model produces a small increase in basal glycaemia and a significant increase in body fat, leaving the animals in the initial stages of development of metabolic syndrome. We also measured the degree of glycosylation of hemoglobin, and the concentration of glucose in contact with this protein, that within the RBC. Glycosylation was measured by colorimetric estimation of the hydroxymethylfurfural liberated from glycosyl residues by incubation with oxalate. Results. Plasma glucose was higher in cafeteria diet and in male rats, both independent effects. However, there were no significant differences induced by sex or diet in either hemoglobin or plasma proteins. Purified RBC membranes showed a marked effect of diet: higher glycosylation in cafeteria rats, which was more marked in females (not in controls). In any case, the number of glycosyl residues per molecule were higher in hemoglobin than in plasma proteins (after correction for molecular weight). The detected levels of glucose in RBC were lower

  14. Fractionation of Plasmodium-infected human red blood cells to study protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Külzer, Simone; Bittl, Verena; Przyborski, Jude M

    2015-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation is a valuable tool to follow protein traffic between cellular compartments. Here we detail a procedure for fractionating erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite P. falciparum using the bacterial pore-forming protein Streptolysin O (SLO). Additionally we describe an experimental protocol to determine protein topology by carrying out a protease protection assay on SLO-lysed infected erythrocytes. PMID:25702109

  15. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    As a result of natural selection driven by severe forms of malaria, 1 in 6 humans in the world, more than 1 billion people, are affected by red cell abnormalities, making them the most common of the inherited disorders. The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics. Our current concept of the red cell membrane envisions it as a composite structure in which a membrane envelope composed of cholesterol and phospholipids is secured to an elastic network of skeletal proteins via transmembrane proteins. Structural and functional characterization of the many constituents of the red cell membrane, in conjunction with biophysical and physiologic studies, has led to detailed description of the way in which the remarkable mechanical properties and other important characteristics of the red cells arise, and of the manner in which they fail in disease states. Current studies in this very active and exciting field are continuing to produce new and unexpected revelations on the function of the red cell membrane and thus of the cell in health and disease, and shed new light on membrane function in other diverse cell types. PMID:18988878

  16. Preferential binding of 4-hydroxynonenal to lysine residues in specific parasite proteins in plakortin-treated Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Evelin; Gallo, Valentina; Valente, Elena; Ulliers, Daniela; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Arese, Paolo; Skorokhod, Oleksii A.

    2015-01-01

    The data show the frequencies by which the amino acid residues lysine, histidine and cysteine of six proteins of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are post-translationally modified by the lipoperoxydation endproduct 4-hydroxynonenal after challenging the parasitized red blood cell with plakortin. Plakortin is an antimalarial endoperoxide whose molecular anti-parasitic effect is described in Skorokhod et al. (2015) [1]. Plakortin did not elicit hemoglobin leakage from host red blood cells and did not oxidize reduced glutathione. PMID:26702418

  17. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  18. Dynamic morphology and cytoskeletal protein changes during spontaneous inside-out vesiculation of red blood cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Tiffert, Teresa; Lew, Virgilio L

    2014-12-01

    Vesicle preparations from cell plasma membranes, red blood cells in particular, are extensively used in transport and enzymic studies and in the fields of drug delivery and drug-transport interactions. Here we investigated the role of spectrin-actin, the main components of the red cell cortical cytoskeleton, in a particular mechanism of vesicle generation found to be relevant to the egress process of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites from infected red blood cells. Plasma membranes from red blood cells lysed in ice-cold media of low ionic strength and free of divalent cations spontaneously and rapidly vesiculate upon incubation at 37 °C rendering high yields of inside-out vesicles. We tested the working hypothesis that the dynamic shape transformations resulted from changes in spectrin-actin configuration within a disintegrating cytoskeletal mesh. We showed that cytoskeletal-free membranes behave like a two-dimensional fluid lacking shape control, that spectrin-actin remain attached to vesiculating membranes for as long as spontaneous movement persists, that most of the spectrin-actin detachment occurs terminally at the time of vesicle sealing and that naked membrane patches increasingly appear during vesiculation. These results support the proposed role of spectrin-actin in spontaneous vesiculation. The implications of these results to membrane dynamics and to the mechanism of merozoite egress are discussed. PMID:24615169

  19. High-protein-PUFA supplementation, red blood cell membranes, and plasma antioxidant activity in volleyball athletes.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Marco; Baldini, Marta; Angeloni, Cristina; Biagi, Pierluigi; Hrelia, Silvana

    2008-06-01

    The authors evaluated the role of a high-protein, low-calorie, polyunsaturated fatty-acid (PUFA) -supplemented diet on anthropometric parameters, erythrocyte-membrane fatty-acid composition, and plasma antioxidant defenses of nonprofessional volleyball athletes. The athletes were divided in two groups: One (n = 5) followed the Mediterranean diet, and the other (n = 6) followed a high-protein, low-calorie diet with a 3-g/day fish-oil supplementation. All the athletes had anthropometric measurements taken, both at the beginning and at the end of the study, which lasted for 2 months. Body-mass index and total body fat were significantly diminished in the second group, while they remained unchanged in the first. Plasma total antioxidant activity (TAA) was significantly increased in the plasma of both groups, with no differences between the groups, suggesting that physical activity, not the different diets, is the main contributor to the increase of plasma TAA. The second group showed a significant increase in erythrocyte-membrane PUFA content and in the unsaturation index value (UI) because of the fish-oil supplementation.A high-protein, low-carbohydrate, fish-oil-supplemented diet seems to be useful only when the aim of the diet is to obtain weight loss in a short-term period. The significant increase in the UI of erythrocyte membranes indicates the potential for harm, because a high intake of PUFA might increase susceptibility to lipid peroxidation not counterbalanced by a higher increase in TAA. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet seems to be the better choice. PMID:18562771

  20. Merozoite surface protein 1 recognition of host glycophorin A mediates malaria parasite invasion of red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Michael R.; Li, Xuerong; Hanada, Toshihiko; Liu, Shih-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invasion of human red blood cells (RBCs) is an intricate process requiring a number of distinct ligand-receptor interactions at the merozoite-erythrocyte interface. Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1), a highly abundant ligand coating the merozoite surface in all species of malaria parasites, is essential for RBC invasion and considered a leading candidate for inclusion in a multiple-subunit vaccine against malaria. Our previous studies identified an interaction between the carboxyl-terminus of MSP1 and RBC band 3. Here, by employing phage display technology, we report a novel interaction between the amino-terminus of MSP1 and RBC glycophorin A (GPA). Mapping of the binding domains established a direct interaction between malaria MSP1 and human GPA within a region of MSP1 known to potently inhibit P falciparum invasion of human RBCs. Furthermore, a genetically modified mouse model lacking the GPA– band 3 complex in RBCs is completely resistant to malaria infection in vivo. These findings suggest an essential role of the MSP1-GPA–band 3 complex during the initial adhesion phase of malaria parasite invasion of RBCs. PMID:25778531

  1. Effect of Thuya occidentalis on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with technetium-99m.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, J. F.; Braga, A. C.; Avila, A. S.; Fonseca, L. M.; Gutfilen, B.; Bernardo-Filho, M.

    1996-01-01

    Thuya occidentalis is used in popular medicine in the treatment of condyloma and has antibacterial action. Red blood cells (RBC) labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc) are used for several evaluations in nuclear medicine. This labeling depends on a reducing agent, usually stannous ion. Any drug which alters the labeling of the tracer could be expected to modify the disposition of the radiopharmaceutical. We have evaluated the influence of T. occidentalis extract on the labeling of RBC and plasma proteins with 99mTc. Blood was withdrawn and incubated with T. occidentalis (0.25; 2.5; 20.5; and 34.1 percent v/v). Stannous chloride (1.2 micrograms/ml) was added and then 99mTc was added. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC) were isolated, also precipitated with trichloroacetic acid and soluble (SF) and insoluble fractions (IF) separated. The analysis of the results shows that there is a decrease in radioactivity (from 97.64 to 75.89 percent) in BC with 34.1 percent of the drug. In the labeling process of RBC with 99mTc, the stannous and pertechnetate ions pass through the membrane, so we suggest that the T. occidentalis effect can be explained (i) by an inhibition of the transport of these ions, (ii) by damage in membrane, (iii) by competition with the cited ions for the same binding sites, or (iv) by possible generation of reactive oxygen species that could oxidize the stannous ion. PMID:9436292

  2. Plasma protein induced clustering of red blood cells in micro capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Aouane, Othmane; Flormann, Daniel; Thiebaud, Marine; Verdier, Claude; Coupier, Gwennou; Podgorski, Thomas; Misbah, Chaouqi; Selmi, Hassib

    2013-11-01

    The plasma molecule fibrinogen induces aggregation of RBCs to clusters, the so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates in bulk flow can break them up which results in the pronounced shear thinning of blood. This led to the assumption that rouleaux formation does not take place in the microcapillaries of the vascular network where high shear rates are present. However, the question is of high medical relevance. Cardio vascular disorders are still the main cause of death in the western world and cardiac patients have often higher fibrinogen level. We performed AFM based single cell force spectroscopy to determine the work of separation. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the adhesion strength and we found that cluster formation is strongly enhanced by fibrinogen at physiological concentrations, even at shear rate as high as 1000 1/s. Numerical simulations based on a boundary integral method confirm our findings and the clustering transition takes place both in the experiments and in the simulations at the same interaction energies. In vivo measurements with intravital fluorescence microscopy in a dorsal skin fold chamber in a mouse reveal that RBCs indeed form clusters in the micrcapillary flow. This work was supported by the German Science Foundation research imitative SFB1027.

  3. Red blood cells, sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    These crescent or sickle-shaped red blood cells (RBCs) are present with Sickle cell anemia, and stand out clearly against the normal round RBCs. These abnormally shaped cells may become entangled and ...

  4. Red blood cell membrane defects.

    PubMed

    Iolascon, Achille; Perrotta, Silverio; Stewart, Gordon W

    2003-03-01

    We present an overview of the currently known molecular basis of red cell membrane disorders. A detailed discussion of the structure of the red cell membrane and the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of its disorders is reported. Generally speaking, hereditary spherocytosis (HS) results from a loss of erythrocyte surface area. The mutations of most cases of HS are located in the following genes: ANK1, SPTB, SLC4A1, EPB42 and SPTA1, which encode for ankyrin, spectrin beta-chain, the anion exchanger 1 (band 3), protein 4.2 and spectrin alpha-chain, respectively. Hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) reflects a diminished elasticity of the skeleton. Its aggravated form, hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP), implies that the skeleton undergoes further destabilization. The mutations responsible for HE and HPP, lie in the SPTA1 and SPTB gene, and in the EPB41 gene encoding protein 4.1. Allele alpha LELY is a common polymorphic allele, which plays the role of an aggravating factor when it occurs in trans of an elliptocytogenic allele of the SPTA1 gene. Southeast Asian ovalocytosis derives from a change in band 3. The genetic disorders of membrane permeability to monovalent cations required a positional cloning approach. In this respect, channelopathies represent a new frontier in the field. Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHS) was shown to belong to a pleiotropic syndrome: DHS + fetal edema + pseudohyperkalemia, which maps 16q23-24. Splenectomy is strictly contraindicated in DHS and another disease of the same class, overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, because it increases the risk of thromboembolic accidents. PMID:14692233

  5. Plasma protein thiols, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein and red blood cell acetylcholinesterase in patients undergoing intrauterine insemination

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Krishnananda; Kumar, Pratap; Adiga, Satish Kumar; Rao, Anjali; Lanka, Anupama; Singh, Jaipal

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), protein thiols (PT), ceruloplasmin (CP) and C-reactive proteins (CRPs) to assess any change in their levels following intrauterine insemination (IUI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-two patients aged 31 ± 4.65 years (mean ± SD) with primary infertility selected for IUI. All of them had induced ovulation with clomiphene citrate 50 mg from day 2 to day 6. After taking the consent, 2 ml of blood was withdrawn before and after 24 h of IUI for biochemical estimations. RESULTS: We observed a significant decrease in plasma CP, PT and RBC AChE (P < 0.001) following IUI compared with the respective pre-procedure levels. Highly sensitive CRP showed a marginal increase after IUI. CONCLUSION: Fluctuations in levels of the above parameters point to their role in the female reproductive system and in the outcome of the IUI. PMID:19562071

  6. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell ...

  7. Effects of a diet high in plant sterols, vegetable proteins, and viscous fibers (dietary portfolio) on circulating sterol levels and red cell fragility in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter J; Raeini-Sarjaz, Mahmoud; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Vidgen, Edward; Trautwein, Elke A; Lapsley, Karen G; Marchie, Augustine; Cunnane, Stephen C; Connelly, Philip W

    2005-02-01

    Plant sterols, soy proteins, viscous fibers, and nuts are advised for cholesterol reduction, but their combined effect on plant sterol absorption has never been tested. We assessed their combined action on serum sterols in hyperlipidemic subjects who were following low-saturated fat diets before starting the study and who returned to these diets post-test. The 1-mon test (combination) diet was high in plant sterols (1 g/1,000 kcal), soy protein (23 g/1,000 kcal), viscous fiber (9 g/1,000 kcal), and almonds (14 g/1000 kcal). Fasting blood was obtained for serum lipids and sterols, and erythrocytes were obtained for fragility prior to and at 2-wk intervals during the study. The combination diet raised serum campesterol concentrations by 50% and beta-sitosterol by 27%, although these changes were not significant after Bonferroni correction; near-maximal rises were found by the end of the first week, but no change was found in red cell fragility despite a 29% reduction in the LDL cholesterol level. No significant associations were observed between changes in red cell fragility and blood lipids or sterols. We conclude that plant sterols had a minimal impact on serum sterol concentrations or red cell fragility in hyperlipidemic subjects on diets that greatly reduced their serum lipids. PMID:15884765

  8. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  9. Advances in engineering of fluorescent proteins and photoactivatable proteins with red emission

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Monomeric fluorescent proteins of different colors are widely used to study behavior and targeting of proteins in living cells. Fluorescent proteins that irreversibly change their spectral properties in response to light irradiation of a specific wavelength, or photoactivate, have become increasingly popular to image intracellular dynamics and super-resolution protein localization. Until recently, however, no optimized monomeric red fluorescent proteins and red photoactivatable proteins have been available. Furthermore, monomeric fluorescent proteins, which change emission from blue to red simply with time, so-called fluorescent timers, were developed to study protein age and turnover. Understanding of chemical mechanisms of the chromophore maturation or photoactivation into a red form will further advance engineering of fluorescent timers and photoactivatable proteins with enhanced and novel properties. PMID:19914857

  10. Evaluation of haemoglobin, haematocrit, haemolysis, residual protein content and leucocytes in 345 red blood cell concentrates used for the treatment of patients with β-thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Roberta; Marinelli, Leonardo; Mirante, Nadia; Gallo, Assunta; Matteocci, Antonella; Terlizzi, Filomena; Palange, Maria; Fioravanti, Daniela; Donnini, Lorella; Pierelli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of red blood cell concentrates obtained from donated whole blood, selected for transfusion therapy of thalassaemic patients, by measuring the following parameters: haemoglobin, haematocrit, percentage haemolysis, residual leucocyte count and residual protein content. Materials and methods Overall 345 red cell concentrates were evaluated, of which 205 had been filtered in-line pre-storage and washed and 140 were buffy coat-depleted and used within 2 days of collection. Of the buffy coat-depleted concentrates, 62 were leucodepleted and 78 washed and leucodepleted post-storage all within 2 days of collection. The off-line filters used for the leucodepletion were gamma-irradiated polyester with a pore size of 200 μm. The washing procedure was automated (Haemonetics ACP 215, Braintree, MA, USA). The haematological parameters were evaluated by a blood cell counter (Coulter, Ramsey, IL, USA) and the white blood cell count by cytofluorimetry (FACScan). Results Ninety-five percent (194/205) of the red cell concentrates that had been filtered pre-storage and washed, 92% (57/62) of the red cell concentrates that had been leucodepleted post-storage and 94% (73/78) of the those subjected to both treatments had normal values of haemoglobin (>40 g/unit), haematocrit (between 50–70%), percentage haemolysis (<0.8/unit), white cell count (<1×106) and residual protein content (<0.5 g/L). Five percent (11/205) of the red cell concentrates that had been filtered pre-storage and washed, 8% (5/62) of those leucodepleted post-storage after 2 days and 6% (5/78) of those that underwent both procedures had a haemoglobin content <40 g/unit and a haematocrit <50%. Conclusions The preparation procedures had been carried out satisfactorily; nevertheless, transfusion therapy with some “low dose” normal units could be less effective and might, therefore, result in greater transfusion requirements in patients receiving such units

  11. A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in red: live cell imaging of the kappa opioid receptor-tdTomato fusion protein (KOPR-tdT) in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chongguang; Wang, Yujun; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In contrast to green fluorescent protein and variants (GFPs), red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) have rarely been employed for generation of GPCR fusion proteins, likely because of formation of aggregates and cell toxicity of some RFPs. Among all the RFPs available, tdTomato (tdT), one of the non-aggregating RFP, has the highest brightness score (about 3 times that of eGFP) and unsurpassed photostability. Methods We fused tdT to the KOPR C-terminus. The KOPR-tdT cDNA construct was transfected into Neuro2A mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro2A cells) and rat cortical primary neurons for characterization of pharmacological properties and imaging studies on KOPR trafficking. Results KOPR-tdT retained KOPR properties (cell surface expression, ligand binding, agonist-induced signaling and internalization) when expressed in Neuro2A cells and rat primary cortical neurons. Live cell imaging of KOPR-tdT enables visualization of time course of agonist-induced internalization of KOPR in real time for 60 min, without photobleaching and apparent cell toxicity. U50,488H-induced KOPR internalization occurred as early as 4 min and plateaued at about 30 min. A unique pattern of internalized KOPR in processes of primary neurons was induced by U50,488H. Discussion tdT is an alternative to, or even a better tool than, GFPs for fusing to GPCR for trafficking studies, because tdT has higher brightness and thus better resolution and less photobleaching problems due to reduced laser power used. It also has advantages associated with its longer-wavelength emission including spectral separation from autofluorescence and GFPs, reduced cell toxicity the laser may impose, and greater tissue penetration. These advantages of tdT over GPFs may be critical for live cell imaging studies of GPCRs in vitro and for studying GPCRs in vivo because of their low abundance. PMID:23856011

  12. Red cell distribution width and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gulcan Kurt, Yasemin; Cayci, Tuncer; Aydin, Fevzi Nuri; Agilli, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Red cell distribution width is a measure of deviation of the volume of red blood cells. It is a marker of anisocytosis and often used to evaluate the possible causes of anemia. Elevated red cell distribution width levels are also associated with acute and chronic inflammatory responses. In nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, inflammation is accompanied with steatosis. For assuming red cell distribution width as a marker of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, intervening factors such as levels of inflammatory markers should also be evaluated. PMID:25473202

  13. Coordination of chemical (trimethylamine oxide) and molecular (heat shock protein 70) chaperone responses to heat stress in elasmobranch red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Ashra; Robertson, Cayleih E; Thistle, Maria E; Gamperl, A Kurt; Currie, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and molecular chaperones are organic compounds that protect and stabilize proteins from damage and aggregation as a result of cellular stress. Using the dogfish (Squalus acanthias) red blood cell (RBC) as a model, we examined whether elasmobranch cells with naturally high concentrations of the chemical chaperone trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) would induce the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) when exposed to an acute thermal stress. Our hypothesis was that TMAO is itself capable of preventing damage and preserving cellular function during thermal stress and thus that the heat shock response would be inhibited/diminished. We incubated RBCs in vitro with and without physiologically relevant concentrations of TMAO at 13°C and then exposed cells to a 1-h acute heat shock at 24°C. HSP70 protein expression was elevated in dogfish RBCs after the acute heat stress, but this induction was inhibited by extracellular TMAO. Regardless of the presence of TMAO and/or HSP70, we did not observe any cell damage, as indicated by changes in caspase 3/7 activity, protein carbonyls, membrane viability, or levels of ubiquitin. We also saw no change in RBC cell function, as determined by hemoglobin oxygen affinity or carrying capacity, in cells lacking the heat shock response but protected by TMAO. This study demonstrates that there is cellular coordination between chemical and molecular chaperones in response to an acute thermal stress in dogfish RBCs and suggests that TMAO has a thermoprotective role in these cells, thus eliminating the need for a heat shock response. PMID:25244377

  14. Non-Invasive In Vivo Imaging and Quantification of Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Rats Using Cells Expressing Far-Red Fluorescence Protein.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jon; Vonwil, Daniel; Shastri, V Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging is emerging as an important tool for basic and preclinical research. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence dyes and probes have been used for non-invasive optical imaging since in the NIR region absorption and auto fluorescence by body tissue is low, thus permitting for greater penetration depths and high signal to noise ratio. Currently, cell tracking systems rely on labeling cells prior to injection or administering probes targeting the cell population of choice right before imaging. These approaches do not enable imaging of tumor growth, as the cell label is diluted during cell division. In this study we have developed cell lines stably expressing the far-red fluorescence protein E2-Crimson, thus enabling continuous detection and quantification of tumor growth. In a xenograft rat model, we show that E2-Crimson expressing cells can be detected over a 5 week period using optical imaging. Fluorescence intensities correlated with tumor volume and weight and allowed for a reliable and robust quantification of the entire tumor compartment. Using a novel injection regime, the seeding of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in the lungs in a rat model was established and verified. PMID:26186005

  15. Carbon Monoxide Signaling in Human Red Blood Cells: Evidence for Pentose Phosphate Pathway Activation and Protein Deglutathionylation

    PubMed Central

    Metere, Alessio; Iorio, Egidio; Scorza, Giuseppe; Camerini, Serena; Casella, Marialuisa; Crescenzi, Marco; Minetti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The biochemistry underlying the physiological, adaptive, and toxic effects of carbon monoxide (CO) is linked to its affinity for reduced transition metals. We investigated CO signaling in the vasculature, where hemoglobin (Hb), the CO most important metal-containing carrier is highly concentrated inside red blood cells (RBCs). Results: By combining NMR, MS, and spectrophotometric techniques, we found that CO treatment of whole blood increases the concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) in RBC cytosol, which is linked to a significant Hb deglutathionylation. In addition, this process (i) does not activate glycolytic metabolism, (ii) boosts the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), (iii) increases glutathione reductase activity, and (iv) decreases oxidized glutathione concentration. Moreover, GSH concentration was partially decreased in the presence of 2-deoxyglucose and the PPP antagonist dehydroepiandrosterone. Our MS results show for the first time that, besides Cys93, Hb glutathionylation occurs also at Cys112 of the β-chain, providing a new potential GSH source hitherto unknown. Innovation: This work provides new insights on the signaling and antioxidant-boosting properties of CO in human blood, identifying Hb as a major source of GSH release and the PPP as a metabolic mechanism supporting Hb deglutathionylation. Conclusions: CO-dependent GSH increase is a new RBC process linking a redox-inactive molecule, CO, to GSH redox signaling. This mechanism may be involved in the adaptive responses aimed to counteract stress conditions in mammalian tissues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 403–416. PMID:23815439

  16. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P.

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar “pearling instability.”

  17. Perforin-like protein PPLP2 permeabilizes the red blood cell membrane during egress of Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Christine C; Glushakova, Svetlana; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Repnik, Urska; Garg, Swati; Schaack, Dominik; Kachman, Marika M; Weißbach, Tim; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Dandekar, Thomas; Griffiths, Gareth; Chitnis, Chetan E; Singh, Shailja; Fischer, Rainer; Pradel, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Egress of malaria parasites from the host cell requires the concerted rupture of its enveloping membranes. Hence, we investigated the role of the plasmodial perforin-like protein PPLP2 in the egress of Plasmodium falciparum from erythrocytes. PPLP2 is expressed in blood stage schizonts and mature gametocytes. The protein localizes in vesicular structures, which in activated gametocytes discharge PPLP2 in a calcium-dependent manner. PPLP2 comprises a MACPF domain and recombinant PPLP2 has haemolytic activities towards erythrocytes. PPLP2-deficient [PPLP2(−)] merozoites show normal egress dynamics during the erythrocytic replication cycle, but activated PPLP2(−) gametocytes were unable to leave erythrocytes and stayed trapped within these cells. While the parasitophorous vacuole membrane ruptured normally, the activated PPLP2(−) gametocytes were unable to permeabilize the erythrocyte membrane and to release the erythrocyte cytoplasm. In consequence, transmission of PPLP2(−) parasites to the Anopheles vector was reduced. Pore-forming equinatoxin II rescued both PPLP2(−) gametocyte exflagellation and parasite transmission. The pore sealant Tetronic 90R4, on the other hand, caused trapping of activated wild-type gametocytes within the enveloping erythrocytes, thus mimicking the PPLP2(−) loss-of-function phenotype. We propose that the haemolytic activity of PPLP2 is essential for gametocyte egress due to permeabilization of the erythrocyte membrane and depletion of the erythrocyte cytoplasm. PMID:24602217

  18. What is red cell deformability?

    PubMed

    Schmid-Schönbein, H; Gaehtgens, P

    1981-01-01

    Microscopic flow visualization of the process of red cell adaptation to flow shows that red cell deformation in flow is the consequence of a continuous viscous rather than an elastic deformation. This fluid drop-like adaptation primarily depends on: (a) the fluidity of the cytoplasm and (b) the favourable surface-area-to-volume ratio, with an excess of surface area allowing strong deformations without an increase in surface area (a real strain). (c) In contrast to previous notions, the modulus of shear elasticity of the membrane is probably less significant. After many attempts to differentiate the contribution of bending and shear stiffness to the elastic recovery of the normal biconcave cell shape have not produced equivocal results, we have changed the elastic shear modulus experimentally by cross-linking the spectrin using the membrane-permeant, bifunctional SH-reagent DIAMIDE, which allows to increase the elastic shear modulus in a dose-dependent manner. Despite a 25-fold decrease in compliance the DIAMIDE-treated cells have normal shape and show remarkably small changes in the rheological behaviour when tested in vitro and in vivo. PMID:6948373

  19. The human Kell blood group binds the erythroid 4.1R protein: new insights into the 4.1R-dependent red cell membrane complex.

    PubMed

    Azouzi, Slim; Collec, Emmanuel; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Protein 4.1R plays an important role in maintaining the mechanical properties of the erythrocyte membrane. We analysed the expression of Kell blood group protein in erythrocytes from a patient with hereditary elliptocytosis associated with complete 4.1R deficiency (4.1(-) HE). Flow cytometry and Western blot analyses revealed a severe reduction of Kell. In vitro pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments from erythrocyte membranes showed a direct interaction between Kell and 4.1R. Using different recombinant domains of 4.1R and the cytoplasmic domain of Kell, we demonstrated that the R(46) R motif in the juxta-membrane region of Kell binds to lobe B of the 4.1R FERM domain. We also observed that 4.1R deficiency is associated with a reduction of XK and DARC (also termed ACKR1) proteins, the absence of the glycosylated form of the urea transporter B and a slight decrease of band 3. The functional alteration of the 4.1(-) HE erythrocyte membranes was also determined by measuring various transport activities. We documented a slower rate of HCO3 (-) /Cl(-) exchange, but normal water and ammonia transport across erythrocyte membrane in the absence of 4.1. These findings provide novel insights into the structural organization of blood group antigen proteins into the 4.1R complex of the human red cell membrane. PMID:26455906

  20. Korean Red Ginseng protects endothelial cells from serum-deprived apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2 family protein dynamics and caspase S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Jung Hwan; Kwon, Hyuk Min; Lee, Dong Heon; Won, Moo-Ho; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong

    2013-01-01

    Korean Red Ginseng extract (KRGE) is a traditional herbal medicine utilized to prevent endothelium dysfunction in the cardiovascular system; however, its underlying mechanism has not been clearly elucidated. We here examined the pharmacological effect and molecular mechanism of KRGE on apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a serum-deprived apoptosis model. KRGE protected HUVECs from serum-deprived apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9/-3 activation. This protective effect was significantly higher than that of American ginseng extract. KRGE treatment increased antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL protein expression and Akt-dependent Bad phosphorylation. Moreover, KRGE prevented serum deprivation-induced subcellular redistribution of these proteins between the mitochondrion and the cytosol, resulting in suppression of mitochondrial cytochrome c release. In addition, KRGE increased nitric oxide (NO) production via Akt-dependent activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), as well as inhibited caspase-9/-3 activities. These increases were reversed by co-treatment of cells with inhibitors of eNOS and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and pre-incubation of cell lysates in dithiothreitol, indicating KRGE induces NO-mediated caspase modification. Indeed, KRGE inhibited caspase-3 activity via S-nitrosylation. These findings suggest that KRGE prevents serum deprivation-induced HUVEC apoptosis via increased Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL protein expression, PI3K/Akt-dependent Bad phosphorylation, and eNOS/NO-mediated S-nitrosylation of caspases. The cytoprotective property of KRGE may be valuable for developing new pharmaceutical means that limit endothelial cell death induced during the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. PMID:24233159

  1. Allelic Diversity of the Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Entails Variant-Specific Red Cell Surface Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Vigan-Womas, Inès; Guillotte, Micheline; Juillerat, Alexandre; Vallieres, Cindy; Lewit-Bentley, Anita; Tall, Adama; Baril, Laurence; Bentley, Graham A.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2011-01-01

    The clonally variant Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 adhesin is a virulence factor and a prime target of humoral immunity. It is encoded by a repertoire of functionally differentiated var genes, which display architectural diversity and allelic polymorphism. Their serological relationship is key to understanding the evolutionary constraints on this gene family and rational vaccine design. Here, we investigated the Palo Alto/VarO and IT4/R29 and 3D7/PF13_003 parasites lines. VarO and R29 form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes, a phenotype associated with severe malaria. They express an allelic Cys2/group A NTS-DBL1α1 PfEMP1 domain implicated in rosetting, whose 3D7 ortholog is encoded by PF13_0003. Using these three recombinant NTS-DBL1α1 domains, we elicited antibodies in mice that were used to develop monovariant cultures by panning selection. The 3D7/PF13_0003 parasites formed rosettes, revealing a correlation between sequence identity and virulence phenotype. The antibodies cross-reacted with the allelic domains in ELISA but only minimally with the Cys4/group B/C PFL1955w NTS-DBL1α. By contrast, they were variant-specific in surface seroreactivity of the monovariant-infected red cells by FACS analysis and in rosette-disruption assays. Thus, while ELISA can differentiate serogroups, surface reactivity assays define the more restrictive serotypes. Irrespective of cumulated exposure to infection, antibodies acquired by humans living in a malaria-endemic area also displayed a variant-specific surface reactivity. Although seroprevalence exceeded 90% for each rosetting line, the kinetics of acquistion of surface-reactive antibodies differed in the younger age groups. These data indicate that humans acquire an antibody repertoire to non-overlapping serotypes within a serogroup, consistent with an antibody-driven diversification pressure at the population level. In addition, the data provide important information for vaccine design, as production of a vaccine

  2. The protective roles of phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 in human cells harboring myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers A8344G mtDNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsueh-Fu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Lin, Ting-Hui; Huang, Zhao-Wei; Chi, Tang-Hao; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wu, Shi-Bei; Wei, Yau-Huei; Hsieh, Mingli

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are associated with a large number of neuromuscular diseases. Myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome is a mitochondrial disease inherited through the maternal lineage. The most common mutation in MERRF syndrome, the A8344G mutation of mtDNA, is associated with severe defects in mitochondrial protein synthesis, which impair the assembly and function of the respiratory chain. We have previously shown that there is a decreased level of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a MERRF patient and in cytoplasmic hybrids (cybrids) harboring the A8344G mutation of mtDNA. In the present study, we found a dramatic decrease in the level of phosphorylated HSP27 (p-HSP27) in the mutant cybrids. Even though the steady-state level of p-HSP27 was reduced in the mutant cybrids, normal phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were observed upon exposure to stress, indicating normal kinase and phosphatase activities. To explore the roles that p-HSP27 may play, transfection experiments with HSP27 mutants, in which three specific serines were replaced with alanine or aspartic acid, showed that the phosphomimicking HSP27 desensitized mutant cybrids to apoptotic stress induced by staurosporine (STS). After heat shock stress, p-HSP27 was found to enter the nucleus immediately, and with a prolonged interval of recovery, p-HSP27 returned to the cytoplasm in wild-type cybrids but not in mutant cybrids. The translocation of p-HSP27 was correlated with cell viability, as shown by the increased number of apoptotic cells after p-HSP27 returned to the cytoplasm. In summary, our results demonstrate that p-HSP27 provides significant protection when cells are exposed to different stresses in the cell model of MERRF syndrome. Therapeutic agents targeting anomalous HSP27 phosphorylation might represent a potential treatment for mitochondrial diseases. PMID:22742457

  3. Chemical toxicity of red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, S

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to toxic chemicals may result in alterations of red cell function. In certain cases, the toxic effect requires a genetic predisposition and thus affects only a restricted number of individuals; in other instances, the toxic effect is exerted on the hematopoietic system of every person. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is probably the most widespread genetic disorder. It is observed at highest frequency in populations from subtropical countries as a result of its selective advantage vis à vis falciparum malaria. The gene controlling this enzyme is located on the X-chromosome; thus, the defect is sex-linked. Individuals with a genetic defect of this enzyme are extremely susceptible to hemolysis, when exposed to oxidant drugs (such as certain antimalarials and sulfonamides) because of the inability of their red cells to regenerate NADPH. Lead poisoning result in profound effects on the process of heme synthesis. Among the steps most sensitive to lead toxicity are the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and the intramitochondrial step that leads to the incorporation of iron into protoporphyrin. By these mechanisms, in severe lead intoxication there is an accumulation of large amounts of delta-aminolevulinic acid (a compound with inherent neurotoxicity), and there are abnormalities of mitochondrial function in all cells of the body. Individuals living in an industrialized society are unavoidably exposed to some environmental lead. Recent evidence indicates that, even at levels of exposure which do not increase the blood lead level above values presently considered normal, abnormalities of heme synthesis are clearly detectable. PMID:7016524

  4. Molecular cloning and expression of a chloride channel-associated protein pICln in human young red blood cells: association with actin.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, R S; Rybicki, A C; Nagel, R L

    1997-01-01

    We report the cloning and sequencing from human reticulocytes of cDNA coding for the Cl- channel-associated protein, pICln. Human reticulocyte pICln (HRpICln) cDNA encodes a protein (predicted molecular mass 26293Da) identical with human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cell pICln. By using full-length HRpICln cDNA (approx. 1.2 kb) to probe human lymphocyte metaphase-chromosome spreads, the location of the human ICln gene was mapped to 11q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Polyclonal antibodies to recombinant HRpICln detected bands at approx. 43 kDa and approx. 37 kDa in both normal (AA) and sickle (SS) red blood cell (RBC) ghost membranes. In SS ghosts, and in ghosts from a patient with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia with 9.8% reticulocytes, the amount of HRpICln was increased compared with AA ghosts, suggesting that the expression or membrane assembly of HRpICln is cell age-dependent. Laser scanning confocal fluorescent microscopy immunolocalized HRpICln largely to the RBC membrane. The increased staining intensity of HRpICln in a reticulocyte-enriched AA RBC density-separated fraction is consistent with a dependence of HRpICln membrane content on cell age. HRpICln and beta-actin form stable complexes in vivo, demonstrated with the yeast two-hybrid system. Low-ionic-strength extraction of ghost membranes, which results in the extraction of the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton, also results in the extraction of HRpICln, consistent with the possibility for the association of these proteins in RBCs in vivo. The results presented here establish the presence of the Cl- channel-associated protein, pICln, in human RBCs, and raises the possibility that this protein has a role in RBC Cl- transport and volume regulation in young RBCs. Moreover the association of RBC pICln with actin offers a model in which to test interactions between RBC ion channels and the cytoskeleton. PMID:9359436

  5. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  6. Involvement of acetylcholinesterase and protein kinase C in the protective effect of caffeine against β-amyloid-induced alterations in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Carelli-Alinovi, Cristiana; Ficarra, Silvana; Russo, Anna Maria; Giunta, Elena; Barreca, Davide; Galtieri, Antonio; Misiti, Francesco; Tellone, Ester

    2016-02-01

    It is well known the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and of other neurodegenerative pathologies. We have previously documented that Amyloid beta peptide (1-42) (Abeta) dependent-oxidative modifications affect red blood cell (RBC) morphology and function. Experimental studies show that caffeine (CF) consumption is inversely correlated with AD. In this study, we investigated the role played by RBC in the protective mechanism elicited by CF against Abeta mediated toxicity. PS exposure levels by FACS analysis, as well as protein band 3 functionality analysis, indicated that CF at 100 μM protected against Abeta-mediated membrane alterations, which are known to occur in AD. Moreover, CF counteracts inhibition of ATP release from RBC by Abeta, restoring its ability to modulate vasodilation. Concurrently, analysis of protein kinase C (PKC) and caspase 3 activities, responsible for cytoskeleton alterations, revealed that unlike to caspase 3, PKCα activation induced by Abeta was fully abolished by CF through a mechanism involving Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), located on external face of RBC plasma membrane. These results provide support for the hypothesis concerning the protective role of CF in AD patients could include also a peripheral mechanism involving RBC. PMID:26620258

  7. Transforming growth factor β1 increase of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase proteins is partly suppressed by red clover isoflavones in human primary prostate cancer-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xunxian; Piao, Yun-Shang; Arnold, Julia T

    2011-11-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) increases dehydro-epiandrosterone (DHEA) metabolism to androgens and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in a prostate tissue model where stromal (6S) cells and epithelial (LAPC-4) cells are cocultured. Red clover (RC) isoflavones inhibits transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-induced androgenicity. Mechanisms controlling those activities were explored. Three hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), 3β-HSD, HSD-17β1 and HSD-17β5 involved in metabolizing DHEA to testosterone (TESTO) were investigated. Individual depletion of HSDs in 6S cells significantly reduced TGF-β1/DHEA-induced PSA in LAPC-4 cells in cocultures. Monomer amounts of 3β-HSD were similar without or with TGF-β1 in both cell types but aggregates of 3β-HSD in 6S cells were much higher than those in LAPC-4 cells and were upregulated by TGFβ in 6S cells. Basal and TGF-β1-treated levels of HSD-17β1 and HSD-17β5 in LAPC-4 cells were significantly lower than in 6S cells, whereas levels of HSD-17β1 but not HSD-17β5 were TGFβ inducible. 6S cell HSD genes expression induced by TGFβ or androgen signaling was insignificant to contribute TGF-β1/DHEA-upregulated protein levels of HSDs. RC decreased TGF-β1- upregulation of aggregates of 3β-HSD but not HSD-17β1. Depletion of TGFβ receptors (TGFβ Rs) reduced TGF-β1/DHEA-upregulated HSDs and TESTO. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that TGF-β1 disrupted associations of TGFβ Rs/HSDs aggregates, whereas RC suppressed the dissociations of aggregates of 3β-HSD but not HSD-17β1 from the receptors. Given that TGFβ Rs are recycled with or without ligand, TGF-β1-induced disassociation of the HSDs from TGFβ Rs may increase stability and activity of the HSDs. These data suggest a pathway connecting overproduction of TGFβ with increased PSA in prostate cancer. PMID:21914638

  8. RED: a red-cell antibody identification expert module.

    PubMed

    Smith, J W; Svirbely, J R; Evans, C A; Strohm, P; Josephson, J R; Tanner, M

    1985-06-01

    We describe a software module in an expert system RED, which interprets data related to red cell antibody identification. There are three portions to this module: the problem-solving component, which incorporates the knowledge required for antibody identification as a hierarchy of programs. The programs in the hierarchy organize within themselves small pieces of knowledge represented in the form of production rules, which are capable of making judgments concerning a specific hypothesis; an intelligent data base for storage of patient data, red cell attributes, and test results; the "overview critic" portion, which combines the atomic hypotheses judged favorably by the antibody programs into a unified judgment concerning the case. Overview makes the decision to terminate processing with a conclusion about which antibodies are actually present and what specific further tests need to be performed to resolve any remaining ambiguities. PMID:3840517

  9. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  10. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  11. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  12. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  13. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  14. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  15. Tissue engineering red blood cells: a therapeutic.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Theun; Hunt, John A

    2015-07-01

    The use of red blood cells (RBCs) in transfusion is widespread in modern medicine. Limitations in blood transfusion have made an urgent argument for the focus on alternatives, as particular medical treatments heavily rely on the supply of donated blood. Stem cells have been successfully used in vitro to produce RBCs and researchers are currently challenged with developing larger-scale culture methods to meet the requirements for clinically relevant cell numbers. The ultimate conditions that will be beneficial for this type of research are trivial. A successful human clinical trial has shown that tremendous progress has already been made in this field. Other alternatives are based on the oxygen carrier protein that RBCs contain, i.e. haemoglobin (Hb). Chemically defined molecules and crosslinked proteins, which are able to bind and transport oxygen, have been found to be functional in vivo. Major progress has been achieved, but developing highly suitable products for the transfusion market still remains an enormous challenge for these acellular blood substitutes. We provide a review about developing alternatives for blood transfusion, with the emphasis on tissue-engineering approaches. PMID:24753354

  16. Associations of obesity with triglycerides and C-reactive protein are attenuated in adults with high red blood cell eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background:N-3 fatty acids are associated with favorable, and obesity with unfavorable, concentrations of chronic disease risk biomarkers.Objective:We examined whether high eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid intakes, measured as percentages of total red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid...

  17. Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Red Fluorescent Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konold, Patrick Eugene

    Red-emitting homologues (RFPs) of the native Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with emission wavelengths beyond 650 nm are desirable probes for in vivo imaging experiments. They offer the potential for deeper tissue penetration and lower background scatter given a cleaner spectral window. However, bioimaging applications are hindered by poor photophysics ( e.g. low fluorescence quantum yield, high photobleaching), which limits experimental resolution and represents a significant obstacle towards utilization for low copy-number, long-duration imaging applications. In this thesis, a variety of femtosecond nonlinear electronic spectroscopies were employed jointly with site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the photophysical properties of RFPs. In one study, the molecular mechanism of red emission was pursued in two notable RFPs, mPlum and TagRFP675. Solvation dynamics observed with time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy were interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations to indicate that their red-emission is correlated with the ability of specific chromophore-sidechain hydrogen-bonding interactions to interconvert between direct and water-mediated states. In a second set of studies, two-dimensional double quantum coherence spectroscopy was used to probe the electronic transitions of mPlum. It was discovered that it displayed a response distinctly different from an organic dye in bulk solvent. Modeling indicate of these spectra indicate the spectral features may be attributed to the existence of multiple high-lying (n>1) excited states. The results provide new insight into the electronic structure of these widely used fluorescent probes.

  18. Anatomy of the red cell membrane skeleton: unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Lux, Samuel E

    2016-01-14

    The red cell membrane skeleton is a pseudohexagonal meshwork of spectrin, actin, protein 4.1R, ankyrin, and actin-associated proteins that laminates the inner membrane surface and attaches to the overlying lipid bilayer via band 3-containing multiprotein complexes at the ankyrin- and actin-binding ends of spectrin. The membrane skeleton strengthens the lipid bilayer and endows the membrane with the durability and flexibility to survive in the circulation. In the 36 years since the first primitive model of the red cell skeleton was proposed, many additional proteins have been discovered, and their structures and interactions have been defined. However, almost nothing is known of the skeleton's physiology, and myriad questions about its structure remain, including questions concerning the structure of spectrin in situ, the way spectrin and other proteins bind to actin, how the membrane is assembled, the dynamics of the skeleton when the membrane is deformed or perturbed by parasites, the role lipids play, and variations in membrane structure in unique regions like lipid rafts. This knowledge is important because the red cell membrane skeleton is the model for spectrin-based membrane skeletons in all cells, and because defects in the red cell membrane skeleton underlie multiple hemolytic anemias. PMID:26537302

  19. Photoswitchable red fluorescent protein with a large Stokes shift

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; English, Brian P.; Malashkevich, Vladimir N.; Xiao, Hui; Almo, Steven C.; Singer, Robert H.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Subclass of fluorescent proteins, large Stokes shift fluorescent proteins, is characterized by their increased spread between the excitation and emission maxima. Here we report a photoswitchable variant of a red fluorescent protein with a large Stokes shift, PSLSSmKate, which initially exhibits excitation/emission at 445/622 nm, but irradiation with violet light photoswitches PSLSSmKate into a common red form with excitation/emission at 573/621 nm. We characterize spectral, photophysical and biochemical properties of PSLSSmKate in vitro and in mammalian cells, and determine its crystal structure in the large Stokes shift form. Mass-spectrometry, mutagenesis and spectroscopic analysis of PSLSSmKate allow us to propose molecular mechanisms for the large Stokes shift, pH dependence and light-induced chromophore transformation. We demonstrate applicability of PSLSSmKate to superresolution PALM microscopy and protein dynamics in live cells. Given its promising properties, we expect that PSLSSmKate-like phenotype will be further used for photoactivatable imaging and tracking multiple populations of intracellular objects. PMID:25242289

  20. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  1. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Steffen, P; Verdier, C; Wagner, C

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow. PMID:23383842

  2. Home improvements: malaria and the red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Foley, M; Tilley, L

    1995-11-01

    In real-estate agent's terms, the red blood cell is a renovator's dream. The mature human erythrocyte has no internal organelles, no protein synthesis machinery and no infrastructure for protein trafficking. The malaria parasite invades this empty shell and effectively converts the erythrocyte back into a fully functional eukaryotic cell. In this article, Michael Foley and Leann Tilley examine the Plasmodium falciparum proteins that interact with the membrane skeleton at different stages of the infection and speculate on the roles of these proteins in the remodelling process. PMID:15275396

  3. Viscoelastic transient of confined red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Prado, Gaël; Farutin, Alexander; Misbah, Chaouqi; Bureau, Lionel

    2015-05-01

    The unique ability of a red blood cell to flow through extremely small microcapillaries depends on the viscoelastic properties of its membrane. Here, we study in vitro the response time upon flow startup exhibited by red blood cells confined into microchannels. We show that the characteristic transient time depends on the imposed flow strength, and that such a dependence gives access to both the effective viscosity and the elastic modulus controlling the temporal response of red cells. A simple theoretical analysis of our experimental data, validated by numerical simulations, further allows us to compute an estimate for the two-dimensional membrane viscosity of red blood cells, η(mem)(2D) ∼ 10(-7) N ⋅ s ⋅ m(-1). By comparing our results with those from previous studies, we discuss and clarify the origin of the discrepancies found in the literature regarding the determination of η(mem)(2D), and reconcile seemingly conflicting conclusions from previous works. PMID:25954871

  4. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  5. Red Blood Cell Spectrin Skeleton in the Spotlight.

    PubMed

    Braun-Breton, Catherine; Abkarian, Manouk

    2016-02-01

    Das et al. recently reported a role for the major merozoite surface protein MSP1 in malarial parasite egress from the red blood cell (RBC). On the basis of these new data and physical considerations, we propose an updated model for the main steps of this essential process for parasite proliferation. PMID:26652974

  6. The structure of the chromophore within DsRed, a red fluorescent protein from coral.

    PubMed

    Gross, L A; Baird, G S; Hoffman, R C; Baldridge, K K; Tsien, R Y

    2000-10-24

    DsRed, a brilliantly red fluorescent protein, was recently cloned from Discosoma coral by homology to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea. A core question in the biochemistry of DsRed is the mechanism by which the GFP-like 475-nm excitation and 500-nm emission maxima of immature DsRed are red-shifted to the 558-nm excitation and 583-nm emission maxima of mature DsRed. After digestion of mature DsRed with lysyl endopeptidase, high-resolution mass spectra of the purified chromophore-bearing peptide reveal that some of the molecules have lost 2 Da relative to the peptide analogously prepared from a mutant, K83R, that stays green. Tandem mass spectrometry indicates that the bond between the alpha-carbon and nitrogen of Gln-66 has been dehydrogenated in DsRed, extending the GFP chromophore by forming C==N==C==O at the 2-position of the imidazolidinone. This acylimine substituent quantitatively accounts for the red shift according to quantum mechanical calculations. Reversible hydration of the C==N bond in the acylimine would explain why denaturation shifts mature DsRed back to a GFP-like absorbance. The C==N bond hydrolyses upon boiling, explaining why DsRed shows two fragment bands on SDS/PAGE. This assay suggests that conversion from green to red chromophores remains incomplete even after prolonged aging. PMID:11050230

  7. The structure of the chromophore within DsRed, a red fluorescent protein from coral

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Larry A.; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Hoffman, Ross C.; Baldridge, Kim K.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2000-01-01

    DsRed, a brilliantly red fluorescent protein, was recently cloned from Discosoma coral by homology to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea. A core question in the biochemistry of DsRed is the mechanism by which the GFP-like 475-nm excitation and 500-nm emission maxima of immature DsRed are red-shifted to the 558-nm excitation and 583-nm emission maxima of mature DsRed. After digestion of mature DsRed with lysyl endopeptidase, high-resolution mass spectra of the purified chromophore-bearing peptide reveal that some of the molecules have lost 2 Da relative to the peptide analogously prepared from a mutant, K83R, that stays green. Tandem mass spectrometry indicates that the bond between the alpha-carbon and nitrogen of Gln-66 has been dehydrogenated in DsRed, extending the GFP chromophore by forming —C⩵N—C⩵O at the 2-position of the imidazolidinone. This acylimine substituent quantitatively accounts for the red shift according to quantum mechanical calculations. Reversible hydration of the C⩵N bond in the acylimine would explain why denaturation shifts mature DsRed back to a GFP-like absorbance. The C⩵N bond hydrolyses upon boiling, explaining why DsRed shows two fragment bands on SDS/PAGE. This assay suggests that conversion from green to red chromophores remains incomplete even after prolonged aging. PMID:11050230

  8. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  9. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  10. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  11. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  12. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  13. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  14. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  15. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  16. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  17. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  18. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  19. Molecular basis of red cell membrane disorders.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, Jean

    2002-01-01

    We will consider an array of genetic disorders of the red cell membrane. Some affect well-known genes. The mutations of most cases of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) are located in the following genes: ANK1, SPTB, SLC4A1, EPB42 and SPTA1, which encode ankyrin, spectrin beta-chain, the anion exchanger 1 (band 3), protein 4.2 and spectrin alpha-chain, respectively. A dominant form of distal renal tubular acidosis also stems from distinct mutations in the SLC4A1 gene. The mutations responsible for hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) and its aggravated form, poikilocytosis (HP), lie in the SPTA1 and SPTB gene, already mentioned, and in the EPB41 gene encoding protein 4.1. Whereas in HS, the SPTA1 and SPTB gene mutations tend to abolish the synthesis of the corresponding chains, in HE/HP, they hinder spectrin tetramerization. Allele alpha(LELY) is a common polymorphic allele which plays the role of an aggravating factor when it occurs in trans of an elliptocytogenic allele of the SPTA1 gene. Southeast Asian ovalocytosis results from a 27- nucleotide deletion in the SLC4A1 gene. Besides these conditions in which the mutations were reached from known alterations in the proteins, other conditions required a positional cloning approach. Such are the genetic disorders of membrane permeability to monovalent cations. Knowledge is the most advanced as regards dehydrated hereditary stomatocytois (DHS). DHS was shown to belong to a pleiotropic syndrome: DHS + fetal edema + pseudohyperkalemia, which maps to 16q23-24. Concerning DHS and another disease of the same class, overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, splenectomy almost certainly appears to elicit thromboembolic accidents. PMID:12432217

  20. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of these background data, metabolic studies were performed on humans involved in space flight. These studies included the Skylab experiences. The primary purpose of the investigations was to study red cells for: (1) evidences of lipid peroxidation, or (2) changes at various points in the glycolytic pathway. The Skylab missions were an opportunity to study blood samples before, during, and after flight and to compare results with simultaneous controls. No direct evidence that lipid peroxidation had occurred in the red blood cells was apparent in the studies.

