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Sample records for red dwarf stars

  1. Identification and Spectral Classification of Close Red Dwarf Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivers, James

    2015-01-01

    The position angle, angular and linear separation, distance, and spectral class of 713 red dwarf binary star systems are reported based on data-mining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. 707 of these systems are new discoveries.

  2. Dating Red Dwarfs: Determining the Ages of Red Dwarf Stars and their Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.; Kullberg, Evan; Watson, William; Michener, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Red Dwarf (dwarf M=dM) stars comprise over 75% of the stars in the Galaxy. The recent statistical analysis of exoplanet systems from the Kepler Mission indicates that about 15% of red dwarf stars host Earth-size planets orbiting in the liquid water Habitable Zones (HZ) of their host stars. This indicates that within 10 pc 33 Ly) of the Sun (which contains ~240 dM stars), there should be about 35 potentially habitable Earth-size planets. Extrapolating to the entire Galaxy indicates that about 50-100 billion earth-size planets may be orbiting within the HZs of red dwarfs.Determining the ages and radiation/plasma properties of these planet hosting dM stars is crucial in assessing the potential for life on their HZ exoplanets. With these aims in mind we have been carrying out multi-wavelength (X-ray - IR) studies of dM stars as part of our NSF/NASA sponsored “Living with a Red Dwarf” Program. Due to their low masses, nuclear evolution of red dwarfs is very slow and their physical properties (e.g. L/Lo, Teff, R/Ro) do not significantly change over the age of the universe This makes it nearly impossible to determine (nuclear) evolutionary ages as is done with more massive stars. However, their rotation-related magnetic dynamo properties such as- coronal X-ray and chromospheric emissions and star spots coverage dramatically decrease with time as the stars spin down from angular momentum loss via magnetic winds We report on the ongoing calibration of Age-Rotation and (magnetic) Activity relations of dM stars. The ages of the calibrator stars are found from memberships in clusters, & moving groups as well as memberships in wide binaries - ages known from white dwarf & main sequence star components. Kinematical ages are used for old high velocity stars. Using these relations, the ages of a dM stars can be estimated from their measured rotation periods, and/or from coronal & chromospheric emissions. We apply these relations to determine ages of nearby dM stars that host

  3. New light on dark stars. Red dwarfs, low-mass stars, brown dwarfs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. N.; Hawley, S. L.

    This book presents a comprehensive discussion of both the astrophysical structure of individual M dwarf and brown dwarf star, and their collective statistical properties as a Galactic stellar population. The first section of the book discusses M dwarfs and brown dwarfs as individual objects - their observational properties, formation, internal structure and atmospheres. The second section deals with M dwarfs from the Galactic perspective - the number of stars, their possible contribution to dark matter and the missing mass and their use as probes of the stellar populations that make up our Galaxy. Contents: (1) Astronomical concepts. (2) Basic observational properties of low-mass dwarfs. (3) The structure, formation and evolution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. (4) The photosphere. (5) Stellar activity. (6) A Galactic structure primer. (7) The stellar luminosity function. (8) The mass function. (9) Brown dwarfs: new light on dark stars. (10) Extrasolar planets. (11) M dwarfs in the Galactic halo. Appendix: The 8 parsec sample.

  4. SEARCH FOR RED DWARF STARS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6397

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a small region (1.4 light-years across) in the globular star cluster NGC 6397. Simulated stars (diamonds) have been added to this view of the same region of the cluster to illustrate what astronomers would have expected to see if faint red dwarf stars were abundant in the Milky Way Galaxy. The field would then contain 500 stars, according to theoretical calculations. Right The unmodified HST image shows far fewer stars than would be expected, according to popular theories of star formation. HST resolves about 200 stars. The stellar density is so low that HST can literally see right through the cluster and resolve far more distant background galaxies. From this observation, scientists have identified the surprising cutoff point below which nature apparently doesn't make many stars smaller that 1/5 the mass of our Sun. These HST findings provide new insights into star formation in our Galaxy. Technical detail:The globular cluster NGC 6397, one of the nearest and densest agglomerations of stars, is located 7,200 light-years away in the southern constellation Ara. This visible-light picture was taken on March 3, 1994 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, as part the HST parallel observing program. Credit: F. Paresce, ST ScI and ESA and NASA

  5. Assessing the Suitability of Nearby Red Dwarf Stars as Hosts to Habitable Life-Bearing Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, E.

    2014-04-01

    As part of our NSF/NASA sponsored ``Living with a Red Dwarf Star'' program, we are carrying out a comprehensive study of red dwarf stars across the electromagnetic spectrum (X-ray-IR) to assess their suitability as hosts of habitable planets. These cool, dim, long-lived, low mass stars comprise >75% of the stars in our Galaxy. Moreover an increasing number of (potentially habitable) large Earth-size planets are being found hosted by red dwarfs. With intrinsically low luminosities (L < 0.02 Lsun), the habitable zones (HZs) of hosted planets are close to their host stars (typically 0.05 AU < HZ < 0.4 AU). However, red dwarf stars have strong magnetic-dynamo generated magnetic fields and resulting coronal and chromospheric X-ray to UV (XUV) emissions, as well as strong flares. These XUV emission greatly decrease with increasing age and slower rotation. Our study indicates red dwarf HZ planets without strong (protective) magnetic fields are especially susceptible to atmospheric erosion & loss by the host star's XUV radiation and frequent flares. We have also estimated the ages of planet-hosting stars using our Age-Rotation-Activity relations. Frequent flares of young red dwarf stars and tidal-locking of close-in planets could challenge the development of life. But tidal locking of these planets could have some advantages for the development of life. The long lifetimes of the red dwarfs ( >100 Ga) could be favorable for the development of complex (possibly even intelligent) life for the many old red dwarfs in the solar neighborhood - such as GJ 581 and HD 85512 - both are old and host HZ Earth-size planets. We gratefully acknowledge the support from NSF-Grant AST-10-09903, Chandra Grants GO1-12124X & GO2-13020X and HST Grant GO-10920.

  6. Identification and Spectral Classification of Red Dwarf Common Proper Motion Binary Stars Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivers, James

    2014-10-01

    The position angle, separation, and spectral class of 1042 common proper motion red dwarf binary stars are reported based on data-mining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. 727 of these are new discoveries.

  7. Can Red Dwarf stars support Earth-like vegetation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Joseph; Wandel, Amri

    2016-07-01

    The Kepler mission has shown that Earthlike planets are common. Of particular interest in our search for extra-solar-system, life-clement conditions, are planets orbiting Red Dwarf (RD) stars, the most numerous stellar type in the Milky Way galaxy. Early considerations indicated that conditions on RD planets would be inimical to life, as their Habitable Zones would be so close as to make planets tidally locked to their star. This was expected to engender tempestuous climates and to expose life forms to flares of ionizing electro-magnetic radiation and charged particles. Moreover, the less photon energy of the radiation of the relatively cool RDs would be too low in the 300-700nm waveband required for Oxygenic Photosynthesis (OP). Recent calculations show that these negative factors are less severe than originally estimated. Many authors have suggested that OP may evolve on RP planets to utilize infrared photons in the 700-1000nm waveband. However, projecting from OP and the vegetation in analogous regions on Earth, we argue that the evolutionary pressure to do so would be small. On RD planets there will be regions receiving continuous illumination, of moderate intensity, containing a significant component of photosynthetic 400-700nm radiation. On Earth, OP has been an essential factor in producing the Biosphere environment that enabled the appearance and evolution of complex life. We conclude that the conditions for OP could exist on RD planets and consequently the evolution of vegetation and complex life is possible (albeit not necessary). Furthermore, the huge number of RDs and their long lifetimes, make advanced vegetation, OP and consequently complex life on RD planets probable, and statistically more likely than on planets of solar type stars.

  8. Survival of a brown dwarf after engulfment by a red giant star.

    PubMed

    Maxted, P F L; Napiwotzki, R; Dobbie, P D; Burleigh, M R

    2006-08-01

    Many sub-stellar companions (usually planets but also some brown dwarfs) orbit solar-type stars. These stars can engulf their sub-stellar companions when they become red giants. This interaction may explain several outstanding problems in astrophysics but it is unclear under what conditions a low mass companion will evaporate, survive the interaction unchanged or gain mass. Observational tests of models for this interaction have been hampered by a lack of positively identified remnants-that is, white dwarf stars with close, sub-stellar companions. The companion to the pre-white dwarf AA Doradus may be a brown dwarf, but the uncertain history of this star and the extreme luminosity difference between the components make it difficult to interpret the observations or to put strong constraints on the models. The magnetic white dwarf SDSS J121209.31 + 013627.7 may have a close brown dwarf companion but little is known about this binary at present. Here we report the discovery of a brown dwarf in a short period orbit around a white dwarf. The properties of both stars in this binary can be directly observed and show that the brown dwarf was engulfed by a red giant but that this had little effect on it. PMID:16885979

  9. Panel 1: A pulsating red giant star and a compact, hot white dwarf star orbit each other.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Panel 1: A pulsating red giant star and a compact, hot white dwarf star orbit each other. Panel 2: The red giant sheds much of its outer layers in a stellar wind. The white dwarf helps concentrate the wind along a thin equatorial plane. The white dwarf accretes some of this escaping gas forming a disk around the itself. Panel 3: When enough gas accumulates on the white dwarf's surface it explodes as a nova outburst. Most of the hot gas forms a pair of expanding bubbles above and below the equatorial disk. Panel 4: A few thousand years after the bubbles expand into space, the white dwarf goes through another nova outburst and makes another pair of bubbles, which form a distinctive hourglass shape.

  10. Titan under a red dwarf star and as a rogue planet: requirements for liquid methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, Ashley E.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2011-07-01

    Titan has a surface temperature of 94 K and a surface pressure of 1.4 atmospheres. These conditions make it possible for liquid methane solutions to be present on the surface. Here, we consider how Titan could have liquid methane while orbiting around an M4 red dwarf star, and a special case of Titan orbiting the red dwarf star Gliese 581. Because light from a red dwarf star has a higher fraction of infrared than the Sun, more of the starlight will reach the surface of Titan because its atmospheric haze is more transparent to infrared wavelengths. If Titan was placed at a distance from a red dwarf star such that it received the same average flux as it receives from the Sun, we calculate the increased infrared fraction, which will warm surface temperatures by an additional ˜10 K. Compared to the Sun, red dwarf stars have less blackbody ultraviolet light but can have more Lyman α and particle radiation associated with flares. Thus depending on the details, the haze production may be much higher or much lower than for the current Titan. With the haze reduced by a factor of 100, Titan would have a surface temperature of 94 K at a distance of 0.23 AU from an M4 star and at a distance of 1.66 AU, for Gliese 581. If the haze is increased by a factor of 100 the distances become 0.08 and 0.6 AU for the M4-star and Gliese 581, respectively. As a rogue planet, with no incident stellar flux, Titan would need 1.6 W/m 2 of geothermal heat to maintain its current surface temperature, or an atmospheric opacity of 20× its present amount with 0.1 W/m 2 of geothermal heat. Thus Titan-like worlds beyond our solar system may provide environment supporting surface liquid methane.

  11. Continuum and line emission of flares on red dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morchenko, E.; Bychkov, K.; Livshits, M.

    2015-06-01

    The emission spectrum has been calculated of a homogeneous pure hydrogen layer, which parameters are typical for a flare on a red dwarf. The ionization and excitation states were determined by the solution of steady-state equations taking into account the continuum and all discrete hydrogen levels. We consider the following elementary processes: electron-impact transitions, spontaneous and induced radiative transitions, and ionization by the bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation of the layer itself. The Biberman-Holstein approximation was used to calculate the scattering of line radiation. Asymptotic formulae for the escape probability are obtained for a symmetric line profile taking into account the Stark and Doppler effects. The approximation for the core of the H- α line by a Gaussian curve has been substantiated.

  12. Future Interstellar Travel Destinations: Assessing the Suitability of Nearby Red Dwarf Stars as Hosts to Habitable Life-bearing Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, S. G.

    2013-01-01

    As part of our NSF/NASA sponsored “Living with a Red Dwarf Star” program, we are carrying out a comprehensive study of red dwarf stars across the electromagnetic spectrum to assess their suitability as hosts for habitable planets. These cool, dim, long-lived, low mass stars comprise >75% of the stars in our Galaxy. Moreover an increasing number of (potentially habitable) large Earth-size planets are being found hosted by red dwarfs. With intrinsically low luminosities (L < 0.02 Lsun), the habitable zones (HZs) of hosted planets are close to their host stars (typically 0.05 AU < HZ <0.4 AU). Our study indicates red dwarf HZ planets without strong (protective) magnetic fields are especially susceptible to atmospheric erosion & loss by the star’s X-UV and wind fluxes. Also, the frequent flaring of young red dwarf stars and tidal-locking of close-in planets could challenge the development of life. But tidal locking of these planets could have some advantages for the developmenet of life. The long lifetimes of the red dwarfs (> 50 BY) could be favorable for the development of complex (possibly even intelligent) life. We discuss our results in the context of nearby red dwarfs as possible destinations for future interstellar missions program. We illustrate this with examples of the red dwarf exoplanet systems: GJ 581 and HD 85512 (both with large HZ Earth-size planets). Also we discuss the nearest star (4.3 LY) - the red dwarf - Proxima Centauri as a potential destination for future interstellar missions such proposed by Icarus Interstellar and the 100-Year Starship and StarVoyager programs. We gratefully acknowledge the support from NSF-Grant AST-10-09903, Chandra Grants GO1-12124X & GO2-13020X and HST Grant GO-10920.

  13. Red Dwarf Stars: Ages, Rotation, Magnetic Dynamo Activity and the Habitability of Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, S. G.; Guinan, E. F.

    2011-12-01

    We report on our continued efforts to understand and delineate the magnetic dynamo-induced behavior/variability of red dwarf (K5 V - M6 V) stars over their long lifetimes. These properties include: rotation, light variations (from star spots), coronal-chromospheric XUV activity and flares. This study is being carried out as part of the NSF-sponsored Living with a Red Dwarf program. The Living with a Red Dwarf program's database of dM stars with photometrically determined rotation rates (from starspot modulations) continues to expand, as does the inventory of archival XUV observations. Recently, the photometric properties of several hundred dM stars from the Kepler database are being analyzed to determine the rotation rates, starspot areal coverage/distributions and stellar flare rates. When all data setsare combined with ages from cluster/population memberships and kinematics, the determination of Age-Rotation-Activity relationships is possible. Such relationships have broad impacts not only on the studies of magnetic dynamo theory and angular momentum loss of low-mass stars with deep convective zones, but also on the suitability of planets hosted by red dwarfs to support life. With intrinsically low luminosities (L< 0.02L⊙), the liquid water habitable zones (HZs) for hosted planets are very close to their host stars - typically at ˜0.1 AU < HZ < 0.4 AU. Planets located close to their host stars risk damage and atmospheric loss from coronal & chromospheric XUV radiation, flares and plasma blasts via strong winds and coronal mass ejections. In addition, our relationships permit the stellar ages to be determined through measures of either the stars' rotation periods (best way) or XUV activity levels. This also permits a determination of the ages of their hosted planets. We illustrate this with examples of age determinations of the exoplanet systems: GJ 581 and HD 85512 (both with large Earth-size planets within the host star's HZ), GJ 1214 (hot, close

  14. Reconnaissance of Stars within Twenty-Five Parsecs: Red Dwarfs Rule the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Pewett, Tiffany; Riedel, Adric R.; Rodriguez, Justin; Siverstein, Michele L; Slatten, Kenneth J.; Winters, Jennifer G.

    2014-06-01

    The REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars (RECONS, www.recons.org) team has been mapping the solar neighborhood for 20 years. We continue to collect original astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic data for the nearest stars and their companions, with significant effort concentrated in the southern hemisphere at the CTIO 0.9m telescope,operated by RECONS for the SMARTS Consortium. These new data are combined with carefully vetted data from classic surveys to paint the most complete portrait to date for the nearby stars.The combined data from RECONS and others have been organized into the RECONS 25 Parsec Database, which as of January 1, 2014 includes 3074 stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets in 2168 systems. All of these systems have accurate trigonometric parallaxes in the refereed literature placing them closer than 25.0 parsecs, i.e. parallaxes greater than 40 mas with errors less than 10 mas. Statistical results from this comprehensive Database are outlined, allowing us to make an unprecedented census of the Galaxy's stellar population, of which more than three-quarters are red dwarfs. Fewer than twenty of these red dwarfs are currently known to harbor planets, indicating that a great deal of work remains to be done in the search for the nearest worlds outside our Solar System. It is virtually certain that most planets in the Galaxy are orbiting red dwarfs, and the nearest examples should be among the prime targets in our search for life elsewhere.This effort has been supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402 and AST-1109445, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  15. RED DWARF DYNAMO RAISES PUZZLE OVER INTERIORS OF LOWEST-MASS STARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered surprising evidence that powerful magnetic fields might exist around the lowest mass stars in the universe, which are near the threshold of stellar burning processes. 'New theories will have to be developed to explain how these strong fields are produced, since conventional models predict that these low mass red dwarfs should have very weak or no magnetic fields,' says Dr. Jeffrey Linsky of the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) in Boulder, Colorado. 'The Hubble observations provide clear evidence that very low mass red dwarf stars must have some form of dynamo to amplify their magnetic fields.' His conclusions are based upon Hubble's detection of a high-temperature outburst, called a flare, on the surface of the extremely small, cool red dwarf star Van Biesbroeck 10 (VB10) also known as Gliese 752B. Stellar flares are caused by intense, twisted magnetic fields that accelerate and contain gasses which are much hotter than a star's surface. Explosive flares are common on the Sun and expected for stars that have internal structures similar to our Sun's. Stars as small as VB10 are predicted to have a simpler internal structure than that of the Sun and so are not expected to generate the electric currents required for magnetic fields that drive flares. Besides leading to a clearer understanding of the interior structure of the smallest red dwarf stars known, these unexpected results might possibly shed light on brown dwarf stars. A brown dwarf is a long-sought class of astronomical object that is too small to shine like a star through nuclear fusion processes, but is too large to be considered a planet. 'Since VB10 is nearly a brown dwarf, it is likely brown dwarfs also have strong magnetic fields,' says Linsky. 'Additional Hubble searches for flares are needed to confirm this prediction.' A QUARTER-MILLION DEGREE TORCH The star VB10 and its companion star Gliese 752A make up a binary system located 19 light

  16. RED DWARF DYNAMO RAISES PUZZLE OVER INTERIORS OF LOWEST-MASS STARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered surprising evidence that powerful magnetic fields might exist around the lowest mass stars in the universe, which are near the threshold of stellar burning processes. 'New theories will have to be developed to explain how these strong fields are produced, since conventional models predict that these low mass red dwarfs should have very weak or no magnetic fields,' says Dr. Jeffrey Linsky of the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) in Boulder, Colorado. 'The Hubble observations provide clear evidence that very low mass red dwarf stars must have some form of dynamo to amplify their magnetic fields.' His conclusions are based upon Hubble's detection of a high-temperature outburst, called a flare, on the surface of the extremely small, cool red dwarf star Van Biesbroeck 10 (VB10) also known as Gliese 752B. Stellar flares are caused by intense, twisted magnetic fields that accelerate and contain gasses which are much hotter than a star's surface. Explosive flares are common on the Sun and expected for stars that have internal structures similar to our Sun's. Stars as small as VB10 are predicted to have a simpler internal structure than that of the Sun and so are not expected to generate the electric currents required for magnetic fields that drive flares. Besides leading to a clearer understanding of the interior structure of the smallest red dwarf stars known, these unexpected results might possibly shed light on brown dwarf stars. A brown dwarf is a long-sought class of astronomical object that is too small to shine like a star through nuclear fusion processes, but is too large to be considered a planet. 'Since VB10 is nearly a brown dwarf, it is likely brown dwarfs also have strong magnetic fields,' says Linsky. 'Additional Hubble searches for flares are needed to confirm this prediction.' A QUARTER-MILLION DEGREE TORCH The star VB10 and its companion star Gliese 752A make up a binary system located 19 light

  17. The Living with a Red Dwarf Program: Observing the Decline in dM Star FUV Emissions With Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Edward F.; Mizusawa, Trisha

    2009-05-01

    Red Dwarf (dM) stars are overwhelmingly the most numerous stars in our Galaxy. These cool, faint and low mass stars make up >80% of all stars. Also dM stars have extremely long life times (>50-100 Gyr). Determining the number of red dwarfs with planets and assessing planetary habitability (a planet's potential to develop and sustain life) is critically important because such studies would indicate how common life is in the universe. Our program-``Living with a Red Dwarf''-addresses these questions by investigating the long-term nuclear evolution and the coronal and chromospheric properties of red dwarf stars with widely different ages (~50 Myr-12 Gyr). One major focus of the program is to study the magnetic-dynamo generated coronal and chromospheric X-ray-FUV/UV emissions and flare properties of a sample of dM0-5 stars. Observations carried out by FUSE of a number of young to old dM stars provide important data for understanding transition region heating in these stars with deep convective zones as well as providing measures of FUV irradiances. Also studied are the effects of X-ray-FUV emissions on possible hosted planets and impacts of this radiation on their habitability. Using these data we are constructing irradiance tables (X-UV irradiances) that can be used to model the effects of XUV radiation on planetary atmospheres and possible life on planetary surfaces. The initial results of this program are discussed.

  18. VLT/FLAMES spectroscopy of red giant branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasle, B.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Venn, K.; Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; François, P.; Helmi, A.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Szeifert, T.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Fornax is one of the most massive dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. The Fornax field star population is dominated by intermediate age stars but star formation was going on over almost its entire history. It has been proposed that Fornax experienced a minor merger event. Aims: Despite recent progress, only the high metallicity end of Fornax field stars ([Fe/H] > -1.2 dex) has been sampled in larger number via high resolution spectroscopy. We want to better understand the full chemical evolution of this galaxy by better sampling the whole metallicity range, including more metal poor stars. Methods: We use the VLT-FLAMES multi-fibre spectrograph in high-resolution mode to determine the abundances of several α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements in a sample of 47 individual red giant branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We combine these abundances with accurate age estimates derived from the age probability distribution from the colour-magnitude diagram of Fornax. Results: Similar to other dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the old, metal-poor stars of Fornax are typically α-rich while the young metal-rich stars are α-poor. In the classical scenario of the time delay between Type II (SNe II) and Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia), we confirm that SNe Ia started to contribute to the chemical enrichment at [Fe/H] between -2.0 and -1.8 dex. We find that the onset of SNe Ia took place between 12-10 Gyr ago. The high values of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] reflect the influence of SNe Ia and AGB stars in the abundance pattern of the younger stellar population of Fornax. Conclusions: Our findings of low [α/Fe] and enhanced [Eu/Mg] are compatible with an initial mass function that lacks the most massive stars and with star formation that kept going on throughout the whole history of Fornax. We find that massive stars kept enriching the interstellar medium in α-elements, although they were not the main contributor to the iron enrichment. Based on FLAMES

  19. Testing gravity using dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    Generic scalar-tensor theories of gravity predict deviations from Newtonian physics inside astrophysical bodies. In this paper, we point out that low mass stellar objects, red and brown dwarf stars, are excellent probes of these theories. We calculate two important and potentially observable quantities: the radius of brown dwarfs and the minimum mass for hydrogen burning in red dwarfs. The brown dwarf radius can differ significantly from the general relativity prediction, and upcoming surveys that probe the mass-radius relation for stars with masses red dwarf stars. This places a new and extremely stringent constraint on the parameters that appear in the effective field theory of dark energy and rules out several well-studied dark energy models.

  20. Ground-based observation of emission lines from the corona of a red-dwarf star.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J H; Wichmann, R

    2001-08-01

    All 'solar-like' stars are surrounded by coronae, which contain magnetically confined plasma at temperatures above 106 K. (Until now, only the Sun's corona could be observed in the optical-as a shimmering envelope during a total solar eclipse.) As the underlying stellar 'surfaces'-the photospheres-are much cooler, some non-radiative process must be responsible for heating the coronae. The heating mechanism is generally thought to be magnetic in origin, but is not yet understood even for the case of the Sun. Ultraviolet emission lines first led to the discovery of the enormous temperature of the Sun's corona, but thermal emission from the coronae of other stars has hitherto been detectable only from space, at X-ray wavelengths. Here we report the detection of emission from highly ionized iron (Fe XIII at 3,388.1 A) in the corona of the red-dwarf star CN Leonis, using a ground-based telescope. The X-ray flux inferred from our data is consistent with previously measured X-ray fluxes, and the non-thermal line width of 18.4 km s-1 indicates great similarities between solar and stellar coronal heating mechanisms. The accessibility and spectral resolution (45,000) of the ground-based instrument are much better than those of X-ray satellites, so a new window to the study of stellar coronae has been opened. PMID:11484044

  1. Living with a Red Dwarf: Rotation and X-Ray and Ultraviolet Properties of the Halo Population Kapteyn's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.; Durbin, Allyn

    2016-04-01

    As part of Villanova's Living with a Red Dwarf program, we have obtained UV, X-ray, and optical data of the Population II red dwarf -- Kapteyn's Star. Kapteyn's Star is noteworthy for its large proper motions and high radial velocity of ∼+245 km s-1. As the nearest Pop II red dwarf, it serves as an old age anchor for calibrating activity/irradiance-rotation-age relations, and an important test bed for stellar dynamos and the resulting X-ray-UV emissions of slowly rotating, near-fully convective red dwarf stars. Adding to the notoriety, Kapteyn's Star has recently been reported to host two super-Earth candidates, one of which (Kapteyn b) is orbiting within the habitable zone. However, Robertson et al. questioned the planet's existence since its orbital period may be an artifact of activity, related to the star's rotation period. Because of its large Doppler-shift, measures of the important, chromospheric H i Lyα 1215.67 Å emission line can be reliably made, because it is mostly displaced from ISM and geo-coronal sources. Lyα emission dominates the FUV region of cool stars. Our measures can help determine the X-ray-UV effects on planets hosted by Kapteyn's Star, and planets hosted by other old red dwarfs. Stellar X-ray and Lyα emissions have strong influences on the heating and ionization of upper planetary atmospheres and can (with stellar winds and flares) erode or even eliminate planetary atmospheres. Using our program stars, we have reconstructed the past exposures of Kapteyn's Star's planets to coronal - chromospheric XUV emissions over time. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13020. This work is also based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, a NASA science mission, program #13200633.

  2. The abundance of biotic exoplanets and life on planets of Red Dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandel, Amri; Gale, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    The Kepler mission has shown that Earthlike planets orbiting within the Habitable Zones of their host stars are common. We derive an expression for the abundance of life bearing (biotic) extra-solar-system planets (exoplanets) in terms of the (yet unknown) probability for the evolution of biotic life. This "biotic probability" may be estimated by future missions and observations, e.g. spectral analyses of the atmospheres of exoplanets, looking for biomarkers. We show that a biotic probability in the range 0.001-1 implies that a biotic planet may be expected within ~10-100 light years from Earth. Of particular interest in the search for exolife are planets orbiting Red Dwarf (RD) stars, the most frequent stellar type. Previous researches suggested that conditions on planets near RDs would be inimical to life, e.g. the Habitable Zone of RDs is small, so their habitable planets would be close enough to be tidally locked. Recent calculations show that this and other properties of RDs, presumed hostile for the evolution of life, are less severe than originally estimated. We conclude that RD planets could be hospitable for the evolution of life as we know it, not less so than planets of solar-type stars. This result, together with the large number of RDs and their Kepler planet-statistics, makes finding life on RD planets ~10-1000 times more likely than on planets of solar-type stars. Our nearest biotic RD-planet is likely to be 2-10 times closer than the nearest solar-type one.

  3. High resolution spectroscopy of Red Giant Branch stars and the chemical evolution of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasle, B.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Venn, K.; Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Francois, P.; Helmi, A.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Szeifert, T.

    2014-12-01

    From VLT-FLAMES high-resolution spectra, we determine the abundances of several α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements in 47 Red Giant Branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We confirm that SNe Ia started to contribute to the chemical enrichment of Fornax at [Fe/H] between --2.0 and --1.8 dex. Combining these abundances with accurate age estimates, we date the onset of SNe Ia to ≈ 12--10 Gyrs ago. Our results are compatible with an initial mass function that lacks the most massive stars and with a star formation going on throughout the whole history of Fornax.

  4. Little Stars Don't Like Big Planets: An Astrometric Search for Super-Jupiters Around Red Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, John C.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.; Koerner, D. W.; Riedel, A. R.; Subasavage, J.; RECONS

    2013-01-01

    The astrometric detection and characterization of extrasolar planets presents considerable technical challenges, but also promises to greatly enhance our understanding of these systems. Nearly all currently confirmed exoplanets have been discovered using transit or radial velocity techniques. The former is geometrically biased towards planets with small orbits, while the latter is biased towards massive planets with short periods that exert large gravitational accelerations on their host stars. Astrometric techniques are limited by the minimum detectable perturbation of a star's position due to a planet, but allow for the determination of orbit inclination and an accurate planetary mass. Here we present astrometric solutions for five nearby stars with known planets: four M dwarfs (GJ 317, GJ 581, GJ 849, and GJ 1214) and one K dwarf (BD -10 3166). Observations have baselines of three to thirteen years, and were made using the 0.9 m telescope at CTIO as part of the RECONS long-term astrometry program. We provide improved parallaxes for the stars and find that there are no planets of several Jupiter masses or brown dwarfs orbiting these stars with periods up to twice the length of the astrometric coverage. In the broader context, these results are consistent with the paucity of super-Jupiter and brown dwarf companions we find among the roughly 200 red dwarfs searched in our astrometric program. This effort has been supported by the National Science Foundation via grant AST 09-08402 and the long-term cooperative efforts of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories and the members of the SMARTS Consortium.

  5. Red Dwarfs and the End of the Main Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, F. C.; Graves, G. J. M.; Laughlin, G.

    2004-12-01

    This paper celebrates the contributions of Peter Bodenheimer to our understanding of stellar evolution by focusing on the long term development of red dwarf stars. We show that these diminutive stellar objects remain convective over most of their lives, they continue to burn hydrogen for trillions of years, and they do not experience red giant phases in their old age. Instead, red dwarfs turn into blue dwarfs and finally white dwarfs. This work shows (in part) why larger stars do become red giants.

  6. A white dwarf companion to the main-sequence star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis and the binary hypothesis for the origin of peculiar red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ake, Thomas B.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1988-04-01

    In the course of an investigation with the IUE satellite of the ultraviolet spectra of peculiar red giants, the authors have discovered a white dwarf companion to the MS star 4 ο1Ori. They discuss the reductions performed for the ο1Ori IUE observations, and compare these with field white dwarfs to derive parameters of the white dwarf and the luminosity of the primary. Upper detection limits are derived for hot degenerate companions to four other bright MS stars, HR 363, RS Cnc, ST Her, and OP Her. Combined with the ο1Ori observations, it is argued that the nondetections for these stars are consistent with the statistics of field giant binaries and that either mass-transfer effects are not responsible for the incipient S-star nature of the MS stars, if their abundance peculiarities are recent, or that the MS stars must be older than 106yr.

  7. A white dwarf companion to the main-sequence star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis and the binary hypothesis for the origin of peculiar red giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, Thomas B.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the peculiar red giants (PRGs) called MS stars are investigated, and the discovery of a white dwarf (WD) companion to the MS star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis is reported. The observations and data analysis are discussed and compared with those for field WDs in order to derive parameters for the WD and the luminosity of the primary. Detection limits for the other MS stars investigated are derived, and the binary hypothesis for PRGs is reviewed.

  8. Milky Way Red Dwarfs in the BoRG Survey; Galactic Scale-height and the Distribution of Dwarf Stars in WFC3 Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Trenti, M.; Clarkson, W.; Sahu, K.; Bradley, L.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N.; De Marchi, G.; Andersen, M.; Bouwens, R.; Ryan, R.

    2014-06-01

    We present a tally of Milky Way late-type dwarf stars in 68 Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) pure-parallel fields (227 arcmin2) from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies survey for high-redshift galaxies. Using spectroscopically identified M-dwarfs in two public surveys, the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey and the Early Release Science mosaics, we identify a morphological selection criterion using the half-light radius (r 50), a near-infrared J - H, G - J color region where M-dwarfs are found, and a V - J relation with M-dwarf subtype. We apply this morphological selection of stellar objects, color-color selection of M-dwarfs, and optical-near-infrared color subtyping to compile a catalog of 274 M-dwarfs belonging to the disk of the Milky Way with a limiting magnitude of m F125W < 24(AB). Based on the M-dwarf statistics, we conclude that (1) the previously identified north-south discrepancy in M-dwarf numbers persists in our sample; there are more M-dwarfs in the northern fields on average than in southern ones, (2) the Milky Way's single disk scale-height for M-dwarfs is 0.3-4 kpc, depending on subtype, (3) the scale-height depends on M-dwarf subtype with early types (M0-4) high scale-height (z 0 = 3-4 kpc) and later types M5 and above in the thin disk (z 0 = 0.3-0.5 kpc), (4) a second component is visible in the vertical distribution, with a different, much higher scale-height in the southern fields compared to the northern ones. We report the M-dwarf component of the Sagittarius stream in one of our fields with 11 confirmed M-dwarfs, seven of which are at the stream's distance. In addition to the M-dwarf catalog, we report the discovery of 1 T-dwarfs and 30 L-dwarfs from their near-infrared colors. The dwarf scale-height and the relative low incidence in our fields of L- and T-dwarfs in these fields makes it unlikely that these stars will be interlopers in great numbers in color-selected samples of high-redshift galaxies. The relative ubiquity

  9. Milky Way red dwarfs in the BoRG survey; galactic scale-height and the distribution of dwarf stars in WFC3 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Holwerda, B. W.; Bouwens, R.; Trenti, M.; Clarkson, W.; Sahu, K.; Bradley, L.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N.; Ryan, R.; De Marchi, G.; Andersen, M.

    2014-06-10

    We present a tally of Milky Way late-type dwarf stars in 68 Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) pure-parallel fields (227 arcmin{sup 2}) from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies survey for high-redshift galaxies. Using spectroscopically identified M-dwarfs in two public surveys, the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey and the Early Release Science mosaics, we identify a morphological selection criterion using the half-light radius (r {sub 50}), a near-infrared J – H, G – J color region where M-dwarfs are found, and a V – J relation with M-dwarf subtype. We apply this morphological selection of stellar objects, color-color selection of M-dwarfs, and optical-near-infrared color subtyping to compile a catalog of 274 M-dwarfs belonging to the disk of the Milky Way with a limiting magnitude of m {sub F125W} < 24(AB). Based on the M-dwarf statistics, we conclude that (1) the previously identified north-south discrepancy in M-dwarf numbers persists in our sample; there are more M-dwarfs in the northern fields on average than in southern ones, (2) the Milky Way's single disk scale-height for M-dwarfs is 0.3-4 kpc, depending on subtype, (3) the scale-height depends on M-dwarf subtype with early types (M0-4) high scale-height (z {sub 0} = 3-4 kpc) and later types M5 and above in the thin disk (z {sub 0} = 0.3-0.5 kpc), (4) a second component is visible in the vertical distribution, with a different, much higher scale-height in the southern fields compared to the northern ones. We report the M-dwarf component of the Sagittarius stream in one of our fields with 11 confirmed M-dwarfs, seven of which are at the stream's distance. In addition to the M-dwarf catalog, we report the discovery of 1 T-dwarfs and 30 L-dwarfs from their near-infrared colors. The dwarf scale-height and the relative low incidence in our fields of L- and T-dwarfs in these fields makes it unlikely that these stars will be interlopers in great numbers in color-selected samples of high

  10. Giants reveal what dwarfs conceal: Li abundance in lower red giant branch stars as diagnostic of the primordial Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Salaris, M.; Bonifacio, P.

