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Sample records for red galactic agb

  1. Galactic Sodium from AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Gibson, B. K.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2007-11-01

    Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models which include sodium from type II supernovae (SNe) alone underestimate the abundance of sodium in the interstellar medium by a factor of 2 to 3 over about 3 ridex in metallicity and predict a flat behavior in the evolution of riNafe at super-solar metallicities. Conversely, recent observations of stars with rifeh ˜ +0.4 suggest that riNafe increases at high metallicity. We have combined stellar evolution models of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with the latest SN yields in an attempt to resolve these problems dots and have created many more.

  2. Rb and Zr abundances in massive Galactic AGB stars revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mesa, V.; Zamora, O.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Plez, B.; Manchado, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Lugaro, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report new abundances of Rb and Zr in a sample of massive Galactic asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars that were previously studied with hydrostatic models by using more realistic dynamical model atmospheres. We use a modified version of the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum, and consider the presence of a circumstellar envelope and a radial wind in the modelling of these Galactic AGB stars. The Rb and Zr are determined from the 7800 Å Rb I resonant line and the 6474 Å ZrO bandhead, respectively, and they are compared with the AGB nucleosynthesis theoretical predictions. The derived Rb abundances are much lower (∼⃒1-2 dex) with the new dynamical models, while the Zr abundances, however, are closer to the hydrostatic values. The new model atmospheres can help to resolve the problem of the mismatch between the observations and the nucleosynthesis theoretical predictions of massive AGB stars.

  3. AGB yields and Galactic Chemical Evolution: last updated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Travaglio, C.; Wiescher, M.; Gallino, R.; Köppeler, F.; Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Imbriani, G.; Görres, J.; deBoer, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the s-process abundances at the epoch of the Solar-system formation as the outcome of nucleosynthesis occurring in AGB stars of various masses and metallicities. The calculations have been performed with the Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model presented by [1, 2]. With respect to previous works, we used updated solar meteoritic abundances, a neutron capture cross section network that includes the most recent measurements, and we implemented the s-process yields with an extended range of AGB initial masses. The new set of AGB yields includes a new evaluation of the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg rate, which takes into account the most recent experimental information.

  4. Sodium abundances of AGB and RGB stars in Galactic globular clusters. I. Analysis and results of NGC 2808

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Primas, F.; Charbonnel, C.; Van der Swaelmen, M.; Bono, G.; Chantereau, W.; Zhao, G.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Galactic globular clusters (GC) are known to have multiple stellar populations and be characterised by similar chemical features, e.g. O-Na anti-correlation. While second-population stars, identified by their Na overabundance, have been found from the main sequence turn-off up to the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) in various Galactic GCs, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars have rarely been targeted. The recent finding that NGC 6752 lacks an Na-rich AGB star has thus triggered new studies on AGB stars in GCs, since this result questions our basic understanding of GC formation and stellar evolution theory. Aims: We aim to compare the Na abundance distributions of AGB and RGB stars in Galactic GCs and investigate whether the presence of Na-rich stars on the AGB is metallicity-dependent. Methods: With high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object high-resolution spectrograph FLAMES on ESO/VLT, we derived accurate Na abundances for 31 AGB and 40 RGB stars in the Galactic GC NGC 2808. Results: We find that NGC 2808 has a mean metallicity of -1.11 ± 0.08 dex, in good agreement with earlier analyses. Comparable Na abundance dispersions are derived for our AGB and RGB samples, with the AGB stars being slightly more concentrated than the RGB stars. The ratios of Na-poor first-population to Na-rich second-population stars are 45:55 in the AGB sample and 48:52 in the RGB sample. Conclusions: NGC 2808 has Na-rich second-population AGB stars, which turn out to be even more numerous - in relative terms - than their Na-poor AGB counterparts and the Na-rich stars on the RGB. Our findings are well reproduced by the fast rotating massive stars scenario and they do not contradict the recent results that there is not an Na-rich AGB star in NGC 6752. NGC 2808 thus joins the larger group of Galactic GCs for which Na-rich second-population stars on the AGB have recently been found. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory

  5. AGB Stars in Galactic Globular Clusters: Are They Really Chemically Distinct from Their Fellow RGB and HB Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. W.; Yong, D.; Wylie-de Boer, E. C.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Angelou, G. C.; Grundahl, F.; Sneden, C.

    2011-09-01

    The handful of available observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in Galactic globular clusters (GCs) suggest that the globular cluster AGB populations are dominated by cyanogen-weak (CN-weak) stars. This contrasts strongly with the distributions on the red giant branch (RGB) and other populations, which often show a 50:50 bimodality in CN band strength. If this is true then it presents a serious problem for low metallicity stellar evolution theory, since such a surface abundance change going from the RGB to AGB is not predicted by stellar models. However this is only a tentative conclusion, since it is based on very small AGB sample sizes. To test whether this problem really exists we have carried out an observational campaign targeting AGB stars in globular clusters. We have obtained medium resolution spectra for about 250 AGB stars across 9 Galactic globular clusters (NGC 1851, NGC 288, NGC 362, NGC 6752, M2, M4, M5, M10, and 47 Tuc) using the multi-object spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (2df/AAOmega). In this contribution we present some preliminary findings of the study, in particular for the second-parameter pair NGC 288 and NGC 362.

  6. The Case of the Missing Cyanogen-rich AGB Stars in Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. W.; Yong, D.; Wylie-de Boer, E. C.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Angelou, G. C.; Grundahl, F.; Sneden, C.

    2012-08-01

    The handful of available observations of AGB stars in Galactic Globular Clusters suggest that the GC AGB populations are dominated by cyanogen-weak stars (eg. Norris et al. 1981; Sneden et al. 2000). This contrasts strongly with the distributions on the RGB (and other) populations, which generally show a 50:50 bimodality in CN band strength. If this is a real difference then it presents a serious problem for low metallicity stellar evolution theory - since such a surface abundance change going from the RGB to AGB is not predicted by stellar models. However this is only a tentative conclusion, since it is based on very small AGB sample sizes. To test whether this problem really exists we have carried out an observational campaign targeting AGB stars in GCs. Our preliminary results indicate there is indeed a lack of CN-strong AGB stars.

  7. Silicate features in Galactic and extragalactic post-AGB discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, C.; Bouwman, J.; van Winckel, H.; Lloyd Evans, T.; Woods, P. M.; Kemper, F.; Marengo, M.; Meixner, M.; Sloan, G. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: In this paper we study the Spitzer and TIMMI2 infrared spectra of post-AGB disc sources, both in the Galaxy and the LMC. Using the observed infrared spectra we determine the mineralogy and dust parameters of the discs, and look for possible differences between the Galactic and extragalactic sources. Methods: Modelling the full spectral range observed allows us to determine the dust species present in the disc and different physical parameters such as grain sizes, dust abundance ratios, and the dust and continuum temperatures. Results: We find that all the discs are dominated by emission features of crystalline and amorphous silicate dust. Only a few sample sources show features due to CO2 gas or carbonaceous molecules such as PAHs and C60 fullerenes. Our analysis shows that dust grain processing in these discs is strong, resulting in large average grain sizes and a very high crystallinity fraction. However, we do not find any correlations between the derived dust parameters and properties of the central source. There also does not seem to be a noticeable difference between the mineralogy of the Galactic and LMC sources. Even though the observed spectra are very similar to those of protoplanetary discs around young stars, showing similar mineralogy and strong grain processing, we do find evidence for differences in the physical and chemical processes of the dust processing. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), La Silla, observing program 072.D-0263 and 077.D-0555, and on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope (program id 3274 and 50092), which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Lithium and zirconium abundances in massive Galactic O-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; García-Lario, P.; Plez, B.; Manchado, A.; D'Antona, F.; Lub, J.; Habing, H.