  1. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  2. Viscoelastic Transient of Confined Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Gaël; Farutin, Alexander; Misbah, Chaouqi; Bureau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    The unique ability of a red blood cell to flow through extremely small microcapillaries depends on the viscoelastic properties of its membrane. Here, we study in vitro the response time upon flow startup exhibited by red blood cells confined into microchannels. We show that the characteristic transient time depends on the imposed flow strength, and that such a dependence gives access to both the effective viscosity and the elastic modulus controlling the temporal response of red cells. A simple theoretical analysis of our experimental data, validated by numerical simulations, further allows us to compute an estimate for the two-dimensional membrane viscosity of red blood cells, ηmem2D ∼ 10−7 N⋅s⋅m−1. By comparing our results with those from previous studies, we discuss and clarify the origin of the discrepancies found in the literature regarding the determination of ηmem2D, and reconcile seemingly conflicting conclusions from previous works. PMID:25954871

  3. Protein import and the origin of red complex plastids.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sven B; Maier, Uwe-G; Martin, William F

    2015-06-15

    The number and nature of endosymbioses involving red algal endosymbionts are debated. Gene phylogenies have become the most popular tool to untangle this issue, but they deliver conflicting results. As gene and lineage sampling has increased, so have both the number of conflicting trees and the number of suggestions in the literature for multiple tertiary, and even quaternary, symbioses that might reconcile the tree conflicts. Independent lines of evidence that can address the issue are needed. Here we summarize the mechanism and machinery of protein import into complex red plastids. The process involves protein translocation machinery, known as SELMA, that arose once in evolution, that facilitates protein import across the second outermost of the four plastid membranes, and that is always targeted specifically to that membrane, regardless of where it is encoded today. It is widely accepted that the unity of protein import across the two membranes of primary plastids is strong evidence for their single cyanobacterial origin. Similarly, the unity of SELMA-dependent protein import across the second outermost plastid membrane constitutes strong evidence for the existence of a single red secondary endosymbiotic event at the common origin of all red complex plastids. We furthermore propose that the two outer membranes of red complex plastids are derived from host endoplasmic reticulum in the initial red secondary endosymbiotic event. PMID:26079086

  4. Absence of the Adaptor Protein PEA-15 Is Associated with Altered Pattern of Th Cytokines Production by Activated CD4+ T Lymphocytes In Vitro, and Defective Red Blood Cell Alloimmune Response In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kerbrat, Stéphane; Vingert, Benoit; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Castellano, Flavia; Renault-Mihara, François; Dos Reis Tavares, Silvina; Surenaud, Mathieu; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Boczkowski, Jorge; Guellaën, Georges; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Le Gouvello, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    TCR-dependent and costimulation signaling, cell division, and cytokine environment are major factors driving cytokines expression induced by CD4+ T cell activation. PEA-15 15 (Protein Enriched in Astrocyte / 15kDa) is an adaptor protein that regulates death receptor-induced apoptosis and proliferation signaling by binding to FADD and relocating ERK1/2 to the cytosol, respectively. By using PEA-15-deficient mice, we examined the role of PEA-15 in TCR-dependent cytokine production in CD4+ T cells. TCR-stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4+ T cells exhibited defective progression through the cell cycle associated with impaired expression of cyclin E and phosphoRb, two ERK1/2-dependent proteins of the cell cycle. Accordingly, expression of the division cycle-dependent cytokines IL-2 and IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine, was reduced in stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4+ T cells. This was associated with abnormal subcellular compartmentalization of activated ERK1/2 in PEA-15-deficient T cells. Furthermore, in vitro TCR-dependent differentiation of naive CD4+ CD62L+ PEA-15-deficient T cells was associated with a lower production of the Th2 cytokine, IL-4, whereas expression of the Th17-associated molecule IL4I1 was enhanced. Finally, a defective humoral response was shown in PEA-15-deficient mice in a model of red blood cell alloimmunization performed with Poly IC, a classical adjuvant of Th1 response in vivo. Collectively, our data suggest that PEA-15 contributes to the specification of the cytokine pattern of activated Th cells, thus highlighting a potential new target to interfere with T cell functional polarization and subsequent immune response. PMID:26317969

  5. Absence of the Adaptor Protein PEA-15 Is Associated with Altered Pattern of Th Cytokines Production by Activated CD4+ T Lymphocytes In Vitro, and Defective Red Blood Cell Alloimmune Response In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kerbrat, Stéphane; Vingert, Benoit; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Castellano, Flavia; Renault-Mihara, François; Dos Reis Tavares, Silvina; Surenaud, Mathieu; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Boczkowski, Jorge; Guellaën, Georges; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Le Gouvello, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    TCR-dependent and costimulation signaling, cell division, and cytokine environment are major factors driving cytokines expression induced by CD4(+) T cell activation. PEA-15 15 (Protein Enriched in Astrocyte / 15 kDa) is an adaptor protein that regulates death receptor-induced apoptosis and proliferation signaling by binding to FADD and relocating ERK1/2 to the cytosol, respectively. By using PEA-15-deficient mice, we examined the role of PEA-15 in TCR-dependent cytokine production in CD4(+) T cells. TCR-stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+) T cells exhibited defective progression through the cell cycle associated with impaired expression of cyclin E and phosphoRb, two ERK1/2-dependent proteins of the cell cycle. Accordingly, expression of the division cycle-dependent cytokines IL-2 and IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine, was reduced in stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+) T cells. This was associated with abnormal subcellular compartmentalization of activated ERK1/2 in PEA-15-deficient T cells. Furthermore, in vitro TCR-dependent differentiation of naive CD4(+) CD62L(+) PEA-15-deficient T cells was associated with a lower production of the Th2 cytokine, IL-4, whereas expression of the Th17-associated molecule IL4I1 was enhanced. Finally, a defective humoral response was shown in PEA-15-deficient mice in a model of red blood cell alloimmunization performed with Poly IC, a classical adjuvant of Th1 response in vivo. Collectively, our data suggest that PEA-15 contributes to the specification of the cytokine pattern of activated Th cells, thus highlighting a potential new target to interfere with T cell functional polarization and subsequent immune response. PMID:26317969

  6. Increased phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) receptor function associated with sickle red cell membrane ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, M.; Nair, C.N.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    The biological receptor for tumor-promoting phorbol esters has been identified as the CaS /phospholipid dependent enzyme, protein kinase C. In the red cell, this enzyme is mainly cytosolic but becomes translocated to the membrane if the cellular CaS is allowed to rise. Since cellular CaS in sickle red cells is high, it was reasoned that this enzyme may become more membrane-bound. In fact, the authors noticed a four-fold increase in the binding of TH-PDBu by membrane ghosts isolated from sickle red cells compared to normal red cells (pmoles PDBu bound/mg protein; normal = 0.3 vs sickle cell = 1.4). Attempts to assay the enzyme directly as phospholipid-activated TSP incorporation into the acid-precipitable membrane proteins also indicated a two-fold increase in the radiolabelling of sickle cell membrane ghosts. Autophosphorylation of membrane proteins and analysis of the phosphorylation profile by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography revealed phosphorylation predominantly of bands 3, 4.1 and 4.9 which are known protein kinase C substrates for the red cell enzyme. The increased membrane-associated protein kinase C in sickle red cells may have a bearing on the altered membrane properties reported in this condition.

  7. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  8. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  9. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  10. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  11. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  12. Determination of Fc function with frozen red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V; Bertolini, J; Lyons, K

    2006-09-01

    The Fc function of immunoglobulins is commonly determined by an assay based on monitoring immunoglobulin induced, complement mediated red cell lysis. This assay requires a continuous source of fresh red cells. We have shown that the assay can be successfully performed with frozen red cells. The possibility of access to a stored standard stock of red cells will improve the convenience of performing the assay and could contribute to improved assay reproducibility. PMID:16500112

  13. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  18. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... identify human blood-group antibodies. (b) Source. Reagent Red Blood Cells shall be prepared from human... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells §...

  19. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  20. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  1. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  2. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  3. Responder individuality in red blood cell alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Körmöczi, Günther F; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2014-11-01

    Many different factors influence the propensity of transfusion recipients and pregnant women to form red blood cell alloantibodies (RBCA). RBCA may cause hemolytic transfusion reactions, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and may be a complication in transplantation medicine. Antigenic differences between responder and foreign erythrocytes may lead to such an immune answer, in part with suspected specific HLA class II associations. Biochemical and conformational characteristics of red blood cell (RBC) antigens, their dose (number of transfusions and pregnancies, absolute number of antigens per RBC) and the mode of exposure impact on RBCA rates. In addition, individual circumstances determine the risk to form RBCA. Responder individuality in terms of age, sex, severity of underlying disease, disease- or therapy-induced immunosuppression and inflammation are discussed with respect to influencing RBC alloimmunization. For particular high-risk patients, extended phenotype matching of transfusion and recipient efficiently decreases RBCA induction and associated clinical risks. PMID:25670932

  4. Multiscale simulation of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Popel, A. S.

    2004-11-01

    In humans and other mammals, aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is a major determinant to blood viscosity in microcirculation under physiological and pathological conditions. Elevated levels of aggregation are often related to cardiovascular diseases, bacterial infection, diabetes, and obesity. Aggregation is a multiscale phenomenon that is governed by the molecular bond formation between adjacent cells, morphological and rheological properties of the cells, and the motion of the extra-cellular fluid in which the cells circulate. We have developed a simulation technique using front tracking methods for multiple fluids that includes the multiscale characteristics of aggregation. We will report the first-ever direct computer simulation of aggregation of deformable cells in shear flows. We will present results on the effect of shear rate, strength of the cross-bridging bonds, and the cell rheological properties on the rolling motion, deformation and subsequent breakage of an aggregate.

  5. Directed molecular evolution to design advanced red fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Fedor V; Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have become indispensable imaging tools for biomedical research. continuing progress in fluorescence imaging, however, requires probes with additional colors and properties optimized for emerging techniques. Here we summarize strategies for development of red-shifted fluorescent proteins. We discuss possibilities for knowledge-based rational design based on the photochemistry of fluorescent proteins and the position of the chromophore in protein structure. We consider advances in library design by mutagenesis, protein expression systems and instrumentation for high-throughput screening that should yield improved fluorescent proteins for advanced imaging applications. PMID:22127219

  6. Red Blood Cell Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection has been widely recognised to result from absence of the Duffy (Fy) blood group from the surface of red blood cells (RBCs) in individuals of African descent. Interestingly, recent studies from different malaria-endemic regions have begun to reveal new perspectives on the association between Duffy gene polymorphism and P. vivax malaria. In Papua New Guinea and the Americas, heterozygous carriers of a Duffy-negative allele are less susceptible to P. vivax infection than Duffy-positive homozygotes. In Brazil, studies show that the Fya antigen, compared to Fyb, is associated with lower binding to the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein and reduced susceptibility to vivax malaria. Additionally, it is interesting that numerous studies have now shown that P. vivax can infect RBCs and cause clinical disease in Duffy-negative people. This suggests that the relationship between P. vivax and the Duffy antigen is more complex than customarily described. Evidence of P. vivax Duffy-independent red cell invasion indicates that the parasite must be evolving alternative red cell invasion pathways. In this chapter, we review the evidence for P. vivax Duffy-dependent and Duffy-independent red cell invasion. We also consider the influence of further host gene polymorphism associated with malaria endemicity on susceptibility to vivax malaria. The interaction between the parasite and the RBC has significant potential to influence the effectiveness of P. vivax-specific vaccines and drug treatments. Ultimately, the relationships between red cell polymorphisms and P. vivax blood-stage infection will influence our estimates on the population at risk and efforts to eliminate vivax malaria. PMID:23384621

  7. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-04-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  8. From Red Cells to Soft Porous Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Gacka, Thomas; Nathan, Rungun; Crawford, Robert; Vucbmss Team

    2014-11-01

    Biological scientists have wondered, since the motion of red cells was first observed in capillaries, how the highly flexible red cell can move with so little friction in tightly fitting microvessels without being damaged or undergoing hemolysis. Theoretical studies (Feng and Weinbaum, 2000, JFM; Wu et al., 2004, PRL) attributed this frictionless motion to the dramatically enhanced hydrodynamic lifting force generated inside the soft, porous, endothelial surface layer (ESL) covering the inner surfaces of our capillaries, as a red blood cell glides over it. Herein we report the first experimental examination of this concept. The results conclusively demonstrate that significant fraction of the overall lifting force generated in a soft porous layer as a planing surface glides over it, is contributed by the pore fluid pressure, and thus frictional loss is reduced significantly. Moreover, the experimental predictions showed excellent agreement with the experimental data. This finding has the potential of dramatically changing existing lubrication approaches, and can result in substantial savings in energy consumption and thus reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  10. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Zhang, Yong; Loeliger, Kelsey; Poon, Andrea; Simakova, Olga; Zingone, Adriana; Costello, Rene; Childs, Richard; Noel, Pierre; Silver, Samuel; Kwok, Mary; Mo, Clifton; Young, Neal; Landgren, Ola; Sloand, Elaine; Maric, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare disorder characterized by inhibition of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and normochromic, normocytic anaemia with reticulocytopenia. Among 51 PRCA patients, we identified 12 (24%) patients having monoclonal gammopathy, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or smouldering multiple myeloma, with presence of monoclonal protein or abnormal serum free light chains and atypical bone marrow features of clonal plasmacytosis, hypercellularity and fibrosis. Thus far, three patients treated with anti-myeloma based therapeutics have responded with reticulocyte recovery and clinical transfusion independence, suggesting plasma cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of this specific monoclonal gammopathy-associated PRCA. PMID:26999424

  11. Red Ginseng Extract Reduced Metastasis of Colon Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eun Young; Kim, Woo Kyoung

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of red ginseng extract on metastasis of colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Wound healing migration, cell motility, invasion, and activity, protein expression, and mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were examined in SW480 human colon cancer cells. SW480 cells were cultured with or without 100 μg/L PMA in the absence or presence of various concentrations (100, 200, or 300 μg/mL) of red ginseng extract. Red ginseng extract treatment caused significant suppression of cell motility and invasion (p<0.05) in SW480 cells. Red ginseng extract inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity and their protein and mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05) in SW480 cells. For experimental metastasis, BALB/c mice were injected intravenously with CT-26 mouse colon cancer cells in the tail vein, and were orally administered various concentrations (0, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg body weight) of red ginseng extract for 3 weeks. Numbers of pulmonary nodules were significantly decreased in mice that were fed red ginseng extract (p<0.05). Plasma MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity significantly decreased in response to treatment with red ginseng extract in mice (p<0.05). These data suggest that red ginseng extract may be useful for prevention of cancer invasion and metastasis through inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 pathways. PMID:23717075

  12. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells. PMID:26013297

  13. Spectroscopy detection of green and red fluorescent proteins in genetically modified plants using a fiber optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Oi Wah; Asundi, Anand K.; Chen, Jun-Wei; Chew, Yiwen; Yu, Shangjuan; Yeo, Gare H.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, fiber optic spectroscopy is developed to detect and quantify recombinant green (EGFP) and red (DsRED) fluorescent proteins in vitro and in vivo. The bacterial expression vectors carrying the coding regions of EGFP and DsRED were introduced into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fiber optic spectroscopy. Fluorescence at the appropriate emission wavelengths could be detected up to 64X dilution for EGFP and 40X dilution for DsRED. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in vivo, transgenic potato hairy roots expressing EGFP and DsRED were regenerated. This was achieved by cloning the EGFP and DsRED genes into the plant binary vector, pTMV35S, to create the recombinant vectors pGLOWGreen and pGLOWRed. These latter binary vectors were introduced into Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain A4T. Infection of potato cells with transformed agrobacteria was used to insert the fluorescent protein genes into the potato genome. Genetically modified potato cells were then regenerated into hairy roots. A panel of transformed hairy roots expressing varying levels of fluorescent proteins was selected by fluorescence microscopy. We are now assessing the capability of spectroscopic detection system for in vivo quantification of green and red fluorescence levels in transformed roots.

  14. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  15. Red Rain Cells Recovered from Interior of the Polonnaruwa Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarathne, K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    2013-03-01

    Red rain cells were discovered in extracts from the Polonnaruwa (Aralaganwila) meteorite that fell nearly ten days before a red rain event in the same location in Sri Lanka. A causal connection is speculated.

  16. Vibrational modes of hemoglobin in red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martel, P; Calmettes, P; Hennion, B

    1991-01-01

    Equine red blood cells were washed in saline heavy water (2H2O) to exchange the hydrogen atoms of the non-hemoglobin components with deuterons. This led to novel neutron scattering measurements of protein vibrations within a cellular system and permitted a comparison with inelastic neutron scattering measurements on purified horse hemoglobin, either dry or wetted with 2H2O. As a function of wavevector transfer Q and the frequency transfer v the neutron response typified by the dynamic structure factor S(Q, v) was found to be similar for extracted and cellular hemoglobin at low and high temperatures. At 77 K, in the cells, a peak in S(Q, v) due to the protein was found near 0.7 THz, approximately half the frequency of a strong peak in the aqueous medium. Measurements at higher temperatures (170 and 230 K) indicated similar small shifts downwards in the peak frequencies of both components. At 260 K the low frequency component became predominantly quasielastic, but a significant inelastic component could still be ascribed to the aqueous scattering. Near 295 K the frequency responses of both components were similar and centered near zero. When scattering due to water is taken into account it appears that the protein neutron response in, or out of, red blood cells is little affected by hydration in the low frequency regime where Van der Waals forces are thought to be effective. PMID:1849028

  17. Green to red photoconversion of GFP for protein tracking in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Saberianfar, Reza; Zipfel, Warren R.; Menassa, Rima; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of fluorescent proteins have been identified that undergo shifts in spectral emission properties over time or once they are irradiated by ultraviolet or blue light. Such proteins are finding application in following the dynamics of particular proteins or labelled organelles within the cell. However, before genes encoding these fluorescent proteins were available, many proteins have already been labelled with GFP in transgenic cells; a number of model organisms feature collections of GFP-tagged lines and organisms. Here we describe a fast, localized and non-invasive method for GFP photoconversion from green to red. We demonstrate its use in transgenic plant, Drosophila and mammalian cells in vivo. While genes encoding fluorescent proteins specifically designed for photoconversion will usually be advantageous when creating new transgenic lines, our method for photoconversion of GFP allows the use of existing GFP-tagged transgenic lines for studies of dynamic processes in living cells. PMID:26148899

  18. Anesthetics and red blood cell rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Burcu; Aydogan, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There are many conditions where it is useful for anesthetists to have a knowledge of blood rheology. Blood rheology plays an important role in numerous clinical situations. Hemorheologic changes may significantly affect the induction and recovery times with anesthetic agents. But also, hemorheologic factors are directly or indirectly affected by many anesthetic agents or their metabolites. In this review, the blood rheology with special emphasis on its application in anesthesiology, the importance hemorheological parameters in anesthesiology and also the effect of some anesthetic substances on red blood cell rheology were presented.

  19. Two-color RESOLFT nanoscopy with green and red fluorescent photochromic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Cardinal, Flavie; Jensen, Nickels A; Westphal, Volker; Stiel, Andre C; Chmyrov, Andriy; Bierwagen, Jakob; Testa, Ilaria; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W

    2014-03-17

    Up to now, all demonstrations of reversible saturable optical fluorescence transitions (RESOLFT) superresolution microscopy of living cells have relied on the use of reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFP) emitting in the green spectral range. Here we show RESOLFT imaging with rsCherryRev1.4, a new red-emitting RSFP enabling a spatial resolution up to four times higher than the diffraction barrier. By co-expressing green and red RSFPs in living cells we demonstrate two-color RESOLFT imaging both for single ("donut") beam scanning and for parallelized versions of RESOLFT nanoscopy where an array of >23,000 "donut-like" minima are scanned simultaneously. PMID:24449030

  20. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  1. Red blood cell volume in preterm neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Quaife, M.A.; Dirksen, J.W.; Paxson, C.L. Jr.; McIntire, R.H. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    In the high-risk neonate, the direct determination of the red cell volume by radionuclide dilution technique appears to be the singularly definitive method of defining treatment efficacy, and is thus a useful evaluation and management tool for the pediatrician. For effective patient management, the red blood cell(RBC) volume of 69 preterm and term neonates was determined. The method utilized, Tc-99m-labeled RBCs, provided a fast and accurate answer with a large reduction in the absorbed radiation dose. In the population studied within a high-risk newborn ICU, the mean RBC volumes between the preterm and term neonates were without significant difference. Grouping and analysis of the RBC volume data with respect to birth weight, gestational ages, and 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores revealed on statistical difference. The mean value found in our population, 32.2 +/- 9.2 ml/kg, however, does differ from those previously reported in which the determinations were made using an indirect estimation from the plasma compartment.

  2. Fragment molecular orbital calculations on red fluorescent proteins (DsRed and mFruits).

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Naoki; Mochizuki, Yuji; Nakano, Tatsuya; Amari, Shinji; Fukuzawa, Kaori; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2009-01-29

    We have performed a series of fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations for a family of red fluorescent proteins, DsRed and mFruits. The electronic transition energies were evaluated by the method of configuration interaction singles with perturbative doubles [CIS(D)] including higher-order corrections. The calculated values were in good agreement with the corresponding experimental peak values of spectra. Additionally, the chromophore environment was systematically analyzed in terms of the interaction energies between the pigment moiety and neighboring residues. It was theoretically revealed that the electrostatic interactions play a dominant role in the DsRed chromophore, whereas the color tunings in mFruits are controlled in a more delicate fashion. PMID:19127982

  3. Microconfined flow behavior of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; D'Apolito, Rosa; Cassinese, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) perform essential functions in human body, such as gas exchange between blood and tissues, thanks to their ability to deform and flow in the microvascular network. The high RBC deformability is mainly due to the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane. Since an impaired RBC deformability could be found in some diseases, such as malaria, sickle cell anemia, diabetes and hereditary disorders, there is the need to provide further insight into measurement of RBC deformability in a physiologically relevant flow field. Here, RBCs deformability has been studied in terms of the minimum apparent plasma-layer thickness by using high-speed video microscopy of RBCs flowing in cylindrical glass capillaries. An in vitro systematic microfluidic investigation of RBCs in micro-confined conditions has been performed, resulting in the determination of the RBCs time recovery constant, RBC volume and surface area and RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and surface viscosity. It has been noticed that the deformability of RBCs induces cells aggregation during flow in microcapillaries, allowing the formation of clusters of cells. Overall, our results provide a novel technique to estimate RBC deformability and also RBCs collective behavior, which can be used for the analysis of pathological RBCs, for which reliable quantitative methods are still lacking. PMID:26071649

  4. Red Fluorescent Proteins: Advanced Imaging Applications and Future Design

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Subach, Oksana M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years a large series of the advanced red-shifted fluorescent proteins (RFPs) has been developed. These enhanced RFPs provide new possibilities to study biological processes at the levels ranging from single molecules to whole organisms. Herein the relationship between the properties of the RFPs of different phenotypes and their applications to various imaging techniques are described. Existing and emerging imaging approaches are discussed for conventional RFPs, far-red FPs, RFPs with a large Stokes shift, fluorescent timers, irreversibly photoactivatable and reversibly photo-switchable RFPs. Advantages and limitations of specific RFPs for each technique are presented. Recent progress in understanding the chemical transformations of red chromophores allows the future RFP phenotypes and their respective novel imaging applications to be foreseen. PMID:22851529

  5. Depletion induced clustering of red blood cells in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    The flow properties of blood are determined by the physical properties of its main constituents, the red blood cells (RBC's). At low shear rates RBC's form aggregates, so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates can break them up and the viscosity of blood shows a shear thinning behavior. The physical origin of the rouleaux formation is not yet fully resolved and there are two competing models available. One predicts that the adhesion is induced by bridging of the plasma (macromolecular) proteins in-between two RBC's. The other is based on the depletion effect and thus predicts the absence of macromolecules in-between the cells of a rouleaux. Recent single cell force measurements by use of an AFM support strongly the depletion model. By varying the concentration of Dextran at different molecular weights we can control the adhesions strength. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the depletion induced adhesion strength.

  6. A novel type of light-harvesting antenna protein of red algal origin in algae with secondary plastids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Light, the driving force of photosynthesis, can be harmful when present in excess; therefore, any light harvesting system requires photoprotection. Members of the extended light-harvesting complex (LHC) protein superfamily are involved in light harvesting as well as in photoprotection and are found in the red and green plant lineages, with a complex distribution pattern of subfamilies in the different algal lineages. Results Here, we demonstrate that the recently discovered “red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like proteins” (RedCAPs) form a monophyletic family within this protein superfamily. The occurrence of RedCAPs was found to be restricted to the red algal lineage, including red algae (with primary plastids) as well as cryptophytes, haptophytes and heterokontophytes (with secondary plastids of red algal origin). Expression of a full-length RedCAP:GFP fusion construct in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum confirmed the predicted plastid localisation of RedCAPs. Furthermore, we observed that similarly to the fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding light-harvesting antenna proteins also RedCAP transcripts in diatoms were regulated in a diurnal way at standard light conditions and strongly repressed at high light intensities. Conclusions The absence of RedCAPs from the green lineage implies that RedCAPs evolved in the red lineage after separation from the the green lineage. During the evolution of secondary plastids, RedCAP genes therefore must have been transferred from the nucleus of the endocytobiotic alga to the nucleus of the host cell, a process that involved complementation with pre-sequences allowing import of the gene product into the secondary plastid bound by four membranes. Based on light-dependent transcription and on localisation data, we propose that RedCAPs might participate in the light (intensity and quality)-dependent structural or functional reorganisation of the light-harvesting antennae of the photosystems upon dark to light

  7. Kinematics of red cell aspiration by fluorescence-imaged microdeformation.

    PubMed

    Discher, D E; Mohandas, N

    1996-10-01

    Maps of fluorescing red cell membrane components on a pipette-aspirated projection are quantitated in an effort to elucidate and unify the heterogeneous kinematics of deformation. Transient gradients of diffusing fluorescent lipid first demonstrate the fluidity of an otherwise uniform-density bilayer and corroborate a "universal" calibration scale for relative surface density. A steep but smooth and stable gradient in the densities of the skeleton components spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1 is used to estimate large elastic strains along the aspirated skeleton. The deformation fields are argued to be an unhindered response to loading in the surface normal direction. Density maps intermediate to those of the compressible skeleton and fluid bilayer are exhibited by particular transmembrane proteins (e.g., Band 3) and yield estimates for the skeleton-connected fractions. Such connected proteins appear to occupy a significant proportion of the undeformed membrane surface and can lead to steric exclusion of unconnected integral membrane proteins from regions of network condensation. Consistent with membrane repatterning kinematics in reversible deformation, final vesiculation of the projection tip produces a cell fragment concentrated in freely diffusing proteins but depleted of skeleton. PMID:8889146

  8. Kinematics of red cell aspiration by fluorescence-imaged microdeformation.

    PubMed Central

    Discher, D E; Mohandas, N

    1996-01-01

    Maps of fluorescing red cell membrane components on a pipette-aspirated projection are quantitated in an effort to elucidate and unify the heterogeneous kinematics of deformation. Transient gradients of diffusing fluorescent lipid first demonstrate the fluidity of an otherwise uniform-density bilayer and corroborate a "universal" calibration scale for relative surface density. A steep but smooth and stable gradient in the densities of the skeleton components spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1 is used to estimate large elastic strains along the aspirated skeleton. The deformation fields are argued to be an unhindered response to loading in the surface normal direction. Density maps intermediate to those of the compressible skeleton and fluid bilayer are exhibited by particular transmembrane proteins (e.g., Band 3) and yield estimates for the skeleton-connected fractions. Such connected proteins appear to occupy a significant proportion of the undeformed membrane surface and can lead to steric exclusion of unconnected integral membrane proteins from regions of network condensation. Consistent with membrane repatterning kinematics in reversible deformation, final vesiculation of the projection tip produces a cell fragment concentrated in freely diffusing proteins but depleted of skeleton. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:8889146

  9. Comparative study reveals better far-red fluorescent protein for whole body imaging

    PubMed Central

    Luker, K.E.; Pata, P.; Shemiakina, I.I.; Pereverzeva, A.; Stacer, A.C.; Shcherbo, D.S.; Pletnev, V.Z.; Skolnaja, M.; Lukyanov, K.A.; Luker, G.D.; Pata, I.; Chudakov, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded far-red and near-infrared fluorescent proteins enable efficient imaging in studies of tumorigenesis, embryogenesis, and inflammation in model animals. Here we report comparative testing of available GFP-like far-red fluorescent proteins along with a modified protein, named Katushka2S, and near-infrared bacterial phytochrome-based markers. We compare fluorescence signal and signal-to-noise ratio at various excitation wavelength and emission filter combinations using transiently transfected cell implants in mice, providing a basis for rational choice of optimal marker(s) for in vivo imaging studies. We demonstrate that the signals of various far-red fluorescent proteins can be spectrally unmixed based on different signal-to-noise ratios in different channels, providing the straightforward possibility of multiplexed imaging with standard equipment. Katushka2S produced the brightest and fastest maturing fluorescence in all experimental setups. At the same time, signal-to-noise ratios for Katushka2S and near-infrared bacterial phytochrome, iRFP720 were comparable in their optimal channels. Distinct spectral and genetic characteristics suggest this pair of a far-red and a near-infrared fluorescent protein as an optimal combination for dual color, whole body imaging studies in model animals. PMID:26035795

  10. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  11. Optical analysis of red blood cell suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szołna, Alicja A.; Grzegorzewski, Bronisław

    2008-12-01

    The optical properties of suspensions of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied. Fresh human venues blood was obtained from adult healthy donors. RBCs were suspended in isotonic salt solution, and in autologous plasma. Suspensions with haematocrit 0.25 - 3% were investigated. Novel technique was proposed to determine the scattering coefficient μs for the suspensions. The intensity of He-Ne laser light transmitted through a wedge-shape container filled with a suspension was recorded. To find the dependence of the intensity on the thickness of the sample the container was moved horizontally. The dependence of μs on the haematocrit was determined for RBCs suspended in the isotonic salt solution. RBCs suspended in plasma tend to form rouleaux. For the RBCs suspended in plasma, the scattering coefficient as a function of time was obtained. It is shown that this technique can be useful in the study of rouleaux formation.

  12. Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121°C and their red fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A. Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey

    2010-09-01

    We have shown that the red cells found in the Red Rain (which fell on Kerala, India, in 2001) survive and grow after incubation for periods of up to two hours at 121°C . Under these conditions daughter cells appear within the original mother cells and the number of cells in the samples increases with length of exposure to 121°C. No such increase in cells occurs at room temperature, suggesting that the increase in daughter cells is brought about by exposure of the Red Rain cells to high temperatures. This is an independent confirmation of results reported earlier by two of the present authors, claiming that the cells can replicate under high pressure at temperatures upto 300°C. The flourescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectagle planetary nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving an extraterrestrial origin.

  13. Distribution of chloride permeabilities in normal human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Raftos, J E; Bookchin, R M; Lew, V L

    1996-01-01

    1. The rate of dehydration of K+ permeabilized red cells is influenced by their Cl- permeability (PCl). In instances of pathological K+ permeabilization, cell-to-cell differences in PCl may determine which red cells dehydrate most. The present study was designed to investigate whether PCl differed significantly among red cells from a single blood sample. 2. Previously available methods measure only the mean PCl of red cell populations. We describe a 'profile migration' method in which dilute red cell suspensions in low-K+ media were permeabilized to K+ with a high concentration of valinomycin, rendering PCl the main rate-limiting factor for cell dehydration. As the cells dehydrated, samples were processed to obtain full haemolysis curves at precise times. Variations in PCl among cells would have appeared as progressive changes in the profile of their haemolysis curves, as the curves migrated towards lower tonicities. 3. Red cells from five normal volunteers showed no change in profile of the migrating haemolysis curves, suggesting that their PCl distributions were fairly uniform. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that intercell variation in PCl was less than 7.5%. 4. Results obtained with this technique were analysed using the Lew-Bookchin red cell model. The calculated PCl was within the normal range described in earlier studies. PMID:8815210

  14. Destruction of newly released red blood cells in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Udden, M. M.; Huntoon, C. L.; Driscoll, T.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight results in a rapid change in total blood volume, plasma volume, and red blood cell mass because the space to contain blood is decreased. The plasma volume and total blood volume decreases during the first hours in space and remain at a decreased level for the remainder of the flight. During the first several hours following return to earth, plasma volume and total blood volume increase to preflight levels. During the first few days in space recently produced red blood cells disappear from the blood resulting in a decrease in red blood cell mass of 10-15%. Red cells 12 d old or older survive normally and production of new cells continues at near preflight levels. After the first few days in space, the red cell mass is stable at the decreased level. Following return to earth the hemoglobin and red blood cell mass concentrations decrease reflecting the increase in plasma volume. The erythropoietin levels increase responding to "postflight anemia"; red cell production increases, and the red cell mass is restored to preflight levels after several weeks.

  15. Post-mortem re-cloning of a transgenic red fluorescent protein dog

    PubMed Central

    Hong, So Gun; Koo, Ok Jae; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Geon-A; Park, Eun Jung; Jang, Goo

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the world's first transgenic dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, cellular senescence is a major limiting factor for producing more advanced transgenic dogs. To overcome this obstacle, we rejuvenated transgenic cells using a re-cloning technique. Fibroblasts from post-mortem red fluorescent protein (RFP) dog were reconstructed with in vivo matured oocytes and transferred into 10 surrogate dogs. One puppy was produced and confirmed as a re-cloned dog. Although the puppy was lost during birth, we successfully established a rejuvenated fibroblast cell line from this animal. The cell line was found to stably express RFP and is ready for additional genetic modification. PMID:22122908

  16. Control of red blood cell mass during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T. B.; Smith, S. M.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    Data are reviewed from twenty-two astronauts from seven space missions in a study of red blood cell mass. The data show that decreased red cell mass in all astronauts exposed to space for more than nine days, although the actual dynamics of mass changes varies with flight duration. Possible mechanisms for these changes, including alterations in erythropoietin levels, are discussed.

  17. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called "sports anemia." This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise. PMID:24273518

  18. Determination of proteins by fluorescence quenching of Magdala Red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wen-wu; Gong, Guo-quan; Song, Yu-min

    2000-04-01

    Magdala Red (MR) binding to protein causes a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of MR at 556 nm. Based on this, a new quantitative determination method for proteins is developed. The linear range of this assay is 0.1-4.0 μg ml -1 of Bovine Serum albumin (BSA). The measurements can be made easily on a common fluorimeter. The reaction between MR and proteins is completed in 1 min, and the fluorescence intensity is stable for at least 2 h. There is little or no interference from amino acids and most metal ions. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of protein in milk powder and soybean milk powder and the results are in agreement with the results by the other methods.

  19. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  20. Developmental Plasticity of Red Blood Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Malka, Roy; Higgins, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Most human physiologic set points like body temperature are tightly regulated and show little variation between healthy individuals. Red blood cell (RBC) characteristics such as hematocrit (HCT) and mean cell volume (MCV) are stable within individuals but can vary by 20% from one healthy person to the next. The mechanisms for the majority of this inter-individual variation are unknown and do not appear to involve common genetic variation. Here we show that environmental conditions present during development, namely in utero iron availability, can exert long-term influence on a set point related to the RBC life cycle. In a controlled study of rhesus monkeys and a retrospective study of humans, we use a mathematical model of in vivo RBC population dynamics to show that in utero iron deficiency is associated with a lowered threshold for RBC clearance and turnover. This in utero effect is plastic, persisting at least two years after birth and after the cessation of iron deficiency. Our study reports a rare instance of developmental plasticity in the human hematologic systems and also shows how mathematical modeling can be used to identify cellular mechanisms involved in the adaptive control of homeostatic set points. PMID:24415575

  1. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  2. Mature parasite-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (MESA) of Plasmodium falciparum binds to the 30-kDa domain of protein 4.1 in malaria-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Waller, Karena L; Nunomura, Wataru; An, Xiuli; Cooke, Brian M; Mohandas, Narla; Coppel, Ross L

    2003-09-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum mature parasite-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (MESA) is exported from the parasite to the infected red blood cell (IRBC) membrane skeleton, where it binds to protein 4.1 (4.1R) via a 19-residue MESA sequence. Using purified RBC 4.1R and recombinant 4.1R fragments, we show MESA binds the 30-kDa region of RBC 4.1R, specifically to a 51-residue region encoded by exon 10 of the 4.1R gene. The 3D structure of this region reveals that the MESA binding site overlaps the region of 4.1R involved in the p55, glycophorin C, and 4.1R ternary complex. Further binding studies using p55, 4.1R, and MESA showed competition between p55 and MESA for 4.1R, implying that MESA bound at the IRBC membrane skeleton may modulate normal 4.1R and p55 interactions in vivo. Definition of minimal binding domains involved in critical protein interactions in IRBCs may aid the development of novel therapies for falciparum malaria. PMID:12730097

  3. Dynamic insight into protein structure utilizing red edge excitation shift.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Haldar, Sourav

    2014-01-21

    Proteins are considered the workhorses in the cellular machinery. They are often organized in a highly ordered conformation in the crowded cellular environment. These conformations display characteristic dynamics over a range of time scales. An emerging consensus is that protein function is critically dependent on its dynamics. The subtle interplay between structure and dynamics is a hallmark of protein organization and is essential for its function. Depending on the environmental context, proteins can adopt a range of conformations such as native, molten globule, unfolded (denatured), and misfolded states. Although protein crystallography is a well established technique, it is not always possible to characterize various protein conformations by X-ray crystallography due to transient nature of these states. Even in cases where structural characterization is possible, the information obtained lacks dynamic component, which is needed to understand protein function. In this overall scenario, approaches that reveal information on protein dynamics are much appreciated. Dynamics of confined water has interesting implications in protein folding. Interfacial hydration combines the motion of water molecules with the slow moving protein molecules. The red edge excitation shift (REES) approach becomes relevant in this context. REES is defined as the shift in the wavelength of maximum fluorescence emission toward higher wavelengths, caused by a shift in the excitation wavelength toward the red edge of absorption spectrum. REES arises due to slow rates (relative to fluorescence lifetime) of solvent relaxation (reorientation) around an excited state fluorophore in organized assemblies such as proteins. Consequently, REES depends on the environment-induced motional restriction imposed on the solvent molecules in the immediate vicinity of the fluorophore. In the case of a protein, the confined water in the protein creates a dipolar field that acts as the solvent for a fluorophore

  4. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V; Sellountos, Euripides J; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 < or = n < or = 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail. PMID:11900021

  5. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V.; Sellountos, Euripides J.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 less-than-or-equal n less-than-or-equal 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail.

  6. Red light interferes in UVA-induced photoaging of human skin fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianhui; Tian, Yan; Ren, Qu; Wei, Lizhao; Li, Xiaoxin; Cai, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The possible regulation mechanism of red light was determined to discover how to retard UVA-induced skin photoaging. Human skin fibroblasts were cultured and irradiated with different doses of UVA, thus creating a photoaging model. Fibroblasts were also exposed to a subtoxic dose of UVA combined with a red light-emitting diode (LED) for five continuous days. Three groups were examined: control, UVA and UVA plus red light. Cumulative exposure doses of UVA were 25 J cm(-2), and the total doses of red light were 0.18 J cm(-2). Various indicators were measured before and after irradiation, including cell morphology, viability, β-galactosidase staining, apoptosis, cycle phase, the length of telomeres and the protein levels of photoaging-related genes. Red light irradiation retarded the cumulative low-dose UVA irradiation-induced skin photoaging, decreased the expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, upregulated SIRT1 expression, decreased matrix metalloproteinase MMP-1 and the acetylation of p53 expression, reduced the horizon of cell apoptosis and enhanced cell viability. Furthermore, the telomeres in UVA-treated cells were shortened compared to those of cells in the red light groups. These results suggest that red light plays a key role in the antiphotoaging of human skin fibroblasts by acting on different signaling transduction pathways. PMID:25039464

  7. Targeted erythropoietin selectively stimulates red blood cell expansion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Burrill, Devin R; Vernet, Andyna; Collins, James J; Silver, Pamela A; Way, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-10

    The design of cell-targeted protein therapeutics can be informed by natural protein-protein interactions that use cooperative physical contacts to achieve cell type specificity. Here we applied this approach in vivo to the anemia drug erythropoietin (EPO), to direct its activity to EPO receptors (EPO-Rs) on red blood cell (RBC) precursors and prevent interaction with EPO-Rs on nonerythroid cells, such as platelets. Our engineered EPO molecule was mutated to weaken its affinity for EPO-R, but its avidity for RBC precursors was rescued via tethering to an antibody fragment that specifically binds the human RBC marker glycophorin A (huGYPA). We systematically tested the impact of these engineering steps on in vivo markers of efficacy, side effects, and pharmacokinetics. huGYPA transgenic mice dosed with targeted EPO exhibited elevated RBC levels, with only minimal platelet effects. This in vivo selectivity depended on the weakening EPO mutation, fusion to the RBC-specific antibody, and expression of huGYPA. The terminal plasma half-life of targeted EPO was ∼28.3 h in transgenic mice vs. ∼15.5 h in nontransgenic mice, indicating that huGYPA on mature RBCs acted as a significant drug sink but did not inhibit efficacy. In a therapeutic context, our targeting approach may allow higher restorative doses of EPO without platelet-mediated side effects, and also may improve drug pharmacokinetics. These results demonstrate how rational drug design can improve in vivo specificity, with potential application to diverse protein therapeutics. PMID:27114509

  8. Electrochemical Red Blood Cell Counting: One at a Time.

    PubMed

    Sepunaru, Lior; Sokolov, Stanislav V; Holter, Jennifer; Young, Neil P; Compton, Richard G

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the concentration of a red blood cell solution under physiological conditions can be determined by electrochemical voltammetry. The magnitude of the oxygen reduction currents produced at an edge-plane pyrolytic graphite electrode was diagnosed analytically at concentrations suitable for a point-of-care test device. The currents could be further enhanced when the solution of red blood cells was exposed to hydrogen peroxide. We show that the enhanced signal can be used to detect red blood cells at a single entity level. The method presented relies on the catalytic activity of red blood cells towards hydrogen peroxide and on surface-induced haemolysis. Each single cell activity is expressed as current spikes decaying within a few seconds back to the background current. The frequency of such current spikes is proportional to the concentration of cells in solution. PMID:27355839

  9. Red fluorescent protein responsible for pigmentation in trematode-infected Porites compressa tissues.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Caroline V; Roth, Melissa S; Gates, Ruth D

    2009-02-01

    Reports of coral disease have increased dramatically over the last decade; however, the biological mechanisms that corals utilize to limit infection and resist disease remain poorly understood. Compromised coral tissues often display non-normal pigmentation that potentially represents an inflammation-like response, although these pigments remain uncharacterized. Using spectral emission analysis and cryo-histological and electrophoretic techniques, we investigated the pink pigmentation associated with trematodiasis, infection with Podocotyloides stenometre larval trematode, in Porites compressa. Spectral emission analysis reveals that macroscopic areas of pink pigmentation fluoresce under blue light excitation (450 nm) and produce a broad emission peak at 590 nm (+/-6) with a 60-nm full width at half maximum. Electrophoretic protein separation of pigmented tissue extract confirms the red fluorescence to be a protein rather than a low-molecular-weight compound. Histological sections demonstrate green fluorescence in healthy coral tissue and red fluorescence in the trematodiasis-compromised tissue. The red fluorescent protein (FP) is limited to the epidermis, is not associated with cells or granules, and appears unstructured. These data collectively suggest that the red FP is produced and localized in tissue infected by larval trematodes and plays a role in the immune response in corals. PMID:19218493

  10. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Materials and methods Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. Results During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. Discussion These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance. PMID:22153688

  11. Preclinical investigation of the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and protein and red blood cell binding of DRDE-07: a prophylactic agent against sulphur mustard.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pankaj; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2014-10-01

    DRDE-07, a newly synthesized amifostine analog currently under clinical investigation in a phase I trial, is a potent antidote against sulfur mustard toxicity. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of DRDE-07 in female Swiss Albino mice after a single oral dose of 400 or 600 mg/kg. The physicochemical properties of DRDE-07, including solubility, pK a, Log P, plasma protein binding and plasma/blood partitioning, were determined to support the pharmacokinetic characterization. DRDE-07 concentration was determined by an HPLC-UV method. The profile of plasma concentration versus time was analyzed using a non-compartmental model. Plasma protein binding was assessed using ultrafiltration. DRDE-07 appeared rapidly in plasma after oral administration with peak plasma levels (C max) observed in less than 15 min. There was a rapid decline in the plasma levels followed by a smaller second peak about 90 min after dosing. The plasma protein binding of DRDE-07 was found to be less than 25% at all concentrations studied. Plasma clearance of DRDE-07 is expected to be ~1.5 fold higher than the blood clearance of DRDE-07. The probable metabolite of DRDE-07 was identified as phenyl-S-ethyl amine. PMID:26579409

  12. Development and characterization of a new inbred transgenic rat strain expressing DsRed monomeric fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Sonia; Wang, Xing-Hua; Yannarelli, Gustavo; Dayan, Victor; Berger, Thorsten; Zocche, Larissa; Kobayashi, Eiji; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Keating, Armand

    2014-10-01

    The inbred rat is a suitable model for studying human disease and because of its larger size is more amenable to complex surgical manipulation than the mouse. While the rodent fulfills many of the criteria for transplantation research, an important requirement is the ability to mark and track donors cells and assess organ viability. However, tracking ability is limited by the availability of transgenic (Tg) rats that express suitable luminescent or fluorescent proteins. Red fluorescent protein cloned from Discosoma coral (DsRed) has several advantages over other fluorescent proteins, including in vivo detection in the whole animal and ex vivo visualization in organs as there is no interference with autofluorescence. We generated and characterized a novel inbred Tg Lewis rat strain expressing DsRed monomeric (DsRed mono) fluorescent protein under the control of a ubiquitously expressed ROSA26 promoter. DsRed mono Tg rats ubiquitously expressed the marker gene as detected by RT-PCR but the protein was expressed at varying levels in different organs. Conventional skin grafting experiments showed acceptance of DsRed monomeric Tg rat skin on wild-type rats for more than 30 days. Cardiac transplantation of DsRed monomeric Tg rat hearts into wild-type recipients further showed graft acceptance and long-term organ viability (>6 months). The DsRed monomeric Tg rat provides marked cells and/or organs that can be followed for long periods without immune rejection and therefore is a suitable model to investigate cell tracking and organ transplantation. PMID:25011565

  13. Detecting Newcastle disease virus in combination of RT-PCR with red blood cell absorption.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianzhong; Liu, Chengqian

    2011-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has limited sensitivity when treating complicated samples, such as feces, waste-water in farms, and nucleic acids, protein rich tissue samples, all the factors may interfere with the sensitivity of PCR test or generate false results. In this study, we developed a sensitive RT-PCR, combination of red blood cell adsorption, for detecting Newcastle disease virus (NDV). One pair of primers which was highly homologous to three NDV pathotypes was designed according to the consensus nucleocapsid protein (NP) gene sequence. To eliminate the interfere of microbes and toxic substances, we concentrated and purified NDV from varied samples utilizing the ability of NDV binding red blood cells (RBCs). The RT-PCR coupled with red blood cell adsorption was much more sensitive in comparison with regular RT-PCR. The approach could also be used to detect other viruses with the property of hemagglutination, such as influenza viruses. PMID:21535888

  14. Single molecule spectroscopic characterization of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed) from the Anthozoa coral Heteractis crispa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi; Whitier, Jennifer E.; Werner, James H.; De Schryver, Frans C.; Hofkens, Johan; Goodwin, Peter M.