    2012-01-01

    The discrepancy between cosmological Li abundance inferred from Population II dwarf stars and that derived from big bang nucleosynthesis calculations is still far from being satisfactorily solved. We investigated, as an alternative route, the use of Li abundances in Population II lower red giant branch stars as empirical diagnostic of the cosmological Li. Both theory and observations suggest that the surface Li abundance in metal-poor red giants after the completion of the first dredge-up and before the red giant branch bump is significantly less sensitive to the efficiency of atomic diffusion, compared with dwarf stars. The surface Li abundances in these objects - after the dilution caused by the first dredge-up - are predicted to be sensitive to the total Li content left in the star, i.e. they are affected only by the total amount of Li eventually burned during the previous main-sequence phase. Standard stellar models computed under different physical assumptions show that the inclusion of the atomic diffusion has an impact of about 0.07 dex in the determination of the primordial Li abundance - much smaller than the case of metal-poor main-sequence turnoff stars - and it is basically unaffected by reasonable variations of other parameters (overshooting, age, initial He abundance and mixing length). We have determined from spectroscopy the surface Li content of 17 halo lower red giant branch stars, in the metallicity range between [Fe/H] ˜- 3.4 and ˜- 1.4 dex, evolving before the extramixing episode that sets in at the red giant branch bump. The initial Li (customarily taken as estimate of the cosmological Li abundance A(Li)0) has then been inferred by accounting for the difference between initial and post-dredge-up Li abundances in the appropriate stellar models. It depends mainly on the Teff scale adopted in the spectroscopic analysis, and is only weakly sensitive to the efficiency of atomic diffusion in the models, so long as one neglects Li destruction

  11. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    White dwarfs are the evolutionary endpoint for nearly 95% of all stars born in our Galaxy, the final stages of evolution of all low- and intermediate mass stars, i.e., main sequence stars with masses below (8.5± 1.5) M_{odot}, depending on metallicity of the progenitor, mass loss and core overshoot. Massive white dwarfs are intrinsically rare objects, tand produce a gap in the determination of the initial vs. final mass relation at the high mass end (e.g. Weidemann 2000 A&A, 363, 647; Kalirai et al. 2008, ApJ, 676, 594; Williams, Bolte & Koester 2009, ApJ, 693, 355). Main sequences stars with higher masses will explode as SNII (Smartt S. 2009 ARA&A, 47, 63), but the limit does depend on the metallicity of the progenitor. Massive white dwarfs are probably SNIa progenitors through accretion or merger. They are rare, being the final product of massive stars (less common) and have smaller radius (less luminous). Kepler et al. 2007 (MNRAS, 375, 1315), Kleinman et al. 2013 (ApJS, 204, 5) estimate only 1-2% white dwarfs have masses above 1 M_{odot}. The final stages of evolution after helium burning are a race between core growth and loss of the H-rich envelope in a stellar wind. When the burning shell is exposed, the star rapidly cools and burning ceases, leaving a white dwarf. As they cool down, the magnetic field freezes in, ranging from a few kilogauss to a gigagauss. Peculiar type Ia SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg suggest progenitors in the range 2.4-2.8 M_{odot}, and Das U. & Mukhopadhyay B. (2012, Phys. Rev. D, 86, 042001) estimate that the Chandrasekhar limit increases to 2.3-2.6 M_{odot} for extremely high magnetic field stars, but differential rotation induced by accretion could also increase it, according to Hachisu I. et al. 2012 (ApJ, 744, 69). García-Berro et al. 2012, ApJ, 749, 25, for example, proposes double degenerate mergers are the progenitors of high-field magnetic white dwarfs. We propose magnetic fields enhance the line broadening in

  12. Asteroseismology of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Carl J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation has been to study various aspects of multimode pulsations in variable white dwarfs. In particular, nonlinear interactions among pulsation modes in white dwarfs (and, to some extent, in other variable stars), analysis of recent observations where such interactions are important, and preliminary work on the effects of crystallization in cool white dwarfs are reported.

  13. Living with a Red Dwarf: Rotation and X-Ray and Ultraviolet Properties of the Halo Population Kapteyn’s Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.; Durbin, Allyn

    2016-04-01

    As part of Villanova’s Living with a Red Dwarf program, we have obtained UV, X-ray, and optical data of the Population II red dwarf—Kapteyn’s Star. Kapteyn’s Star is noteworthy for its large proper motions and high radial velocity of ∼+245 km s‑1. As the nearest Pop II red dwarf, it serves as an old age anchor for calibrating activity/irradiance–rotation–age relations, and an important test bed for stellar dynamos and the resulting X-ray–UV emissions of slowly rotating, near-fully convective red dwarf stars. Adding to the notoriety, Kapteyn’s Star has recently been reported to host two super-Earth candidates, one of which (Kapteyn b) is orbiting within the habitable zone. However, Robertson et al. questioned the planet’s existence since its orbital period may be an artifact of activity, related to the star’s rotation period. Because of its large Doppler-shift, measures of the important, chromospheric H i Lyα 1215.67 Å emission line can be reliably made, because it is mostly displaced from ISM and geo-coronal sources. Lyα emission dominates the FUV region of cool stars. Our measures can help determine the X-ray–UV effects on planets hosted by Kapteyn’s Star, and planets hosted by other old red dwarfs. Stellar X-ray and Lyα emissions have strong influences on the heating and ionization of upper planetary atmospheres and can (with stellar winds and flares) erode or even eliminate planetary atmospheres. Using our program stars, we have reconstructed the past exposures of Kapteyn’s Star's planets to coronal—chromospheric XUV emissions over time. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13020. This work is also based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, a NASA science

  14. Gravitational Interactions of White Dwarf Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, James; Robinson, Chloe; Ortiz, Bridget; Hira, Ajit

    2016-03-01

    In the light of the possible role of White Dwarf stars as progenitors of Type Ia supernovas, we present computational simulations of some astrophysical phenomena associated with a study of gravitationally-bound binary stars, composed of at least one white dwarf star. Of particular interest to astrophysicists are the conditions inside a white dwarf star in the time frame leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova, for an understanding of the massive stellar explosions. In addition, the studies of the evolution of white dwarfs could serve as promising probes of theories of gravitation. We developed FORTRAN computer programs to implement our models for white dwarfs and other stars. These codes allow for different sizes and masses of stars. Simulations were done in the mass interval from 0.1 to 2.5 solar masses. Our goal was to obtain both atmospheric and orbital parameters. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant observational data. The data are further analyzed to identify trends in terms of sizes and masses of stars. We will extend our computational studies to blue giant and red giant stars in the future. Funding from National Science Foundation.

  15. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the

  16. Clandestine Companions of Nearby Red Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Koerner, D. W.; Jao, W. C.; Subasavage, J. P.; Ianna, P. A.; RECONS

    2006-12-01

    During the RECONS parallax program at the CTIO 0.9m, we have accumulated more than six years of astrometric data on red dwarfs in the southern sky. Eighty red dwarfs within 10 pc, including more than two dozen new discoveries by our team, are being followed to reveal the telltale perturbations caused by unseen companions. The advent of modern CCD technology yields substantial improvement in the detection of low mass companions over the classic studies done using photographic plates. The current ASPENS (Astrometric Search for Planets Encircling Nearby Stars) program is capable of finding hidden companions with masses as low as 10 Jupiters. Here we report the first results of the ASPENS effort, including a few intriguing systems with orbital periods of several years. Nearby red dwarfs are prime candidates for NASA's Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) because the astrometric perturbations are largest for planets orbiting nearby stars of low mass. In addition, new multiple red dwarf systems can be targeted for mass determinations, thereby providing points on a comprehensive mass-luminosity relation for the most populous members of the Galaxy. These long-term observations began in 1999 as an NOAO Surveys program, and are continuing via the SMARTS Consortium. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation (AST 98-20711 and 05-07711), NASA's Space Interferometry Mission, Georgia State University, and Northern Arizona University.

  17. Nearby Dwarf Stars: Duplicity, Binarity, and Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Subasavage, John; Riedel, Adric; Winters, Jennifer

    2010-02-01

    Double stars have proven to be both a blessing and a curse for astronomers since their discovery over two centuries ago. They remain the only reliable source of masses, the most fundamental parameter defining stars. On the other hand, their sobriquet ``vermin of the sky'' is well-earned, due to the complications they present to both observers and theoreticians. These range from non-linear proper motions to stray light in detectors, to confusion in pointing of instruments due to non-symmetric point spread functions, to angular momentum conservation in multiple stars which results in binaries closer than allowed by evolution of two single stars. This proposal is primarily focused on targets where precise astrophysical information is sorely lacking: white dwarfs, red dwarfs, and subdwarfs. The proposed work will refine current statistics regarding duplicity (chance alignments of nearby point sources) and binarity (actual physical relationships), and improve the precisions and accuracies of stellar masses. Several targets support Riedel's and Winters' theses.

  18. Nearby Dwarf Stars: Duplicity, Binarity, and Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Subasavage, John; Riedel, Adric; Winters, Jennifer

    2009-08-01

    Double stars have proven to be both a blessing and a curse for astronomers since their discovery over two centuries ago. They remain the only reliable source of masses, the most fundamental parameter defining stars. On the other hand, their sobriquet ``vermin of the sky'' is well-earned, due to the complications they present to both observers and theoreticians. These range from non-linear proper motions to stray light in detectors, to confusion in pointing of instruments due to non-symmetric point spread functions, to angular momentum conservation in multiple stars which results in binaries closer than allowed by evolution of two single stars. This proposal is primarily focused on targets where precise astrophysical information is sorely lacking: white dwarfs, red dwarfs, and subdwarfs. The proposed work will refine current statistics regarding duplicity (chance alignments of nearby point sources) and binarity (actual physical relationships), and improve the precisions and accuracies of stellar masses. Several targets support Riedel's and Winters' theses.

  19. THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH AS PROBES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY: THE NEARBY DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY KKH 98

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Williams, B.; Dalcanton, J.; Ammons, S. M.; Max, C.; Koo, D. C.; Dolphin, A. E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed E-mail: ammons@ucolick.or E-mail: koo@ucolick.or E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.co

    2010-03-20

    We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D = 2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (near-IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR-bright stars reaching over 1 mag below the tip of the RGB. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the red clump and the main-sequence turnoff for 0.5 Gyr old populations. Compared to the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD), the near-IR CMD shows significantly tighter AGB sequences, providing a good probe of the intermediate-age (0.5-5 Gyr) populations. We match observed CMDs with stellar evolution models to recover the SFH of KKH 98. On average, the galaxy has experienced relatively constant low-level star formation (5 x 10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for much of cosmic time. Except for the youngest main-sequence populations (age <0.1 Gyr), which are typically fainter than the AO data flux limit, the SFH estimated from the 592 IR-bright stars is a reasonable match to that derived from the much larger optical data set. Differences between the optical- and IR-derived SFHs for 0.1-1 Gyr populations suggest that current stellar evolution models may be overproducing the AGB by as much as a factor of 3 in this galaxy. At the depth of the AO data, the IR-luminous stars are not crowded. Therefore, these techniques can potentially be used to determine the stellar populations of galaxies at significantly further distances.

  20. Tracking star formation in dwarf cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rude, Cody Millard

    The evolution of galaxies in dense environments can be affected by close encounters with neighboring galaxies and interactions with the intracluster medium (ICM). Dwarf galaxies may be especially susceptible to these effects due to their low mass. The goal of my dissertation research is to look for signs of star formation in cluster dwarf galaxies by measuring and comparing the r- and u-band luminosity functions of 15 low redshift Abell galaxy clusters using archival data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions are measured in four cluster-centric annuli from stacked cluster data. To account for differences in cluster optical richness, each cluster is scaled according to r200, where r200 is the radius of a sphere, centered on the cluster, whose average density is 200 times the critical density of the universe. The outer region of the cluster sample shows an increase in the faint-end slope of the u-band luminosity function relative to the r-band, indicating star formation in dwarf galaxies. The blue fraction for dwarf galaxies steadily rises with increasing cluster-centric radii. The change in the blue fraction of giant galaxies also increases, but at a lower rate. Additionally, the inner regions of clusters ranging from 0.185 < z < 0.7 from the "Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH)" are used to generate blue- and red-band luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions. Comparisons of the inner region of the CLASH and CFHT clusters show an increase in the blue fraction of dwarf galaxies with redshift that is not present in giant galaxies.

  1. The Pulsating White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present a summary of what is currently known about the three distinct families of isolated pulsating white dwarfs. These are the GW Vir stars (He/C/O-atmosphere stars with Teff sime 120,000 K), the V777 Her stars (He-atmosphere, Teff sime 25,000 K), and the ZZ Ceti stars (H-atmosphere, Teff sime 12,000 K), all showing multiperiodic luminosity variations caused by low-order and low-degree g-mode instabilities. We also provide, in an Appendix, a very brief overview of the newly found evidence in favor of the existence of a fourth category of oscillating white dwarfs bearing strong similarities with these families of pulsators. We begin our survey with a short historical introduction, followed by a general discussion of pulsating white dwarfs as compact pulsators. We then discuss the class properties of these objects, including an updated census. We next focus on the instability domains for each family of pulsators in the log g - Teff diagram, and present their time-averaged properties in more detail. This is followed by a section on excitation physics, i.e., the causes of the pulsational instabilities, with emphasis on the common properties of the different types of pulsator. We then discuss the time-dependent properties of the pulsating white dwarfs featuring, among other things, a brief "picture tour" across the ZZ Ceti instability strip. We next review the methods used to infer or constrain the angular geometry of a pulsation mode in a white dwarf. These include multicolor photometry and time-resolved spectroscopy, the exploitation of the nonlinear features in the observed light curves, and rotational splitting. We also consider basic adiabatic asteroseismology starting with a discussion of the reaction of the period spectrum to variations of model parameters. We next review the various asteroseismological inferences that have so far been claimed for white dwarfs. We also discuss the potential of exploiting the rates of period change. We finally provide some

  2. A Search for Fine Wines: Discovering Close Red Dwarf-White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Mark; Finch, C. T.; Hambly, N. C.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.; Riedel, A. R.; Subasavage, J. P.; Winters, J. G.; RECONS

    2012-01-01

    Like fine wines, stars come in both red and white varieties. Here we present initial results of the Fine Wines Project that targets red dwarf-white dwarf pairs. The two scientific goals of Fine Wines are (1) to develop methods to estimate ages for red dwarfs based on the cooling ages of the white dwarfs, and (2) to identify suitable pairs for dynamical mass determinations of white dwarfs to probe their interior structures. Here we focus on the search for Fine Wines, including sample selection, elimination of false positives, and initial reconnaissance. The sample was extracted via color-color plots from a pool of more than 30,000 proper motion systems examined during the SuperCOSMOS-RECONS (SCR) and UCAC3 Proper Motion (UPM) surveys. The initial sample of 75 best candidates is being observed for BVRI photometry and 3500-9500 A spectroscopy to confirm whether or not the systems are red dwarf-white dwarf pairs. Early results indicate that roughly 50% of the candidates selected are indeed Fine Wine systems. This effort is supported by the NSF through grant AST 09-08402 and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  3. White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, P.

    1977-01-01

    The three possible fates of burned-out stars: white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, are described in elementary terms. Characteristics of these celestial bodies, as provided by Einstein's work, are described. (CP)

  4. Innocent Bystanders and Smoking Guns: Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    As far as we know, most carbon throughout the Universe is created and dispersed by AGB stars. So it was at first surprising to find that the carbon stars most prevalent in the Galaxy are in fact dwarfs. We suspect that dC stars are most likely innocent bystanders in post-mass transfer binaries, and may be predominantly metal-poor. Among 1200 C stars found in the SDSS (Green 2013), we confirm 724 dCs, of which a dozen are DA/dC stars in composite spectrum binaries, quadrupling the total sample of these "smoking guns" for AGB binary mass transfer. The dCs likely span absolute magnitudes M_i from about 6.5 to 10.5. G-type dC stars with weak CN and relatively blue colors are probably the most massive dCs still cool enough to show C_2 bands. Eleven very red C stars with strong red CN bands appear to be N-type AGB stars at large Galactocentric distances, one likely a new discovery in the dIrr galaxy Le A. Two such stars within 30arcmin of each other may trace a previously unidentified dwarf galaxy or tidal stream at ~40 kpc. We describe follow-up projects to study the spatial, kinematic, and binary properties of these C-enriched dwarfs.

  5. Are All Dwarf Carbon Stars Binary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farihi, Jay; Harris, Hugh; Subasavage, John; Bergfors, Carolina; Green, Paul; Gansicke, Boris

    2014-08-01

    The origin of dwarf carbon stars is a persistent astrophysical curiosity dating back to 1977. Only giant stars dredge up interior carbon, and hence the discovery of an unevolved dwarf star with C/O >1 was a big surprise. Astronomers are no closer to understanding these rare and spectrally peculiar stars 37 years later(!). The bulk of dwarf carbon stars show no sign of an evolved companion necessary to account for their externally polluted atmospheres. These stars are sensitive tracers of Galactic chemical evolution and star formation, and provide strong constraints on the potential for carbon-dominated (single star) planetary systems. We propose to conclusively validate or refute the hypothetical binary nature of dwarf carbon stars, and hence their chemical and physical formation channel(s). For all binaries, we will initially constrain and eventually measure orbital periods. By determining their physical separation during the previous epoch of mass transfer, we will distinguish between the Roche lobe overflow and wind capture models for the creation of carbon dwarfs.

  6. Dwarf Star Erupts in Giant Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This movie taken by NASA'S Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows one of the largest flares, or star eruptions, ever recorded at ultraviolet wavelengths. The star, called GJ 3685A, just happened to be in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's field of view while the telescope was busy observing galaxies. As the movie demonstrates, the seemingly serene star suddenly exploded once, then even more intensely a second time, pouring out in total about one million times more energy than a typical flare from our Sun. The second blast of light constituted an increase in brightness by a factor of at least 10,000.

    Flares are huge explosions of energy stemming from a single location on a star's surface. They are caused by the brief destruction of a star's magnetic fields. Many types of stars experience them, though old, small, rapidly rotating 'red dwarfs' like GJ 3685A tend to flare more frequently and dramatically. These stars, called flare stars, can experience powerful eruptions as often as every few hours. Younger stars, in general, also erupt more often. One of the reasons astronomers study flare stars is to gain a better picture and history of flare events taking place on the Sun.

    A preliminary analysis of the GJ 3685A flare shows that the mechanisms underlying stellar eruptions may be more complex than previously believed. Evidence for the two most popular flare theories was found.

    Though this movie has been sped up (the actual flare lasted about 20 minutes), time-resolved data exist for each one-hundredth of a second. These observations were taken at 2 p.m. Pacific time, April 24, 2004. In the still image, the time sequence starts in the upper left panel, continues in the upper right, then moves to the lower left and ends in the lower right.

    The circular and linear features that appear below and to the right of GJ 3685A during the flare event are detector artifacts caused by the extreme brightness of the flare.

  7. Planets and Brown Dwarfs and Stars, Oh My! --- Companions Along the Road to the Nearest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Davison, C. L.; Dieterich, S. B.; Ianna, P. A.; Jao, W. C.; Koerner, D. W.; Subasavage, J. P.; Tanner, A. M.; White, R. J.; RECONS

    2012-01-01

    RECONS (www.recons.org, REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars) has been using astrometric techniques since 1999 to search for massive planets orbiting more than 130 nearby red and white dwarfs. Because of their proximity, nearby stars are natural locations to search for other solar systems --- the stars provide increased fluxes, larger astrometric perturbations, and higher probabilities for eventual resolution of planets than similar stars at larger distances. Unlike radial velocity searches, our astrometric effort is most sensitive to Jovian planets in Jovian orbits, i.e. those that span decades. We have discovered stellar companions with masses of a few hundred Jupiters, brown dwarf companions with masses of a few tens of Jupiters, and are now pushing into the realm of planets with masses of a few Jupiters around the nearest red dwarfs. Several previously unknown companions have been imaged via Gemini-AO observations, but we have also detected perturbations caused by enigmatic companions that elude direct detection. As we sweep through the mass regimes of stars to exoplanets for companions, we are now able to assess the various populations --- stars are common as companions, whereas brown dwarfs and massive planets are rare. We outline what we have discovered so far and place our exoplanet search results in context with an overview of the census of more than 60 stars with exoplanets known within 25 pc. This effort is supported by the NSF through grant AST-0908402 and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  8. Variable stars in the dwarf galaxy GR 8 (DDO 155)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Saha, A.; Hoessel, John G.; Danielson, G. Edward

    1995-01-01

    Observations of the resolved stars in dwarf galaxy GR 8, obtained over the period 1980 February to 1994 March, are presented. Thirty-four separate epochs were searched for variable stars, and a total of six were found, of which one has Cepheid characteristics. After correction for Galactic extinction this single Cepheid yields a distance modulus of m - M = 26.75 +/- 0.35. This corresponds to a distance of 2.24 Mpc, placing GR 8 near the Local Group (LG) zero-velocity surface. The other five variable stars are very red, and possibly have long periods of order 100 days or more.

  9. White dwarf stars with carbon atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Dufour, P; Liebert, J; Fontaine, G; Behara, N

    2007-11-22

    White dwarfs represent the endpoint of stellar evolution for stars with initial masses between approximately 0.07 and 8-10, where is the mass of the Sun (more massive stars end their life as either black holes or neutron stars). The theory of stellar evolution predicts that the majority of white dwarfs have a core made of carbon and oxygen, which itself is surrounded by a helium layer and, for approximately 80 per cent of known white dwarfs, by an additional hydrogen layer. All white dwarfs therefore have been traditionally found to belong to one of two categories: those with a hydrogen-rich atmosphere (the DA spectral type) and those with a helium-rich atmosphere (the non-DAs). Here we report the discovery of several white dwarfs with atmospheres primarily composed of carbon, with little or no trace of hydrogen or helium. Our analysis shows that the atmospheric parameters found for these stars do not fit satisfactorily in any of the currently known theories of post-asymptotic giant branch evolution, although these objects might be the cooler counterpart of the unique and extensively studied PG 1159 star H1504+65 (refs 4-7). These stars, together with H1504+65, might accordingly form a new evolutionary sequence that follows the asymptotic giant branch. PMID:18033290

  10. Infrared Properties of Star Forming Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaduvescu, Ovidiu

    2005-11-01

    order to achieve 1% accuracy in surface photometry. We discovered that the NIR surface brightness profiles of dIs can be fitted with a hyperbolic secant (sech) function with only two parameters: the central surface brightness and the scale length. This led to the discovery that BCD profiles could be fitted with a sech component to trace the diffuse component responsible for most of the light, and a Gaussian for the central starburst. For 25 of the 34 observed dIs, we resolved stars as faint as M_K=-7.5 mag out to 5 Mpc. We show that the resolved component comprises more than 50% of the light from star formation bursts within the last 3 Gyr. By separating the resolved sources associated with each galaxy from the unresolved component, we determined for the first time the contribution from the resolved stellar component to the total light in the NIR. In nearly all galaxies, the resolved population up to M_K=-7.5 mag represents less than 5% of the total flux in K_s, with ratios in J 1.5-2 times larger. Compared with the visible, the small contribution of the resolved flux allows us to consider the NIR a better domain to sample the old stellar populations, and thus use it to gauge the stellar mass of star-forming dwarf galaxies. For 29 dIs, colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for the resolved component were derived. Three CMDs include more than 1000 stars in both K_s and J, while another 15 CMDs have more than 100 stars. Most of the CMDs show a main blue finger centered around J-K_s=1 mag. In some cases, a red tail extends from the finger out to J-K_s =+2.5 mag. The colour profiles of the unresolved components show a remarkably constant J-K_s = +0.8 to +1.0 mag, which matches the colour of the main finger in the CMDs. For both dIs and BCDs, we searched for correlations between galaxy size, absolute magnitude, central surface brightness, colours, and the resolved over total ratio (for dIs). Good linear correlations were found between the scale length, and the sech magnitude, and

  11. Theoretical Study of White Dwarf Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, Ajit; Koetter, Ted; Rivera, Ruben; Diaz, Juan

    2015-04-01

    We continue our interest in the computational simulation of the astrophysical phenomena with a study of gravitationally-bound binary stars, composed of at least one white dwarf star. Of particular interest to astrophysicists are the conditions inside a white dwarf star in the time frame leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova, for an understanding of the massive stellar explosions. In addition, the studies of the evolution of white dwarfs could serve as promising probes of theories of gravitation. We developed FORTRAN computer programs to implement our models for white dwarfs and other stars. These codes allow for different sizes and masses of stars. Simulations were done in the mass interval from 0.1 to 2.0 solar masses. Our goal was to obtain both atmospheric and orbital parameters. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant observational data. The data are further analyzed to identify trends in terms of sizes and masses of stars. We hope to extend our computational studies to blue giant stars in the future. Research Supported by National Science Foundation.

  12. Detection of starquakes on magnetically active red dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Avgoloupis, S. J.; Seiradakis, J. H.; Papantoniou, Ch.

    2015-07-01

    The scientific team of the Stephanion Observatory, University of Thessaloniki contributed to the research of high frequency optical oscillations on red dwarfs by participating in international programs for Multiwavelength observation of strong Flares of selected flare stars ([12]). These joined research shed plenty of light on the phenomenon of high frequency optical oscillations. Nevertheless a better understanding of the high-frequency oscillations demand a unified analysis of the flare light-curve for a wider time window covering pre-flare, flare and post flare and a broader band of frequencies. Thus in addition to the international campaign research the Stephanion Observatory group observe and analysis one colour (B, or U) observations of the Stephanion Observatory of different red dwarfs: EV Lac([1], [2] and [7]), AD Leo ([4] and [5]),YZ CMin ([3],[9]), V 390 Auri ([6],[10]), UV Cet([8]), at any stage of their activity (quiescence, weak flares, strong flare! s).In this paper we present the analysis of the quiet state observations of the stars EV Lac, BY Drac , AD Leo, YZ Cmin in order to realize if starquakes appear far apart from the observed flares, during the quiet state of the stars, as a result of the general magnetic activity of the star.

  13. A Search for Close Red Dwarf-White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Mark R.; Henry, Todd J.; Subasavage, John P.

    2011-08-01

    We propose to observe 59 objects suspected to be red dwarf-white dwarf (RD-WD) binaries with separations < 3 arcsec using the CTIO 1.0m. Our goals are to use images of these objects to both resolve the systems and to obtain accurate BVRI photometry. The systems have been selected based on positions in three different color-color plots using SuperCOSMOS BRI plate photometry and 2MASS JHK photometry in accordance with the positions of known RD-WD binaries. This effort will identify candidates for detailed observations as part of the RECONS astrometric program on the CTIO 0.9m to yield accurate parallaxes and photocentric orbits. The parallaxes will then be used to determine the ages of the systems from WD cooling curves, and the orbits will eventually be used to measure dynamical masses. Ultimately, we aim to increase significantly the number of dynamical masses for white dwarfs because currently only three have been determined to 5% accuracy. The first observational step outlined here will allow us to identify appropriate systems for long-term work. This 1.0m project is likely to become the undergraduate senior thesis work of the PI.

  14. Searching for Treasure in the South: Red Dwarfs within 25 Parsecs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosey, Altonio D.; Winters, J. G.; Boyd, M. R.; Dieterich, S. B.; Finch, C. T.; Hambly, N. C.; Henry, T. J.; Ianna, P. A.; Jao, W.; Riedel, A. R.; Subasavage, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the RECONS (REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars) effort to find the missing red dwarf star systems in the solar neighborhood, defined here to be those closer than 25 parsecs. Knowing that there are currently 37 red dwarf systems known within 5 parsecs, and assuming a constant density of star systems in the solar neighborhood, we predict there to be roughly 4600 red dwarf star systems within 25 parsecs. But how many have been identified? Here we present results of our comprehensive reconnaissance of the southern sky, focused on red dwarf systems having proper motions in excess of 0.18"/yr. Using BRI plate magnitudes from the SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey and photometry from 2MASS, we have found 1711 star systems estimated to be within 25 parsecs, or 74% of the anticipated 2300 systems in the southern sky. However, 1041 of the star systems do not have the trigonometric parallaxes required to verify their proximity. Since 1999, we have been obtaining accurate VRI photometry at the CTIO 0.9m to improve distance estimates (also in concert with 2MASS photometry), and measuring trigonometric parallaxes for the closest systems. Here we provide a census of the southern red dwarf systems, which span V magnitudes of 7.3 to 20.4. At present, the 25 parsec census includes 750 systems with plate distance estimates, 270 systems with CCD distance estimates, and 660 systems with trigonometric parallaxes, for a total of 1700 systems. These nearby red dwarfs will be the fundamental sample to inform us about the stellar content of the Milky Way, and provide the benchmark luminosity and mass functions against which star formation scenarios must be reconciled. This effort is supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402 and AST-1109445, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  15. Determining the Locations of Brown Dwarfs in Young Star Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Lauren A.

    2005-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are stellar objects with masses less than 0.08 times that of the Sun that are unable to sustain nuclear fusion. Because of the lack of fusion, they are relatively cold, allowing the formation of methane and water molecules in their atmospheres. Brown dwarfs can be detected by examining stars' absorption spectra in the near-infrared to see whether methane and water are present. The objective of this research is to determine the locations of brown dwarfs in Rho Ophiuchus, a star cluster that is only 1 million years old. The cluster was observed in four filters in the near-infrared range using the Wide-Field Infra-Red Camera (WIRC) on the 100" DuPont Telescope and Persson's Auxiliary Nasymith Infrared Camera (PANIC) on the 6.5-m Magellan Telescope. By comparing the magnitude of a star in each of the four filters, an absorption spectrum can be formed. This project uses standard astronomical techniques to reduce raw frames into final images and perform photometry on them to obtain publishable data. Once this is done, it will be possible to determine the locations and magnitudes of brown dwarfs within the cluster.

  16. White dwarfs in Be star binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apparao, K. M. V.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of possible reasons for the persistent inability to identify white dwarf stars in the Be binary systems. It is noted that many Be stars exhibiting large optical enhancements may be Be + WD and Be + He systems, and that observations of pulsations in the H-alpha emission, as well as observation of time delays between enhancements of optical line and continuum, can identify such systems.

  17. Massive Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Soeren

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies are often characterized by very high globular cluster specific frequencies, in some cases exceeding that of the Milky Way by a factor of 100 or more. Moreover, the GCs are typically much more metal-poor than the bulk of the field stars, so that a substantial fraction (up to 20-25% or more) of all metal-poor stars in some dwarf galaxies are associated with GCs. The metal-poor components of these galaxies thus represent an extreme case of the "specific frequency problem". In this talk I will review the current status of our understanding of GC systems in dwarf galaxies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the implications of the high GC specific frequencies for the amount of mass loss the clusters could have experienced and the constraints this provides on theories for the origin of multiple populations in globular clusters.

  18. Chemical Abundances of Metal-poor stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Jablonka, Pascale; Hill, Vanessa; Starkenburg, Else; Lemasle, Bertrand; Shetrone, Matthew; Irwin, Mike; Norris, John; Yong, David; Gilmore, Gerry; Salvadori, Stephania; Skuladottir, Asa; Tolstoy, Eline

    2016-08-01

    Stars in low-mass dwarf galaxies show a larger range in their chemical properties than those in the Milky Way halo. The slower star formation efficiency make dwarf galaxies ideal systems for testing nucleosynthetic yields. Not only are alpha-poor stars found at lower metallicities, and a higher fraction of carbon-enhanced stars, but we are also finding stars in dwarf galaxies that appear to be iron-rich. These are compared with yields from a variety of supernova predictions.

  19. About Exobiology: The Case for Dwarf K Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Guinan, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most fundamental topics of exobiology concerns the identification of stars with environments consistent with life. Although it is believed that most types of main-sequence stars might be able to support life, particularly extremophiles, special requirements appear to be necessary for the development and sustainability of advanced life forms. From our study, orange main-sequence stars, ranging from spectral type late-G to mid-K (with a maximum at early K), are most promising. Our analysis considers a variety of aspects, including (1) the frequency of the various types of stars, (2) the speed of stellar evolution in their lifetimes, (3) the size of the stellar climatological habitable zones (CLI-HZs), (4) the strengths and persistence of their magnetic-dynamo-generated X-ray–UV emissions, and (5) the frequency and severity of flares, including superflares; both (4) and (5) greatly reduce the suitability of red dwarfs to host life-bearing planets. The various phenomena show pronounced dependencies on the stellar key parameters such as effective temperature and mass, permitting the assessment of the astrobiological significance of various types of stars. Thus, we developed a “Habitable-Planetary-Real-Estate Parameter” (HabPREP) that provides a measure for stars that are most suitable for planets with life. Early K stars are found to have the highest HabPREP values, indicating that they may be “Goldilocks” stars for life-hosting planets. Red dwarfs are numerous, with long lifetimes, but their narrow CLI-HZs and hazards from magnetic activity make them less suitable for hosting exolife. Moreover, we provide X-ray–far-UV irradiances for G0 V–M5 V stars over a wide range of ages.

  20. Pulsating White Dwarf Star GD99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chynoweth, K. M.; Thompson, S.; Mullally, F.; Yeates, C.

    2004-12-01

    We present 15 hours of time-series photometry of the variable white dwarf star GD99. These data were obtained at the McDonald Observatory 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope in January 2003, using the Argos CCD photometer. We achieved a noise level as low as 0.07 %, as measured from the power spectrum of our first night. Our observations confirm that GD99 is a unique pulsating white dwarf whose modes show characteristics of both the hot and cold type of DA variable stars. Additionally, GD99 has a large number of modes, making it a good candidate for asteroseismological study. Our preliminary results indicate that this star merits further study to decipher its abundant set of unusual modes. With such a rich period structure, longer continuous data sets will be required to fully resolve the pulsation spectrum.

  1. Be stars with white dwarf companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina; Luna, Gerardo; Zemko, Polina; Kotulla, Ralf; Gallagher, Jay; Harbeck, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    A handful of supersoft X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds that could not be identified with transient nova outbursts turned out to be mainly massive close binaries. Recently, we have clearly identified a Be binary in M31, and are currently collecting data for another candidate in that galaxy. Work is in progress to assess whether the compact object companion really is a hydrogen burning white dwarf (the alternative being a massive stellar-mass black hole). If we can prove that Be+white dwarf interacting close binaries are common, and that hydrogen is often ignited on the white dwarf in these systems, we have discovered a new promising channel towards the explosion of supernovae of type Ia in star forming regions, without invoking double degenerate systems

  2. Charged condensate and helium dwarf stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gabadadze, Gregory; Rosen, Rachel A E-mail: rar339@nyu.edu

    2008-10-15

    White dwarf stars composed of carbon, oxygen and heavier elements are expected to crystallize as they cool down below certain temperatures. Yet, simple arguments suggest that the helium white dwarf cores may not solidify, mostly because of zero-point oscillations of the helium ions that would dissolve the crystalline structure. We argue that the interior of the helium dwarfs may instead form a macroscopic quantum state in which the charged helium-4 nuclei are in a Bose-Einstein condensate, while the relativistic electrons form a neutralizing degenerate Fermi liquid. We discuss the electric charge screening, and the spectrum of this substance, showing that the bosonic long-wavelength fluctuations exhibit a mass gap. Hence, there is a suppression at low temperatures of the boson contribution to the specific heat-the latter being dominated by the specific heat of the electrons near the Fermi surface. This state of matter may have observational signatures.