    2007-02-01

    Lithium and zirconium abundances (the latter taken as representative of s-process enrichment) are determined for a large sample of massive Galactic O-rich AGB stars, for which high-resolution optical spectroscopy has been obtained (R˜ 40 000{-}50 000). This was done by computing synthetic spectra based on classical hydrostatic model atmospheres for cool stars and using extensive line lists. The results are discussed in the framework of "hot bottom burning" (HBB) and nucleosynthesis models. The complete sample is studied for various observational properties such as the position of the stars in the IRAS two-colour diagram ([ 12] - [25] vs. [ 25] - [60] ), Galactic distribution, expansion velocity (derived from the OH maser emission), and period of variability (when available). We conclude that a considerable fraction of these sources are actually massive AGB stars (M>3{-}4 M⊙) experiencing HBB, as deduced from the strong Li overabundances we found. A comparison of our results with similar studies carried out in the past for the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) reveals that, in contrast to MC AGB stars, our Galactic sample does not show any indication of s-process element enrichment. The differences observed are explained as a consequence of metallicity effects. Finally, we discuss the results obtained in the framework of stellar evolution by comparing our results with the data available in the literature for Galactic post-AGB stars and PNe. Based on observations at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Also based on observations with the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory (Chile). Tables [see full text]-[see full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galactic and MC O-AGBs and RSGs stars (Jones+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. C.; Kemper, F.; Sargent, B. A.; McDonald, I.; Gielen, C.; Woods, P. M.; Sloan, G. C.; Boyer, M. L.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Clayton, G. C.; Kraemer, K. E.; Srinivasan, S.; Ruffle, P. M. E.

    2015-11-01

    Our sample contains 69 oxygen-rich AGB stars (O-AGB) and 76 RSG stars in the Magellanic Clouds which were observed spectroscopically with Spitzer, and 131 Galactic field O-AGBs and RSGs observed with either Spitzer or ISO. The Spitzer spectra cover a wavelength range of 5.2-37.2um, while ISO spectra cover the 2.38-45.2um part of the spectrum. We combine this sample with 39 spectra from 14 GGCs to extend the low end of the metallicity range. (5 data files).

  10. AKARI All Sky Survey: contribution from AGB stars to the far infrared flux from the Milky Way related to point sources outside the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Rybka, P.

    2011-10-01

    Using data from the FIS AKARI All-Sky Survey, we make a first step towards the estimation of the contribution from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to the far-infrared (FIR) flux from the Milky Way. We estimate the contribution from the AGB, and post-AGB, stars to the total flux generated by point sources outside the Galactic plane. Additionally, we present the positions of different types of AGB, and post-AGB, stars in the FIR color-color diagrams. Our main conclusion is that there is a high contribution from AGB stars, and particularly post-AGB stars, to the FIR flux coming from point sources in the outer parts of the Milky Way and possibly other Milky Way-type galaxies. FIR colors of different types of AGB stars remain similar but post-AGB stars are redder in the FIR and, as a result, contribute more to the total Galaxy flux density at longer FIR wavelengths.

  11. Understanding AGB evolution in Galactic bulge stars from high-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenthaler, S.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Wood, P. R.; Lebzelter, T.; Aringer, B.; Schultheis, M.; Ryde, N.

    2015-08-01

    An analysis of high-resolution near-infrared spectra of a sample of 45 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars towards the Galactic bulge is presented. The sample consists of two subsamples, a larger one in the inner and intermediate bulge, and a smaller one in the outer bulge. The data are analysed with the help of hydrostatic model atmospheres and spectral synthesis. We derive the radial velocity of all stars, and the atmospheric chemical mix ([Fe/H], C/O, 12C/13C, Al, Si, Ti, and Y) where possible. Our ability to model the spectra is mainly limited by the (in)completeness of atomic and molecular line lists, at least for temperatures down to Teff ≈ 3100 K. We find that the subsample in the inner and intermediate bulge is quite homogeneous, with a slightly subsolar mean metallicity and only few stars with supersolar metallicity, in agreement with previous studies of non-variable M-type giants in the bulge. All sample stars are oxygen-rich, C/O < 1.0. The C/O and carbon isotopic ratios suggest that third dredge-up (3DUP) is absent among the sample stars, except for two stars in the outer bulge that are known to contain technetium. These stars are also more metal-poor than the stars in the intermediate or inner bulge. Current stellar masses are determined from linear pulsation models. The masses, metallicities and 3DUP behaviour are compared to AGB evolutionary models. We conclude that these models are partly in conflict with our observations. Furthermore, we conclude that the stars in the inner and intermediate bulge belong to a more metal-rich population that follows bar-like kinematics, whereas the stars in the outer bulge belong to the metal-poor, spheroidal bulge population.

  12. A Luminous Yellow Post-AGB Star in the Galactic Globular Cluster M79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Siegel, Michael H.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of a luminous F-type post-asymptotic-giant-branch (PAGB) star in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) M79 (NGC 1904). At visual apparent and absolute magnitudes of V=12.20 and {M}V=-3.46, this “yellow” PAGB star is by a small margin the visually brightest star known in any GC. It was identified using CCD observations in the uBVI photometric system, which is optimized to detect stars with large Balmer discontinuities, indicative of very low surface gravities. Follow-up observations with the SMARTS 1.3 and 1.5 m telescopes show that the star is not variable in light or radial velocity, and that its velocity is consistent with cluster membership. Near- and mid-infrared observations with 2MASS and WISE show no evidence for circumstellar dust. We argue that a sharp upper limit to the luminosity function exists for yellow PAGB stars in old populations, making them excellent candidates for Population II standard candles, which are four magnitudes brighter than RR Lyrae variables. Their luminosities are consistent with the stars being in a PAGB evolutionary phase, with core masses of ˜ 0.53 {M}⊙ . We also detected four very hot stars lying above the horizontal branch (“AGB-manqué” stars); along with the PAGB star, they are the brightest objects in M79 in the near-ultraviolet. In the Appendix, we give periods and light curves for five variables in M79: three RR Lyrae stars, a Type II Cepheid, and a semiregular variable. Based in part on observations with the 1.3 and 1.5 m telescopes operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory.