    2006-02-01

    We report on the photophysical properties of a far-red intrinsic fluorescent protein by means of single molecule and ensemble spectroscopic methods. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria is a popular fluorescent marker with genetically encoded fluorescence and which can be fused to any biological structure without affecting its function. GFP and its variants provide emission colors from blue to yellowish green. Red intrinsic fluorescent proteins from Anthozoa species represent a recent addition to the emission color palette provided by GFPs. Red intrinsic fluorescent markers are on high demand in protein-protein interaction studies based on fluorescence-resonance energy transfer or in multicolor tracking studies or in cellular investigations where autofluorescence possesses a problem. Here we address the photophysical properties of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed), a mutant engineered from a chromoprotein cloned from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa, by using a combination of ensemble and single molecule spectroscopic methods. We show evidence for the presence of HcRed protein as an oligomer and for incomplete maturation of its chromophore. Incomplete maturation results in the presence of an immature (yellow) species absorbing/fluorescing at 490/530-nm. This yellow chromophore is involved in a fast resonance-energy transfer with the mature (purple) chromophore. The mature chromophore of HcRed is found to adopt two conformations, a Transoriented form absorbing and 565-nm and non-fluorescent in solution and a Cis-oriented form absorbing at 590-nm and emitting at 645-nm. These two forms co-exist in solution in thermal equilibrium. Excitation-power dependence fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of HcRed shows evidence for singlet-triplet transitions in the microseconds time scale and for cis-trans isomerization occurring in a time scale of tens of microseconds. Single molecule fluorescence data recorded from immobilized HcRed proteins, all

  15. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M.; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBCs). Although the oxygen affinity of blood is well-understood and routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of RBC volume and Hb concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers, and they are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume, and Hb concentration for individual RBCs in high throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.9%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen–Hb dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with Hb concentration but independent of osmolarity, which suggests variation in the Hb to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2–3 DPG) ratio on a cellular level. By quantifying the functional behavior of a cellular population, our system adds a dimension to blood cell analysis and other measurements of single-cell variability. PMID:26216973

  16. Astringency reduction in red wine by whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, Paula; Olatujoye, Jumoke B; Cabezudo, Ignacio; Frazier, Richard A; Gordon, Michael H

    2016-05-15

    Whey is a by-product of cheese manufacturing and therefore investigating new applications of whey proteins will contribute towards the valorisation of whey and hence waste reduction. This study shows for the first time a detailed comparison of the effectiveness of gelatin and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) as fining agents. Gelatin was more reactive than whey proteins to tannic acid as shown by both the astringency method (with ovalbumin as a precipitant) and the tannins determination method (with methylcellulose as a precipitant). The two proteins showed similar selectivity for polyphenols but β-LG did not remove as much catechin. The fining agent was removed completely or to a trace level after centrifugation followed by filtration which minimises its potential allergenicity. In addition, improved understanding of protein-tannin interactions was obtained by fluorescence, size measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Overall this study demonstrates that whey proteins have the potential of reducing astringency in red wine and can find a place in enology. PMID:26776007

  17. Models for the red blood cell lifespan.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rajiv P; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V; Germain, Michael J; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95 % confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17-121.66), 116.71 (110.81-122.51), and 116.79 (111.23-122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82-28.81), 24.30 (20.53-28.33), and 24.19 (20.43-27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02-158.36), 159.51 (155.09-164.00), and 160.40 (156.00-165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18-62.85), 60.82 (58.77-63.33), and 57.26 (54.33-60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96-60.90), 58.36 (55.45-61.26), and 58.40 (55.62-61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters. PMID:27039311

  18. Formation of dimethylthioarsenicals in red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Kazuo T.

    2008-03-15

    The bladder and skin are the primary targets for arsenic-induced carcinogenicity in mammals. Thioarsenicals dimethylmonothioarsinic (DMMTA{sup V}) and dimethyldithioarsinic (DMDTA{sup V}) acids are common urinary metabolites, the former being much more toxic than non-thiolated dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) and comparable to dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in epidermoid cells, suggesting that the metabolic production of thioarsenicals may be a risk factor for the development of cancer in these organs. To reveal their production sites (tissues/body fluids), we examined the uptake and transformation of the four dimethylated arsenicals by incubation with rat and human red blood cells (RBCs). Although DMA{sup V} and DMDTA{sup V} were not taken up by either type of RBCs, DMA{sup III} and DMMTA{sup V} were taken up by both (more efficiently by rat ones), though DMMTA{sup V} was taken up slowly, and then the arsenic transformed into DMDTA{sup V} was excreted from both types of animal RBCs. On the other hand, although DMA{sup III} taken up rapidly by rat RBCs was retained in the RBCs, that taken up by human RBCs was immediately transformed into DMMTA{sup V} and then excreted into the incubation medium without being retained in the RBCs. In a separate experiment, arsenic remaining in primary rat hepatocytes after incubation with 1.5 {mu}M DMA{sup III} was recovered from the incubation medium in the forms of DMA{sup V} and DMMTA{sup V} in the presence of human RBCs, but not in the presence of rat RBCs (in which the arsenic was bound to hemoglobin). Thus, DMMTA{sup V} was detected in the medium only in the presence of human RBCs and increased with incubation time. It was proposed that arsenic is excreted from hepatocytes into the bloodstream in the form of DMA{sup III} and then taken up by RBCs in humans, where it is transformed into DMMTA{sup V} and then excreted again into the bloodstream.

  19. Bright and stable near infra-red fluorescent protein for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Filonov, Grigory S.; Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Ting, Li-Min; Zhang, Jinghang; Kim, Kami; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of non-invasive monitoring of deep-tissue developmental, metabolic, and pathogenic processes will advance modern biotechnology. Imaging of live mammals using fluorescent probes is more feasible within a “near-infrared optical window” (NIRW)1. Here we report a phytochrome-based near infra-red fluorescent protein (iRFP) with the excitation/emission maxima at 690/713 nm. Bright fluorescence in a living mouse proved iRFP to be a superior probe for non-invasive imaging of internal mammalian tissues. Its high intracellular stability, low cytotoxicity, and lack of the requirement to add external biliverdin-chromophore makes iRFP as easy to use as conventional GFP-like proteins. Compared to earlier phytochrome-derived fluorescent probes, the iRFP protein has better in vitro characteristics and performs well in cells and in vivo, having greater effective brightness and photostability. Compared to the far-red GFP-like proteins, iRFP has substantially higher signal to background ratio in a mouse model owing to its infra-red shifted spectra. PMID:21765402

  20. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient’s health. In this work, we have simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns of the cell. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry that imaged the cells in a linear flow without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to confocal images of the cells, this method could be used for measuring cell morphology in three dimensions and for studying their physiology. PMID:26600999

  1. Enhancement of red blood cell aggregation by plasma triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Cicha, I; Suzuki, Y; Tateishi, N; Maeda, N

    2001-01-01

    The effects of plasma triglycerides level on human red blood cells (RBCs) indices, hematological parameters, RBCs aggregation velocity and whole blood viscosity were studied at 2 hours after high-fat or low-fat meal. Proteins, triglycerides and cholesterol levels of plasma were analysed. The RBCs rouleaux formation rate was measured in 70% autologous plasma (with 30% phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) or 1 g/dl dextran T70 solution (with 4 g/dl bovine serum albumin) in PBS, using a low-shear rheoscope. The results were grouped according to triglycerides content in plasma. No significant difference in whole blood viscosity, hematological parameters, RBC indices, protein and cholesterol content was observed between high-fat and low-fat blood samples. There was a significant increase in rouleaux formation rate of samples with high triglyceride levels, when measured in 70% autologous plasma, but it was not significant in dextran T70 containing medium. In conclusion, the results obtained suggest that alteration of plasma lipid levels as well as possible changes in the cell membrane lipid composition lead to enhanced RBC aggregation. PMID:11564913

  2. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). PMID:27282583

  3. Method for determining properties of red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for quantifying the concentration of hemoglobin in a cell, and indicia of anemia, comprises determining the wavelength of the longitudinal mode of a liquid in a laser microcavity; determining the wavelength of the fundamental transverse mode of a red blood cell in the liquid in the laser microcavity; and determining if the cell is anemic from the difference between the wavelength of the longitudinal mode and the fundamental transverse mode. In addition to measuring hemoglobin, the invention includes a method using intracavity laser spectroscopy to measure the change in spectra as a function of time for measuring the influx of water into a red blood cell and the cell's subsequent rupture.

  4. The Effect of Shape Memory on Red Blood Cell Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiting; Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2013-11-01

    An elastic spring model is applied to study the effect of the shape memory on the motion of red blood cell in flows. In shear flow, shape memory also plays an important role to obtain all three motions: tumbling, swinging, and tank-treading. In Poiseuille flow, cell has an equilibrium shape as a slipper or parachute depending on capillary number. To ensure the tank-treading motion while in slippery shape, a modified model is proposed by introducing a shape memory coefficient which describes the degree of shape memory in cells. The effect of the coefficient on the cell motion of red blood cell will be presented.

  5. Membranotropic photobiomodulation on red blood cell deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gang-Yue; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Song-Hao

    2007-05-01

    To assess modulation of laser on erythrocyte permeability and deformability via cell morphology changes, healthy human echinocytes with shrinking size and high plasmic viscosity due to cellular dehydration were treated with 1 mW, 2 mW, 3 mW, and 5 mW laser power exposure respectively. Image analyzing system on single intact erythrocyte was applied for measuring comprehensive cell morphological parameters (surface area, external membrane perimeter, circle index and elongation index) that were determined by the modulation of erythrocyte water permeability and deformability to detect relationship between erythrocyte water permeability alteration and deformability. Our preliminary experiment showed that exposure under light dose of 5 mW for 5 min could induce more active erythrocyte swelling and deformation. water channel aquaporin-1(AQP-1) was inhibited by the incubation of HgCl II in the presence and absence of 5 mW laser irradiation. The result suggested that osmotic water permeability is a primary factor in the procedure of erythrocyte deformability. In addition, no modulation of laser(5mW) on erythrocyte deformability had been found when the echinocytes were cultured with GDP-β-S (G protein inhibitor).

  6. Chloride transport in human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dalmark, M

    1975-01-01

    1. The chloride equilibrium flux (chloride self-exchange) was determined by measuring the rate of 36Cl efflux from radioactively labelled human red cells. The cellular chloride concentration was varied between 5 and 700 mM by the nystatin technique (Cass & Dalmark, 1973). The chloride transport capacity was not affected by the nystatin technique. 2. The chloride equilibrium flux showed saturation kinetics in the pH range between 6-2 and 9-2 (0 degrees C). The chloride transport decreased at chloride concentrations higher than those which gave the maximum transport. 3. The apparent half-saturation constant, (K1/2), depended on the pH and whether the chloride transport was perceived as a function of the chloride concentration in the medium or in the cell water. The (K1/2)m increased and the (K1/2)c decreased with increasing pH. The dependence of the chloride transport on the chloride concentration was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics at pH 7-2, but at values of pH outside pH 7-8 S-shaped or steeper graphs were observed. 4. The chloride equilibrium flux varied with the pH at constant chloride concentration in the medium (pH 5-7-9-5). The transport had a bell-shaped pH dependence at chloride concentrations below 200 mM. At chloride concentrations between 300 and 600 mM the chloride transport increased with increasing pH to reach a plateau around pH 8. The position of the acidic branches of the pH graphs was independent of the chloride concentration (25-600 mM), but the position of the alkaline branches moved towards higher values of pH with increasing chloride concentration (5-150 mM). Thus, the position of the pH optimum increased with increasing chloride concentration. The chloride transport at low pH values was a function of the inverse second power of the hydrogen ion concentration. The pK of the groups which caused the inhibition was approximately 6 and independent of the temperature (0-18 degrees C). 5. The chloride equilibrium flux as a function of

  7. In vivo red blood cell compatibility testing using indium-113m tropolone-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, G.J.; Gravelle, D.; Dietz, G.; Driedger, A.A.; King, M.; Cradduck, T.D.

    1988-05-01

    In vivo radionuclide crossmatch is a method for identifying compatible blood for transfusion when allo- or autoantibodies preclude the use of conventional crossmatching techniques. A technique for labeling small volumes of donor red blood cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is reported. The use of /sup 113m/In minimizes the accumulation of background radioactivity and the radiation dose especially so when multiple crossmatches are performed. Labeling red cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is faster and easier to perform than with other radionuclides. Consistently high labeling efficiencies are obtained and minimal /sup 113m/In activity elutes from the labeled red blood cells. A case study involving 22 crossmatches is presented to demonstrate the technique. The radiation dose equivalent from /sup 113m/In is significantly less than with other radionuclides that may be used to label red cells.

  8. Separation of a single cell by red-laser manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikano, Shuji; Horio, Koji; Ohtsuka, Yoshihiro; Eto, Yuzuro

    1999-10-01

    A single cell of yeast was separated from a bulk sample of yeast without causing damage to the cell. A focused red-laser light beam was used for trapping and transporting the cell. A specially designed microchannel separator played an essential role in the success of the separation.

  9. Acetylcholinesterase: an enzymatic marker of human red blood cell aging.

    PubMed

    Prall, Y G; Gambhir, K K; Ampy, F R

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether acetylcholinesterase (AChE) can be used as a marker of cell aging in human red blood cells (RBCs). This study used consented subjects; both males and females in an age range of 21-42 years. The blood samples (8-9 mL) were drawn in tubes containing sodium heparin or EDTA as anticoagulants. To avoid contamination with other cells, (lymphocytes, monocytes and reticulocytes), RBCs were purified (PRBC) by Hypaque-Ficoll gradient technique. The PRBCs were subfractionated into young (y) (1.08-1.09), mid (m) (1.09-1.11) and old (o) (1.11-1.12) percoll density (g/mL) fractions using a discontinuous percoll gradient. The mean +/- 1 SD AChE per gram hemoglobin (U/g Hgb) activities in whole blood (WB) purified human red blood cells (PRBCs), young human red blood cells (y-RBCs), mid age human red blood cells (m-RBCs) and old human red blood cells (o-RBCs) were 27.4 +/- 2.98, 26.0 +/- 2.33, 25.5 +/- 1.64, 20.3 +/- 3.84, 14.6 +/- 3.42 in males and 26.3 +/- 4.44, 24.8 /- 4.83, 26.4 +/- 4.59, 24.0 +/- 5.50 and 12.4 +/- 7.09 in females respectively. Although there was variation in the data, the results indicated that old human red blood cells showed significantly (p<.05) lower AChE activity compared to young human red blood cells of both sexes. These preliminary but novel observations suggest that AChE can be an excellent enzymatic marker for RBC aging in man. PMID:9698047

  10. Intracellular energetic units in red muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Saks, V A; Kaambre, T; Sikk, P; Eimre, M; Orlova, E; Paju, K; Piirsoo, A; Appaix, F; Kay, L; Regitz-Zagrosek, V; Fleck, E; Seppet, E

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of regulation of mitochondrial respiration by endogenous and exogenous ADP in muscle cells in situ was studied in skinned cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres. Endogenous ADP production was initiated by addition of MgATP; under these conditions the respiration rate and ADP concentration in the medium were dependent on the calcium concentration, and 70-80% of maximal rate of respiration was achieved at ADP concentration below 20 microM in the medium. In contrast, when exogenous ADP was added, maximal respiration rate was observed only at millimolar concentrations. An exogenous ADP-consuming system consisting of pyruvate kinase (PK; 20-40 units/ml) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP; 5 mM), totally suppressed respiration activated by exogenous ADP, but the respiration maintained by endogenous ADP was not suppressed by more than 20-40%. Creatine (20 mM) further activated respiration in the presence of ATP and PK+PEP. Short treatment with trypsin (50-500 nM for 5 min) decreased the apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP from 300-350 microM to 50-60 microM, increased inhibition of respiration by PK+PEP system up to 70-80%, with no changes in MgATPase activity and maximal respiration rates. Electron-microscopic observations showed detachment of mitochondria and disordering of the regular structure of the sarcomere after trypsin treatment. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed a group of at least seven low-molecular-mass proteins in cardiac skinned fibres which were very sensitive to trypsin and not present in glycolytic fibres, which have low apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP. It is concluded that, in oxidative muscle cells, mitochondria are incorporated into functional complexes ('intracellular energetic units') with adjacent ADP-producing systems in myofibrils and in sarcoplasmic reticulum, probably due to specific interaction with cytoskeletal elements responsible for mitochondrial distribution in the cell. It is suggested that these complexes represent the basic

  11. Non-invasive intravital imaging of cellular differentiation with a bright red-excitable fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jun; Haynes, Russell D; Corbel, Stéphane Y; Li, Pengpeng; González-González, Emilio; Burg, John S; Ataie, Niloufar J; Lam, Amy J; Cranfill, Paula J; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Ng, Ho-Leung; Garcia, K Christopher; Contag, Christopher H; Shen, Kang; Blau, Helen M; Lin, Michael Z

    2014-01-01

    A method for non-invasive visualization of genetically labelled cells in animal disease models with micron-level resolution would greatly facilitate development of cell-based therapies. Imaging of fluorescent proteins (FPs) using red excitation light in the “optical window” above 600 nm is one potential method for visualizing implanted cells. However, previous efforts to engineer FPs with peak excitation beyond 600 nm have resulted in undesirable reductions in brightness. Here we report three new red-excitable monomeric FPs obtained by structure-guided mutagenesis of mNeptune, previously the brightest monomeric FP when excited beyond 600 nm. Two of these, mNeptune2 and mNeptune2.5, demonstrate improved maturation and brighter fluorescence, while the third, mCardinal, has a red-shifted excitation spectrum without reduction in brightness. We show that mCardinal can be used to non-invasively and longitudinally visualize the differentiation of myoblasts and stem cells into myocytes in living mice with high anatomical detail. PMID:24633408

  12. Transplantation of Adrenal Cortical Progenitor Cells Enriched by Nile Red

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, James C.Y.; Chu, Yinting; Qin, Harry H.; Zupekan, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    Background The adrenal cortex may contain progenitor cells useful for tissue regeneration. Currently there are no established methods to isolate these cells. Material and Methods Murine adrenal cells were sorted into a Nile-Red-bright (NRbright) and a Nile-Red-dim (NRdim) population of cells according to their degree of cholesterol content revealed by Nile Red fluorescence. The cells were transplanted under the renal capsule to determine their ability for regeneration. Results The NRbright cells contained an abundance of lipid droplets, whereas the NRdim cells contained little. The NRbright cells expressed Sf1 and the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes including Cyp11a1, Cyp11b1, and Cyp11b2, whereas the NRdim cells expressed Sf1 but not the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes. After 56 days of implantation in unilateral adrenalectomized mice, the NRdim cells expressed Sf1 and the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes, whereas the NRbright cells ceased to express Sf1 as well as the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes. NRdim cells also proliferated in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor. Conclusions The population of NRdim cells contained adrenal cortical progenitor cells that can proliferate and give rise to differentiated daughter cells. These cells may be useful for adrenal cortical regeneration. PMID:19592014

  13. Theory of the sphering of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Fung, Y C; Tong, P

    1968-02-01

    A rigorous mathematical solution of the sphering of a red blood cell is obtained under the assumptions that the red cells is a fluid-filled shell and that it can swell into a perfect sphere in an appropriate hypotonic medium. The solution is valid for finite strain of the cell membrane provided that the membrane is isotropic, elastic and incompressible. The most general nonlinear elastic stress-strain law for the membrane in a state of generalized plane stress is used. A necessary condition for a red cell to be able to sphere is that its extensional stiffness follow a specific distribution over the membrane. This distribution is strongly influenced by the surface tension in the cell membrane. A unique relation exists between the extensional stiffness, pressure differential, surface tension, and the ratio of the radius of the sphere to that of the undeformed red cell. The functional dependence of this stiffness distribution on various physical parameters is presented. A critique of some current literature on red cell mechanics is presented. PMID:5639934

  14. Microfluidics-Based Selection of Red-Fluorescent Proteins with Decreased Rates of Photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M.; Lubbeck, Jennifer L.; Davis, Lloyd M.; Regmi, Chola K.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.; Jimenez, Ralph; Palmer, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins offer exceptional labeling specificity in living cells and organisms. Unfortunately, their photophysical properties remain far from ideal for long-term imaging of low-abundance cellular constituents, in large part because of their poor photostability. Despite widespread engineering efforts, improving the photostability of fluorescent proteins remains challenging due to lack of appropriate high-throughput selection methods. Here, we use molecular dynamics guided mutagenesis in conjunction with a recently developed microfluidic-based platform, which sorts cells based on their fluorescence photostability, to identify red fluorescent proteins with decreased photobleaching from a HeLa cell-based library. The identified mutant, named Kriek, has 2.5- and 4-fold higher photostability than its progenitor, mCherry, under widefield and confocal illumination, respectively. Furthermore, the results provide insight into mechanisms for enhancing photostability and their connections with other photophysical processes, thereby providing direction for ongoing development of fluorescent proteins with improved single-molecule and low-copy imaging capabilities. Insight, innovation, integration Fluorescent proteins enable imaging in situ, throughout the visible spectrum, with superb molecular specificity and single-molecule sensitivity. Unfortunately, when compared to leading small-molecule fluorophores (e.g., Cy3), fluorescent proteins, suffer from accelerated photobleaching and poor integrated photon output. This results from a lack of appropriate high-throughput methods for improving the photostability of fluorescent proteins, as well as a poor molecular understanding of fluorescent protein photobleaching. Here, we report the first application of a recently developed microfluidic cell-sorter to identify fluorescent proteins from a mCherry-derived library with improved photostability. The results provide insight into fluorescent protein photophysics, greatly

  15. Radiolabeled red blood cells: status, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclidic labels for red cells can be divided into two main categories - cohort or pulse labels, and random labels. The random labels are incorporated into circulating cells of all ages and the labeling process is usually carried out in vitro. The red cell labels in predominant use involve random labeling and employ technetium-99m, chromium-51, indium-111, and gallium-68, roughly in that order. The extent of usefulness depends on the properties of the label such as the half-life, decay mode, and in-vivo stability, etc. Labeled cells can be used for red cell survival measurements when the half-life of the radionuclide is sufficiently long. The major portion of this article deals with random labels.

  16. Red fluorescent proteins for imaging Zymoseptoria tritici during invasion of wheat.

    PubMed

    Schuster, M; Kilaru, S; Guo, M; Sommerauer, M; Lin, C; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    The use of fluorescent proteins (FPs) in plant pathogenic fungi provides valuable insight into their intracellular dynamics, cell organization and invasion mechanisms. Compared with green-fluorescent proteins, their red-fluorescent "cousins" show generally lower fluorescent signal intensity and increased photo-bleaching. However, the combined usage of red and green fluorescent proteins allows powerful insight in co-localization studies. Efficient signal detection requires a bright red-fluorescent protein (RFP), combined with a suitable corresponding filter set. We provide a set of four vectors, suitable for yeast recombination-based cloning that carries mRFP, TagRFP, mCherry and tdTomato. These vectors confer carboxin resistance after targeted single-copy integration into the sdi1 locus of Zymoseptoria tritici. Expression of the RFPs does not affect virulence of this wheat pathogen. We tested all four RFPs in combination with four epi-fluorescence filter sets and in confocal laser scanning microscopy, both in and ex planta. Our data reveal that mCherry is the RFP of choice for investigation in Z. tritici, showing highest signal intensity in epi-fluorescence, when used with a Cy3 filter set, and laser scanning confocal microscopy. However, mCherry bleached significantly faster than mRFP, which favors this red tag in long-term observation experiments. Finally, we used dual-color imaging of eGFP and mCherry expressing wild-type strains in planta and show that pycnidia are formed by single strains. This demonstrates the strength of this method in tracking the course of Z. tritici infection in wheat. PMID:26092800

  17. Single-cell proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.

    1983-02-11

    Both photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic microorganisms, grown on various carbon and energy sources, are used in fermentation processes for the production of single-cell proteins. Commercial-scale production has been limited to two algal processes, one bacterial process, and several yeast and fungal processes. High capital and operating costs and the need for extensive nutritional and toxicological assessments have limited the development and commercialization of new processes. Any increase in commercial-scale production appears to be limited to those regions of the world where low-cost carbon and energy sources are available and conventional animal feedstuff proteins, such as soybean meal or fish meal, are in short supply. (Refs. 59).

  18. Red Blood Cell Docosapentaenoic Acid (DPA n-3) is Inversely Associated with Triglycerides and C-reactive Protein (CRP) in Healthy Adults and Dose-Dependently Increases Following n-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Skulas-Ray, Ann C.; Flock, Michael R.; Richter, Chesney K.; Harris, William S.; West, Sheila G.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the long-chain omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in lipid metabolism and inflammation has been extensively studied; however, little is known about the relationship between docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 n-3) and inflammation and triglycerides (TG). We evaluated whether n-3 DPA content of red blood cells (RBC) was associated with markers of inflammation (interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and C-reactive protein (CRP) and fasting TG prior to n-3 supplementation in two studies (Study 1: n = 115, aged 20–44 years, body mass index (BMI) 20–30 kg/m2, TG = 34–176 mg/dL; Study 2: n = 28, aged 22–65 years, BMI 24–37 kg/m2, TG = 141–339 mg/dL). We also characterized the dose-response effects of n-3 fatty acid supplementation on RBC n-3 DPA after five months of supplementation with fish oil (Study 1: 0, 300, 600, 900, and 1800 mg/day EPA + DHA) and eight weeks of prescription n-3 ethyl esters (Study 2: 0, 850, and 3400 mg/day EPA + DHA). In Study 1, RBC n-3 DPA was inversely correlated with CRP (R2 = 36%, p < 0.001) and with fasting TG (r = −0.30, p = 0.001). The latter finding was replicated in Study 2 (r = −0.33, p = 0.04). In both studies, n-3 supplementation significantly increased RBC n-3 DPA dose-dependently. Relative increases were greater for Study 1, with increases of 29%–61% vs. 14%–26% for Study 2. The associations between RBC n-3 DPA, CRP, and fasting TG may have important implications for the prevention of atherosclerosis and chronic inflammatory diseases and warrant further study. PMID:26247967

  19. Pure Red Cell Aplasia Following Interleukin-2 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dutcher, Janice P.; Fan, Wen; Wiernik, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman with metastatic renal cell carcinoma underwent systemic treatment with high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). Anemia requiring transfusion of 1 unit of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) was required during the second week of IL-2 therapy. One month following completion of high-dose IL-2 treatment, she was hospitalized for severe, symptomatic anemia and received 5 units of PRBCs. She was referred back for evaluation. A complete hematologic evaluation was performed including antiviral serology, evaluation for hemolysis, complete iron studies, and finally bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. The diagnosis was pure red cell aplasia, and no inciting viral cause could be ascertained. She required PRBCs for 5 months following IL-2 therapy. It was concluded that IL-2 was the cause of her red cell aplasia. This subsequently resolved spontaneously, and she had normal hemoglobin and hematocrit, respectively, 1 and 2 years after treatment. PMID:27144182

  20. A statistical model for red blood cell survival.

    PubMed

    Korell, Julia; Coulter, Carolyn V; Duffull, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model for the survival time of red blood cells (RBCs) with a continuous distribution of cell lifespans is presented. The underlying distribution of RBC lifespans is derived from a probability density function with a bathtub-shaped hazard curve, and accounts for death of RBCs due to senescence (age-dependent increasing hazard rate) and random destruction (constant hazard), as well as for death due to initial or delayed failures and neocytolysis (equivalent to early red cell mortality). The model yields survival times similar to those of previously published studies of RBC survival and is easily amenable to inclusion of drug effects and haemolytic disorders. PMID:20950630

  1. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Yunus; Kim, Ceonne; Adhikari, Anima; Gray, Kayla E; Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Little, Jane A; Gurkan, Umut A

    2016-07-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  2. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  3. Effect of Hydroperoxides on Red Blood Cell Membrane Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hale, John P.; Winlove, C. Peter; Petrov, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of oxidative stress on red blood cell membrane mechanical properties in vitro using detailed analysis of the membrane thermal fluctuation spectrum. Two different oxidants, the cytosol-soluble hydrogen peroxide and the membrane-soluble cumene hydroperoxide, are used, and their effects on the membrane bending elastic modulus, surface tension, strength of confinement due to the membrane skeleton, and 2D shear elastic modulus are measured. We find that both oxidants alter significantly the membrane elastic properties, but their effects differ qualitatively and quantitatively. While hydrogen peroxide mainly affects the elasticity of the membrane protein skeleton (increasing the membrane shear modulus), cumene hydroperoxide has an impact on both membrane skeleton and lipid bilayer mechanical properties, as can be seen from the increased values of the shear and bending elastic moduli. The biologically important implication of these results is that the effects of oxidative stress on the biophysical properties, and hence the physiological functions, of the cell membrane depend on the nature of the oxidative agent. Thermal fluctuation spectroscopy provides a means of characterizing these different effects, potentially in a clinical milieu. PMID:22004746

  4. Reduction of prion infectivity in packed red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Rodrigo; Buytaert-Hoefen, Kimberley A.; Gonzalez-Romero, Dennisse; Castilla, Joaquin; Hansen, Eric T.; Hlavinka, Dennis; Goodrich, Raymond P.; Soto, Claudio

    2008-12-12

    The link between a new variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the consumption of prion contaminated cattle meat as well as recent findings showing that vCJD can be transmitted by blood transfusion have raised public health concerns. Currently, a reliable test to identify prions in blood samples is not available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to remove scrapie prion protein (PrP{sup Sc}) and infectivity from red blood cell (RBC) suspensions by a simple washing procedure using a cell separation and washing device. The extent of prion removal was assessed by Western blot, PMCA and infectivity bioassays. Our results revealed a substantial removal of infectious prions ({>=}3 logs of infectivity) by all techniques used. These data suggest that a significant amount of infectivity present in RBC preparations can be removed by a simple washing procedure. This technology may lead to increased safety of blood products and reduce the risk of further propagation of prion diseases.

  5. A far-red fluorescent protein evolved from a cyanobacterial phycobiliprotein.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Erik A; Tran, Geraldine N; Gross, Larry A; Crisp, Jessica L; Shu, Xiaokun; Lin, John Y; Tsien, Roger Y

    2016-09-01

    Far-red fluorescent proteins (FPs) are desirable for in vivo imaging because with these molecules less light is scattered, absorbed, or re-emitted by endogenous biomolecules compared with cyan, green, yellow, and orange FPs. We developed a new class of FP from an allophycocyanin α-subunit (APCα). Native APC requires a lyase to incorporate phycocyanobilin. The evolved FP, which we named small ultra-red FP (smURFP), covalently attaches a biliverdin (BV) chromophore without a lyase, and has 642/670-nm excitation-emission peaks, a large extinction coefficient (180,000 M(-1)cm(-1)) and quantum yield (18%), and photostability comparable to that of eGFP. smURFP has significantly greater BV incorporation rate and protein stability than the bacteriophytochrome (BPH) FPs. Moreover, BV supply is limited by membrane permeability, and smURFPs (but not BPH FPs) can incorporate a more membrane-permeant BV analog, making smURFP fluorescence comparable to that of FPs from jellyfish or coral. A far-red and near-infrared fluorescent cell cycle indicator was created with smURFP and a BPH FP. PMID:27479328

  6. Metabolic imaging of the tumor treated by KillerRed fluorescent protein-based photodynamic therapy in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Qin, Lingsong; Wang, Anle; Liu, Zheng; Yang, Fei; Jin, Honglin; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-02-01

    KillerRed is a unique red fluorescent protein exhibiting excellent phototoxic properties. It has the ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), for killing tumor cells in vitro upon laser irradiation and has the potential to act as a photosensitizer in the application of tumor therapy. Here, we investigated the effects of KillerRed-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) on tumor growth in vivo and examined the subsequent tumor metabolic states including the changes of pyridine nucleotide (PN) and flavoprotein (Fp), two important metabolic coenzymes of tumor cells. Results showed that the tumor was scabbed in response to 561 nm laser irradiation at 80 mV for 3 min, and the tumor growth had been significantly inhibited by KillerRed-based PDT treatment compared to control groups. More importantly, a home-made cryo-imaging redox scanner was used to measure intrinsic fluorescence and exogenous KillerRed fluorescence signals in tumors. The flavoprotein was remarkable elevated and the PN was seldom increased with concomitant photobleaching of KillerRed fluorescence after irradiation, suggesting that flavoprotein and PN were oxidized in the course of KillerRed-based PDT.

  7. In vivo red cell destruction by anti-Lu6

    SciTech Connect

    Issitt, P.D.; Valinsky, J.E.; Marsh, W.L.; DiNapoli, J.; Gutgsell, N.S. )

    1990-03-01

    An example is presented of an IgG1, anti-Lu6, that reacted by indirect antiglobulin test and was capable of destroying antigen-positive red cells in vivo. Two methods for the measurement of red cell survival, {sup 51}Cr labeling and flow cytometry, gave the same result: 20 percent of the test dose of Lu:6 red cells was destroyed in the first hour after injection and 80 percent in the first 24 hours. The clinical relevance of the antibody was correctly predicted by an in vitro monocyte monolayer assay. The finding that this example of anti-Lu6 was clinically significant should not be taken to mean that all antibodies directed against high-incidence Lutheran and Lutheran system-related antigens will behave similarly. When such antibodies are encountered, in vivo and/or in vitro studies to assess their clinical significance are necessary before rare blood is used for transfusion.

  8. Molecular Maps of Red Cell Deformation: Hidden Elasticity and in Situ Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, D. E.; Mohandas, N.; Evans, E. A.

    1994-11-01

    Fluorescence-imaged micropipette aspiration was used to map redistribution of the proteins and lipids in highly extended human red blood cell membranes. Whereas the fluid bilayer distributed uniformly (±10 percent), the underlying, solidlike cytoskeleton of spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1 exhibited a steep gradient in density along the aspirated projection, which was reversible on release from deformation. Quantitation of the cytoskeletal protein density gradients showed that skeletal elasticity is well represented by a grafted polymer network with a ratio of surface dilation modulus to shear modulus of approximately 2:1. Fractionally mobile integral proteins, such as band 3, and highly mobile receptors, such as CD59 as well as glycophorin C in protein 4.1-deficient cells, appeared to be squeezed out of areas dense in the underlying network and enriched in areas of network dilation. This complementary segregation demonstrates patterning of cell surface components by cytoskeletal dilation.

  9. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353

  10. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353

  11. Dual network model for red blood cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boal, David H.; Seifert, Udo; Zilker, Andreas

    1992-12-01

    A two-component network is studied by Monte Carlo simulation to model the lipid/spectrin membrane of red blood cells. The model predicts that the shear modulus decreases rapidly with the maximum length of the model spectrin and should be in the 10-7 J/m2 range for human red blood cells. A simplified model for the isolated spectrin network shows a negative Lamé coefficient λ. Transverse fluctuations of the dual membrane are found to be fluidlike over the range of wavelengths investigated.

  12. Photoacoustic response of suspended and hemolyzed red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ratan K.; Karmakar, Subhajit; Roy, Madhusudan

    2013-07-01

    The effect of confinement of hemoglobin molecules on photoacoustic (PA) signal is studied experimentally. The PA amplitudes for samples with suspended red blood cells (SRBCs) and hemolyzed red blood cells (HRBCs) were found to be comparable at each hematocrit for 532 nm illumination. The difference between the corresponding amplitudes increased with increasing hematocrit for 1064 nm irradiation. For example, the PA amplitude for the SRBCs was about 260% higher than that of the HRBCs at 40% hematocrit. This observation may help to develop a PA method detecting hemolysis noninvasively.

  13. Evaluation of the red cell storage lesion after irradiation in filtered packed red cell units

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyer, C.D.; Tiegerman, K.O.; Berkman, E.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Packed red cell units (n = 10) were filtered and divided equally. One-half unit from each donor was irradiated (x) (3500 cGy). On Days 0, 14, 28, and 42, ATP, K+, Na+, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), plasma-free hemoglobin (PFH), and pH were determined. The reduction in ATP was greater in the irradiated than the nonirradiated (y) units by Day 42 (mean x-y: -70, p = 0.0005). The increase in K+ was greater in the irradiated than nonirradiated units on Days 14, 28, and 42 (mean x-y: 17-20, p = 0.0001). Decrease in pH and increases in LDH and PFH were significant (p less than 0.05) on Day 42 only. K+ increases added only 1.7 to 2.0 mmol per unit, a difference felt to be clinically insignificant. The changes noted in ATP, pH, LDH, and PFH are significant but minimal on Day 42 and imply that viability changes would also be minimal. These biochemical data support the storage of irradiated units for at least 28 days.

  14. Red Raspberry Phenols Inhibit Angiogenesis: A Morphological and Subcellular Analysis Upon Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M; Machado, V; Costa, R; Figueira, M E; Sepodes, B; Barata, P; Ribeiro, L; Soares, R

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenols are a class of natural compounds whose potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenesis has been reported in many pathological conditions. Red raspberry extract, rich in polyphenols, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects and prevent cell proliferation in distinct animal models. However, the signaling pathways involved remain unknown. Herein, we used human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) to determine the influence of red raspberry phenolic compound extract concentrations, ranging from 10 to 250 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL, on endothelium viability (MTS assay), proliferation (BrdU incorporation), migration (injury assay), and capillary-like structures formation (Matrigel assay). Protein expression in cell lysates was determined by Western blot analysis. We showed that red raspberry extracts reduced cell viability (GI50  = 87,64 ± 6,59 μg GAE/mL) and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant abrogation of cells ability to migrate to injured areas, even at low concentrations, was observed by injury assay. Cell assembly into capillary-like structures on Matrigel also decreased in a dose dependent-manner for higher extract concentrations, as well as the number of branching points per unit of area. Protein expression analysis showed a dose-dependent decrease in Phospho-VEGFR2 expression, implying abrogation of VEGF signaling activity. We also showed for the first time that red raspberry phenolic compounds induce the rearrangement of filamentous actin cytoskeleton, with an isotropy increase found for higher testing concentrations. Taken together, our findings corroborate the anti-angiogenic potential of red raspberry phenolic compounds and provide new insights into their mode of action upon endothelium. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1604-1612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26590362

  15. Red Blood Cell Dysfunction Induced by High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Dusten; Srinivasan, Ramprasad; Benson, Tyler; Haigh, Stephen; Coyle, Danielle; Batra, Neil; Keil, Ryan; Sturm, Robert; Blanco, Victor; Palascak, Mary; Franco, Robert S.; Tong, Wilson; Chatterjee, Tapan; Hui, David Y.; Davidson, W. Sean; Aronow, Bruce J.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Manka, David; Peairs, Abigail; Blomkalns, Andra; Fulton, David J.; Brittain, Julia E.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-fat diet (HFD) promotes endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory monocyte activation, which contribute to atherosclerosis in obesity. We investigated whether HFD also induces the dysfunction of red blood cells (RBCs), which serve as a reservoir for chemokines via binding to Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC). Methods and Results A 60% HFD for 12 weeks, which produced only minor changes in lipid profile in C57/BL6 mice, markedly augmented the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 bound to RBCs, which in turn stimulated macrophage migration through an endothelial monolayer. Levels of RBC-bound KC were also increased by HFD. These effects of HFD were abolished in DARC−/− mice. In RBCs from HFD-fed wild-type and DARC−/− mice, levels of membrane cholesterol and phosphatidylserine externalization were increased, fostering RBC-macrophage inflammatory interactions and promoting macrophage phagocytosis in vitro. When labeled ex vivo and injected into wild-type mice, RBCs from HFD-fed mice exhibited ≈3-fold increase in splenic uptake. Finally, RBCs from HFD-fed mice induced increased macrophage adhesion to the endothelium when they were incubated with isolated aortic segments, indicating endothelial activation. Conclusions RBC dysfunction, analogous to endothelial dysfunction, occurs early during diet-induced obesity and may serve as a mediator of atherosclerosis. These findings may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity, a worldwide epidemic. PMID:26467254

  16. Interactions between earthworm hemolysins and sheep red blood cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Roch, P; Canicatti, C; Valembois, P

    1989-08-01

    The hemolytic activity exhibited by the coelomic fluid of the Annelid Eisenia fetida andrei is mediated by two lipoproteins of mass 40 and 45 kDa, each of them capable of hemolysis. Such an activity is not inhibited by zymosan, inulin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), nor by hydrazine or methylamine, suggesting that earthworm hemolysins are not related to C3 or C3b complement components. Among the membrane lipids tested (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, sphingomyelin and cholesterol) only sphingomyelin inhibited hemolysis. The analysis of E.f. andrei proteins bound to sphingomyelin microvesicles, as well as to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) membranes, revealed a polymerization of E.f. andrei 40 kDa and/or 45 kDa hemolysins. Consequently, sphingomyelin appears a likely candidate for hemolytic complex receptor. Electron microscopy observations suggested that the polymerization causes an open channel through the lipid bilayer. As demonstrated using metal ions, heparin, chondroitin sulfate, poly(L-lysine) and protamine chloride, the mode of action of earthworm hemolytic complex is not analogous to that of C9 or perforine. PMID:2758056

  17. Fermented red ginseng extract inhibits cancer cell proliferation and viability.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jisun; Jeon, Seong Bin; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Hyeji; Kim, Ju; Kwon, Bo Ra; Yu, Kang-Yeol; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Hwang, Seung-Mi; Choi, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Yong-Seob

    2015-04-01

    Red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is the most widely recognized medicinal herb due to its remedial effects in various disorders, such as cancers, diabetes, and heart problems. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of fermented red ginseng extract (f-RGE; provided by Jeonju Biomaterials Institute, Jeonju, South Korea) in a parallel comparison with the effect of nonfermented red ginseng extract (nf-RGE; control) on several cancer cell lines--MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and reprogrammed MCF-7 cells (mimicking cancer stem cells). Cells were cultured at various concentrations of RGE (from 0.5 up to 5 mg/mL) and their viabilities and proliferative properties were examined. Our data demonstrate the following: (1) nf-RGE inhibited cell viability at ≥1 mg/mL for MCF-7 cells and ≥2 mg/mL for HepG2 cells, (2) in the presence of a carcinogenic agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), nf-RGE treatment in combination with paclitaxel synergistically decreased MCF-7 as well as HepG2 cell viability, (3) f-RGE (which contained a greater level of Rg3 content) more effectively decreased the viability of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to nf-RGE, and (4) f-RGE appeared more potent for inhibiting cancerous differentiation of reprogrammed MCF-7 cells in a synergistic fashion with paclitaxel, especially in the presence of TPA, compared to nf-RGE. These findings suggest that f-RGE treatment may be more effective for decreasing cancer cell survival by inducing apoptotic cell death and also presumably for preventing cancer stem cell differentiation compared to nf-RGE. PMID:25658580

  18. Proteins and Carbohydrates from Red Seaweeds: Evidence for Beneficial Effects on Gut Function and Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cian, Raúl E; Drago, Silvina R; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2015-08-01

    Based on their composition, marine algae, and namely red seaweeds, are good potential functional foods. Intestinal mucosal barrier function refers to the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules. Here, we will first outline the component of seaweeds and will summarize the effects of these on the regulation of mucosal barrier function. Special attention will be paid to unique components of red seaweeds: proteins and derived peptides (e.g., phycobiliproteins, glycoproteins that contain "cellulose binding domains", phycolectins and the related mycosporine-like amino acids) together with polysaccharides (e.g., floridean starch and sulfated galactans, such as carrageenans, agarans and "dl-hybrid") and minerals. These compounds have been shown to exert prebiotic effects, to regulate intestinal epithelial cell, macrophage and lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation and to modulate the immune response. Molecular mechanisms of action of peptides and polysaccharides are starting to be elucidated, and evidence indicating the involvement of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), Toll-like receptors (TLR) and signal transduction pathways mediated by protein kinase B (PKB or AKT), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) will also be summarized. The need for further research is clear, but in vivo experiments point to an overall antiinflammatory effect of these algae, indicating that they can reinforce membrane barrier function. PMID:26308006

  19. Proteins and Carbohydrates from Red Seaweeds: Evidence for Beneficial Effects on Gut Function and Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cian, Raúl E.; Drago, Silvina R.; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Based on their composition, marine algae, and namely red seaweeds, are good potential functional foods. Intestinal mucosal barrier function refers to the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules. Here, we will first outline the component of seaweeds and will summarize the effects of these on the regulation of mucosal barrier function. Special attention will be paid to unique components of red seaweeds: proteins and derived peptides (e.g., phycobiliproteins, glycoproteins that contain “cellulose binding domains”, phycolectins and the related mycosporine-like amino acids) together with polysaccharides (e.g., floridean starch and sulfated galactans, such as carrageenans, agarans and “dl-hybrid”) and minerals. These compounds have been shown to exert prebiotic effects, to regulate intestinal epithelial cell, macrophage and lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation and to modulate the immune response. Molecular mechanisms of action of peptides and polysaccharides are starting to be elucidated, and evidence indicating the involvement of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), Toll-like receptors (TLR) and signal transduction pathways mediated by protein kinase B (PKB or AKT), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) will also be summarized. The need for further research is clear, but in vivo experiments point to an overall antiinflammatory effect of these algae, indicating that they can reinforce membrane barrier function. PMID:26308006

  20. Attachment of antibody to biotinylated red blood cells: immuno-red blood cells display high affinity to immobilized antigen and normal biodistribution in rats.

    PubMed

    Muzykantov, V R; Murciano, J C

    1996-08-01

    Streptavidin-mediated attachment of biotinylated antibodies (b-Ab) to biotinylated red blood cells (b-RBC) is useful for preparation of immuno-red blood cells, a prospective vehicle for drug targeting. However, streptavidin (SA) induces lysis of extensively biotinylated RBC by complement due to cross-linking and inactivation of RBC complement regulators. To reduce cross-linking of RBC membrane proteins, we utilized mild biotinylation of RBC with 20 microM biotin ester (b20-RBC). SA effectively binds to rat b20-RBC (10(5) SA molecules/cell) and provides for following attachment of 5 x 10(4) molecules of b-IgG/SA per b20-RBC. By in vitro assay, b-Ab/SA/b20-RBC were stable in fresh rat serum. Serum-stable immuno-red blood cells (b-Ab/SA/b20-RBC) specifically bound to antigen-coated surfaces, but not to BSA-coated surfaces. Biodistribution of 51Cr-labelled b-Ab/SA/b20-RBC in rats was similar to that of control RBC, with no indication of lysis in vivo. These results suggest b-Ab/SA/b20-RBC may be explored as a vehicle for drug targeting. PMID:8756393

  1. Spatial Distributions of Red Blood Cells Significantly Alter Local Haemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Joseph M.; Holmes, David; Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Balabani, Stavroula

    2014-01-01

    Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics. PMID:24950214

  2. Further studies of sodium transport in feline red cells.

    PubMed

    Sha'afi, R I; Pascoe, E

    1973-06-01

    The transport of radioactive sodium in high sodium cat red blood cells has been studied under various experimental conditions. It was found that iodoacetate (IAA) and iodoacetamide (IAM) inhibit Na influx by 50% whereas NaF has no effect. Reversible dyes, such as methylene blue (Mb), also inhibit this influx by 60%. Both IAA and Mb effects show a lag period of about 40 min. Cell starvation abolishes the volume-dependent Na influx which is generally observed in these cells. IAA reduces significantly the volume-dependent Na influx but does not inhibit it completely. 5 mM magnesium chloride produces a twofold increase in Na influx. On the other hand, MgCl(2) has no effect on Na transport in human red cells or on potassium or sulfate transport in cat red cells. The effect of MgCl(2) is quite rapid and does not interfere with the volume-dependent Na influx. This effect is abolished in starved cells. Reincubation of previously stored cells in buffered solutions containing glucose and MgCl(2) causes more than one order of magnitude increase in Na influx. These several observations are discussed in terms of the possibility of a link between Na transport and Na-Mg-activated ATPase. PMID:4733097

  3. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  4. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window. PMID:26096663

  5. Red blood cell homeostasis: recognition of distinct types of damaged homologous red blood cells by a mouse macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Singer, J A; Morrison, M; Walker, W S

    1987-06-01

    The mouse macrophage (M phi) cell line IC-21 preferentially ingests a subpopulation of homologous red blood cells (MRBC) from normal mice. This subpopulation presumably bears the so-called transfusion lesion, a consequence of damage acquired during the drawing and processing of blood. To determine if all damaged MRBC were recognized by a common receptor site on IC-21 M phi, we prepared suspensions of MRBC damaged in vitro by treatment with tannic acid and compared the phagocytic uptake of these cells with those bearing the transfusion lesion. Trypsin treatment of IC-21 M phi rendered them unable to recognize MRBC bearing the transfusion lesion; but it had no effect on the uptake of tannic acid-damaged MRBC, showing that IC-21 M phi have separate recognition sites for these two populations of damaged MRBC. PMID:3474332

  6. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  7. Calcium movements across the membrane of human red cells

    PubMed Central

    Schatzmann, H. J.; Vincenzi, F. F.