  3. HOT WHITE DWARF SHINES IN YOUNG STAR CLUSTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A dazzling 'jewel-box' collection of over 20,000 stars can be seen in crystal clarity in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image, taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The young (40 million year old) cluster, called NGC 1818, is 164,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. The LMC, a site of vigorous current star formation, is an ideal nearby laboratory for studying stellar evolution. In the cluster, astronomers have found a young white dwarf star, which has only very recently formed following the burnout of a red giant. Based on this observation astronomers conclude that the red giant progenitor star was 7.6 times the mass of our Sun. Previously, astronomers have estimated that stars anywhere from 6 to 10 solar masses would not just quietly fade away as white dwarfs but abruptly self-destruct in torrential explosions. Hubble can easily resolve the star in the crowded cluster, and detect its intense blue-white glow from a sizzling surface temperature of 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit. IMAGE DATA Date taken: December 1995 Wavelength: natural color reconstruction from three filters (I,B,U) Field of view: 100 light-years, 2.2 arc minutes TARGET DATA Name: NGC 1818 Distance: 164,000 light-years Constellation: Dorado Age: 40 million years Class: Rich star cluster Apparent magnitude: 9.7 Apparent diameter: 7 arc minutes Credit: Rebecca Elson and Richard Sword, Cambridge UK, and NASA (Original WFPC2 image courtesy J. Westphal, Caltech) Image files are available electronically via the World Wide Web at: http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/1998/16 and via links in http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/latest.html or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pictures.html. GIF and JPEG images are available via anonymous ftp to oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo/GIF/9816.GIF and /pubinfo/JPEG/9816.jpg.

  4. Turbulence and Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollyday, Gigja; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Little Things Team

    2015-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the nature and role of turbulence in the interstellar medium of dwarf irregular galaxies. Turbulence, resulting from a variety of processes, is a potential source for cloud formation, and thus star formation. We have undertaken an indirect analysis of turbulence via the third (skewness) and fourth (kurtosis) moments of the distribution of atomic hydrogen gas densities using the LITTLE THINGS data for a 40-count sample of nearby (<10.3 Mpc) dwarf galaxies. We followed the formulism used by Burkhart et al. (2010) in a study of the SMC. We found that there is evidence of turbulence in dwarf galaxies at a level comparable to that found in the SMC, but we have found no correlation between integrated star formation rates and integrated kurtosis values nor a clear correlation between kurtosis as a function of radius with gas surface density and star formation profiles. We are grateful for a summer internship provided by the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program at Northern Arizona University, run by Dr. Kathy Eastwood and Dr. David Trilling and funded by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1004107.

  5. Reliable Radii for M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Feiden, Gregory A.; Gaidos, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Precise and accurate parameters for late-type (late K and M) dwarf stars are critical for characterizing their planets. A deluge of planets discovered by Kepler has driven the need for even more precise stellar radii. We present our efforts to better constrain the luminosity-radius and Teff-radius relations for late-type (K5-M6) stars, taking advantage of improved techniques to calculate bolometric fluxes and [Fe/H] for M dwarfs. We determine effective temperatures for these stars by comparing observed spectra to atmospheric models, and confirm the accuracy of these temperatures using stars with temperatures determined from long-baseline optical interferometry. Using the Stefan-Boltzmann law we can empirically determine radii for these stars to better than 5%. We find the Teff-radius relation depends strongly on [Fe/H], which was missed in earlier studies that used smaller samples or less precise methods. We expect our empirical relations to be increasingly useful with the arrival of Gaia parallaxes in the near future.

  6. An unsuccessful search for brown dwarf companions to white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Harry L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a survey to detect excess infrared emission from white dwarf stars which would be attributable to a low mass companion are reviewed. Neither a simple comparison of spectroscopically identified white dwarf stars with the IRAS Point Source Catalog nor the coadding of IRAS survey data resulted in a detection of a brown dwarf. The seven nearest stars where the most stringent limits to the presence of a brown dwarf were obtained are listed, and an effort to detect brown dwarfs in the solar neighborhood is discussed.

  7. NTT Observations Indicate that Brown Dwarfs Form Like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    -floating Brown Dwarfs in the Milky Way galaxy. Both facts would appear to imply a stellar, rather than a planet-like origin for these objects. However, one might also explain these observations if most Brown Dwarfs initially formed as companions to stars (within circumstellar disks), but were later ejected from the systems, e.g., because of gravitational effects during encounters with other stars. So the issue of Brown Dwarf origin is still unsettled. NTT observations of substellar objects in the Orion Nebula ESO PR Photo 22a/01 ESO PR Photo 22a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 434 pix - 192k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 877 pix - 496k] [Full Resolution - JPEG: 1772 x 1943 pix - 1.2Mb Caption : PR Photo 22a/01 shows a colour composite of near-infrared images of the central regions of the Orion Nebula, obtained on March 14, 2000, with the SOFI instrument at the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla. Three exposures were made through J- (wavelength 1.25 µm here colour-coded as "blue"), H- (1.65 µm; "green") and Ks-filters (2.16 µm; "red"), respectively. The central group of bright stars is the famous "Trapezium" . The total effective exposure time was 86.4 seconds per band. The sky field measures about 4.9 x 4.9 arcmin 2 (1024 x 1024 pix 2 ). North is up and East is left. ESO PR Photo 22b/01 ESO PR Photo 22b/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 439 pix - 35k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 877 pix - 90k] Caption : PR Photo 22b/01 contains the corresponding "finding chart" with the positions of the very young Brown Dwarfs in the Orion Nebula that were studied during the present investigation. The starlike symbols represent the brightest stars in PR Photo 22a/01 and are plotted for reference. In this chart, very young Brown Dwarfs are represented by a double open circle (if a dusty disk was detected) or with a single open circle (if no dusty disk was detected). The scale is exactly as in PR Photo 22a/01 . ESO PR Photo 22c/01 ESO PR Photo 22c/01 [Animated GIF: 482 x 465 pix - 248k] Caption : PR

  8. GAS, STARS, AND STAR FORMATION IN ALFALFA DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G. E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jarle@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: susan.g.neff@nasa.gov

    2012-06-15

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and H I components of 229 low H I mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H I masses <10{sup 7.7} M{sub Sun} and H I line widths <80 km s{sup -1}. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M{sub *}) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M{sub *} obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper H I mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M{sub *} than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H I depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that H I disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  9. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses <10(sup 7.7) solar mass and Hi line widths <80 kilometers per second. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  10. Activity-Induced Radial Velocity Variation of M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jan Marie; Korhonen, Heidi

    2014-04-01

    Stellar magnetic activity manifests itself in a variety of ways including starspots-cool, dark regions on the stellar surface. Starspots can cause variations (`jitter') in spectral line-profiles which can mimic the radial velocity (RV) variations caused by an orbiting planet, or create RV noise that can drown out a planetary signature. Cool, low-mass M dwarf stars can be highly active, which can make detection of potentially habitable planets around these stars difficult. We investigate radial velocity variations caused by different activity (spot) patterns on M dwarf stars in order to determine the limits of detectability for small planets orbiting active M dwarfs. We report on our progress toward the aim of answering the following questions: What types of spot patterns are realistic for M dwarf stars? What effect will spots have on M dwarf RV measurements? Can jitter from M dwarf spots mimic planetary signals? What is the ideal observing wavelength to reduce M dwarf jitter?

  11. CARMENES: Blue planets orbiting red dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Caballero, J. A.; Mandel, H.; Mundt, R.; Reiners, A.; Ribas, I.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Seifert, W.; Azzaro, M.; Galadí, D.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Dreizler, S.; Montes, D.; Rhode, P.; Stürmer, J.

    2013-04-01

    The CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exo-earths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs) consortium, consisting of eleven Spanish and German institutions, has been established to conduct a radial-velocity survey of M dwarfs with the 3.5 m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory. This survey will target ˜300 M stars, with emphasis on spectral types M4V and later. The CARMENES instrument is currently under construction; it consists of two independent échelle spectrographs covering the wavelength ranges 0.55 …1.05 μm and 0.95 …1.7 μm, respectively, at a spectral resolution of R = 82,000. The spectrographs are fed by fibers from the Cassegrain focus of the telescope; calibration is performed simultaneously with emission-line lamps. The optical benches of the spectrographs are housed in vacuum tanks and climatic chambers, which provide the temperature-stabilized environments necessary to enable a 1 m/s radial velocity precision.

  12. Our Southern Neighbors - 2000 Nearby Red Dwarf Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Jennifer G.; Hosey, A. D.; Lurie, J. C.; Hambly, N.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.; Riedel, A. R.; Subasavage, J.

    2013-01-01

    Distance determinations to nearby objects are vitally important, as our solar neighbors set the standards for the primary rung in the cosmic distance ladder. The optimal tool for accomplishing this seemingly simple task is trigonometric parallax. Measuring parallaxes is very time-intensive, however. Photometric distance estimates can be useful in deciding which are the best targets for the limited slots available in traditional parallax programs. Photometry also reveals stars that do not fall neatly onto the main sequence, such as young stars, unresolved multiples, and subdwarfs, once an accurate trigonometric parallax has been measured. We present photometry and distances for more than 2000 southern M dwarf systems thought to be near the Sun, broken into three distinct samples. The first includes ~500 systems with accurate trigonometric parallaxes placing them within 25 pc --- ~150 have been published as a result of the RECONS astrometry program at the CTIO 0.9m telescope, which we now operate for NOAO. For an additional ~700 systems, we use VRI measurements from our photometry program (also at the 0.9m) with 2MASS JHK photometry to estimate distances accurate to 15%. Roughly one third of these systems are on our parallax program. The third sample includes ~1000 more systems for which plate BRI photometry from SuperCOSMOS is combined with JHK to provide distances accurate to 26%. Together, these three sets of stars comprise a list of ~2100 red dwarf systems within 25 pc in the southern sky. These stars are crucial to our understanding of the stellar luminosity and mass functions in the Milky Way and beyond, and provide ideal targets for planets searches using a variety of techniques. This effort is supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402 and AST-1109445, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  13. UBV photometry of hot white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheselka, Mathew; Holberg, J. B.; Watkins, Ron; Collins, James; Tweedy, R. W.

    1993-12-01

    Johnson UBV photometry has been obtained for a set of hot degenerate stars, primarily DA and DO white dwarfs from among those detected in the Palomar-Green survey of UV excess objects. Most of our program stars have estimated effective temperatures (Teff) in the range 22,000 to 80,000 K and have no previous photometry. Some objects selected are also x-ray and extreme ultraviolet sources from the ROSAT all sky survey. The importance of precise photometric measurements in the analysis of x-ray data is discussed. A discrepancy between the observed colors and predicted colors is noted, and possibly accounted for by difficulties in defining the atmospheric cutoff of the U band and a general lack of hot stars used to define the photometric transformation between theoretical and observed colors.

  14. Detection of starquakes on the red dwarf AD Leo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Avgoloupis, S. J.; Seiradakis, J. H.; Papantoniou, Ch.

    2016-07-01

    The results of the analysis of the one color (B) observations of the Stefanion Observatory for the red dwarf AD Leo at any stage of the stellar activity (quiescence, weak flares, strong flares),indicate that: (1) Transient high frequency oscillations occur during the flare event and during the quiet-star phase as well; (2) The Observed frequencies range between 0.0005Hz (period 33min) and 0.3 Hz (period 3s) not rigorously bounded; However, the quiescence parts of the light-curve which were analyzed belong to the pre- or after- flare state i.e. are connected with a major magnetic even (the observed flare). In this work we find that transient oscillations appear far apart from the observed flares, during the quiet state of the stars, as a result of the general magnetic activity of the star. The power spectrum of these oscillations resembles that of the solar like oscillation spectra i.e the sunquakes spectra. Finally a tentative estimation of the main physical parameters of the star, using asteroseismic analysis, was performed.

  15. On oxygenic photosynthesis in planets of Red Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandel, Amri; Gale, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    The results of the Kepler mission indicate that Earthlike planets are common not only around solar-type stars but also among planets orbiting Red Dwarf (RD) stars, the most numerous stellar type in the Milky Way galaxy. Early considerations indicated that conditions on RD planets would be inimical to life, as their Habitable Zones would be so close as to make planets tidally locked to their star. This was thought to cause an erratic climate and expose life forms to flares of ionizing electro-magnetic radiation and charged particles. It has also been argued that the lesser photon energy of the radiation of the relatively cool RDs would not suffice for oxygenic photosynthesis. However, recent calculations show that these negative factors are less severe than originally estimated, hence conditions for photosynthesis could exist on RD planets. Furthermore, the huge number and the long Main-Sequence lifetime of RDs could make photosynthesis and biotic life on RD planets statistically even more abundant than on planets of solar type stars.

  16. DISCOVERY OF SUPER-Li-RICH RED GIANTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Deng, Licai; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-06-10

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the {sup 7}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 4}He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants-14 of which are new discoveries-among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li){sub NLTE} = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief.

  17. White dwarf stars in D dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, P.-H.

    2007-07-01

    We derive the mass-radius relation of relativistic white dwarf stars (modeled as a self-gravitating degenerate Fermi gas at T=0) in a D-dimensional universe and study the influence of the dimension of space on the laws of physics when we combine quantum mechanics, special relativity, and gravity. We exhibit characteristic dimensions D=1, D=2, D=3, D=(3+17)/2, D=4, D=2(1+2) and show that quantum mechanics cannot balance gravitational collapse for D≥4. This is similar to a result found by Ehrenfest (1917) at the atomic level for Coulomb forces (in Bohr’s model) and for the Kepler problem. This makes the dimension of our universe D=3 very particular with possible implications regarding the anthropic principle. We discuss some historic aspects concerning the discovery of the Chandrasekhar (1931) limiting mass in relation to previous investigations by Anderson (1929) and Stoner (1930). We also propose different derivations of the stability limits of polytropic distributions and consider their application to classical and relativistic white dwarf stars.

  18. A heating mechanism for the chromospheres of M dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giampapa, M. S.; Golub, L.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G.; Linsky, J. L.; Worden, S. P.

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric structure of the dwarf M-stars which is especially important to the general field of stellar chromospheres and coronae was investigated. The M-dwarf stars constitute a class of objects for which the discrepancy between the predictions of the acoustic wave chromospheric/coronal heating hypothesis and the observations is most vivid. It is assumed that they represent a class of stars where alternative atmospheric heating mechanisms, presumably magnetically related, are most clearly manifested. Ascertainment of the validity of a hypothesis to account for the origin of the chromospheric and transition region line emission in M-dwarf stars is proposed.

  19. Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies: Life in a Rough Neighborhood

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S

    2003-10-16

    Star formation within dwarf galaxies is governed by several factors. Many of these factors are external, including ram-pressure stripping, tidal stripping, and heating by external UV radiation. The latter, in particular, may prevent star formation in the smallest systems. Internal factors include negative feedback in the form of UV radiation, winds and supernovae from massive stars. These act to reduce the star formation efficiency within dwarf systems, which may, in turn, solve several theoretical and observational problems associated with galaxy formation. In this contribution, we discuss our recent work being done to examine the importance of the many factors in the evolution of dwarf galaxies.

  20. A low-temperature companion to a white dwarf star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becklin, E. E.; Zuckerman, B.

    1988-01-01

    An infrared object located about 120 AU from the white dwarf GD165 has been discovered. With the exception of the possible brown dwarf companion to Giclas 29-38 reported last year, the companion to GD165 is the coolest (2100 K) dwarf star ever reported and, according to some theoretical models, it should be a substellar brown dwarf with a mass between 0.06 and 0.08 solar mass. These results, together with newly discovered low-mass stellar companions to white dwarfs, change the investigation of very low-mass stars from the study of a few chance objects to that of a statistical distribution. In particular, it appears that very low-mass stars and perhaps even brown dwarfs could be quite common in the Galaxy.

  1. Fundamental Parameters of Nearby Red Dwarfs: Stellar Radius as an Indicator of Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Michele L.; Henry, Todd J.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Riedel, Adric R.; Dieterich, Sergio; RECONS Team

    2016-01-01

    Red dwarfs dominate the Galactic population, yet determining one of their most fundamental characteristics --- age --- has proven difficult. The characterization of red dwarfs in terms of their age is fundamental to mapping the history of star and, ultimately, planet formation in the Milky Way. Here we report on a compelling technique to evaluate the radii of red dwarfs, which can be used to provide leverage in estimating their ages. These radii are also particularly valuable in the cases of transiting exoplanet hosts because accurate stellar radii are required to determine accurate planetary radii.In this work, we use the BT-Settl models in combination with Johnson-Kron-Cousins VRI, 2MASS JHK, and WISE All-Sky Release photometry to produce spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to determine the temperatures and bolometric fluxes for 500 red dwarfs, most of which are in the southern sky. The full suites of our photometric and astrometric data (including hundreds of accurate new parallaxes from the RECONS team at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m) allow us to also determine the bolometric luminosities and radii. This method of radius determination is validated by a comparison of our measurements to those found using the CHARA Array (Boyajian et al. 2012), which match within a few percent.In addition to a compilation of red dwarf fundamental parameters, our findings provide a snapshot of relative stellar ages in the solar neighborhood. Of particular interest are the cohorts of very young and very old stars identified within 50 pc. These outliers exemplify the demographic extremes of the nearest stars.This effort has been supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402, AST-1109445, and AST-1412026, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  2. OGLE-2009-BLG-076S: THE MOST METAL-POOR DWARF STAR IN THE GALACTIC BULGE

    SciTech Connect

    Bensby, T.; Feltzing, S.; Aden, D.; Simmerer, J.; Johnson, J. A.; Gould, A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C. E-mail: sofia@astro.lu.se E-mail: jennifer@astro.lu.se E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl

    2009-07-10

    Measurements based on a large number of red giant stars suggest a broad metallicity distribution function (MDF) for the Galactic bulge, centered on [Fe/H] {approx} -0.1. However, recently, a new opportunity emerged to utilize temporary flux amplification (by factors of {approx}100 or more) of faint dwarf stars in the Bulge which are gravitationally lensed, making them observable with high-resolution spectrographs during a short observational window. Surprisingly, of the first six stars measured, five have [Fe/H]> + 0.30, suggesting a highly skewed MDF, inconsistent with observations of giant stars. Here we present a detailed elemental abundance analysis of OGLE-2009-BLG-076S, based on a high-resolution spectrum obtained with the UVES spectrograph at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Our results indicate it is the most metal-poor dwarf star in the Bulge yet observed, with [Fe/H] = -0.76. Our results argue against a strong selection effect disfavoring metal-poor microlensed stars. It is possible that small number statistics is responsible for the giant/dwarf Bulge MDF discrepancy. Should this discrepancy survive when larger numbers of Bulge dwarf stars (soon to be available) are analyzed, it may require modification of our understanding of either Bulge formation models, or the behavior of metal-rich giant stars.

  3. Magnetic activity of red secondaries: clues from the outburst cycle variations of dwarf novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinarova, L. L.

    Photometric variations of 6 dwarf novae stars are studied based on the photographic observations from the Odessa, Moscow and Sonneberg plate collections and published visual monitoring data from the AFOEV database (Schweitzer E.: 1993, Bull. AFOEV, 64, 14). The moments of maxima are determined by using the "running parabola" fit (Andronov I.L., 1990, Kinematika Fizika Nebesn. Tel., v.6,,N 6, 87) with automatically determined filter half-width (Andronov I.L., 1997, As.Ap. Suppl., in press). All investigated stars exhibit significant changes not only from cycle-to-cycle, but from season-to-season as well. Secondary decade-scale cycles of smooth variations (Bianchini A., 1990, AJ 99, 1941) and abrupt switchings (Andronov I.L., Shakun L.I., 1990, ASS 169, 237) were interpreted by a solar-type activity of the red dwarf secondary in a binary system and may argue for existence of two different subgroups of the dwarf novae.

  4. Diffusion of neon in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentation of the neutron rich isotope 22Ne may be an important source of gravitational energy during the cooling of white dwarf stars. This depends on the diffusion constant for 22Ne in strongly coupled plasma mixtures. We calculate self-diffusion constants D(i) from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon, oxygen, and neon mixtures. We find that D(i) in a mixture does not differ greatly from earlier one component plasma results. For strong coupling (coulomb parameter Γ> few), D(i) has a modest dependence on the charge Z(i) of the ion species, D(i)∝Z(i)(-2/3). However, D(i) depends more strongly on Z(i) for weak coupling (smaller Γ). We conclude that the self-diffusion constant D(Ne) for 22Ne in carbon, oxygen, and neon plasma mixtures is accurately known so that uncertainties in D(Ne) should be unimportant for simulations of white dwarf cooling. PMID:21230741

  5. Discovery of a brown dwarf in the Pleiades star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolo, R.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Martín, E. L.

    1995-09-01

    BROWN dwarfs are cool star-like objects that have insufficient mass to maintain stable nuclear fusion in their interiors. Although brown dwarfs are not stars, they are expected to form in the same way, and their frequency of occurrence should reflect the trends seen in the birthrates of low-mass stars. But finding brown dwarfs has proved to be difficult, because of their low intrinsic luminosity. The nearby Pleiades star cluster is widely recognized as a likely host for detectable brown dwarfs because of its young age - the still-contracting brown dwarfs should radiate a large fraction of their gravitational energy at near-infrared wavelengths. Here we report the discovery of a brown dwarf near the centre of the Pleiades. The luminosity and temperature of this object are so low that its mass must be less than 0.08 solar masses, the accepted lower limit on the mass of a true star1-3. The detection of only one brown dwarf within our survey area is consistent with a smooth extrapolation of the stellar mass function of the Pleiades4, suggesting that brown dwarfs, although probably quite numerous in the Galactic disk, are unlikely to comprise more than ~1% of its mass.

  6. Do all barium stars have a white dwarf companion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, J. F.; Lambert, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer short-wavelength, low-dispersion spectra were analyzed for four barium, two mild barium, and one R-type carbon star in order to test the hypothesis that the barium and related giants are produced by mass transfer from a companion now present as a white dwarf. An earlier tentative identification of a white dwarf companion to the mild barium star Zeta Cyg is confirmed. For the other stars, no ultraviolet excess attributable to a white dwarf is seen. Limits are set on the bolometric magnitude and age of a possible white dwarf companion. Since the barium stars do not have obvious progenitors among main-sequence and subgiant stars, mass transfer must be presumed to occur when the mass-gaining star is already on the giant branch. This restriction, and the white dwarf's minimum age, which is greater than 8 x 10 to the 8th yr, determined for several stars, effectively eliminates the hypothesis that mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch star creates a barium star. Speculations are presented on alternative methods of producing a barium star in a binary system.

  7. Surprising Rapid Collapse of Sirius B from Red Giant to White Dwarf Through Mass Transfer to Sirius a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Shahinaz; Ali, Ola

    2013-03-01

    Sirius was observed in antiquity as a red star. In his famous astronomy textbook the Almagest written 140 AD, Ptolemy described the star Sirius as fiery red. He curiously depicted it as one of six red-colored stars. The other five are class M and K stars, such as Arcturus and Betelgeuse. Apparent confirmation in ancient Greek and Roman sources are found and Sirius was also reported red in Europe about 1400 years ago. Sirius must have changed to a white dwarf in the night of Ascension. The star chapter in the Quran started with "by the star as it collapsed (1) your companion have not gone astray nor being misled (2), and in verse 49 which is the rotation period of the companion Sirius B around Sirius A, it is said" He is the Lord of Sirius (49). If Sirius actually was red what could have caused it to change into the brilliant bluish-white star we see today? What the naked eye perceives as a single star is actually a binary star system, consisting of a white main sequence star of spectral type A1V, termed Sirius A, and a faint white dwarf companion of spectral type DA2, termed Sirius B. The red color indicates that the star seen then was a red giant. It looks that what they have seen in antiquity was Sirius B which was then a red giant and it collapsed to form a white dwarf. Since there is no evidence of a planetary nebula, then the red Sirius paradox can be solved in terms of stellar evolution with mass transfer. Sirius B was the most massive star which evolved to a red giant and filled the Roche lobe. Mass transfer to Sirius A occurred through the Lagrangian point. Sirius A then became more massive while Sirius B lost mass and shrank. Sirius B then collapsed abruptly into a white dwarf. In the case of Algol, Ptolmy observed it as white star but it was red at the time of El sufi. At present it is white. The rate of mass transfer from Sirius B to Sirius A, and from Algol B to A is estimated from observational data of colour change from red to bullish white to be 0

  8. Progress of the Living with a Red Dwarf Program: Activity-Rotation-Age Relationships for M dwarfs and the Ages of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Edward Francis; Harper, Graham

    2015-08-01

    Red Dwarfs (M dwarfs or dM stars) make up over 75% of the local stellar population. This is among the reasons they are being targeted by an increasing number of planet-hunting programs. As such, developing a method to accurately estimate the age of a field M dwarf is of critical importance. However, due to their long lifetimes and very slow nuclear evolution, the best method for determining ages is likely through “magnetic tracers” such as X-UV activity levels and stellar rotation rates. The Living with a Red Dwarf program’s database of M dwarfs with photometrically determined rotation periods (via starspot modulations) is becoming substantial. Its expansion to include M dwarfs with well-detached WD companions - through which reliable ages can be determined - has had significant impacts on the reliability of the relations. When combined with M dwarfs possessing cluster/population memberships, or specific kinematics, a full range of “calibrators” is being realized. We report on our continuing efforts to build reliable Activity-Rotation-Age relationships for M dwarfs, utilizing X-UV measures obtained with HST, IUE Chandra and XMM (both proposed by us, and archival). Such relationships permit the assessment of the habitability of planets hosted by red dwarfs, by delineating the X-UV radiation environments these planets are exposed to, and have been exposed to in the past. After proper calibration, the relationships can also permit the age of a field red dwarf (and any hosted planets) to be determined through measures of either the stellar rotation period or X-UV activity level.We gratefully acknowledge the support from NSF/RUI Grant AST 1009903, Chandra Grant GO-13200633, HST Grants GO-12124X and GO-13020X.

  9. Luminosities and temperatures of M dwarf stars from infrared photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Bolometric magnitudes for a large number of M type dwarf stars, obtained by broadband infrared photometry at 1.65, 2.2, and 3.5 microns, are reviewed. The data obtained indicate that one parameter is sufficient to describe the blanketing in all of the UBVRI bands for all types of M dwarfs. In general, late M dwarfs seem to have lower effective temperatures than are predicted by theoretical models.

  10. Supernova SN 2011fe from an exploding carbon-oxygen white dwarf star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Peter E.; Sullivan, Mark; Cenko, S. Bradley; Thomas, Rollin C.; Kasen, Daniel; Howell, D. Andrew; Bersier, David; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kandrashoff, Michael T.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Maguire, Kate; Suzuki, Nao; Tarlton, James E.; Pan, Yen-Chen; Bildsten, Lars; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Parrent, Jerod T.; Sand, David; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Bianco, Federica B.; Dilday, Benjamin; Graham, Melissa L.; Lyman, Joe; James, Phil; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Law, Nicholas M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Hook, Isobel M.; Walker, Emma S.; Mazzali, Paolo; Pian, Elena; Ofek, Eran O.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Poznanski, Dovi

    2011-12-01

    Type Ia supernovae have been used empirically as `standard candles' to demonstrate the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe even though fundamental details, such as the nature of their progenitor systems and how the stars explode, remain a mystery. There is consensus that a white dwarf star explodes after accreting matter in a binary system, but the secondary body could be anything from a main-sequence star to a red giant, or even another white dwarf. This uncertainty stems from the fact that no recent type Ia supernova has been discovered close enough to Earth to detect the stars before explosion. Here we report early observations of supernova SN 2011fe in the galaxy M101 at a distance from Earth of 6.4 megaparsecs. We find that the exploding star was probably a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, and from the lack of an early shock we conclude that the companion was probably a main-sequence star. Early spectroscopy shows high-velocity oxygen that slows rapidly, on a timescale of hours, and extensive mixing of newly synthesized intermediate-mass elements in the outermost layers of the supernova. A companion paper uses pre-explosion images to rule out luminous red giants and most helium stars as companions to the progenitor.

  11. Supernova SN 2011fe from an exploding carbon-oxygen white dwarf star.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Peter E; Sullivan, Mark; Cenko, S Bradley; Thomas, Rollin C; Kasen, Daniel; Howell, D Andrew; Bersier, David; Bloom, Joshua S; Kulkarni, S R; Kandrashoff, Michael T; Filippenko, Alexei V; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard T; Maguire, Kate; Suzuki, Nao; Tarlton, James E; Pan, Yen-Chen; Bildsten, Lars; Fulton, Benjamin J; Parrent, Jerod T; Sand, David; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Bianco, Federica B; Dilday, Benjamin; Graham, Melissa L; Lyman, Joe; James, Phil; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Law, Nicholas M; Quimby, Robert M; Hook, Isobel M; Walker, Emma S; Mazzali, Paolo; Pian, Elena; Ofek, Eran O; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Poznanski, Dovi

    2011-12-15

    Type Ia supernovae have been used empirically as 'standard candles' to demonstrate the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe even though fundamental details, such as the nature of their progenitor systems and how the stars explode, remain a mystery. There is consensus that a white dwarf star explodes after accreting matter in a binary system, but the secondary body could be anything from a main-sequence star to a red giant, or even another white dwarf. This uncertainty stems from the fact that no recent type Ia supernova has been discovered close enough to Earth to detect the stars before explosion. Here we report early observations of supernova SN 2011fe in the galaxy M101 at a distance from Earth of 6.4 megaparsecs. We find that the exploding star was probably a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, and from the lack of an early shock we conclude that the companion was probably a main-sequence star. Early spectroscopy shows high-velocity oxygen that slows rapidly, on a timescale of hours, and extensive mixing of newly synthesized intermediate-mass elements in the outermost layers of the supernova. A companion paper uses pre-explosion images to rule out luminous red giants and most helium stars as companions to the progenitor. PMID:22170680

  12. The Solar Neighborhood. XXXVI. The Long-term Photometric Variability of Nearby Red Dwarfs in the VRI Optical Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosey, Altonio D.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Dieterich, Sergio B.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Lurie, John C.; Riedel, Adric R.; Subasavage, John P.

    2015-07-01

    We present an analysis of long-term photometric variability for nearby red dwarf stars at optical wavelengths. The sample consists of 264 M dwarfs south of decl. = +30 with V-K = 3.96-9.16 and MV ≈ 10-20, corresponding to spectral types M2V-M8V, most of which are within 25 pc. The stars have been observed in the VRI filters for ˜4-14 yr at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9 m telescope. Of the 238 red dwarfs within 25 pc, we find that only ˜8% are photometrically variable by at least 20 mmag (˜2%) in the VRI bands. Only four stars have been found to vary by more than 50 mmag, including GJ 1207 at 8.6 pc, which experienced a single extraordinary flare, and GJ 2006 A, TWA 8 A, and TWA 8 B, which are all young stars beyond 25 pc linked to moving groups. We find that high variability at optical wavelengths over the long term can in fact be used to identify young stars. Overall, however, the fluxes of most red dwarfs at optical wavelengths are steady to a few percent over the long term. The low overall rate of photometric variability for red dwarfs is consistent with results found in previous work on similar stars on shorter timescales, with the body of work indicating that most red dwarfs are only mildly variable. As expected, we find that the degree of photometric variability is greater in the V band than in the R or I bands, but we do not find any obvious trends in variability over the long term with red dwarf luminosity or temperature. We highlight 17 stars that show long-term changes in brightness, sometimes because of flaring activity or spots, and sometimes because of stellar cycles similar to our Sun's solar cycle. Remarkably, two targets show brightnesses that monotonically increase (G 169-029) or decrease (WT 460AB) by several percent over a decade. We also provide long-term variability measurements for seven M dwarfs within 25 pc that host exoplanets, none of which vary by more than 20 mmag. Both as a population, and for the specific red dwarfs with exoplanets observed

  13. Erratum: “Milky Way Red Dwarfs in the Borg Survey; Galactic Scale-Height and the Distribution of Dwarfs Stars in WFC3 Imaging" (2014, ApJ, 788, 77)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Trenti, M.; Clarkson, W.; Sahu, K.; Bradley, L.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N.; De Marchi, G.; Andersen, M.; Bouwens, R.; Ryan, R.; van Vledder, I.; van der Vlugt, D.

    2016-07-01

    In the catalog of M-dwarfs presented in Holwerda et al. (2014, H14 hereafter), there is an issue with the conversion from celestial coordinates to Galactic ones, done with pyephem a wrapper around a trusted and vetted library ephermis. Here we present the corrected coordinates (using AstroPy) and distances based on AB magnitudes. We have amended the tables and figures accordingly. The relation between vertical scale-height (z0) and M- dwarf subtype found in H14 is no longer present. We find a scale-height of 600 pc for all types, in part due to the presence of a second Galactic structural component.

  14. Variable Stars in the Sextans Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Mario; Fischer, Philippe; Krzeminski, Wojtek

    1995-11-01

    We describe a survey for variable stars in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy based on the analysis of 113 B and 48 V CCD images of four fields covering a total area of 18' x 18'. We have identified 44 variables: 36 RR Lyr star, 6 anomalous Cepheids, one long-period red variable, all probable members of Sextans, and one foreground contact binary. We have used the pulsating stars to derive a true distance modulus of 19.67 +/- 0.15 for Sextans (or D = 86 +/-6 kpc), where the error is primarily due to uncertainties in the luminosity-metallicity relation for RR Lyr stars. Based on our new data we conclude that [Fe/H]_Sex_ = -1.6 +/- 0.2, somewhat higher than the value from Suntzeff et al. (ApJ, 418,208(1993)] obtained from the analysis of fiber spectroscopy of the near-IR Calcium triplet. We present a new deep color- magnitude diagram for Sextans which reveals the presence of a metal-poor population containing stars as young as 2-4 Gyr, consistent with the presence of anomalous Cepheids in the galaxy. This young population may represent as much as 25% of the total stellar content of Sextans. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the frequency of anomalous Cepheids in dSph galaxies and galaxian luminosity and speculate on the possible origin of this strange effect. The RR Lyr stars in Sextans do not exhibit the Oosterhoff dichotomy observed in globular clusters and in the Galactic halo field.