  13. Exploring the Onset of the Contribution of the First AGB Stars to the Galactic Chemical Enrichment using Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is uncertainty over the time at which the first intermediate and low-mass stars reach the AGB phase and begin to influence their environments with the products of nucleosynthesis. While some studies have indicated that enrichment from AGB stars sets in at a time corresponding to -2.4 < [Fe/H] < -2.1, others suggest a time as early as [Fe/H] ≍ -2.75. These suggestions come from observations of s-process heavy elements in old metal-poor stars. Measurements of stellar isotopic ratios, such as the Mg isotope ratios, can also be a useful probe to explore the contribution of AGB stars to the Galactic chemical inventory. However, measurements of isotopic ratios require spectra with high resolution (R > 90 000) and high S/N ratios (> 200) which require very long exposure times with the existing observing facilities. Upcoming large telescopes of 25 to 42-m size equipped with high resolution spectrographs will provide the resolution and sensitivity required for measurements of isotopic ratios that are fundamental indicators of nucleosynthesis.

  14. Detailed homogeneous abundance studies of 14 Galactic s-process enriched post-AGB stars: In search of lead (Pb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Karakas, A. I.; Manick, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we systematically study the chemical abundances of Galactic and extragalactic post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. The goal at large is to provide improved observational constraints to the models of the complex interplay between the AGB s-process nucleosynthesis and the associated mixing processes. Aims: Lead (Pb) is the final product of the s-process nucleosynthesis and is predicted to have large overabundances with respect to other s-process elements in AGB stars of low metallicities. However, Pb abundance studies of s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds show a discrepancy between observed and predicted Pb abundances. The determined upper limits based on spectral studies are much lower than what is predicted. In this paper, we focus specifically on the Pb abundance of 14 Galactic s-process enhanced post-AGB stars to check whether the same discrepancy is present in the Galaxy as well. Among these 14 objects, two were not yet subject to a detailed abundance study in the literature. We apply the same method to obtain accurate abundances for the 12 others. Our homogeneous abundance results provide the input of detailed spectral synthesis computations in the spectral regions where Pb lines are located. Methods: We used high-resolution UVES and HERMES spectra for detailed spectral abundance studies of our sample of Galactic post-AGB stars. None of the sample stars display clear Pb lines, and we only deduced upper limits of the Pb abundance by using spectrum synthesis in the spectral ranges of the strongest Pb lines. Results: We do not find any clear evidence of Pb overabundances in our sample. The derived upper limits are strongly correlated with the effective temperature of the stars with increasing upper limits for increasing effective temperatures. We obtain stronger Pb constraints on the cooler objects. Moreover, we confirm the s-process enrichment and carbon enhancement of two

  15. Detailed homogeneous abundance studies of 14 Galactic s-process enriched post-AGB stars: In search of lead (Pb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Karakas, A. I.; Manick, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we systematically study the chemical abundances of Galactic and extragalactic post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. The goal at large is to provide improved observational constraints to the models of the complex interplay between the AGB s-process nucleosynthesis and the associated mixing processes. Aims: Lead (Pb) is the final product of the s-process nucleosynthesis and is predicted to have large overabundances with respect to other s-process elements in AGB stars of low metallicities. However, Pb abundance studies of s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds show a discrepancy between observed and predicted Pb abundances. The determined upper limits based on spectral studies are much lower than what is predicted. In this paper, we focus specifically on the Pb abundance of 14 Galactic s-process enhanced post-AGB stars to check whether the same discrepancy is present in the Galaxy as well. Among these 14 objects, two were not yet subject to a detailed abundance study in the literature. We apply the same method to obtain accurate abundances for the 12 others. Our homogeneous abundance results provide the input of detailed spectral synthesis computations in the spectral regions where Pb lines are located. Methods: We used high-resolution UVES and HERMES spectra for detailed spectral abundance studies of our sample of Galactic post-AGB stars. None of the sample stars display clear Pb lines, and we only deduced upper limits of the Pb abundance by using spectrum synthesis in the spectral ranges of the strongest Pb lines. Results: We do not find any clear evidence of Pb overabundances in our sample. The derived upper limits are strongly correlated with the effective temperature of the stars with increasing upper limits for increasing effective temperatures. We obtain stronger Pb constraints on the cooler objects. Moreover, we confirm the s-process enrichment and carbon enhancement of two

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Linelist of 14 Galactic post-AGB stars (De Smedt+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Smedt, K.; van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Karakas, A. I.; Manick, R.

    2015-11-01

    We used the UVES spectrograph mounted on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), and the HERMES spectrograph mounted on the 1.2m Mercator telescope to obtain high-resolution spectra with high signal-to-noise (S/N) of 14 Galactic post-AGB stars of the Large Magellanic Cloud. We perform an extensive detailed abundance analysis on the basis of these spectra. Here we provide the linelists of all objects with the same layour: the identification is given by the proton-number of the chemical element. For lines coming from ionised lines, we add 0.1 to the proton number; the wavelength is given in rest in air in Angstrom units; the excitation potential (eV); the used oscillator strength and finally the measured equivalent width (mÅ). We also provide the normalised spectra obtained with UVES and with HERMES in fits format. (17 data files).

  17. Luminosities and mass-loss rates of SMC and LMC AGB stars and red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Sloan, G. C.; Soszyński, I.; Petersen, E. A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Mass loss is one of the fundamental properties of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, and through the enrichment of the interstellar medium, AGB stars are key players in the life cycle of dust and gas in the universe. However, a quantitative understanding of the mass-loss process is still largely lacking, particularly its dependence on metallicity. Aims: To investigate the relation between mass loss, luminosity and pulsation period for a large sample of evolved stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods: Dust radiative transfer models are presented for 101 carbon stars and 86 oxygen-rich evolved stars in the Magellanic Clouds for which 5-35 μm Spitzer IRS spectra are available. The spectra are complemented with available optical and infrared photometry to construct the spectral energy distribution. A minimisation procedure is used to fit luminosity, mass-loss rate and dust temperature at the inner radius. Different effective temperatures and dust content are also considered. Periods from the literature and from new OGLE-III data are compiled and derived. Results: We derive (dust) mass-loss rates and luminosities for the entire sample. Based on luminosities, periods and amplitudes and colours, the O-rich stars are classified as foreground objects, AGB stars and Red Super Giants. For the O-rich stars silicates based on laboratory optical constants are compared to “astronomical silicates”. Overall, the grain type by Volk & Kwok (1988, ApJ, 331, 435) fits the data best. However, the fit based on laboratory optical constants for the grains can be improved by abandoning the small-particle limit. The influence of grain size, core-mantle grains and porosity are explored. A computationally convenient method that seems to describe the observed properties in the 10 μm window are a distribution of hollow spheres with a large vacuum fraction (typically 70%), and grain size of about 1 μm. Relations between mass-loss rates and luminosity and pulsation

  18. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galactic post-AGB stars distances (Vickers+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, S. B.; Frew, D. J.; Parker, Q. A.; Bojicic, I. S.

    2015-07-01

    The Torun catalogue provides easy online access to processed photometric and spectroscopic data for the currently identified Galactic population of PAGB stars and related objects. The catalogue is divided into five categories: (i) very-likely PAGB stars, (ii) RV Tauri stars, (iii) R Coronae Borealis/extreme helium/late thermal pulse stars, (iv) possible PAGB stars and (v) unlikely PAGB objects. Hereafter, likely PAGB stars will be referred to simply as PAGB, R Coronae Borealis/extreme helium/late thermal pulse as R CrB/eHe/LTP, while the possible PAGB objects will be simply referred to as possible. We will present a distance catalogue of the R Tau and R CrB/eHe/LTP stars in a second paper (Vickers et al., in preparation), concentrating on the likely and possible PAGB objects in this work. (3 data files).