    1969-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the cellular content and movement of Ca across the membrane of human red blood cells. 2. The [Ca] in the cellular contents of fresh red cells is 4·09 × 10-2 mM. The intracellular concentration of free ionic Ca ([Ca2+]) is considered to be less than this value and therefore less than extracellular [Ca2+] under normal conditions. 3. Observation of unidirectional Ca fluxes with 45Ca confirms previous reports of low permeability of the red cell membrane for Ca. After nearly 1 week of loading in the cold, intracellular 45Ca content is 1·8% of extracellular 45Ca content. Appearance in extracellular fluid of 45Ca from coldloaded cells can be considered to arise from two compartments. Efflux of 45Ca from the `slower compartment' is accelerated by the addition of glucose. 4. Starved red cells, incubated at 37° C, after reversible haemolysis for loading with Ca and Mg-ATP, exhibit an outward net transport of Ca against an electrochemical gradient. The transport is associated with the appearance of inorganic phosphate (Pi). Cells treated similarly, but without ATP show no transport and no appearance of Pi. 5. During the initial phase of transport, 1·3 mole Pi appear per mole Ca transported. 6. The transport of Ca from ATP-loaded cells is highly temperature-dependent, with a Q10 of 3·5. 7. Cell membrane adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of reversibly haemolysed cells is stimulated only by intracellular, and not by extracellular Ca. 8. Neither Ca transport in reversibly haemolysed cells, nor the Ca-Mg activated ATPase of isolated cell membranes is sensitive to Na, K, ouabain or oligomycin. 9. Mg is not transported under the conditions which reveal Ca transport, but Mg appears to be necessary for Ca transport. 10. Sr is transported from reversibly haemolysed Mg-ATP-loaded cells. Sr also can substitute for Ca, but not for Mg, in the activation of membrane ATPase. 11. It is concluded that, in addition to a low passive permeability, an

  8. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M

    2002-10-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood. PMID:12361780

  9. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  10. Rapid, Specific, No-wash, Far-red Fluorogen Activation in Subcellular Compartments by Targeted Fluorogen Activating Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Live cell imaging requires bright photostable dyes that can target intracellular organelles and proteins with high specificity in a no-wash protocol. Organic dyes possess the desired photochemical properties and can be covalently linked to various protein tags. The currently available fluorogenic dyes are in the green/yellow range where there is high cellular autofluorescence and the near-infrared (NIR) dyes need to be washed out. Protein-mediated activation of far-red fluorogenic dyes has the potential to address these challenges because the cell-permeant dye is small and nonfluorescent until bound to its activating protein, and this binding is rapid. In this study, three single chain variable fragment (scFv)-derived fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs), which activate far-red emitting fluorogens, were evaluated for targeting, brightness, and photostability in the cytosol, nucleus, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum with a cell-permeant malachite green analog in cultured mammalian cells. Efficient labeling was achieved within 20–30 min for each protein upon the addition of nM concentrations of dye, producing a signal that colocalized significantly with a linked mCerulean3 (mCer3) fluorescent protein and organelle specific dyes but showed divergent photostability and brightness properties dependent on the FAP. These FAPs and the ester of malachite green dye (MGe) can be used as specific, rapid, and wash-free labels for intracellular sites in live cells with far-red excitation and emission properties, useful in a variety of multicolor experiments. PMID:25650487

  11. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  12. Identification of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (mrp) related gene in red mullet (Mullus barbatus).

    PubMed

    Sauerborn, Roberta; Polancec, Darija Stupin; Zaja, Roko; Smital, Tvrtko

    2004-01-01

    Multixenobiotic resistance mechanism (MXR) in aquatic organisms is mediated by the activity of the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter that binds and actively effluxes different chemicals out of cell. In addition to the Pgp, several other, non-Pgp transport proteins have been recently identified in different human and animal tissues. Given their characteristics and tissue distribution we hypothesized that members of the so-called multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) family may be expressed in aquatic organisms. This study attempted to identify MRP related genes in different tissues of several marine and freshwater bivalves (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Dreissena polymorpha, Anodonta cygnea) and fish species (Mullus barbatus, Cyprinus carpio, Salmo trutta). Following an alignment of known MRP1 and MRP2 human sequences, as well as the GenBank available mrp2 sequences from different animals, we determined highly conserved regions and used them to design three pairs of consensus primers. Total RNA was isolated, reverse transcribed to cDNA and the obtained cDNAs were PCR amplified with the corresponding primers. The amplified PCR products were sequenced and their homology compared with Pgp and MRP protein sequences from different species. The expression of MRP related mRNA was clearly identified only in liver tissue isolated from red mullet, with homologies at the protein level ranging from 75% to 76%. Described results clearly pointed at the possibility that at least in the red mullet MXR as a general defense mechanism may be mediated by the activities of at least two different types of transport proteins. PMID:15178032

  13. Visualizing compound transgenic zebrafish in development: a tale of green fluorescent protein and KillerRed.

    PubMed

    Korzh, Vladimir; Teh, Cathleen; Kondrychyn, Igor; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Lukyanov, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    Optically translucent embryos of model vertebrates expressing transgenic fluorescent proteins provide a possibility to unravel developmental events, particularly when combined with live imaging. An introduction of transposon-mediated transgenesis resulted in generation of a number of transgenics expressing cytosolic green fluorescent protein in a tissue-specific manner. The recent generation of photodynamic and differentially tagged fluorescent proteins opened a possibility not only to mix-and-match living markers of different color, but also to employ them as powerful experimental tools for studies of cell physiology. Using this approach, transgenic lines expressing membrane-tagged KillerRed (memKR), a genetically encoded photosensitizer, with little or no inducible phototoxicity under confocal imaging were generated. Phototoxicity is only induced by intense green or white light generated by the mercury lamp in a widefield mode. Here, we discuss new ideas born from experimentation using the zebrafish Tol2 transposon-mediated enhancer trap transgenic lines expressing memKR. Because of accumulation on the cell membrane, memKR reveals fine details of cellular morphology. In combination with cytosolic green fluorescent protein, the multicolor in vivo imaging of memKR transgenics reveals complex developmental processes and provides a possibility to manipulate them by regulated generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:21348774

  14. Forage Management Effects on Protein and Fiber Fractions, Protein Degradability, and Dry Matter Yield of Red Clover Conserved as Silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the action of o-quinones formed via polyphenol oxidase, conserved red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) contains abundant rumen undegradable protein (RUP), but inadequate rumen degradable protein (RDP) for dairy cattle. This study examined how forage management influences RDP, RUP, crude protein...

  15. A Novel Reporter Rat Strain That Conditionally Expresses the Bright Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Kyo; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Keiko; Egawa, Ryo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Toru; Yawo, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the strength of the Cre/loxP recombination system in animal models, its application in rats trails that in mice because of the lack of relevant reporter strains. Here, we generated a floxed STOP tdTomato rat that conditionally expresses a red fluorescent protein variant (tdTomato) in the presence of exogenous Cre recombinase. The tdTomato signal vividly visualizes neurons including their projection fibers and spines without any histological enhancement. In addition, a transgenic rat line (FLAME) that ubiquitously expresses tdTomato was successfully established by injecting intracytoplasmic Cre mRNA into fertilized ova. Our rat reporter system will facilitate connectome studies as well as the visualization of the fine structures of genetically identified cells for long periods both in vivo and ex vivo. Furthermore, FLAME is an ideal model for organ transplantation research owing to improved traceability of cells/tissues. PMID:27195805

  16. A Novel Reporter Rat Strain That Conditionally Expresses the Bright Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Kyo; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Keiko; Egawa, Ryo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Toru; Yawo, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the strength of the Cre/loxP recombination system in animal models, its application in rats trails that in mice because of the lack of relevant reporter strains. Here, we generated a floxed STOP tdTomato rat that conditionally expresses a red fluorescent protein variant (tdTomato) in the presence of exogenous Cre recombinase. The tdTomato signal vividly visualizes neurons including their projection fibers and spines without any histological enhancement. In addition, a transgenic rat line (FLAME) that ubiquitously expresses tdTomato was successfully established by injecting intracytoplasmic Cre mRNA into fertilized ova. Our rat reporter system will facilitate connectome studies as well as the visualization of the fine structures of genetically identified cells for long periods both in vivo and ex vivo. Furthermore, FLAME is an ideal model for organ transplantation research owing to improved traceability of cells/tissues. PMID:27195805

  17. Red blood cell sodium heteroexchange in familial primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Semplicini, A; Mozzato, M G; Bongiovi, S; Marzola, M; Macor, F; Ceolotto, G; Serena, L; Pessina, A C

    1994-03-01

    The hallmark of primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an inappropriate myocardial hypertrophy, linked to myofibril disarray of the left ventricle. Its variable clinical expression may be due to genetic heterogeneity and variable penetrance. Since we have recently shown that abnormalities of cation transport in the erythrocytes are associated with cardiac hypertrophy in essential hypertensives and insulin-dependent diabetics, we have investigated the relationship between cardiac anatomy and function and red cell Li+/Na+ and Na+/H+ exchange in 33 relatives of a patient who died of cardiac failure and was found to have a primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at autopsy. According to echocardiographic examination, 11 members of the family also had a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a family distribution compatible with autosomal dominant genetic transmission and variable penetrance. Red cell Li+/Na+ and Na+/H+ exchange were not significantly different in the affected members as compared to the unaffected, but in the former, after correction for potentially confounding variables, interventricular septum thickness was positively correlated to Na+/H+ exchange and diastolic function (Area E/Area A and Vmax E/Vmax A) negatively correlated to Li+/Na+ exchange. Since a generalized overactivity of the cell membrane Na+/H+ exchange, reflected by increased Na+/H+ and Li+/Na+ exchanges in the red cells, could favour cellular growth and diastolic dysfunction, our data suggest that abnormalities of cell membrane cation transport could play a role in the phenotypic expression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:8013504

  18. Light inactivation of water transport and protein–protein interactions of aquaporin–Killer Red chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Florian; Rossi, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) have a broad range of cellular and organ functions; however, nontoxic inhibitors of AQP water transport are not available. Here, we applied chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) to inhibit the water permeability of AQP1, and of two AQP4 isoforms (M1 and M23), one of which (M23) forms aggregates at the cell plasma membrane. Chimeras containing Killer Red (KR) and AQPs were generated with linkers of different lengths. Osmotic water permeability of cells expressing KR/AQP chimeras was measured from osmotic swelling–induced dilution of cytoplasmic chloride, which was detected using a genetically encoded chloride-sensing fluorescent protein. KR-AQP1 red fluorescence was bleached rapidly (∼10% per second) by wide-field epifluorescence microscopy. After KR bleaching, KR-AQP1 water permeability was reduced by up to 80% for the chimera with the shortest linker. Remarkably, CALI-induced reduction in AQP4-KR water permeability was approximately twice as efficient for the aggregate-forming M23 isoform; this suggests intermolecular CALI, which was confirmed by native gel electrophoresis on cells coexpressing M23-AQP4-KR and myc-tagged M23-AQP4. CALI also disrupted the interaction of AQP4 with a neuromyelitis optica autoantibody directed against an extracellular epitope on AQP4. CALI thus permits rapid, spatially targeted and irreversible reduction in AQP water permeability and interactions in live cells. Our data also support the utility of CALI to study protein–protein interactions as well as other membrane transporters and receptors. PMID:22200949

  19. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  20. Alterations of Red Cell Membrane Properties in Nneuroacanthocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Siegl, Claudia; Hamminger, Patricia; Jank, Herbert; Ahting, Uwe; Bader, Benedikt; Danek, Adrian; Gregory, Allison; Hartig, Monika; Hayflick, Susan; Hermann, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Sammler, Esther M.; Yapici, Zuhal; Prohaska, Rainer; Salzer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) refers to a group of heterogenous, rare genetic disorders, namely chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), McLeod syndrome (MLS), Huntington’s disease-like 2 (HDL2) and pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), that mainly affect the basal ganglia and are associated with similar neurological symptoms. PKAN is also assigned to a group of rare neurodegenerative diseases, known as NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation), associated with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and progressive movement disorder. Acanthocytosis, the occurrence of misshaped erythrocytes with thorny protrusions, is frequently observed in ChAc and MLS patients but less prevalent in PKAN (about 10%) and HDL2 patients. The pathological factors that lead to the formation of the acanthocytic red blood cell shape are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether NA/NBIA acanthocytes differ in their functionality from normal erythrocytes. Several flow-cytometry-based assays were applied to test the physiological responses of the plasma membrane, namely drug-induced endocytosis, phosphatidylserine exposure and calcium uptake upon treatment with lysophosphatidic acid. ChAc red cell samples clearly showed a reduced response in drug-induced endovesiculation, lysophosphatidic acid-induced phosphatidylserine exposure, and calcium uptake. Impaired responses were also observed in acanthocyte-positive NBIA (PKAN) red cells but not in patient cells without shape abnormalities. These data suggest an “acanthocytic state” of the red cell where alterations in functional and interdependent membrane properties arise together with an acanthocytic cell shape. Further elucidation of the aberrant molecular mechanisms that cause this acanthocytic state may possibly help to evaluate the pathological pathways leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:24098554

  1. Alterations of red cell membrane properties in neuroacanthocytosis.

    PubMed

    Siegl, Claudia; Hamminger, Patricia; Jank, Herbert; Ahting, Uwe; Bader, Benedikt; Danek, Adrian; Gregory, Allison; Hartig, Monika; Hayflick, Susan; Hermann, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Sammler, Esther M; Yapici, Zuhal; Prohaska, Rainer; Salzer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) refers to a group of heterogenous, rare genetic disorders, namely chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), McLeod syndrome (MLS), Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2) and pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), that mainly affect the basal ganglia and are associated with similar neurological symptoms. PKAN is also assigned to a group of rare neurodegenerative diseases, known as NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation), associated with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and progressive movement disorder. Acanthocytosis, the occurrence of misshaped erythrocytes with thorny protrusions, is frequently observed in ChAc and MLS patients but less prevalent in PKAN (about 10%) and HDL2 patients. The pathological factors that lead to the formation of the acanthocytic red blood cell shape are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether NA/NBIA acanthocytes differ in their functionality from normal erythrocytes. Several flow-cytometry-based assays were applied to test the physiological responses of the plasma membrane, namely drug-induced endocytosis, phosphatidylserine exposure and calcium uptake upon treatment with lysophosphatidic acid. ChAc red cell samples clearly showed a reduced response in drug-induced endovesiculation, lysophosphatidic acid-induced phosphatidylserine exposure, and calcium uptake. Impaired responses were also observed in acanthocyte-positive NBIA (PKAN) red cells but not in patient cells without shape abnormalities. These data suggest an "acanthocytic state" of the red cell where alterations in functional and interdependent membrane properties arise together with an acanthocytic cell shape. Further elucidation of the aberrant molecular mechanisms that cause this acanthocytic state may possibly help to evaluate the pathological pathways leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:24098554

  2. Oxidative inhibition of red blood cell ATPases by glyceraldehyde.

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Martinho, F; Azevedo, M S; Manso, C F

    1991-11-01

    Glyceraldehyde and other simple monosaccharides autoxidize under physiological conditions, forming dicarbonyl compounds and hydrogen peroxide via intermediate free radicals. These products may have deleterious effects on cell components. In this paper we study the effect of glyceraldehyde autoxidation on red-cell ATPase activities. The autoxidation of glyceraldehyde in imidazole-glycylglycine buffer, measured by oxygen consumption, depends on the buffer concentration and decreases in the presence of superoxide dismutase and catalase. The addition of DETAPAC inhibits the autoxidation almost completely. When human red-blood-cell membranes are incubated with glyceraldehyde, the red-blood-cell ATPase activities decrease significantly. The addition of DETAPAC, GSH and DTE (dithioerythritol) protects the enzyme from inactivation, but superoxide dismutase and catalase have no effect. Methylglyoxal (a dicarbonyl which is analogous to hydroxypyruvaldehyde derived from glyceraldehyde autoxidation) proved to have a powerful inhibitory action on ATPase activities. The addition of DTE completely protects the enzyme from inactivation, suggesting that the sulphydryl groups of the active site of the enzyme are the critical targets for dicarbonyl compounds. PMID:1836354

  3. Hypochromicity in red blood cells: an experimental and theoretical investigation

    PubMed Central

    Nonoyama, Akihisa; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.; Leparc, German F.; Potter, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Multiwavelength UV-visible transmission spectrophotometry is a useful tool for the examination of micron-size particle suspensions in the context of particle size and chemical composition. This paper reports the reliability of this method to characterize the spectra of purified red blood cells both in their physiological state and with modified hemoglobin content. Previous studies have suggested the contribution of hypochromism on the particle spectra caused by the close electronic interaction of the encapsulated chromophores. Our research shows, however, that this perceived hypochromism can be accounted for by considering two important issues: the acceptance angle of the instrument and the combined scattering and absorption effect of light on the particles. In order to establish these ideas, spectral analysis was performed on purified and modified red cells where the latter was accomplished with a modified hypotonic shock protocol that altered the hemoglobin concentration within the cells. Moreover, the Mie theory was used to successfully simulate the spectral features and trends of the red cells. With this combination of experimental and theoretical exploration, definition of hypochromism has been extended to two subcategories. PMID:21833353

  4. Vesiculation of healthy and defective red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2015-07-01

    Vesiculation of mature red blood cells (RBCs) contributes to removal of defective patches of the erythrocyte membrane. In blood disorders, which are related to defects in proteins of the RBC membrane, vesiculation of the plasma membrane is intensified. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain RBC vesiculation but the exact underlying mechanisms and what determines the sizes of the vesicles are still not completely understood. In this work, we apply a two-component coarse-grained molecular dynamics RBC membrane model to study how RBC vesiculation is controlled by the membrane spontaneous curvature and by lateral compression of the membrane. Our simulation results show that the formation of small homogeneous vesicles with a diameter less than 40 nm can be attributed to a large spontaneous curvature of membrane domains. On the other hand, compression on the membrane can cause the formation of vesicles with heterogeneous composition and with sizes comparable with the size of the cytoskeleton corral. When spontaneous curvature and lateral compression are simultaneously considered, the compression on the membrane tends to facilitate formation of vesicles originating from curved membrane domains. We also simulate vesiculation of RBCs with membrane defects connected to hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) and to hereditary spherocytosis (HS). When the vertical connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton is elevated, as in normal RBCs, multiple vesicles are shed from the compressed membrane with diameters similar to the cytoskeleton corral size. In HS RBCs, where the connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton is reduced, larger-size vesicles are released under the same compression ratio as in normal RBCs. Lastly, we find that vesicles released from HE RBCs can contain cytoskeletal filaments due to fragmentation of the membrane skeleton while vesicles released from the HS RBCs are depleted of cytoskeletal filaments.

  5. The fate of phenylhydroxylamine in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Kiese, M; Taeger, K

    1976-01-01

    Phenylhydroxylamine added to human red cells under aerobic conditions and in the presence of glucose was partly reduced to aniline. About half the hydroxylamine was recovered as amine after a 2-hr incubation. The aniline, after acetylation, was identified as acetanilide by melting point, Rf-value in TCL as well as UV, IR, and NMR spectroscopy. The fate of the remaining phenylhydroxylamine was followed by use of 14C-labeled phenylhydroxylamine. About 30% of the total radioactivity was bound to hemoglobin or other proteins and about 20% was found in highly polar low-molecular substances which were insoluble in organic solvents. The elucidation of the sites at which phenylhydroxylamine was bound to hemoglobin was complicated by the lability of the bonds. When purified human hemoglobin had reacted with radioactive phenylhydroxylamine, large proportions of the radioactivity bound to hemoglobin were removed by treatment with acid or with PMB for separation of alpha- and beta-chains. The radioactive compound liberated from hemoglobin by acid was found to be aniline. After reaction with phenylhydroxylamine the number of SH groups titrable with PMB was found to be diminished. Pretreatment of hemoglobin with N-ethylmaleimide or PMB decreased the amount of phenylhydroxylamine bound to hemoglobin but did not fully prevent the reaction. Tryptic digestion of hemoglobin after reaction with radioactive phenylhydroxylamine yielded tryptic peptides with lower specific activity than that of hemoglobin. Chymotryptic digestion of the tryptic core yielded a core with specific activity much higher than that of hemoglobin. Fingerprinting of the tryptic or chymotryptic hydrolyzates showed the presence of peptides with high and other ones with low or no radioactivity and of radioactive compounds which did not react with ninhydrin. In the covalent binding of phenylhydroxylamine to globin the SH group beta93 plays an important role, but other yet unknown sites are also reactive. PMID:934354

  6. Pure red-cell aplasia "epidemic"--mystery completely revealed?

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Pozzoni, Pietro

    2007-06-01

    Starting in 1998, the number of pure red-cell aplasia (PRCA) cases in patients treated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) increased dramatically. Most cases were observed in patients treated with epoetin alfa produced outside the United States. The peak was observed in 2002; since then, the PRCA incidence has declined. Many factors are likely to have contributed to this up-surge. The molecular structure of the various epoetins and patient characteristics do not seem to play a major role. The route of administration holds some importance, because most PRCA patients received rHuEPO subcutaneously. The peak of PRCA cases overlapped with the removal of human serum albumin from the Eprex formulation (Janssen-Pharmaceutica NV, Beerse, Belgium), for which polysorbate 80 and glycine were substituted. Polysorbate 80 may have increased the immunogenicity of Eprex by eliciting the formation of epoetin-containing micelles or by interacting with leachates released by the uncoated rubber stoppers of prefilled syringes. Compared with the previous formulation, the polysorbate 80 formulation has lower stability, making it more susceptible to stress conditions such as insufficient attention to the cold chain. This situation could facilitate protein denaturation or aggregate formation. Uncoated rubber stoppers were replaced with coated stoppers, and the cold chain was reinforced; the Eprex formulation has remained unchanged. Even though the incidence of PRCA returned to very low levels, discriminating the cause-effect relationship of a single action is difficult, given that all occurred with a similar chronology, and that PRCA develops after a relatively long exposure period. Careful observation of future trends of new PRCA cases is thus mandatory. PMID:17556324

  7. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient.

  8. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.

    1995-12-19

    A method is disclosed using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient. 5 figs.

  9. Recovery of Red Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Maturation Deficiency through Rational Design

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Matthew M.; Oteng-Pabi, Samuel K.; Pandelieva, Antonia T.; Mayo, Stephen L.; Chica, Roberto A.

    2012-01-01

    Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) derived from organisms in the class Anthozoa have found widespread application as imaging tools in biological research. For most imaging experiments, RFPs that mature quickly to the red chromophore and produce little or no green chromophore are most useful. In this study, we used rational design to convert a yellow fluorescent mPlum mutant to a red-emitting RFP without reverting any of the mutations causing the maturation deficiency and without altering the red chromophore’s covalent structure. We also created an optimized mPlum mutant (mPlum-E16P) that matures almost exclusively to the red chromophore. Analysis of the structure/function relationships in these proteins revealed two structural characteristics that are important for efficient red chromophore maturation in DsRed-derived RFPs. The first is the presence of a lysine residue at position 70 that is able to interact directly with the chromophore. The second is an absence of non-bonding interactions limiting the conformational flexibility at the peptide backbone that is oxidized during red chromophore formation. Satisfying or improving these structural features in other maturation-deficient RFPs may result in RFPs with faster and more complete maturation to the red chromophore. PMID:23285050

  10. Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Hod; Mohar, Boaz; Sun, Yi; Narayan, Sujatha; Gordus, Andrew; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Holt, Graham T; Hu, Amy; Walpita, Deepika; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Ahrens, Misha B; Schreiter, Eric R; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow measurement of activity in large populations of neurons and in small neuronal compartments, over times of milliseconds to months. Although GFP-based GECIs are widely used for in vivo neurophysiology, GECIs with red-shifted excitation and emission spectra have advantages for in vivo imaging because of reduced scattering and absorption in tissue, and a consequent reduction in phototoxicity. However, current red GECIs are inferior to the state-of-the-art GFP-based GCaMP6 indicators for detecting and quantifying neural activity. Here we present improved red GECIs based on mRuby (jRCaMP1a, b) and mApple (jRGECO1a), with sensitivity comparable to GCaMP6. We characterized the performance of the new red GECIs in cultured neurons and in mouse, Drosophila, zebrafish and C. elegans in vivo. Red GECIs facilitate deep-tissue imaging, dual-color imaging together with GFP-based reporters, and the use of optogenetics in combination with calcium imaging. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12727.001 PMID:27011354

  11. Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity.

    PubMed

    Dana, Hod; Mohar, Boaz; Sun, Yi; Narayan, Sujatha; Gordus, Andrew; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Holt, Graham T; Hu, Amy; Walpita, Deepika; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Ahrens, Misha B; Schreiter, Eric R; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow measurement of activity in large populations of neurons and in small neuronal compartments, over times of milliseconds to months. Although GFP-based GECIs are widely used for in vivo neurophysiology, GECIs with red-shifted excitation and emission spectra have advantages for in vivo imaging because of reduced scattering and absorption in tissue, and a consequent reduction in phototoxicity. However, current red GECIs are inferior to the state-of-the-art GFP-based GCaMP6 indicators for detecting and quantifying neural activity. Here we present improved red GECIs based on mRuby (jRCaMP1a, b) and mApple (jRGECO1a), with sensitivity comparable to GCaMP6. We characterized the performance of the new red GECIs in cultured neurons and in mouse, Drosophila, zebrafish and C. elegans in vivo. Red GECIs facilitate deep-tissue imaging, dual-color imaging together with GFP-based reporters, and the use of optogenetics in combination with calcium imaging. PMID:27011354

  12. Online biomedical resources for malaria-related red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-07-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed. PMID:23568771

  13. Color contrast of red blood cells on solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiziev, Adkham A.

    2013-02-01

    In present study we developed the new method of colour visualization of red blood cells without using any chemical staining. The method based on physical phenomena a white light interference on thin transparent films. It is shown that in the case of thin human blood smears colour interference contrast occurs on solid polished substrates. The best contrast shows substrates with maximal refractive index (Mo, W, Si). These materials have been selected as substrate instead of ordinary microscopic slide in reflected light microscopy. It is shown that reflection of incident white light from blood cell surface and boundary cell-substrate generate two coherent lights. The second one (object signal) after passing through red blood cell gathers additional phase and after interference interaction with reference signal (light reflected from outer cell surface) enables cell image in colour. Number of blood smears of healthy persons (control) and patients who were diagnosed with cancer are presented. It is concluded that the offered method may be used as an effective diagnostic tool to detect early stage blood cells lesion by its interference painting in white light. Offered method may be used in research laboratories, hospitals, diagnostic centres, emergency medicine and other as complementary diagnostic tool to present convenient optical and electron microscopy technique.

  14. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  15. Degradation of the 32 kD herbicide binding protein in far red light. [Spirodella oligorrhiza

    SciTech Connect

    Gaba, V.; Marder, J.B.; Greenberg, B.M.; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M.

    1987-06-01

    White light (400-700 nanometers) supports the activity of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II while far red light (greater than or equal to700 nanometers) supports PSI almost exclusively. In intact fronds of Spirodela oligorrhiza, turnover of the 32 kilodaltons herbicide binding protein is stimulated under both these light conditions, although not in the dark or at wavelengths > 730 nanometers. As is the case in white light, the far red light induced degradation of the protein is inhibited by DCMU. The means by which far red light operates is unclear. Hypotheses considered include: PSI activated proteolysis, PSI-induced formation of semiquinone anions, and PSI-generated free radicals.

  16. [Management of feto-maternal red cell allo-immunizations].

    PubMed

    Bricca, P; Guinchard, E; Guitton Bliem, C

    2011-04-01

    Feto-maternal red cell alloimmunization is defined by the presence in a pregnant woman of alloantibodies directed against blood group antigens present on the red blood cells of the fetus and inherited from the father. It arises from the immune response to a first contact to these same antigens during a prior transfusion, transplant or pregnancy. The placental transfer and the fixation of the antibodies on the fetal red cells antigenic targets lead to a haemolysis in the fetus and the newborn. The resulting haemolytic disease can show different clinical forms, from a mild anaemia with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia to a major fetal damage with stillbirth caused by hydrops fetalis. The objective of management strategies of feto-maternal alloimmunization is to detect and monitor maternal alloimmunization and to appreciate the effects on the fetus or the newborn. Since a few years, some new non-invasive techniques of surveillance are used, for instance fetal RHD genotyping on maternal plasma and evaluation of fetal anaemia through velocimetry measurement of the blood flow in the middle cerebral artery. The need for a careful postnatal surveillance has to be emphasized due to the neonatal anaemia, which can be prolonged, and to the resurgence of cases of severe neonatal icteruses recently reported by the Académie de Médecine. The policy of prevention of anti-RH1 alloimmunization should also benefit from the evolution of biological techniques by allowing an improved targeting of concerned women. PMID:21397546

  17. Permeability and reflection coefficients of urea and small amides in the human red cell.

    PubMed

    Toon, M R; Solomon, A K

    1996-09-01

    Measurement of the transport parameters that govern the passage of urea and amides across the red cell membrane leads to important questions about transport of water. It had initially been thought that small protein channels, permeable to water and small solutes, traversed the membrane (see Solomon, 1987). Recently, however, very strong evidence has been presented that the 28 kDa protein, CHIP28, found in the red cell membrane, is the locus of the water channel (see Agre et al., 1993). CHIP28 transports water very rapidly but does not transport small nonelectrolytes such as urea. The irreversible thermodynamic parameter, sigma i, the reflection coefficient, is a measure of the relationship between the permeability of the solute and that of water. If a solute permeates by dissolution in the membrane, sigma i = 1.0; if it permeates by passage through an aqueous channel, sigma i < 1.0. For urea, Goldstein and Solomon (1960) found that sigma urea = 0.62 +/- 0.03 which meant that urea crosses the red cell membrane in a water-filled channel. This result and many subsequent observations that showed that sigma urea < 1.0 are at variance with the observation that CHIP28 is impermeable to urea. In view of this problem, we have made a new series of measurements of sigma i for urea and other small solutes by a different method, which obviates many of the criticisms Macey and Karan (1993) have made of our earlier method. The new method (Chen et al., 1988), which relies upon fluorescence of the intracellular dye, fluorescein sulfonate, leads to the corrected value, sigma urea,corr = 0.64 +/- 0.03 for ghosts, in good agreement with earlier data for red cells. Thus, the conclusion on irreversible thermodynamic and other grounds that urea and water share a common channel is in disagreement with the view that CHIP28 provides the sole channel for water entrance into the cell. PMID:8703203

  18. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  19. Red Blood Cell Homeostasis: Pharmacological Interventions to Explore Biochemical, Morphological and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Cluitmans, Judith C A; Gevi, Federica; Siciliano, Angela; Matte, Alessandro; Leal, Joames K F; De Franceschi, Lucia; Zolla, Lello; Brock, Roland; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J W; Bosman, Giel J G C M

    2016-01-01

    During their passage through the circulation, red blood cells (RBCs) encounter severe physiological conditions consisting of mechanical stress, oxidative damage and fast changes in ionic and osmotic conditions. In order to survive for 120 days, RBCs adapt to their surroundings by subtle regulation of membrane organization and metabolism. RBC homeostasis depends on interactions between the integral membrane protein band 3 with other membrane and cytoskeletal proteins, and with key enzymes of various metabolic pathways. These interactions are regulated by the binding of deoxyhemoglobin to band 3, and by a signaling network revolving around Lyn kinase and Src family kinase-mediated phosphorylation of band 3. Here we show that manipulation of the interaction between the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton, using various pharmacological agents that interfere with protein-protein interactions and membrane lipid organization, has various effects on: (1) morphology, as shown by high resolution microscopy and quantitative image analysis; (2) organization of membrane proteins, as indicated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and quantitative as well as qualitative analysis of vesicle generation; (3) membrane lipid organization, as indicated by flow cytometric analysis of phosphatidylserine exposure; (4) deformability, as assessed in capillary-mimicking circumstances using a microfluidics system; (5) deformability as determined using a spleen-mimicking device; (6) metabolic activity as indicated by metabolomics. Our data show that there is a complex relationship between red cell morphology, membrane organization and deformability. Also, our data show that red blood cells have a relatively high resistance to disturbance of membrane organization in vitro, which may reflect their capacity to withstand mechanical, oxidative and osmotic stress in vivo. PMID:27066490

  20. Red Blood Cell Homeostasis: Pharmacological Interventions to Explore Biochemical, Morphological and Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cluitmans, Judith C. A.; Gevi, Federica; Siciliano, Angela; Matte, Alessandro; Leal, Joames K. F.; De Franceschi, Lucia; Zolla, Lello; Brock, Roland; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J. W.; Bosman, Giel J. G. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    During their passage through the circulation, red blood cells (RBCs) encounter severe physiological conditions consisting of mechanical stress, oxidative damage and fast changes in ionic and osmotic conditions. In order to survive for 120 days, RBCs adapt to their surroundings by subtle regulation of membrane organization and metabolism. RBC homeostasis depends on interactions between the integral membrane protein band 3 with other membrane and cytoskeletal proteins, and with key enzymes of various metabolic pathways. These interactions are regulated by the binding of deoxyhemoglobin to band 3, and by a signaling network revolving around Lyn kinase and Src family kinase-mediated phosphorylation of band 3. Here we show that manipulation of the interaction between the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton, using various pharmacological agents that interfere with protein-protein interactions and membrane lipid organization, has various effects on: (1) morphology, as shown by high resolution microscopy and quantitative image analysis; (2) organization of membrane proteins, as indicated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and quantitative as well as qualitative analysis of vesicle generation; (3) membrane lipid organization, as indicated by flow cytometric analysis of phosphatidylserine exposure; (4) deformability, as assessed in capillary-mimicking circumstances using a microfluidics system; (5) deformability as determined using a spleen-mimicking device; (6) metabolic activity as indicated by metabolomics. Our data show that there is a complex relationship between red cell morphology, membrane organization and deformability. Also, our data show that red blood cells have a relatively high resistance to disturbance of membrane organization in vitro, which may reflect their capacity to withstand mechanical, oxidative and osmotic stress in vivo. PMID:27066490

  1. Red blood cell clustering in Poiseuille microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Misbah, Chaouqi; Guido, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) flowing in microcapillaries tend to associate into clusters, i.e., small trains of cells separated from each other by a distance comparable to cell size. This process is usually attributed to slower RBCs acting to create a sequence of trailing cells. Here, based on the first systematic investigation of collective RBC flow behavior in microcapillaries in vitro by high-speed video microscopy and numerical simulations, we show that RBC size polydispersity within the physiological range does not affect cluster stability. Lower applied pressure drops and longer residence times favor larger RBC clusters. A limiting cluster length, depending on the number of cells in a cluster, is found by increasing the applied pressure drop. The insight on the mechanism of RBC clustering provided by this work can be applied to further our understanding of RBC aggregability, which is a key parameter implicated in clotting and thrombus formation.

  2. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  3. Visible red and infrared light alters gene expression in human marrow stromal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jie; Wang, Qing; Wai, Daniel; Zhou, Qunzhou; Shi, Shihong; Le, Anh D; Shi, Songtao; Yen, Stephen L-K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study tested whether or not gene expression in human marrow stromal fibroblast (MSF) cells depends on light wavelength and energy density. Material and Methods Primary cultures of isolated human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSC) were exposed to visible red (VR, 633 nm) and infrared (IR, 830) radiation wavelengths from a light emitting diode (LED) over a range of energy densities (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 Joules/cm2) Cultured cells were assayed for cell proliferation, osteogenic potential, adipogenesis, mRNA and protein content. mRNA was analyzed by microarray, and compared among different wavelengths and energy densities. Mesenchymal and epithelial cell responses were compared to determine whether responses were cell-type specific. Protein array analysis was used to further analyze key pathways identified by microarrays. Result Different wavelengths and energy densities produced unique sets of genes identified by microarray analysis. Pathway analysis pointed to TGF beta 1 in the visible red and Akt 1 in the infrared wavelengths as key pathways to study. TGF beta protein arrays suggested switching from canonical to non-canonical TGF beta pathways with increases to longer IR wavelengths. Microarrays suggest RANKL and TIMP 10 followed IR energy density dose response curves. Epithelial and mesenchymal cells respond differently to stimulation by light suggesting cell-type specific response is possible. Conclusions These studies demonstrate differential gene expression with different wavelengths, energy densities and cell types. These differences in gene expression have the potential to be exploited for therapeutic purposes and can help explain contradictory results in the literature when wavelengths, energy densities and cell types differ. PMID:25865533

  4. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  5. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  6. Effects of ethanol on red blood cell rheological behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rabai, M.; Detterich, J.A.; Wenby, R.B.; Toth, K.; Meiselman, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of red wine is associated with a decreased risk of several cardiovascular diseases (e.g., coronary artery disease, stroke), but unfortunately literature reports regarding ethanol’s effects on hemorheological parameters are not concordant. In the present study, red blood cell (RBC) deformability was tested via laser ektacytometry (LORCA, 0.3 – 30 Pa) using two approaches: 1) addition of ethanol to whole blood at 0.25% – 2% followed by incubation and testing in ethanol-free LORCA medium; 2) addition of ethanol to the LORCA medium at 0.25% – 6% then testing untreated native RBC in these media. The effects of ethanol on deformability for oxidatively stressed RBC were investigated as were changes of RBC aggregation (Myrenne Aggregometer) for cells in autologous plasma or 3% 70 kDa dextran. Significant dose-related increases of RBC deformability were observed at 0.25% (p<0.05) and higher concentrations only if ethanol was in the LORCA medium; no changes occurred for cells previously incubated with ethanol then tested in ethanol-free medium. The impaired deformability of cells pre-exposed to oxidative stress was improved only if ethanol was in the LORCA medium. RBC aggregation decreased with concentration at 0.25% and higher for cells in both autologous plasma and dextran 70. Our results indicate that ethanol reversibly improves erythrocyte deformability and irreversibly decreases erythrocyte aggregation; the relevance of these results to the health benefits of moderate wine consumption require further investigation. PMID:23089886

  7. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  8. Cytoplasmic calcium buffers in intact human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tiffert, T; Lew, V L

    1997-01-01

    1. Precise knowledge of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering behaviour in intact human red cells is essential for the characterization of their [Ca2+]i-dependent functions. This was investigated by using a refined method and experimental protocols which allowed continuity in the estimates of [Ca2+]i, from nanomolar to millimolar concentrations, in the presence and absence of external Ca2+ chelators. 2. The study was carried out in human red cells whose plasma membrane Ca2+ pump was inhibited either by depleting the cells of ATP or by adding vanadate to the cell suspension. Cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering was analysed from plots of total cell calcium content vs. ionized cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([CaT]i vs. [Ca2+]i) obtained from measurements of the equilibrium distribution of 45Ca2+ at different external Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]o), in conditions known to clamp cell volume and pH. The equilibrium distribution of 45Ca2+ was induced by the divalent cation ionophore A23187. 3. The results showed the following. (i) The known red cell Ca2+ buffer represented by alpha, with a large capacity and low Ca2+ affinity, was the main cytoplasmic Ca2+ binding agent. (ii) The value of alpha was remarkably constant; the means for each of four donors ranged from 0.33 to 0.35, with a combined value of all independent measurements of 0.34 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 16). This contrasts with the variability previously reported. (iii) There was an additional Ca2+ buffering complex with a low capacity (approximately 80 micromol (340 g Hb)(-1)) and intermediate Ca2+ affinity (apparent dissociation constant, K(D,app) approximately 4-50 microM) whose possible identity is discussed. (iv) The cell content of putative Ca2+ buffers with submicromolar Ca2+ dissociation constants was below the detection limit of the methods used here (less than 2 micromol (340 g Hb)(-1)). 4. Vanadate (1 mM) inhibited the Vmax of the Ca2+ pump in inosine-fed cells by 99.7%. The cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering behaviour

  9. Changes in En(a-) human red blood cell membranes during in vivo ageing.

    PubMed

    Shinozuka, T; Miyata, Y; Takei, S; Yoshida, R; Ogamo, A; Nakagawa, Y; Kuroda, N; Yanagida, J

    1996-01-01

    The human red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) were characterized by the lack of MN antigens. The red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) which were found in a Japanese family were tested to clarify the changes in membrane surfaces of the red blood cells during in vivo ageing. The contents of sialic acid, glucose, mannose, galactose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine of the red blood cell membranes obtained from the old red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) were significantly lower than those of the young red blood cell membranes. Neither the young nor the old red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) showed the agglutination with Arachis hypogaea (PNA) which was capable of binding to T agglutinogen. It is presumed that En(a-) red blood cells are not exposed to sialidase in vivo. In comparison with the young En(a-) red blood cell membranes, the number and the distribution density of lectin receptor sites on the old ones for Limulus polyphemus (LPA), Canavalia ensiformis (Con A), Triticum vulgaris (WGA) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA) were significantly lower. It is thought that En(a-) red blood cell ageing is accompanied by elimination of some sialoglycoconjugates which have affinity for LPA, Con A, WGA and BPA, whereas En(a-) red blood cells lack glycophorin A. PMID:8866734

  10. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells.

    PubMed

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J; Roback, John D; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L; Zimring, James C

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation. PMID:26921359

  11. Refined crystal structure of DsRed, a red fluorescent protein from coral, at 2.0-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Yarbrough, D; Wachter, R M; Kallio, K; Matz, M V; Remington, S J

    2001-01-16

    The crystal structure of DsRed, a red fluorescent protein from a corallimorpharian, has been determined at 2.0-A resolution by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion and crystallographic refinement. Crystals of the selenomethionine-substituted protein have space group P2(1) and contain a tetramer with 222 noncrystallographic symmetry in the asymmetric unit. The refined model has satisfactory stereochemistry and a final crystallographic R factor of 0.162. The protein, which forms an obligatory tetramer in solution and in the crystal, is a squat rectangular prism comprising four protomers whose fold is extremely similar to that of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein despite low ( approximately 23%) amino acid sequence homology. The monomer consists of an 11-stranded beta barrel with a coaxial helix. The chromophores, formed from the primary sequence -Gln-Tyr-Gly- (residues 66-68), are arranged in a approximately 27 x 34-A rectangular array in two approximately antiparallel pairs. The geometry at the alpha carbon of Gln-66 (refined without stereochemical restraints) is consistent with an sp(2) hybridized center, in accord with the proposal that red fluorescence is because of an additional oxidation step that forms an acylimine extension to the chromophore [Gross, L. A., Baird, G. S., Hoffman, R. C., Baldridge, K. K. & Tsien, R. Y. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87, 11990-11995]. The carbonyl oxygen of Phe-65 is almost 90 degrees out of the plane of the chromophore, consistent with theoretical calculations suggesting that this is the minimum energy conformation of this moiety despite the conjugation of this group with the rest of the chromophore. PMID:11209050

  12. Membrane stress increases cation permeability in red cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R M

    1994-11-01

    The human red cell is known to increase its cation permeability when deformed by mechanical forces. Light-scattering measurements were used to quantitate the cell deformation, as ellipticity under shear. Permeability to sodium and potassium was not proportional to the cell deformation. An ellipticity of 0.75 was required to increase the permeability of the membrane to cations, and flux thereafter increased rapidly as the limits of cell extension were reached. Induction of membrane curvature by chemical agents also did not increase cation permeability. These results indicate that membrane deformation per se does not increase permeability, and that membrane tension is the effector for increased cation permeability. This may be relevant to some cation permeabilities observed by patch clamping. PMID:7858123

  13. Red cell glycolytic enzyme disorders caused by mutations: an update.

    PubMed

    Climent, Fernando; Roset, Feliu; Repiso, Ada; Pérez de la Ossa, Pablo

    2009-06-01

    Glycolysis is one of the principle pathways of ATP generation in cells and is present in all cell tissues; in erythrocytes, glycolysis is the only pathway for ATP synthesis since mature red cells lack the internal structures necessary to produce the energy vital for life. Red cell deficiencies have been detected in all erythrocyte glycolytic pathways, although their frequencies differ owing to diverse causes, such as the affected enzyme and severity of clinical manifestations. The number of enzyme deficiencies known is endless. The most frequent glycolysis abnormality is pyruvate kinase deficiency, since around 500 cases are known, the first of which was reported in 1961. However, only approximately 200 cases were due to mutations. In contrast, only one case of phosphoglycerate mutase BB type mutation, described in 2003, has been detected. Most mutations are located in the coding sequences of genes, while others, missense, deletions, insertions, splice defects, premature stop codons and promoter mutations, are also frequent. Understanding of the crystal structure of enzymes permits molecular modelling studies which, in turn, reveal how mutations can affect enzyme structure and function. PMID:19519368

  14. Studying red blood cell agglutination by measuring membrane viscosity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Heloise P.; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2007-09-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) viscoelastic membrane contains proteins and glycoproteins embedded in a fluid lipid bilayer that are responsible for cell agglutination. Manipulating RBCs rouleaux with a double optical tweezers, we observed that the cells slide easily one over the others but are strongly connected by their edges. An explanation for this behavior could be the fact that when the cells slide one over the others, proteins are dragged through the membrane. It confers to the movement a viscous characteristic that is dependent of the velocity between the RBCs and justifies why is so easy to slide them apart. Therefore, in a first step of this work, by measuring the force as a function of the relative velocity between two cells, we confirmed this assumption and used this viscous characteristic of the RBC rouleaux to determine the apparent membrane viscosity of the cell. As this behavior is related to the proteins interactions, we can use the apparent membrane viscosity to obtain a better understanding about cell agglutination. Methods related to cell agglutination induced by antigen-antibody interactions are the basis of most of tests used in transfusion centers. Then, in a second step of this work, we measured the apparent membrane viscosity using antibodies. We observed that this methodology is sensitive to different kinds of bindings between RBCs. Better comprehension of the forces and bindings between RBCs could improve the sensibility and specificity of the hemagglutination reactions and also guides the development of new potentiator substances.