  15. Multi-periodic pulsations of a stripped red-giant star in an eclipsing binary system.

    PubMed

    Maxted, Pierre F L; Serenelli, Aldo M; Miglio, Andrea; Marsh, Thomas R; Heber, Ulrich; Dhillon, Vikram S; Littlefair, Stuart; Copperwheat, Chris; Smalley, Barry; Breedt, Elmé; Schaffenroth, Veronika

    2013-06-27

    Low-mass white-dwarf stars are the remnants of disrupted red-giant stars in binary millisecond pulsars and other exotic binary star systems. Some low-mass white dwarfs cool rapidly, whereas others stay bright for millions of years because of stable fusion in thick surface hydrogen layers. This dichotomy is not well understood, so the potential use of low-mass white dwarfs as independent clocks with which to test the spin-down ages of pulsars or as probes of the extreme environments in which low-mass white dwarfs form cannot fully be exploited. Here we report precise mass and radius measurements for the precursor to a low-mass white dwarf. We find that only models in which this disrupted red-giant star has a thick hydrogen envelope can match the strong constraints provided by our data. Very cool low-mass white dwarfs must therefore have lost their thick hydrogen envelopes by irradiation from pulsar companions or by episodes of unstable hydrogen fusion (shell flashes). We also find that this low-mass white-dwarf precursor is a type of pulsating star not hitherto seen. The observed pulsation frequencies are sensitive to internal processes that determine whether this star will undergo shell flashes. PMID:23803845

  16. Infrared spectrum of an extremely cool white-dwarf star

    PubMed

    Hodgkin; Oppenheimer; Hambly; Jameson; Smartt; Steele

    2000-01-01

    White dwarfs are the remnant cores of stars that initially had masses of less than 8 solar masses. They cool gradually over billions of years, and have been suggested to make up much of the 'dark matter' in the halo of the Milky Way. But extremely cool white dwarfs have proved difficult to detect, owing to both their faintness and their anticipated similarity in colour to other classes of dwarf stars. Recent improved models indicate that white dwarfs are much more blue than previously supposed, suggesting that the earlier searches may have been looking for the wrong kinds of objects. Here we report an infrared spectrum of an extremely cool white dwarf that is consistent with the new models. We determine the star's temperature to be 3,500 +/- 200 K, making it the coolest known white dwarf. The kinematics of this star indicate that it is in the halo of the Milky Way, and the density of such objects implied by the serendipitous discovery of this star is consistent with white dwarfs dominating the dark matter in the halo. PMID:10638748

  17. Do Some X-ray Stars Have White Dwarf Companions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Some Be stars which are intermittent C-ray sources may have white dwarf companions rather than neutron stars. It is not possible to prove or rule out the existence of Be+WD systems using X-ray or optical data. However, the presence of a white dwarf could be established by the detection of its EUV continuum shortward of the Be star's continuum turnover at 1OOOA. Either the detection or the nondetection of Be+WD systems would have implications for models of Be star variability, models of Be binary system formation and evolution, and models of wind-fed accretion.

  18. Do some x-ray stars have white dwarf companions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccollum, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Some Be stars which are intermittent X-ray sources may have white dwarf companions rather than neutron stars. It is not possible to prove or rule out the existence of Be + WD systems using X-ray or optical data. However, the presence of a white dwarf could be established by the detection of its EUV continuum shortward of the Be star's continuum turnover at 100 A. Either the detection or the nondetection of Be + WD systems would have implications for models of Be star variability, models of Be binary system formation and evolution, and models of wind-fed accretion.

  19. V and K-band Mass-Luminosity Relations for M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, George Frederick; Henry, Todd J.; McArthur, Barbara E.; Franz, Otto; Wasserman, Larry H.; Dieterich, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Applying Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor astrometric techniques developed to establish relative orbits for binary stars (Franz et al. 1998, AJ, 116, 1432), determine masses of binary components (Benedict et al. 2001, AJ, 121, 1607), and measure companion masses of exoplanet host stars (McArthur et al. 2010, ApJ, 715, 1203), we derive masses with an average 2% error for 28 components of 14 M dwarf binary star systems. With these and other published masses we update the lower Main Sequence V-band Mass-Luminosity Relation first shown in Henry et al. 1999, ApJ, 512, 864. We demonstrate that a Mass-Luminosity Relation in the K-band has far less scatter. These relations can be used to estimate the masses of the ubiquitous red dwarfs (75% of all stars) to an accuracy of better than 5%.

  20. A coronagraphic search for brown dwarfs around nearby stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakajima, T.; Durrance, S. T.; Golimowski, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Brown dwarf companions have been searched for around stars within 10 pc of the Sun using the Johns-Hopkins University Adaptive Optics Coronagraph (AOC), a stellar coronagraph with an image stabilizer. The AOC covers the field around the target star with a minimum search radius of 1 sec .5 and a field of view of 1 arcmin sq. We have reached an unprecedented dynamic range of Delta m = 13 in our search for faint companions at I band. Comparison of our survey with other brown dwarf searches shows that the AOC technique is unique in its dynamic range while at the same time just as sensitive to brown dwarfs as the recent brown dwarf surveys. The present survey covered 24 target stars selected from the Gliese catalog. A total of 94 stars were detected in 16 fields. The low-latitude fields are completely dominated by background star contamination. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were carried out for a sample restricted to high latitudes and a sample with small angular separations. The high-latitude sample (b greater than or equal to 44 deg) appears to show spatial concentration toward target stars. The small separation sample (Delta Theta less than 20 sec) shows weaker dependence on Galactic coordinates than field stars. These statistical tests suggest that both the high-latitude sample and the small separation sample can include a substantial fraction of true companions. However, the nature of these putative companions is mysterious. They are too faint to be white dwarfs and too blue for brown dwarfs. Ignoring the signif icance of the statistical tests, we can reconcile most of the detections with distant main-sequence stars or white dwarfs except for a candidate next to GL 475. Given the small size of our sample, we conclude that considerably more targets need to be surveyed before a firm conclusion on the possibility of a new class of companions can be made.

  1. Discovery of Super-Li-rich Red Giants in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Deng, Licai

    2012-06-01

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the 7Li(p, α)4He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants—14 of which are new discoveries—among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] <~ -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li)NLTE = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  2. Connections between MWG Star Clusters and Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.

    2015-03-01

    It seems that in the past decade, there have been two paradigm shifts regarding star clusters. Firstly, the observational evidence for multiple stellar populations requires more extended and often complex star formation histories in star clusters. Secondly, theoretical models that form globular clusters in dwarf galaxies that are accreted at very early epochs (z > 5) are able to reproduce the age-metallicity relations observed. For the accretion scenario to be viable, globular clusters should also resemble the chemistry of at least some dwarf galaxies.

  3. The White Dwarf Binary Pathways Survey I: A sample of FGK stars with white dwarf companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. G.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Schreiber, M. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Zorotovic, M.; Ren, J. J.

    2016-08-01

    The number of spatially unresolved white dwarf plus main-sequence star binaries has increased rapidly in the last decade, jumping from only ˜30 in 2003 to over 3000. However, in the majority of known systems the companion to the white dwarf is a low mass M dwarf, since these are relatively easy to identify from optical colours and spectra. White dwarfs with more massive FGK type companions have remained elusive due to the large difference in optical brightness between the two stars. In this paper we identify 934 main-sequence FGK stars from the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey in the southern hemisphere and the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey in the northern hemisphere, that show excess flux at ultraviolet wavelengths which we interpret as the likely presence of a white dwarf companion. We obtained Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra for nine systems which confirmed that the excess is indeed caused, in all cases, by a hot compact companion, eight being white dwarfs and one a hot subdwarf or pre-helium white dwarf, demonstrating that this sample is very clean. We also address the potential of this sample to test binary evolution models and type Ia supernovae formation channels.

  4. Potential Nearby M Dwarf Stars Selected from the 2MASS Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Thomas H.; Thompson, Dayna L.

    2016-01-01

    Potential nearby red dwarf stars have been selected from the 2MASS catalogs using assumptions about apparent magnitudes and colors. Candidate stars in this study are north of the celestial equator and have been restricted to galactic latitudes greater than 20 degrees from the galactic plane to permit subsequent aperture photometry with small telescopes. Stars with close companions have also been eliminated. Most probable M giant stars were eliminated using the (J-H) - (H-K) two-color diagram. Proper motions were obtained from the USNO-B catalog. Additional potential M giant stars were eliminated by removing stars with very low proper motions. Known nearby stars were removed from the list and stars with proper motions greater than 0.175 arcsec yr-1 were also removed, since such stars will likely be studied in other programs devoted to stars of known proper motion. Photometric parallaxes for the candidate stars were computed using 2MASS photometry and stars having average photometric distances of 25 pc or less were retained. A sample of 121 stars was produced. These stars are being observed using Kron-Cousins R, I and CaH photometry. To date about 75% of the program stars have been observed. All are confirmed dwarf stars and about 50% have distances of 25 pc or less based on photometric parallaxes using Kron-Cousins photometry.This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the U.S. Naval Observatory B1.0 Catalog. Services and products provided by the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS) and US Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) were used in processing the data. Observations have been obtained using the telescopes of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA).

  5. Einstein solid state spectrometer observation of the peculiar red dwarf Wolf 630 AB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J. H.; Johnson, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    Wolf 630 AB is a double and perhaps triple star with a predominant dM 3.5e spectrum. It is one of the relatively strong red dwarf X-ray sources. The 0.5 to 4 keV spectral data for a steady, non-flaring flux are interpreted in terms of emission from thin thermal plasma with a dominant temperature of approximately 6,500,000 K. Both in temperature and average surface flux the quiescent corona is similar to that of the low temperature component found for RS Canum Venaticorum binaries. There is an indication of additional emission above 10 to the 7th power K, but the ratio of high to low temperature emission is smaller than for typical RS CVn systems. The solid state spectrometer observed the spectrum of only one other red dwarf, Ad Leo, which is very similar to that observed for Wolf 630 AB.

  6. An extrasolar extreme-ultraviolet object. II - The nature of HZ 43. [hot white dwarf star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Liebert, J.; Lampton, M.; Spinrad, H.; Bowyer, S.; Gatewood, G.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of data are presented concerning the spectrum, distance, temperature, and evolutionary state of the hot white dwarf HZ 43, the first extrasolar object to be detected in the EUV band. The data include spectrophotometry of the star and its red dwarf companion (HZ 43B), a trigonometric parallax for the star, its tangential velocity, and results of soft X-ray and EUV observations. The main conclusions are that: (1) the spectrum of HZ 43A is that of a hot DAwk star, (2) HZ 43B is a dM3.5e star, (3) the distance of the system is about 65 pc, (4) the tangential velocity is not atypical of white dwarfs, and (5) the stellar energy distribution of HZ 43A is well fitted by a black body with an effective temperature of approximately 110,000 K. Evolutionary implications of the existence of an object as hot as HZ 43A are briefly considered, and it is suggested that the progenitors of hot DA stars must include objects hotter than spectral type sdB, with logical possibilities being nuclei of planetary nebulae and sdO stars.

  7. Can brown dwarfs survive on close orbits around convective stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, C.; Díaz, R. F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The mass range of brown dwarfs extends across the planetary domain to stellar objects. There is a relative paucity of brown dwarfs companions around FGKM-type stars compared to exoplanets for orbital periods of less than a few years, but most of the short-period brown dwarf companions that are fully characterised by transits and radial velocities are found around F-type stars. Aims: We examine the hypothesis that brown dwarf companions could not survive on close orbit around stars with important convective envelopes because the tides and angular momentum loss, the result of magnetic braking, would lead to a rapid orbital decay with the companion being quickly engulfed. Methods: We use a classical Skumanich-type braking law and constant time-lag tidal theory to assess the characteristic timescale for orbital decay for the brown dwarf mass range as a function of the host properties. Results: We find that F-type stars may host massive companions for a significantly longer time than G-type stars for a given orbital period, which may explain the paucity of G-type hosts for brown dwarfs with an orbital period less than five days. On the other hand, we show that the small radius of early M-type stars contributes to orbital decay timescales that are only half those of F-type stars, despite their more efficient tidal dissipation and magnetic braking. For fully convective later type M-dwarfs, orbital decay timescales could be orders of magnitude greater than for F-type stars. Moreover, we find that, for a wide range of values of tidal dissipation efficiency and magnetic braking, it is safe to assume that orbital decay for massive companions can be neglected for orbital periods greater than ten days. Conclusions: For orbital periods greater than ten days, brown dwarf occurrence should largely be unaffected by tidal decay, whatever the mass of the host. On closer orbital periods, the rapid engulfment of massive companions could explain the lack of G and K-type hosts

  8. Can brown dwarfs survive on close orbits around convective stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, C.; Díaz, R. F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The mass range of brown dwarfs extends across the planetary domain to stellar objects. There is a relative paucity of brown dwarfs companions around FGKM-type stars compared to exoplanets for orbital periods of less than a few years, but most of the short-period brown dwarf companions that are fully characterised by transits and radial velocities are found around F-type stars. Aims: We examine the hypothesis that brown dwarf companions could not survive on close orbit around stars with important convective envelopes because the tides and angular momentum loss, the result of magnetic braking, would lead to a rapid orbital decay with the companion being quickly engulfed. Methods: We use a classical Skumanich-type braking law and constant time-lag tidal theory to assess the characteristic timescale for orbital decay for the brown dwarf mass range as a function of the host properties. Results: We find that F-type stars may host massive companions for a significantly longer time than G-type stars for a given orbital period, which may explain the paucity of G-type hosts for brown dwarfs with an orbital period less than five days. On the other hand, we show that the small radius of early M-type stars contributes to orbital decay timescales that are only half those of F-type stars, despite their more efficient tidal dissipation and magnetic braking. For fully convective later type M-dwarfs, orbital decay timescales could be orders of magnitude greater than for F-type stars. Moreover, we find that, for a wide range of values of tidal dissipation efficiency and magnetic braking, it is safe to assume that orbital decay for massive companions can be neglected for orbital periods greater than ten days. Conclusions: For orbital periods greater than ten days, brown dwarf occurrence should largely be unaffected by tidal decay, whatever the mass of the host. On closer orbital periods, the rapid engulfment of massive companions could explain the lack of G and K-type hosts

  9. Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Nearby Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrance, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of G77-61 (Dahn et al. 1977) -- a star with a carbon-rich spectrum a mere 58 pc away and therefore of relatively low luminosity -- led to the recognition that _dwarf_ carbon (dC) stars exist. As more dCs are now known, the accepted paradigm of the presence of atmospheric carbon is that dCs must contain a white dwarf secondary. While the white dwarf companion was going through an AGB stage, it deposited carbon-rich material in the atmosphere of the lower-mass (and now brighter) dwarf star. Indeed, a handful of the dC's have exhibited radial velocity signatures consistent with this picture. To allow for the carbon to still be present in the atmosphere past the AGB stage, a replenishing outer shell or disk has been proposed. Current understanding of the formation and evolution of a dC is, however, limited by the small number of objects and observations. We present a full range of fluxes and flux limits from 1 - 160 um including 2MASS, WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel observations for a list of the nearest carbon dwarfs. We reconstruct the spectral energy distribution exploring the mid-infrared region where any residual debris disks would be detectable. The carbon dwarfs have been historically studied in the visible, and these new infrared observations provide a picture of the circumstellar dust.

  10. THE CLOSE BINARY FRACTION OF DWARF M STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Benjamin M.; Blake, Cullen H.; Knapp, Gillian R.

    2012-01-10

    We describe a search for close spectroscopic dwarf M star binaries using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to address the question of the rate of occurrence of multiplicity in M dwarfs. We use a template-fitting technique to measure radial velocities from 145,888 individual spectra obtained for a magnitude-limited sample of 39,543 M dwarfs. Typically, the three or four spectra observed for each star are separated in time by less than four hours, but for {approx}17% of the stars, the individual observations span more than two days. In these cases we are sensitive to large-amplitude radial velocity variations on timescales comparable to the separation between the observations. We use a control sample of objects having observations taken within a four-hour period to make an empirical estimate of the underlying radial velocity error distribution and simulate our detection efficiency for a wide range of binary star systems. We find the frequency of binaries among the dwarf M stars with a < 0.4 AU to be 3%-4%. Comparison with other samples of binary stars demonstrates that the close binary fraction, like the total binary fraction, is an increasing function of primary mass.

  11. Evidence for dwarf stars at D of about 100 kiloparsecs near the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Richstone, Douglas; Flynn, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for detecting individual, metal-poor, dwarf stars at distances less than about 150 kpc - a method specifically designed to filter out stars from among the much more numerous faint background field galaxies on the basis of broad-band colors. This technique is applied to two fields at high Galactic latitude, for which there are deep CCD data in four bands ranging from 3600 to 9000 A. The field in Sextans probably contains more than about five dwarf stars with BJ not greater than 25.5. These are consistent with being at a common distance about 100 kpc and lie about 1.7 deg from the newly discovered dwarf galaxy in Sextans whose distance is about 85 +/- 10 kpc. The stars lie near the major axis of the galaxy and are near or beyond the tidal radius. The second field, toward the south Galactic pole, may contain up to about five extra-Galactic stars, but these show no evidence for being at a common distance. Possible applications of this type technique are discussed, and it is shown that even very low surface brightness star clusters or dwarf galaxies may be detected at distances less than about 1 Mpc.

  12. New white dwarf stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, I.; Koester, D.; Ourique, G.; Kleinman, S. J.; Romero, A. D.; Nitta, A.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Costa, J. E. S.; Külebi, B.; Jordan, S.; Dufour, P.; Giommi, Paolo; Rebassa-Mansergas, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    We report the discovery of 9088 new spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs and subdwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. We obtain Teff, log g and mass for hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf stars (DAs) and helium atmosphere white dwarf stars (DBs), and estimate the calcium/helium abundances for the white dwarf stars with metallic lines (DZs) and carbon/helium for carbon-dominated spectra DQs. We found 1 central star of a planetary nebula, 2 new oxygen spectra on helium atmosphere white dwarfs, 71 DQs, 42 hot DO/PG1159s, 171 white dwarf+main-sequence star binaries, 206 magnetic DAHs, 327 continuum-dominated DCs, 397 metal-polluted white dwarfs, 450 helium-dominated white dwarfs, 647 subdwarfs and 6887 new hydrogen-dominated white dwarf stars.

  13. The Origin and Evolution of the White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, J. C.

    1994-05-01

    The secret of how white dwarf stars form and evolve is hidden in their interiors. There, gravity separates the constituent elements into layers; the lighter elements float to the top and the heavier ones sink. Consequently, a white dwarf's structure depends on the quantity of the elements present. Measuring that structure can tell us about the processes which formed white dwarfs and allow us to calculate how fast they cool. The latter is indispensable for measuring the age of our galaxy using the oldest white dwarfs as chronometers. Because some white dwarfs pulsate, we can exploit the resulting luminosity variations to measure their internal structure using asteroseismology. Exploring white dwarf structure via asteroseismology poses a difficult observational task: acquiring essentially uninterrupted time series measurements of the brightness changes of pulsating white dwarf stars. We have accomplished this task using an instrument we call the Whole Earth Telescope (WET). By combining data from the WET with published measurements, we have detected a common pattern in the pulsation spectra of all the variable, hydrogen spectra white dwarfs (DAVs), implying that they have similar surface hydrogen layer masses. Because we have identified the degree (l) and the radial overtone (k) of the modes in the pattern detected, we have been able to compare their periods to published pulsation models to find the mass of the hydrogen layer; it is about 10(-4) times the total stellar mass. This result will require adjustments to published estimates of the age of the galaxy which use theoretical cooling times of the oldest white dwarfs as a time standard; the theoretical models typically assume much thinner hydrogen layers. We have also investigated the two classes of pulsating helium spectra white dwarfs (DOVs and DBVs). From their pulsation properties, and the mass of the hydrogen layer measured for the DAVs, we have concluded that the helium surface white dwarfs do not form via

  14. The Origin and Evolution of the White-Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, J. C.

    1994-12-01

    The secret of how white dwarf stars form and evolve is hidden in their interiors. There, gravity separates the constituent elements into layers; the lighter elements float to the top and the heavier ones sink. Consequently, a white dwarf's structure depends on the quantity of the elements present. Measuring that structure can tell us about the processes which formed white dwarfs and allow us to calculate how fast they cool. The latter is indispensable for measuring the age of our galaxy using the oldest white dwarfs as chronometers. Because some white dwarfs pulsate, we can exploit the resulting luminosity variations to measure their internal structure using "asteroseismology," a procedure analogous to terrestrial seismology. Exploring white dwarf structure via asteroseismology poses a difficult observational task: acquiring essentially uninterrupted time series measurements of the brightness changes of pulsating white dwarf stars. We have accomplished this task using an instrument we developed for this purpose, the Whole Earth Telescope. By combining data from the Whole Earth Telescope with published measurements, we have detected a common pattern in the pulsation spectra of all the variable, hydrogen spectra white dwarfs (DAVs), implying that they have similar surface hydrogen layer masses. Because we have identified the degree (l) and the radial overtone (k) of the modes in the pattern detected, we have been able to compare their periods to published pulsation models to find the mass of the hydrogen layer; it is about 10^-4 times the total stellar mass. This result will require adjustments to published estimates of the age of the galaxy which use theoretical cooling times of the oldest white dwarfs as a time standard; the theoretical models typically assume much thinner hydrogen layers. We have also investigated the two classes of pulsating helium spectra white dwarfs (DOVs and DBVs). From their pulsation properties, and the mass of the hydrogen layer measured

  15. The origin and evolution of the white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, James Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The secret of how white dwarf stars form and evolve is hidden in their interiors. There, gravity separates the constituent elements into layers; the lighter elements float to the top and the heavier ones sink. Consequently, a white dwarf's structure depends on the quantity of the elements present. Measuring that structure can tell Us about the processes which formed white dwarfs and allow us to calculate how fast they cool. The latter is indispensable for measuring the age of our galaxy using the oldest white dwarfs as chronometers. Because some white dwarfs pulsate, we can exploit the resulting luminosity variations to measure their internal structure using 'asteroseismology', a procedure analogous to terrestrial seismology. Exploring white dwarf structure via asteroseismology poses a difficult observational task: acquiring essentially uninterrupted time series measurements of the brightness changes of pulsating white dwarf stars. We have accomplished this task using an instrument we developed for this purpose, the Whole Earth Telescope. By combining data from the Whole Earth Telescope with published measurements, we have detected a common pattern in the pulsation spectra of all the variable, hydrogen spectra white dwarfs (DAVs), implying that they have similar surface hydrogen layer masses. Because we have identified the degree (l) and the radial overtone (k) of the modes in the pattern detected, we have been able to compare their periods to published pulsation models to find the mass of the hydrogen layer, it is about 10-4 times the total stellar mass. This result will require adjustments to published estimates of the age of the galaxy which use theoretical cooling times of the oldest white dwarfs as a time standard; the theoretical models typically assume much thinner hydrogen layers. We have also investigated the two classes of pulsating helium spectra white dwarfs (DOVs and DBVs). From their pulsation properties and the mass of the hydrogen layer measured for

  16. Emerging monochromatic fluxes and colors of red degenerate stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapranidis, S.

    1985-01-01

    The emerging monochromatic fluxes and the B-V, V-I, J-H, and V-K color indices are presented for red degenerate stars with helium atmospheres which were calculated using an equation of state and opacities based on a hot Thomas-Fermi model of the helium gas. The effective temperature range is 4500-2500 K. It is found that although the emerging fluxes resemble blackbody curves, red degenerates emit more radiation than blackbodies in the short wavelength range and less in the long wavelength range. Thus, red degenerates appear bluer than blackbodies of the same temperature. The calculated colors of these models are compared to the colors of some of the coolest known non-DA degenerate stars. In particular it is found that the B-V and V-I colors of the cool white dwarf VB 11, whose temperature had been previously estimated to be higher than 4000 K, suggest a temperature of 3750 K. If this result is correct, then VB 11 is probably the coolest known white dwarf.

  17. Inclusion of horizontal branch stars in the derivation of star formation histories of dwarf galaxies: The Carina dSph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, Alessandro; Salaris, Maurizio; Tolstoy, Eline

    2015-11-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the horizontal branch of the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy by means of synthetic modelling techniques, taking consistently into account the star formation history and metallicity evolution as determined from main sequence and red giant branch spectroscopic observations. We found that a range of integrated red giant branch mass loss values of 0.1-0.14 M⊙ increasing with metallicity is able to reproduce the colour extension of the old horizontal branch. Nonetheless, leaving the mass loss as the only free parameter is not enough to match the detailed morphology of Carina horizontal branch. We then investigated the role played by the star formation history on the discrepancies between synthetic and observed horizontal branches. We derived a "toy" bursty star formation history that reproduces well the observed horizontal branch star counts, and also matches qualitatively the red giant and the turn-off regions. This bursty star formation history is made of a subset of age and [M/H] components of the star formation history based on turn off and red giants only, and entails four separate bursts of star formation of different strengths, centred at 2, 5, 8.6, and 11.5 Gyr, respectively, with mean [M/H] decreasing from ~-1.7 to ~-2.2 when the age of the burst increases, and with a Gaussian spread of σ 0.1 dex around these mean values. The comparison between the metallicity distribution function of our bursty star formation history and the one measured from the infrared CaT feature using a CaT-[Fe/H] calibration shows a qualitative agreement, once the range of [Ca/Fe] abundances measured in a sample of Carina stars have been taken into account, that causes a bias of the derived [Fe/H] distribution toward values that are too low. In conclusion, we show how the information contained within the horizontal branch of Carina (and dwarf galaxies in general) can be extracted and interpreted to refine the star formation history derived exclusively

  18. Near-infrared properties of asymptotic giant branch stars in nearby dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M. Y.; Ko, J.; Kim, J.-W.; Chun, S.-H.; Kim, H.-I.; Sohn, Y.-J.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: We investigated the distribution of resolved asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars over a much larger area than covered by previous near-infrared studies in the nearby dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 205. Methods: Using data obtained with the WIRCam near-infrared imager of the CFHT, we selected the AGB stars in the JHKs color - magnitude diagrams, and separated the C stars from M-giant stars in the JHKs color - color diagram. Results: We identified 1,550 C stars in NGC 205 with a mean absolute magnitude of ⟨ MKs ⟩ = -7.49 ± 0.54, and colors of ⟨ (J - Ks)0 ⟩ = 1.81 ± 0.41 and ⟨ (H - Ks)0 ⟩ = 0.76 ± 0.24. The ratio of C stars to M-giant stars was estimated to be 0.15 ± 0.01 in NGC 205, and the local C/M ratios for the southern region are somewhat lower than those for the northern region. The (J - Ks) color distributions of AGB stars contain the main peak of the M-giant stars and the red tail of the C stars. A comparison of the theoretical isochrone models with the observed color distribution indicates that most of the bright M-giant stars in NGC 205 were formed at log (tyr) ~ 9.0-9.7. The logarithmic slope of the MKs luminosity function for M-giant stars was estimated to be 0.84 ± 0.01, which is comparable with dwarf elliptical galaxies NGC 147 and NGC 185. Furthermore, we found that the logarithmic slopes of the MKs luminosity function for C and M-giant stars are different to places, implying a different star formation history within NGC 205. The bolometric luminosity function for M-giant stars extends to Mbol = -6.0 mag, and that for C stars spans -5.6 < Mbol < -3.0. The bolometric luminosity function of C stars is unlikely to be a Gaussian distribution and the mean bolometric magnitude of C stars is estimated to be Mbol = -4.24 ± 0.55, which is consistent with our results for dwarf elliptical galaxies NGC 147 and NGC 185. Based on observations carried out at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the National Research Council of Canada

  19. Circumstellar debris and pollution at white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farihi, J.

    2016-04-01

    Circumstellar disks of planetary debris are now known or suspected to closely orbit hundreds of white dwarf stars. To date, both data and theory support disks that are entirely contained within the preceding giant stellar radii, and hence must have been produced during the white dwarf phase. This picture is strengthened by the signature of material falling onto the pristine stellar surfaces; disks are always detected together with atmospheric heavy elements. The physical link between this debris and the white dwarf host abundances enables unique insight into the bulk chemistry of extrasolar planetary systems via their remnants. This review summarizes the body of evidence supporting dynamically active planetary systems at a large fraction of all white dwarfs, the remnants of first generation, main-sequence planetary systems, and hence provide insight into initial conditions as well as long-term dynamics and evolution.

  20. White dwarf stars with chemically stratified atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muchmore, D.

    1982-01-01

    Recent observations and theory suggest that some white dwarfs may have chemically stratified atmospheres - thin layers of hydrogen lying above helium-rich envelopes. Models of such atmospheres show that a discontinuous temperature inversion can occur at the boundary between the layers. Model spectra for layered atmospheres at 30,000 K and 50,000 K tend to have smaller decrements at 912 A, 504 A, and 228 A than uniform atmospheres would have. On the basis of their continuous extreme ultraviolet spectra, it is possible to distinguish observationally between uniform and layered atmospheres for hot white dwarfs.

  1. Observational diagnostics of accretion on young stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Beate; Argiroffi, Costanza

    I present a summary of recent observational constraints on the accretion properties of young stars and brown dwarfs with focus on the high-energy emission. In their T Tauri phase young stars assemble a few percent of their mass by accretion from a disk. Various observational signatures of disks around pre-main sequence stars and the ensuing accretion process are found in the IR and optical regime: e.g. excess emission above the stellar photosphere, strong and broad emission lines, optical veiling. At high energies evidence for accretion is less obvious, and the X-ray emission from stars has historically been ascribed to magnetically confined coronal plasmas. While being true for the bulk of the emission, new insight obtained from XMM-Newton and Chandra observations has unveiled contributions from accretion and outflow processes to the X-ray emission from young stars. Their smaller siblings, the brown dwarfs, have been shown to undergo a T Tauri phase on the basis of optical/IR observations of disks and measurements of accretion rates. Most re-cently, first evidence was found for X-rays produced by accretion in a young brown dwarf, complementing the suspected analogy between stars and substellar objects.

  2. Models of very-low-mass stars, brown dwarfs and exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Allard, F.; Homeier, D.; Freytag, B.

    2012-01-01

    Within the next few years, GAIA and several instruments aiming to image extrasolar planets will be ready. In parallel, low-mass planets are being sought around red dwarfs, which offer more favourable conditions, for both radial velocity detection and transit studies, than solar-type stars. In this paper, the authors of a model atmosphere code that has allowed the detection of water vapour in the atmosphere of hot Jupiters review recent advances in modelling the stellar to substellar transition. The revised solar oxygen abundances and cloud model allow the photometric and spectroscopic properties of this transition to be reproduced for the first time. Also presented are highlight results of a model atmosphere grid for stars, brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets. PMID:22547243

  3. Models of very-low-mass stars, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Allard, F; Homeier, D; Freytag, B

    2012-06-13

    Within the next few years, GAIA and several instruments aiming to image extrasolar planets will be ready. In parallel, low-mass planets are being sought around red dwarfs, which offer more favourable conditions, for both radial velocity detection and transit studies, than solar-type stars. In this paper, the authors of a model atmosphere code that has allowed the detection of water vapour in the atmosphere of hot Jupiters review recent advances in modelling the stellar to substellar transition. The revised solar oxygen abundances and cloud model allow the photometric and spectroscopic properties of this transition to be reproduced for the first time. Also presented are highlight results of a model atmosphere grid for stars, brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets. PMID:22547243

  4. RED CLUMP STARS IN THE SAGITTARIUS TIDAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Carrell, Kenneth; Chen Yuqin; Wilhelm, Ronald

    2012-07-15

    We have probed a section (l {approx} 150, b {approx} -60) of the trailing tidal arm of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy by identifying a sample of Red Clump (RC) stream stars. RC stars are not generally found in the halo field, but are found in significant numbers in both the Sagittarius galaxy and its tidal streams, making them excellent probes of stream characteristics. Our target sample was selected using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 6, which was constrained in color to match the Sagittarius RC stars. Spectroscopic observations of the target stars were conducted at Kitt Peak National Observatory using the WIYN telescope. The resulting spectroscopic sample is magnitude limited and contains both main-sequence disk stars and evolved RC stars. We have developed a method to systematically separate these two stellar classes using kinematic information and a Bayesian approach for surface gravity determination. The resulting RC sample allows us to determine an absolute stellar density of {rho} = 2.7 {+-} 0.5 RC stars kpc{sup -3} at this location in the stream. Future measurements of stellar densities for a variety of populations and at various locations along the streams will lead to a much improved understanding of the original nature of the Sagittarius galaxy and the physical processes controlling its disruption and subsequent stream generation.

  5. The Star Formation Properties of Void Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on time scales of 10 Myr and 100 Myr, using Ha emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable S/N HI detections from ALFALFA. For the HI detected sample, SSFRs are similar regardless of large-scale environment. Investigating only the HI detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend towards higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit HI mass, known as the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall HI detected population, we notice no environmental dependence. Limiting the sample to dwarf galaxies again reveals a trend towards higher SFEs in voids. These results suggest that void environments provide a nurturing environment for dwarf galaxy evolution.

  6. Effective field theory for quantum liquid in dwarf stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gabadadze, Gregory; Rosen, Rachel A. E-mail: rarosen@physik.su.se

    2010-04-01

    An effective field theory approach is used to describe quantum matter at greater-than-atomic but less-than-nuclear densities which are encountered in white dwarf stars. We focus on the density and temperature regime for which charged spin-0 nuclei form an interacting charged Bose-Einstein condensate, while the neutralizing electrons form a degenerate fermi gas. After a brief introductory review, we summarize distinctive properties of the charged condensate, such as a mass gap in the bosonic sector as well as gapless fermionic excitations. Charged impurities placed in the condensate are screened with great efficiency, greater than in an equivalent uncondensed plasma. We discuss a generalization of the Friedel potential which takes into account bosonic collective excitations in addition to the fermionic excitations. We argue that the charged condensate could exist in helium-core white dwarf stars and discuss the evolution of these dwarfs. Condensation would lead to a significantly faster rate of cooling than that of carbon- or oxygen-core dwarfs with crystallized cores. This prediction can be tested observationally: signatures of charged condensation may have already been seen in the recently discovered sequence of helium-core dwarfs in the nearby globular cluster NGC 6397. Sufficiently strong magnetic fields can penetrate the condensate within Abrikosov-like vortices. We find approximate analytic vortex solutions and calculate the values of the lower and upper critical magnetic fields at which vortices are formed and destroyed respectively. The lower critical field is within the range of fields observed in white dwarfs, but tends toward the higher end of this interval. This suggests that for a significant fraction of helium-core dwarfs, magnetic fields are entirely expelled within the core.

  7. Variable stars in the Pegasus dwarf galaxy (DDO 216)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.; Abbott, Mark J.; Saha, A.; Mossman, Amy E.; Danielson, G. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Observations obtained over a period of five years of the resolved stars in the Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 216) have been searched for variable stars. Thirty-one variables were found, and periods established for 12. Two of these variable stars are clearly eclipsing variables, seven are very likely Cepheid variables, and the remaining three are probable Cepheids. The period-luminosity relation for the Cepheids indicates a distance modulus for Pegasus of m - M = 26.22 + or - 0.20. This places Pegasus very near the zero-velocity surface of the Local Group.

  8. Variable stars in the Pegasus dwarf galaxy (DDO 216)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoessel, J.G.; Abbott, M.J.; Saha, A.; Mossman, A.E.; Danielson, G.E. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Palomar Observatory, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-10-01

    Observations obtained over a period of five years of the resolved stars in the Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 216) have been searched for variable stars. Thirty-one variables were found, and periods established for 12. Two of these variable stars are clearly eclipsing variables, seven are very likely Cepheid variables, and the remaining three are probable Cepheids. The period-luminosity relation for the Cepheids indicates a distance modulus for Pegasus of m - M = 26.22 + or - 0.20. This places Pegasus very near the zero-velocity surface of the Local Group. 25 refs.