  20. Post-AGB Stars in the AKARI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siódmiak, N.; Cox, N.; Szczerba, R.; García-Lario, P.

    2009-12-01

    Obscured by their circumstellar dusty envelopes post-AGB stars emit a large fraction of their energy in the infrared and thus, infrared sky surveys like IRAS were essential for discoveries of post-AGBs in the past. Now, with the AKARI infrared sky survey we can extend our knowledge about the late stages of stellar evolution. The long-term goal of our work is to define new photometric criteria to distinguish new post-AGB candidates from the AKARI data. We have cross-correlated the Toruń catalogue of Galactic post-AGB and related objects with the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue (for simplicity, hereafter AKARI). The scientific and technical aspects of our work are presented here as well as our plans for the future. In particular, we found that only 9 post-AGB sources were detected in all four AKARI bands. The most famous objects like: Red Rectangle, Egg Nebula, Minkowski’s Footprint belong to this group. From the technical point of view we discuss positional accuracy by comparing (mostly) 2MASS coordinates of post-AGB objects with those given by AKARI; flux reliability by comparing IRAS 60 and 100 μm fluxes with those from AKARI -N65 and AKARI -90 bands, respectively; as well as completeness of the sample as a function of the IRAS fluxes.

  1. Heavy elements Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu in 56 Galactic bulge red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Swaelmen, M.; Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the heavy elements Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu in 56 bulge giants (red giant branch and red clump) with metallicities ranging from -1.3 dex to 0.5 dex. Methods: We obtained high-resolution spectra of our giant stars using the FLAMES-UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. We inspected four bulge fields along the minor axis. Results: We measure the chemical evolution of heavy elements, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. Conclusions: The [Ba,La,Ce,Nd/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] ratios decrease with increasing metallicity, in which aspect they differ from disc stars. In our metal-poor bulge stars, La and Ba are enhanced relative to their thick disc counterpart, while in our metal-rich bulge stars La and Ba are underabundant relative to their disc counterpart. Therefore, this contrast between bulge and discs trends indicates that bulge and (solar neighbourhood) thick disc stars could behave differently. An increase in [La,Nd/Eu] with increasing metallicity, for metal-rich stars with [Fe/H] > 0 dex, may indicate that the s-process from AGB stars starts to operate at a metallicity around solar. Finally, [Eu/Fe] follows the [α/ Fe] behaviour, as expected, since these elements are produced by SNe type II. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196)

  2. Hiding in plain sight - red supergiant imposters? Super-AGB stars - bridging the divide between low/intermediate-mass and high-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Carolyn Louise; Gil-Pons, Pilar; Lattanzio, John; Siess, Lionel

    2015-08-01

    Super Asymptotic Giant Branch (Super-AGB) stars reside in the mass range ~ 6.5-10 M⊙ and bridge the divide between low/intermediate-mass and massive stars. They are characterised by off-centre carbon ignition prior to a thermally pulsing phase which can consist of many tens to even thousands of thermal pulses. With their high luminosities and very large, cool, red stellar envelopes, these stars appear seemingly identical to their slightly more massive red supergiant counterparts. Due to their similarities, super-AGB stars may therefore act as stellar imposters and contaminate red supergiant surveys. Super-AGB stars undergo relatively extreme nucleosynthetic conditions, with very efficient proton-capture nucleosynthesis occurring at the base of the convective envelope and also heavy element (s-process) production during the thermal pulse to be later mixed to the surface during third dredge-up events. The surface enrichment from these two processes may result in a clear nucleosynthetic signature to differentiate these two classes of star.The final fate of super-AGB stars is also quite uncertain and depends primarily on the competition between the core growth and mass-loss rates. If the stellar envelope is removed prior to the core reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, an O-Ne white dwarf will remain, otherwise the star will undergo an electron-capture supernova leaving behind a neutron star. We describe the factors which influence these different final fate channels, such as the efficiency of convection, the mass-loss rates, the third dredge-up efficiency and the Fe-peak opacity instability which may lead to expulsion of the entire remaining stellar envelope. We determine the relative fraction of super-AGB stars that end life as either an O-Ne white dwarf or as a neutron star, and provide a mass limit for the lowest mass supernova over a broad range of metallicities from the earliest time (Z=0) right through until today (Z~0.04).

  3. AGB sodium abundances in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; McDonald, Iain; Zijlstra, Albert A. E-mail: iain.mcdonald-2@manchester.ac.uk; and others

    2015-02-01

    A recent analysis comparing the [Na/Fe] distributions of red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6752 found that the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars changes from 30:70 on the RGB to 100:0 on the AGB. The surprising paucity of Na-rich stars on the AGB in NGC 6752 warrants additional investigations to determine if the failure of a significant fraction of stars to ascend the AGB is an attribute common to all globular clusters. Therefore, we present radial velocities, [Fe/H], and [Na/Fe] abundances for 35 AGB stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc; NGC 104), and compare the AGB [Na/Fe] distribution with a similar RGB sample published previously. The abundances and velocities were derived from high-resolution spectra obtained with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System and MSpec spectrograph on the Magellan–Clay 6.5 m telescope. We find the average heliocentric radial velocity and [Fe/H] values to be 〈RV{sub helio.}〉 = −18.56 km s{sup −1} (σ = 10.21 km s{sup −1}) and 〈[Fe/H]〉 = −0.68 (σ = 0.08), respectively, in agreement with previous literature estimates. The average [Na/Fe] abundance is 0.12 dex lower in the 47 Tuc AGB sample compared to the RGB sample, and the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars is 63:37 on the AGB and 45:55 on the RGB. However, in contrast to NGC 6752, the two 47 Tuc populations have nearly identical [Na/Fe] dispersion and interquartile range values. The data presented here suggest that only a small fraction (≲20%) of Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc may fail to ascend the AGB, which is a similar result to that observed in M13. Regardless of the cause for the lower average [Na/Fe] abundance in AGB stars, we find that Na-poor stars and at least some Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc evolve through the early AGB phase. The contrasting behavior of Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc and NGC 6752 suggests that the RGB [Na/Fe] abundance alone is insufficient for predicting if a star will

  4. An extreme paucity of second population AGB stars in the `normal' globular cluster M4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, B. T.; Campbell, S. W.; De Silva, G. M.; Lattanzio, J.; D'Orazi, V.; Simpson, J. D.; Momany, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Galactic globular clusters (GCs) are now known to harbour multiple stellar populations, which are chemically distinct in many light element abundances. It is becoming increasingly clear that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in GCs show different abundance distributions in light elements compared to those in the red giant branch (RGB) and other phases, skewing towards more primordial, field-star-like abundances, which we refer to as subpopulation one (SP1). As part of a larger programme targeting giants in GCs, we obtained high-resolution spectra for a sample of 106 RGB and 15 AGB stars in Messier 4 (NGC 6121) using the 2dF+HERMES facility on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In this Letter, we report an extreme paucity of AGB stars with [Na/O] >-0.17 in M4, which contrasts with the RGB that has abundances up to [Na/O] =0.55. The AGB abundance distribution is consistent with all AGB stars being from SP1. This result appears to imply that all subpopulation two stars (SP2; Na-rich, O-poor) avoid the AGB phase. This is an unexpected result given M4's horizontal branch morphology - it does not have an extended blue horizontal branch. This is the first abundance study to be performed utilizing the HERMES spectrograph.