  15. Protein composition and function of red and white skeletal muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Red and white muscles are faced with very different energetic demands. However, it is unclear whether relative mitochondrial protein expression is different between muscle types. Mitochondria from red and white porcine skeletal muscle were isolated with a Percoll gradient. Differences in protein composition were determined using blue native (BN)-PAGE, two-dimensional differential in gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE), optical spectroscopy, and isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). Complex IV and V activities were compared using BN-PAGE in-gel activity assays, and maximal mitochondrial respiration rates were assessed using pyruvate (P) + malate (M), glutamate (G) + M, and palmitoyl-carnitine (PC) + M. Without the Percoll step, major cytosolic protein contamination was noted for white mitochondria. Upon removal of contamination, very few protein differences were observed between red and white mitochondria. BN-PAGE showed no differences in the subunit composition of Complexes I–V or the activities of Complexes IV and V. iTRAQ analysis detected 358 mitochondrial proteins, 69 statistically different. Physiological significance may be lower: at a 25% difference, 48 proteins were detected; at 50%, 14 proteins were detected; and 3 proteins were detected at a 100%. Thus any changes could be argued to be physiologically modest. One area of difference was fat metabolism where four β-oxidation enzymes were ∼25% higher in red mitochondria. This was correlated with a 40% higher rate of PC+M oxidation in red mitochondria compared with white mitochondria with no differences in P+M and G+M oxidation. These data suggest that metabolic demand differences between red and white muscle fibers are primarily matched by the number of mitochondria and not by significant alterations in the mitochondria themselves. PMID:21289287

  16. Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Puja; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation forces have been used to manipulate cells and bacteria in a number of recent microfluidic applications. The net force on a cell has been subject to careful investigation over a number of decades. We demonstrate that the radiation forces also act to deform cells. An ultrasonic standing wave field is created in a 0.1 mm glass capillary at a frequency of 7.9 MHz. Using osmotically swollen red-blood cells, we show observable deformations up to an aspect ratio of 1.35, comparable to deformations created by optical tweezing. In contrast to optical technologies, ultrasonic devices are potentially capable of deforming thousands of cells simultaneously. We create a finite element model that includes both the acoustic environment of the cell, and a model of the cell membrane subject to forces resulting from the non-linear aspects of the acoustic field. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results, and shows that the deformation is the result of variation in an acoustic force that is directed outwards at all points on the cell membrane. We foresee applications in diagnostic devices, and in the possibility of mechanically stimulating cells to promote differentiation and physiological effects. PMID:25379070

  17. Red wine polyphenolics increase LDL receptor expression and activity and suppress the secretion of ApoB100 from human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Ho, Nerissa; Santos, Carlos; Dubois, Paul; Mamo, John; Croft, Kevin; Allister, Emma

    2003-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that the consumption of red wine may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. The cardioprotective effect of red wine has been attributed to the polyphenols present in red wine, particularly resveratrol (a stilbene, with estrogen-like activity), and the flavonoids, catechin, epicatechin, quercetin and phenolic acids such as gallic acid. At present, very little is known about the mechanisms by which red wine phenolic compounds benefit the cardiovascular system. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate whether red wine polyphenolics reduce lipoprotein production and clearance by the liver. Cultured HepG2 cells were incubated in the presence of dealcoholized red wine, alcohol-containing red wine and atorvastatin for 24 h. The apolipoprotien B100 (apoB100) protein (marker of hepatic lipoproteins) was quantified on Western blots with an anti-apoB100 antibody and the enhanced chemiluminescence detection system. Apolipoprotein B100 levels in the cells and that secreted into the media were significantly reduced by 50% in liver cells incubated with alcohol-stripped red wine compared with control cells. This effect of dealcoholized red wine on apoB100 production in HepG2 cells was similar to the effect of atorvastatin. Apo B100 production was significantly attenuated by 30% in cells incubated with alcoholized red wine, suggesting that the alcohol was masking the effect of red wine polyphenolics. Apo B100 production was significantly attenuated by 45% with the polyphenolic compounds resveratrol and quercertin. In addition, dealcoholized and alcoholized red wine and atorvastatin significantly increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase mRNA and LDL receptor binding activity relative to controls. Dealcoholized red wine also increased LDL receptor gene expression. Collectively, this study suggests that red wine polyphenolics regulate major pathways involved in lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:12612140

  18. Influence of increased membrane cholesterol on membrane fluidity and cell function in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A

    1978-01-01

    Cholesterol and phospholipid are the two major lipids of the red cell membrane. Cholesterol is insoluble in water but is solubilized by phospholipids both in membranes and in plasma lipoproteins. Morever, cholesterol exchanges between membranes and lipoproteins. An equilibrium partition is established based on the amount of cholesterol relative to phospholipid (C/PL) in these two compartments. Increases in the C/PL of red cell membranes have been studied under three conditions: First, spontaneous increases in vivo have been observed in the spur red cells of patients with severe liver disease; second, similar red cell changes in vivo have been induced by the administration of cholesterol-enriched diets to rodents and dogs; third, increases in membrane cholesterol have been induced in vitro by enriching the C/PL of the lipoprotein environment with cholesterol-phospholipid dispersions (liposomes) having a C/PL of greater than 1.0. In each case, there is a close relationship between the C/PL of the plasma environment and the C/PL of the red cell membrane. In vivo, the C/PL mole ratio of red cell membranes ranges from a normal value of 0.09--1.0 to values which approach but do not reach 2.0. In vitro, this ratio approaches 3.0. Cholesterol enrichment of red cell membranes directly influences membrane lipid fluidity, as assessed by the rotational diffusion of hydrophobic fluorescent probes such as diphenyl hexatriene (DPH). A close correlation exists between increases in red cell membrane C/PL and decreases in membrane fluidity over the range of membrane C/PL from 1.0 to 2.0; however, little further change in fluidity occurs when membrane C/PL is increased to 2.0--3.0. Cholesterol enrichment of red cell membranes is associated with the transformation of cell contour to one which is redundant and folded, and this is associated with a decrease in red cell filterability in vitro. Circulation in vivo in the presence of the spleen further modifies cell shape to a spiny

  19. From stem cell to red blood cells in vitro: "the 12 labors of Hercules".

    PubMed

    Douay, Luc

    2010-06-01

    This article describes the research in progress that will permit the large-scale production of human red blood cells from hematopoietic stem cells. It also discusses the current state of this research, suggests the obstacles to be overcome to pass from the laboratory model to clinical practice, and analyzes the possible indications in the medium and long term. The potential interest of pluripotent stem cells as an unlimited source of red blood cells is considered. If it succeeds, this new approach could mark a considerable advance in the field of transfusion. PMID:20513558

  20. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  1. Measurement of red blood cell mechanics during morphological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, Yongkeun; Best, Catherine; Dasari, Ramachandra; Feld, Michael; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark; Levine, Alex

    2010-03-01

    The human red blood cell (RBC) membrane, a fluid lipid bilayer tethered to an elastic 2D spectrin network, provides the principal control of the cell's morphology and mechanics. These properties, in turn, influence the ability of RBCs to transport oxygen in circulation. Current mechanical measurements of RBCs rely on external loads. Here we apply a Noncontact optical interferometric technique to quantify the thermal fluctuations of RBC membranes with 3 nm accuracy over a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies. Combining this technique with a new mathematical model describing RBC membrane undulations, we measure the mechanical changes of RBCs as they undergo a transition from the normal discoid shape to the abnormal echinocyte and spherical shapes. These measurements indicate that, coincident with this morphological transition, there is a significant increase in the membrane's shear and bending moduli. This mechanical transition can alter cell circulation and impede oxygen delivery.

  2. A photoswitchable orange-to-far-red fluorescent protein, PSmOrange

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Oksana M.; Patterson, George H.; Ting, Li-Min; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2011-01-01

    We report a monomeric PSmOrange protein that is initially orange (excitation and emission at 548 and 565 nm) but becomes far-red (excitation and emission at 636 and 662 nm) after irradiation with blue-green light. Compared to its parental orange proteins, PSmOrange has greater brightness, faster maturation, higher photoconversion contrast, and better photostability. The red-shifted spectra of both forms of PSmOrange enable its simultaneous use with cyan-to-green photoswitchable proteins to study four intracellular populations. Photoconverted PSmOrange has, to date, the most far-red excitation peak, provides diffraction-limited and super-resolution imaging in far-red range, is optimally excited with common red lasers, and can be photoconverted subcutaneously in a mouse. PSmOrange photoswitching occurs via a two-step photo-oxidation process, which causes cleavage of the polypeptide backbone. The far-red fluorescence of photoconverted PSmOrange results from a novel chromophore containing N-acylimine with a coplanar carbon-oxygen double bond. PMID:21804536

  3. Transport of diseased red blood cells in the spleen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2012-11-01

    A major function of the spleen is to remove old and diseased red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties. We investigated this mechanical filtering mechanism by combining experiments and computational modeling, especially for red blood cells in malaria and sickle cell disease (SCD). First, utilizing a transgenic line for 3D confocal live imaging, in vitro capillary assays and 3D finite element modeling, we extracted the mechanical properties of both the RBC membrane and malaria parasites for different asexual malaria stages. Secondly, using a non-invasive laser interferometric technique, we optically measured the dynamic membrane fluctuations of SCD RBCs. By simulating the membrane fluctuation experiment using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model, we retrieved mechanical properties of SCD RBCs with different shapes. Finally, based on the mechanical properties obtained from these experiments, we simulated the full fluid-structure interaction problem of diseased RBCs passing through endothelial slits in the spleen under different fluid pressure gradients using the DPD model. The effects of the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer, the cytoskeleton and the parasite on the critical pressure of splenic passage of RBCs were investigated separately. This work is supported by NIH and Singapore-MIT Alliance for Science and Technology (SMART).

  4. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    PubMed

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of <25 nm hydrodynamic size and their application as fluorescent cell labels. Hydrophobic carbon nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes. PMID:27011336

  5. Pure red cell aplasia induced by epoetin zeta.

    PubMed

    Panichi, Vincenzo; Ricchiuti, Guido; Scatena, Alessia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) may develop in patients with chronic kidney disease receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA). We report on a 72-year-old patient who developed hypo-proliferative anaemia unresponsive to ESA following the administration of epoetin zeta subcutaneously for 7 months. On the basis of severe isolated hypoplasia of the erythroid line in the bone marrow and high-titre neutralizing anti-erythropoietin antibodies (Ab), a diagnosis of Ab-mediated PRCA was made. Epoetin zeta was discontinued and the patient was given steroids. This was associated with anaemia recovery. To our knowledge this is the first PRCA case related to epoetin zeta. PMID:27478604

  6. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  7. Pure red cell aplasia induced by epoetin zeta

    PubMed Central

    Panichi, Vincenzo; Ricchiuti, Guido; Scatena, Alessia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) may develop in patients with chronic kidney disease receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA). We report on a 72-year-old patient who developed hypo-proliferative anaemia unresponsive to ESA following the administration of epoetin zeta subcutaneously for 7 months. On the basis of severe isolated hypoplasia of the erythroid line in the bone marrow and high-titre neutralizing anti-erythropoietin antibodies (Ab), a diagnosis of Ab-mediated PRCA was made. Epoetin zeta was discontinued and the patient was given steroids. This was associated with anaemia recovery. To our knowledge this is the first PRCA case related to epoetin zeta. PMID:27478604

  8. Cytoskeleton confinement of red blood cell membrane fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gov, Nir; Zilman, Anton; Safran, Samuel

    2003-03-01

    We analyze theoretically both the static and dynamic fluctuation spectrum of the red-blood cell in a unified manner, using a simple model of the composite membrane. In this model, the two-dimensional spectrin network that forms the cytoskeleton is treated as a rigid shell, located at a fixed, average distance from the lipid bilayer. The cytoskeleton thereby confines both the static and dynamic fluctuations of the lipid bilayer. The predictions of the model account for the wavevector and frequency dependence of the experimental data.

  9. Cytoskeleton Confinement and Tension of Red Blood Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gov, N.; Zilman, A. G.; Safran, S.

    2003-06-01

    We analyze theoretically both the static and dynamic fluctuation spectra of the red blood cell in a unified manner, using a simple model of the composite membrane. In this model, the two-dimensional spectrin network that forms the cytoskeleton is treated as a rigid shell, located at a fixed, average distance from the lipid bilayer. The cytoskeleton thereby confines both the static and dynamic fluctuations of the lipid bilayer. The sparse connections of the cytoskeleton and bilayer induce a surface tension, for wavelengths larger than the bilayer persistence length. The predictions of the model give a consistent account for both the wave vector and frequency dependence of the experimental data.

  10. Red blood cell orientation in orbit C = 0.

    PubMed Central

    Bitbol, M

    1986-01-01

    Two modes of behavior of single human red cells in a shear field have been described. It is known that in low viscosity media and at shear rates less than 20 s-1, the cells rotate with a periodically varying angular velocity, in accord with the theory of Jeffery (1922) for oblate spheroids. In media of viscosity greater than approximately 5 mPa s and sufficiently high shear rates, the cells align themselves at a constant angle to the direction of flow with the membrane undergoing tank-tread motion. Also, in low viscosity media, as the shear rate is increased, more and more cells lie in the plane of shear, undergoing spin with their axes of symmetry aligned with the vorticity axis of the shear field in an orbit "C = 0" (Goldsmith and Marlow, 1972). We have explored this latter phenomenon using two experimental methods. First, the erythrocytes were observed in the rheoscope and their diameters measured. Forward light scattering patterns were correlated with the red cell orientation mode. Light flux variations after flow onset or stop were measured, and the characteristic times of erythrocyte orientation and disorientation were assessed. The characteristic time of erythrocyte orientation in Orbit C = 0 is proportional to the inverse of the shear rate. The corresponding coefficient of proportionality depends on the suspending medium viscosity eta o. The disorientation time tau D, after flow has been stopped, is such that the ratio tau D/eta o is independent of the initial applied shear stress. However, tau D is much shorter than one would expect if pure Brownian motion were involved. The proportion of erythrocytes in orbit C = 0 was also measured. It was found that this proportion is a function of both the shear rate and eta o. At low values of eta o, the proportion increases with increasing shear rate and then reaches a plateau. For higher values of eta o (5 to 10 mPa s), the proportion of RBC in orbit C = 0 is a decreasing function of the shear stress. A critical

  11. Red blood cell aquaporin-1 expression is decreased in hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Renée L; Maltaneri, Romina E; Vittori, Daniela C; Solari, Liliana; Gammella, Daniel; Schvartzman, Gabriel; García, Eliana; Rapetti, María C; Donato, Hugo; Nesse, Alcira

    2016-10-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the membrane water channel responsible for changes in erythrocyte volume in response to the tonicity of the medium. As the aberrant distribution of proteins in hereditary spherocytosis (HS) generates deficiencies of proteins other than those codified by the mutated gene, we postulated that AQP1 expression might be impaired in spherocytes. AQP1 expression was evaluated through flow cytometry in 5 normal controls, 1 autoimmune hemolytic anemia, 10 HS (2 mild, 3 moderate, 2 severe, and 3 splenectomized), and 3 silent carriers. The effect of AQP1 inhibitors was evaluated through water flow-based tests: osmotic fragility and hypertonic cryohemolysis. Serum osmolality was measured in 20 normal controls and 13 HS. The effect of erythropoietin (Epo) on AQP1 expression was determined in cultures of erythroleukemia UT-7 cells, dependent on Epo to survive. Independent of erythrocyte size, HS patients showed a lower content of AQP1 in erythrocyte membranes which correlated with the severity of the disease. Accordingly, red blood cells from HS subjects were less sensitive to cryohemolysis than normal erythrocytes after inhibition of the AQP1 water channel. A lower serum osmolality in HS with respect to normal controls suggests alterations during reticulocyte remodeling. The decreased AQP1 expression could contribute to explain variable degrees of anemia in hereditary spherocytosis. The finding of AQP1 expression induced by Epo in a model of erythroid cells may be interpreted as a mechanism to restore the balance of red cell water fluxes. PMID:27465156

  12. Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of the red cell volume disorders.

    PubMed

    Badens, Catherine; Guizouarn, Hélène

    2016-09-01

    Genetic defects of erythrocyte transport proteins cause disorders of red blood cell volume that are characterized by abnormal permeability to the cations Na(+) and K(+) and, consequently, by changes in red cell hydration. Clinically, these disorders are associated with chronic haemolytic anaemia of variable severity and significant co-morbidities, such as iron overload. This review provides an overview of recent insights into the molecular basis of this group of rare anaemias involving cation channels and transporters dysfunction. To date, a total of 5 different membrane proteins have been reported to be responsible for volume homeostasis alteration when mutated, 3 of them leading to overhydrated cells (AE1 [also termed SLC4A1], RHAG and GLUT1 [also termed SCL2A1) and 2 others to dehydrated cells (PIEZO1 and the Gardos Channel). These findings are not only of basic scientific interest, but also of direct clinical significance for improving diagnostic procedures and identify potential approaches for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27353637

  13. [Red Blood Cells Raman Spectroscopy Comparison of Type Two Diabetes Patients and Rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Gui-dong; Mu, Xin; Xiao, Hong-bin; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Si-qi; Niu Wen-ying; Jiang, Guang-kun; Feng, Yue-nan; Bian, Jing-qi

    2015-10-01

    By using confocal Raman spectroscopy, Raman spectra were measured in normal rat red blood cells, normal human red blood cells, STZ induced diabetetic rats red blood cells, Alloxan induced diabetetic rats red blood cells and human type 2 diabetes red blood cells. Then principal component analysis (PCA) with support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used for data analysis, and then the distance between classes was used to judge the degree of close to two kinds of rat model with type 2 diabetes. The results found significant differences in the Raman spectra of red blood cell in diabetic and normal red blood cells. To diabetic red blood cells, the peak in the amide VI C=O deformation vibration band is obvious, and amide V N-H deformation vibration band spectral lines appear deviation. Belong to phospholipid fatty acyl C-C skeleton, the 1 130 cm(-1) spectral line is enhanced and the 1 088 cm(-1) spectral line is abated, which show diabetes red cell membrane permeability increased. Raman spectra of PCA combined with SVM can well separate 5 types of red blood cells. Classifier test results show that the classification accuracy is up to 100%. Through the class distance between the two induced method and human type 2 diabetes, it is found that STZ induced model is more close to human type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy can be used for diagnosis of diabetes and rats STZ induced diabetes method is closer to human type 2 diabetes. PMID:26904817

  14. Bio-inspired Cryo-ink Preserves Red Blood Cell Phenotype and Function during Nanoliter Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Assal, Rami El; Guven, Sinan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Gozen, Irep; Shafiee, Hadi; Dalbeyber, Sedef; Abdalla, Noor; Thomas, Gawain; Fuld, Wendy; Illigens, Ben M.W.; Estanislau, Jessica; Khoory, Joseph; Kaufman, Richard; Zylberberg, Claudia; Lindeman, Neal; Wen, Qi; Ghiran, Ionita; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Current red blood cell cryopreservation methods utilize bulk volumes, causing cryo-injury of cells, which results in irreversible disruption of cell morphology, mechanics, and function. An innovative approach to preserve human red blood cell morphology, mechanics, and function following vitrification in nanoliter volumes is developed using a novel cryo-ink integrated with a bio-printing approach. PMID:25047246

  15. Replication-competent influenza A viruses expressing a red fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Like most animal viruses, studying influenza A in model systems requires secondary methodologies to identify infected cells. To circumvent this requirement, we describe the generation of replication-competent influenza A red fluorescent viruses. These influenza A viruses encode mCherry fused to the viral non-structural 1 (NS1) protein and display comparable growth kinetics to wild-type viruses in vitro. Infection of cells with influenza A mCherry viruses was neutralized with monoclonal antibodies and inhibited with antivirals to levels similar to wild-type virus. Influenza A mCherry viruses were also able to lethally infect mice, and strikingly, dose- and time-dependent kinetics of viral replication were monitored in whole excised mouse lungs using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS). By eliminating the need for secondary labeling of infected cells, influenza A mCherry viruses provide an ideal tool in the ongoing struggle to better characterize the virus and identify new therapeutics against influenza A viral infections. PMID:25553516

  16. Biochemical and Cellular Changes in Leukocyte-Depleted Red Blood Cells Stored for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Diana; Rocha, Susana; Abreu, Estela; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate biochemical and cellular changes associated with the storage of leukocyte-depleted red blood cells (RBCs). Methods We investigated 10 leukocyte-depleted RBC units, randomly chosen from volunteer donors. Every week an aliquot was collected for laboratorial evaluation, which included complete cell blood count, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity, extracellular sodium, potassium and pH, membrane-bound hemoglobin (MBH), band 3 profile, and quantification of RBC membrane proteins composition. Results We observed an increase in mean cell volume (from 91.86 ± 4.65 fl to 98.10 ± 5.80 fl, day 0 vs. day 21; p < 0.05), red cell distribution width, percentage of macrocytic RBCs, reticulocyte hemoglobin content and a decreased percentage of microcytic RBCs, mean cell volume concentration and G6PD activity. The extracellular concentration of sodium decreased, and that of potassium increased significantly over time. RBC membrane composition revealed an increase in spectrin/ankyrin ratio after 21 days (from 4.84 ± 0.99 to 5.27 ± 0.94, day 0 vs. day 21; p < 0.05). At day 35, a decrease in ankyrin (from 6.44 ± 1.70% to 5.49 ± 1.96%, day 0 vs. day 35; p < 0.05), in protein 4.1/band 3, protein 4.2/band 3, and ankyrin/band 3 ratios and in band 5 was observed. Conclusions Our data show that leukocyte-depleted RBCs present changes in the RBC morphology, membrane protein composition, enzymatic activity, and extracellular electrolyte concentration and pH. PMID:25960715

  17. A system for counting fetal and maternal red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ji; Gong, Zheng; Chen, Jun; Liu, Jun; Nguyen, John; Yang, Zongyi; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2014-12-01

    The Kleihauer-Betke (KB) test is the standard method for quantitating fetal-maternal hemorrhage in maternal care. In hospitals, the KB test is performed by a certified technologist to count a minimum of 2000 fetal and maternal red blood cells (RBCs) on a blood smear. Manual counting suffers from inherent inconsistency and unreliability. This paper describes a system for automated counting and distinguishing fetal and maternal RBCs on clinical KB slides. A custom-adapted hardware platform is used for KB slide scanning and image capturing. Spatial-color pixel classification with spectral clustering is proposed to separate overlapping cells. Optimal clustering number and total cell number are obtained through maximizing cluster validity index. To accurately identify fetal RBCs from maternal RBCs, multiple features including cell size, roundness, gradient, and saturation difference between cell and whole slide are used in supervised learning to generate feature vectors, to tackle cell color, shape, and contrast variations across clinical KB slides. The results show that the automated system is capable of completing the counting of over 60,000 cells (versus ∼2000 by technologists) within 5 min (versus ∼15 min by technologists). The throughput is improved by approximately 90 times compared to manual reading by technologists. The counting results are highly accurate and correlate strongly with those from benchmarking flow cytometry measurement. PMID:24879644

  18. Simple model can explain self-inhibition of red cell anion exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, C

    1985-01-01

    Ion translocation in red cell anion exchange is assumed to occur by means of an alternating access mechanism, in which a critical binding site for the transported ion alternates between two conformational states, each accessible from only one side of the membrane. If this alternating site is located within the transport protein at some distance from one or both surfaces of the membrane, an access channel is required to connect the alternating site to the adjacent bulk solution. This automatically leads to inhibition of transport at high concentrations of the transported ion because release of the ion from the alternating site can occur only via unoccupied channel sites. PMID:2579684

  19. Red blood cell distribution width and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Elisa; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background The red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a rather simple measure of red blood cell (RBC) size heterogeneity (i.e., anisocytosis), which is easily calculated by dividing the standard deviation (SD) of erythrocyte volumes for the mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Emerging evidence suggests that, besides RBC abnormalities, many human disorders may be frequently associated with a high degree of anisocytosis. Methods In this narrative review, we analyzed the current scientific literature about the putative role and the potential epidemiologic association between RDW and cardiovascular diseases. The findings of the most representative epidemiological studies were summarized and discussed. Results Overall, considerable and convincing evidence has been brought that an increased RDW value is associated with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) [including acute myocardial infarction (AMI)], ischemic cerebrovascular disease (including stroke), peripheral artery disease (PAD), as well as with atrial fibrillation (AF), heart failure (HF) and hypertension. Higher anisocytosis also significantly and independently predicts adverse outcomes in patients with these conditions. Conclusions Although the role of anisocytosis in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases remains uncertain, the considerable evidence available so far suggests that the clinical use of RDW may be broadened beyond the conventional boundaries of erythrocyte disorders, in particular for assisting the diagnosis and prognostication of patients with ACS, ischemic cerebrovascular disease, PAD, HF and AF. PMID:26623117

  20. Existence of a Flat Phase in Red Cell Membrane Skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christoph F.; Svoboda, Karel; Lei, Ning; Petsche, Irena B.; Berman, Lonny E.; Safinya, Cyrus R.; Grest, Gary S.

    1993-02-01

    Biomolecular membranes display rich statistical mechanical behavior. They are classified as liquid in the absence of shear elasticity in the plane of the membrane and tethered (solid) when the neighboring molecules or subunits are connected and the membranes exhibit solid-like elastic behavior in the plane of the membrane. The spectrin skeleton of red blood cells was studied as a model tethered membrane. The static structure factor of the skeletons, measured by small-angle x-ray and light scattering, was fitted with a structure factor predicted with a model calculation. The model describes tethered membrane sheets with free edges in a flat phase, which is a locally rough but globally flat membrane configuration. The fit was good for large scattering vectors. The membrane roughness exponent, zeta, defined through h propto L^zeta, where h is the average amplitude of out-of-plane fluctuations and L is the linear membrane dimension, was determined to be 0.65 ± 0.10. Computer simulations of model red blood cell skeletons also showed this flat phase. The value for the roughness exponent, which was determined from the scaling properties of membranes of different sizes, was consistent with that from the experiments.

  1. Interaction of injectable neurotropic drugs with the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Walter H; Lubszky, Szabina; Thöny, Sandra; Schulzki, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The normal red blood cell (RBC) shape is a biconcave discocyte. An intercalation of a drug in the outer half of the membrane lipid bilayer leads to echinocytosis, an intercalation in the inner half to stomatocytosis. We have used the shape transforming capacity of RBCs as a model to analyse the membrane interaction potential of various neurotropic drugs. Chlorpromazine, clomipramine, citalopram, clonazepam, and diazepam induced a reversible stomatocytosis, phenytoin induced echinocytosis, while the anticonvulsants levetiracetam, valproic acid and phenobarbital had no effect. This diversity of RBC shape transformations suggests that the pharmacological action is not linked to the membrane interaction. We conclude that this simple RBC shape transformation assay could be a useful tool to screen for potential drug interactions with cell membranes. PMID:24997296

  2. Anisotropic light scattering of individual sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Higgins, John M.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Suresh, Subra; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-01

    We present the anisotropic light scattering of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). To measure light scattering spectra along two independent axes of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs with arbitrary orientation, we introduce the anisotropic Fourier transform light scattering (aFTLS) technique and measured both the static and dynamic anisotropic light scattering. We observed strong anisotropy in light scattering patterns of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs along its major axes using static aFTLS. Dynamic aFTLS analysis reveals the significantly altered biophysical properties in individual sickle RBCs. These results provide evidence that effective viscosity and elasticity of sickle RBCs are significantly different from those of the healthy RBCs.

  3. Measurement of the nonlinear elasticity of red blood cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yongkeun; Best, Catherine A.; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark L.; Feld, Michael S.; Levine, Alex J.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-05-01

    The membranes of human red blood cells (RBCs) are a composite of a fluid lipid bilayer and a triangular network of semiflexible filaments (spectrin). We perform cellular microrheology using the dynamic membrane fluctuations of the RBCs to extract the elastic moduli of this composite membrane. By applying known osmotic stresses, we measure the changes in the elastic constants under imposed strain and thereby determine the nonlinear elastic properties of the membrane. We find that the elastic nonlinearities of the shear modulus in tensed RBC membranes can be well understood in terms of a simple wormlike chain model. Our results show that the elasticity of the spectrin network can mostly account for the area compression modulus at physiological osmolality, suggesting that the lipid bilayer has significant excess area. As the cell swells, the elastic contribution from the now tensed lipid membrane becomes dominant.

  4. Red Blood Cells Motion in a Glass Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, Diana; Pereira, Ana I.; Lima, Rui

    2010-09-01

    The motion of the red blood cells (RBCs) flowing in microvessels and microchannels depend on several effects, such as hematocrit (Hct), geometry, and temperature. According to our knowledge, the effect of the temperature on RBC motion was never investigated at a microscale level. Hence, the aim of the present work is to determine the effect of the temperature on the RBC's trajectories and to investigate the best approximation of the trajectories through a nonlinear optimization. In vitro human blood was pumped through a 100 μm circular microchannel and by using a confocal micro-PTV system the RBC's trajectories were measured at different temperatures, i.e., 25° C and 37° C. In this study we measured the motion of forty cells flowing in the middle of the microchannel and applied different functions to approximate its behavior.

  5. Arginine kinase: differentiation of gene expression and protein activity in the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haichuan; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Lee; Lin, Qin; Liu, Nannan

    2009-02-01

    Arginine kinase (AK), a primary enzyme in cell metabolism and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-consuming processes, plays an important role in cellular energy metabolism and maintaining constant ATP levels in invertebrate cells. In order to identify genes that are differentially expressed between larvae and adults, queens and workers, and female alates (winged) and queens (wingless), AK cDNA was obtained from the red imported fire ant. The cDNA sequence of the gene has open reading frames of 1065 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 355 amino acid residues that includes the substrate recognition region, the signature sequence pattern of ATP:guanidino kinases, and an "actinin-type" actin binding domain. Northern blot analysis and protein activity analysis demonstrated that the expression of the AK gene and its protein activity were developmentally, caste specifically, and tissue specifically regulated in red imported fire ants with a descending order of worker> alate (winged adult) female> alate (winged adult) male> larvae> worker pupae approximately alate pupae. These results suggest a different demand for energy-consumption and production in the different castes of the red imported fire ant, which may be linked to their different missions and physiological activities in the colonies. The highest level of the AK gene expression and activity was identified in head tissue of both female alates and workers and thorax tissue of workers, followed by thorax tissue of female alates and abdomen tissue of male alates, suggesting the main tissues or cells in these body parts, such as brain, neurons and muscles, which have been identified as the major tissues and/or cells that display high and variable rates of energy turnover in other organisms, play a key role in energy production and its utilization in the fire ant. In contrast, in the male alate, the highest AK expression and activity were found in the abdomen, suggesting that here energy demand may relate to sperm formation

  6. Stretching and relaxation of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2013-09-01

    The invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by malaria parasites is a complex dynamic process, in which the infected RBCs gradually lose their deformability and their ability to recover their original shape is greatly reduced with the maturation of the parasites. In this work, we developed two types of cell model, one with an included parasite, and the other without an included parasite. The former is a representation of real malaria-infected RBCs, in which the parasite is treated as a rigid body. In the latter, where the parasite is absent, the membrane modulus and viscosity are elevated so as to produce the same features present in the parasite model. In both cases, the cell membrane is modeled as a viscoelastic triangular network connected by wormlike chains. We studied the transient behaviors of stretching deformation and shape relaxation of malaria-infected RBCs based on these two models and found that both models can generate results in agreement with those of previously published studies. With the parasite maturation, the shape deformation becomes smaller and smaller due to increasing cell rigidity, whereas the shape relaxation time becomes longer and longer due to the cell's reduced ability to recover its original shape. PMID:24010653

  7. IMAGING RED BLOOD CELL DYNAMICS BY QUANTITATIVE PHASE MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, YoungKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a crucial role in health and disease, and structural and mechanical abnormalities of these cells have been associated with important disorders such as Sickle cell disease and hereditary cytoskeletal abnormalities. Although several experimental methods exist for analysis of RBC mechanical properties, optical methods stand out as they enable collecting mechanical and dynamic data from live cells without physical contact and without the need for exogenous contrast agents. In this report, we present quantitative phase microscopy techniques that enable imaging RBC membrane fluctuations with nanometer sensitivity at arbitrary time scales from milliseconds to hours. We further provide a theoretical framework for extraction of membrane mechanical and dynamical properties using time series of quantitative phase images. Finally, we present an experimental approach to extend quantitative phase imaging to 3-dimensional space using tomographic methods. By providing non-invasive methods for imaging mechanics of live cells, these novel techniques provide an opportunity for high-throughput analysis and study of RBC mechanical properties in health and disease. PMID:18387320

  8. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  9. Research opportunities in loss of red blood cell mass in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, J. M.; Fisher, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    Decreases of red blood cell mass and plasma volume have been observed consistently following manned space flights. Losses of red cell mass by United States astronauts have averaged 10 to 15% (range: 2 to 21%). Based on postflight estimates of total hemoglobin, Soviet cosmonauts engaged in space missions lasting from 1 to 7 months have exhibited somewhat greater losses. Restoration of red cell mass requires from 4 to 6 weeks following return to Earth, regardless of the duration of space flight.

  10. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E; Ustinov, V D

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  11. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  12. Thyroid hormone stimulation in vitro of red blood cell Ca2+-ATPase activity: interspecies variation.

    PubMed

    Davis, F B; Kite, J H; Davis, P J; Blas, S D

    1982-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility to thyroid hormone stimulation of membrane-associated Ca2+-ATPase activity has been examined in red blood cells from rat, rabbit, dog, monkey, and man. Monkey and human red cell Ca2+-ATPase activities responded comparably to 10(-10)M T4 or T3. Basal and thyroid hormone-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase activity in rabbit erythrocytes was four-fold higher than in primate red cells. Rat and dog red cell Ca2+-ATPase did not respond to iodothyronines in vitro. PMID:6459228

  13. A transgenic red fluorescent protein-expressing nude mouse for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Reynoso, Jose; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2009-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical for tumor growth and progression. We have previously developed color-coded imaging of the TME using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic nude mouse as a host. However, most donor sources of cell types appropriate for study in the TME are from mice expressing GFP. Therefore, a nude mouse expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) would be an appropriate host for transplantation of GFP-expressing stromal cells as well as double-labeled cancer cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm, thereby creating a three-color imaging model of the TME. The RFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing non-transgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives RFP (DsRed2) expression in essentially all tissues. In crosses between nu/nu RFP male mice and nu/+ RFP female mice, the embryos fluoresced red. Approximately 50% of the offspring of these mice were RFP nude mice. In the RFP nude mouse, the organs all brightly expressed RFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart, and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed RFP. The bone marrow and spleen cells were also RFP positive. GFP-expressing human cancer cell lines, including HCT-116-GFP colon cancer and MDA-MB-435-GFP breast cancer were orthotopically transplanted to the transgenic RFP nude mice. These human tumors grew extensively in the transgenic RFP nude mouse. Dual-color fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of human tumor-host interaction. The RFP nude mouse model should greatly expand our knowledge of the TME. PMID:19097136

  14. Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) and RFP-based biosensors for neuronal imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Lai, Tiffany; Campbell, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The inherent advantages of red-shifted fluorescent proteins and fluorescent protein-based biosensors for the study of signaling processes in neurons and other tissues have motivated the development of a plethora of new tools. Relative to green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and other blue-shifted alternatives, red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) provide the inherent advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescence, and deeper tissue penetration associated with longer wavelength excitation light. All other factors being the same, the multiple benefits of using RFPs make these tools seemingly ideal candidates for use in neurons and, ultimately, the brain. However, for many applications, the practical utility of RFPs still falls short of the preferred GFPs. We present an overview of RFPs and RFP-based biosensors, with an emphasis on their reported applications in neuroscience. PMID:26158012

  15. RUMEN MICROBE ADAPTATION TO RED CLOVER POLYPHENOL OXIDASE PROTEIN AND LIPID PROTECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce both proteolysis and lipolysis in incubated red clover (Lee et al. 2004). However it has not been determined whether rumen microbes can adapt to utilize PPO-protected protein and lipid. This study investigated whether rumen inoculum fro...

  16. Minimal RED cell pairs markedly improve electrode kinetics and power production in microbial reverse electrodialysis cells.

    PubMed

    Cusick, Roland D; Hatzell, Marta; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-12-17

    Power production from microbial reverse electrodialysis cell (MRC) electrodes is substantially improved compared to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) solutions in multiple RED cell pair stacks and the cathode chamber. Reducing the number of RED membranes pairs while maintaining enhanced electrode performance could help to reduce capital costs. We show here that using only a single RED cell pair (CP), created by operating the cathode in concentrated AmB, dramatically increased power production normalized to cathode area from both acetate (Acetate: from 0.9 to 3.1 W/m(2)-cat) and wastewater (WW: 0.3 to 1.7 W/m(2)), by reducing solution and charge transfer resistances at the cathode. A second RED cell pair increased RED stack potential and reduced anode charge transfer resistance, further increasing power production (Acetate: 4.2 W/m(2); WW: 1.9 W/m(2)). By maintaining near optimal electrode power production with fewer membranes, power densities normalized to total membrane area for the 1-CP (Acetate: 3.1 W/m(2)-mem; WW: 1.7 W/m(2)) and 2-CP (Acetate: 1.3 W/m(2)-mem; WW: 0.6 W/m(2)) reactors were much higher than previous MRCs (0.3-0.5 W/m(2)-mem with acetate). While operating at peak power, the rate of wastewater COD removal, normalized to reactor volume, was 30-50 times higher in 1-CP and 2-CP MRCs than that in a single chamber MFC. These findings show that even a single cell pair AmB RED stack can significantly enhance electrical power production and wastewater treatment. PMID:24224718

  17. Modeling of Red Blood Cells and Related Spleen Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2011-11-01

    A key function of the spleen is to clear red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties from the circulation. These abnormal mechanical properties may be due to RBC aging or RBC diseases, e.g., malaria and sickle cell anemia. Specifically, 10% of RBCs passing through the spleen are forced to squeeze into the narrow slits between the endothelial cells, and stiffer cells which get stuck are killed and digested by macrophages. To investigate this important physiological process, we employ three different approaches to study RBCs passage through these small slits, including analytical theory, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation and Multiscale Finite Element Method (MS-FEM). By applying the analytical theory, we estimate the critical limiting geometries RBCs can pass. By using the DPD method, we study the full fluid-structure interaction problem, and compute RBC deformation under different pressure gradients. By employing the MS-FEM approach, we model the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton as two distinct layers, and focus on the cytoskeleton deformation and the bilayer-skeleton interaction force at the molecular level. Finally the results of these three approaches are compared to each other and correlated to the experimental observations.

  18. Immunoregulatory function of neonatal nucleated red blood cells in humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lili; Takada, Hidetoshi; Takimoto, Tomohito; Fujiyoshi, Junko; Ishimura, Masataka; Hara, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    We found that human cord blood nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) have a regulatory function in the innate immune reaction. These cells suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β from monocytes in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The NRBCs exerted their regulatory function even without cell-to-cell contact with the monocytes. However, IL-10 production from the monocytes by LPS stimulation in the presence of NRBCs was higher than that from LPS-stimulated monocytes cultured in the absence of NRBCs. Addition of an anti-IL-10 receptor blocking antibody restored the inflammatory cytokine production from the monocytes, suggesting that the functional change of the monocytes caused by the interaction with NRBCs was mediated by the increased IL-10 production. A whole-genome microarray analysis revealed that the monocytes expressed increased amounts of IL-10 superfamily genes after interacting with NRBCs. IL-19, which is a member of the IL-10 superfamily, enhanced IL-10 production from the monocytes, which suggested a cooperative role of the IL-10 superfamily in the suppression of inflammatory cytokine production from monocytes. Arginase, which was reported to play an important role in the suppressive function of NRBCs in mice monocytes, was found to have no significant role in human monocytes. The NRBCs seem to have a regulatory role through the induction of IL-10/IL-19 production by monocytes to suppress a vigorous innate immune reaction, which can be harmful to fetuses. PMID:27117669

  19. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow

    PubMed Central

    Alapan, Y.; Matsuyama, Y.; Little, J. A.; Gurkan, U. A.

    2016-01-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell’s aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events. PMID:27437432

  20. Energy of dissociation of lipid bilayer from the membrane skeleton of red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, W C; Waugh, R E

    1997-01-01

    The association between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton is important to cell function. In red blood cells, defects in this association can lead to various forms of hemolytic anemia. Although proteins involved in this association have been well characterized biochemically, the physical strength of this association is only beginning to be studied. Formation of a small cylindrical strand of membrane material (tether) from the membrane involves separation of the lipid bilayer from the membrane skeleton. By measuring the force required to form a tether, and knowing the contribution to the force due to the deformation of a lipid bilayer, it is possible to calculate the additional contribution to the work of tether formation due to the separation of membrane skeleton from the lipid bilayer. In the present study, we measured the tethering force during tether formation using a microcantilever (a thin, flexible glass fiber) as a force transducer. Numerical calculations of the red cell contour were performed to examine how the shape of the contour affects the calculation of tether radius, and subsequently separation work per unit area W(sk) and bending stiffness k(c). At high aspiration pressure and small external force, the red cell contour can be accurately modeled as a sphere, but at low aspiration pressure and large external force, the contour deviates from a sphere and may affect the calculation. Based on an energy balance and numerical calculations of the cell contour, values of the membrane bending stiffness k(c) = 2.0 x 10(-19) Nm and the separation work per unit area W(sk) = 0.06 mJ/m2 were obtained. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 8 PMID:9168042

  1. The involvement of cation leaks in the storage lesion of red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Flatt, Joanna F.; Bawazir, Waleed M.; Bruce, Lesley J.

    2014-01-01

    Stored blood components are a critical life-saving tool provided to patients by health services worldwide. Red cells may be stored for up to 42 days, allowing for efficient blood bank inventory management, but with prolonged storage comes an unwanted side-effect known as the “storage lesion”, which has been implicated in poorer patient outcomes. This lesion is comprised of a number of processes that are inter-dependent. Metabolic changes include a reduction in glycolysis and ATP production after the first week of storage. This leads to an accumulation of lactate and drop in pH. Longer term damage may be done by the consequent reduction in anti-oxidant enzymes, which contributes to protein and lipid oxidation via reactive oxygen species. The oxidative damage to the cytoskeleton and membrane is involved in increased vesiculation and loss of cation gradients across the membrane. The irreversible damage caused by extensive membrane loss via vesiculation alongside dehydration is likely to result in immediate splenic sequestration of these dense, spherocytic cells. Although often overlooked in the literature, the loss of the cation gradient in stored cells will be considered in more depth in this review as well as the possible effects it may have on other elements of the storage lesion. It has now become clear that blood donors can exhibit quite large variations in the properties of their red cells, including microvesicle production and the rate of cation leak. The implications for the quality of stored red cells from such donors is discussed. PMID:24987374

  2. Circularly permuted monomeric red fluorescent proteins with new termini in the beta-sheet.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Haley J; Cotton, Darrel W; Campbell, Robert E

    2010-08-01

    Circularly permuted fluorescent proteins (FPs) have a growing number of uses in live cell fluorescence biosensing applications. Most notably, they enable the construction of single fluorescent protein-based biosensors for Ca(2+) and other analytes of interest. Circularly permuted FPs are also of great utility in the optimization of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors by providing a means for varying the critical dipole-dipole orientation. We have previously reported on our efforts to create circularly permuted variants of a monomeric red FP (RFP) known as mCherry. In our previous work, we had identified six distinct locations within mCherry that tolerated the insertion of a short peptide sequence. Creation of circularly permuted variants with new termini at the locations corresponding to the sites of insertion led to the discovery of three permuted variants that retained no more than 18% of the brightness of mCherry. We now report the extensive directed evolution of the variant with new termini at position 193 of the protein sequence for improved fluorescent brightness. The resulting variant, known as cp193g7, has 61% of the intrinsic brightness of mCherry and was found to be highly tolerant of circular permutation at other locations within the sequence. We have exploited this property to engineer an expanded series of circularly permuted variants with new termini located along the length of the 10th beta-strand of mCherry. These new variants may ultimately prove useful for the creation of single FP-based Ca(2+) biosensors. PMID:20521333

  3. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  4. A red/far-red light-responsive bi-stable toggle switch to control gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Metzger, Stéphanie; Schulz, Simon; Kämpf, Michael M.; Busacker, Moritz; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Ehrbar, Martin; Nagy, Ferenc; Timmer, Jens; Zubriggen, Matias D.; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of multicellular systems is orchestrated by spatially restricted gene expression programs in specialized subpopulations. The targeted manipulation of such processes by synthetic tools with high-spatiotemporal resolution could, therefore, enable a deepened understanding of developmental processes and open new opportunities in tissue engineering. Here, we describe the first red/far-red light-triggered gene switch for mammalian cells for achieving gene expression control in time and space. We show that the system can reversibly be toggled between stable on- and off-states using short light pulses at 660 or 740 nm. Red light-induced gene expression was shown to correlate with the applied photon number and was compatible with different mammalian cell lines, including human primary cells. The light-induced expression kinetics were quantitatively analyzed by a mathematical model. We apply the system for the spatially controlled engineering of angiogenesis in chicken embryos. The system’s performance combined with cell- and tissue-compatible regulating red light will enable unprecedented spatiotemporally controlled molecular interventions in mammalian cells, tissues and organisms. PMID:23355611

  5. P2X and P2Y receptor signaling in red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Sluyter, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purinergic signaling involves the activation of cell surface P1 and P2 receptors by extracellular nucleosides and nucleotides such as adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. P2 receptors comprise P2X and P2Y receptors, and have well-established roles in leukocyte and platelet biology. Emerging evidence indicates important roles for these receptors in red blood cells. P2 receptor activation stimulates a number of signaling pathways in progenitor red blood cells resulting in microparticle release, reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Likewise, activation of P2 receptors in mature red blood cells stimulates signaling pathways mediating volume regulation, eicosanoid release, phosphatidylserine exposure, hemolysis, impaired ATP release, and susceptibility or resistance to infection. This review summarizes the distribution of P2 receptors in red blood cells, and outlines the functions of P2 receptor signaling in these cells and its implications in red blood cell biology. PMID:26579528

  6. Molecular characterization of the human red cell Rho(D) antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gahmberg, C G

    1983-01-01

    Human red cells of Rh blood groups -D-/-D- ('super-D'), -/- (Rhnull) and normal Rho(D)+ cells were radioactively surface-labeled using the lactoperoxidase 125I method. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS followed by fluorography showed a strong enrichment of a polypeptide with an apparent mol. wt. of 28,0000-33,000 in the 125I-labeled -D-/-D- membranes. This polypeptide was specifically immune precipitated with anti-Rho(D) antiserum. Treatment of intact cells with trypsin or Pronase did not digest the protein. The Rho polypeptide migrated identically on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions. It was not phosphorylated after in vitro incubation of red cells with 32P. When whole labeled membranes were solubilized in neutral detergent and applied to lectin-Sepharose columns the Rho(D) polypeptide adsorbed to Ricinus communis lectin but not to wheat germ lectin or Lens culinaris lectin. The purified molecule did not adsorb to R. communis lectin-Sepharose. Treatment of the Rho(D) antigen with endo-N-acetyl glucosaminidase H, endo-beta-galactosidase or mild alkali did not lower its apparent mol. wt. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:11894930

  7. Bacterial glycosidases for the production of universal red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiyong P; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Yuan, Huaiping; Bennett, Eric P; Pietz, Greg; Saunders, Kristen; Spence, Jean; Nudelman, Edward; Levery, Steven B; White, Thayer; Neveu, John M; Lane, William S; Bourne, Yves; Olsson, Martin L; Henrissat, Bernard; Clausen, Henrik

    2007-04-01

    Enzymatic removal of blood group ABO antigens to develop universal red blood cells (RBCs) was a pioneering vision originally proposed more than 25 years ago. Although the feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in clinical trials for group B RBCs, a major obstacle in translating this technology to clinical practice has been the lack of efficient glycosidase enzymes. Here we report two bacterial glycosidase gene families that provide enzymes capable of efficient removal of A and B antigens at neutral pH with low consumption of recombinant enzymes. The crystal structure of a member of the alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase family reveals an unusual catalytic mechanism involving NAD+. The enzymatic conversion processes we describe hold promise for achieving the goal of producing universal RBCs, which would improve the blood supply while enhancing the safety of clinical transfusions. PMID:17401360

  8. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  9. SEM analysis of red blood cells in aged human bloodstains.

    PubMed

    Hortolà, P

    1992-08-01

    Mammal red blood cells (RBC) in bloodstains have been previously detected by light microscopy on stone tools from as early as 100,000 +/- 25,000 years ago. In order to evaluate the degree of morphological preservation of erythrocytes in bloodstains, an accidental human blood smear on white chert and several experimental bloodstains on hard substrates (the same stone-white chert; another type of stone-graywacke; a non-stone support-stainless steel), were stored in a room, in non-sterile and fluctuating conditions, for lengths of time ranging from 3 to 18 months. Afterwards, the specimens were coated with gold and examined by a Cambridge Stereoscan 120 scanning electron microscope. Results revealed a high preservation of RBC integrity, with the maintenance of several discocytary shapes, a low tendency to echinocytosis and a frequent appearance of a moon-like erythrocytary shape in the thinner areas of the bloodstains. PMID:1398371

  10. Image-based red cell counting for wild animals blood.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Claudio R M; Schneider, Fabio K; Dos Santos, Leonilda Correia

    2010-01-01

    An image-based red blood cell (RBC) automatic counting system is presented for wild animals blood analysis. Images with 2048×1536-pixel resolution acquired on an optical microscope using Neubauer chambers are used to evaluate RBC counting for three animal species (Leopardus pardalis, Cebus apella and Nasua nasua) and the error found using the proposed method is similar to that obtained for inter observer visual counting method, i.e., around 10%. Smaller errors (e.g., 3%) can be obtained in regions with less grid artifacts. These promising results allow the use of the proposed method either as a complete automatic counting tool in laboratories for wild animal's blood analysis or as a first counting stage in a semi-automatic counting tool. PMID:21096766

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia Enhances Red Blood Cell Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nagababu, Enika; Gulyani, Seema; Earley, Christopher J.; Cutler, Roy G.; Mattson, Mark P.; Rifkind, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress associated with iron deficiency anemia in a murine model was studied feeding an iron deficient diet. Anemia was monitored by a decrease in hematocrit and hemoglobin. For the 9 week study an increase in total iron binding capacity was also demonstrated. Anemia resulted in an increase in red blood cells (RBC) oxidative stress as indicated by increased levels of fluorescent heme degradation products (1.24 fold after 5 weeks; 2.1 fold after 9 weeks). The increase in oxidative stress was further confirmed by elevated levels of methemoglobin for mice fed an iron deficient diet. Increased hemoglobin autoxidation and subsequent generation of ROS can account for the shorter RBC lifespan and other pathological changes associated with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:19051108

  12. Dynamics of flat membranes and flickering in red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Erwin; Nelson, David R.

    1991-12-01

    A theory of the dynamics of polymerized membranes in the flat phase is presented. The dynamics of dilute membrane solutions is strongly influenced by long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions among the monomers, mediated by the intervening solvent. We discuss the renormalization of the kinetic coefficients for the undulation and phonon modes due to hydrodynamic “backflow” (Zimm behavior). The dynamics is also studied for free draining membranes (Rouse dynamics) corresponding to the Brownian dynamics method used in Monte Carlo simulations. The long time behavior of the dynamic structure factor is given by stretched exponentials with stretching exponents determined by the exponents of the elastic coefficients and the wave vector dependence of the Oseen tensor. We also study the dynamics of the thickness fluctuations in red blood cells (flicker phenomenon) taking into account the underlying polymerized spectrin skeleton. Qualitatively different dynamical behavior is predicted for spectrin skeletons isolated from heir natural lipid environment.

  13. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  14. Pure red cell aplasia secondary to treatment with erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2003-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare condition defined as severe anemia secondary to the virtual absence of red blood cell precursors in the bone marrow. In the setting of patients treated with rHuEPO, the disease is generated by epoetin-induced antibodies that neutralise all the exogenous rHuEPO and cross-react with endogenous erythropoietin. As a result, serum erythropoietin levels are undetectable and erythropoiesis becomes ineffective. Only 4 cases of PRCA associated with rh-EPO have been reported before 1998. Thereafter, a sharp increase in the incidence of this rare condition has been reported, mainly associated with epoetin alpha use outside the United States. A number of possible mechanisms leading to PRCA development have been identified. Among these, modification of drug formulation and down stream processing probably has had a major role. Indeed, in 1998 the formulation of epoetin alpha in Europe was modified because of the fear of the "mad cow" syndrome. However, differences in molecule structure and glycosylation among different epoetins can not be excluded. It should also be underlined that the rise in the incidence of PRCA cases has been coincident with a major shift from intravenous to subcutaneous administration of rHuEPO. The abrupt rise in the incidence of PRCA cases observed in the last few years, deserves particular attention; however, we have to balance its severity, but extreme rarity, with the high number of chronic kidney disease patients who die each year because of cardiovascular disease that could partially be reduced by anemia treatment. PMID:14696747

  15. Nitric oxide measurements in hTERT-RPE cells and subcellular fractions exposed to low levels of red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Denton, Michael L.; Holwitt, Eric A.