  9. Scl-1013644: a CEMP-s star in the Sculptor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, C.; Da Costa, G. S.; Yong, D.; Norris, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of the Milky Way and its satellites have paid special attention to the importance of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars due to their involvement in Galactic formation history and their possible connection with the chemical elements originating in the first stellar generation. In an ongoing study of red giants in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy we have discovered a star with extremely strong CN and CH molecular bands. This star, Scl-1013644, has previously been identified by Geisler et al. (2005) as a star with an enrichment in the heavy elements. Spectrum synthesis has been used to derive the carbon, nitrogen and barium abundances for Scl-1013644. Our findings are [C/Fe] = +0.8, [N/Fe] = -0.3 and [Ba/Fe] = +2.1 with the latter result consistent with the value found by Geisler et al. (2005). These results reveal Scl-1013644 as a CEMP-s star, the third such star discovered in this dwarf galaxy.

  10. Completing the Census of Isolated Dwarf Galaxy Star Formation Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    We propose to complete our census of the ancient star formation histories (SFHs) of isolated dwarf galaxies by obtaining deep ACS/WFC optical imaging of WLM and Pegasus Dwarf Irregular Galaxy (PegDIG). They are the only two systems without previous deep HST imaging that are isolated yet close enough to guarantee that their oldest main sequence turnoffs are accessible with HST. We will measure their lifetime SFHs with an age resolution of < 1 Gyr at all epochs to address questions about growth of stellar mass, the effects of reionization, radial population gradients, and variable star populations in WLM and PegDIG. This program is a concerted effort between theorists and observers to obtain the best possible observational constraints on the early epochs of star formation in isolated low-mass galaxies, which are essential to the next generation of galaxy simulations. With these new observations we will have completed our efforts to collect precise lifetime SFHs of all nearby isolated dwarfs that are accessible with HST. In combination with archival data, we will create a legacy sample isolated dwarfs with identically derived SFHs, that will be serve as the baseline for the community's understanding of how low-mass galaxies form and evolve over a Hubble time and in the absence of environmental effects of a massive host (e.g., tides, ram pressure).

  11. The star formation and chemical evolution history of the sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxyâ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Saha, A.; Olsen, K.; Starkenburg, E.; Lemasle, B.; Irwin, M. J.; Battaglia, G.

    2012-03-01

    We have combined deep photometry in the B, V and I bands from CTIO/MOSAIC of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, going down to the oldest main sequence turn-offs, with spectroscopic metallicity distributions of red giant branch stars. This allows us to obtain the most detailed and complete star formation history to date, as well as an accurate timescale for chemical enrichment. The star formation history shows that Sculptor is dominated by old (>10 Gyr), metal-poor stars, but that younger, more metal-rich populations are also present. Using star formation histories determined at different radii from the centre we show that Sculptor formed stars with an increasing central concentration with time. The old, metal-poor populations are present at all radii, while more metal-rich, younger stars are more centrally concentrated. We find that within an elliptical radius of 1 degree, or 1.5 kpc from the centre, a total mass in stars of 7.8 × 10^6 Mstar formation history to determine age estimates for individual red giant branch stars with high resolution spectroscopic abundances. Thus, for the first time, we can directly determine detailed timescales for the evolution of individual chemical elements. We find that the trends in alpha-elements match what is expected from an extended, relatively uninterrupted period of star formation continuing for 6-7 Gyr. The knee in the alpha-element distribution occurs at an age of 10.9 ± 1Gyr, suggesting that SNe Ia enrichment began ≈2 ± 1 Gyr after the start of star formation in Sculptor.

  12. Spectroscopy of Six Red Giants in the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme H.; Siegel, Michael H.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Winnick, Rebeccah

    2006-10-01

    Keck Observatory LRIS-B (Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) spectra are reported for six red giant stars in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy and several comparison giants in the globular cluster M13. Indexes that quantify the strengths of the Ca II H and K lines, the λ3883 and λ4215 CN bands, and the λ4300 G band have been measured. These data confirm evidence of metallicity inhomogeneity within Draco obtained by previous authors. The four brightest giants in the sample have absolute magnitudes in the range -2.6stars may have higher [C/Fe] ratios than globular cluster red giants: deep mixing might be inhibited in these Draco stars, they may formerly have been mass-transfer binaries that acquired carbon from a more massive companion, or the Draco dwarf galaxy may have experienced relatively slow chemical evolution over a period of several billion years, allowing carbon-enhanced ejecta from intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to enrich the interstellar medium while star formation was still occurring. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  13. Sulfur and zinc abundances of red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Sato, Bun'ei

    2016-08-01

    Sulfur and zinc are chemically volatile elements, which play significant roles as depletion-free tracers in studying galactic chemical evolution. However, regarding red giants having evolved off the main sequence, reliable abundance determinations of S and Zn seem to be difficult, despite the several studies that have been reported so far. Given this situation, we tried to establish the abundances of these elements for an extensive sample of 239 field GK giants ( - 0.8 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ +0.2), by applying the spectrum-fitting technique to S I 8694-5, S I 6757, and Zn I 6362 lines and by taking into account the non-LTE effect. Besides, similar abundance analysis was done for 160 FGK dwarfs to be used for comparison. The non-LTE corrections for the S and Zn abundances derived from these lines turned out to be ≲ 0.1(-0.2) dex for most cases and not very significant. It revealed that the S I 6757 feature is more reliable as an abundance indicator than S I 8694-5 for the case of red giants, because the latter suffers blending of unidentified lines. The finally resulting [S/Fe]-[Fe/H] and [Zn/Fe]-[Fe/H] relations for GK giants were confirmed to be in good agreement with those for FGK dwarfs, indicating that S and Zn abundances of red giants are reliably determinable from the S I 6757 and Zn I 6362 lines. Accordingly, not only main-sequence stars but also evolved red giant stars are usable for tracing the chemical evolution history of S and Zn in the regime of disk metallicity by using these lines.

  14. Distance and absolute magnitudes of the brightest stars in the dwarf galaxy Sextans A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandage, A.; Carlson, G.

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to improve present bright star calibration, data were gathered for the brightest red and blue stars and the Cepheids in the Im V dwarf galaxy, Sextans A. On the basis of a magnitude sequence measured to V and B values of about 22 and 23, respectively, the mean magnitudes of the three brightest blue stars are V=17.98 and B=17.88. The three brightest red supergiants have V=18.09 and B=20.14. The periods and magnitudes measured for five Cepheids yield an apparent blue distance modulus of 25.67 + or - 0.2, via the P-L relation, and the mean absolute magnitudes of V=-7.56 and B=-5.53 for the red supergiants provide additional calibration of the brightest red stars as distance indicators. If Sextans A were placed at the distance of the Virgo cluster, it would appear to have a surface brightness of 23.5 mag/sq arcec. This, together with the large angular diameter, would make such a galaxy easily discoverable in the Virgo cluster by means of ground-based surveys.

  15. Dwarf galaxies in the coma cluster: Star formation properties and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek M.

    in the process of being quenched or were only recently quenched. We modeled the quenching timescales for transition galaxies, or “green valley” objects, and found that the majority are quenched in less than 1 Gyr. This timescale is consistent with rapid dynamical processes that are active in the cluster environment as opposed to the more gradual quenching mechanisms that exist in the group environment. For the passive galaxy population, we have measured an average stellar age of 6-8 Gyr for the red sequence which is consistent with previous studies based on spectroscopic observations. We note that the star formation properties of Coma member galaxies were established from photometry alone, as opposed to using spectroscopic data which are more challenging to obtain for dwarf galaxies. We have measured the faintest UV luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies in Coma, and are sufficiently deep that we reach the dwarf passive galaxy population for the first time. We have introduced a new technique for measuring the LF which avoids color selection effects associated with previous methods. The UV LFs constructed separately for star-forming and passive galaxies follow a similar distribution at faint magnitudes, which suggests that the recent quenching of infalling dwarf star-forming galaxies is sufficient to build the dwarf passive population in Coma. The Coma UV LFs show a turnover at faint magnitudes as compared to the field, owing to a deficit of dwarf galaxies with stellar masses below M∗ = 108 M⊙ . We show that the UV LFs for the field behind the Coma cluster are nearly identical to the average field environment, and do not show evidence for a turnover at faint magnitudes. We suspect that the missing dwarf galaxies in Coma are severely disrupted by tidal processes as they are accreted onto the cluster, just prior to reaching the infall region studied here.

  16. Delayed star formation in isolated dwarf galaxies: Hubble space telescope star formation history of the Aquarius dwarf irregular

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Andrew A.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Leaman, Ryan E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ≈10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ≈10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ≈ 2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ≈6-8 Gyr ago (z ≈ 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M {sub H} {sub I}/M {sub *}, dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CDM simulations. The similarities between Leo A and Aquarius suggest that if gas is not removed from dwarf galaxies by interactions or feedback, it can linger for several gigayears without cooling in sufficient quantity to form stars efficiently. We discuss possible causes for the delay in star formation including suppression by reionization and late-time mergers. We find reasonable agreement between our measured SFHs and select cosmological simulations of isolated dwarfs. Because star formation and merger processes are both stochastic in nature, delayed star formation in various degrees is predicted to be a characteristic (but not a universal) feature of isolated small galaxies.

  17. The red and blue galaxy populations in the GOODS field: evidence for an excess of red dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, S.; Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Grazian, A.; Pentericci, L.; Trevese, D.; Cristiani, S.; Nonino, M.; Vanzella, E.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: We study the evolution of the galaxy population up to z˜ 3 as a function of its colour properties. In particular, luminosity functions and luminosity densities were derived as a function of redshift for the blue/late and red/early populations. Methods: We use data from the GOODS-MUSIC catalogue, which have typical magnitude limits z850≤ 26 and K_s≤ 23.5 for most of the sample. About 8% of the galaxies have spectroscopic redshifts; the remaining have well calibrated photometric redshifts derived from the extremely wide multi-wavelength coverage in 14 bands (from the U band to the Spitzer 8~ μm band). We have derived a catalogue of galaxies complete in the rest-frame B-band, which has been divided into two subsamples according to their rest-frame U-V colour (or derived specific star formation rate) properties. Results: We confirm a bimodality in the U-V colour and specific star formation rate of the galaxy sample up to z˜ 3. This bimodality is used to compute the luminosity functions of the blue/late and red/early subsamples. The luminosity functions of the blue/late and total samples are well represented by steep Schechter functions evolving in luminosity with increasing redshifts. The volume density of the luminosity functions of the red/early populations decreases with increasing redshift. The shape of the red/early luminosity functions shows an excess of faint red dwarfs with respect to the extrapolation of a flat Schechter function and can be represented by the sum of two Schechter functions. Our model for galaxy formation in the hierarchical clustering scenario, which also includes external feedback due to a diffuse UV background, shows a general broad agreement with the luminosity functions of both populations, the larger discrepancies being present at the faint end for the red population. Hints on the nature of the red dwarf population are given on the basis of their stellar mass and spatial distributions.

  18. A Pulsational Study of Crystallized White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.

    1998-03-01

    The DAV BPM 37093 should have a substantially crystallized core based on its mass and temperature. Using this as a motivation, we examine the way in which a crystalline interior affects the nonradial g-mode frequencies of a white dwarf star. We confine ourselves to a relatively massive model within the DA instability strip (M_⋆ = 1.1Msun), since crystallization in this temperature range should be important only for high-mass white dwarfs. We find that crystallization has a significant effect on the mean period spacing of adjacent radial overtones, of order 10--30 %. Thus, a correct pulsational treatment of crystallization is vital if we are to make reliable asteroseismological measurements of a given stars' properties.

  19. Nearby Dwarf Stars: Duplicity, Binarity, and Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hatkopf, William I.; Raghavan, Deepak

    2008-02-01

    Double stars have proven to be both a blessing and a curse for astronomers since their discovery over two centuries ago. They remain the only reliable source of masses, the most fundamental parameter defining stars. On the other hand, their sobriquet ``vermin of the sky'' is well-earned, due to the complications they present to both observers and theoreticians. These range from non-linear proper motions to stray light in detectors, to confusion in pointing of instruments due to non-symmetric point spread functions, to angular momentum conservation in multiple stars which results in binaries closer than allowed by evolution of two single stars. This proposal is an effort to address both their positive and negative aspects, through speckle interferometric observations, targeting ~1200 systems where useful information can be obtained with only a single additional observation. The proposed work will refine current statistics regarding duplicity (chance alignments of nearby point sources) and binarity (actual physical relationships), and improve the precisions and accuracies of stellar masses. Several targets support Raghavan's Ph.D. thesis, which is a comprehensive survey aimed at determining the multiplicity fraction among solar-type stars.

  20. Nearby Dwarf Stars: Duplicity, Binarity, and Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Raghavan, Deepak

    2007-08-01

    Double stars have proven to be both a blessing and a curse for astronomers since their discovery over two centuries ago. They remain the only reliable source of masses, the most fundamental parameter defining stars. On the other hand, their sobriquet ``vermin of the sky'' is well-earned, due to the complications they present to both observers and theoreticians. These range from non-linear proper motions to stray light in detectors, to confusion in pointing of instruments due to non-symmetric point spread functions, to angular momentum conservation in multiple stars which results in binaries closer than allowed by evolution of two single stars. This proposal is an effort to address both their positive and negative aspects, through speckle interferometric observations, targeting ~1200 systems where useful information can be obtained with only a single additional observation. The proposed work will refine current statistics regarding duplicity (chance alignments of nearby point sources) and binarity (actual physical relationships), and improve the precisions and accuracies of stellar masses. Several targets support Raghavan's Ph.D. thesis, which is a comprehensive survey aimed at determining the multiplicity fraction among solar-type stars.

  1. New white dwarf and subdwarf stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, I.; Koester, D.; Ourique, G.; Romero, A. D.; Reindl, N.; Kleinman, S. J.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Valois, A. D. M.; Amaral, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of 6576 new spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf and subdwarf stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We obtain Teff, log g and mass for hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf stars (DAs) and helium atmosphere white dwarf stars (DBs), estimate the calcium/helium abundances for the white dwarf stars with metallic lines (DZs) and carbon/helium for carbon-dominated spectra (DQs). We found one central star of a planetary nebula, one ultracompact helium binary (AM CVn), one oxygen line-dominated white dwarf, 15 hot DO/PG1159s, 12 new cataclysmic variables, 36 magnetic white dwarf stars, 54 DQs, 115 helium-dominated white dwarfs, 148 white dwarf + main-sequence star binaries, 236 metal-polluted white dwarfs, 300 continuum spectra DCs, 230 hot subdwarfs, 2936 new hydrogen-dominated white dwarf stars, and 2675 cool hydrogen-dominated subdwarf stars. We calculate the mass distribution of all 5883 DAs with S/N ≥ 15 in DR12, including the ones in DR7 and DR10, with an average S/N = 26, corrected to the 3D convection scale, and also the distribution after correcting for the observed volume, using 1/Vmax.

  2. Luminosity functions for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the luminosity function for low-mass objects to constrain the stellar initial mass function at the low-mass end is reported. The ways in which luminosity functions for low-mass stars are affected by star formation histories, brown dwarf and premain-sequence cooling rates and main-sequence mass luminosity relations, and the IMF are examined. Cooling rates and the mass-luminosity relation are determined through a new series of evolutionary calculations for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the range 0.05-0.50 solar mass. Model luminosity functions are constructed for specific comparison with the results of four recent observational surveys. The likelihood that the stellar mass function in the solar neighborhood is increasing at masses near the bottom of the main sequence and perhaps at lower masses is confirmed. In the most optimistic case, brown dwarfs contribute half of the local missing disk mass. The actual contribution is likely to be considerably less.

  3. Variable stars in the Leo A dwarf galaxy (DDO 69)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, John G.; Saha, A.; Krist, John; Danielson, G. Edward

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the Leo A dwarf galaxy, obtained over the period from 1980 to 1991 are reported. Forty two separate Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) frames were searched for variable stars. A total of 14 suspected variables were found, 9 had sufficient coverage for period determination, and 5 had Cepheid light curves. Four of these stars fit well on a P-L relation and yield a distance modulus, after correction for Galactic foreground extinction, of m-M = 26.74. This corresponds to a distance of 2.2 Mpc, placing Leo A near the Local Group zero-velocity surface.

  4. Shock formation around planets orbiting M-dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Llama, J.; Jardine, M.; Helling, Ch.; Wood, K.

    2011-12-01

    Bow shocks can be formed around planets due to their interaction with the coronal medium of the host stars. The net velocity of the particles impacting on the planet determines the orientation of the shock. At the Earth's orbit, the (mainly radial) solar wind is primarily responsible for the formation of a shock facing towards the Sun. However, for close-in planets that possess high Keplerian velocities and are frequently located at regions where the host star's wind is still accelerating, a shock may develop ahead of the planet. If the compressed material is able to absorb stellar radiation, then the signature of bow shocks may be observed during transits. Bow-shock models have been investigated in a series of papers \\citep{2010ApJ...722L.168V, 2011MNRAS.411L..46V, 2011MNRAS.414.1573V, 2011MNRAS.416L..41L} for known transiting systems. Once the signature of a bow-shock is observed, one can infer the magnetic field intensity of the transiting planet. Here, we investigate the potential to use this model to detect magnetic fields of (hypothetical) planets orbiting inside the habitable zone of M-dwarf stars. For these cases, we show, by means of radiative transfer simulations, that the detection of bow-shocks of planets surrounding M-dwarf stars may be more difficult than for the case of close-in giant planets orbiting solar-type stars.

  5. THE ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ENVIRONMENT AROUND M DWARF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Stocke, John T.; Bushinsky, Rachel; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Tian, Feng; Desert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-02-15

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No 'UV-quiet' M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Ly{alpha} emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Ly{alpha} line fluxes comprise {approx}37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; {approx}>10{sup 3} times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Ly{alpha} and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Ly{alpha}. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Ly{alpha})/F(Mg II) = 10 {+-} 3. The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}, is shown to be {approx}0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, >10{sup 3} times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%-500% on 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} s timescales. This effect should be taken into account in future UV transiting

  6. The Ultraviolet Radiation Environment around M Dwarf Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Stocke, John T.; Tian, Feng; Bushinsky, Rachel; Desert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Mauas, Pablo; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No "UV-quiet" M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Lyman-alpha emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Lyman-alpha line fluxes comprise approximately 37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; approximately greater than 10(exp3) times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Lyman-alpha and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Lyman-alpha. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Lyman-alpha)/F(Mg II) = 10(exp3). The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, is shown to be approximately 0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, greather than 10(exp3) times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%.500% on 10(exp2)-10(exp3) s timescales. This effect should be taken

  7. Star Formation at Low Metallicity in Local Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Rubio, Monica; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R.; Cigan, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The radial profiles of star formation rates and surface mass densities for gas and stars have been compiled for 20 local dwarf irregular galaxies and converted into disk scale heights and Toomre Q values. The scale heights are relatively large compared to the galaxy sizes (~0.6 times the local radii) and generally increase with radius in a flare. The gaseous Q values are high, ~4, at most radii and even higher for the stars. Star formation proceeds even with these high Q values in a normal exponential disk as viewed in the far ultraviolet. Such normal star formation suggests that Q is not relevant to star formation in dIrrs. The star formation rate per unit area always equals approximately the gas surface density divided by the midplane free fall time with an efficiency factor of about 1% that decreases systematically with radius in approximate proportion to the gas surface density. We view this efficiency variation as a result of a changing molecular fraction in a disk where atomic gas dominates both stars and molecules. In a related study, CO observations with ALMA of star-forming regions at the low metallicities of these dwarfs, which averages 13% solar, shows, in the case of the WLM galaxy, tiny CO clouds inside much larger molecular and atomic hydrogen envelopes. The CO cloud mass fraction within the molecular region is only one percent or so. Nevertheless, the CO clouds have properties that are similar to solar neighborhood clouds: they satisfy the size-linewidth relation observed in the LMC, SMC, and other local dwarfs where CO has been observed, and the same virial mass versus luminosity relation. This uniforming of CO cloud properties seems to be the result of a confining pressure from the weight of the overlying molecular and atomic shielding layers. Star formation at low metallicity therefore appears to be a three dimensional process independent of 2D instabilities involving Q, in highly atomic gas with relatively small CO cores, activated at a rate

  8. The history of star formation in nearby dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel Ray

    2010-11-01

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of resolved stellar populations in nearby dwarf galaxies based on observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). From the positions of individual stars on a CMD, we are able to derive the star formation histories (SFHs), i.e., the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time and metallicity, of the observed stellar populations. Specifically, we apply this technique to a number of nearby dwarf galaxies to better understand the mechanisms driving their evolution. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury program (ANGST) provides multi-color photometry of resolved stars in ˜ 60 nearby dwarf galaxies from images taken with HST. This sample contains 12 dSph, 5 dwarf spiral, 28 dIrr, 12 dSph/dIrr (transition), and 3 tidal dwarf galaxies. The sample spans a range of ˜ 10 in MB and covers a wide range of environments, from highly interacting to truly isolated. From the best fit lifetime SFHs we find three significant results: (1) the average dwarf galaxy formed ˜ 60% of its stars by z ˜ 2 and 70% of its stars by z ˜ 1, regardless of morphological type, (2) the only statistically significant difference between the SFHs of different morphological types is within the most recent 1 Gyr (excluding tidal dwarf galaxies), and (3) the SFHs are complex and the mean values are inconsistent with simple SFH models, e.g., single epoch SF or constant SFH. We then present the recent ( ≲ 1 Gyr) SFHs of nine M81 Group Dwarf Galaxies. Comparing the SFHs, birthrate parameters, fraction of stars formed per time interval, and spatial distribution of stellar components as a function of luminosity, we find only minor differences in SF characteristics among the M81 Group dIs despite a wide range of physical properties. We extend our comparison to select dIs in the Local Group (LG), with similar quality photometry, and again find only minor differences in SF parameters. The lack of a clear trend in SF parameters over

  9. The Nature of the Red Giant Branches in the Ursa Minor and Draco Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetrone, Matthew D.; Côté, Patrick; Stetson, Peter B.

    2001-09-01

    Spectra for stars located redward of the fiducial red giant branches (RGBs) of the Ursa Minor and Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxies have been obtained with the Hobby-Eberly telescope and the Marcario Low Resolution Spectrometer. From a comparison of our radial velocities with those reported in previous medium-resolution studies, we find an average difference of 10 km s-1 with a standard deviation of 11 km s-1. On the basis of these radial velocities, we confirm the membership of five stars in Ursa Minor and find two others to be nonmembers. One of the confirmed members is a known carbon star that lies redward of the RGB; three others are previously unidentified carbon stars. The fifth star is a red giant that was found previously by Shetrone and coworkers to have [Fe/H]=-1.68+/-0.11 dex. In Draco, we find eight nonmembers, confirm the membership of one known carbon star, and find two new members. One of these stars is a carbon star, while the other shows no evidence for C2 bands or strong atomic bands, although the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrum is low. Thus, we find no evidence for a population of stars more metal-rich than [Fe/H]~=-1.45 dex in either of these galaxies. Indeed, our spectroscopic survey suggests that every candidate suspected of having a metallicity in excess of this value based on its position in the color-magnitude diagram is, in actuality, a carbon star. Based on the census of 13 known carbon stars in these two galaxies, we estimate the carbon star specific frequency to be ɛdSph~=2.4×10-5 L-1V,solar, 25-100 times higher than that of Galactic globular clusters. This work is based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximillians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  10. V and K-band Mass-Luminosity Relations for M dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; Henry, Todd J.; McArthur, Barbara; Franz, Otto G.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Dieterich, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Applying Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor astrometric techniques developed to establish relative orbits for binary stars (Franz et al. 1998, AJ, 116, 1432), determine masses of binary components (Benedict et al. 2001, AJ, 121, 1607), and measure companion masses of exoplanet host stars (McArthur et al. 2010, ApJ, 715, 1203), we derive masses with an average 2.1% error for 24 components of 12 M dwarf binary star systems. Masses range 0.08 to 0.40 solar masses. With these we update the lower Main Sequence V-band Mass-Luminosity Relation first shown in Henry et al. (1999, ApJ, 512, 864). We demonstrate that a Mass-Luminosity Relation in the K-band has far less scatter than in the V-band. For the eight binary components for which we have component magnitude differences in the K-band the RMS residual drops from 0.5 magnitude in the V-band to 0.05 magnitude in the K-band. These relations can be used to estimate the masses of the ubiquitous red dwarfs that account for 75% of all stars, to an accuracy of 5%, which is much better than ever before.

  11. Search for white dwarf companions of cool stars with peculiar element abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1984-01-01

    A search for a white dwarf companions of cool stars with peculiar element abundances was undertaken. One additional star the xi Cet, was found with a white dwarf companion. It was found that HR 1016, 56Uma, 16 Ser, have high excitation emission lines which indicate a high temperature object in the system. It is suggested that since these indications for high temperature companions were seen for all nearby Ba stars, it is highly probable that all Ba stars have white dwarf companions, and that the peculiar element abundances seen in the Ba stars are due to mass transfer. Observations, arguments and conclusions are presented. White dwarf companions were not found. Together with the Li and Be abundances and the chromospheric emission line spectra in these stars were studied. No white dwarf companions were seen for subgiant CH stars.

  12. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  13. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  14. Global radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of red supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytag, B.; Chiavassa, A.

    2013-05-01

    The small-scale surface granulation on cool main-sequence stars and white dwarfs influences the overall appearance of these objects only weakly. And it is only indirectly observable by analyzing e.g. line-shapes or temporal fluctuations - except for the Sun. The large-scale and high-contrast convective surface cells and accompanying sound waves on supergiants and low-gravity AGB stars on the other hand have a strong impact on the outer atmospheric layers and are directly detectable by interferometric observations. Necessary to interpret modern observations with their high resolution in frequency, time, and/or space are detailed numerical multi-dimensional time-dependent radiation-hydrodynamical simulations. Local simulations of small patches of convective surface layers and the atmosphere of main-sequence stars have matured over three decades and have reached an impressive level of agreement with observations and also between different computational codes. However, global simulations of the entire convective surface and atmosphere of a red supergiants are considerably more demanding - and limited - and have become available only for about one decade. Still, they show how the surface is shaped by the interaction of small surface granules, that sit on top of large envelope convection cells, and waves, that can travel as shocks into the outer atmosphere. The route to more complete future models will be discussed, that comprise the outer atmosphere of the stars and that could explain some of the little-understood phenomena like chromosphere, molsphere, or wind-formation.

  15. UVES Abundances of Stars in Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Venn, Kim; Shetrone, Matt; Primas, Francesca; Hill, Vanessa; Kaufer, Andreas; Szeifert, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a galaxy in possession of a good quantity of gas must want to form stars. It is the details of how and why that baffle us all. The simplest theories either would have this process a carefully self-regulated affair, or one that goes completely out of control and is capable of wrecking the galaxy which hosts it. Of course the majority of galaxies seem to amble along somewhere between these two extremes, and the mean properties tend to favour a quiescent self-regulated evolutionary scenario. But there area variety of observations which require us to invoke transitory ‘bursts’ of star-formation at one time or another in most galaxy types. Several nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies have clearly determined star-formation histories with apparent periods of zero star formation followed by periods of fairly active star formation. If we are able to understand what separated these bursts we would understand several important phenomena in galaxy evolution. Were these galaxies able to clear out their gas reservoir in a burst of star formation? How did this gas return? or did it? Have these galaxies receieved gas from the IGM instead? Could stars from these types of galaxy contribute significantly to the halo population in our Galaxy? To answer these questions we need to combine accurate stellar photometry and Colour-Magnitude Diagram interpretation with detailed metal abundances to combine a star-formation rate versus time with a range of element abundances with time. Different elements trace different evolutionary process (e.g., relative contributions of type I and II supernovae). We often aren't even sure of the abundance spread in these galaxies. We have collected detailed high resolution UVES spectra of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I & Carina) to begin to answer these questions. This is a precursor study to a more complete study with FLAMES. We presented at this meeting the initial results for

  16. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. II. CATALOG OF STARS IN MILKY WAY DWARF SATELLITE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; Geha, Marla C.; Sneden, Christopher; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Majewski, Steven R.; Siegel, Michael

    2010-12-15

    We present a catalog of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 2961 stars in eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW): Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I, Sextans, Leo II, Canes Venatici I, Ursa Minor, and Draco. For the purposes of validating our measurements, we also observed 445 red giants in MW globular clusters and 21 field red giants in the MW halo. The measurements are based on Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectroscopy (MRS) combined with spectral synthesis. We estimate uncertainties in [Fe/H] by quantifying the dispersion of [Fe/H] measurements in a sample of stars in monometallic globular clusters (GCs). We estimate uncertainties in Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances by comparing to high-resolution spectroscopic abundances of the same stars. For this purpose, a sample of 132 stars with published high-resolution spectroscopy in GCs, the MW halo field, and dwarf galaxies has been observed with MRS. The standard deviations of the differences in [Fe/H] and ([{alpha}/Fe]) (the average of [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) between the two samples is 0.15 and 0.16, respectively. This catalog represents the largest sample of multi-element abundances in dwarf galaxies to date. The next papers in this series draw conclusions on the chemical evolution, gas dynamics, and star formation histories from the catalog presented here. The wide range of dwarf galaxy luminosity reveals the dependence of dwarf galaxy chemical evolution on galaxy stellar mass.

  17. Multi-element Abundance Measurements from Medium-resolution Spectra. II. Catalog of Stars in Milky Way Dwarf Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Simon, Joshua D.; Geha, Marla C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Sneden, Christopher; Cohen, Judith G.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Majewski, Steven R.; Siegel, Michael

    2010-12-01

    We present a catalog of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 2961 stars in eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW): Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I, Sextans, Leo II, Canes Venatici I, Ursa Minor, and Draco. For the purposes of validating our measurements, we also observed 445 red giants in MW globular clusters and 21 field red giants in the MW halo. The measurements are based on Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectroscopy (MRS) combined with spectral synthesis. We estimate uncertainties in [Fe/H] by quantifying the dispersion of [Fe/H] measurements in a sample of stars in monometallic globular clusters (GCs). We estimate uncertainties in Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances by comparing to high-resolution spectroscopic abundances of the same stars. For this purpose, a sample of 132 stars with published high-resolution spectroscopy in GCs, the MW halo field, and dwarf galaxies has been observed with MRS. The standard deviations of the differences in [Fe/H] and lang[α/Fe]rang (the average of [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) between the two samples is 0.15 and 0.16, respectively. This catalog represents the largest sample of multi-element abundances in dwarf galaxies to date. The next papers in this series draw conclusions on the chemical evolution, gas dynamics, and star formation histories from the catalog presented here. The wide range of dwarf galaxy luminosity reveals the dependence of dwarf galaxy chemical evolution on galaxy stellar mass. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  18. Carbon and nitrogen abundances of individual stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardo, C.; Battaglia, G.; Pancino, E.; Romano, D.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Starkenburg, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Tosi, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] abundance ratios and CH(λ4300) and S(λ3883) index measurements for 94 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy from VLT/VIMOS MOS observations at a resolving power R = 1150 at 4020 Å. This is the first time that [N/Fe] abundances are derived for a large number of stars in a dwarf spheroidal. We found a trend for the [C/Fe] abundance to decrease with increasing luminosity on the RGB across the whole metallicity range, a phenomenon observed in both field and globular cluster giants, which can be interpreted in the framework of evolutionary mixing of partially processed CNO material. Both our measurements of [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for stars at similar luminosity and metallicity. We detected a dispersion in the carbon abundance at a given [Fe/H], which cannot be ascribed to measurement uncertainties alone. We interpret this observational evidence as the result of the contribution of different nucleosynthesis sources over time to a not well-mixed interstellar medium. We report the discovery of two new carbon-enhanced, metal-poor stars. These are likely the result of pollution from material enriched by asymptotic giant branch stars, as indicated by our estimates of [Ba/Fe] >+1. We also attempted a search for dissolved globular clusters in the field of the galaxy by looking for the distinctive C-N pattern of second population globular clusters stars in a previously detected, very metal-poor, chemodynamical substructure. We do not detect chemical anomalies among this group of stars. However, small number statistics and limited spatial coverage do not allow us to exclude the hypotheses that this substructure forms part of a tidally shredded globular cluster. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 091.D-0089

  19. Coronal Mass Ejections from a Young K0 Dwarf Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David R.

    We propose to carry out a joint ESA NASA IUE and ground-based spectroscopic study of the rapid ly rotating (P = 0.514 day), bright (V =6.9). young K0 dwarf HD 36705 (= AB Doradus). Cameron and Robinson have recently discovered prominence-like clouds of neutral material in the outer corona of this star. We intend to determine the column densities and temperatures of the clouds from the widths of the Mg II h and k absorption features produced as those clouds transit the stellar disk. We can thus determine the masses of these clouds, which are ejected from the star about twice per day, and hence their effectiveness as a magnetic braking mechanism in very young, low-mass, main sequence stars. Between Mg II observations. we will obtain short-wavelength spectra to monitor the variability in other chromospheric and transition region line emissions over six consecutive stellar rotations.

  20. White dwarf kicks and implications for barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Church, R. P.; Dermine, T.

    The barium stars have caused much grief in the field of binary stellar evolution. They are often eccentric when they should be circular and are not found to have periods longer than 104 days even though wind accretion should still be efficient at such separations. We address both these problems by introducing a kick to white dwarfs when they are born, thus solving the eccentricity problem, and imposing strong orbital angular momentum loss to shrink barium-star binaries down to the observed periods. Whilst our angular momentum prescription is hard to justify for the barium stars it shows that strong angular momentum loss is necessary to reproduce the observed period-eccentricity distribution. We are investigating whether this can be obtained from a circumbinary disc.

  1. Confirmation of Flickering Red Giants in the Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, M. L.; Mighell, K. J.

    2005-12-01

    Confirmation of Flickering Red Giants in the Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy M.L. Franz (NOAO/U. Florida), K.J. Mighell (NOAO) The discovery by Mighell & Roederer last year of flickering red giants (FRGs) in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy has been confirmed through the analysis of four archival HST WFPC2 observations in that galaxy. Many new FRG candidates were found that exhibit low-amplitude brightness fluctuations (at the few percent level) over timescales ranging from minutes to hours. We describe the conservative non-constancy statistical test used to detect these new variable stars and present many detailed light curves which have a much better time resolution than the observations analyzed by Mighell & Roederer. M.L.F, was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation through Scientific Program Order No. 3 (AST-0243875) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF. K.J.M was supported by a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Interagency Order No. NNG05EB61I, which was awarded by the Applied Information Systems Research (AISR) Program of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  2. Cleaning spectroscopic samples of stars in nearby dwarf galaxies. The use of the nIR Mg I line to weed out Milky Way contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.