  5. An extreme paucity of second population AGB stars in the `normal' globular cluster M4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, B. T.; Campbell, S. W.; De Silva, G. M.; Lattanzio, J.; D'Orazi, V.; Simpson, J. D.; Momany, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Galactic Globular clusters (GCs) are now known to harbour multiple stellar populations, which are chemically distinct in many light element abundances. It is becoming increasingly clear that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in GCs show different abundance distributions in light elements compared to those in the red giant branch (RGB) and other phases, skewing toward more primordial, field-star-like abundances, which we refer to as subpopulation one (SP1). As part of a larger program targeting giants in GCs, we obtained high-resolution spectra for a sample of 106 RGB and 15 AGB stars in Messier 4 (NGC 6121) using the 2dF+HERMES facility on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In this Letter we report an extreme paucity of AGB stars with [Na/O] >-0.17 in M4, which contrasts with the RGB that has abundances up to [Na/O] =0.55. The AGB abundance distribution is consistent with all AGB stars being from SP1. This result appears to imply that all subpopulation two stars (SP2; Na-rich, O-poor) avoid the AGB phase. This is an unexpected result given M4's horizontal branch morphology - it does not have an extended blue horizontal branch. This is the first abundance study to be performed utilising the HERMES spectrograph.

  6. Using red clump stars to decompose the galactic magnetic field with distance

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    A new method for measuring the large-scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field is presented. The Galactic magnetic field has been probed through the Galactic disk with near-infrared starlight polarimetry; however, the distance to each background star is unknown. Using red clump stars as near-infrared standard candles, this work presents the first attempt to decompose the line-of-sight structure of the sky-projected Galactic magnetic field. Two example lines of sight are decomposed: toward a field with many red clump stars and toward a field with few red clump stars. A continuous estimate of magnetic field orientation over several kiloparsecs of distance is possible in the field with many red clump stars, while only discrete estimates are possible in the sparse example. Toward the outer Galaxy, there is a continuous field orientation with distance that shows evidence of perturbation by the Galactic warp. Toward the inner Galaxy, evidence for a large-scale change in the magnetic field geometry is consistent with models of magnetic field reversals, independently derived from Faraday rotation studies. A photo-polarimetric method for identifying candidate intrinsically polarized stars is also presented. The future application of this method to large regions of the sky will begin the process of mapping the Galactic magnetic field in a way never before possible.

  7. Using Red Clump Stars to Decompose the Galactic Magnetic Field with Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    A new method for measuring the large-scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field is presented. The Galactic magnetic field has been probed through the Galactic disk with near-infrared starlight polarimetry; however, the distance to each background star is unknown. Using red clump stars as near-infrared standard candles, this work presents the first attempt to decompose the line-of-sight structure of the sky-projected Galactic magnetic field. Two example lines of sight are decomposed: toward a field with many red clump stars and toward a field with few red clump stars. A continuous estimate of magnetic field orientation over several kiloparsecs of distance is possible in the field with many red clump stars, while only discrete estimates are possible in the sparse example. Toward the outer Galaxy, there is a continuous field orientation with distance that shows evidence of perturbation by the Galactic warp. Toward the inner Galaxy, evidence for a large-scale change in the magnetic field geometry is consistent with models of magnetic field reversals, independently derived from Faraday rotation studies. A photo-polarimetric method for identifying candidate intrinsically polarized stars is also presented. The future application of this method to large regions of the sky will begin the process of mapping the Galactic magnetic field in a way never before possible.

  8. The Distance to the Galactic Center Derived from Infrared Photometry of Bulge Red Clump Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuji; Kato, Daisuke; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Naoi, Takahiro; Sugitani, Koji; Tamura, Motohide

    2006-08-01

    On the basis of the near-infrared observations of bulge red clump stars near the Galactic center, we have determined the galactocentric distance to be R0=7.52+/-0.10 (stat) +/-0.35 (sys) kpc. We observed the red clump stars at |l|<~1.0d and 0.7d<~|b|<~1.0d with the IRSF 1.4 m telescope and the SIRIUS camera in the H and KS bands. After extinction and population corrections, we obtained (m-M)0=14.38+/-0.03 (stat) +/- 0.10 (sys). The statistical error is dominated by the uncertainty of the intrinsic local red clump stars' luminosity. The systematic error is estimated to be +/-0.10, including uncertainties in extinction and population correction, zero point of photometry, and the fitting of the luminosity function of the red clump stars. Our result, R0=7.52 kpc, is in excellent agreement with the distance determined geometrically with the star orbiting the massive black hole in the Galactic center. The recent result based on the spatial distribution of globular clusters is also consistent with our result. In addition, our study exhibits that the distance determination to the Galactic center with the red clump stars, even if the error of the population correction is taken into account, can achieve an uncertainty of about 5%, which is almost the same level as that in recent geometrical determinations.

  9. Uncertainties on near-core mixing in red-clump stars: effects on the period spacing and on the luminosity of the AGB bump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossini, Diego; Miglio, Andrea; Salaris, Maurizio; Pietrinferni, Adriano; Montalbán, Josefina; Bressan, Alessandro; Noels, Arlette; Cassisi, Santi; Girardi, Léo; Marigo, Paola

    2015-11-01

    Low-mass stars in the He-core-burning (HeCB) phase play a major role in stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astrophysics. The ability to predict accurately the properties of these stars, however, depends on our understanding of convection, which remains one of the key open questions in stellar modelling. We argue that the combination of the luminosity of the AGB bump (AGBb) and the period spacing of gravity modes (ΔΠ1) during the HeCB phase provides us with a decisive test to discriminate between competing models of these stars. We use the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), a Bag of Stellar Tracks and Isochrones (BaSTI), and PAdova & TRieste Stellar Evolution Code (PARSEC) stellar evolution codes to model a typical giant star observed by Kepler. We explore how various near-core-mixing scenarios affect the predictions of the above-mentioned constraints, and we find that ΔΠ1 depends strongly on the prescription adopted. Moreover we show that the detailed behaviour of ΔΠ1 shows the signature of sharp variations in the Brunt-Väisälä frequency, which could potentially give additional information about near-core features. We find evidence for the AGBb among Kepler targets, and a first comparison with observations shows that, even if standard models are able to reproduce the luminosity distribution, no standard model can account for satisfactorily the period spacing of HeCB stars. Our analysis allows us to outline a candidate model to describe simultaneously the two observed distributions: a model with a moderate overshooting region characterized by an adiabatic thermal stratification. This prescription will be tested in the future on cluster stars, to limit possible observational biases.