    2014-02-01

    Cells in a tissue culture model for laser eye injury exhibit increased resistance to a lethal pulse of 2.0-μm laser radiation if the cells are first exposed to 2.88 J/cm2 of red light 24 hr prior to the lethal laser exposure. Changes in expression of various genes associated with apoptosis have been observed, but the biochemical link between light absorption and gene expression remains unknown. Cytochome c oxidase (CCOX), in the electron transport chain, is the currentlyhypothesized absorber. Absorption of the red light by CCOX is thought to facilitate displacement of nitric oxide (NO) by O2 in the active site, increasing cellular respiration and intracellular ATP. However, NO is also an important regulator and mediator of numerous physiological processes in a variety of cell and tissue types that is synthesized from l-arginine by NO synthases. In an effort to determine the relative NO contributions from these competing pathways, we measured NO levels in whole cells and subcellular fractions, with and without exposure to red light, using DAF-FM, a fluorescent dye that stoichiometrically reacts with NO. Red light induced a small, but consistently reproducible, increase in fluorescence intensity in whole cells and some subcellular fractions. Whole cells exhibited the highest overall fluorescence intensity followed by (in order) cytosolic proteins, microsomes, then nuclei and mitochondria.

  16. Red blood cells do not contribute to removal of K+ released from exhaustively working forearm muscle.

    PubMed

    Maassen, N; Foerster, M; Mairbäurl, H

    1998-07-01

    K+ released from exercising muscle via K+ channels needs to be removed from the interstitium into the blood to maintain high muscle cell membrane potential and allow normal muscle contractility. Uptake by red blood cells has been discussed as one mechanism that would also serve to regulate red blood cell volume, which was found to be constant despite increased plasma osmolality and K+ concentration ([K+pl]). We evaluated exercise-related changes in [K+pl], pH, osmolality, mean cellular Hb concentration, cell water, and red blood cell K+ concentration during exhaustive handgrip exercise. Unidirectional 86Rb+ (K+) uptake by red blood cells was measured in media with elevated extracellular K+, osmolarity, and catecholamines to simulate particularly those exercise-related changes in plasma composition that are known to stimulate K+ uptake. During exercise [K+pl] increased from 4.4 +/- 0.7 to 7.1 +/- 0.5 mmol/l plasma water and red blood cell K+ concentration increased from 137.2 +/- 6.0 to 144.6 +/- 4.6 mmol/l cell water (P red blood cells was increased by approximately 20% on stimulation, caused by activation of the Na+-K+ pump and Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransport. Results indicate the K+ content of red blood cells did not change as cells passed the exhaustively exercising forearm muscle despite the elevated [K+pl]. The tendency for an increase in intracellular K+ concentration was due to a slight, although statistically not significant, decrease in red blood cell volume. K+ uptake, although elevated, was too small to move significant amounts of K+ into red blood cells. Our results suggest that red blood cells do not contribute to the removal of K+ released from muscle and do not regulate their volume by K+ uptake during exhaustive forearm exercise. PMID:9655793

  17. Quantifying the deformation of the red blood cell skeleton in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Zhu, Qiang

    2012-02-01

    To quantitatively predict the response of red blood cell (RBC) membrane in shear flow, we carried out multiphysics simulations by coupling a three-level multiscale approach of RBC membranes with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for surrounding flows. Our multiscale approach includes a model of spectrins with the domain unfolding feature, a molecular-based model of the junctional complex with detailed protein connectivity and a whole cell Finite Element Method (FEM) model with the bilayer-skeleton friction derived from measured transmembrane protein diffusivity based on the Einstein-Stokes relation. Applying this approach, we investigated the bilayer-skeleton slip and skeleton deformation of healthy RBCs and RBCs with hereditary spherocytosis anemia during tank-treading motion. Compared with healthy cells, cells with hereditary spherocytosis anemia sustain much larger skeleton-bilayer slip and area deformation of the skeleton due to deficiency of transmembrane proteins. This leads to extremely low skeleton density and large bilayer-skeleton interaction force, both of which may cause bilayer loss. This finding suggests a possible mechanism of the development of hereditary spherocytosis anemia.

  18. Integration of red cell genotyping into the blood supply chain: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Willy A; Gottschall, Jerome L; Denomme, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Background When problems with compatibility arise, transfusion services often perform time-consuming serologic testing to locate antigen-negative red cell units for safe transfusion. New technologies enabled red cell genotyping for all clinically relevant blood group antigens. We performed mass-scale genotyping and provided access to a large red cell database to meet the demand for antigen-negative red cell units beyond ABO and Rh. Methods A red cell genotype database was established in 2010. Hospitals were given online access to a web-based antigen query portal in 2013 to find antigen-negative units in their inventories. Findings Genotype data were analyzed for 43,066 blood donors covering a set of 42 clinically relevant red cell antigens. Requests were filled for 5661 of 5672 patient encounters (99.8%) requiring antigen-negative red cell units in a multi-ethnic and multi-racial population. Red cell genotyping met the demand for antigen-negative blood in 5339 of 5672 (95%) patient encounters, while 333 remaining requests were filled using serologic data. In a pilot phase, seven community and rural transfusion services searched their local inventories using an online antigen query portal. Interpretation Red cell genotyping has the potential to transform the way antigen-negative red cell units are provided. An antigen query portal may reduce the need to ship blood or perform serologic screening. The wealth of genotype data, easily accessible online, facilitates the supply of affordable antigen-negative red cell units for patient safety. Physicians may recognize these new efficiencies for patient transfusion support. Funding BloodCenter of Wisconsin Diagnostic Laboratories Strategic Initiative and the NIH Clinical Center Intramural Research Program. PMID:26207259

  19. Peripheral red blood cell split chimerism as a consequence of intramedullary selective apoptosis of recipient red blood cells in a case of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Marziali, Marco; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid; Fraboni, Daniela; Paciaroni, Katia; Gallucci, Cristiano; Alfieri, Cecilia; Roveda, Andrea; De Angelis, Gioia; Cardarelli, Luisa; Ribersani, Michela; Andreani, Marco; Lucarelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC) has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80% circulating donor red blood cells (RBC). The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism. PMID:25408852

  20. Peripheral Red Blood Cell Split Chimerism as a Consequence of Intramedullary Selective Apoptosis of Recipient Red Blood Cells in a Case of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marziali, Marco; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid; Fraboni, Daniela; Paciaroni, Katia; Gallucci, Cristiano; Alfieri, Cecilia; Roveda, Andrea; De Angelis, Gioia; Cardarelli, Luisa; Ribersani, Michela; Andreani, Marco; Lucarelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC) has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80% circulating donor red blood cells (RBC). The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism. PMID:25408852

  1. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments. PMID:27431921

  2. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  3. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story.

    PubMed

    de Back, Djuna Z; Kostova, Elena B; van Kraaij, Marian; van den Berg, Timo K; van Bruggen, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC). During steady state hematopoiesis, approximately 10(10) RBC are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages. PMID:24523696

  4. Fibrinogen and red blood cells in venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Maria M.; Walton, Bethany L.; Byrnes, James R.; Wolberg, Alisa S.

    2014-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively termed venous thromboembolism (VTE), affect over 1 million Americans each year. VTE is triggered by inflammation and blood stasis leading to the formation of thrombi rich in fibrin and red blood cells (RBCs). However, little is known about mechanisms regulating fibrin and RBC incorporation into venous thrombi, or how these components mediate thrombus size or resolution. Both elevated circulating fibrinogen (hyperfibrinogenemia) and abnormal fibrin(ogen) structure and function, including increased fibrin network density and resistance to fibrinolysis, have been observed in plasmas from patients with VTE. Abnormalities in RBC number and/or function have also been associated with VTE risk. RBC contributions to VTE are thought to stem from their effects on blood viscosity and margination of platelets to the vessel wall. More recent studies suggest RBCs also express phosphatidylserine, support thrombin generation, and decrease fibrinolysis. RBC interactions with fibrin(ogen) and cells, including platelets and endothelial cells, may also promote thrombus formation. The contributions of fibrin(ogen) and RBCs to the pathophysiology of VTE warrants further investigation. PMID:24759140

  5. Red Blood Cells Play a Role in Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Kimberly T.; Berisha, Stela Z.; Ritchey, Brian M.; Santore, Jennifer; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) involves the removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissue for excretion in the feces. Here, we determined whether red blood cells (RBCs) can contribute to RCT. Methods and Results We performed a series of studies in apoAI-deficient mice where the HDL-mediated pathway of RCT is greatly diminished. RBCs carried a higher fraction of whole blood cholesterol than plasma in apoAI-deficient mice, and as least as much of the labeled cholesterol derived from injected foam cells appeared in RBCs compared to plasma. To determine if RBCs mediate RCT to the fecal compartment, we measured RCT in anemic and control apoAI-deficient mice and found that anemia decreased RCT to the feces by over 35% after correcting for fecal mass. Transfusion of [3H]cholesterol labeled RBCs led to robust delivery of the labeled cholesterol to the feces in apoAI-deficient hosts. In wild type mice, the majority of the blood cholesterol mass, as well as [3H]cholesterol derived from the injected foam cells, was found in plasma, and anemia did not significantly alter RCT to the feces after correction for fecal mass. Conclusion The RBC cholesterol pool is dynamic and facilitates RCT of peripheral cholesterol to the feces, particularly in the low HDL state. PMID:22499994

  6. Cytoskeletal control of the red-blood cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gov, Nir; Safran, Sam

    2004-03-01

    We have shown (Physical Review Letters, 90, 228101 (2003)) that the thermal fluctuations of red blood cells can be accounted for by a model of a nearly-free, but confined bilayer membrane with a finite tension; both the confinement and tension arise from the coupling of the membrane with the cytoskeleton. Recently, we have shown that these relatively gentle effects of the cytoskeleton-membrane couplings on the membrane fluctuations are due to the dilute nature of the coupling molecules. To quantify this, we predict the fluctuation amplitude for a microscopic model of the inhomogeneous coupling of a fluid membrane and a fixed cytoskeleton. The coupling is modeled as periodic and harmonic, and we consider the linear response of the membrane. We find that there is indeed, an effective surface tension and confinement of such a membrane, in accord with our phenomenological model, and relate these quantities to the strength and periodicity of the microscopic coupling. We also find, surprisingly, that the membrane can develop a spontaneous breaking of the cytoskeleton symmetry, at low confinements. Finally we address the role of ATP activity on the cytoskeleton-driven fluctuations and the equilibrium shape of the cell. We examine in detail the role of spectrin disconnections as the main ATP-activated network defects on the global cell shape and membrane fluctuations.

  7. Loss of deformability of malaria-infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. Majid; Feng, James

    2012-11-01

    The pathogenesis of malaria is largely due to stiffening of the infected red blood cells (RBCs). Contemporary understanding ascribes the loss of RBC deformability to a 10-fold increase in membrane stiffness caused by extra cross-linking in the spectrin network. Local measurements by micropipette aspiration, however, have reported only an increase of 3-fold in the shear modulus. We believe the discrepancy stems from the rigid parasite particles inside infected cells, and have carried out numerical simulations to demonstrate this mechanism. The cell membrane is represented by a set of discrete particles connected by linearly elastic springs. The cytosol is modeled as a homogeneous Newtonian fluid, and discretized by particles as in standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The malaria parasite is modeled as an aggregate of particles constrained to rigid-body motion. We simulate RBC stretching tests by optical tweezers in three dimensions. The results demonstrate that the presence of a sizeable parasite greatly reduces the ability of RBCs to deform under stretching. With the solid inclusion, the observed loss of deformability can be predicted quantitatively using the local membrane elasticity measured by micropipettes.

  8. Red blood cell as an adaptive optofluidic microlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    The perspective of using live cells as lenses could open new revolutionary and intriguing scenarios in the future of biophotonics and biomedical sciences for endoscopic vision, local laser treatments via optical fibres and diagnostics. Here we show that a suspended red blood cell (RBC) behaves as an adaptive liquid-lens at microscale, thus demonstrating its imaging capability and tunable focal length. In fact, thanks to the intrinsic elastic properties, the RBC can swell up from disk volume of 90 fl up to a sphere reaching 150 fl, varying focal length from negative to positive values. These live optofluidic lenses can be fully controlled by triggering the liquid buffer’s chemistry. Real-time accurate measurement of tunable focus capability of RBCs is reported through dynamic wavefront characterization, showing agreement with numerical modelling. Moreover, in analogy to adaptive optics testing, blood diagnosis is demonstrated by screening abnormal cells through focal-spot analysis applied to an RBC ensemble as a microlens array.

  9. Red cell substitutes from hemoglobin--do we start all over again?

    PubMed

    Kluger, Ronald

    2010-08-01

    Red cells are the oxygen-carrying components of blood. In modern medical practice, transfusions are given as suspensions of type-matched red cells in saline to replace lost blood, preventing organ damage and allowing for recovery. Since red cells cannot be stored for more than about 40 days and because they can transmit infections, alternative materials for transfusions were developed to replace the oxygenation function of the red cells. One approach involves chemically stabilizing hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein of the red cell, while also adjusting its oxygenation properties to replicate that of the red cell. Evaluation of clinical trials of all products led to the conclusion that none that were tested would be suitable for clinical use [Natanson C, Kern SJ, Lurie P, Banks SM, Wolfe SM: Cell-free hemoglobin-based blood substitutes and risk of myocardial infarction and death: a meta-analysis. J Am Med Assoc 2008, 299:2304-2312]. Most notably, the materials increased blood pressure and some were associated with increased risk of heart attacks. More recently, it was found that materials from covalent addition of polyethylene glycol polymers (PEG) to hemoglobin do not elicit the undesired effects on blood pressure [Vandegriff K, Bellelli A, Samaja M, Malavalli A, Brunori M, Winslow RM: Rates of NO binding to MP4, a non-hypertensive polyethylene glycol-conjugated hemoglobin. FASEB J 2003, 17:A183; Vandegriff KD, Malavalli A, Wooldridge J, Lohman J, Winslow RM: MP4: a new nonvasoactive PEG-Hb conjugate. Transfusion 2003, 43:509-516]. Also, materials with higher oxygen affinity than red cells are able to provide oxygenation at the sites in capillaries that have the most critical need for oxygen [Villela NR, Cabrales P, Tsai AG, Intaglietta M: Microcirculatory effects of changing blood hemoglobin oxygen affinity during hemorrhagic shock resuscitation in an experimental model. Shock 2009, 31:645-652]. It had been considered that the origin of the negative effects

  10. Red Blood Cell Susceptibility to Pneumolysin: CORRELATION WITH MEMBRANE BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES.

    PubMed

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Petrov, Peter G; Khafaji, Mawya A; Mughal, Muhammad K; Naylor, Claire E; Shore, Angela C; Gooding, Kim M; Casanova, Francesco; Mitchell, Tim J; Titball, Richard W; Winlove, C Peter

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the plasma membrane as well as membrane morphology on the susceptibility of human red blood cells to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin, a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, using single cell studies. We show a correlation between the physical properties of the membrane (bending rigidity and surface and dipole electrostatic potentials) and the susceptibility of red blood cells to pneumolysin-induced hemolysis. We demonstrate that biochemical modifications of the membrane induced by oxidative stress, lipid scrambling, and artificial cell aging modulate the cell response to the toxin. We provide evidence that the diversity of response to pneumolysin in diabetic red blood cells correlates with levels of glycated hemoglobin and that the mechanical properties of the red blood cell plasma membrane are altered in diabetes. Finally, we show that diabetic red blood cells are more resistant to pneumolysin and the related toxin perfringolysin O relative to healthy red blood cells. Taken together, these studies indicate that the diversity of cell response to pneumolysin within a population of human red blood cells is influenced by the biophysical and biochemical status of the plasma membrane and the chemical and/or oxidative stress pre-history of the cell. PMID:26984406

  11. Macrophages and iron trafficking at the birth and death of red cells

    PubMed Central

    Korolnek, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in iron homeostasis via their intimate association with developing and dying red cells. Central nurse macrophages promote erythropoiesis in the erythroblastic island niche. These macrophages make physical contact with erythroblasts, enabling signaling and the transfer of growth factors and possibly nutrients to the cells in their care. Human mature red cells have a lifespan of 120 days before they become senescent and again come into contact with macrophages. Phagocytosis of red blood cells is the main source of iron flux in the body, because heme must be recycled from approximately 270 billion hemoglobin molecules in each red cell, and roughly 2 million senescent red cells are recycled each second. Here we will review pathways for iron trafficking found at the macrophage-erythroid axis, with a focus on possible roles for the transport of heme in toto. PMID:25778532

  12. Density increment and decreased survival of rat red blood cells induced by cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Kunimoto, M.; Miura, T.

    1986-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were injected with CdCl/sub 2/ subcutaneously to examine in vivo effects of Cd on density and survival of red blood cells. During the 7 days after administration of 1.0 mg Cd/kg, the following sequence of events occurred: (1) a progressive increase in the amount of more dense red blood cells concomitant with a decrease in that of light red blood cells from the first to the third day; (2) an increase in the spleen weight at the third day; (3) a decrease in the hematocrit value and an increase in the amount of light red blood cells at the fifth day; and (4) a recovery of the hematocrit value at the seventh day. Five days after administration, the hematocrit value decreased in a dose-dependent mode and the decrease was significant at the 1% level at 1.0 and 1.5 mg Cd/kg. A highly significant splenomegaly was also observed at 0.5 to 1.5 mg Cd/kg. In order to label red blood cells in vivo, (/sup 3/H) diisopropylfluorophosphate ((/sup 3/H)DFP) was injected into rats. At Day 11, Cd at either 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg was administered to (/sup 3/H)DFP-prelabeled animals. Cd administration accelerated /sup 3/H-labeled red cell clearance from the blood. Six days after Cd administration, the radioactivity of red blood cells was 76 and 68% of the control at 0.5 and 1.0 mg Cd/kg, respectively. In vitro treatment of rat red density and accelerated in vivo clearance of red blood cells from the recipient circulation. These results show that Cd at low dose can cause anemia by increasing red cell density and by accelerating red cell sequestration, presumably in the spleen.

  13. Dipolar relaxation within the protein matrix of the green fluorescent protein: a red edge excitation shift study.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-12-27

    The fluorophore in green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in a highly constrained environment, protected from the bulk solvent by the barrel-shaped protein matrix. We have used the wavelength-selective fluorescence approach (red edge excitation shift, REES) to monitor solvent (environment) dynamics around the fluorophore in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under various conditions. Our results show that EGFP displays REES in buffer and glycerol, i.e., the fluorescence emission maxima exhibit a progressive shift toward the red edge, as the excitation wavelength is shifted toward the red edge of the absorption spectrum. Interestingly, EGFP displays REES when incorporated in reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), independent of the hydration state. We interpret the observed REES to the constrained environment experienced by the EGFP fluorophore in the rigid protein matrix, rather than to the dynamics of the bulk solvent. These results are supported by the temperature dependence of REES and characteristic wavelength-dependent changes in fluorescence anisotropy. PMID:18052368

  14. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Malik, Vikas; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs) has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to "read" genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivocounterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies. PMID:25652623

  15. Modulation of ligand-mediated human red cell agglutinability by prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    McLawhon, R.W.; Marikovsky, Y.; Weinstein, R.S.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol induces the transformation of human red cells from bioconcave discs to echinocytes in vitro. In addition, they have observed that ethanol can enhance the agglutination of red cells by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin or poly-L-lysine. Incubation of washed human red cells with 5 and 10% ethanol (v/v) in phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.3 at 25/sup 0/C produced a 30% increase in ligand-mediated agglutinability within 12 min. Simultaneous addition of ethanol and one of the following prostaglandin derivatives, PGE/sub 1/, pge/sub 2/, pgf/sub 2/-alpha, or PGl/sub 2/ (10/sup -9/ to 5 x 10/sup -7/ M) prevented the shape-associated increases in red cell agglutinability. Thromboxane-B/sub 2/ had no effect on agglutinability. Prostaglandins did not prevent ethanol-induced red cell shape transformations per se under identical experimental conditions. As intragastric administration of 100% ethanol results in the formation of spiculated red cell thrombi in postcapillary venules of rat gastric mucosa, they postulate that the cytoprotective role of prostanoids in preventing mucosal ulceration may be due in part to their capacity to inhibit intravascular ligand mediated red cell agglutination, hemostasis, and their sequelae, epithelial necrosis. Moreover, the data suggest that ethanol-induced red cell shape transformations and ligand-mediated agglutination represent two distinct and independent biological phenomena.

  16. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with .sup.9 TC

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium.

  17. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with [sup 99]Tc

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1992-05-26

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  18. Antibody-mediated red blood cell agglutination resulting in spontaneous echocardiographic contrast.

    PubMed

    Miller, M R; Thompson, W R; Casella, J F; Spevak, P J

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous echocardiographic contrast is well reported in states of low flow and low shear stress, and the primary blood component involved has been reported as red blood cells via rouleaux formation. This report describes the occurrence of spontaneous echocardiographic contrast from a unique mechanism of IgM-mediated red blood cell agglutination and describes the clinical sequelae. PMID:10368455

  19. Cell Stress Proteins in Atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Fernandez-Garcia, Carlos Ernesto; Ramos-Mozo, Priscila; Burillo, Elena; Egido, Jesus; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis

    2012-01-01

    Cell stress proteins (CSPs) are a large and heterogenous family of proteins, sharing two main characteristics: their levels and/or location are modified under stress and most of them can exert a chaperon function inside the cells. Nonetheless, they are also involved in the modulation of several mechanisms, both at the intracellular and the extracellular compartments. There are more than 100 proteins belonging to the CSPs family, among them the thioredoxin (TRX) system, which is the focus of the present paper. TRX system is composed of several proteins such as TRX and peroxiredoxin (PRDX), two thiol-containing enzymes that are key players in redox homeostasis due to their ability to scavenge potential harmful reactive oxygen species. In addition to their main role as antioxidants, recent data highlights their function in several processes such as cell signalling, immune inflammatory responses, or apoptosis, all of them key mechanisms involved in atherothrombosis. Moreover, since TRX and PRDX are present in the pathological vascular wall and can be secreted under prooxidative conditions to the circulation, several studies have addressed their role as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). PMID:22792412

  20. Mach-Zehnder interferometer for separation of platelets from red blood cells using dielectrophoretics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwetha, M.; Narayan, K.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, separation of platelets from red blood cells using Mach-Zehnder interferometer is shown using Dielectrophoretics (DEP). The proposed model demonstrates continuous separation of platelets from red blood cells. Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) has two arms, in which sensing arm will sense according to the applied voltage and separate the platelets from mixed blood cells. The platelets and the red blood cells will flow in two outlets of MZI. Microfluidic device is used to separate the RBC's and the platelets from the mixed blood cells.

  1. Mechanical properties of stored red blood cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Alexandre de Thomaz, Andre; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; de Lourdes Barjas-Castro, Maria; Brandao, Marcelo M.; Saad, Sara T. O.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the red blood cell (RBC) membrane overall elasticity μ by measuring the deformation of the cells when dragged at a constant velocity through a plasma fluid by an optical tweezers. The deformability of erythrocytes is a critical determinant of blood flow in the microcirculation. We tested our method and hydrodynamic models, which included the presence of two walls, by measuring the RBC deformation as a function of drag velocity and of the distance to the walls. The capability and sensitivity of this method can be evaluated by its application to a variety of studies, such as, the measurement of RBC elasticity of sickle cell anemia patients comparing homozygous (HbSS), including patients taking hydroxyrea (HU) and heterozygous (HbAS) with normal donors and the RBC elasticity measurement of gamma irradiated stored blood for transfusion to immunosupressed patients as a function of time and dose. These studies show that the technique has the sensitivity to discriminate heterozygous and homozygous sickle cell anemia patients from normal donors and even follow the course of HU treatment of Homozygous patients. The gamma irradiation studies show that there is no significant change in RBC elasticity over time for up to 14 days of storage, regardless of whether the unit was irradiated or not, but there was a huge change in the measured elasticity for the RBC units stored for more than 21 days after irradiation. These finds are important for the assessment of stored irradiated RBC viability for transfusion purposes because the present protocol consider 28 storage days after irradiation as the limit for the RBC usage.

  2. The aging of the red blood cell. A multifactor process.

    PubMed

    Danon, D; Marikovsky, Y

    1988-01-01

    Red blood cell (rbc) senescence is associated with loss of surface sialic acid, which is the principal carrier of surface negative charge and determines the electrokinetic behavior of old rbcs. Loss of sialic acid in an old rbc is demonstrated in its decreased electric mobility and lower negative charge density, determined topographically with cationic particle labeling. Surface sialic acid determines also the mutual attraction--repulsion forces, as demonstrated in enhanced aggluinability with cationic molecules, lectins, and blood group antibodies. Loss of sialic acid accompanies ATP-depletion in vitro; thus, a T-antigen site is unmasked. Macrophages have specific receptors to the site as to newly exposed galactose and N-acetyl galactosamine sugars. Furthermore, the involvement of complement molecules in the recognition of old RBCs by macrophages has been shown. This is possibly due to loss of sialic acid or at least a regrouping--relocation of surface anionic sites due to cell shape changes from discocytes to crenated forms, which accompany both in vivo and in vitro rbc aging. In turn, shape changes are apparently controlled by the cytoskeletal network underlying the rbc membrane, which undergoes structural alteration with physiologic aging in changing the dimensions of oligomeric spectrin and the thickness of the spectrin-actin cytoskeletal assembly. PMID:3052636

  3. Mechanical response of red blood cells entering a constriction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Nancy F; Ristenpart, William D

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the dynamic response of red blood cells (RBCs) to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity profiles. Relatively little experimental work has examined how individual RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as the flow at the entrance of a capillary. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of healthy RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in a microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4400 RBCs. We show that approximately 85% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, a plurality of cells (∼30%) exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity profiles. We present detailed statistical analyses on the dynamics of each motion and demonstrate that the behavior is highly sensitive to the location of the RBC within the channel. We further demonstrate that the observed tumbling, twisting, and rolling rotations can be rationalized qualitatively in terms of rigid body mechanics. The detailed experimental statistics presented here should serve as a useful resource for modeling of RBC behavior under physiologically important flow conditions. PMID:25553197

  4. Twisting of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the dynamic response of red blood cells (RBCs) to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity profiles. Relatively little experimental work has examined how individual RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as the flow at the entrance of a capillary. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of healthy RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,400 RBCs. We show that approximately 85% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, a plurality of cells (~30%) exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity profiles. We examine the mechanical origin of twisting using, as a limiting case, the equations of motion for rigid ellipsoids, and we demonstrate that the observed rotation is qualitatively consistent with rigid body theory.

  5. The rat red blood cell proteome is altered by priming with 2-butoxyethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Palkar, Prajakta S.; Kakhniashvili, David G.; Goodman, Steven R.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-08-01

    Administration of a low priming dose of 2-butoxyethanol (BE, 500 mg/kg, p.o.) 7 days prior to a larger LD{sub 90} dose (1500 mg BE/kg, p.o.) offers protection against the lethal dose-induced hemolysis and death in female Sprague Dawley rats because of prompt and efficient replacement of red blood cells (RBCs) with new resilient RBCs. The objective of the present work was to analyze the altered proteome of RBCs upon priming with BE in order to identify the potential anti-hemolytic survival proteins induced in the primed rat RBCs (P-RBCs) as opposed to vehicle-treated RBCs (V-RBCs). The RBCs from the two groups were fractionated into membrane and cytosolic fractions. The cytosolic fractions were further fractionated for proteomic analysis into 3 fractions. The fractions were labeled with Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescent dyes and subjected to 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to analyze the protein profiles. Seven membrane and 8 cytosolic proteins were found to be significantly increased ({>=} 2.5 fold) in P-RBCs as compared to V-RBCs. The identified proteins can be classified into antioxidant, membrane skeleton, protein turnover, lipid raft, and energy metabolism components. Increased levels of the proteins from antioxidant and membrane skeleton groups were confirmed by Western blot analysis. The study provides the first report on protein profiling of rat RBCs as well as on alteration of the proteome upon exposure to a priming dose of hemotoxicant. Further studies are needed to prove the protective role of the identified proteins and will initiate the field of survival/protective/anti-hemolytic proteins in RBCs.

  6. Probing the Cytoadherence of Malaria Infected Red Blood Cells under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Efremov, Artem K.; Li, Ang; Lai, Lipeng; Dao, Ming; Lim, Chwee Teck; Cao, Jianshu

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread and deadly human parasitic diseases caused by the Plasmodium (P.) species with the P.falciparum being the most deadly. The parasites are capable of invading red blood cells (RBCs) during infection. At the late stage of parasites’ development, the parasites export proteins to the infected RBCs (iRBC) membrane and bind to receptors of surface proteins on the endothelial cells that line microvasculature walls. Resulting adhesion of iRBCs to microvasculature is one of the main sources of most complications during malaria infection. Therefore, it is important to develop a versatile and simple experimental method to quantitatively investigate iRBCs cytoadhesion and binding kinetics. Here, we developed an advanced flow based adhesion assay to demonstrate that iRBC’s adhesion to endothelial CD36 receptor protein coated channels is a bistable process possessing a hysteresis loop. This finding confirms a recently developed model of cell adhesion which we used to fit our experimental data. We measured the contact area of iRBC under shear flow at different stages of infection using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF), and also adhesion receptor and ligand binding kinetics using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). With these parameters, we reproduced in our model the experimentally observed changes in adhesion properties of iRBCs accompanying parasite maturation and investigated the main mechanisms responsible for these changes, which are the contact area during the shear flow as well as the rupture area size. PMID:23724092

  7. Electrophoretic characterization of aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, kidney cells, lynphocytes and chamber coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Ground-based electrokinetic data on the electrophoresis flight experiment to be flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project experiment MA-011 are stipulated. Aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, embryonic kidney cells and lymphocytes were evaluated by analytical particle electrophoresis. The results which aided in the interpretation of the final analysis of the MA-011 experiment are documented. The electrophoresis chamber surface modifications, the buffer, and the material used in the column system are also discussed.

  8. Novel multistep BRET-FRET energy transfer using nanoconjugates of firefly proteins, quantum dots, and red fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Rabeka; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M.; Branchini, Bruce R.; Maye, Mathew M.

    2013-05-01

    Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from firefly luciferase to red fluorescent proteins using quantum dot or rod acceptor/donor linkers is described. The effect of morphology and tuned optical properties on the efficiency of this unique BRET-FRET system was evaluated.Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from firefly luciferase to red fluorescent proteins using quantum dot or rod acceptor/donor linkers is described. The effect of morphology and tuned optical properties on the efficiency of this unique BRET-FRET system was evaluated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, Fig. S1 and Table S1-S4. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01842c

  9. An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for estimating red cell survival of transfused red cells-validation using CR-51 labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.; Kickler, T.; Smith, B.; LaFrance, N.

    1984-01-01

    The survival time of transfused red cells antigenically distinct from the recipient's red cells was determined using an indirect enzyme linked antiglobulin test. These results were then compared to those determined by Cr-51 labeling. Three patients with hypoproliferative anemias and one patient (2 studies) with traumatic hemolytic anemia caused by a prosthetic heart valve were studied. Survival times were performed by transfusing a 5cc aliquot of Cr-51 labeled cells along with the remaining unit. One hour post transfusion, a blood sample was drawn and used as the 100% value. Subsequent samples drawn over a 2-3 week period were then compared to the initial sample to determine percent survival for both methods. The ELISA method for measuring red cell survival in antigenically distinct cells is in close agreement with the Cr-51 method. Although CR-51 labeling is the accepted method for red cell survival determination the ELISA method can be used when radioisotopes are unavailable or contraindicated or when the decision to estimate red cell survival is made after transfusion.

  10. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  11. Influence of red cell concentration on filtration of blood cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Schmalzer, E A; Skalak, R; Usami, S; Vayo, M; Chien, S

    1983-01-01

    Pressure-time curves obtained by passing suspensions of blood cells in Ringer solution through a 5 microns polycarbonate filter at constant flow (1.6 ml/min) were evaluated for their ability to reflect the deformability of the erythrocytes. The initial pressure reading (Pi) obtained in a quasi-steady state during the first 1-2 sec of pumping was found to be reproducible for hematocrit values between 10 and 30 percent. This Pi value was normalized by the pressure generated by the cell-free suspending medium (PO) at the same flow rate. The ratio Pi/PO was found to be linearly proportional to hematocrit up to 30 percent but independent of leukocyte concentration up to 12,000/mm3. Later portions of the curve did vary with leukocyte count. By using the equations developed from theoretical modeling of cells passing through a filter, the experimentally determined relation of Pi/PO to hematocrit, and the known geometry of the filter pores, we were able to calculate parameters reflecting the deformability of red cells. These include beta, the ratio of resistance in a pore containing a red cell to that in a pore containing only the suspending medium, and alpha, the proportion of pores filled by erythrocytes in transit. The application of theoretical analysis to experimental data has provided quantitative insights into the behavior of red cells during filtration tests in normal and disease states. PMID:6871424

  12. Crystal structure of a novel red copper protein from Nitrosomonas europaea

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.L.; Arciero, D.M.; Hooper, A.B.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Nitrosocyanin (NC) is a mononuclear red copper protein isolated from the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. Although NC exhibits some sequence homology to classic blue copper proteins, its spectroscopic and electrochemical properties are drastically different. The 1.65 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of oxidized NC reveals an unprecedented trimer of single domain cupredoxins. Each copper center is partially covered by an unusual extended {beta}-hairpin structure from an adjacent monomer. The copper ion is coordinated by His 98, His 103, Cys 95, a single side chain oxygen of Glu 60, and a solvent molecule. In the 2.3 {angstrom} resolution structure of reduced NC, His 98 shifts away from the copper ion, and the solvent molecule is not observed. The arrangement of these ligands renders the coordination geometry of the NC red copper center distinct from that of blue copper centers. In particular, the red copper center has a higher coordination number and lacks the long Cu-S(Met) and short Cu-S(Cys) bond distances characteristic of blue copper. Moreover, the red copper center is square pyramidal whereas blue copper is typically distorted tetrahedral. Analysis of the NC structure provides insight into possible functions of this new type of biological copper center.

  13. Colloidal Properties of Nanoerythrosomes Derived from Bovine Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yuan-Chia; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Hoang, Dao; Bentley, William E; D'Souza, Warren D; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-12

    Liposomes are nanoscale containers that are typically synthesized from lipids using a high-shear process such as extrusion or sonication. While liposomes are extensively used in drug delivery, they do suffer from certain problems including limited colloidal stability and short circulation times in the body. As an alternative to liposomes, we explore a class of container structures derived from erythrocytes (red blood cells). The procedure involves emptying the inner contents of these cells (specifically hemoglobin) and resuspending the empty structures in buffer, followed by sonication. The resulting structures are termed nanoerythrosomes (NERs), i.e., they are membrane-covered nanoscale containers, much like liposomes. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are employed for the first time to study these NERs. The results reveal that the NERs are discrete spheres (∼110 nm diameter) with a unilamellar membrane of thickness ∼4.5 nm. Remarkably, the biconcave disc-like shape of erythrocytes is also exhibited by the NERs under hypertonic conditions. Moreover, unlike typical liposomes, NERs show excellent colloidal stability in both buffer as well as in serum at room temperature, and are also able to withstand freeze-thaw cycling. We have explored the potential for using NERs as colloidal vehicles for targeted delivery. Much like conventional liposomes, NER membranes can be decorated with fluorescent or other markers, solutes can be encapsulated in the cores of the NERs, and NERs can be targeted to specifically bind to mammalian cells. Our study shows that NERs are a promising and versatile class of nanostructures. NERs that are harvested from a patient's own blood and reconfigured for nanomedicine can potentially offer several benefits including biocompatibility, minimization of immune response, and extended circulation time in the body. PMID:26684218

  14. Visualization and targeted disruption of protein interactions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Herce, Henry D; Deng, Wen; Helma, Jonas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are the basis of all processes in living cells, but most studies of these interactions rely on biochemical in vitro assays. Here we present a simple and versatile fluorescent-three-hybrid (F3H) strategy to visualize and target protein-protein interactions. A high-affinity nanobody anchors a GFP-fusion protein of interest at a defined cellular structure and the enrichment of red-labelled interacting proteins is measured at these sites. With this approach, we visualize the p53-HDM2 interaction in living cells and directly monitor the disruption of this interaction by Nutlin 3, a drug developed to boost p53 activity in cancer therapy. We further use this approach to develop a cell-permeable vector that releases a highly specific peptide disrupting the p53 and HDM2 interaction. The availability of multiple anchor sites and the simple optical readout of this nanobody-based capture assay enable systematic and versatile analyses of protein-protein interactions in practically any cell type and species. PMID:24154492

  15. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  16. Theoretical models for near forward light scattering by a Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    A number of experimental elastic light scattering studies have been performed in the past few years with the aim of developing automated in vivo tools for differentiating a healthy red blood cell from a Plasmodium falciparum infected cell. This paper examines some theoretical aspects of the problem. An attempt has been made to simulate the scattering patterns of healthy as well as infected individual red blood cells. Two models, namely, a homogeneous sphere model and a coated sphere model have been considered. The scattering patterns predicted by these models are examined. A possible method for discriminating infected red blood cells from healthy ones has been suggested.

  17. Microscopic Diffusion and Hydrodynamic Interactions of Hemoglobin in Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Doster, Wolfgang; Longeville, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    The cytoplasm of red blood cells is congested with the oxygen storage protein hemoglobin occupying a quarter of the cell volume. The high protein concentration leads to a reduced mobility; the self-diffusion coefficient of hemoglobin in blood cells is six times lower than in dilute solution. This effect is generally assigned to excluded volume effects in crowded media. However, the collective or gradient diffusion coefficient of hemoglobin is only weakly dependent on concentration, suggesting the compensation of osmotic and friction forces. This would exclude hydrodynamic interactions, which are of dynamic origin and do not contribute to the osmotic pressure. Hydrodynamic coupling between protein molecules is dominant at short time- and length scales before direct interactions are fully established. Employing neutron spin-echo-spectroscopy, we study hemoglobin diffusion on a nanosecond timescale and protein displacements on the scale of a few nanometers. A time- and wave-vector dependent diffusion coefficient is found, suggesting the crossover of self- and collective diffusion. Moreover, a wave-vector dependent friction function is derived, which is a characteristic feature of hydrodynamic interactions. The wave-vector and concentration dependence of the long-time self-diffusion coefficient of hemoglobin agree qualitatively with theoretical results on hydrodynamics in hard spheres suspensions. Quantitative agreement requires us to adjust the volume fraction by including part of the hydration shell: Proteins exhibit a larger surface/volume ratio compared to standard colloids of much larger size. It is concluded that hydrodynamic and not direct interactions dominate long-range molecular transport at high concentration. PMID:17513357

  18. Sequestration and Red Cell Deformability as Determinants of Hyperlactatemia in Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ishioka, Haruhiko; Ghose, Aniruddha; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Maude, Richard; Plewes, Katherine; Kingston, Hugh; Intharabut, Benjamas; Woodrow, Charlie; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Sayeed, Abdullah Abu; Hasan, Mahtab Uddin; Day, Nicholas P.; Faiz, Abul; White, Nicholas J.; Hossain, Amir; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hyperlactatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in severe falciparum malaria. Sequestered parasitized erythrocytes and reduced uninfected red blood cell deformability (RCD) compromise microcirculatory flow, leading to anaerobic glycolysis. Methods. In a cohort of patients with falciparum malaria hospitalized in Chittagong, Bangladesh, bulk RCD was measured using a laser diffraction technique, and parasite biomass was estimated from plasma concentrations of Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2). A multiple linear regression model was constructed to examine their associations with plasma lactate concentrations. Results. A total of 286 patients with falciparum malaria were studied, of whom 224 had severe malaria, and 70 died. Hyperlactatemia (lactate level, ≥4 mmol/L) was present in 111 cases. RCD at shear stresses of 1.7 Pa and 30 Pa was reduced significantly in patients who died, compared with survivors, individuals with uncomplicated malaria, or healthy individuals (P < .05, for all comparisons). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the plasma PfHRP2 level, parasitemia level, total bilirubin level, and RCD at a shear stress of 1.7 Pa were each independently correlated with plasma lactate concentrations (n = 278; R2 = 0.35). Conclusions. Sequestration of parasitized red blood cells and reduced RCD both contribute to decreased microcirculatory flow in severe disease. PMID:26494775

  19. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare. PMID:12012283

  20. Characterization of Red Blood Cells with Multiwavelength Transmission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Serebrennikova, Yulia M.; Huffman, Debra E.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2015-01-01

    Multiwavelength transmission (MWT) spectroscopy was applied to the investigation of the morphological parameters and composition of red blood cells (RBCs). The MWT spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a Mie theory based interpretation model modified to incorporate the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation of RBCs. The MWT spectra of the healthy and anemic samples were investigated for the RBC indices in open and blinded studies. When MWT performance was evaluated against a standard reference system, very good agreement between two methods, with R2 > 0.85 for all indices studied, was demonstrated. The RBC morphological parameters were used to characterize three types of anemia and to draw an association between RBC morphology and anemia severity. The MWT spectra of RBCs infected with malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at different life cycle stages were analyzed for RBC morphological parameters. The changes in the RBC volume, surface area, aspect ratio, and hemoglobin composition were used to trace the morphological and compositional alterations in the infected RBCs occurring with parasites' development and to provide insights into parasite-host interactions. The MWT method was shown to be reliable for determination of the RBC morphological parameters and to be valuable for identification of the RBC pathologic changes and disease states. PMID:25654099

  1. Characterization of red blood cells with multiwavelength transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serebrennikova, Yulia M; Huffman, Debra E; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H

    2015-01-01

    Multiwavelength transmission (MWT) spectroscopy was applied to the investigation of the morphological parameters and composition of red blood cells (RBCs). The MWT spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a Mie theory based interpretation model modified to incorporate the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation of RBCs. The MWT spectra of the healthy and anemic samples were investigated for the RBC indices in open and blinded studies. When MWT performance was evaluated against a standard reference system, very good agreement between two methods, with R (2) > 0.85 for all indices studied, was demonstrated. The RBC morphological parameters were used to characterize three types of anemia and to draw an association between RBC morphology and anemia severity. The MWT spectra of RBCs infected with malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at different life cycle stages were analyzed for RBC morphological parameters. The changes in the RBC volume, surface area, aspect ratio, and hemoglobin composition were used to trace the morphological and compositional alterations in the infected RBCs occurring with parasites' development and to provide insights into parasite-host interactions. The MWT method was shown to be reliable for determination of the RBC morphological parameters and to be valuable for identification of the RBC pathologic changes and disease states. PMID:25654099

  2. Ratio of Spleen Diameter to Red Blood Cell Distribution Width

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Daniel Vasile; Popp, Alina; Lungu, Andrei Marian; Costache, Raluca Simona; Anca, Ioana Alina; Jinga, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Celiac disease (CD) is currently considerably underdiagnosed, setting the need for developing tools to select patients with probability of CD, who warrant further testing. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) has been shown in previous studies to be a sensitive predictor for CD, but it lacks specificity. Splenic hypotrophy is also noted frequently in celiac patients. Our aim was to evaluate if spleen diameter to RDW ratio can be used as an indicator for CD. We evaluated 15 newly diagnosed CD patients, 52 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and 35 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We evaluated the differences in spleen diameter, RDW, and their ratio among the four groups. Two-thirds of the CD patients had elevated RDW, compared to 9% in the IBS group. A small spleen was seen in 80% of the celiacs, compared to 21.9% in the ulcerative colitis group, 10% in the Crohn disease group, and 9% in the IBS group. A spleen diameter to RDW ratio under 6 had a sensitivity of 73.3% and specificity of 88.5% in predicting CD, with an AUROC of 0.737. Spleen diameter to RDW ratio is a simple, widely available score, which can be used to select adult patients with probability of CD. PMID:25881851

  3. Alteration of red blood cell aggregation during blood storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun-Jung; Nam, Jeong-Hun; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Suh, Jang-Soo; Shin, Sehyun

    2011-06-01

    Even though the trade-off between the benefits and risks of blood transfusion has been discussed for the last several decades, it requires further understanding of the rheological changes in stored blood that include the alteration of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. The RBC aggregation of stored blood in its autologous plasma was monitored through the storage period (35 days). The critical shear stress, as a measure of RBC aggregation, was determined by using a microfluidic aggregometer. Blood was processed into a blood bag containing the anticoagulant CPDA1 and stored at 4°C. It was subjected to assays after zero, seven, 14, and 35 days. The critical shear stress for stored blood did not change up to 14 days of storage but exhibited a significant decrease after 35 days of storage. These results were identical to those of the conventional aggregation index (AI). Also, in the alteration of RBC aggregation for blood storage, the effect of the plasma factor was slightly stronger than that of the cellular factor. Through the present study, the critical shear stress as a new measure of RBC aggregation may help to monitor and control the quality of blood storage.

  4. Harmless Pregnancy-Induced Warm Autoantibodies to Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sürücü, Gülüstan; Mayer, Beate; Märzacker, Anneliese; Yürek, Salih; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background There is little information concerning the development and significance of autoantibodies (aab) to red blood cells (RBCs) during pregnancy. Methods Unselected pregnant women were routinely screened for the presence of unexpected antibodies to RBCs using standard techniques. Results Between 2009 and 2013, 153,612 pregnant women were tested. The antibody screening test was positive in 1,721 women (1.12%). In 1,602 (1.04%) cases, immune and/or non-immune alloantibodies and cold-reactive aab were detected, whereas warm-reactive aab were found in 119 women (0.08%). In almost all cases, warm-reactive aab belonged to the IgG class. No evidence of the presence of significant haemolysis in affected women was observed. Conclusion Pregnant women may rarely develop aab to RBCs, which do not appear to cause haemolytic anaemia. Further clarification is required on the reasons behind the development of these aab and their clinical insignificance. PMID:26696801

  5. Continuum modeling of deformation and aggregation of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Daegeun; You, Donghyun

    2016-07-26

    In order to gain better understanding for rheology of an isolated red blood cell (RBC) and a group of multiple RBCs, new continuum models for describing mechanical properties of cellular structures of an RBC and inter-cellular interactions among multiple RBCs are developed. The viscous property of an RBC membrane, which characterizes dynamic behaviors of an RBC under stress loading and unloading processes, is determined using a generalized Maxwell model. The present model is capable of predicting stress relaxation and stress-strain hysteresis, of which prediction is not possible using the commonly used Kelvin-Voigt model. Nonlinear elasticity of an RBC is determined using the Yeoh hyperelastic material model in a framework of continuum mechanics using finite-element approximation. A novel method to model inter-cellular interactions among multiple adjacent RBCs is also developed. Unlike the previous modeling approaches for aggregation of RBCs, where interaction energy for aggregation is curve-fitted using a Morse-type potential function, the interaction energy is analytically determined. The present aggregation model, therefore, allows us to predict various effects of physical parameters such as the osmotic pressure, the thickness of a glycocalyx layer, the penetration depth, and the permittivity, on the depletion and electrostatic energy among RBCs. Simulations for elongation and recovery deformation of an RBC and for aggregation of multiple RBCs are conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the present continuum modeling methods. PMID:26706720

  6. Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: What We Do Not Know

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chong; Xiong, Li-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusion saves lives but may also increase the risk of injury. The objective of this review was to evaluate the possible adverse effects related to transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates stored for prolonged periods. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to February 2015. Study Selection: Clinical and basic research articles were selected according to their relevance to this topic. Results: The ex vivo changes to RBC that occur during storage are collectively called storage lesion. It is still inconclusive if transfusion of RBC with storage lesion has clinical relevance. Multiple ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials are aimed to clarify this clinical issue. It was observed that the adverse events related to stored RBC transfusion were prominent in certain patient populations, including trauma, critical care, pediatric, and cardiac surgery patients, which leads to the investigation of underlying mechanisms. It is demonstrated that free hemoglobin toxicity, decreasing of nitric oxide bioavailability, and free iron-induced increasing of inflammation may play an important role in this process. Conclusion: It is still unclear whether transfusion of older RBC has adverse effects, and if so, which factors determine such clinical effects. However, considering the magnitude of transfusion and the widespread medical significance, potential preventive strategies should be considered, especially for the susceptible recipients. PMID:26315088

  7. Red blood cell deformability in diabetes mellitus: effect of phytomenadione.

    PubMed

    Sabo, A; Jakovljević, V; Stanulović, M; Lepsanović, L; Pejin, D

    1993-01-01

    Decreased deformability of red blood cells (RBC) in diabetes mellitus (DM) is considered to be linked to microcirculatory complications in this condition. As we found that phytomenadione increased RBC deformability in experimental animals, the question was raised, whether phytomenadione had the same effect on the RBC of diabetic patients. The study was performed in 10 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, where the erythrocyte deformability was impaired. Patients received 10 mg/day phytomenadione i.m. for five days. Deformability was measured with policarbonate membranes (Nucleopore) with pore diameter 5 microns, under gravity. The results were expressed as the ratio (r) between the flow of 1.5 ml (r1) and 2 ml (r2) of RBC suspension and 1.5 ml of buffer. Phytomenadione increased the erythrocyte deformability in patients with diabetes mellitus, lowering the value r1 from 3.54 +/- 0.84 to 2.32 +/- 0.61 (p 0.02) and r2 from 7.80 +/- 2.41 to 4.65 +/- 1.07 (p 0.01). The values after treatment reached the range of healthy controls (r1 3.11 +/- 0.98, r2 6.52 +/- 3.04). The whole blood viscosity was significantly lowered after phytomenadione (5.28 +/- 0.58 mPas before, 4.64 +/- 0.74 mPas after, p < 0.02) with unchanged plasma viscosity, but significantly lowered internal viscosity of erythrocytes. PMID:8444511

  8. Triiodothyronine improves the primary antibody response to sheep red blood cells in severely undernourished weanling mice

    SciTech Connect

    Filteau, S.M.; Perry, K.J.; Woodward, B.