    2012-03-01

    Dwarf galaxies provide insight into the processes of star formation and chemical enrichment at the low end of the galaxy mass function, as well as into the clustering of dark matter on small scales. In studies of Local Group dwarf galaxies, spectroscopic samples of individual stars are used to derive the internal kinematics and abundance properties of these galaxies. It is therefore important to clean these samples from Milky Way stars, which are not related to the dwarf galaxy, since they can contaminate analysis of the properties of these objects. Here we introduce a new diagnostic for separating Milky Way contaminant stars, which mainly consist of dwarf stars, and red giant branch stars targeted in dwarf galaxies. As discriminator we use the trends in the equivalent width of the nIR Mg I line at 8806.8 Å as a function of the equivalent width of Ca II triplet lines. This method is particularly useful for works dealing with multi-object, intermediate-resolution spectroscopy focusing in the region of the nIR Ca II triplet. We use synthetic spectra to explore how the equivalent width of these lines changes for stars with different properties (gravity, effective temperature, metallicity) and find that a distinction among giants above the horizontal branch and dwarfs can be made with this method at [Fe/H] > -2 dex. For -2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ -1, this method is also valid for distinguishing dwarfs and giants down to approximately one magnitude below the horizontal branch. Using a foreground model we make predictions on the use of this new discrimination method for nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including the ultra-faints. We subsequently use VLT/FLAMES data for the Sextans, Sculptor, and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies to verify the predicted theoretical trends. Based on FLAMES observations collected at the ESO, proposals 171.B-0588, 076.B-0391, 079.B-0435.

  3. Delayed Star Formation in Isolated Dwarf galaxies: Hubble Space Telescope Star Formation History of the Aquarius Dwarf Irregular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Andrew A.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Leaman, Ryan

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ≈10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ≈10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ≈ 2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ≈6-8 Gyr ago (z ≈ 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M H I /M sstarf, dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CDM simulations. The similarities between Leo A and Aquarius suggest that if gas is not removed from dwarf galaxies by interactions or feedback, it can linger for several gigayears without cooling in sufficient quantity to form stars efficiently. We discuss possible causes for the delay in star formation including suppression by reionization and late-time mergers. We find reasonable agreement between our measured SFHs and select cosmological simulations of isolated dwarfs. Because star formation and merger processes are both stochastic in nature, delayed star formation in various degrees is predicted to be a characteristic (but not a universal) feature of isolated small galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations were obtained under program GO

  4. Merging binary stars and the magnetic white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Gordon P.; Ferrario, Lilia; Tout, Christopher A.; Wickramasinghe, Dayal T.; Hurley, Jarrod R.

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic dynamo driven by differential rotation generated when stars merge can explain strong fields in certain classes of magnetic stars, including the high field magnetic white dwarfs (HFMWDs). In their case the site of the differential rotation has been variously proposed to be within a common envelope, the massive hot outer regions of a merged degenerate core or an accretion disc formed by a tidally disrupted companion that is subsequently incorporated into a degenerate core. We synthesize a population of binary systems to investigate the stellar merging hypothesis for observed single HFMWDs. Our calculations provide mass distribution and the fractions of white dwarfs that merge during a common envelope phase or as double degenerate systems in a post-common-envelope phase. We vary the common envelope efficiency parameter α and compare with observations. We find that this hypothesis can explain both the observed incidence of magnetism and the mass distribution of HFMWDs for a wide range of α. In this model, the majority of the HFMWDs are of the carbon-oxygen type and merge within a common envelope. Less than about a quarter of a per cent of HFMWDs originate from double degenerate stars that merge after common envelope evolution and these populate the high-mass tail of the HFMWD mass distribution.

  5. A SUBSTELLAR COMPANION TO THE WHITE DWARF-RED DWARF ECLIPSING BINARY NN Ser

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Dai, Z.-B.; Liao, W.-P.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, E. G.

    2009-11-20

    NN Ser is a short-period (P = 3.12 hr) close binary containing a very hot white dwarf primary with a mass of 0.535 M{sub sun} and a fully convective secondary with a mass of 0.111 M{sub sun}. The changes in the orbital period of the eclipsing binary were analyzed based on our five newly determined eclipse times together with those compiled from the literature. A small-amplitude (0fd00031) cyclic period variation with a period of 7.56 years was discovered to be superimposed on a possible long-term decrease. The periodic change was plausibly explained as the light-travel time effect via the presence of a tertiary companion. The mass of the tertiary companion is determined to be M{sub 3}sin i' = 0.0107(+-0.0017) M{sub sun} when a total mass of 0.646 M{sub sun} for NN Ser is adopted. For orbital inclinations i' >= 49.{sup 0}56, the mass of the tertiary component was calculated to be M {sub 3} <= 0.014 M{sub sun}; thus it would be an extrasolar planet. The third body is orbiting the white dwarf-red dwarf eclipsing binary at a distance shorter than 3.29 AU. Since the observed decrease rate of the orbital period is about two orders larger than that caused by gravitational radiation, it can be plausibly interpreted by magnetic braking of the fully convective component, which is driving this binary to evolve into a normal cataclysmic variable.

  6. WHITE DWARF-RED DWARF SYSTEMS RESOLVED WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE. II. FULL SNAPSHOT SURVEY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Farihi, J.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, S.

    2010-10-15

    Results are presented for a Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys high-resolution imaging campaign of 90 white dwarfs with known or suspected low-mass stellar and substellar companions. Of the 72 targets that remain candidate and confirmed white dwarfs with near-infrared excess, 43 are spatially resolved into two or more components, and a total of 12 systems are potentially triples. For 68 systems where a comparison is possible, 50% have significant photometric distance mismatches between their white dwarf and M dwarf components, suggesting that white dwarf parameters derived spectroscopically are often biased due to the cool companion. Interestingly, 9 of the 30 binaries known to have emission lines are found to be visual pairs and hence widely separated, indicating an intrinsically active cool star and not irradiation from the white dwarf. There is a possible, slight deficit of earlier spectral types (bluer colors) among the spatially unresolved companions, exactly the opposite of expectations if significant mass is transferred to the companion during the common envelope phase. Using the best available distance estimates, the low-mass companions to white dwarfs exhibit a bimodal distribution in projected separation. This result supports the hypothesis that during the giant phases of the white dwarf progenitor, any unevolved companions either migrate inward to short periods of hours to days, or outward to periods of hundreds to thousands of years. No intermediate projected separations of a few to several AU are found among these pairs. However, a few double M dwarfs (within triples) are spatially resolved in this range, empirically demonstrating that such separations were readily detectable among the binaries with white dwarfs. A straightforward and testable prediction emerges: all spatially unresolved, low-mass stellar and substellar companions to white dwarfs should be in short-period orbits. This result has implications for substellar companion and

  7. A compact system of small planets around a former red-giant star.

    PubMed

    Charpinet, S; Fontaine, G; Brassard, P; Green, E M; Van Grootel, V; Randall, S K; Silvotti, R; Baran, A S; Ostensen, R H; Kawaler, S D; Telting, J H

    2011-12-22

    Planets that orbit their parent star at less than about one astronomical unit (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance) are expected to be engulfed when the star becomes a red giant. Previous observations have revealed the existence of post-red-giant host stars with giant planets orbiting as close as 0.116 AU or with brown dwarf companions in tight orbits, showing that these bodies can survive engulfment. What has remained unclear is whether planets can be dragged deeper into the red-giant envelope without being disrupted and whether the evolution of the parent star itself could be affected. Here we report the presence of two nearly Earth-sized bodies orbiting the post-red-giant, hot B subdwarf star KIC 05807616 at distances of 0.0060 and 0.0076 AU, with orbital periods of 5.7625 and 8.2293 hours, respectively. These bodies probably survived deep immersion in the former red-giant envelope. They may be the dense cores of evaporated giant planets that were transported closer to the star during the engulfment and triggered the mass loss necessary for the formation of the hot B subdwarf, which might also explain how some stars of this type did not form in binary systems. PMID:22193103

  8. The Radial Distribution of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Mallory B.; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Boyer, Martha L.; Skillman, Evan D.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Sloan, Greg; McDonald, Iain; Groenewegen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are evolved stars that can experience repeated episodes of mass loss and dust production. As such, they are drivers of galactic chemical enrichment and evolution. While AGB populations have been imaged in many nearby galaxies at optical wavelengths, optical imaging can miss up to 50% of this population due to extinction. Not only is a significant population of AGB stars unidentified in optical surveys, it also is unclear whether younger (and more massive) AGB stars are preferentially obscured. Thus, the distribution, radial profile, and, potentially, age gradient of this important class of stars is not well-constrained in galaxies. The DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer (DUSTiNGS) survey is a 3.6 and 4.5 μm IRAC imaging survey from the post-cryogen Spitzer mission designed to catalog the evolved stars in 50 nearby dwarf galaxies and identify the most luminous, variable AGB stars. The resulting catalog of the resolved stellar populations at infrared wavelengths provides the means to trace the spatial distribution of evolved stars in the host galaxies. In this study, we use the DUSTiNGS dataset to create radial stellar profiles in nine of the DUSTiNGS sample. We compare the radial distribution of the total evolved stellar populations to the distribution of both the intermediate aged AGB stars and the optically identified, older red giant branch (RGB) stars from Hubble Space Telescope archival images. Additionally, we derive elliptical parameters for seven of the systems from the infrared data and compare these to parameters previously derived from optical data.

  9. Spectroscopy of Carbon Stars in the Draco and Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abia, C.

    2008-07-01

    With the ISIS spectrograph on the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained intermediate-resolution optical spectra in three and five carbon stars belonging to the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies Draco and Ursa Minor, respectively. The metallicity, carbon isotopic ratios, and high-mass s-element abundances were determined by spectral synthesis in LTE using appropriate spherically symmetric, carbon-rich atmosphere models. The infrared colors and derived luminosities suggest that these stars are equivalent to the classical CH-type stars found in the halo of the Milky Way, although the evidence of luminosity variations in the stars Draco 461 and Draco 20733 may be compatible with these being carbon-rich low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars. The derived overall metallicity in the stellar sample ([M/H] ~-2.0) agrees with the average metallicity of the main stellar component in these dSphs obtained by previous studies. The C/O and 12C/13C ratios, and the average large heavy-element (Ba, La, Nd, Sm) enhancements derived ([hs/M] >=1) are also similar to the values found in galactic CH-type stars at the same stellar metallicity. Although this average excess in heavy elements can be explained by standard s-process nucleosynthesis models, in two stars of Ursa Minor there is a suggestion that their heavy-element abundance pattern bears a closer resemblance to the scaled solar system r-process than the s-process abundance curve. If this is confirmed, these stars would represent an extragalactic example of the s + r carbon-rich (binary) stars found in the galactic halo. This r-process like abundance pattern has been found previously in other red giant stars belonging to Ursa Minor, suggesting a peculiar chemical evolution history in this dSph galaxy.

  10. Thomson scattering in magnetic fields. [of white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara

    1989-01-01

    The equation of transfer in Thomson scattering atmospheres with magnetic fields is solved using Monte Carlo methods. Two cases, a plane parallel atmosphere with a magnetic field perpendicular to the atmosphere, and a dipole star, are investigated. The wavelength dependence of polarization from plane-parallel atmosphere is qualitatively similar to that observed in the magnetic white dwarf Grw+70 deg 8247, and the field strength determined by the calculation, 320 MG, is quantitatively similar to that determined from the line spectrum. The dipole model does not resemble the data as well as the single plane-parallel atmosphere.

  11. Spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarr, Steven H.; Neff, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Two active K dwarfs are examined to determine the temperatures of the stars and to estimate the locations and sizes of cool spots on the stellar surfaces. Two wavelength regions with TiO absorption bands at different temperature sensitivities are modeled simultaneously using the method developed by Huenemoerder and Ramsey (1987). The spectrum of BD +26deg730 shows excess absorption in the TiO band, and the absence of the 8860 A band in HD 82558 indicates that its spots are warmer than those of BD +26deg730.

  12. Star Formation Rate in Holmberg IX Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andjelic, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009) to calculate star formation rate (SFR) in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3.4×10-4M_{⊙} yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  13. SDSS J001641-000925: THE FIRST STABLE RED DWARF CONTACT BINARY WITH A CLOSE-IN STELLAR COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E. G.; He, J.-J.; Liao, W.-P.; Wang, J.-J.; Liu, L.; Zhou, X.; Liu, N. P.; Fernández Lajús, E.; Soonthornthum, B.; Rattanasoon, S.; Aukkaravittayapun, S.

    2015-01-10

    SDSS J001641-000925 is the first red dwarf contact binary star with an orbital period of 0.19856 days that is one of the shortest known periods among M-dwarf binary systems. The orbital period was detected to be decreasing rapidly at a rate of P-dot ∼8 s yr{sup −1}. This indicated that SDSS J001641-000925 was undergoing coalescence via a dynamical mass transfer or loss and thus this red dwarf contact binary is dynamically unstable. To understand the properties of the period change, we monitored the binary system photometrically from 2011 September 2 to 2014 October 1 by using several telescopes in the world and 25 eclipse times were determined. It is discovered that the rapid decrease of the orbital period is not true. This is contrary to the prediction that the system is merging driven by rapid mass transfer or loss. Our preliminary analysis suggests that the observed minus calculated (O–C) diagram shows a cyclic oscillation with an amplitude of 0.00255 days and a period of 5.7 yr. The cyclic variation can be explained by the light travel time effect via the presence of a cool stellar companion with a mass of M {sub 3}sin i' ∼ 0.14 M {sub ☉}. The orbital separation between the third body and the central binary is about 2.8 AU. These results reveal that the rarity of red dwarf contact binaries could not be explained by rapidly dynamical destruction and the presence of the third body helps to form the red dwarf contact binary.

  14. SDSS J001641-000925: The First Stable Red Dwarf Contact Binary with a Close-in Stellar Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Fernández Lajús, E.; Soonthornthum, B.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E. G.; He, J.-J.; Liao, W.-P.; Wang, J.-J.; Liu, L.; Rattanasoon, S.; Aukkaravittayapun, S.; Zhou, X.; Liu, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    SDSS J001641-000925 is the first red dwarf contact binary star with an orbital period of 0.19856 days that is one of the shortest known periods among M-dwarf binary systems. The orbital period was detected to be decreasing rapidly at a rate of \\dot{P}˜ {8} s yr-1. This indicated that SDSS J001641-000925 was undergoing coalescence via a dynamical mass transfer or loss and thus this red dwarf contact binary is dynamically unstable. To understand the properties of the period change, we monitored the binary system photometrically from 2011 September 2 to 2014 October 1 by using several telescopes in the world and 25 eclipse times were determined. It is discovered that the rapid decrease of the orbital period is not true. This is contrary to the prediction that the system is merging driven by rapid mass transfer or loss. Our preliminary analysis suggests that the observed minus calculated (O-C) diagram shows a cyclic oscillation with an amplitude of 0.00255 days and a period of 5.7 yr. The cyclic variation can be explained by the light travel time effect via the presence of a cool stellar companion with a mass of M 3sin i' ~ 0.14 M ⊙. The orbital separation between the third body and the central binary is about 2.8 AU. These results reveal that the rarity of red dwarf contact binaries could not be explained by rapidly dynamical destruction and the presence of the third body helps to form the red dwarf contact binary.

  15. Star formation history and evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Disney, M. J.; Pritzl, B. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Gallagher, J. S.; Minchin, R. F.; Freeman, K. C.

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the properties of three unusual dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered with the HIPASS survey. From their optical morphology, they appear to be low surface brightness dwarf spheroidals, yet they are gas rich (MHI/LB > 1) with gas-mass-to-stellar light ratios larger than typical dwarf irregular galaxies. Therefore these systems appear different from any dwarfs of the Local Group. They should be favoured hosts for starburst, whereas we find a faint star formation region in only one object. We have obtained 21-cm data and Hubble Space Telescope photometry in V and I bands, and have constructed colour magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to investigate their stellar populations and to set a constraint on their age. From the comparison of the observed and model CMDs, we infer that all three galaxies are at least older than 2 Gyr (possibly even as old as 10 Gyr) and remain gas rich because their star formation rates have been very low (<~10-3Msolaryr-1) throughout. In such systems, star formation appears to have been sporadic and local, though one object (HIPASS J1321-31) has a peculiar red plume in its CMD suggesting that many of its stars were formed in a `miniburst' 300-500 Myr ago. The question of why there are no similar dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains open. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Associations of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555; the Australia Telescope Compact Array which is part of the Australia Telescope, funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO. E-mail: marco.grossi@roma 1.infn.it ‡ Visiting Astronomer, Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which is operated by the Association of Unicersities for for Reasearch in Astronomy. Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National

  16. White dwarf stars and the age of the Galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    The history of the Galaxy is written in its oldest stars, the white dwarf (WD) stars. Significant limits can be placed on both the Galactic age and star formation history. A wide range of input WD model sequences is used to derive the current limits to the age estimates suggested by fitting to the observed falloff in the WD luminosity function. The results suggest that the star formation rate over the history of the Galaxy has been relatively constant, and that the disk age lies in the range 6-12 billion years, depending upon the assumed structure of WD stars, and in particular on the core composition and surface helium layer mass. Using plausible mixed C/O core input models, the estimates for the disk age range from 8-10.5 Gyr, i.e.,sustantially younger than most age estimates for the halo globular clusters. After speculating on the significance of the results, expected observational and theoretical refinements which will further enhance the reliability of the method are discussed.

  17. Search for carbon stars and DZ white dwarfs in SDSS spectra survey through machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, JianMin; Luo, ALi; Li, YinBi; Zhang, JianNan; Wei, Peng; Wu, YiHong; Wu, FuChao; Zhao, YongHeng

    2014-01-01

    Carbon stars and DZ white dwarfs are two types of rare objects in the Galaxy. In this paper, we have applied the label propagation algorithm to search for these two types of stars from Data Release Eight (DR8) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which is verified to be efficient by calculating precision and recall. From nearly two million spectra including stars, galaxies and QSOs, we have found 260 new carbon stars in which 96 stars have been identified as dwarfs and 7 identified as giants, and 11 composition spectrum systems (each of them consists of a white dwarf and a carbon star). Similarly, using the label propagation method, we have obtained 29 new DZ white dwarfs from SDSS DR8. Compared with PCA reconstructed spectra, the 29 findings are typical DZ white dwarfs. We have also investigated their proper motions by comparing them with proper motion distribution of 9,374 white dwarfs, and found that they satisfy the current observed white dwarfs by SDSS generally have large proper motions. In addition, we have estimated their effective temperatures by fitting the polynomial relationship between effective temperature and g-r color of known DZ white dwarfs, and found 12 of the 29 new DZ white dwarfs are cool, in which nine are between 6,000 K and 6,600 K, and three are below 6,000 K.

  18. Crystallization of carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C J; Schneider, A S; Berry, D K

    2010-06-11

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and from Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction to S(300)≤170  keV b. PMID:20867223

  19. Crystallization of Carbon-Oxygen Mixtures in White Dwarf Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C. J.; Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.

    2010-06-11

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and from Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction to S{sub 300{<=}}170 keV b.

  20. Crystallization of Carbon-Oxygen Mixtures in White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.

    2010-06-01

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and from Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the C12(α,γ)O16 reaction to S300≤170keVb.

  1. R Coronae Borealis Stars formed from Double White Dwarf Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Herwig, F.; Menon, A.; Even, W.; Tohline, J.; Clayton, G.; Motl, P.; Fryer, C.; Geballe, T.

    2011-01-01

    R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are hydrogen-deficient variable stars that suddenly fade by several magnitudes at irregular intervals whereafter they gradually return to their original brightness over a period of some months. The origin of RCBs remain a mystery. It is often thought that they are the result of the merger of a He and a CO white dwarf, while the fading is thought to be due to the formation of dust blocking light from the star. We are working on revealing the secrets behind the origin of RCBs. Here we present the results of 3 dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the merger of a double white dwarf system where total mass is 0.9 M⊙ and initial mass ratio is q=0.7. We use a zero-temperature plus ideal gas equation of state that allows for heating through shocks. These simulations allow us to follow the evolution of the system for 10-20 initial orbital periods (1000-2000 seconds), from the onset of mass-transfer to a point after merger when the combined object has settled into a nearly axisymmetric, rotationally flattened configuration. The final merged object from the hydrodynamics simulation is then used as input for a stellar evolution code where the object's evolution can be followed over a much longer (thermal and/or nuclear) timescale. A preliminary post-merger stellar evolution simulation shows how an initial configuration of a 0.7 CO WD surrounded by 0.3 M⊙ of dynamically accreted He evolves on a time scale of 105 years to the location of the RCB stars in the H-R diagram at an effective temperature Teff<7000 K and log L 4. We acknowledge support from NASA Astrophysics Theory Program grant number NNX10AC72G.

  2. SPLAT: Using Spectral Indices to Identify and Characterize Ultracool Stars, Brown Dwarfs and Exoplanets in Deep Surveys and as Companions to Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganze, Christian; Burgasser, Adam J.; Martin, Eduardo; Konopacky, Quinn; Masters, Daniel C.

    2016-06-01

    The majority of ultracool dwarf stars and brown dwarfs currently known were identified in wide-field red optical and infrared surveys, enabling measures of the local, typically isolated, population in a relatively shallow (<100 pc radius) volume. Constraining the properties of the wider Galactic population (scale height, radial distribution, Population II sources), and close brown dwarf and exoplanet companions to nearby stars, requires specialized instrumentation, such as high-contrast, coronagraphic spectrometers (e.g., Gemini/GPI, VLT/Sphere, Project 1640); and deep spectral surveys (e.g., HST/WFC3 parallel fields, Euclid). We present a set of quantitative methodologies to identify and robustly characterize sources for these specific populations, based on templates and tools developed as part of the SpeX Prism Library Analysis Toolkit. In particular, we define and characterize specifically-tuned sets spectral indices that optimize selection of cool dwarfs and distinguish rare populations (subdwarfs, young planetary-mass objects) based on low-resolution, limited-wavelength-coverage spectral data; and present a template-matching classification method for these instruments. We apply these techniques to HST/WFC3 parallel fields data in the WISPS and HST-3D programs, where our spectral index set allows high completeness and low contamination for searches of late M, L and T dwarfs to distances out to ~3 kpc.The material presented here is based on work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX15AI75G.

  3. Calibrating UV Star Formation Rates for Dwarf Galaxies from STARBIRDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Mitchell, Noah P.

    2015-08-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV-SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ˜53% larger than previous relations. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA), and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA).

  4. CEPHEID VARIABLE STARS IN THE PEGASUS DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY: CONSTRAINTS ON THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Meschin, I.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A.; Rosenberg, A.; Cassisi, S. E-mail: carme@iac.es E-mail: alf@iac.es

    2009-03-15

    Observations of the resolved stars obtained over a period of 11 years in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy Pegasus have been used to search for Cepheid variable stars. Images were obtained in 55 epochs in the V band and in 24 epochs in the I band. We have identified 26 Cepheids and have obtained their light curves and periods. On the basis of their position in the period-luminosity (PL) diagram, we have classified them as 18 fundamental modes and eight first overtone Cepheids. Two PL relations for Cepheids have been used to derive the distance, resulting in 1.07 {+-} 0.05 Mpc. We present the VARFINDER code which finds the variable stars and their predicted periods in a given synthetic color-magnitude diagram computed with IAC-star and we propose the use of the Cepheid population as a constraint of the star formation history of Pegasus.

  5. Stars of type MS with evidence of white dwarf companions. [IUE, Main Sequence (MS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peery, Benjamin F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A search for white dwarf companions of MS-type stars was conducted, using IUE. The overendowments of these stars in typical S-process nuclides suggest that they, like the Ba II stars, may owe their peculiar compositions to earlier mass transfer. Short-wavelength IUE spectra show striking emission line variability in HD35155, HD61913, and 4 Ori; HD35155 and 4 Ori show evidence of white dwarf companions.

  6. High-Resolution Spectral Analysis of KI Lines in Unusually Red & Blue L Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalida Alam, Munazza; Camnasio, Sara; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Mace, Gregory N.; Martin, Emily; Logsdon, Sarah E.; McLean, Ian S.; Brown Dwarfs in New York City (Bdnyc)

    2015-01-01

    L dwarfs have a range of near-infrared colors at a given optically-defined spectral subtype. L dwarfs of the same spectral subtype are thought to have similar surface temperatures, and the presence of extreme near-IR colors in some L dwarfs suggests that parameters other than temperature influence their spectra. For some of these objects, diagnostic spectral features indicate the cause of extreme near-IR color. Blue L dwarfs that have low metallicity spectral features, called subdwarfs, are known to have old ages. Red L dwarfs that have low surface gravity spectral features are known to be young. The spectra of some blue and red L dwarfs do not show evidence for low metallicity or low gravity. This project investigates the cause of extreme color in these photometric outliers by comparing spectral line measurements for a sample of red, blue, and standard L dwarfs to elucidate their underlying atmospheric and physical properties. We use KI lines to make these comparisons because they are pressure-broadened and therefore sensitive to temperature, gravity, and metallicity. We use high-resolution NIRSPEC J band spectra to measure equivalent widths, line depths, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of KI lines at 1.1773 um, 1.1776 um, 1.2436 um, and 1.2525 um. Consistent with trends in the literature, our preliminary results suggest that unusually blue L dwarfs are field age or older.

  7. The quiescent chromospheres and transition regions of active dwarf stars - What are we learning from recent observations and models?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in understanding active dwarf stars based on recent IUE, Einstein, and ground-based observations is reviewed. The extent of magnetic field control over nonflare phenomena in active dwarf stars is considered, and the spatial homogeneity and time variability of active dwarf atmospheres is discussed. The possibility that solar like flux tubes can explain enhanced heating in active dwarf stars in examined, and the roles of systematic flows in active dwarf star atmospheres are considered. The relation between heating rates in different layers of active dwarf stars is summarized, and the mechanism of chromosphere and transition region heating in these stars are discussed. The results of one-component and two-component models of active dwarf stars are addressed.

  8. The collapse of white dwarfs to neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.; Baron, E.

    1992-01-01

    The observable consequences of an accreting white dwarf collapsing directly to a neutron star are considered. The outcome depends critically upon the nature of the wind that is driven by neutrino absorption in the surface layers as the dwarf collapses. Unlike previous calculations which either ignored mass loss or employed inadequate zoning to resolve it, a characteristic mass-loss rate of about 0.005 solar mass/s and an energy input of 5 x 10 exp 50 ergs/s is found. Such a large mass-loss rate almost completely obscures any prompt electromagnetic display and certainly rules out the production by this model of gamma-ray bursts situated at cosmological distances. The occurrence of such collapses with the Milky Way Galaxy might, however, be detected and limited by their nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line emission. To avoid the overproduction of rare neutron-rich isotopes heavier than iron, such events must be very infrequent, probably happening no more than once every thousand years.

  9. The Main-Sequence Stars of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlman, G. G.; Mandushev, G.; Richer, H. B.; Thompson, I. B.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.

    1996-03-01

    The Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (SDG) is visible in the background field of the globular cluster M55. We present a deep VI color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of M55, which shows a prominent sequence of stars some 3.5 mag below the cluster main sequence. Through a comparison with a similar CMD for the globular cluster M4, we show that the M55 background field is not the Galactic bulge or spheroid. The SDG main sequence is almost as blue as that of M55 and thus, if it is metal rich, it must be younger than M55, a typical old Galactic globular cluster. The results from isochrone fitting indicate that the age of the SDG is 10--14 Gyr, similar to the ages inferred for the two associated globular clusters Ter 7 and Arp 2.

  10. Origin of the DA and non-DA white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Harry L.

    1989-01-01

    Various proposals for the bifurcation of the white dwarf cooling sequence are reviewed. 'Primordial' theories, in which the basic bifurcation of the white dwarf sequence is rooted in events predating the white dwarf stage of stellar evolution, are discussed, along with the competing 'mixing' theories in which processes occurring during the white dwarf stage are responsible for the existence of DA or non-DA stars. A new proposal is suggested, representing a two-channel scenario. In the DA channel, some process reduces the hydrogen layer mass to the value of less than 10 to the -7th. The non-DA channel is similar to that in the primordial scenario. These considerations suggest that some mechanism operates in both channels to reduce the thickness of the outermost layer of the white dwarf. It is also noted that accretion from the interstellar medium has little to do with whether a particular white dwarf becomes a DA or a non-DA star.

  11. Abundance ratios of red giants in low-mass ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, P.; Monaco, L.; Bonifacio, P.; Moni Bidin, C.; Geisler, D.; Sbordone, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Low-mass dwarf spheroidal galaxies are key objects for our understanding of the chemical evolution of the pristine Universe and the Local Group of galaxies. Abundance ratios in stars of these objects can be used to better understand their star formation and chemical evolution. Aims: We report on the analysis of a sample of 11 stars belonging to five different ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UfDSph) that is based on X-Shooter spectra obtained at the VLT. Methods: Medium-resolution spectra have been used to determine the detailed chemical composition of their atmosphere. We performed a standard 1D LTE analysis to compute the abundances. Results: Considering all the stars as representative of the same population of low-mass galaxies, we found that the [α/Fe] ratios vs.s [Fe/H] decreases as the metallicity of the star increases in a way similar to that which is found for the population of stars that belong to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The main difference is that the solar [α/Fe] is reached at a much lower metallicity for the UfDSph than for the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We report for the first time the abundance of strontium in CVn II. The star we analyzed in this galaxy has a very high [Sr/Fe] and a very low upper limit of barium which makes it a star with an exceptionally high [Sr/Ba] ratio.

  12. Very low mass stars and white dwarfs in NGC 6397

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, Francesco; De Marchi, Guido; Romaniello, Martino

    1995-01-01

    Deep Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images in wide bands centered at 606 and 802 nm were taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) 4.6 min from the center of the galactic globular cluster NGC 6397. The images were used to accurately position approximately 2120 stars detected in the field on a color magnitude diagram down to a limiting magnitude m(sub 814) approximately = m(sub I) approximately = 26 determined reliably and solely by counting statistics. A white dwarf sequence and a rich, narrow cluster main sequence are detected for the first time, the latter stretching from m(sub 814) = 18.5 to m(sub 814) = 24.0 where it becomes indistinguishable from the field population. Two changes of slope of the main sequence at m(sub 814) approximately = 20 and m(sub 814) approximately = 22.5 are evident. The corresponding luminosity function increases slowly from M(sub 814) approximately = 6.5 to 8.5 are expected from ground-based observations but then drops sharply from there dwon to the measurement limit. The corresponding mass function obtained bu using the only presently available mass-luminosity function for the cluster's metallicity rises to a plateau between approximately 0.25 and approximately 0.15 solar mass, but drops toward the expected mass limit of the normal hydrogen burning main sequence at approximately 0.1 solar mass. This result is in clear contrast to that obtained from the ground and implies either a substantial modification of the cluster's initial mass function due to dynamical evolution in its lifetime, or that very low mass stars are not produced in any dynamically significant amount by clusters of this type. The white dwarf sequence is in reasonable agreement with a cooling sequence of models of mass 0.5 solar mass at the canonical distance of NGC 6397 with a scatter that is most likely due to photometric errors, but may also reflect real differences in mass or chemical composition. Contamination from unresolved galaxies, which cannot be

  13. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF WHITE DWARFS: THE MISSING PLANETARY DEBRIS AROUND DZ STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Jura, M. E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-01-20

    We report a Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera search for infrared excesses around white dwarfs, including 14 newly observed targets and 16 unpublished archived stars. We find a substantial infrared excess around two warm white dwarfs-J220934.84+122336.5 and WD 0843+516, the latter apparently being the hottest white dwarf known to display a close-in dust disk. Extending previous studies, we find that the fraction of white dwarfs with dust disks increases as the star's temperature increases; for stars cooler than 10,000 K, even the most heavily polluted ones do not have {approx}1000 K dust. There is tentative evidence that the dust disk occurrence is correlated with the volatility of the accreted material. In the Appendix, we modify a previous analysis to clarify how Poynting-Robertson drag might play an important role in transferring materials from a dust disk into a white dwarf's atmosphere.

  14. Hunting for exploding red supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Menten, Karl M.; Figer, Donald F.; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Zhu, Qingfeng; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Davies, Ben; Clark, J. Simon; Rich, Michael; Chen, Rosie; Trombley, Christine; MacKenty, John W.; Habing, Harm; Churchwell, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Red supergiants (RSGs) are among the brightest Galactic stars at infrared wavelengths. They lose mass at high-rates and, eventually, explode as supernovae, enriching the interstellar medium. I would like to present results on our ongoing searches for candidate obscured-far-luminous late-type stars, which are based on 2MASS, UKIDSS, and GLIMPSE data, on extinction-free colors(Messineo et al. 2012, A&A, 537) and on the analysis of the extinction curve along a given line-of-sight with clump stars. Messineo et al. (2014, A&A, 571, 43) spectroscopically confirmed two clusters of red supergiants, one on the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm at a distance of ~7 kpc, and another on the Scutum-Crux arm at a distance of ~4 kpc; while Messineo et al. (2014, A&A, 569, 20) have, found several RSGs in the core of SNRs W41 and within the area covered by the SNR G22.7-0.2 in the GMC G23.3-0.3. SNR G22.7-0.2 appears to be most likely a type II SNR.Messineo , M.; Menten, K. M.; Churchwell, E.; Habing, H. 2012A&A...537A..10MMessineo, Maria; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Menten, Karl M.; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie 2014A&A...571A..43MMessineo, Maria; Menten, Karl M.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Clark, J. Simon; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Rich, R. Michael; MacKenty, John W.; Trombley, Christine; 2014A&A...569A..20M

  15. The imprint of reionization on the star formation histories of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez-Llambay, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Abadi, M. G.; Gottlöber, S.; Yepes, G.; Hoffman, Y.; Steinmetz, M.

    2015-07-01

    We use a compilation of star formation histories (SFHs) and cosmological simulations to explore the impact of cosmic reionization on nearby isolated dwarf galaxies. Nearby dwarfs show a wide diversity of SFHs; from ancient systems that completed their star formation (SF) ˜10 Gyr ago to young dwarfs that formed the majority of their stars in the past ˜5 Gyr to `two-component' systems characterized by the overlap of old and young stars. As an ensemble, SF in nearby dwarfs dips to lower-than-average rates at intermediate times (4 < t/Gyr < 8), a feature caused in the simulation by cosmic reionization. Reionization heats the gas and drives it out of low-mass haloes, affecting especially systems with virial temperatures of ˜2 × 104 K at zreion. SF begins before zreion in systems above this threshold; its associated feedback compounds the effects of reionization, emptying the haloes of gas and leaving behind old stellar systems. In haloes below the threshold at zreion, reionization leads to a delay in the onset of SF that lasts until the halo grows massive enough to allow gas to cool and form stars, leading to a system with a prominent young stellar component. `Two-component' systems may be traced to late accretion events that allow young stars to form in systems slightly above the threshold at zreion. The dearth of intermediate-age stars in nearby dwarfs might be the clearest signature of the imprint of cosmic reionization on the SFHs of dwarf galaxies.

  16. Limits from the Ongoing Search for Planets Around White Dwarf Stars Using Pulsation Timings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.; Mullally, Fergal; Bell, K. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Williams, S. G.; Harrold, S. T.; Kepler, S. O.; Castanheira, B.; Chandler, D. W.; Winget, K. I.; Mukadam, A. S.; Nather, R. E.