  10. Optically visible post-AGB stars, post-RGB stars and young stellar objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out a search for optically visible post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). First, we selected candidates with a mid-IR excess and then obtained their optical spectra. We disentangled contaminants with unique spectra such as M stars, C stars, planetary nebulae, quasi-stellar objects and background galaxies. Subsequently, we performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the remaining candidates to estimate their stellar parameters such as effective temperature, surface gravity (log g), metallicity ([Fe/H]), reddening and their luminosities. This resulted in a sample of 35 likely post-AGB candidates with late-G to late-A spectral types, low log g, and [Fe/H] < -0.5. Furthermore, our study confirmed the existence of the dusty post-red giant branch (post-RGB) stars, discovered previously in our Small Magellanic Cloud survey, by revealing 119 such objects in the LMC. These objects have mid-IR excesses and stellar parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) similar to those of post-AGB stars except that their luminosities (< 2500 L⊙), and hence masses and radii, are lower. These post-RGB stars are likely to be products of binary interaction on the RGB. The post-AGB and post-RGB objects show spectral energy distribution properties similar to the Galactic post-AGB stars, where some have a surrounding circumstellar shell, while some others have a surrounding stable disc similar to the Galactic post-AGB binaries. This study also resulted in a new sample of 162 young stellar objects, identified based on a robust log g criterion. Other interesting outcomes include objects with an UV continuum and an emission line spectrum; luminous supergiants; hot main-sequence stars; and 15 B[e] star candidates, 12 of which are newly discovered in this study.

  11. Investigation of Faint Galactic Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral sky Survey. Optical Variability. I. N-Type AGB Carbon Stars. K-band Absolute Magnitudes and Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.; Sarkissian, A.; Russeil, D.; Mauron, N.; Kostandyan, G.; Vartanian, R.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to present an optical variability study of the comparatively faint carbon (C) stars which have been discovered by searching the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) low-resolution (lr) spectral plates at high Galactic latitudes using recent wide-area variability databases. The light curves from the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) databases were exploited to study theit variability nature. In this paper, first in this series, the variability classes are presented for 54 N-type Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) C stars. One finds that 9 stars belongs to the group of Mira-type, 43 are Semi-Regular (SR), and 2 stars are Irregular (Irr)-type variables. The variability types of 27 objects has been established for the first time. K-band absolute magnitudes, distances, and height from the Galactic plane were estimated for all of them. We aim to better understand the nature of the selected C stars through spectroscopy, 2MASS photometric colors, and variability data. Most of the tools used in this study are developed within the framework of the Astronomical Virtual Observatory.

  12. Chemical pollution from AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.; Gallino, R.; Piersanti, L.; Dominguez, I.

    Low mass AGB Stars are the main contributors to the Galactic s-process enrichment. We present new theoretical results obtained by adopting a full network from H to Bi coupled with the physical evolution of the stellar structure. We describe the formation of a 13C pocket as a consequence of H diffusion from the envelope into the He-rich intershell. Such 13C is burnt during the interpulse phase and provides the main neutron source in these stars. We computed two models with the same total mass (that is 2 M⊙) but two different initial chemical composition, namely (Y=0.269 - Z=0.015) and (Y=0.245 - Z=0.0001), representative of disk and halo stars respectively. We evaluate the differences in the final s-process surface composition and compare the results with the available observational data.

  13. THE SPLIT RED CLUMP OF THE GALACTIC BULGE FROM OGLE-III

    SciTech Connect

    Nataf, D. M.; Gould, A.; Stanek, K. Z.; Udalski, A.; Fouque, P. E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-09-20

    The red clump (RC) is found to be split into two components along several sightlines toward the Galactic bulge. This split is detected with high significance toward the areas (-3.5 < l < 1, b < -5) and (l, b) = (0, + 5.2), i.e., along the bulge minor axis and at least 5 deg off the plane. The fainter (hereafter 'main') component is the one that more closely follows the distance-longitude relation of the bulge RC. The main component is {approx}0.5 mag fainter than the secondary component and with an overall approximately equal population. For sightlines further from the plane, the difference in brightness increases, and more stars are found in the secondary component than in the main component. The two components have very nearly equal (V - I) color.

  14. A new tool for post-AGB SED classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendjoya, P.; Suarez, O.; Galluccio, L.; Michel, O.

    We present the results of an unsupervised classification method applied on a set of 344 spectral energy distributions (SED) of post-AGB stars extracted from the Torun catalogue of Galactic post-AGB stars. This method aims to find a new unbiased method for post-AGB star classification based on the information contained in the IR region of the SED (fluxes, IR excess, colours). We used the data from IRAS and MSX satellites, and from the 2MASS survey. We applied a classification method based on the construction of the dataset of a minimal spanning tree (MST) with the Prim's algorithm. In order to build this tree, different metrics have been tested on both flux and color indices. Our method is able to classify the set of 344 post-AGB stars in 9 distinct groups according to their SEDs.

  15. Evolution models from the AGB to the PNe and the rapid evolution of SAO 244567

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawlor, Timothy M.; Sebzda, Steven; Peterson, Zach

    2015-08-01

    We present evolution calculations from the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) to the Planetary Nebula (PNe) phase for models of mass 1 M⊙ over a range of metallicities from primordial, Z = 10-14, through near solar, Z = 0.02. Using our grid of models, we determine a central star mass dependence on initial metallicity. We also present a range of low masses for our low to very low metal models. The understanding of these objects is an important part of galactic evolution and the evolution of the composition of the universe over a broad range of red shits. For our low Z models, we find key differences in how they cross the HR diagram to the PNe phase, compared with models with higher initial Z. Some of our models experience the so called AGB Final Thermal Pulse (AFTP), which is a helium pulse that occurs while leaving the AGB and causes a rapid looping evolution while evolving between the AGB and PN phase. We use these models to make comparisons to the central star of the Stingray Nebula, SAO 244567. This object has been observed to be rapidly evolving (heating) over more than the last 50 years and is the central star of the youngest known planetary nebula. These two characteristics are similar to what is expected for AFTP models. It is a short lived phase that is related to, but different than, very late thermal pulse objects such as Sakurai’s Object, FG Sge, and V605 Aql. These objects experienced a similar thermal pulse, but later on the white dwarf cooling track.

  16. Wet disc contraction to galactic blue nuggets and quenching to red nuggets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, A.; Burkert, A.

    2014-02-01

    We study the origin of high-redshift, compact, quenched spheroids (red nuggets) through the dissipative shrinkage of gaseous discs into compact star-forming systems (blue nuggets). The discs, fed by cold streams, undergo violent disc instability that drives gas into the centre (along with mergers). The inflow is dissipative when its time-scale is shorter than the star formation time-scale. This implies a threshold of ˜0.28 in the cold-to-total mass ratio within the disc radius. For the typical gas fraction ˜0.5 at z ˜ 2, this threshold is traced back to a maximum spin parameter of ˜0.05, implying that ˜half the star-forming galaxies contract to blue nuggets, while the rest form extended stellar discs. Thus, the surface density of blue galaxies is expected to be bimodal about ˜109 M⊙ kpc-2, slightly increasing with mass. The blue nuggets are expected to be rare at low z when the gas fraction is low. The blue nuggets quench to red nuggets by complementary internal and external mechanisms. Internal quenching by a compact bulge, in a fast mode and especially at high z, may involve starbursts, stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback, or Q-quenching. Quenching due to hot-medium haloes above 1012 M⊙ provides maintenance and a slower mode at low redshift. These predictions are confirmed in simulations and are consistent with observations at z = 0-3.