    1987-09-01

    Three experiments were conducted in which weanling mice were fed a nutritionally complete diet either ad libitum or in restricted quantities such that they lost about 30% of their initial weight over a 14-day period. In Experiments 1 and 2, half the animals from each group received dietary triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) supplements. In Experiment 3, food-intake-restricted mice were fed graded levels of potassium iodide. Malnutrition reduced the number of nucleated cells per spleen, the number of splenic IgG plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 10/sup 6/ cells, and the serum antibody titers against sheep red blood cells as determined by radioimmunoassay. T/sub 3/ supplements increased antibody titers, the number of nucleated cells per spleen, and both IgM and IgG PFC per 10/sup 6/ spleen cells in malnourished mice, but had no effect on well-nourished mice. The beneficial effect of T/sub 3/ was not a result of improved protein, energy, or iodine status in the malnourished mice.

  9. Excited states of fluorescent proteins, mKO and DsRed: chromophore-protein electrostatic interaction behind the color variations.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Jun-ya; Ise, Takehiko; Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Fukumura, Eiko; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2010-03-01

    The emitting states of green fluorescent protein (GFP), monomeric Kusabira orange (mKO), and Discosoma red (DsRed) were studied using QM/MM and SAC-CI methods. By comparing the electronic structures among the green-, orange-, and red-emitting states as well as their electrostatic and quantum mechanical interactions within the protein cavity, the basic mechanisms for determining emission colors have been clarified. We found that the orange and red emissions of mKO and DsRed, respectively, result from cancellation between two effects, the pi skeleton extension (red shift) and protein electrostatic potential (blue shift). The extension of the pi skeleton enhances the intramolecular charge-transfer character of the transition, which makes the fluorescence energy more sensitive to the protein's electrostatic potential. On the basis of this mechanism, we predicted amino acid mutations that could red shift the emission energy of DsRed. A novel single amino acid mutation, which was examined computationally, reduced the DsRed emission energy from 2.14 (579 nm) to 1.95 eV (636 nm), which is approaching near-infrared fluorescence. PMID:20131896

  10. Procoagulant activity in stored units of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Aleshnick, Maya; Foley, Jonathan H; Keating, Friederike K; Butenas, Saulius

    2016-06-10

    The procoagulant activity (PA) of stored units of red blood cells (RBC) increases over time, which is related to the expression/exposure of tissue factor (TF). However, there is a discrepancy between the TF measured and changes in PA observed, suggesting that other blood components contribute to this activity. Our goal was to evaluate changes in PA of stored RBCs and to determine possible contributors to it. RBC units from 4 healthy donors were prepared and stored at 4 °C. On selected days, RBC aliquots were reconstituted with autologous plasma and tested in the thromboelastography assay. Corresponding supernatants were tested in a clotting assay. For all donors, the clotting time (CT) of reconstituted RBC units decreased from ∼3000-4000s on day 1 to ∼1000-1600s on day 30, with the most dramatic changes occurring between days 1 and 5. Anti-TF antibody slightly prolonged the CT. The concentration of TF did not change significantly over time and was within the range of 0.3-2.3 pM. Bovine lactadherin (LTD) prolonged the CT of the RBC (by 2.4-3.4-fold in days 3-5 and by 1.3-1.8-fold at day 30). Anti-TF antibody together with LTD had a cumulative effect on the CT prolongation. CT of supernatants responded to both anti-TF and anti-FXIa antibodies. Three contributors to the PA of stored RBC were identified, i.e. FXIa in solution and phosphatidylserine and TF exposed on blood cells and microparticles. Failure of LTD and antibodies to completely eliminate PA suggests that other components of blood could contribute to it. PMID:27150627

  11. Use of indium-111 as a red cell label

    SciTech Connect

    AuBuchon, J.P.; Brightman, A.

    1989-02-01

    To select the most promising 111In chelate for use as a second red cell (RBC) label for comparison of the survival of autologous and allogeneic cells, 49 normal RBC samples were studied in vitro after being labeled with 111In-8-hydroxyquinolinol (111In-oxine) prepared by three different methods, 111In-tropolone, and 111In-acetylacetone. Labeling efficiencies reached 99 percent and did not decline when the amount of 111In used was increased from 1.75 to 50 muCi per ml of RBCs. Storage of labeled RBCs in normal AB plasma at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C for up to 48 hours resulted in a similar rate of loss of the label from the RBCs with all labeling methods. These rates were time- and temperature-dependent and were accurate predictions of the rates found in later in vivo experimentation. Fresh RBCs from 11 subjects were labeled with 111In chelated with oxine in the presence of the RBCs or chelated with tropolone just prior to the labeling. RBC mass determinations using these autologous RBCs labeled with 111In accurately reflected the subjects' RBC masses as predicted through standard morphometric formulae. The rate of disappearance of the radionuclide after reinfusion of the autologous RBCs decreased with time. At 24 hours after reinfusion, 89.5 +/- 1.29 percent (mean +/- SEM) of the 111In-tropolone and 87.3 +/- 1.25 percent of the 111In-oxine continued in circulation. 111In is a simple and efficient agent for the labeling of RBCs for blood volume determinations and short-term survivals.

  12. Measuring red blood cell aggregation forces using double optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Heloise P; Fontes, Adriana; Thomaz, André; Castro, Vagner; Cesar, Carlos L; Barjas-Castro, Maria L

    2013-04-01

    Classic immunohematology approaches, based on agglutination techniques, have been used in manual and automated immunohematology laboratory routines. Red blood cell (RBC) agglutination depends on intermolecular attractive forces (hydrophobic bonds, Van der Walls, electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds) and repulsive interactions (zeta potential). The aim of this study was to measure the force involved in RBC aggregation using double optical tweezers, in normal serum, in the presence of erythrocyte antibodies and associated to agglutination potentiator solutions (Dextran, low ionic strength solution [LISS] and enzymes). The optical tweezers consisted of a neodymium:yattrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam focused through a microscope equipped with a minicam, which registered the trapped cell image in a computer where they could be analyzed using a software. For measuring RBC aggregation, a silica bead attached to RBCs was trapped and the force needed to slide one RBC over the other, as a function of the velocities, was determined. The median of the RBC aggregation force measured in normal serum (control) was 1 × 10(-3) (0.1-2.5) poise.cm. The samples analyzed with anti-D showed 2 × 10(-3) (1.0-4.0) poise.cm (p < 0.001). RBC diluted in potentiator solutions (Dextran 0.15%, Bromelain and LISS) in the absence of erythrocyte antibodies, did not present agglutination. High adherence was observed when RBCs were treated with papain. Results are in agreement with the imunohematological routine, in which non-specific results are not observed when using LISS, Dextran and Bromelain. Nevertheless, false positive results are frequently observed in manual and automated microplate analyzer using papain enzyme. The methodology proposed is simple and could provide specific information with the possibility of meansuration regarding RBC interaction. PMID:23402665

  13. Mechanisms tagging senescent red blood cells for clearance in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Hans U.; Bogdanova, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the analysis and evaluation of the diverse senescence markers suggested to prime red blood cells (RBC) for clearance in humans. These tags develop in the course of biochemical and structural alterations accompanying RBC aging, as the decrease of activities of multiple enzymes, the gradual accumulation of oxidative damage, the loss of membrane in form of microvesicles, the redistribution of ions and alterations in cell volume, density, and deformability. The actual tags represent the penultimate galactosyl residues, revealed by desialylation of glycophorins, or the aggregates of the anion exchanger (band 3 protein) to which anti-galactose antibodies bind in the first and anti-band 3 naturally occurring antibodies (NAbs) in the second case. While anti-band 3 NAbs bind to the carbohydrate-free portion of band 3 aggregates in healthy humans, induced anti-lactoferrin antibodies bind to the carbohydrate-containing portion of band 3 and along with anti-band 3 NAbs may accelerated clearance of senescent RBC in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Exoplasmically accessible phosphatidylserine (PS) and the alterations in the interplay between CD47 on RBC and its receptor on macrophages, signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPalpha protein), were also reported to induce erythrocyte clearance. We discuss the relevance of each mechanism and analyze the strength of the data. PMID:24399969

  14. Crystal structure of the fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. in both green and photoconverted red forms.

    PubMed

    Pletneva, Nadya V; Pletnev, Sergei; Pakhomov, Alexey A; Chertkova, Rita V; Martynov, Vladimir I; Muslinkina, Liya; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir Z

    2016-08-01

    The fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. (DendFP) is a member of the Kaede-like group of photoconvertible fluorescent proteins with a His62-Tyr63-Gly64 chromophore-forming sequence. Upon irradiation with UV and blue light, the fluorescence of DendFP irreversibly changes from green (506 nm) to red (578 nm). The photoconversion is accompanied by cleavage of the peptide backbone at the C(α)-N bond of His62 and the formation of a terminal carboxamide group at the preceding Leu61. The resulting double C(α)=C(β) bond in His62 extends the conjugation of the chromophore π system to include imidazole, providing the red fluorescence. Here, the three-dimensional structures of native green and photoconverted red forms of DendFP determined at 1.81 and 2.14 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. This is the first structure of photoconverted red DendFP to be reported to date. The structure-based mutagenesis of DendFP revealed an important role of positions 142 and 193: replacement of the original Ser142 and His193 caused a moderate red shift in the fluorescence and a considerable increase in the photoconversion rate. It was demonstrated that hydrogen bonding of the chromophore to the Gln116 and Ser105 cluster is crucial for variation of the photoconversion rate. The single replacement Gln116Asn disrupts the hydrogen bonding of Gln116 to the chromophore, resulting in a 30-fold decrease in the photoconversion rate, which was partially restored by a further Ser105Asn replacement. PMID:27487823

  15. Perturbation of red blood cell flow in small tubes by white blood cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, T N; La Celle, P L; Cokelet, G R

    1989-02-01

    The flow of blood in the microcirculation is facilitated by the dynamic reduction in viscosity (Fahraeus-Lindquist effect) resulting from the axial flow of deforming erythrocytes (RBCs) and from the decrease in the ratio of cell to vessel diameter. RBC velocity exceeds that of average fluid velocity; however the slower moving white blood cells (WBC) perturb flow velocity and the ratio of cell to vessel diameter by obstructing red cell flow through formation of "trains" of red cells collecting behind the white cell. This effect of white cells was studied quantitatively in a model in vitro tubes less than 10 microns in diameter with the demonstration that flow resistance increases linearly with white cell numbers up to 1,000 WBC/mm3 at tube hematocrit of 17.7%. The increase in resistance exceeds the flow resistance of WBC and appears to relate directly to train formation. A mechanical model of train formation developed to predict WBC influence in flow resistance over the range of WBC studied reasonably fits observed WBC effects. PMID:2928089

  16. Effects of Poloxamer 188 on red blood cell membrane properties in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Barbara; Marin, Mickaël; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Rabaï, Miklos; Lefevre, Sophie D; Lemonne, Nathalie; El Nemer, Wassim; Mozar, Anaïs; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Connes, Philippe; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the main acute complication in sickle cell anaemia (SS) and several clinical trials are investigating different drugs to improve the clinical severity of SS patients. A phase III study is currently exploring the profit of Velopoloxamer in SS during VOCs. We analysed, in-vitro, the effect of poloxamer (P188) on red blood cell (RBC) properties by investigating haemorheology, mechanical and adhesion functions using ektacytometry, microfluidics and dynamic adhesion approaches, respectively. We show that poloxamer significantly reduces blood viscosity, RBC aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting the beneficial use of this molecule in SS therapy. PMID:26846309

  17. Membrane characteristics and osmotic fragility of red cells, fractionated with anglehead centrifugation and counterflow centrifugation.

    PubMed

    van der Vegt, S G; Ruben, A M; Werre, J M; de Gier, J; Staal, G E

    1985-11-01

    Red cell populations were separated on the basis of differences in density using anglehead centrifugation and on the basis of differences in mean cell volume using counterflow centrifugation. In the different fractions, mean surface area was calculated, phospholipid and cholesterol content determined as well as the osmotic behaviour in hypotonic salt solutions. Older red cells appeared to be more resistant to hypotonic salt solutions, due to favourable surface area to volume ratio. PMID:4063204

  18. Computational Design of the β-Sheet Surface of a Red Fluorescent Protein Allows Control of Protein Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Wannier, Timothy M.; Moore, Matthew M.; Mou, Yun; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Computational design has been used with mixed success for the design of protein surfaces, with directed evolution heretofore providing better practical solutions than explicit design. Directed evolution, however, requires a tractable high-throughput screen because the random nature of mutation does not enrich for desired traits. Here we demonstrate the successful design of the β-sheet surface of a red fluorescent protein (RFP), enabling control over its oligomerization. To isolate the problem of surface design, we created a hybrid RFP from DsRed and mCherry with a stabilized protein core that allows for monomerization without loss of fluorescence. We designed an explicit library for which 93 of 96 (97%) of the protein variants are soluble, stably fluorescent, and monomeric. RFPs are heavily used in biology, but are natively tetrameric, and creating RFP monomers has proven extremely difficult. We show that surface design and core engineering are separate problems in RFP development and that the next generation of RFP markers will depend on improved methods for core design. PMID:26075618

  19. Biological effects of the electrostatic field: red blood cell-related alterations of oxidative processes in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Hayk A.; Sahakyan, Gohar V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine activities of pro-/antioxidant enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and oxidative modification of proteins and lipids in red blood cells (RBCs) and blood plasma of rats exposed to electrostatic field (200 kV/m) during the short (1 h) and the long periods (6 day, 6 h daily). Short-term exposure was characterized by the increase of oxidatively damaged proteins in blood of rats. This was strongly expressed in RBC membranes. After long-term action, RBC content in peripheral blood was higher than in control ( P < 0.01) and the attenuation of prooxidant processes was shown.

  20. New Red-Emitting Tetrazine-Phenoxazine Fluorogenic Labels for Live-Cell Intracellular Bioorthogonal Labeling Schemes.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Gergely; Kozma, Eszter; Herner, András; Lemke, Edward A; Kele, Péter

    2016-06-20

    The synthesis of a set of tetrazine-bearing fluorogenic dyes suitable for intracellular labeling of proteins in live cells is presented. The red excitability and emission properties ensure minimal autofluorescence, while through-bond energy-transfer-based fluorogenicity reduces nonspecific background fluorescence of unreacted dyes. The tetrazine motif efficiently quenches fluorescence of the phenoxazine core, which can be selectively turned on chemically upon bioorthogonal inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction with proteins modified genetically with strained trans-cyclooctenes. PMID:27218228

  1. Marked increase of calcium uptake in the ATP-depleted red cells of patients with iron deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoda, M.; Yawata, Y.

    1985-05-01

    Calcium (Ca) uptake was markedly increased in ATP-depleted red cells of patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) compared to ATP- depleted normal red cells. The extent of increased Ca uptake was related to the severity of iron deficiency as judged by decreased mean cell volume. Moreover, the increased Ca uptake returned to normal levels after oral iron supplementation therapy. The net calcium content of fresh red cells from iron-deficient individuals was the same as in red cells from normal subjects. Sodium influx and ferric ion uptake appeared to be virtually unaffected in the iron deficient red cells.

  2. Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells for the measurement of red cell mass in newborn infants: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Linderkamp, O.; Betke, K.; Fendel, H.; Klemm, J.; Lorenzen, K.; Riegel, K.P.

    1980-07-01

    In vitro and in vivo investigations were performed to examine the binding of Tc-99m to neonatal red blood cells (RBC). Labeling efficiency was about 90%, and unbound Tc-99m less than 3% after one washing, in premature and full-term newborns and in children. Thus presence of high percentages of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) did not influence the labeling of RBCs with Tc-99m. RBCs of 11 newborns were hemolysed and the distribution of Tc-99m on RBC components was analyzed. Although Hb F percentage averaged (60.0 +- 8.10)% (s.d.), only (11.9 +- 3.7)% of Tc-99m was bound by Hb F, whereas (45.0 +- 6.1)% was associated with Hb A. RBC membranes bound (13.7 +- 4.3)% and (29.3 +- 4.0)% were found unbound in hemolysates. These results indicate that Tc-99m preferentially binds to beta chains. In vivo equilibration of Tc-99m RBCs and of albumin labeled with Evans blue was investigated in five newborn infants. Tc-99m RBCs were stable in each case during the first hour after injection. Elution of Tc-99m from RBCs was (3.4 +- 1.5)% per h. Body-to-venous hematocrit ratio averaged 0.86 +- 0.03.

  3. Rheological properties of RBC in the microcirculation of mammalian skeletal muscle. [red blood cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrenberg, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    In the investigation the established technique of direct microscopic viewing was combined with the use of a closed circuit television system and cinematography. The red cell flow patterns in all capillaries were found to be oscillatory with characteristic cycle frequencies and amplitudes for all concentrations of inspired oxygen greater than 8%. Generally, there was a transient decrease in mean flow rate with increasing severity of hypoxia, with a gradual return toward control values. Red cell flow patterns are discussed along with questions of red cell configuration.

  4. The acute effects of nifedipine on red cell deformability in angina pectoris.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, D G; Nicholson, H P; Roath, S

    1984-01-01

    In a randomised double-blind study, the effects on red cell deformability of a single sublingual dose of nifedipine were compared with placebo in eight patients with stable angina pectoris. Red cell deformability, measured by filtration and centrifugation techniques, was significantly increased at rest in all eight patients 1 h after nifedipine, while no change occurred after placebo. The improvement in deformability after nifedipine was maintained at the end of a period of exercise and unchanged from resting values after placebo. The results suggest that the increased deformability of red cells after nifedipine could contribute to the therapeutic effects of the drug in myocardial ischaemia. PMID:6704282

  5. The energy-less red blood cell is lost: erythrocyte enzyme abnormalities of glycolysis.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Richard; van Solinge, Wouter W

    2005-12-15

    The red blood cell depends solely on the anaerobic conversion of glucose by the Embden-Meyerhof pathway for the generation and storage of high-energy phosphates, which is necessary for the maintenance of a number of vital functions. Many red blood cell enzymopathies have been described that disturb the erythrocyte's integrity, shorten its cellular survival, and result in hemolytic anemia. By far the majority of these enzymopathies are hereditary in nature. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the genetic, biochemical, and structural features of clinically relevant red blood cell enzymopathies involved in the Embden-Meyerhof pathway and the Rapoport-Luebering shunt. PMID:16051738

  6. Erythropoietic Protoporphyria: Lipid Peroxidation and Red Cell Membrane Damage Associated with Photohemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Bernard D.; Harber, Leonard C.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanism by which long wavelength ultraviolet light hemolyzes red cells obtained from patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) was investigated. Previous studies had suggested that irradiation of these red cells with wavelengths of light capable of eliciting dermatological manifestations led to oxygen-dependent colloid osmotic hemolysis through the formation of peroxides. In the present report, lipid peroxidation during in vitro irradiation of EPP red cells with long ultraviolet light was demonstrated by: (a) the formation of 2-thiobarbituric acid reactants; (b) the presence of conjugated diene bonds in red cell lipid; and (c) the selective loss of unsaturated fatty acids proportional to the number of carbon-carbon double bonds in each. Irradiation of EPP red cells was also shown to result in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Before photohemolysis there was a decline in cell membrane sulfhydryl groups and a loss in activity of the cell membrane enzyme acetylcholinesterase. These parameters provide further evidence suggesting that the cell membrane is a primary site of the photohemolytic effect of long ultraviolet light in EPP red cells. Further evaluation of the radiation-induced inactivation of EPP red cell acetylcholinesterase was performed by radiating mixtures containing bovine erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and protoporphyrin IX. These studies revealed that the rate of decline in enzyme activity is accelerated by the addition of linoleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, but not by palmitic acid, a saturated fatty acid. Partial protection against both photohemolysis and acetylcholinesterase decline is provided by alpha-to-copherol. This lipid antioxidant loses its activity during the irradiation of EPP red cells suggesting that it is utilized in this process. PMID:5014616

  7. Measuring electrical and mechanical properties of red blood cells with a double optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; de Thomaz, André A.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-08-01

    The fluid lipid bilayer viscoelastic membrane of red blood cells (RBC) contains antigen glycolproteins and proteins which can interact with antibodies to cause cell agglutination. This is the basis of most of the immunohematologic tests in blood banks and the identification of the antibodies against the erythrocyte antigens is of fundamental importance for transfusional routines. The negative charges of the RBCs creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. The first counterions cloud strongly binded moving together with the RBC is called the compact layer. This report proposes the use of a double optical tweezers for a new procedure for measuring: (1) the apparent membrane viscosity, (2) the cell adhesion, (3) the zeta potential and (4) the compact layer's size of the charges formed around the cell in the electrolytic solution. To measure the membrane viscosity we trapped silica beads strongly attached to agglutinated RBCs and measured the force to slide one RBC over the other as a function of the relative velocity. The RBC adhesion was measured by slowly displacing two RBCs apart until the disagglutination happens. The compact layer's size was measured using the force on the silica bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied voltage and the zeta potential was obtained by measuring the terminal velocity after releasing the RBC from the optical trap at the last applied voltage. We believe that the methodology here proposed can improve the methods of diagnosis in blood banks.

  8. Safe extension of red blood cell storage life at 4{degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1996-04-01

    The project sought to develop methods to extend the storage life of red blood cells. Extended storage would allow donor to self or autologous transfusion, expand and stabilize the blood supply, reduce the cost of medical care and eliminate the risk of transfusion related infections, including a spectrum of hepatitides (A, B and C) and HIV. The putative cause of red blood cell spoilage at 4 C has been identified as oxidative membrane damage resulting from deoxyhemoglobin and its denaturation products including hemichrome, hemin and Fe{sup 3+}. Trials with carbon monoxide, which is a stabilizer of hemoglobin, have produced striking improvement of red blood cell diagnostics for cells stored at 4 C. Carbonmonoxy hemoglobin is readily converted to oxyhemoglobin by light in the presence of oxygen. These findings have generated a working model and an approach to identify the best protocols for optimal red cell storage and hemoglobin regeneration.

  9. Biophysical Properties of Lumbricus terrestris Erythrocruorin and Its Potential Use as a Red Blood Cell Substitute.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Jacob; Palmer, Andre F

    2012-01-01

    Previous generations of hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have been plagued by key biophysical limitations that result in severe side-effects once transfused in vivo, including protein instability, high heme oxidation rates, and nitric oxide (NO) scavenging. All of these problems emerge after mammalian Hbs are removed from red blood cells (RBCs) and used for HBOC synthesis/formulation. Therefore, extracellular Hbs (erythrocruorins) from organisms which lack RBCs might serve as better HBOCs. This review focuses on the erythrocruorin of Lumbricus terrestris (LtEc), which has been shown to be extremely stable, resistant to oxidation, and may interact with NO differently than mammalian Hbs. All of these beneficial properties show that LtEc is a promising new HBOC which warrants further investigation. PMID:24956515

  10. Isoelectric focusing of red blood cells in a density gradient stabilized column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Miller, T. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of Ficoll and cell application pH on red blood cell electrophoretic mobility and focusing pH were investigated by focusing cells in a density gradient stabilized column. Sample loading, cell dispersion, column conductivity, resolution of separation, and the effect of Ampholines were examined.

  11. Post-prandial changes in protein synthesis in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) larvae.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ian D; Fuiman, Lee A

    2011-06-01

    Protein synthesis is one of the major energy-consuming processes in all living organisms. Post-prandial changes in protein synthesis have been studied in a range of animal taxa but have been little studied in fish larvae. Using the flooding-dose method, we measured post-prandial changes in whole-body rates of protein synthesis in regularly fed red drum Sciaenops ocellatus (Linnaeus) larvae for 24-28 h following their daily meal. Fractional rates of protein synthesis increased from a baseline (pre-feeding) rate of 16% day(-1) to a post-prandial peak of 48% day(-1) ca. 8 h after feeding before declining to 12% day(-1) after 24-28 h. The overall mean daily rate of protein synthesis was calculated as 27% day(-1). Although suggested as energetically impossible in larval poikilotherms, our results show that rates in excess of 30% day(-1) can be attained by larval fishes for a few hours but are not sustained. The average daily energetic cost of protein synthesis was estimated as 34% of daily total oxygen consumption, ranging from 19% immediately before feeding to 61% during the post-prandial peak in protein synthesis. This suggests that during the post-prandial peak, protein synthesis will require a large proportion of the hourly energy production, which, given the limited metabolic scope in fish larvae, may limit the energy that could otherwise be allocated to other energy-costly functions, such as foraging and escape responses. PMID:21562168

  12. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P.; Mañú-Pereira, María del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca2+ handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na+, K+, Ca2+) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca2+ cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca2+-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the patients to

  13. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation.

    PubMed

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P; Mañú-Pereira, María Del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca(2+) handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+)) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca(2+) cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca(2+)-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the

  14. Effect of Irradiation on Microparticles in Red Blood Cell Concentrates.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chi Hyun; Yun, Seung Gyu; Koh, Young Eun; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-07-01

    Changes in microparticles (MP) from red blood cell (RBC) concentrates in the context of irradiation have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate how irradiation affects the number of MPs within transfusion components. Twenty RBC concentrates, within 14 days after donation, were exposed to gamma rays (dose rate: 25 cGy) from a cesium-137 irradiator. Flow cytometry was used to determine the numbers of MPs derived from RBC concentrates before and 24 hr after irradiation. The mean number of MPs (±standard deviation) in RBC concentrates was 21.9×10⁹/L (±22.7×10⁹/L), and the total number of MPs ranged from 2.6×10⁹/L to 96.9×10⁹/L. The mean number of MPs increased to 22.6×10⁹/L (±31.6×10⁹/L) after irradiation. Before irradiation, the CD41-positive and CD235a-positive MPs constituted 9.5% (1.0×10⁹/L) and 2.2% (263×10⁶/L) of total MPs, respectively. After irradiation, CD41-positive MPs increased to 12.1% (1.5×10⁹/L) (P=0.014), but the CD235a-positive MPs decreased to 2.0% (214×10⁶/L) of the total MPs (P=0.369). Irradiation increases the number of CD41-positive MPs within RBC concentrates, suggesting the irradiation of RBC concentrates could be associated with thrombotic risk of circulating blood through the numerical change. PMID:27139610

  15. Red blood cell sodium transport in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Ulrik Lütken; Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens H

    2016-09-01

    Patients with advanced cirrhosis have abnormal sodium homoeostasis. The study was undertaken to quantify the sodium transport across the plasma membrane of red blood cells (RBC) in patients with cirrhosis. RBC efflux and influx of sodium were studied in vitro with tracer (22) Na(+) according to linear kinetics in 24 patients with cirrhosis and 14 healthy controls. The sodium efflux was modified by ouabain (O), furosemide (F) and a combination of O and F (O + F). RBC sodium was significantly decreased (4·6 versus control 6·3 mmol l(-1) , P<0·001) and directly related to serum sodium (r = 0·57, P<0·05). The RBC fractional sodium efflux was higher in patients with cirrhosis (+46%, P<0·01) compared to controls. Inhibition in both high (145 mmol l(-1) )- and low (120 mmol l(-1) )-sodium buffers showed that the F-insensitive sodium efflux was twice as high in cirrhosis as in controls (P = 0·03-0·007), especially the O-sensitive, F-insensitive efflux was increased (+ 225%, P = 0·01-0·006). Fractional F-sensitive transport was normal in cirrhosis. RBC sodium influx was largely normal in cirrhosis. In conclusion, RBC sodium content is reduced in patients with cirrhosis with a direct relation to serum sodium. Increased RBC sodium efflux is especially related to ouabain-sensitive, furosemide-insensitive transport and thus most likely due to upregulated activity of the sodium-potassium pump. The study gives no evidence to an altered intracellular/extracellular sodium ratio or to a reduced fractional furosemide-sensitive sodium transport in cirrhosis. PMID:26016736

  16. Effect of Irradiation on Microparticles in Red Blood Cell Concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chi Hyun; Yun, Seung Gyu; Koh, Young Eun

    2016-01-01

    Changes in microparticles (MP) from red blood cell (RBC) concentrates in the context of irradiation have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate how irradiation affects the number of MPs within transfusion components. Twenty RBC concentrates, within 14 days after donation, were exposed to gamma rays (dose rate: 25 cGy) from a cesium-137 irradiator. Flow cytometry was used to determine the numbers of MPs derived from RBC concentrates before and 24 hr after irradiation. The mean number of MPs (±standard deviation) in RBC concentrates was 21.9×109/L (±22.7×109/L), and the total number of MPs ranged from 2.6×109/L to 96.9×109/L. The mean number of MPs increased to 22.6×109/L (±31.6×109/L) after irradiation. Before irradiation, the CD41-positive and CD235a-positive MPs constituted 9.5% (1.0×109/L) and 2.2% (263×106/L) of total MPs, respectively. After irradiation, CD41-positive MPs increased to 12.1% (1.5×109/L) (P=0.014), but the CD235a-positive MPs decreased to 2.0% (214×106/L) of the total MPs (P=0.369). Irradiation increases the number of CD41-positive MPs within RBC concentrates, suggesting the irradiation of RBC concentrates could be associated with thrombotic risk of circulating blood through the numerical change. PMID:27139610

  17. Effects of pegylated hamster red blood cells on microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peter C Y; Huang, Wei; Stassinopoulos, Adonis; Cheung, Anthony T W

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) treated red blood cells (RBCs) on the microcirculation in a hamster back skin window chamber model. Donor hamster RBCs were PEGylated through an incubation with an activated PEG solution, washed, resuspended, and infused through a 10% volume top loading procedure into the carotid artery in an awake Syrian Golden hamster. Eight hamster groups were treated with activated PEG different sizes and concentrations: 0.05 mM-5 kDa PEG, 0.5 mM-5 kDa PEG, 1.1 mM-5 kDa PEG, 2.2 mM-5 kDa PEG, 22 mM-5 kDa PEG, 0.05 mM-20 kDa PEG, 0.5 mM-20 kDa PEG, and 5 mM-20 kDa PEG. Non-treated RBCs were used as control. The microvascular bed under observation was videotaped 30 min before the infusion and followed for 30 min post infusion. The diameter of individual blood vessels and blood flow velocities in selected vessels was measured. Hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were recorded before infusion and at the end of experiment. Tissue pO(2) was also monitored. Results showed the hamsters tolerated the PEGylated RBCs without apparent ill effects. No significant changes were recorded for the hematocrit, the hemoglobin concentration, the blood vessel diameters, blood flow velocities, and the interstitial partial oxygen pressure (pO(2)) before, during, and after the injections of PEG-RBCs (P > 0.05). Unlike most hemoglobin-based oxygen carrying compounds, which can cause vasoconstriction, the PEGylated RBCs did not produce any measurable vasoactivity. Together with the absence of rouleaux formation and the fact that PEG molecules can mask the surface antigens on RBCs, PEGylation appeared promising as a circulation enhancement treatment. PMID:18649167

  18. SLP assay: a rapid assay for detection of red blood cell antibodies in the serology of pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Giannitsis, D J; Hofstätter, I; Wild, J; Häcker-Shahin, B

    1992-01-01

    A rapid manual test for the detection of red cell antibodies called SLP assay has been developed and compared with the sensitivity of the antiglobulin assay. Acid-soluble proteins (SLP) from human leukocytes cause aggregation of human red blood cells. SLP represents a group of proteins consisting of 5 fractions of different positively charged macromolecules, which are able to reduce the negative charge of the red cells. Reduction of the negative charge results in a nonspecific hemagglutination of different strengths, depending on the SLP fractions used. This hemagglutination can be reversed by neutralizing the SLP with heparin. In the case of blood group-antibody-mediated aggregation the hemagglutination is nonreversible despite neutralization with heparin and remains stable for several hours. Because of the high sensitivity of the SLP assay all blood group antibodies from the IgM type as well as from the IgG type are detectable even in low concentrations. The sensitivity of the SLP assay is comparable to the antiglobulin assay. PMID:1284754

  19. The lambda red proteins promote efficient recombination between diverged sequences: implications for bacteriophage genome mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Martinsohn, Jann T; Radman, Miroslav; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2008-05-01

    Genome mosaicism in temperate bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) is so great that it obscures their phylogeny at the genome level. However, the precise molecular processes underlying this mosaicism are unknown. Illegitimate recombination has been proposed, but homeologous recombination could also be at play. To test this, we have measured the efficiency of homeologous recombination between diverged oxa gene pairs inserted into lambda. High yields of recombinants between 22% diverged genes have been obtained when the virus Red Gam pathway was active, and 100 fold less when the host Escherichia coli RecABCD pathway was active. The recombination editing proteins, MutS and UvrD, showed only marginal effects on lambda recombination. Thus, escape from host editing contributes to the high proficiency of virus recombination. Moreover, our bioinformatics study suggests that homeologous recombination between similar lambdoid viruses has created part of their mosaicism. We therefore propose that the remarkable propensity of the lambda-encoded Red and Gam proteins to recombine diverged DNA is effectively contributing to mosaicism, and more generally, that a correlation may exist between virus genome mosaicism and the presence of Red/Gam-like systems. PMID:18451987

  20. Flow structures and red blood cell dynamics in arteriole of dilated or constricted cross section.

    PubMed

    Gambaruto, Alberto M

    2016-07-26

    Vessel with 'circular' or 'star-shaped' cross sections are studied, representing respectively dilated or constricted cases where endothelial cells smoothly line or bulge into the lumen. Computational haemodynamics simulations are carried out on idealised periodic arteriole-sized vessels, with red blood cell 'tube' hematocrit value=24%. A further simulation of a single red blood cell serves for comparison purposes. The bulk motion of the red blood cells reproduces well-known effects, including the presence of a cell-free layer and the apparent shear-thinning non-Newtonian rheology. The velocity flow field is analysed in a Lagrangian reference frame, relative to any given red blood cell, hence removing the bulk coaxial motion and highlighting instead the complex secondary flow patterns. An aggregate formation becomes apparent, continuously rearranging and dynamic, brought about by the inter-cellular fluid mechanics interactions and the deformability properties of the cells. The secondary flow field induces a vacillating radial migration of the red blood cells. At different radial locations, the red blood cells express different residence times, orientation and shape. The shear stresses exerted by the flow on the vessel wall are influenced by the motion of red blood cells, despite the presence of the cell-free layer. Spatial (and temporal) variations of wall shear stress patters are observed, especially for the 'circular' vessel. The 'star-shaped' vessel bears considerable stress at the protruding endothelial cell crests, where the stress vectors are coaxially aligned. The bulging endothelial cells hence regularise the transmission of stresses on the vessel wall. PMID:26822224

  1. Biosignatures of Kerala red rain cells: Implications in understanding their origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangappa, R.; Thomas, M.; Hogg, S.

    2013-09-01

    The red rain that fell over Kerala, southern India (2001-2012) was characterised by the red pigmented particles. Earlier proposal claiming that these are known algal bloom blown from trees (Sampath et al, 2001; DiGregorio, 2007) has been studied by us and disproved. Also, further investigation reporting their extraordinary properties including a suggestion that they lack DNA (Louis and Kumar 2003; 2006; 2008) has been invalidated (Gangappa and Hogg, 2013). However, their claim regarding the growth and replication of these cells at 300ºC needs more investigation if it is to gain acceptance. Current study provide evidences regarding the biological properties of Kerala red rain cells to gain insights into environmental conditions from which they may have originated. Combined with various research strategies and high resolution instruments, we have demonstrated the following interesting properties of Kerala red rain cells: (1) unusually thick external envelope enclosing the central core; (2)stability of red pigment at temperatures about 100ºC and pH variations; (3) absence of eukaryotic ultrastructures; (4) possible replication at 121ºC with nanostructures (possible daughter cells) having similar morphological features inside the large mother cells at such high temperature. They contain high percentage of carbon, iron, silicon and aluminum and often enclosed in a silicon rich biofilms. Further investigation shows that the positive detection of DNA in these cells was possible only after the complete removal of red pigment, thereby providing an explanation for the negative outcome of earlier studies in this regard. Moreover, evidences are shown to support that these cells contain high amounts of UV absorbing compounds, porphyrin complexes and possible scytonemin. Kerala red rain cells may prove to be polyextermophiles belonging to prokaryotes and may have possibly originated from the environment containing above mentioned chemical elements, high energy UV exposure and

  2. Studies with nonradioisotopic sodium chromate. I. Development of a technique for measuring red cell volume

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, W.A.; Hanbury, C.M.; Keegan, T.E.; Pleban, P.; Holme, S. )

    1989-10-01

    A nonradioisotopic method for measuring red cell volume that involves the use of 52Cr-sodium chromate as the red cell label and of graphite furnace atomic absorption analysis of chromium is described. The technique allows the labelling of 20 mL of packed red cells with 40 to 50 micrograms of sodium chromate (Na2CrO4) in 30 minutes at 22 degrees C with 94 +/- 6 percent uptake. Approximately 40 micrograms of Na2CrO4 was injected for in vivo studies. This results in posttransfusion in vivo red cell chromium levels after sample processing in the range of 1 to 7 micrograms per L, which could be quantitated accurately (coefficient of variation = 4.7%) by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The labeling concentration of chromium did not cause increased hemolysis, and the labeled cells exhibited an osmotic fragility curve similar to that of unlabeled, fresh ACD red cells. Red cell glutathione peroxidase was unaffected by labeling, although glutathione reductase was reduced by approximately 13 percent (p less than 0.05). The 52Cr red cell volume-measuring method was evaluated by concurrent in vivo studies with the standard 51Cr and 125I-albumin methods for that procedure. Simultaneous measurement of red cell volumes in seven volunteers by the 51Cr, 52Cr, and 125I-albumin techniques correlated highly with each other (r greater than 0.76), with mean values of 2294 +/- 199, 2191 +/- 180, and 2243 +/- 291 mL, respectively. The standard deviations of the differences were small: 134 mL for 52Cr versus 51Cr and 183 mL for 52Cr versus 125I.

  3. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-04-29

    A method is disclosed using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen from the red blood cells at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate. 4 figs.

  4. Current issues relating to the transfusion of stored red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zimrin, A B; Hess, J R

    2009-02-01

    The development of blood storage systems allowed donation and transfusion to be separated in time and space. This separation has permitted the regionalization of donor services with subsequent economies of scale and improvements in the quality and availability of blood products. However, the availability of storage raises the question of how long blood products can and should be stored and how long they are safe and effective. The efficacy of red blood cells was originally measured as the increment in haematocrit and safety began with typing and the effort to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination. Appreciation of a growing list of storage lesions of red blood cells has developed with our increasing understanding of red blood cell physiology and our experience with red blood cell transfusion. However, other than frank haemolysis, rare episodes of bacterial contamination and overgrowth, the reduction of oxygen-carrying capacity associated with the failure of some transfused cells to circulate, and the toxicity of lysophospholipids released from membrane breakdown, storage-induced lesions have not had obvious correlations with safety or efficacy. The safety of red blood cell storage has also been approached in retrospective epidemiologic studies of transfused patients, but the results are frequently biased by the fact that sicker patients are transfused more often and blood banks do not issue blood products in a random order. Several large prospective studies of the safety of stored red blood cells are planned. PMID:19152602

  5. Effects of 4000 rad irradiation on the in vitro storage properties of packed red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.L.; Ledford, M.E.

    1985-11-01

    Immunosuppressed patients who require red cell transfusions receive irradiated (1500-3000 rad) packed red cells. These cells are irradiated immediately before infusion. If a large group of patients become immunosuppressed due to exposure to radiation or chemicals, the ability to supply large volumes of irradiated blood at the time of use might not be possible. An alternate solution to providing quantities of irradiated blood is to irradiate the units prior to storage. This study presents in vitro data comparing storage of paired packed red cell units either irradiated or not irradiated. Five units of fresh blood drawn into citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA-1) were packed to a hematocrit of 75 +/- 1 percent, and then each unit was divided in two equal parts. One of each pair was irradiated (4000 rads), and both parts of each unit were stored for 35 days at 4 degrees C. Samples were analyzed every 7 days. Irradiation caused a slight drop in red cell adenosine triphosphate and 2,3 diphosphoglycerate and a slight increase in plasma hemoglobin compared to controls. Methemoglobin, pH, and glucose consumption were identical to the controls. The evidence indicates that irradiation did not cause biochemical or metabolic changes in the red cells that would lead us to suspect a difference between irradiated and nonirradiated stored red cells in function or viability. These negative findings require in vivo confirmation.

  6. In vitro red blood cell assay for oxidant toxicity of petroleum oil

    SciTech Connect

    Couillard, C.M.; Leighton, F.A. )

    1993-05-01

    Petroleum oil has caused hemolytic anemia in birds and mammals. In birds, an oxidant damage on circulating red cells has been identified as the primary toxic effect of ingested petroleum oils. An in vitro red blood cell assay was developed to discriminate among the oxidant activities of different petroleum oils. The assay used rabbit red blood cells with a rat liver enzyme system and formation of methemoglobin was measured as an indicator of oxidant damage to the red cells. The assay was applied to five different petroleum oils and to naphthalene, a petroleum hydrocarbon known to cause hemolytic anemia. Different petroleum oils differed in their capacity to induce methemoglobin formation. Methemoglobin levels varied from 2.9% with Arabian light crude oil to 6.2% with South Louisiana crude oil. Naphthalene induced formation of up to 37% methemoglobin. Naphthalene and the five petroleum oils generated methemoglobin only in the presence of liver enzymes.

  7. Fetal anaemia from red blood cell membrane defect and co-inherited haemoglobin Constant Spring.

    PubMed

    Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee; Tongsong, Theera

    2015-01-01

    The case presented here is an example of hereditary red blood cell membrane defect with a co-inherited haemoglobin Constant Spring. This case is of an anaemic fetus that presented with isolated ascites at 18 weeks of gestation. Fetal blood analysis revealed abnormal shaped red blood cells. The same pattern of red blood cell morphology was also seen on paternal peripheral blood smear. Intrauterine blood transfusions were given twice to correct fetal anaemia. The fetus showed a good response to the transfusions and was delivered at term with mild anaemia and did not need blood transfusion after birth. This report describes a natural course of red blood cell membrane defect with co-inherited haemoglobin Constant Spring, indicating that the course of disease was more severe during fetal life. Intrauterine transfusion supported the transition of the fetus through the critical period in utero to a healthier life after birth. PMID:26216922

  8. Photoacoustic assessment of oxygen saturation: effect of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysi, Eno; Saha, Ratan K.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-03-01

    The simultaneous photoacoustic assessment of oxygen saturation and red blood cell aggregation is presented. Aggregation was induced on porcine red blood cells using Dextran-70 at multiple hematocrit levels. Samples were exposed to 750 nm and 1064 nm for each hematocrit and aggregate size in order to compute the oxygen saturation. As the size of the aggregate increased, the photoacoustic signal amplitude increased monotonically. The same trend was observed for increasing hematocrit at each aggregation level. The oxygen saturation of aggregated samples was 30% higher than non-aggregated samples at each hematocrit level. This suggests that the presence of red blood cell aggregates impairs the release of oxygen to the surrounding environment. Such a result has important implications for detecting red blood cell aggregation non-invasively and making clinical decisions based on the simulatenous assessment of oxygen saturation.

  9. Glutathione loading prevents free radical injury in red blood cells after storage.

    PubMed

    Dumaswala, U J; Wilson, M J; Wu, Y L; Wykle, J; Zhuo, L; Douglass, L M; Daleke, D L

    2000-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the loss of glutathione (GSH) and GSH-peroxidase (GSH-PX) in banked red blood cells (RBCs) is accompanied by oxidative modifications of lipids, proteins and loss of membrane integrity. The objective of this study was to determine whether artificial increases in antioxidant (GSH) or antioxidant enzyme (catalase) content could protect membrane damage in the banked RBCs following an oxidant challenge. RBCs stored at 1-6 degrees C for 0, 42 and 84 days in a conventional additive solution (Adsol) were subjected to oxidative stress using ferric/ascorbic acid (Fe/ASC) before and after enriching them with GSH or catalase using a hypotonic lysis-isoosmotic resealing procedure. This lysis-resealing procedure in the presence of GSH/catalase raised intracellular GSH and catalase concentrations 4-6 fold, yet produced only a small reduction in mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH) and mean cell hemoglobin concentrations (MCHC). Indicators of oxidative stress and membrane integrity were measured, including acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, GSH concentration, phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization (prothrombin-converting activity) and transmembrane lipid movements (14C-lyso phosphatidylcholine flip-flop and PS transport). GSH-enrichment protected AChE activity in fresh (0 day) and stored (42 and 84 days) RBCs from Fe/ASC oxidation by 10, 23 and 26%, respectively, compared with not-enriched controls. Following oxidative stress, the rate of transbilayer lipid flip-flop did not increase in fresh cells, but increased 9.3% in 42-day stored cells. Phosphatidylserine exposure, as measured by prothrombinase activity, increased 2.4-fold in fresh and 5.2-fold in 42-day stored cells exposed to Fe/ASC. Previous studies have shown that 42-day storage causes a moderate decrease in PS transport (approximately 50%), whereas transport rates declined by up to 75% in stored RBCs when challenged with Fe/ASC. GSH-enrichment prevented the increase

  10. Primary Role of the Chromophore Bond Length Alternation in Reversible Photoconversion of Red Fluorescence Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Wnuk, Pawel; O'Donnell, Kieran; Scott, J. Nathan; Callis, Patrik R.; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Dokken, Leslie; Rebane, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Rapid photobleaching of fluorescent proteins can limit their use in imaging applications. The underlying kinetics is multi-exponential and strongly depends on the local chromophore environment. The first, reversible, step may be attributed to a rotation around one of the two exocyclic C-C bonds bridging phenol and imidazolinone groups in the chromophore. However it is not clear how the protein environment controls this motion - either by steric hindrances or by modulating the electronic structure of the chromophore through electrostatic interactions. Here we study the first step of the photobleaching kinetics in 13 red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with different chromophore environment and show that the associated rate strongly correlates with the bond length alternation (BLA) of the two bridge bonds. The sign of the BLA appears to determine which rotation is activated. Our results present experimental evidence for the dominance of electronic effects in the conformational dynamics of the RFP chromophore. PMID:23008753

  11. Purification and structural characterisation of lipid transfer protein from red wine and grapes.

    PubMed

    Jaeckels, Nadine; Tenzer, Stefan; Rosfa, Susanne; Schild, Hansjoerg; Decker, Heinz; Wigand, Petra

    2013-05-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTP) play a major role in plant defence and are of particular interest due to their known ability to cause allergic reactions. These proteins are expressed in grapes and also remain detectable after vinification, especially in red wine. However, it remains unknown whether the protein undergoes any changes during the vinification process. Here, we present a purification method for LTPs from Dornfelder grapes and wine. By liquid-chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) we identified LTPs from two different species (Vitis vinifera and Vitis aestivalis). Additionally, the purified LTPs were characterised using spectrometric methods, confirming their high purity and structural stability during vinification. We conclude that LTPs are resistant to the alcohol content (13.5 vol%), acidic milieu of wine and other ingredients present during the vinification process, indicating that the allergenic potential of grape LTP is not diminished by the vinification process. PMID:23265486

  12. Novel insights into red blood cell physiology using parasites as tools.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Stefan; Gangopadhyay, Preetish; Repnik, Urska; Lingelbach, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian red blood cell is a terminally differentiated cell that lacks a genetic programme and that has only a very limited metabolic capacity. Nonetheless, it serves as habitat for two parasites belonging to the monophyletic group of Apicomplexa, namely Plasmodium and Babesia. Studies of the parasitized red blood cell have revealed several properties that are unknown in the non-infected cell and that are difficult to conceptualize based on our view of red blood cell function. Here we review the current knowledge on host cell invasion and nutrient acquisition by these parasites. We attempt to dissect the factors that are directly contributed by the parasites from those that exist but have remained undetected in the non-infected cell. PMID:26105829

  13. Optogenetic in vivo cell manipulation in KillerRed-expressing zebrafish transgenics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background KillerRed (KR) is a novel photosensitizer that efficiently generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in KR-expressing cells upon intense green or white light illumination in vitro, resulting in damage to their plasma membrane and cell death. Results We report an in vivo modification of this technique using a fluorescent microscope and membrane-tagged KR (mem-KR)-expressing transgenic zebrafish. We generated several stable zebrafish Tol2 transposon-mediated enhancer-trap (ET) transgenic lines expressing mem-KR (SqKR series), and mapped the transposon insertion sites. As mem-KR accumulates on the cell membrane and/or Golgi, it highlights cell bodies and extensions, and reveals details of cellular morphology. The photodynamic property of KR made it possible to damage cells expressing this protein in a dose-dependent manner. As a proof-of-principle, two zebrafish transgenic lines were used to affect cell viability and function: SqKR2 expresses mem-KR in the hindbrain rhombomeres 3 and 5, and elsewhere; SqKR15 expresses mem-KR in the heart and elsewhere. Photobleaching of KR by intense light in the heart of SqKR15 embryos at lower levels caused a reduction in pumping efficiency of the heart and pericardial edema and at higher levels - in cell death in the hindbrain of SqKR2 and in the heart of SqKR15 embryos. Conclusions An intense illumination of tissues expressing mem-KR affects cell viability and function in living zebrafish embryos. Hence, the zebrafish transgenics expressing mem-KR in a tissue-specific manner are useful tools for studying the biological effects of ROS. PMID:21040591

  14. Identification of signalling cascades involved in red blood cell shrinkage and vesiculation

    PubMed Central

    Kostova, Elena B.; Beuger, Boukje M.; Klei, Thomas R.L.; Halonen, Pasi; Lieftink, Cor; Beijersbergen, Roderick; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Even though red blood cell (RBC) vesiculation is a well-documented phenomenon, notably in the context of RBC aging and blood transfusion, the exact signalling pathways and kinases involved in this process remain largely unknown. We have established a screening method for RBC vesicle shedding using the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin which is a rapid and efficient method to promote vesiculation. In order to identify novel pathways stimulating vesiculation in RBC, we screened two libraries: the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) and the Selleckchem Kinase Inhibitor Library for their effects on RBC from healthy donors. We investigated compounds triggering vesiculation and compounds inhibiting vesiculation induced by ionomycin. We identified 12 LOPAC compounds, nine kinase inhibitors and one kinase activator which induced RBC shrinkage and vesiculation. Thus, we discovered several novel pathways involved in vesiculation including G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)–Akt (protein kinase B) pathway, the Jak–STAT (Janus kinase–signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway and the Raf–MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase)–ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated a link between casein kinase 2 (CK2) and RBC shrinkage via regulation of the Gardos channel activity. In addition, our data showed that inhibition of several kinases with unknown functions in mature RBC, including Alk (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), induced RBC shrinkage and vesiculation. PMID:25757360

  15. Quantitative label-free redox proteomics of reversible cysteine oxidation in red blood cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Zaccarin, Mattia; Falda, Marco; Roveri, Antonella; Bosello-Travain, Valentina; Bordin, Luciana; Maiorino, Matilde; Ursini, Fulvio; Toppo, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    Reversible oxidation of cysteine residues is a relevant posttranslational modification of proteins. However, the low activation energy and transitory nature of the redox switch and the intrinsic complexity of the analysis render quite challenging the aim of a rigorous high-throughput screening of the redox status of redox-sensitive cysteine residues. We describe here a quantitative workflow for redox proteomics, where the ratio between the oxidized forms of proteins in the control vs treated samples is determined by a robust label-free approach. We critically present the convenience of the procedure by specifically addressing the following aspects: (i) the accurate ratio, calculated from the whole set of identified peptides rather than just isotope-tagged fragments; (ii) the application of a robust analytical pipeline to frame the most consistent data averaged over the biological variability; (iii) the relevance of using stringent criteria of analysis, even at the cost of losing potentially interesting but statistically uncertain data. The pipeline has been assessed on red blood cell membrane challenged with diamide as a model of a mild oxidative condition. The cluster of identified proteins encompassed components of the cytoskeleton more oxidized. Indirectly, our analysis confirmed the previous observation that oxidized hemoglobin binds to membranes while oxidized peroxiredoxin 2 loses affinity. PMID:24642086

  16. Biotransformation of nitrosobenzene in the red cell and the role of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Eyer, P; Lierheimer, E

    1980-01-01

    1. In the red cell nitrosobenzene formed glutathione-sulphinanilide from reduced glutathione, and the corresponding sulphinanilide with the reactive cysteine residues of haemoglobin. 2. Glutathionesulphinanilide was reductively cleaved by an NADPH-linked reductase with formation of free analine half an equivalent of reduced glutathione and half of glutathione sulphinic acid. 3. About three quarters of the aniline produced from nitrosobenzene or phenylhydroxylamine was formed via this pathway within the red cell. PMID:6893778

  17. Pure red cell aplasia in a simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation patient: inside the erythroblast

    PubMed Central

    Labbadia, Francesca; Salido-Fierréz, Eduardo; Majado-Martinez, Juliana; Cabañas-Perianes, Valentin; Moraleda, Jiménez José M.