    2015-06-01

    Evidence from searches of stars in our galaxy for exoplanet companions suggests that most lower main sequence stars likely have one or more planets; the vast majority of these planet-hosting stars will evolve into white dwarf stars. Some planets may survive this process and new ones may form in a sort of second generation from the cast-off material. If we combine this argument with evidence of a substantial population of metal polluted white dwarf stars, we may plausibly expect that planets may be common around white dwarf stars. Empirically, however, little is known about the presence of planets, new or old around white dwarf stars. Our search is small (˜15 white dwarf stars), but sensitive. Using pulsation arrival times we reach a large search volume around each star: we are sensitive to 1 MJupiter planets at distances ranging from 1- 100AU. In this context, our tightening constraints from pulsation timings become increasingly important to the broader study of planet formation, dynamical evolution, and ultimate survival.

  17. Environmental effects on star formation in dwarf galaxies and star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Cropper, M.; Fujita, Y.; Chiosi, C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The role of the environment in the formation of a stellar population is a difficult problem in astrophysics. The reason is that similar properties of a stellar population are found in star systems embedded in different environments or, vice versa, similar environments contain stellar systems with stellar populations having different properties. Aims: In this paper, we develop a simple analytical criterion to investigate the role of the environment on the onset of star formation. We will consider the main external agents that influence star formation (i.e. ram pressure, tidal interaction, Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities) in a spherical galaxy moving through an external environment. The theoretical framework developed here has direct applications to the cases of dwarf galaxies in galaxy clusters and dwarf galaxies orbiting our Milky Way system, as well as any primordial gas-rich cluster of stars orbiting within its host galaxy. Methods: We develop an analytic formalism to solve the fluid dynamics equations in a non-inertial reference frame mapped with spherical coordinates. The two-fluids instability at the interface between a stellar system and its surrounding hotter and less dense environment is related to the star formation processes through a set of differential equations. The solution presented here is quite general, allowing us to investigate most kinds of orbits allowed in a gravitationally bound system of stars in interaction with a major massive companion. Results: We present an analytical criterion to elucidate the dependence of star formation in a spherical stellar system (as a dwarf galaxy or a globular cluster) on its surrounding environment useful in theoretical interpretations of numerical results as well as observational applications. We show how spherical coordinates naturally enlighten the interpretation of two-fluids instability in a geometry that directly applies to an astrophysical case. This criterion predicts the

  18. Fundamental Properties of Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Allard, France; Blake, Cullen H.; Bonnefoy, M.; Cody, Ann Marie; Kraus, Adam; Day-Jones, A. C.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2009-02-16

    Precise measurements of the fundamental properties of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs are key to understanding the physics underlying their formation and evolution. While there has been great progress over the last decade in studying the bulk spectrophotometric properties of low-mass objects, direct determination of their masses, radii, and temperatures have been very sparse. Thus, theoretical predictions of low-mass evolution and ultracool atmospheres remain to be rigorously tested. The situation is alarming given that such models are widely used, from the determination of the low-mass end of the initial mass function to the characterization of exoplanets.An increasing number of mass, radius, and age determinations are placing critical constraints on the physics of low-mass objects. A wide variety of approaches are being pursued, including eclipsing binary studies, astrometric-spectroscopic orbital solutions, interferometry, and characterization of benchmark systems. In parallel, many more systems suitable for concerted study are now being found, thanks to new capabilities spanning both the very widest (all-sky surveys) and very narrowest (diffraction-limited adaptive optics) areas of the sky. This Cool Stars 15 splinter session highlighted the current successes and limitations of this rapidly growing area of precision astrophysics.

  19. Strange stars, strange dwarfs, and planetary-like strange-matter objects

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Schaab, C.; Weigel, M.K.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1995-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of the properties of all possible equilibrium sequences of compact strange-matter stars with nuclear crusts, which range from strange stars to strange dwarfs. In contrast to their non-strange counterparts--neutron stars and white dwarfs--their properties are determined by two (rather than one) parameters, the central star density and the density at the base of the nuclear crust. This leads to stellar strange-matter configurations whose properties are much more complex than those of the conventional sequence. As an example, two generically different categories of stable strange dwarfs are found, which could be the observed white dwarfs. Furthermore the authors find very-low-mass strange stellar objects, with masses as small as those of Jupiter or even lighter planets. Such objects, if abundant enough, should be seen by the presently performed gravitational microlensing searches.

  20. A novel multi-scale analysis to determine red giant branch metallicities of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Christopher Thomas

    Through the last century the color-magnitude diagram has given a huge wealth of information about resolved stellar populations. Objects ranging from sparse star associations and open clusters to the massive spiral and elliptical galaxies have been measured in a wide array of photometric filter systems to understand how galaxies formed into the structure that we as humans see them as today. With a basic knowledge of nuclear physics fused with stellar evolution we have measured the ages of these systems of stars, along with estimates of the chemical abundances. Our understanding has been that smaller systems like open and globular star clusters were formed as a single population of stars at roughly the same time. In contrast the larger systems like spiral and elliptical galaxies were formed by a combination of constant star formation along with mergers of smaller proto systems. In fact, these mergers are still happening in the current epoch of the universe. Over the last decade higher resolution studies paved by larger 8-10 meter telescopes, along with the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope, have shown the simplistic view of the formation of globular clusters and dwarf galaxies is no longer acceptable. Photometric and spectroscopic observations show that the globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies have multiple populations that vary with age, and/or metallicity (Geisler et al. 2007, Tolstoy et al. 2009). Two objects that show the extremes of each are the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Hurley-Keller et al. 1998) and the massive o Centauri globular cluster (Sollima et al. 2005). The more massive globular clusters show hints of multiple populations such as the NGC2808 globular cluster. It seems as though our understanding of the universe has only begun as we uncover more complexities with better tools to probe the universe. This dissertation thesis brings a new tool for stellar population studies when analyzing data from photometric systems. I have chosen theM I

  1. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 16. Damped Lyα systems as probes of chemical evolution over cosmological timescales Miroslava Dessauges-Zavadsky; 17. Connecting high-redshift galaxy populations through observations of local damped Lyman alpha dwarf galaxies Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; 18. Chemical enrichment and feedback in low metallicity environments: constraints on galaxy formation Francesca Matteucci; 19. Effects of reionization on dwarf galaxy formation Massimo Ricotti; 20. The importance of following the evolution of the dust in galaxies on their SEDs A. Schurer, F. Calura, L. Silva, A. Pipino, G. L. Granato, F. Matteucci and R. Maiolino; 21. About the chemical evolution of dSphs (and the peculiar globular cluster ωCen) Andrea Marcolini and Annibale D'Ercole; 22. Young star clusters in the small Magellanic cloud: impact of local and global conditions on star formation Elena Sabbi, Linda J. Smith, Lynn R. Carlson, Antonella Nota, Monca Tosi, Michele Cignoni, Jay S. Gallagher III, Marco Sirianni and Margaret Meixner; 23. Modeling the ISM properties of metal-poor galaxies and gamma-ray burst hosts Emily M. Levesque, Lisa J. Kewley, Kirsten Larson and Leonie Snijders; 24. Dwarf galaxies and the magnetisation of the IGM Uli Klein; Session III. Explosive Events in Low-Metallicity Environments: 25. Supernovae and their evolution in a low metallicity ISM Roger A. Chevalier; 26. First stars - type Ib supernovae connection Ken'ichi Nomoto, Masaomi Tanaka, Yasuomi Kamiya, Nozomu Tominaga and Keiichi Maeda; 27. Supernova nucleosynthesis in the early universe Nozomu Tominaga, Hideyuki Umeda, Keiichi Maeda, Ken'ichi Nomoto and Nobuyuki Iwamoto; 28. Powerful explosions at Z = 0? Sylvia Ekström, Georges Meynet, Raphael Hirschi and André Maeder; 29. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution Cyril Georgy, Georges Meynet and André Maeder; 30. Low-mass and metal-poor gamma-ray burst

  2. Spectroscopy of New High Proper Motion Stars in the Northern Sky. I. New Nearby Stars, New High-Velocity Stars, and an Enhanced Classification Scheme for M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, Sébastien; Rich, R. Michael; Shara, Michael M.

    2003-03-01

    We define an enhanced spectral classification scheme for M dwarf stars and use it to derive spectral classification of 104 northern stars with proper motions larger than 0.5" yr-1 that we discovered in a survey of high proper motion stars at low Galactic latitudes. The final tally is as follows: 54 M dwarfs, 25 sdK and sdM subdwarfs, 14 esdK and esdM extreme subdwarfs, and 11 DA and DC white dwarfs. Among the most interesting cases, we find one star to be the coolest subdwarf ever reported (LSR 2036+5059, with spectral type sdM7.5), a new M9.0 dwarf only about 6 pc distant (LSR 1835+3259), and a new M6.5 dwarf only 7 pc from the Sun (LSR 2124+4003). Spectroscopic distances suggests that 27 of the M dwarfs, three of the white dwarfs, and one of the subdwarfs (LSR 2036+5059) are within 25 pc of the Sun, making them excellent candidates for inclusion in the solar neighborhood census. Estimated sky-projected velocities suggest that most of our subdwarfs and extreme subdwarfs have halo kinematics. We find that several white dwarfs and non-metal-poor M dwarfs also have kinematics consistent with the halo, and we briefly discuss their possible origin.

  3. DISCOVERY OF MIRA VARIABLE STARS IN THE METAL-POOR SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2012-12-10

    We report the discovery of two Mira variable stars (Miras) toward the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). We performed optical long-term monitoring observations for two red stars in the Sextans dSph. The light curves of both stars in the I{sub c} band show large-amplitude (3.7 and 0.9 mag) and long-period (326 {+-} 15 and 122 {+-} 5 days) variations, suggesting that they are Miras. We combine our own infrared data with previously published data to estimate the mean infrared magnitudes. The distances obtained from the period-luminosity relation of the Miras (75.3{sup +12.8}{sub -10.9} and 79.8{sup +11.5}{sub -9.9} kpc, respectively), together with the radial velocities available, support memberships of the Sextans dSph (90.0 {+-} 10.0 kpc). These are the first Miras found in a stellar system with a metallicity as low as [Fe/H] {approx} -1.9 than any other known system with Miras.

  4. The Mass-Radius-Luminosity-Rotation Relationship for M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Eunkyu; Muirhead, Philip Steven; Swift, Jonathan; Isaacson, Howard T.; DeFelippis, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    NASA's future Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission is expected to discover hundreds of terrestrial exoplanets orbiting around M dwarf stars, which will be nearby and amenable to detailed characterization. To accurately measure radii and equilibrium temperatures of these exoplanets, we need to know the host star properties, specifically mass, radius and luminosity, to equal accuracy. However, relationships for M dwarf stellar properties are poorly constrained, which leaves us unprepared to characterize exoplanets to be discovered by the TESS mission. The best way to determine relationships for M dwarf stars is to study mutually eclipsing binaries because the photometric and spectroscopic data empirically determine the physical parameters of the stars. We are conducting an on-going survey to measure infrared eclipses and individual spectra of carefully selected M dwarf eclipsing binary targets. We are using Mimir, a near-infrared wide-field imager, on the 72-inch Perkins Telescope near Flagstaff, Arizona, to determine the J, H, and K band magnitudes of the individual stars, and we are using Keck HIRES to measure the radial velocities of each component. Combining the observations, we determine the masses, radii and the semi-major axes of each component to an accuracy of 1%. We are also using measured parallaxes to determine the individual components' absolute infrared magnitudes and bolometric luminosities. The ultimate goal is to combine the measurements to determine the mass-radius-luminosity-rotation relationship for M dwarf stars. The relationship is critical for choosing the best TESS M dwarf exoplanets for detailed characterization.

  5. Fluorine abundances in dwarf stars of the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Worley, C.; Santos, N. C.; Melo, C.; Israelian, G.

    2012-02-01

    Context. In spite of many observational efforts to characterize the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, not much is known about the origin of fluorine (F). Models suggest that the F found in the Galaxy might have been produced mainly in three different ways, namely, Type II supernovae, asymptotic giant branch nucleosynthesis, or in the core of Wolf-Rayet stars. Only a few observational measurements of F abundances are available in the literature and mostly for objects whose characteristics might hamper an accurate determination of fluorine abundance (e.g., complex mixing and nucleosynthesis processes, external/internal contamination). Aims: We acquire data using the high-resolution IR-spectrograph CRIRES and gather FEROS data from the European Southern Observatory archive. The classical method of spectral synthesis in local thermodynamic equilibrium has been used to perform the abundance analysis. Methods: We derive the F abundances of nine cool main-sequence dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood, based on an unblended line of the HF molecule at 2.3 microns. In addition, we study the s-process elements of five of these stars. Results: Several of the analysed stars seem to be slightly fluorine enhanced with respect to the Sun, although no correlation is found between the F abundance and the iron content. In addition, the most fluorine enriched stars are also yttrium and zirconium enriched, which suggests that AGB fluorine nucleosynthesis is the dominant source of fluorine production for the observed stars. Nevertheless, the correlation between [F/Fe] and the s-elements is rather weak and possibly masked by the uncertainties in the F abundance measurements. Finally, we compare our derived F abundances to previous measurements of alpha-element and iron-peak element abundances. Type II core collapse supernovae do not appear to be the main site of F production for our targets, as no correlation seems to exist between the [F/Fe] and the [α/Fe] ratios. Based on VLT

  6. Quantitative Spectral Morphology Analysis of Unusually Red and Blue L Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camnasio, Sara; Khalida Alam, Munazza; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Mace, Gregory N.; Martin, Emily; Logsdon, Sarah E.; McLean, Ian S.; Brown Dwarfs in New York City (BDNYC)

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to constrain the properties of photometric color outliers, we present a quantitative spectral morphology analysis of medium-resolution NIRSPEC (R~2,000), SpeX cross-dispersed (R~2,000), Palomar TripleSpec (R~2600), and Magellan FIRE (R~6000) J-band spectra for a sample of unusually red and blue L dwarfs. Some red L dwarfs are low surface gravity, young objects whose spectra present weak Na I doublets and FeH absorption bands, but strong VO features (Cruz et al. 2009). Some blue L dwarfs are subdwarfs with low metallicity spectral features such as greater H2 absorption, stronger metal hydride bands, and enhanced TiO absorption (Burgasser et al 2008c). We fit 3rd order polynomials to the pseudo-continuum in order to provide a quantitative comparison of spectral morphology with other peculiar L dwarfs, field standards, young L dwarfs, and L subdwarf. The results indicated that the coefficients of the fit correlate with spectral type, but are independent of color. This newly found trend provides a parameter which can be utilized as an additional tool in characterizing quantifiable differences in the spectra of brown dwarfs. Furthermore, this method can be applied in studying the atmospheric properties of exoplanets, given their similarities with brown dwarfs in mass and photospheric properties.

  7. Chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge as traced by microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars. IV. Two bulge populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensby, T.; Adén, D.; Meléndez, J.; Gould, A.; Feltzing, S.; Asplund, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Lucatello, S.; Yee, J. C.; Ramírez, I.; Cohen, J. G.; Thompson, I.; Bond, I. A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Han, C.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Wada, K.; Miyake, N.; Furusawa, K.; Ohmori, K.; Saito, To.; Tristram, P.; Bennett, D.

    2011-09-01

    Based on high-resolution (R ≈ 42 000 to 48 000) and high signal-to-noise (S/N ≈ 50 to 150) spectra obtained with UVES/VLT, we present detailed elemental abundances (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Y, and Ba) and stellar ages for 12 new microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars in the Galactic bulge. Including previous microlensing events, the sample of homogeneously analysed bulge dwarfs has now grown to 26. The analysis is based on equivalent width measurements and standard 1-D LTE MARCS model stellar atmospheres. We also present NLTE Li abundances based on line synthesis of the 7Li line at 670.8 nm. The results from the 26 microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars show that the bulge metallicity distribution (MDF) is double-peaked; one peak at [Fe/H] ≈ -0.6 and one at [Fe/H] ≈ + 0.3, and with a dearth of stars around solar metallicity. This is in contrast to the MDF derived from red giants in Baade's window, which peaks at this exact value. A simple significance test shows that it is extremely unlikely to have such a gap in the microlensed dwarf star MDF if the dwarf stars are drawn from the giant star MDF. To resolve this issue we discuss several possibilities, but we can not settle on a conclusive solution for the observed differences. We further find that the metal-poor bulge dwarf stars arepredominantly old with ages greater than 10 Gyr, while the metal-rich bulge dwarf stars show a wide range of ages. The metal-poor bulge sample is very similar to the Galactic thick disk in terms of average metallicity, elemental abundance trends, and stellar ages. Speculatively, the metal-rich bulge population might be the manifestation of the inner thin disk. If so, the two bulge populations could support the recent findings, based on kinematics, that there are no signatures of a classical bulge and that the Milky Way is a pure-disk galaxy. Also, recent claims of a flat IMF in the bulge based on the MDF of giant stars may have to be revised based on the MDF and

  8. Star formation in globular clusters and dwarf galaxies and implications for the early evolution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas N. C.; Murray, Stephen D.

    1991-01-01

    Based upon the observed properties of globular clusters and dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, we present important theoretical constraints on star formation in these systems. These constraints indicate that protoglobular cluster clouds had long dormant periods and a brief epoch of violent star formation. Collisions between protocluster clouds triggered fragmentation into individual stars. Most protocluster clouds dispersed into the Galactic halo during the star formation epoch. In contrast, the large spread in stellar metallicity in dwarf galaxies suggests that star formation in their pregenitors was self-regulated: we propose the protocluster clouds formed from thermal instability in the protogalactic clouds and show that a population of massive stars is needed to provide sufficient UV flux to prevent the collapsing protogalactic clouds from fragmenting into individual stars. Based upon these constraints, we propose a unified scenario to describe the early epochs of star formation in the Galactic halo as well as the thick and thin components of the Galactic disk.

  9. Ghostly Halos in Dwarf Galaxies: a probe of star formation in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hoyoung; Ricotti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We carry out numerical simulations to characterize the size, stellar mass, and stellar mass surface density of extended stellar halos in dwarf galaxies as a function of dark matter halo mass. We expect that for galaxies smaller than a critical value, these ghostly halos will not exist because the smaller galactic subunits that build it up, do not form any stars. The detection of ghostly halos around isolated dwarf galaxies is a sensitive test of the efficiency of star formation in the first galaxies and of whether ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way are fossils of the first galaxies.

  10. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY IN GIANT PLANETS, BROWN DWARFS, AND LOW-MASS DWARF STARS. III. IRON, MAGNESIUM, AND SILICON

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, Channon; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce E-mail: lodders@wustl.ed

    2010-06-20

    We use thermochemical equilibrium calculations to model iron, magnesium, and silicon chemistry in the atmospheres of giant planets, brown dwarfs, extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), and low-mass stars. The behavior of individual Fe-, Mg-, and Si-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of temperature, pressure, and metallicity. Our equilibrium results are thus independent of any particular model atmosphere. The condensation of Fe metal strongly affects iron chemistry by efficiently removing Fe-bearing species from the gas phase. Monatomic Fe is the most abundant Fe-bearing gas throughout the atmospheres of EGPs and L dwarfs, and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. Mg- and Si-bearing gases are effectively removed from the atmosphere by forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) and enstatite (MgSiO{sub 3}) cloud formation. Monatomic Mg is the dominant magnesium gas throughout the atmospheres of EGPs and L dwarfs and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. Silicon monoxide (SiO) is the most abundant Si-bearing gas in the deep atmospheres of brown dwarfs and EGPs, whereas SiH{sub 4} is dominant in the deep atmosphere of Jupiter and other gas giant planets. Several other Fe-, Mg-, and Si-bearing gases become increasingly important with decreasing effective temperature. In principle, a number of Fe, Mg, and Si gases are potential tracers of weather or diagnostic of temperature in substellar atmospheres.

  11. M dwarfs and the fraction of high carbon-to-oxygen stars in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizis, John E.; Marks, Zachary; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the frequency of high carbon-to-oxygen (C/O = 0.9) M dwarf stars in the solar neighbourhood. Using synthetic spectra, we find that such M dwarfs would have weaker TiO bands relative to hydride features. Similar weakening has already been detected in M-subdwarf (sdM) stars. By comparing to existing spectroscopic surveys of nearby stars, we show that less than one per cent of nearby stars have high carbon-to-oxygen ratios. This limit does not include stars with C/O = 0.9, [m/H] > 0.3, and [C/Fe] > 0.1, which we predict to have low-resolution optical spectra similar to solar metallicity M dwarfs.

  12. Observing the First Stars in Luminous, Red Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally; Lindler, Don

    2010-01-01

    Modern cosmological simulations predict that the first stars are to be found today in luminous, red galaxies. Although observing such stars individually against a background of younger, metal-rich stars is impossible, the first stars should make their presence known by their strong, line-free ultraviolet flux. We have found evidence for a UV-bright stellar population in Sloan spectra of LRG's at z=0.4-0.5. We present arguments for interpreting this UV-bright stellar population as the oldest stars, rather than other types of stellar populations (e.g. young stars or blue straggler stars in the dominant, metal-rich stellar population

  13. VARIABLE STARS IN THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY URSA MAJOR I

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, Alessia; Moretti, Maria Ida; Cusano, Felice; Clementini, Gisella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Coppola, Giuseppina; Musella, Ilaria; Marconi, Marcella E-mail: fcusano@na.astro.it E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it E-mail: imoretti@na.astro.it E-mail: ilaria@na.astro.it

    2013-04-10

    We have performed the first study of the variable star population of Ursa Major I (UMa I), an ultra-faint dwarf satellite recently discovered around the Milky Way (MW) by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Combining time series observations in the B and V bands from four different telescopes, we have identified seven RR Lyrae stars in UMa I, of which five are fundamental-mode (RRab) and two are first-overtone pulsators (RRc). Our V, B - V color-magnitude diagram of UMa I reaches V {approx} 23 mag (at a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}6) and shows features typical of a single old stellar population. The mean pulsation period of the RRab stars (P{sub ab}) = 0.628, {sigma} = 0.071 days (or (P{sub ab}) = 0.599, {sigma} = 0.032 days, if V4, the longest period and brightest variable, is discarded) and the position on the period-amplitude diagram suggest an Oosterhoff-intermediate classification for the galaxy. The RR Lyrae stars trace the galaxy horizontal branch (HB) at an average apparent magnitude of (V(RR)) = 20.43 {+-} 0.02 mag (average on six stars and discarding V4), giving in turn a distance modulus for UMa I of (m - M){sub 0} = 19.94 {+-} 0.13 mag, distance d = 97.3{sup +6.0}{sub -5.7} kpc, in the scale where the distance modulus of the Large Magellanic Cloud is 18.5 {+-} 0.1 mag. Isodensity contours of UMa I red giants and HB stars (including the RR Lyrae stars identified in this study) show that the galaxy has an S-shaped structure, which is likely caused by the tidal interaction with the MW. Photometric metallicities were derived for six of the UMa I RR Lyrae stars from the parameters of the Fourier decomposition of the V-band light curves, leading to an average metal abundance of [Fe/H] = -2.29 dex ({sigma} = 0.06 dex, average on six stars) on the Carretta et al. metallicity scale.

  14. The star formation and chemical evolution history of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Saha, A.; Olszewski, E. W.; Mateo, M.; Starkenburg, E.; Battaglia, G.; Walker, M. G.

    2012-08-01

    We present deep photometry in the B, V and I filters from CTIO/MOSAIC for about 270 000 stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy, out to a radius of rell ≈ 0.8 degrees. By combining the accurately calibrated photometry with the spectroscopic metallicity distributions of individual red giant branch stars we obtain the detailed star formation and chemical evolution history of Fornax. Fornax is dominated by intermediate age (1-10 Gyr) stellar populations, but also includes ancient (10-14 Gyr), and young (≤1 Gyr) stars. We show that Fornax displays a radial age gradient, with younger, more metal-rich populations dominating the central region. This confirms results from previous works. Within an elliptical radius of 0.8 degrees, or 1.9 kpc from the centre, a total mass in stars of 4.3 × 107 M⊙ was formed, from the earliest times until 250 Myr ago. Using the detailed star formation history, age estimates are determined for individual stars on the upper RGB, for which spectroscopic abundances are available, giving an age-metallicity relation of the Fornax dSph from individual stars. This shows that the average metallicity of Fornax went up rapidly from [Fe/H] ≤ -2.5 dex to [Fe/H] = -1.5 dex between 8-12 Gyr ago, after which a more gradual enrichment resulted in a narrow, well-defined sequence which reaches [Fe/H] ≈ -0.8 dex, ≈3 Gyr ago. These ages also allow us to measure the build-up of chemical elements as a function of time, and thus determine detailed timescales for the evolution of individual chemical elements. A rapid decrease in [Mg/Fe] is seen for the stars with [Fe/H] ≥ -1.5 dex, with a clear trend in age. Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/544/A73

  15. Astero-archaeology: Reading the galactic history recorded in the white dwarf stars

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Galactic history is written in its oldest stars, the white dwarfs. Although still some years away from reading the details of that history, significant limits can already be placed on both the Galactic age and star formation history. The following is a complete analysis of the problem, starting with a fresh exploration of the physics of white dwarf stars. An extensive grid of numerical model sequences is presented and these are used to describe in detail the behavior of the white dwarf stars as a function of mass, core composition, surface layer masses and compositions, and uncertainties in the constitutive physics. These model sequences are used to decode the information contained in the white dwarf luminosity function. A theoretical context is established for current and future observations by presenting luminosity functions computed with differing choices for the input white dwarf evolutionary sequences, the assumed age of the local disk, the star formation rate as a function of time, and the possibility of scale height inflation of the disk with time. Finally, white dwarf cosmochronology is discussed within the context of other, conflicting, methods of cosmochronology. How this work can help resolve these conflicts and shed light on fundamental problems in galaxy formation and cosmology.

  16. Linking dwarf galaxies to halo building blocks with the most metal-poor star in Sculptor.

    PubMed

    Frebel, Anna; Kirby, Evan N; Simon, Joshua D

    2010-03-01

    Current cosmological models indicate that the Milky Way's stellar halo was assembled from many smaller systems. On the basis of the apparent absence of the most metal-poor stars in present-day dwarf galaxies, recent studies claimed that the true Galactic building blocks must have been vastly different from the surviving dwarfs. The discovery of an extremely iron-poor star (S1020549) in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy based on a medium-resolution spectrum cast some doubt on this conclusion. Verification of the iron-deficiency, however, and measurements of additional elements, such as the alpha-element Mg, are necessary to demonstrate that the same type of stars produced the metals found in dwarf galaxies and the Galactic halo. Only then can dwarf galaxy stars be conclusively linked to early stellar halo assembly. Here we report high-resolution spectroscopic abundances for 11 elements in S1020549, confirming its iron abundance of less than 1/4,000th that of the Sun, and showing that the overall abundance pattern follows that seen in low-metallicity halo stars, including the alpha-elements. Such chemical similarity indicates that the systems destroyed to form the halo billions of years ago were not fundamentally different from the progenitors of present-day dwarfs, and suggests that the early chemical enrichment of all galaxies may be nearly identical. PMID:20203604

  17. Dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31. I. Variable stars and stellar populations in Andromeda XIX

    SciTech Connect

    Cusano, Felice; Clementini, Gisella; Garofalo, Alessia; Federici, Luciana E-mail: gisella.clementini@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: alessia.garofalo@studio.unibo.it; and others

    2013-12-10

    We present B, V time-series photometry of Andromeda XIX (And XIX), the most extended (half-light radius of 6.'2) of Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal companions, which we observed with the Large Binocular Cameras at the Large Binocular Telescope. We surveyed a 23' × 23' area centered on And XIX and present the deepest color-magnitude diagram (CMD) ever obtained for this galaxy, reaching, at V ∼ 26.3 mag, about one magnitude below the horizontal branch (HB). The CMD shows a prominent and slightly widened red giant branch, along with a predominantly red HB, which extends to the blue to significantly populate the classical instability strip. We have identified 39 pulsating variable stars, of which 31 are of RR Lyrae type and 8 are Anomalous Cepheids (ACs). Twelve of the RR Lyrae variables and three of the ACs are located within And XIX's half light radius. The average period of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars ((P {sub ab}) = 0.62 days, σ = 0.03 days) and the period-amplitude diagram qualify And XIX as an Oosterhoff-Intermediate system. From the average luminosity of the RR Lyrae stars ((V(RR)) = 25.34 mag, σ = 0.10 mag), we determine a distance modulus of (m – M){sub 0} = 24.52 ± 0.23 mag in a scale where the distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is 18.5 ± 0.1 mag. The ACs follow a well-defined Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation that appears to be in very good agreement with the PW relationship defined by the ACs in the LMC.

  18. THE KINEMATICS AND CHEMISTRY OF RED HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS IN THE SAGITTARIUS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W. B.; Chen, Y. Q.; Carrell, K.; Zhao, G. E-mail: cyq@bao.ac.cn E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn

    2012-06-01

    We have selected 556 red horizontal branch stars along the streams of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy from Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 spectroscopic data using a theoretical model. The metallicity and {alpha}-element distributions are investigated for stars in the Sgr streams and for Galactic stars at the same locations. We find that the Sgr stars have two peaks in the metallicity distribution while the Galactic stars have a more prominent metal-poor peak. Meanwhile, [{alpha}/Fe] ratios of the Sgr stars are lower than those of the Galactic stars. Among the Sgr stars, we find a difference in the metallicity distribution between the leading and trailing arms of the Sgr tidal tails. The metallicity and [{alpha}/Fe] distribution of the leading arm is similar to that of the Galaxy. The trailing arm is composed mainly of a metal-rich component and [{alpha}/Fe] is obviously lower than that of the Galactic stars. The metallicity gradient is -(1.8 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} dex deg{sup -1} in the first wrap of the trailing arm and -(1.5 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} dex deg{sup -1} in the first wrap of the leading arm. No significant gradient exists along the second wraps of the leading or trailing arms. It seems that the Sgr dwarf galaxy initially lost the metal-poor component in the second wrap (older) arms due to the tidal force of our Galaxy and then the metal-rich component is disrupted in the first wrap (younger) arms. Finally, we found that the velocity dispersion of the trailing arm from 88 Degree-Sign < {Lambda}{sub Sun} < 112 Degree-Sign is {sigma} = 9.808 {+-} 1.0 km s{sup -1}, which is consistent with previous work in the literature.

  19. Carbon in Red Giants in Globular Clusters and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guo, Michelle; Zhang, Andrew J.; Deng, Michelle; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Lee, Young Sun; Rizzi, Luca

    2015-03-01

    We present carbon abundances of red giants in Milky Way (MW) globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our sample includes measurements of carbon abundances for 154 giants in the clusters NGC 2419, M68, and M15 and 398 giants in the dSphs Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Draco. This sample doubles the number of dSph stars with measurements of [C/Fe]. The [C/Fe] ratio in the clusters decreases with increasing luminosity above log (L/{{L}})≃ 1.6, which can be explained by deep mixing in evolved giants. The same decrease is observed in dSphs, but the initial [C/Fe] of the dSph giants is not uniform. Stars in dSphs at lower metallicities have larger [C/Fe] ratios. We hypothesize that [C/Fe] (corrected to the initial carbon abundance) declines with increasing [Fe/H] due to the metallicity dependence of the carbon yield of asymptotic giant branch stars and due to the increasing importance of SNe Ia at higher metallicities. We also identified 11 very carbon-rich giants (eight previously known) in three dSphs. However, our selection biases preclude a detailed comparison to the carbon-enhanced fraction of the MW stellar halo. Nonetheless, the stars with [C/Fe]\\lt +1 in dSphs follow a different [C/Fe] track with [Fe/H] than the halo stars. Specifically, [C/Fe] in dSphs begins to decline at lower [Fe/H] than in the halo. The difference in the metallicity of the [C/Fe] “knee” adds to the evidence from [α/Fe] distributions that the progenitors of the halo had a shorter timescale for chemical enrichment than the surviving dSphs. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. Probing the Deep End of the Milky Way with Kepler: Asteroseismic Analysis of 854 Faint Red Giants Misclassified as Cool Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Huber, D.; Regulo, C.; Stello, D.; Beck, P. G.; Houmani, K.; Salabert, D.

    2016-08-01

    Asteroseismology has proven to be an excellent tool to determine not only global stellar properties with good precision, but also to infer the stellar structure, dynamics, and evolution for a large sample of Kepler stars. Prior to the launch of the mission, the properties of Kepler targets were inferred from broadband photometry, leading to the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC was later revised in the Kepler Star Properties Catalog, based on literature values and an asteroseismic analysis of stars that were unclassified in the KIC. Here, we present an asteroseismic analysis of 45,400 stars that were classified as dwarfs in the Kepler Star Properties Catalog. We found that around 2% of the sample shows acoustic modes in the typical frequency range that put them in the red-giant category rather than the cool dwarf category. We analyze the asteroseismic properties of these stars, derive their surface gravities, masses, and radii, and present updated effective temperatures and distances. We show that the sample is significantly fainter than the previously known oscillating giants in the Kepler field, with the faintest stars reaching down to a Kepler magnitude of Kp ˜ 16. We demonstrate that 404 stars are at distances beyond 5 kpc and that the stars are significantly less massive than for the original Kepler red-giant sample, consistent with a population of distant halo giants. A comparison with a galactic population model shows that up to 40 stars might be genuine halo giants, which would increase the number of known asteroseismic halo stars by a factor of 4. The detections presented here will provide a valuable sample for galactic archeology studies.

  1. PROTOPLANETARY DISK MASSES FROM STARS TO BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Mortlock, Daniel; Greaves, Jane; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel; Scholz, Aleks; Thompson, Mark; Lodato, Giuseppe; Looper, Dagny

    2013-08-20

    We present SCUBA-2 850 {mu}m observations of seven very low mass stars (VLMS) and brown dwarfs (BDs). Three are in Taurus and four in the TW Hydrae Association (TWA), and all are classical T Tauri (cTT) analogs. We detect two of the three Taurus disks (one only marginally), but none of the TWA ones. For standard grains in cTT disks, our 3{sigma} limits correspond to a dust mass of 1.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} in Taurus and a mere 0.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} in the TWA (3-10 Multiplication-Sign deeper than previous work). We combine our data with other submillimeter/millimeter (sub-mm/mm) surveys of Taurus, {rho} Oph, and the TWA to investigate the trends in disk mass and grain growth during the cTT phase. Assuming a gas-to-dust mass ratio of 100:1 and fiducial surface density and temperature profiles guided by current data, we find the following. (1) The minimum disk outer radius required to explain the upper envelope of sub-mm/mm fluxes is {approx}100 AU for intermediate-mass stars, solar types, and VLMS, and {approx}20 AU for BDs. (2) While the upper envelope of apparent disk masses increases with M{sub *} from BDs to VLMS to solar-type stars, no such increase is observed from solar-type to intermediate-mass stars. We propose this is due to enhanced photoevaporation around intermediate stellar masses. (3) Many of the disks around Taurus and {rho} Oph intermediate-mass and solar-type stars evince an opacity index of {beta} {approx} 0-1, indicating significant grain growth. Of the only four VLMS/BDs in these regions with multi-wavelength measurements, three are consistent with considerable grain growth, though optically thick disks are not ruled out. (4) For the TWA VLMS (TWA 30A and B), combining our 850 {mu}m fluxes with the known accretion rates and ages suggests substantial grain growth by 10 Myr, comparable to that in the previously studied TWA cTTs Hen 3-600A and TW Hya. The degree of grain growth in the TWA BDs (2M1207A and SSPM1102) remains largely unknown. (5) A

  2. Suppression of cooling by strong magnetic fields in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Valyavin, G; Shulyak, D; Wade, G A; Antonyuk, K; Zharikov, S V; Galazutdinov, G A; Plachinda, S; Bagnulo, S; Machado, L Fox; Alvarez, M; Clark, D M; Lopez, J M; Hiriart, D; Han, Inwoo; Jeon, Young-Beom; Zurita, C; Mujica, R; Burlakova, T; Szeifert, T; Burenkov, A

    2014-11-01

    Isolated cool white dwarf stars more often have strong magnetic fields than young, hotter white dwarfs, which has been a puzzle because magnetic fields are expected to decay with time but a cool surface suggests that the star is old. In addition, some white dwarfs with strong fields vary in brightness as they rotate, which has been variously attributed to surface brightness inhomogeneities similar to sunspots, chemical inhomogeneities and other magneto-optical effects. Here we describe optical observations of the brightness and magnetic field of the cool white dwarf WD 1953-011 taken over about eight years, and the results of an analysis of its surface temperature and magnetic field distribution. We find that the magnetic field suppresses atmospheric convection, leading to dark spots in the most magnetized areas. We also find that strong fields are sufficient to suppress convection over the entire surface in cool magnetic white dwarfs, which inhibits their cooling evolution relative to weakly magnetic and non-magnetic white dwarfs, making them appear younger than they truly are. This explains the long-standing mystery of why magnetic fields are more common amongst cool white dwarfs, and implies that the currently accepted ages of strongly magnetic white dwarfs are systematically too young. PMID:25327247

  3. First Metallicty Distribution From CaT Spectroscopy of RGB Stars in the Dwarf Irregular Galaxy WLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaman, Ryan; Cole, A.; Venn, K.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M.; Szeifert, T.