  17. OGLE-III DETECTION OF THE ANOMALOUS GALACTIC BULGE RED GIANT BRANCH BUMP: EVIDENCE OF ENHANCED HELIUM ENRICHMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nataf, D. M.; Gould, A.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Udalski, A.

    2011-04-01

    We measure the red giant branch bump (RGBB) of the Galactic bulge, the most metal-rich RGBB ever detected. The RGBB luminosity function peaks at the expected brightness, but its number density is very low relative to Galactic globular cluster calibrations, implying the Galactic bulge has a higher helium enrichment parameter {Delta}Y/{Delta}Z {>=} 4.0 for Y {approx} 0.35 rather than the standard 2.0 with Y = 0.27, which we suggest may be a common feature of galactic spheroids. The RGBB is (0.71 {+-} 0.02) mag fainter than the red clump (RC) in I toward the densest stellar regions imaged by the OGLE-III Galactic bulge photometric survey, (|l| {<=} 4, 2 {approx}< |b| {<=} 4). The number density of RGBB stars is (12.7 {+-} 2.0)% that of RC stars. The brightness dispersion of the RGBB is significantly lower than that of the RC, a result that is difficult to explain as the RGBB luminosity is known to vary significantly with metallicity. Sight lines that have two RCs have two RGBBs with similar properties to one another, an expected outcome if the Milky Way's bulge is X-shaped. We also find preliminary evidence of the Galactic bulge asymptotic giant branch bump, at a brightness of {approx}1.06 mag brighter than the RC in I and with a number density {approx}1.5% that of the RC. Accounting for the RGBB has a small effect on the best-fit parameters of the RC, shifting its best-fit peak brightness and reducing its brightness dispersion by {approx}0.015 mag each.

  18. Can Star–Disk Collisions Explain the Missing Red Giants Problem in the Galactic Center?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, T. Forrest; Bogdanović, Tamara

    2016-06-01

    Observations have revealed a relative paucity of red giant (RG) stars within the central 0.5 pc in the Galactic Center (GC). Motivated by this finding we investigate the hypothesis that collisions of stars with a fragmenting accretion disk are responsible for the observed dearth of evolved stars. We use three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to model a star with radius 10 R ⊙ and mass 1 M ⊙, representative of the missing population of RGs, colliding with high density clumps. We find that multiple collisions with clumps of column density ≳108 g cm‑2 can strip a substantial fraction of the star’s envelope and in principle render it invisible to observations. Simulations confirm that repeated impacts are particularly efficient in driving mass loss as partially stripped RGs expand and have increased cross sections for subsequent collisions. Because the envelope is unbound on account of the kinetic energy of the star, any significant amount of stripping of the RG population in the GC should be mirrored by a systematic decay of their orbits and possibly by their enhanced rotational velocity. To be viable, this scenario requires that the total mass of the fragmenting disk has been several orders of magnitude higher than that of the early-type stars which now form the stellar disk in the GC.

  19. Building the Galactic halo from globular clusters: evidence from chemically unusual red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, S. L.; Smolinski, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2011-10-01

    We present a spectroscopic search for halo field stars that originally formed in globular clusters. Using moderate-resolution SDSS-III/SEGUE-2 spectra of 561 red giants with typical halo metallicities (-1.8 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ -1.0), we identify 16 stars, 3% of the sample, with CN and CH bandstrength behavior indicating depleted carbon and enhanced nitrogen abundances relative to the rest of the data set. Since globular clusters are the only environment known in which stars form with this pattern of atypical light-element abundances, we claim that these stars are second-generation globular cluster stars that have been lost to the halo field via normal cluster mass-loss processes. Extrapolating from theoretical models of two-generation globular cluster formation, this result suggests that globular clusters contributed significant numbers of stars to the construction of the Galactic halo: we calculate that a minimum of 17% of the present-day mass of the stellar halo was originally formed in globular clusters. The ratio of CN-strong to CN-normal stars drops with Galactocentric distance, suggesting that the inner-halo population may be the primary repository of these stars. Full Tables 1 and 3 are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/534/A136

  20. Do Globular Clusters Care about AGB Stars? Metallicity Distribution of AGB and RGB Stars in NGC 2808

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Primas, F.; Charbonnel, C.

    2015-08-01

    Galactic globular clusters are known to have multiple stellar populations with different scenarios being debated for their origin. In this context, the core of our project is to disentangle the first and second generation stars based on their chemical properties, in order to test different model predictions. Here we present a preliminary chemical analysis of a new sample of AGB stars in NGC 2808 observed at the VLT with FLAMES, in order to further investigate the recent finding that no Na-rich stars are found on the AGB.

  1. REVEALING PROBABLE UNIVERSAL FEATURES IN THE LOWER RED GIANT BRANCH LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. V.

    2009-06-15

    This paper aims at demonstrating, for the first time, very probable universal peculiarities of the evolution of stars in the lower red giant branch (RGB) of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), reflected in two corresponding dips in the luminosity functions (LFs). By relying on the database of Hubble Space Telescope photometry of GCs, we analyze the lower RGB LFs of a sample of 18 GCs in a wide metallicity range, {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.9 dex. We first show that in the F555W-(F439W-F555W) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the lower RGB of GCs, except for the most metal-poor of them, frequently shows an apparent 'knee'. It reveals itself as a fairly abrupt change of the RGB slope. At the same luminosity level, the RGB LFs show a feature in the form of a more or less pronounced dip. We find that the magnitude difference between the RGB base and the given feature is, on average, around {delta} F555W{sup dip} {sub base}{approx} 1.4 mag. It shows a marginal variation with metallicity, if any, comparable to the error. At the same time, the magnitude difference between the dip and the RGB bump, {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip}, decreases with increasing metallicity and falls within the range 0.8 {approx}< {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip} {approx}< 1.7 mag. Generalized LFs (GLFs) have been obtained for three subsamples of GCs within limited metallicity ranges and with different horizontal branch (HB) morphology. They reproduce the 'knee-related' dip that is statistically significant in two of the GLFs. This feature turns out to be more pronounced in the GLFs of GCs with either the blue or red HB morphology than with the intermediate one. The same GLFs also reveal an additional probable universal dip. It shows up below the RGB bump at {delta} F555W slightly increasing from {approx}0.3 to {approx}0.5 mag with increasing metallicity. Also, the statistical significance of this 'prebump' dip increases, on average, toward higher metallicity. Except for the well known RGB bump, no

  2. An Abundance Analysis of Red Giant Stars in the Retrograde Galactic Globular Cluster NGC 3201: Implications for Cluster Formation Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmerer, Jennifer A.; Ivans, I. I.

    2011-01-01

    Globular clusters have long been central to the study of Galactic Chemical Evolution. They serve as laboratories for stellar physics, evolution, and nucleosynthesis as well as representing fossil remnants of Galactic assembly processes. Our work addresses two recent areas of interest: globular clusters as accreted objects and globular clusters as hosts for multiple stellar populations. The globular cluster NGC 3201 is a curious object on a retrograde orbit. Some studies suggest that it contains stars of more than one metallicity, a property seen only in the peculiar globular cluster Omega Centauri. Both properties hint at an extra-Galactic origin. We present an elemental abundance pattern for NGC 3201 based on high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of red giant stars. We present abundance patterns of similar stars from the globular cluster M5 for comparison. Interpretation of our results is complicated by the discovery that at least two of our giants are variable stars. Though we can derive adequate stellar parameter solutions for both stars in every stage of variability and heavy element abundances do not change with the stellar phase, the abundances of the light elements O, Na, Mg, and Al are extremely unstable and vary greatly. Our inability to correctly model light element line formation in the atmosphere of variable red giant stars has significant implications for studies of star to star abundance variations in exactly these elements in globular clusters, which rely on stars at the same evolutionary stage as the variables in NGC 3201.