    2012-01-01

    A case of pure red cell aplasia in a simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplant recipient on immunosuppressive therapy is reported here. The patient presented with anemia unresponsive to erythropoietin treatment. Bone marrow cytomorphology was highly suggestive of parvovirus pure red cell aplasia, which was confirmed with serology and polymerase chain reaction positive for parvovirus B19 DNA in peripheral blood. After the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin the anemia improved with a rising number of the reticulocytes. PMID:23087806

  18. An antifungal peptide with antiproliferative activity toward tumor cells from red kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-06-01

    A 7.3-kDa antifungal peptide was purified from dried red kidney beans. The purification procedure entailed ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose, followed by fast protein liquid chromatography-gel filtration on Superdex 75. The peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-cellulose. It exhibited a molecular mass of 7.3 kDa in gel filtration and also in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that it is a single-chained protein. The N-terminal sequence of the peptide was DGVCFGGLANGDRT. The peptide exerted an antifungal action on Fusarium oxysporum with an IC₅₀ of 3.8±0.4 µM (mean±SD, n=3). It also inhibited mycelial growth in Mycosphaerella arachidicola. It suppressed growth of lymphoma MBL2 cells and leukemia L1210 cells with an IC₅₀ of 5.2±0.4 µM and 7.6±0.6 µM, respectively. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was inhibited with an IC₅₀ of 40±3.2 µM. However, no activity was demonstrated toward other viral enzymes. PMID:21309741

  19. Effects of dietary triglycerides on rheological properties of human red blood cells (abstract).

    PubMed

    Cicha, I; Suzuki, Y; Tateishi, N; Maeda, N

    2004-01-01

    Atherogenic diets rich in saturated fat and cholesterol influence the blood viscosity and red blood cell (RBC) aggregability, the parameters associated with increased risk of circulatory disorders. However, little is known about the effect of triglycerides, which are the major dietary lipid form in humans, on blood rheology. Therefore, we studied the effects of postprandial plasma triglyceride levels on human RBC indices, hematological parameters, RBCs aggregation velocity and whole blood viscosity. For this purpose, whole blood was collected 2 hours after high-fat or low-fat meal. Proteins, triglycerides and cholesterol levels of plasma were analysed, and RBCs rouleaux formation rate was measured in 70% autologous plasma using a low-shear rheoscope. There were no significant differences in hematological parameters, RBC indices, whole blood viscosity, plasma protein and cholesterol content between high-fat and low-fat blood samples. However, a significant increase in rouleaux formation rate was observed in samples with high postprandial triglyceride levels, when compared with low-triglyceride samples. Plasma triglyceride levels correlated significantly with rouleaux formation rate. In conclusion, these results suggest that diet-dependent alterations of plasma triglyceride levels as well as possible changes in the cell membrane lipid composition lead to RBC hyperaggregability. PMID:15258358

  20. Mechanical property analysis of stored red blood cell using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjie; Wen, Cheng; Xie, Huimin; Ye, Anpei; Yin, Yajun

    2009-05-01

    The deformation of human red blood cells subjected to direct stretching by optical tweezers was analyzed. The maximum force exerted by optical tweezers on the cell via a polystyrene microbead 5microm in diameter was 315pN. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was introduced to calculate the force and the deformation of the cell for the first time. Force-extension relation curves of the biconcave cell were quantitatively assessed when erythrocytes were stored in Alsever's Solution for 2 days, 5 days, 7 days and 14 days respectively. Experiment results demonstrated that the deformability of red blood cells was impaired with the stored time. PMID:19168336

  1. Mechanical and electrical properties of red blood cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, A.; Barjas Castro, M. L.; Brandão, M. M.; Fernandes, H. P.; Thomaz, A. A.; Huruta, R. R.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Barbosa, L. C.; Costa, F. F.; Saad, S. T. O.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    Optical tweezers are a very sensitive tool, based on photon momentum transfer, for individual, cell by cell, manipulation and measurements, which can be applied to obtain important properties of erythrocytes for clinical and research purposes. Mechanical and electrical properties of erythrocytes are critical parameters for stored cells in transfusion centers, immunohematological tests performed in transfusional routines and in blood diseases. In this work, we showed methods, based on optical tweezers, to study red blood cells and applied them to measure apparent overall elasticity, apparent membrane viscosity, zeta potential, thickness of the double layer of electrical charges and adhesion in red blood cells.

  2. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from

  3. Packed Red Blood Cells Are an Abundant and Proximate Potential Source of Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zwemer, Charles F.; Davenport, Robertson D.; Gomez-Espina, Juan; Blanco-Gonzalez, Elisa; Whitesall, Steven E.; D'Alecy, Louis G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We determined, for packed red blood cells (PRBC) and fresh frozen plasma, the maximum content, and ability to release the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethylarginine (LNMMA). Background ADMA and LNMMA are near equipotent NOS inhibitors forming blood’s total NOS inhibitory content. The balance between removal from, and addition to plasma determines their free concentrations. Removal from plasma is by well-characterized specific hydrolases while formation is restricted to posttranslational protein methylation. When released into plasma they can readily enter endothelial cells and inhibit NOS. Fresh rat and human whole blood contain substantial protein incorporated ADMA however; the maximum content of ADMA and LNMMA in PRBC and fresh frozen plasma has not been determined. Methods We measured total (free and protein incorporated) ADMA and LNMMA content in PRBCs and fresh frozen plasma, as well as their incubation induced release, using HPLC with fluorescence detection. We tested the hypothesis that PRBC and fresh frozen plasma contain substantial inhibitory methylarginines that can be released chemically by complete in vitro acid hydrolysis or physiologically at 37°C by enzymatic blood proteolysis. Results In vitro strong-acid-hydrolysis revealed a large PRBC reservoir of ADMA (54.5 ± 9.7 µM) and LNMMA (58.9 ± 28.9 μM) that persisted over 42-d at 6° or -80°C. In vitro 5h incubation at 37°C nearly doubled free ADMA and LNMMNA concentration from PRBCs while no change was detected in fresh frozen plasma. Conclusion The compelling physiological ramifications are that regardless of storage age, 1) PRBCs can rapidly release pathologically relevant quantities of ADMA and LNMMA when incubated and 2) PRBCs have a protein-incorporated inhibitory methylarginines reservoir 100 times that of normal free inhibitory methylarginines in blood and thus could represent a clinically relevant and proximate

  4. Improved stop-flow apparatus to measure permeability of human red cells and ghosts.

    PubMed

    Levin, S W; Levin, R L; Solomon, A K; Pandiscio, A; Kirkwood, D H

    1980-11-01

    An improved stop-flow apparatus has been designed and constructed to measure the permeability characteristics of human red cells, which can be inferred from the time course of red cell volume changes following a sudden change in cellular environment produced by a raped mixing device. The improved apparatus is directly coupled to a computer which automates the subtraction and averaging procedures that have been developed to minimize the noise generated in the system by the cessation of red cell forward motion when the flow is suddenly stopped. Real time data acquisition also makes it possible to increase the number of data points by an order of magnitude, thus improving accuracy significantly. The apparatus has been tested by measurements of the human red cell hydraulic permeability coefficient. Data are presented to validate the subtraction procedure. Experiments have also been carried out on red cell ghosts which indicate that the hydraulic conductivity of the ghost is similar to that of the undisturbed red cell. PMID:7002984

  5. Red Blood Cell Hematocrit Influences Platelet Adhesion Rate in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Andrew; Campbell, James; Fitzgibbon, Sean; Rodriguez, Armando; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The creation of a blood clot to stop bleeding involves platelets forming a plug at the site of injury. Red blood cells indirectly play a role in ensuring that the distribution of platelets across the height of the channel is not uniform - the contrast in deformability and size between platelets and red blood cells allows the platelets to preferentially marginate close to the walls. We perform 3D boundary integral simulations of a suspension of platelets and red blood cells in a periodic channel with a model that allows for platelet binding at the walls. The relative rate of platelet activity with varying hematocrit (volume fraction of red blood cells) is compared to experiments in which red blood cells and platelets flow through a channel coated with von Willebrand factor. In the simulations as well as the experiments, a decrease in hematocrit of red blood cells is found to reduce the rate at which platelets adhere to the channel wall in a manner that is both qualitatively and quantitatively similar. We conclude with a discussion of the tumbling and wobbling motions of platelets in 3D leading up to the time at which the platelets bind to the wall. Funded by Stanford Army High Performance Computing Research Center, experiments by US Army Institute of Surgical Research.

  6. Alterations in cell adhesion proteins and cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesive junction is specialized intercellular structure composed of cell adhesion proteins. They are essential to connect adjacent heart muscle cell and make heart contraction effectively and properly. Clinical and genetic studies have revealed close relationship between cell adhesive proteins and the occurrence of various cardiomyopathies. Here we will review recent development on the disease phenotype, potential cellular and molecular mechanism related to cell adhesion molecules, with particular disease pathogenesis learned from genetic manipulated murine models. PMID:24944760

  7. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, E.J.; Pierce, S.W.; Branks, M.J.; Masouredis, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10%, consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3.

  8. Antioxidant activities of red tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) protein hydrolysates as influenced by thermolysin and alcalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, Nur'Aliah; Babji, Abdul Salam; Yusop, Salma Mohamad

    2013-11-01

    The hydrolysis process was performed on fish meat from Red Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) by enzymes thermolysin and alcalase under optimum conditions. The hydrolysis was performed from 0 - 4 hours at 37°C. Hydrolysates after 2 hours incubation with thermolysin and alcalase had degree of hydrolysis of 76.29 % and 63.49 %, respectively. The freeze dried protein hydrolysate was tested for peptide content and characterized with respect to amino acid composition. The result of increased peptide content in Red Tilapia (O. Niloticus) hydrolysates obtained was directly proportional to the increase activities of different proteolytic enzymes. The result of amino acid composition showed that the sample used contained abundant Gly, Ala, Asp, Glu, Lys and Leu in residues or peptide sequences. Both enzymatic hydrolysates were tested for anti-oxidant activity with DPPH and ABTS assay. Alcalase yielded higher anti-oxidative activity than Thermolysin hydrolysates after 1 hour incubation, but both enzymes hydrolysates showed a significant decrease of anti-oxidant activity after 2 hours of incubation. Hydrolysates from Red Tilapia may contribute as a health promoting ingredient in functional foods to reduce oxidation stress caused by accumulated free radicals.

  9. Visualization and targeted disruption of protein interactions in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Herce, Henry D.; Deng, Wen; Helma, Jonas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are the basis of all processes in living cells, but most studies of these interactions rely on biochemical in vitro assays. Here we present a simple and versatile fluorescent-three-hybrid (F3H) strategy to visualize and target protein–protein interactions. A high-affinity nanobody anchors a GFP-fusion protein of interest at a defined cellular structure and the enrichment of red-labelled interacting proteins is measured at these sites. With this approach, we visualize the p53–HDM2 interaction in living cells and directly monitor the disruption of this interaction by Nutlin 3, a drug developed to boost p53 activity in cancer therapy. We further use this approach to develop a cell-permeable vector that releases a highly specific peptide disrupting the p53 and HDM2 interaction. The availability of multiple anchor sites and the simple optical readout of this nanobody-based capture assay enable systematic and versatile analyses of protein–protein interactions in practically any cell type and species. PMID:24154492

  10. Mesoscale simulations of two model systems in biophysics: from red blood cells to DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Chen, Yeng-Long; Lu, Huijie; Pan, Zehao; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2015-12-01

    Computational modeling has become increasingly important in biophysics, but the great challenge in numerical simulations due to the multiscale feature of biological systems limits the capability of modeling in making discoveries in biology. Innovative multiscale modeling approaches are desired to bridge different scales from nucleic acids and proteins to cells and tissues. Although all-atom molecular dynamics has been successfully applied in many microscale biological processes such as protein folding, it is still prohibitively expensive for studying macroscale problems such as biophysics of cells and tissues. On the other hand, continuum-based modeling has become a mature procedure for analysis and design in many engineering fields, but new insights for biological systems in the microscale are limited when molecular details are missing in continuum-based modeling. In this context, mesoscale modeling approaches such as Langevin dynamics, lattice Boltzmann method, and dissipative particle dynamics have become popular by simultaneously incorporating molecular interactions and long-range hydrodynamic interactions, providing insights to properties on longer time and length scales than molecular dynamics. In this review, we summarized several mesoscale simulation approaches for studying two model systems in biophysics: red blood cells (RBCs) and deoxyribonucleic acids (DNAs). The RBC is a model system for cell mechanics and biological membranes, while the DNA represents a model system for biopolymers. We introduced the motivations of studying these problems and presented the key features of different mesoscale methods. Furthermore, we described the latest progresses in these methods and highlighted the major findings for modeling RBCs and DNAs. Finally, we also discussed the challenges and potential issues of different approaches.

  11. Red blood cell, hemoglobin and heme in the progression of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeney, Viktória; Balla, György; Balla, József

    2014-01-01

    For decades plaque neovascularization was considered as an innocent feature of advanced atherosclerotic lesions, but nowadays growing evidence suggest that this process triggers plaque progression and vulnerability. Neovascularization is induced mostly by hypoxia, but the involvement of oxidative stress is also established. Because of inappropriate angiogenesis, neovessels are leaky and prone to rupture, leading to the extravasation of red blood cells (RBCs) within the plaque. RBCs, in the highly oxidative environment of the atherosclerotic lesions, tend to lyse quickly. Both RBC membrane and the released hemoglobin (Hb) possess atherogenic activities. Cholesterol content of RBC membrane contributes to lipid deposition and lipid core expansion upon intraplaque hemorrhage. Cell-free Hb is prone to oxidation, and the oxidation products possess pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory activities. Defense and adaptation mechanisms evolved to cope with the deleterious effects of cell free Hb and heme. These rely on plasma proteins haptoglobin (Hp) and hemopexin (Hx) with the ability to scavenge and eliminate free Hb and heme form the circulation. The protective strategy is completed with the cellular heme oxygenase-1/ferritin system that becomes activated when Hp and Hx fail to control free Hb and heme-mediated stress. These protective molecules have pharmacological potential in diverse pathologies including atherosclerosis. PMID:25324785

  12. Equilibrium physics breakdown reveals the active nature of red blood cell flickering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlier, H.; Fedosov, D. A.; Audoly, B.; Auth, T.; Gov, N. S.; Sykes, C.; Joanny, J.-F.; Gompper, G.; Betz, T.

    2016-05-01

    Red blood cells, or erythrocytes, are seen to flicker under optical microscopy, a phenomenon initially described as thermal fluctuations of the cell membrane. But recent studies have suggested the involvement of non-equilibrium processes, without definitively ruling out equilibrium interpretations. Using active and passive microrheology to directly compare the membrane response and fluctuations on single erythrocytes, we report here a violation of the fluctuation-dissipation relation, which is a direct demonstration of the non-equilibrium nature of flickering. With an analytical model of the composite erythrocyte membrane and realistic stochastic simulations, we show that several molecular mechanisms may explain the active fluctuations, and we predict their kinetics. We demonstrate that tangential metabolic activity in the network formed by spectrin, a cytoskeletal protein, can generate curvature-mediated active membrane motions. We also show that other active membrane processes represented by direct normal force dipoles may explain the observed membrane activity. Our findings provide solid experimental and theoretical frameworks for future investigations of the origin and function of active motion in cells.

  13. Stiffening of Red Blood Cells Induced by Cytoskeleton Disorders: A Joint Theory-Experiment Study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lipeng; Xu, Xiaofeng; Lim, Chwee Teck; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-12-01

    The functions and elasticities of the cell are largely related to the structures of the cytoskeletons underlying the lipid bilayer. Among various cell types, the red blood cell (RBC) possesses a relatively simple cytoskeletal structure. Underneath the membrane, the RBC cytoskeleton takes the form of a two-dimensional triangular network, consisting of nodes of actins (and other proteins) and edges of spectrins. Recent experiments focusing on the malaria-infected RBCs (iRBCs) show that there is a correlation between the elongation of spectrins in the cytoskeletal network and the stiffening of the iRBCs. Here we rationalize the correlation between these two observations by combining the wormlike chain model for single spectrins and the effective medium theory for the network elasticity. We specifically focus on how the disorders in the cytoskeletal network affect its macroscopic elasticity. Analytical and numerical solutions from our model reveal that the stiffness of the membrane increases with increasing end-to-end distances of spectrins, but has a nonmonotonic dependence on the variance of the end-to-end distance distributions. These predictions are verified quantitatively by our atomic force microscopy and micropipette aspiration measurements of iRBCs. The model may, from a molecular level, provide guidelines for future identification of new treatment methods for RBC-related diseases, such as malaria infection. PMID:26636940

  14. Expression of CD55 on red blood cells of β-thalassemia patients.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Jamil M A S; Abo El-Nazar, Salma Y; Ghanem, Amal M; El-Hadidi, Abeer S; Mersal, Basma H M

    2014-01-01

    CD55 is a complement regulatory protein expressed by cells to protect them from bystander lysis by complement. It prevents the formation of C3/C5 convertase. In β-thalassemia (β-thal), the defective hemoglobin (Hb) production makes red blood cells (RBCs) lyse early and frequently. Loss of CD55 expression in those patients compromises the complement regulatory function, thereby accelerating RBC lysis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the expression of CD55 on erythrocytes of β-thal patients. Flow cytometry analysis of CD55 was conducted on RBCs of 21 β-thalassemia major (β-TM) patients, 11 β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) patients and 10 healthy volunteers. The results showed a significant decrease in CD55 expression in β-TM (57.5 ± 16.7%), while there was a slight decrease in β-TI patients (81.8 ± 3.8%) in comparison with that of the normal controls (88.7 ± 0.8%). The diminished expression of CD55 was not accompanied by decrease in CD59 expression in β-thal patients (97.2 ± 2.3%). This could suggest a mechanism (could be genetic) responsible for low CD55 expression. It may be related to defective Hb genes in thalassemia, but it does not relate to cell membrane changes. PMID:25026028

  15. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Minai, Limor; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-03-01

    The properties of red blood cells are a remarkable indicator of the body's physiological condition; their density could indicate anemia or polycythemia, their absorption spectrum correlates with blood oxygenation, and their morphology is highly sensitive to various pathologic states including iron deficiency, ovalocytosis, and sickle cell disease. Therefore, measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient's health. In this work, we simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the cells' morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry (SEFC) that imaged the cells during linear flow and without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to the SEFC images of the cells, the cells' three-dimensional shapes were evaluated and their volumes were calculated. Potential applications include measurement of the mean corpuscular volume, cell morphological abnormalities, cell stiffness under mechanical stimuli, and the detection of various hematological diseases.

  16. Engineering Cells to Improve Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Su; Shiloach, Joseph; Betenbaugh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular engineering of bacteria, fungi, insect cells and mammalian cells is a promising methodology to improve recombinant protein production for structural, biochemical, and commercial applications. Increased understanding of the host organism biology has suggested engineering strategies targeting bottlenecks in transcription, translation, protein processing and secretory pathways, as well as cell growth and survival. A combination of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology has been used to improve the properties of cells for protein production, which has resulted in enhanced yields of multiple protein classes. PMID:24704806

  17. Effects of dietary protein level on growth and utilization of protein and energy by juvenile mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulam, Abbas; Khalid, Jamil; Rukhsana, Akhtar; Lin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    A feeding trial was conducted in a recirculating water system to investigate the effects of dietary protein levels on growth, feed utilization, hepatosomatic index and liver lipid deposition of juvenile red snapper, Lutjanus argentimaculatus (average initial wet weight 8.0 ± 0.39 g and total length 3.14 ± 0.3 cm). In the experiment, six fishmeal-based diets were formulated to contain various protein levels (20% to 45% in 5% increments), with dietary energy ranging from 2210.7kJ lOOg to 2250.2kJlOOg dry matter. The protein to energy ratios of diets ranged from 8.58 mg protein kJ-1 to 20.03 mg protein kJ-1. Diets were fed for 90d to triplicate groups of fish stocked in 0.128m3 seawater tanks, 25 individuals each. The daily ration of 2% wet body weight was offered to the fish thrice a day. The fish at the end of the study had more than ten-fold (77.0g) increase in weight compared to the initial (8.0g). Fish fed diets of 40% and 45% protein produced significantly (P<0.05) higher weight gain of 77.2g and 76.5g, and specific growth rate (SGR) of 2.65% and 2.62% than those of 67.0 g and 68.3g, and 2.49% and 2.51% of the other diets. The broken-line regression of SGR against dietary protein level yielded an optimum dietary protein requirement of 42.6% (Y=-1.6295 + 0.1114 X 2,P<0.05). Survival remained 100% among groups. Feed conversion ratio decreased from 0.45 for fish fed 20% dietary protein to 0.35 for fish fed 45% dietary protein. Nitrogen intake increased with an increase in dietary protein, which in turn resulted in an increase in nitrogen gain of fish whole body. Fish fed 40% and 45% protein diets showed higher (P<0.05) nitrogen gain (0.27g and 0.26g) than those (0.23g and 025g) fed all other diets. Gross energy intake (GEI) in fish fed 45% protein was lower (600.67kJ) than that (607.97 kJ) of 40% protein diet, though the differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05); GEI ranging from 677.31 kJ to 663.20 kJ at remaining four diets (20% to 35% protein

  18. Small-angle X-ray scattering probe of intermolecular interaction in red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guan-Fen; Wang, We-Jia; Xu, Jia-Hua; Dong, Yu-Hui

    2015-03-01

    With high concentrations of hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells, self-interactions among these molecules could increase the propensities of their polymerization and aggregation. In the present work, high concentration Hb in solution and red blood cells were analyzed by small-angle X-ray scattering. Calculation of the effective structure factor indicates that the interaction of Hb molecules is the same when they are crowded together in both the cell and physiological saline. The Hb molecules stay individual without the formation of aggregates and clusters in cells. Supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2009CB918600) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (10979005)

  19. Force Balance and Membrane Shedding at the Red-Blood-Cell Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens, Pierre; Gov, Nir

    2007-01-01

    During the aging of the red-blood cell, or under conditions of extreme echinocytosis, membrane is shed from the cell plasma membrane in the form of nanovesicles. We propose that this process is the result of the self-adaptation of the membrane surface area to the elastic stress imposed by the spectrin cytoskeleton, via the local buckling of membrane under increasing cytoskeleton stiffness. This model introduces the concept of force balance as a regulatory process at the cell membrane and quantitatively reproduces the rate of area loss in aging red-blood cells.

  20. SOD2 deficiency in hematopoietic cells in mice results in reduced red blood cell deformability and increased heme degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Joy G.; Nagababu, Enika; Friedman, Jeffrey S.; Rifkind, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Among the three types of super oxide dismutases (SODs) known, SOD2 deficiency is lethal in neonatal mice owing to cardiomyopathy caused by severe oxidative damage. SOD2 is found in red blood cell (RBC) precursors, but not in mature RBCs. To investigate the potential damage to mature RBCs resulting from SOD2 deficiency in precursor cells, we studied RBCs from mice in which fetal liver stem cells deficient in SOD2 were capable of efficiently rescuing lethally irradiated host animals. These transplanted animals lack SOD2 only in hematopoietically generated cells and live longer than SOD2 knockouts. In these mice, approximately 2.8% of their total RBCs in circulation are iron-laden reticulocytes, with numerous siderocytic granules and increased protein oxidation similar to that seen in sideroblastic anemia. We have studied the RBC deformability and oxidative stress in these animals and the control group by measuring them with a microfluidic ektacytometer and assaying fluorescent heme degradation products with a fluorimeter, respectively. In addition, the rate of hemoglobin oxidation in RBCs from these mice and the control group were measured spectrophotometrically. The results show that RBCs from these SOD2-deficient mice have reduced deformability, increased heme degradation products, and an increased rate of hemoglobin oxidation compared with control animals, indicative of increased RBC oxidative stress. PMID:23142655

  1. Detection of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells by optical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritz, Jakob M. A.; Tiffert, Teresa; Seear, Rachel; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Esposito, Alessandro; Lew, Virgilio L.; Guck, Jochen; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2010-05-01

    We present the application of a microfluidic optical cell stretcher to measure the elasticity of malaria-infected red blood cells. The measurements confirm an increase in host cell rigidity during the maturation of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The device combines the selectivity and sensitivity of single-cell elasticity measurements with a throughput that is higher than conventional single-cell techniques. The method has potential to detect early stages of infection with excellent sensitivity and high speed.

  2. On the agglutinogens of red cells developed with proteolytic enzymes and neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, K; Takahashi, K

    1976-10-01

    It has been known that the agglutinability of human red cells is changed or enhanced by treatments with proteolytic enzymes or neuraminidase. In this paper, the serological properties of agglutinogens developed by proteolytic enzymes (bromelin, ficin, papain, trypsin and pronase) and neuraminidase are investigated by using antisera to trypsin- and neuraminidase-treated red cells. The adsorptions of the antiserum to trypsinized red cells with the cells treated with each of the proteolytic enzymes showed that the agglutinogens uncovered by bromelin, ficin and papain were different from those by pronase and trypsin. It was demonstrated that pronase was the most effective enzyme to uncover the agglutinogen located on deeper site of red cell membrane. This was confirmed by the agglutination with the test cells treated twice with two kinds of the enzymes. The reactions of the antiserum to neuraminidase-treated red cells treated with six kinds of the enzymes indicated that the agglutinogens developed by neuraminidase resembled those by bromelin, ficin and papain more than those by trypsin and pronase. PMID:982434

  3. Red cell distribution width and end-organ damage in patients with systo-diastolic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Ozgur; Erturk, Mehmet; Surgit, Ozgur; Tasbulak, Omer; Akkaya, Emre; Yazan, Serkan; Gül, Mehmet; Türen, Selahattin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Both end-organ damage and high red cell distribution width (RDW) values are associated with adverse cardiovascular events, inflammatory status, and neurohumoral activation in hypertensive disease and in the general population. In this study, we investigated the relationship between RDW and end-organ damage in hypertensive patients. Material and methods The 446 systo-diastolic hypertensive patients included in the study received 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Left ventricular mass index, glomerular filtration rate, and microalbuminuria were measured to identify end-organ damage. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels of all patients were also examined. Results The mean age of the participants was 49.96 ±11.04 years. The mean RDW was 13.06 ±1.05%. Red cell distribution width was positively correlated with left ventricular myocardial index (LVMI), urinary albumin, hs-CRP, and NT-proBNP (r = 0.298, p < 0.001; r = 0.228, p < 0.001; r = 0.337, p < 0.001; r = 0.277, p < 0.001, respectively), while RDW was negatively correlated with eGFR (r = –0.153, p < 0.001). Additionally, while there was a positive correlation between RDW and 24-h systolic blood pressure, no correlation was found between RDW and 24-h diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.132, p = 0.006 and r = 0.017, p = 0.725, respectively). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that RDW levels were independently associated with eGFR, LVMI, and severity of albuminuria (β = 0.126, p = 0.010; β = –0.149, p = 0.002; β = 0.114, p = 0.035). Conclusions High RDW levels in systo-diastolic hypertensive patients were found to be an independent predictor of end-organ damage. PMID:27186175

  4. Red Cell Distribution Width and Mean Platelet Volume in Patients With Pityriasis Rosea

    PubMed Central

    Pancar, Gunseli Sefika; Eyupoglu, Oznur

    2016-01-01

    Background Pityriasis rosea (PR) is an inflammatory skin disorder of unknown etiology. However, it is suggested to be related with the reactivation of human herpes virus 7 (HHV-7) and/or HHV-6. It is sometimes diffucult to distinguish PR from PR-like drug eruptions and other inflammatory disorders, so we need new parameters which are cheap and easy in determining PR. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) have been studied as inflammatory markers in recent studies. However, the RDW and MPV in PR patients have not been investigated. This is the first study investigating RDW and MPV parameters in PR. Methods This was a retrospective study of 127 patients and 127 healthy controls. MPV, RDW and the other laboratory tests were recorded. Results RDW levels of patients with PR were significantly lower than those of the controls (13.66 ± 2.68 and 14.00 ± 1.39, P < 0.01). The other inflammatory markers such as MPV (9.97 ± 0.99 and 10.0 ± 1.06, P = 0.7) and platelet (2.66.29 ± 62.85 and 277.41 ± 63.50, P = 0.3) were studied and statistically significant differences were not obtained. There were no significant differences found between the patient group and healthy controls in terms of hemoglobin, hematocrite, C-reactive protein (CRP), sedimentation, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), red blood cell (RBC), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine parameters (P > 0.05). Conclusion RDW can be used as a marker in diagnosing PR. PMID:27222672

  5. The role of the red blood cell in the transport of carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Lam, C W; DiStefano, V; Morken, D A

    1986-04-01

    When rats were exposed to 2 mg l-1 (approximately 640 ppm) of carbon disulfide (CS2) for 4 h, the concentration of free CS2 in the red blood cells (RBCs) approached a plateau within 2 h. Free CS2 in plasma reached a steady state concentration within 15 min of exposure. More than 90% of the free CS2 in blood was found in the RBCs regardless of the length of exposure. In vitro studies showed that about 90% of the free CS2 partitioned into the RBCs regardless of whether the CS2 was added first to the plasma or directly to the RBCs. Hence, it appears that the RBC is the major carrier of CS2 in blood. It was found that 98% of the free CS2 in red blood cell lysates was associated with hemoglobin. Free CS2 in RBCs was readily partitioned into olive oil (RBCs/oil = 1/6), less readily into the plasma (RBCs/plasma = 12/1), and only to a small extent into phosphate buffer (RBCs/buffer = 39/1). The extraction of free CS2-loaded RBCs into albumin solution increased with increasing albumin concentrations. CS2 can be extracted with buffer, protein solution, and oil, indicating that CS2 in RBCs can be transferred to the medium in which the RBCs contact. It is proposed that RBCs may also play an important role in the transport of CS2 from lung to tissues and vice versa. The possible role of RBCs in the transport of other organic solvents in the blood is also discussed. PMID:3700964

  6. Association between red cell distribution width and acute pancreatitis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jinmei; Lv, Guocai

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated whether red cell distribution width (RDW) was associated with mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Patients with AP were recruited in the emergency department and healthy individuals were recruited in healthcare centre in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University. Participants A total of 106 patients with AP and 204 healthy individuals were enrolled. Primary and secondary outcome measures Haematology and biochemistry results of the first test after admission were collected. The significance of the differences in RDW values among healthy individuals, non-survivors of patients with AP, and survivors of patients with AP was determined using one-way analysis of variance. Patients with AP were divided into three groups according to RDW tertiles. All patients with AP were followed up for at least 3 months. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to evaluate RDW values to predict mortality of patients with AP. Results The RDW values were non-survivors of patients with AP>healthy individuals>survivors of patients with AP. Patients with AP with the highest RDW tertiles had the lowest levels of Ca, total protein, albumin, haemoglobin, white and red blood cell count, but the highest mortality. The area under the ROC curve of RDW was 0.846 (95% CI 0.727 to 0.964, p<0.001). With a cut-off value of 14.2 for RDW, sensitivity and specificity of RDW to predict mortality were 75.0% and 89.8%, and Kaplan-Meier analysis showed an increase in probability of death with high RDW values. Conclusions There is significant association between RDW and mortality of patients with AP. PMID:25095875

  7. Structural and functional analysis of native peroxiredoxin 2 in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yuki; Ohminato, Takuya; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-01

    Peroxiredoxin 2, a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin, is the third most abundant protein in erythrocytes. It is understood that the physiologically functional state of peroxiredoxin 2 is the monomer, and that its role in scavenging low levels of H(2)O(2) results in the formation of disulfide-linked dimers, which are reversibly reduced to monomers by the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system. Additionally, peroxiredoxins are highly susceptible to sulfinic acid formation through reactions with various peroxides. This overoxidized form, which is thought to convert peroxiredoxins into molecular chaperones and to be accompanied by a transition to polymeric forms, can be reversed by sulfiredoxins. However, physiological conformational changes and the antioxidant role of erythrocyte peroxiredoxin 2 are still unclear because there is low sulfiredoxin and thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase activity in erythrocytes. In this study, we examined the structural and redox states of peroxiredoxin 2 in fresh hemolysates and estimated the activities of native and overoxidized peroxiredoxin 2 purified from red blood cells to clear the physiological roles of peroxiredoxin 2 in erythrocyte. Our findings demonstrate that native peroxiredoxin 2 exists as high molecular weight (>160 kDa) oligomers and that decamers or higher order molecular weight oligomers (260-460 kDa) have peroxidase activity. We further showed that peroxiredoxin 2 oligomers, which were predominantly composed of monomers in the reduced form, exert a chaperone activity equal to that of overoxidized peroxiredoxin 2 polymers. These results provide the novel insight that redox-active peroxiredoxin 2 functions in human red blood cells as high molecular weight oligomers that possess peroxidase and chaperone activities. PMID:22537912

  8. Mass spectrometric imaging of red fluorescent protein in breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Post, Harm; Winnard, Paul T; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Heeren, Ron M A; Glunde, Kristine

    2013-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in combination with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for visualization and identification of a variety of different biomolecules directly from thin tissue sections. As commonly used tools for molecular reporting, fluorescent proteins are molecular reporter tools that have enabled the elucidation of a multitude of biological pathways and processes. To combine these two approaches, we have performed targeted MS analysis and MALDI-MSI visualization of a tandem dimer (td)Tomato red fluorescent protein, which was expressed exclusively in the hypoxic regions of a breast tumor xenograft model. For the first time, a fluorescent protein has been visualized by both optical microscopy and MALDI-MSI. Visualization of tdTomato by MALDI-MSI directly from breast tumor tissue sections will allow us to simultaneously detect and subsequently identify novel molecules present in hypoxic regions of the tumor. MS and MALDI-MSI of fluorescent proteins, as exemplified in our study, is useful for studies in which the advantages of MS and MSI will benefit from the combination with molecular approaches that use fluorescent proteins as reporters. PMID:23184411

  9. In-vitro stem cell derived red blood cells for transfusion: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ok

    2014-03-01

    To date, the use of red blood cells (RBCs) produced from stem cells in vitro has not proved practical for routine transfusion. However, the perpetual and widespread shortage of blood products, problems related to transfusion-transmitted infections, and new emerging pathogens elicit an increasing demand for artificial blood. Worldwide efforts to achieve the goal of RBC production through stem cell research have received vast attention; however, problems with large-scale production and cost effectiveness have yet to prove practical usefulness. Some progress has been made, though, as cord blood stem cells and embryonic stem cells have shown an ability to differentiate and proliferate, and induced pluripotent stem cells have been shown to be an unlimited source for RBC production. However, transfusion of stem cell-derived RBCs still presents a number of challenges to overcome. This paper will summarize an up to date account of research and advances in stem cell-derived RBCs, delineate our laboratory protocol in producing RBCs from cord blood, and introduce the technological developments and limitations to current RBC production practices. PMID:24532496

  10. Dynamic quantitative photothermal monitoring of cell death of individual human red blood cells upon glucose depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George Chung Kit; Andika, Marta; Agarwal, Shuchi; Chen, Peng; Olivo, Malini

    2010-09-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) have been found to undergo ``programmed cell death,'' or eryptosis, and understanding this process can provide more information about apoptosis of nucleated cells. Photothermal (PT) response, a label-free photothermal noninvasive technique, is proposed as a tool to monitor the cell death process of living human RBCs upon glucose depletion. Since the physiological status of the dying cells is highly sensitive to photothermal parameters (e.g., thermal diffusivity, absorption, etc.), we applied linear PT response to continuously monitor the death mechanism of RBC when depleted of glucose. The kinetics of the assay where the cell's PT response transforms from linear to nonlinear regime is reported. In addition, quantitative monitoring was performed by extracting the relevant photothermal parameters from the PT response. Twofold increases in thermal diffusivity and size reduction were found in the linear PT response during cell death. Our results reveal that photothermal parameters change earlier than phosphatidylserine externalization (used for fluorescent studies), allowing us to detect the initial stage of eryptosis in a quantitative manner. Hence, the proposed tool, in addition to detection of eryptosis earlier than fluorescence, could also reveal physiological status of the cells through quantitative photothermal parameter extraction.

  11. In-Vitro Stem Cell Derived Red Blood Cells for Transfusion: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To date, the use of red blood cells (RBCs) produced from stem cells in vitro has not proved practical for routine transfusion. However, the perpetual and widespread shortage of blood products, problems related to transfusion-transmitted infections, and new emerging pathogens elicit an increasing demand for artificial blood. Worldwide efforts to achieve the goal of RBC production through stem cell research have received vast attention; however, problems with large-scale production and cost effectiveness have yet to prove practical usefulness. Some progress has been made, though, as cord blood stem cells and embryonic stem cells have shown an ability to differentiate and proliferate, and induced pluripotent stem cells have been shown to be an unlimited source for RBC production. However, transfusion of stem cell-derived RBCs still presents a number of challenges to overcome. This paper will summarize an up to date account of research and advances in stem cell-derived RBCs, delineate our laboratory protocol in producing RBCs from cord blood, and introduce the technological developments and limitations to current RBC production practices. PMID:24532496

  12. A fluorogenic probe for SNAP-tagged plasma membrane proteins based on the solvatochromic molecule Nile Red.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Efthymia; Reymond, Luc; Umebayashi, Miwa; Hovius, Ruud; Riezman, Howard; Johnsson, Kai

    2014-03-21

    A fluorogenic probe for plasma membrane proteins based on the dye Nile Red and SNAP-tag is introduced. It takes advantage of Nile Red, a solvatochromic molecule highly fluorescent in an apolar environment, such as cellular membranes, but almost dark in a polar aqueous environment. The probe possesses a tuned affinity for membranes allowing its Nile Red moiety to insert into the lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane, becoming fluorescent, only after its conjugation to a SNAP-tagged plasma membrane protein. The fluorogenic character of the probe was demonstrated for different SNAP-tag fusion proteins, including the human insulin receptor. This work introduces a new approach for generating a powerful turn-on probe for "no-wash" labeling of plasma membrane proteins with numerous applications in bioimaging. PMID:24471525

  13. Excited State Proton Transfer in the Red Fluorescent Protein mKeima

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Nathan; Osborn, Maire F.; Koon, Nayden; Gepshtein, Rinat; Huppert, Dan; Remington, S. James

    2009-01-01

    mKeima is an unusual monomeric red fluorescent protein (λemmax ~620 nm) that is maximally excited in the blue (λexmax ~440 nm). The large Stokes shift suggests that the chromophore is normally protonated. A 1.63 Å resolution structure of mKeima reveals the chromophore to be imbedded in a novel hydrogen bond network, different than in GFP, which could support proton transfer from the chromophore hydroxyl, via Ser142, to Asp157. At low temperatures the emission contains a green component (λemmax ~535 nm), enhanced by deuterium substitution, presumably resulting from reduced proton transfer efficiency. Ultrafast pump/probe studies reveal a rising component in the 610 nm emission with lifetime ~4 ps, characterizing the rate of proton transfer. Mutation of Asp157 to neutral Asn changes the chromophore resting charge state to anionic (λexmax ~565 nm, λemmax ~620 nm). Thus, excited state proton transfer (ESPT) explains the large Stokes shift. This work unambiguously characterizes green emission from the protonated acylimine chromophore of red fluorescent proteins. PMID:19708654

  14. Energetic and molecular water permeation mechanisms of the human red blood cell urea transporter B.

    PubMed

    Azouzi, Slim; Gueroult, Marc; Ripoche, Pierre; Genetet, Sandrine; Colin Aronovicz, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Etchebest, Catherine; Mouro-Chanteloup, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Urea transporter B (UT-B) is a passive membrane channel that facilitates highly efficient permeation of urea. In red blood cells (RBC), while the major function of UT-B is to transport urea, it is assumed that this protein is able to conduct water. Here, we have revisited this last issue by studying RBCs and ghosts from human variants with defects of aquaporin 1 (AQP1) or UT-B. We found that UT-B's osmotic water unit permeability (pfunit) is similar to that of AQP1. The determination of diffusional permeability coefficient (Pd) allowed the calculation of the Pf/Pd ratio, which is consistent with a single-file water transport. Molecular dynamic simulations of water conduction through human UT-B confirmed the experimental finding. From these results, we propose an atomistic description of water-protein interactions involved in this permeation. Inside the UT-B pore, five water molecules were found to form a single-file and move rapidly along a channel by hydrogen bond exchange involving two critical threonines. We further show that the energy barrier for water located in the central region coincides with a water dipole reorientation, which can be related to the proton exclusion observed experimentally. In conclusion, our results indicate that UT-B should be considered as a new member of the water channel family. PMID:24376529

  15. Diagnostic tool for red blood cell membrane disorders: Assessment of a new generation ektacytometer.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Lydie; Suner, Ludovic; Galimand, Julie; Bonnel, Amandine; Pascreau, Tiffany; Couque, Nathalie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2016-01-01

    Inherited red blood cell (RBC) membrane disorders, such as hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis and hereditary ovalocytosis, result from mutations in genes encoding various RBC membrane and skeletal proteins. The RBC membrane, a composite structure composed of a lipid bilayer linked to a spectrin/actin-based membrane skeleton, confers upon the RBC unique features of deformability and mechanical stability. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. RBC membrane disorders can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include RBC cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of RBC membrane proteins and genetics. The reference technique for diagnosis of RBC membrane disorders is the osmotic gradient ektacytometry. However, in spite of its recognition as the reference technique, this technique is rarely used as a routine diagnosis tool for RBC membrane disorders due to its limited availability. This may soon change as a new generation of ektacytometer has been recently engineered. In this review, we describe the workflow of the samples shipped to our Hematology laboratory for RBC membrane disorder analysis and the data obtained for a large cohort of French patients presenting with RBC membrane disorders using a newly available version of the ektacytomer. PMID:26603718

  16. Neocytolysis on descent from altitude: a newly recognized mechanism for the control of red cell mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Ruiz, W.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Tapia, R.; Hachey, D. L.; Gonzales, G. F.; Alfrey, C. P.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of space-flight anemia have uncovered a physiologic process, neocytolysis, by which young red blood cells are selectively hemolyzed, allowing rapid adaptation when red cell mass is excessive for a new environment. OBJECTIVES: 1) To confirm that neocytolysis occurs in another situation of acute plethora-when high-altitude dwellers with polycythemia descend to sea level; and 2) to clarify the role of erythropoietin suppression. DESIGN: Prospective observational and interventional study. SETTING: Cerro de Pasco (4380 m) and Lima (sea level), Peru. PARTICIPANTS: Nine volunteers with polycythemia. INTERVENTIONS: Volunteers were transported to sea level; three received low-dose erythropoietin. MEASUREMENTS: Changes in red cell mass, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, reticulocyte count, ferritin level, serum erythropoietin, and enrichment of administered(13)C in heme. RESULTS: In six participants, red cell mass decreased by 7% to 10% within a few days of descent; this decrease was mirrored by a rapid increase in serum ferritin level. Reticulocyte production did not decrease, a finding that establishes a hemolytic mechanism.(13)C changes in circulating heme were consistent with hemolysis of young cells. Erythropoietin was suppressed, and administration of exogenous erythropoietin prevented the changes in red cell mass, serum ferritin level, and(13)C-heme. CONCLUSIONS: Neocytolysis and the role of erythropoietin are confirmed in persons with polycythemia who descend from high altitude. This may have implications that extend beyond space and altitude medicine to renal disease and other situations of erythropoietin suppression, hemolysis, and polycythemia.

  17. Red cell parameters in infant and children from the Arabian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Mekaini, Lolowa A Al; Denic, Srdjan; Jabri, Omar N Al; Narchi, Hassib; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Al-Hammadi, Suleiman

    2015-01-01

    α+-Thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia are frequent causes of microcytosis and a common diagnostic challenge in Arabian children. In this study, their prevalences and effects on the red cell parameters were evaluated in 28,457 children aged one day to 6 years. α+-Thalassemia trait was considered to be present when mean cell volume (MCV) was <94 fL at birth and iron deficiency anemia when red cell distribution width (RDW) was >14.5%. The prevalence of α+-thalassemia trait was 15.7% (502/3,191), which was similar to previously reported values for adults (9-14%). Iron deficiency anemia peaked at 7 months (53%) and then declined at a rate of 8% per year. The nadirs of red blood cell count (RBC) and hemoglobin concentration (Hb) occurred at two months of age (physiological anemia). Subsequently, Hb increased at a rate similar to that of MCV, demonstrating the two processes are coupled. The third percentile MCV in children older than 3 months was ≤64 fL, which was significantly lower than that in European children. The third percentile Hb, on the other hand, was similar to that in European children. Thus, α+-thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia are exceptionally frequent in Arabian children and their red cell indices are considerably different from European-based norms. Careful interpretation of red cell parameters is required for the evaluation of microcytic anemia in Arabian children. PMID:27069759

  18. Direct In Vivo Electrochemical Detection of Haemoglobin in Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Rou Jun; Peng, Weng Kung; Han, Jongyoon; Pumera, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of iron ion in haemoglobin provides insight to the chemical activity in the red blood cell which is important in the field of hematology. Herein, the detection of haemoglobin in human red blood cells on glassy carbon electrode (GC) was demonstrated. Red blood cells or raw blood cells was immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode surface with Nafion films employed to sandwich the layer of biological sample firmly on the electrode surface. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analyses revealed a well-defined reduction peak for haemoglobin at about -0.30 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) at the red blood cell (GC-Nf-RBC-3Nf) and blood (GC-Nf-B-3Nf) film modifie