    2007-07-01

    A metallicity distribution for the central bar region of the dwarf irregular galaxy WLM is presented from VLT FORS2 spectra of 46 red giant stars, as well as radial velocities for the member stars in this field. The [Fe/H] values were derived using the near infrared Ca II triplet lines as a tracer of metallicity (see Grocholski et al. 2006, Rutledge et al. 1997) and is conformed to a metallicity scale with the aid of four calibrating globular clusters. Although limited by small number statistics in this preliminary release, the ability to study the metallicitiy with respect to velocity and physical location of the member stars is invaluable in helping to characterize the formation and enrichment history of these kind of stellar populations - as has been found from CaT analysis of RGB stars in the Sculptor and Fornax galaxies. (Tolstoy et al. 2004, Battaglia et al. 2006) Specifically, the metallicty distribution for the WLM stellar population(s) can be tied to the recent HST star formation history study (Dolphin, 2000) which places estimates on the frequency and duration of star formation episodes in WLM. The isolated nature of WLM allows a unique opportunity to analyze the enrichment and star formation history of a low luminosity stellar population, which presumably has had a less complicated evolution due to minimal local group interactions. Research for this study was funded in part by NSERC Discovery Grant Program #327292-06.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lowell GR* red stars (Giclas+ 1972-1978)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giclas, H. L.; Burnham, R.; Thomas, N. G.

    2009-10-01

    This file shows accurate coordinates for the ~500 red stars found by Giclas et al. near the south galactic pole. This was part of a general survey of large proper motion stars. In 2002 August I sent Gerard Jasniewicz corrections for the first batch of 47 stars, mainly just to see for myself what sorts of stars are involved. These 47 stars were observed photoelectrically by Warren (1976MNRAS.176..667W), who obtained UBV photometry. Although every star was a dwarf, they were not extraordinarily red, but merely garden-variety late-K and early-M dwarfs. Gerard corrected all those entries in SIMBAD, and the UBV data are linked. I have now gone through the entire list and show improved positions below. For most stars UCAC3 positions were adopted. In this part of the sky UCAC3 draws from both the Schmidt plate-scans and the Yale SPM series as well as the UCAC astrograph series. The multiple epochs mean the positions and proper motions for the fainter stars are usually the best ones. There are still a few where the motion is forced to zero or is blank, and UCAC2, 2MASS, or other source is used, as specified in the column 's' following the position. I show V magnitudes for all the stars. For stars brighter than between V = 14.5 and 15.0, the ASAS-3 is preferred. For the fainter stars this is merely average of the GSC-2.3 blue and red magnitudes. Where there is overlap, the naive b+r/2 from the Schmidt plates matches ASAS-3 to within 0.1 mag usually, and only sometimes differs by as much as 0.3 mag. Stars with motion >0".15/year are flagged 'lg pm' (large proper motion). In identifying the stars, I also found a substantial number of common-motion pairs, which have all been sent to Brian Mason (USNO) for possible inclusion in the WDS. I noticed a few stars whose 2MASS J-K colors are >0.9mag; these must be late-K/early-M giants --- interesting in themselves, since at Vmag 15 they are ~10 kpc out in the halo. Those I noticed are flagged in the remarks, but there could be more

  5. Detection of a white dwarf companion to the Hyades stars HD 27483

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1993-01-01

    We observed with IUE a white dwarf (WD) companion to the Hyades F6 V binary stars HD 27483. This system is known to be a close binary of two nearly equal stars with an orbital period of 3.05 days. Our IUE observations revealed the presence of a third star, a white dwarf with an effective temperature of 23,000 +/- 1000 K and a mass of approximately 0.6 solar mass. Its presence in the Hyades cluster with a known age permits me to derive the mass of its progenitor, which must have been about 2.3 solar masses. The presence of the white dwarf in a binary system opens the possibility that some of the envelope material, which was expelled by the WD progenitor, may have been collected by the F6 stars. We may thus be able to study abundance anomalies of the WD progenitor with known mass on the surface of the F6 companions.

  6. Investigating coronal saturation and supersaturation in fast-rotating M-dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, R. D.; Jackson, R. J.; Briggs, K. R.; Evans, P. A.; Pye, J. P.

    2011-03-01

    At fast rotation rates, the coronal activity of G- and K-type stars has been observed to 'saturate' and then decline again at even faster rotation rates - a phenomenon dubbed 'supersaturation'. In this paper, we investigate coronal activity in fast-rotating M-dwarfs using deep XMM-Newton observations of 97 low-mass stars of known rotation period in the young open cluster NGC 2547 and combine these with published X-ray surveys of low-mass field and cluster stars of known rotation period. Like G- and K-dwarfs, we find that M-dwarfs exhibit increasing coronal activity with decreasing Rossby number NR, the ratio of period to convective turnover time, and that activity saturates at LX/Lbol≃ 10-3 for log NR < -0.8. However, supersaturation is not convincingly displayed by M-dwarfs, despite the presence of many objects in our sample with log NR < -1.8, where supersaturation is observed to occur in higher mass stars. Instead, it appears that a short rotation period is the primary predictor of supersaturation; P ≤ 0.3 d for K-dwarfs and perhaps P ≤ 0.2 d for M-dwarfs. These observations favour the 'centrifugal stripping' model for supersaturation, where coronal structures are forced open or become radiatively unstable as the Keplerian corotation radius moves inside the X-ray-emitting coronal volume.

  7. Fundmental Parameters of Low-Mass Stars, Brown Dwarfs, and Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montet, Benjamin; Johnson, John A.; Bowler, Brendan; Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in evolutionary models of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, these models remain poorly constrained by observations. In order to test these predictions directly, masses of individual stars must be measured and combined with broadband photometry and medium-resolution spectroscopy to probe stellar atmospheres. I will present results from an astrometric and spectroscopic survey of low-mass pre-main sequence binary stars to measure individual dynamical masses and compare to model predictions. This is the first systematic test of a large number of stellar systems of intermediate age between young star-forming regions and old field stars. Stars in our sample are members of the Tuc-Hor, AB Doradus, and beta Pictoris moving groups, the last of which includes GJ 3305 AB, the wide binary companion to the imaged exoplanet host 51 Eri. I will also present results of Spitzer observations of secondary eclipses of LHS 6343 C, a T dwarf transiting one member of an M+M binary in the Kepler field. By combining these data with Kepler photometry and radial velocity observations, we can measure the luminosity, mass, and radius of the brown dwarf. This is the first non-inflated brown dwarf for which all three of these parameters have been measured, providing the first benchmark to test model predictions of the masses and radii of field T dwarfs. I will discuss these results in the context of K2 and TESS, which will find additional benchmark transiting brown dwarfs over the course of their missions, including a description of the first planet catalog developed from K2 data and a program to search for transiting planets around mid-M dwarfs.

  8. Alignment of Red-Sequence Cluster Dwarf Galaxies: From the Frontier Fields to the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhouse, Wayne Alan; Archer, Haylee; Burgad, Jaford; Foote, Gregory; Rude, Cody; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest virialized structures in the universe. Due to their high density and mass, they are an excellent laboratory for studying the environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Numerical simulations have predicted that tidal torques acting on dwarf galaxies as they fall into the cluster environment will cause the major axis of the galaxies to align with their radial position vector (a line that extends from the cluster center to the galaxy's center). We have undertaken a study to measure the redshift evolution of the alignment of red-sequence cluster dwarf galaxies based on a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters imaged at KPNO using the 0.9-meter telescope, and 64 clusters from the WINGS dataset. To supplement our low-redshift sample, we have included galaxies selected from the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier fields. Leveraging the HST data allows us to look for evolutionary changes in the alignment of red-sequence cluster dwarf galaxies over a redshift range of 0 < z < 0.35. The alignment of the major axis of the dwarf galaxies is measured by fitting a Sersic function to each red-sequence galaxy using GALFIT. The quality of each model is checked visually after subtracting the model from the galaxy. The cluster sample is then combined by scaling each cluster by r200. We present our preliminary results based on the alignment of the red-sequence dwarf galaxies with: 1) the major axis of the brightest cluster galaxy, 2) the major axis of the cluster defined by the position of cluster members, and 3) a radius vector pointing from the cluster center to individual dwarf galaxies. Our combined cluster sample is sub-divided into different radial regions and redshift bins.

  9. On the age of Galactic bulge microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, G.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Recent results by Bensby and collaborators on the ages of microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars in the Galactic bulge have challenged the picture of an exclusively old stellar population, because ages significantly younger than 9 Gyr have been found. Aims: However, these age estimates have not been independently confirmed with different techniques and theoretical stellar models. One of the aims of this paper is to verify these results by means of a grid-based method. We also quantify the systematic biases that might be induced by some assumptions adopted to compute stellar models. In particular, we explore the impact of increasing the initial helium abundance, neglecting the element microscopic diffusion, and changing the mixing-length calibration in theoretical stellar track computations. Methods: We adopt the SCEPtER pipeline with a newly computed stellar model grid for metallicities [Fe/H] from - 2.00 dex to 0.55 dex, and masses in the range [0.60; 1.60] M⊙ from the zero-age main sequence to the helium flash at the red giant branch tip. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we show for the considered evolutionary phases that our technique provides unbiased age estimates. Results: Our age results are in good agreement with Bensby and collaborators findings and show 16 stars younger than 5 Gyr and 28 younger than 9 Gyr over a sample of 58. The effect of a helium enhancement as large as ΔY/ ΔZ = 5 is quite modest, resulting in a mean age increase of metal rich stars of 0.6 Gyr. Even simultaneously adopting a high helium content and the upper values of age estimates, there is evidence of 4 stars younger than 5 Gyr and 15 younger than 9 Gyr. For stars younger than 5 Gyr, the use of stellar models computed by neglecting microscopic diffusion or by assuming a super-solar mixing-length value leads to a mean increase in the age estimates of about 0.4 Gyr and 0.5 Gyr respectively. Even considering the upper values for the age estimates, there are four stars

  10. LIMITS ON UNRESOLVED PLANETARY COMPANIONS TO WHITE DWARF REMNANTS OF 14 INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, Mukremin; Gould, Andrew; Koester, Detlev

    2009-11-10

    We present Spitzer IRAC photometry of white dwarf remnants of 14 stars with M = 3-5 M{sub sun}. We do not detect mid-infrared excess around any of our targets. By demanding a 3sigma photometric excess at 4.5 mum for unresolved companions, we rule out planetary mass companions down to 5, 7, or 10 M {sub J} for 13 of our targets based on the Burrows et al. substellar cooling models. Combined with previous IRAC observations of white dwarf remnants of intermediate-mass stars, we rule out >=10M {sub J} companions around 40 white dwarfs and >=5M {sub J} companions around 10 white dwarfs.

  11. A Population Study of Wide-Separation Brown Dwarf Companions to Main Sequence Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Increased interest in infrared astronomy has opened the frontier to study cooler objects that shed significant light on the formation of planetary systems. Brown dwarf research provides a wealth of information useful for sorting through a myriad of proposed formation theories. Our study combines observational data from 2MASS with rigorous computer simulations to estimate the true population of long-range (greater than 1000 AU) brown dwarf companions in the solar neighborhood (less than 25 pc from Earth). Expanding on Gizis et al. (2001), we have found the margin of error in previous estimates to be significantly underestimated after we included orbit eccentricity, longitude of pericenter, angle of inclination, field star density, and primary and secondary luminosities as parameters influencing the companion systems in observational studies. We apply our simulation results to current L- and T-dwarf catalogs to provide updated estimates on the frequency of wide-separation brown dwarf companions to main sequence stars.

  12. Star formation in blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuram, Ramya

    I present the optical photometry, spectroscopy using HCT of Blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. The BCDs are observed through UBVRI filters. The colour-colour diagram (CCD) of U-B vs V-I and U-B vs B-V are created from integrated magnitudes. We have for the first time employed the mixed population technique using CCDs to find out ages of the underlying population intermixed with the starburst regions. A combination of few Gyr population, few hundred million years population and an young burst of age 5-15 Myr is detected for most of these galaxies. The structure of BCDs is a smooth background of low surface brightness (LSB) old stellar population and intermixed with the clumps of H II regions. The spectra of BCDs are typical H II region kind of spectra. The electron densities are < 100 cm^{-3} and temperatures are in the range 6000-15000 K. The oxygen abundance is calculated using the standard bright line methods. The oxygen abundance (log[O/H] + 12) of the sample of BCDs varies from as low as 7.9 to as high as 8.5. So these galaxies are (1/5 - 1/2.5) times metal poor when compared to solar. The BCDs are observed through H_α filters installed in the HFOSC system. The H_α fluxes and luminosities are used to calculate star formation rates (SFR) that are in the range 0.01 to 0.1 M_⊙/yr for individual H II regions and ranges between 0.1 to 1.0 M_⊙/yr for the whole galaxy. The archival data from 2MASS is used to obtain the integrated colour-colour diagrams of (J-H) vs (V-K). NIR colours are less affected by reddening and are better signatures of old stellar population. The results are compared with optical CCD, the interesting dichotomy are presented.

  13. Mapping the Abyss: A Breakthrough in Mass Determinations for Stars and Brown Dwarfs using HST and RECONS Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevrinsky, Raymond Andrew; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; RECONS Team

    2016-01-01

    We present astrometric results for 7 close binary systems from the ongoing RECONS (REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars, www.recons.org) astrometry program on the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m telescope. The systems consist of red and brown dwarf components with masses of 0.05-0.30solar masses that straddle the transition region between stars and substellar objects. We report trigonometric parallaxes with errors less than 3 milliarcseconds that place the objects at distances between 10 and 33 parsecs.Measurements of the long-term perturbations in the systems' photocenters over 5-13 years allows us to derive orbital periods that are on the order of one decade for all seven systems. Followup analysis is underway using measurements from HST-WFC3 to measure the optical fluxes, separations, and position angles of the individual components in these systems. These new resolved astrometric data, coupled with the long-term ground-based work, will be used to convert the photocentric orbits into relative orbits to provide critical mass ratios and mass measurements for both components in each system. The 14 carefully characterized objects will comprise a fundamental set of standards that will stress-test theoretical models of the smallest stars and brown dwarfs for years to come. The results will be combined with our previous mass-luminosity relation work for stars with masses 0.08-0.60 Msun to extend our understanding into the realm of brown dwarfs. We will then have a detailed map covering a factor of more than 10 in mass for the most common objects in the Galaxy.This effort has been supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402, AST-1109445, and AST-1412026, STScI grant HST-GO-13724.001-A, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  14. Brown dwarfs: At last filling the gap between stars and planets

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, Ben

    2000-01-01

    Until the mid-1990s a person could not point to any celestial object and say with assurance that “here is a brown dwarf.” Now dozens are known, and the study of brown dwarfs has come of age, touching upon major issues in astrophysics, including the nature of dark matter, the properties of substellar objects, and the origin of binary stars and planetary systems. PMID:10655468

  15. The Rose-red Glow of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    The vivid red cloud in this new image from ESO's Very Large Telescope is a region of glowing hydrogen surrounding the star cluster NGC 371. This stellar nursery lies in our neighbouring galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud. The object dominating this image may resemble a pool of spilled blood, but rather than being associated with death, such regions of ionised hydrogen - known as HII regions - are sites of creation with high rates of recent star birth. NGC 371 is an example of this; it is an open cluster surrounded by a nebula. The stars in open clusters all originate from the same diffuse HII region, and over time the majority of the hydrogen is used up by star formation, leaving behind a shell of hydrogen such as the one in this image, along with a cluster of hot young stars. The host galaxy to NGC 371, the Small Magellanic Cloud, is a dwarf galaxy a mere 200 000 light-years away, which makes it one of the closest galaxies to the Milky Way. In addition, the Small Magellanic Cloud contains stars at all stages of their evolution; from the highly luminous young stars found in NGC 371 to supernova remnants of dead stars. These energetic youngsters emit copious amounts of ultraviolet radiation causing surrounding gas, such as leftover hydrogen from their parent nebula, to light up with a colourful glow that extends for hundreds of light-years in every direction. The phenomenon is depicted beautifully in this image, taken using the FORS1 instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). Open clusters are by no means rare; there are numerous fine examples in our own Milky Way. However, NGC 371 is of particular interest due to the unexpectedly large number of variable stars it contains. These are stars that change in brightness over time. A particularly interesting type of variable star, known as slowly pulsating B stars, can also be used to study the interior of stars through asteroseismology [1], and several of these have been confirmed in this cluster. Variable stars

  16. Episodic Model For Star Formation History and Chemical Abundances in Giant and Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debsarma, Suma; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Das, Sukanta; Pfenniger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    In search for a synthetic understanding, a scenario for the evolution of the star formation rate and the chemical abundances in galaxies is proposed, combining gas infall from galactic halos, outflow of gas by supernova explosions, and an oscillatory star formation process. The oscillatory star formation model is a consequence of the modelling of the fractional masses changes of the hot, warm and cold components of the interstellar medium. The observed periods of oscillation vary in the range (0.1 - 3.0) × 107 yr depending on various parameters existing from giant to dwarf galaxies. The evolution of metallicity varies in giant and dwarf galaxies and depends on the outflow process. Observed abundances in dwarf galaxies can be reproduced under fast outflow together with slow evaporation of cold gases into hot gas whereas slow outflow and fast evaporation is preferred for giant galaxies. The variation of metallicities in dwarf galaxies supports the fact that low rate of SNII production in dwarf galaxies is responsible for variation in metallicity in dwarf galaxies of similar masses as suggested by various authors.

  17. Binary-binary collisions involving main-sequence stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars in globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, P.J.T.; Davies, M.B.

    1993-12-31

    We consider collisions between dynamically-evolved primordial binaries consisting of main-sequence stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars in globular clusters. In our four-body binary-binary scattering experiments, we allow stars to ``stick`` if they pass close enough to each other, which leads to the formation of a wide variety of exotic objects. Most of these objects have binary companions. Also, relatively clean exchange interactions can produce binaries containing neutron stars that eventually receive material from their companions. Such systems will be observable as X-ray binaries.

  18. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVIII. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in a cluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S. C.; Hughes, T. M.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Pappalardo, C.; Pierini, D.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Vlahakis, C.

    2015-02-01

    To assess the effects of the cluster environment on the different components of the interstellar medium, we analyse the far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) properties of a sample of star-forming dwarf galaxies detected by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We determine dust masses and dust temperatures by fitting a modified black body function to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Stellar and gas masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and metallicities are obtained from the analysis of a set of ancillary data. Dust is detected in 49 out of a total 140 optically identified dwarfs covered by the HeViCS field; considering only dwarfs brighter than mB = 18 mag, this gives a detection rate of 43%. After evaluating different emissivity indices, we find that the FIR-submm SEDs are best-fit by β = 1.5, with a median dust temperature Td = 22.4 K. Assuming β = 1.5, 67% of the 23 galaxies detected in all five Herschel bands show emission at 500 μm in excess of the modified black-body model. The fraction of galaxies with a submillimetre excess decreases for lower values of β, while a similarly high fraction (54%) is found if a β-free SED modelling is applied. The excess is inversely correlated with SFR and stellar masses. To study the variations in the global properties of our sample that come from environmental effects, we compare the Virgo dwarfs to other Herschel surveys,such as the Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH), the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), and the HeViCS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (BGC). We explore the relations between stellar mass and Hi fraction, specific star formation rate, dust fraction, gas-to-dust ratio over a wide range of stellar masses (from 107 to 1011 M⊙) for both dwarfs and spirals. Highly Hi-deficient Virgo dwarf galaxies are mostly characterised by quenched star formation activity and lower dust fractions giving hints for dust stripping in cluster dwarfs. However, to explain the

  19. Evidence for extended chromospheres surrounding red giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence and theoretical arguments are summarized which indicate that regions of partially ionized hydrogen extending several stellar radii are an important feature of red giant and supergiant stars. The implications of the existence of extended chromospheres are examined in terms of the nature of the other atmospheres of, and mass loss from cool stars.

  20. Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology database for stars in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, T.; Hidaka, J.; Ishigaki, M.; Katsuta, Y.; Yamada, S.; Komiya, Y.; Fujimoto, M. Y.; Aoki, W.

    We present a new database for observed stars in dwarf galaxies in the local group. This is an extension of the Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) database (Suda et al. 2008, PASJ, 60, 1159) that deals with metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The main features of the new database are the same as the database for Galactic halo stars. Users can access and select data based on various criteria, and then inspect the selected data on a diagram with user-specified axes. The database includes more than two hundred stars based on high-resolution spectra for 20 galaxies, while the number of data is more than five thousand by including the data with medium-resolution spectra. We briefly discuss the characteristics of stars in dwarf galaxies using the database.

  1. Chemistry of Stars in the Sculptor Dwarf Galaxy from VLT-FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Hill, V.

    The chemical composition of 91 stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is presented as determined from spectra taken with the FLAMES multiobject spectrograph in the Medusa mode. The analysis methods are outlined. The [α/Fe] ratios are shown for Mg, Ca, and Ti, and compared with those of Galactic stars. Heavy element abundance ratios (Y, Ba, and Eu) are also presented. Since the Sculptor dwarf galaxy has had a significantly different star formation history and chemical evolution than the Galaxy, then comparison of Sculptor's metal-poor (old) stars to similar metallicity stars in the Galaxy can be used to discuss galaxy formation scenarios, as well as test some of our fundamental assumptions in stellar nucleosynthesis.

  2. Discovery of true, likely and possible symbiotic stars in the dwarf spheroidal NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Denise R.; Magrini, Laura; de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; Akras, Stavros

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the photometric and spectroscopic observations of newly discovered (symbiotic) systems in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy NGC 205. The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on-off band [O III] 5007 Å emission imaging highlighted several [O III] line emitters, for which optical spectra were then obtained. The detailed study of the spectra of three objects allows us to identify them as true, likely and possible symbiotic systems (SySts), the first ones discovered in this galaxy. SySt-1 is unambiguously classified as a symbiotic star, because of the presence of unique emission lines which belong only to symbiotic spectra, the well-known O VI Raman-scattered lines. SySt-2 is only possibly a SySt because the Ne VII Raman-scattered line at 4881 Å, recently identified in a well-studied Galactic symbiotic as another very conspicuous property of symbiotic, could as well be identified as N III or [Fe III]. Finally, SySt-3 is likely a symbiotic binary because in the red part of the spectrum it shows the continuum of a late giant, and forbidden lines of moderate to high ionization, like [Fe V] 4180 Å. The main source for scepticism on the symbiotic nature of the latter systems is their location in the planetary nebula region in the [O III]4363/Hγ versus [O III]5007/Hβ diagnostic diagram. It is worth mentioning that at least another two confirmed symbiotics, one of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal IC 10 and the other of the Galaxy, are also misplaced in this diagram.

  3. The influence of H2O line blanketing on the spectra of cool dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, F.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Miller, S.; Tennyson, J.

    1994-01-01

    We present our initial results of model atmosphere calculations for cool M dwarfs using an opacity sampling method and a new list of H2O lines. We obtain significantly improved fits to the infrared spectrum of the M dwarf VB10 when compared to earlier models. H2O is by far the dominant opacity source in cool stars. To illustrate this, we show the Rosseland mean of the total extinction under various assumptions. Our calculations demonstrate the importance of a good treatment of the water opacities in cool stars and the improvements possible by using up-to-date data for the water line absorption.

  4. A PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY SURVEY OF FIELD K AND M DWARF STARS WITH HATNet

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Sipocz, B.; Pal, A.; Kovacs, G.; Mazeh, T.; Shporer, A.

    2011-05-15

    Using light curves from the HATNet survey for transiting extrasolar planets we investigate the optical broadband photometric variability of a sample of 27, 560 field K and M dwarfs selected by color and proper motion (V - K {approx}> 3.0, {mu} > 30 mas yr{sup -1}, plus additional cuts in J - H versus H - K{sub S} and on the reduced proper motion). We search the light curves for periodic variations and for large-amplitude, long-duration flare events. A total of 2120 stars exhibit potential variability, including 95 stars with eclipses and 60 stars with flares. Based on a visual inspection of these light curves and an automated blending classification, we select 1568 stars, including 78 eclipsing binaries (EBs), as secure variable star detections that are not obvious blends. We estimate that a further {approx}26% of these stars may be blends with fainter variables, though most of these blends are likely to be among the hotter stars in our sample. We find that only 38 of the 1568 stars, including five of the EBs, have previously been identified as variables or are blended with previously identified variables. One of the newly identified EBs is 1RXS J154727.5+450803, a known P = 3.55 day, late M-dwarf SB2 system, for which we derive preliminary estimates for the component masses and radii of M{sub 1} = M{sub 2} = 0.258 {+-} 0.008 M{sub sun} and R{sub 1} = R{sub 2} = 0.289 {+-} 0.007 R{sub sun}. The radii of the component stars are larger than theoretical expectations if the system is older than {approx}200 Myr. The majority of the variables are heavily spotted BY Dra-type stars for which we determine rotation periods. Using this sample, we investigate the relations between period, color, age, and activity measures, including optical flaring, for K and M dwarfs, finding that many of the well-established relations for F, G, and K dwarfs continue into the M dwarf regime. We find that the fraction of stars that is variable with peak-to-peak amplitudes greater than 0.01 mag

  5. A Photometric Variability Survey of Field K and M Dwarf Stars with HATNet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Noyes, R. W.; Sipőcz, B.; Kovács, G.; Mazeh, T.; Shporer, A.; Pál, A.

    2011-05-01

    Using light curves from the HATNet survey for transiting extrasolar planets we investigate the optical broadband photometric variability of a sample of 27, 560 field K and M dwarfs selected by color and proper motion (V - K >~ 3.0, μ > 30 mas yr-1, plus additional cuts in J - H versus H - KS and on the reduced proper motion). We search the light curves for periodic variations and for large-amplitude, long-duration flare events. A total of 2120 stars exhibit potential variability, including 95 stars with eclipses and 60 stars with flares. Based on a visual inspection of these light curves and an automated blending classification, we select 1568 stars, including 78 eclipsing binaries (EBs), as secure variable star detections that are not obvious blends. We estimate that a further ~26% of these stars may be blends with fainter variables, though most of these blends are likely to be among the hotter stars in our sample. We find that only 38 of the 1568 stars, including five of the EBs, have previously been identified as variables or are blended with previously identified variables. One of the newly identified EBs is 1RXS J154727.5+450803, a known P = 3.55 day, late M-dwarf SB2 system, for which we derive preliminary estimates for the component masses and radii of M 1 = M 2 = 0.258 ± 0.008 M sun and R 1 = R 2 = 0.289 ± 0.007 R sun. The radii of the component stars are larger than theoretical expectations if the system is older than ~200 Myr. The majority of the variables are heavily spotted BY Dra-type stars for which we determine rotation periods. Using this sample, we investigate the relations between period, color, age, and activity measures, including optical flaring, for K and M dwarfs, finding that many of the well-established relations for F, G, and K dwarfs continue into the M dwarf regime. We find that the fraction of stars that is variable with peak-to-peak amplitudes greater than 0.01 mag increases exponentially with the V - KS color such that

  6. Dark influences II. Gas and star formation in minor mergers of dwarf galaxies with dark satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, T. K.; Helmi, A.; Sales, L. V.

    2016-03-01

    Context. It has been proposed that mergers induce starbursts and lead to important morphological changes in galaxies. Most studies so far have focused on large galaxies, but dwarfs might also experience such events, since the halo mass function is scale-free in the concordance cosmological model. Notably, because of their low mass, most of their interactions will be with dark satellites. Aims: In this paper we follow the evolution of gas-rich disky dwarf galaxies as they experience a minor merger with a dark satellite. We aim to characterize the effects of such an interaction on the dwarf's star formation, morphology, and kinematical properties. Methods: We performed a suite of carefully set-up hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxies that include dark matter, gas, and stars merging with a satellite consisting solely of dark matter. For the host system we vary the gas fraction, disk size and thickness, halo mass, and concentration, while we explore different masses, concentrations, and orbits for the satellite. Results: We find that the interactions cause strong starbursts of both short and long duration in the dwarfs. Their star formation rates increase by factors of a few to 10 or more. They are strongest for systems with extended gas disks and high gas fractions merging with a high-concentration satellite on a planar, radial orbit. In contrast to analogous simulations of Milky Way-mass galaxies, many of the systems experience strong morphological changes and become spheroidal even in the presence of significant amounts of gas. Conclusions: The simulated systems compare remarkably well with the observational properties of a large selection of irregular dwarf galaxies and blue compact dwarfs. This implies that mergers with dark satellites might well be happening but not be fully evident, and may thus play a role in the diversity of the dwarf galaxy population.

  7. Temperate Earth-sized planets transiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star.

    PubMed

    Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Lederer, Susan M; Delrez, Laetitia; de Wit, Julien; Burdanov, Artem; Van Grootel, Valérie; Burgasser, Adam J; Triaud, Amaury H M J; Opitom, Cyrielle; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Sahu, Devendra K; Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella; Magain, Pierre; Queloz, Didier

    2016-05-12

    Star-like objects with effective temperatures of less than 2,700 kelvin are referred to as 'ultracool dwarfs'. This heterogeneous group includes stars of extremely low mass as well as brown dwarfs (substellar objects not massive enough to sustain hydrogen fusion), and represents about 15 per cent of the population of astronomical objects near the Sun. Core-accretion theory predicts that, given the small masses of these ultracool dwarfs, and the small sizes of their protoplanetary disks, there should be a large but hitherto undetected population of terrestrial planets orbiting them--ranging from metal-rich Mercury-sized planets to more hospitable volatile-rich Earth-sized planets. Here we report observations of three short-period Earth-sized planets transiting an ultracool dwarf star only 12 parsecs away. The inner two planets receive four times and two times the irradiation of Earth, respectively, placing them close to the inner edge of the habitable zone of the star. Our data suggest that 11 orbits remain possible for the third planet, the most likely resulting in irradiation significantly less than that received by Earth. The infrared brightness of the host star, combined with its Jupiter-like size, offers the possibility of thoroughly characterizing the components of this nearby planetary system. PMID:27135924

  8. Detection of the white dwarf and the secondary star in the new SU UMa dwarf nova HS 2219+1824

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Hagen, H.-J.; Marsh, T. R.; Harlaftis, E. T.; Kitsionas, S.; Engels, D.

    2005-02-01

    We report the discovery of a new, non-eclipsing SU UMa-type dwarf nova, HS 2219+1824. Photometry obtained in quiescence (V≈17.5) reveals a double-humped light curve from which we derive an orbital period of ≃86.2 min. Additional photometry obtained during a superoutburst reaching V≃12.0 clearly shows superhumps with a period of ≃89.05 min. The optical spectrum contains double-peaked Balmer and He I emission lines from the accretion disc as well as broad absorption troughs of Hβ, Hγ, and Hδ from the white dwarf primary star. Modelling of the optical spectrum implies a white dwarf temperature of 13 000 K⪉Teff⪉17 000 K, a distance of 180 pc⪉ d⪉230 pc, and suggests that the spectral type of the donor star is later than M 5. Phase-resolved spectroscopy obtained during quiescence reveals a narrow Hα emission line component which has a radial velocity amplitude and phase consistent with an origin on the secondary star, possibly on the irradiated hemisphere facing the white dwarf. This constitutes the first detection of line emission from the secondary star in a quiescent SU UMa star. Based in part on observations obtained at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg, jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy; on observations made with the IAC80 and OGS telescopes, operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the European Space Agency (ESA), respectively, in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide of the IAC; on observations made at the 1.2 m telescope, located at Kryoneri Korinthias, and owned by the National Observatory of Athens, Greece; and on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope, which is operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the IAC.

  9. Three Red Variable Stars in SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinger, Kyle; Lutz, Julie H.

    2016-06-01

    We examined light curves of stars with g-r values greater than 0.6 in the LSST project's re-reduction of the SDSS Stripe 82 photometric data. A few stars have interesting light curves in which we chose for spectroscopic follow-up with DIS on the Apache Point 3.5-m telescope. In this poster we will report our findings on three of the most interesting red variable stars. One of the stars (GI Cet) has a period of 219.86 days, as determined from the Stripe 82 light curve. Spectra of GI Ceti taken at 3 epochs will be discussed. A second variable, TY Aqr, does not have a period. We will present the light curve and spectra taken in 2013 and 2014. The third variable is very red and a-periodic. The spectrum obtained in 2013 is that of a carbon star.

  10. ANCIENT PLANETARY SYSTEMS ARE ORBITING A LARGE FRACTION OF WHITE DWARF STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.; Melis, C.; Klein, B.; Jura, M.; Koester, D. E-mail: cmelis@ucsd.ed E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.ed

    2010-10-10

    Infrared studies have revealed debris likely related to planet formation in orbit around {approx}30% of youthful, intermediate mass, main-sequence stars. We present evidence, based on atmospheric pollution by various elements heavier than helium, that a comparable fraction of the white dwarf descendants of such main-sequence stars are orbited by planetary systems. These systems have survived, at least in part, through all stages of stellar evolution that precede the white dwarf. During the time interval ({approx}200 million years) that a typical polluted white dwarf in our sample has been cooling it has accreted from its planetary system the mass of one of the largest asteroids in our solar system (e.g., Vesta or Ceres). Usually, this accreted mass will be only a fraction of the total mass of rocky material that orbits these white dwarfs; for plausible planetary system configurations we estimate that this total mass is likely to be at least equal to that of the Sun's asteroid belt, and perhaps much larger. We report abundances of a suite of eight elements detected in the little studied star G241-6 that we find to be among the most heavily polluted of all moderately bright white dwarfs.