  3. Out on a Limb: Updates on the Search for X-ray Emission from AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, Rodolfo; Ramstedt, Sofia; Santiago-Boyd, Andrea; Kastner, Joel; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    X-rays from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are rarely detected, however, few modern X-ray observatories have targeted AGB stars. In 2012, we searched a list of 480 galactic AGB stars and found a total of 13 targeted or serendipitous observations with few detections (Ramstedt et al. 2012). Since this initial search new programs have successfully targeted and detected X-ray emission from a handful of AGB stars. The X-ray emission, when detected, reveals high temperature plasma (>= 10 MK). This plasma might be heated by a large-scale magnetic field or indicate the presence of accretion onto a compact companion. In this poster, we update our search for X-ray emission from AGB stars with a review of their characteristics, potential origins, and impact of X-ray emission in this late stage of stellar evolution.

  4. Characterizing AGB stars in Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianhui; Zhu, Qingfeng; Kong, Xu; He, Jinhua

    2014-04-01

    Aims: Since asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are bright and extended infrared objects, most Galactic AGB stars saturate the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detectors and therefore the WISE magnitudes that are restored by applying point-spread-function fitting need to be verified. Statistical properties of circumstellar envelopes around AGB stars are discussed on the basis of a WISE AGB catalog verified in this way. Methods: We cross-matched an AGB star sample with the WISE All-Sky Source Catalog and the Two Mircon All Sky Survey catalog. Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) spectra of a subsample of WISE AGB stars were also exploited. The dust radiation transfer code DUSTY was used to help predict the magnitudes in the W1 and W2 bands, the two WISE bands most affected by saturation, for calibration purpose, and to provide physical parameters of the AGB sample stars for analysis. Results: DUSTY is verified against the ISO spectra to be a good tool to reproduce the spectral energy distributions of these AGB stars. Systematic magnitude-dependent offsets have been identified in WISE W1 and W2 magnitudes of the saturated AGB stars, and empirical calibration formulas are obtained for them on the basis of 1877 (W1) and 1558 (W2) AGB stars that are successfully fit with DUSTY. According to the calibration formulas, the corrections for W1 at 5 mag and W2 at 4 mag are -0.383 and 0.217 mag, respectively. In total, we calibrated the W1/W2 magnitudes of 2390/2021 AGB stars. The model parameters from the DUSTY and the calibrated WISE W1 and W2 magnitudes are used to discuss the behavior of the WISE color-color diagrams of AGB stars. The model parameters also reveal that O-rich AGB stars with opaque circumstellar envelopes are much rarer than opaque C-rich AGB stars toward the anti-Galactic center direction, which we attribute to the metallicity gradient of our Galaxy. The synthetic photometry and input parameters for the model grid are only available at the CDS via

  5. Clear Evidence for the Presence of Second-generation Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in Metal-poor Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Mészáros, Sz.; Monelli, M.; Cassisi, S.; Stetson, P. B.; Zamora, O.; Shetrone, M.; Lucatello, S.

    2015-12-01

    Galactic globular clusters (GCs) are known to host multiple stellar populations: a first generation (FG) with a chemical pattern typical of halo field stars and a second generation (SG) enriched in Na and Al and depleted in O and Mg. Both stellar generations are found at different evolutionary stages (e.g., the main-sequence turnoff, the subgiant branch, and the red giant branch (RGB)). The non detection of SG asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in several metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) GCs suggests that not all SG stars ascend the AGB phase, and that failed AGB stars may be very common in metal-poor GCs. This observation represents a serious problem for stellar evolution and GC formation/evolution theories. We report fourteen SG-AGB stars in four metal-poor GCs (M13, M5, M3, and M2) with different observational properties: horizontal branch (HB) morphology, metallicity, and age. By combining the H-band Al abundances obtained by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey with ground-based optical photometry, we identify SG Al-rich AGB stars in these four GCs and show that Al-rich RGB/AGB GC stars should be Na-rich. Our observations provide strong support for present, standard stellar models, i.e., without including a strong mass-loss efficiency, for low-mass HB stars. In fact, current empirical evidence is in agreement with the predicted distribution of FG and SG stars during the He-burning stages based on these standard stellar models.

  6. The origin of fluorine: abundances in AGB carbon stars revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abia, C.; Cunha, K.; Cristallo, S.; de Laverny, P.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Revised spectroscopic parameters for the HF molecule and a new CN line list in the 2.3 μm region have recently become available, facilitating a revision of the F content in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Aims: AGB carbon stars are the only observationally confirmed sources of fluorine. Currently, there is no consensus on the relevance of AGB stars in its Galactic chemical evolution. The aim of this article is to better constrain the contribution of these stars with a more accurate estimate of their fluorine abundances. Methods: Using new spectroscopic tools and local thermodynamical equilibrium spectral synthesis, we redetermine fluorine abundances from several HF lines in the K-band in a sample of Galactic and extragalactic AGB carbon stars of spectral types N, J, and SC, spanning a wide range of metallicities. Results: On average, the new derived fluorine abundances are systematically lower by 0.33 dex with respect to previous determinations. This may derive from a combination of the lower excitation energies of the HF lines and the larger macroturbulence parameters used here as well as from the new adopted CN line list. Yet, theoretical nucleosynthesis models in AGB stars agree with the new fluorine determinations at solar metallicities. At low metallicities, an agreement between theory and observations can be found by handling the radiative/convective interface at the base of the convective envelope in a different way. Conclusions: New fluorine spectroscopic measurements agree with theoretical models at low and at solar metallicity. Despite this, complementary sources are needed to explain its observed abundance in the solar neighbourhood.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Torun catalog of post-AGB and related objects (Szczerba+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, R.; Siodmiak, N.; Stasinska, G.; Borkowski, J.

    2007-09-01

    With the ongoing AKARI infrared sky survey, of much greater sensitivity than IRAS, a wealth of post-AGB objects may be discovered. It is thus time to organize our present knowledge of known post-AGB stars in the galaxy with a view to using it to search for new post-AGB objects among AKARI sources. We searched the literature available on the NASA Astrophysics Data System up to 1 October 2006, and defined criteria for classifying sources into three categories: very likely, possible and disqualified post-AGB objects. The category of very likely post-AGB objects is made up of several classes. We have created an evolutionary, on-line catalogue of Galactic post-AGB objects, to be referred to as the Torun catalogue of Galactic post-AGB and related objects. The present version of the catalogue contains 326 very likely, 107 possible and 64 disqualified objects. For the very likely post-AGB objects, the catalogue gives the available optical and infrared photometry, infrared spectroscopy and spectral types, and links to finding charts and bibliography. (3 data files).

  8. SHALON observations of Active Galactic Nuclei at red shift from z = 0.0179 to z = 2.979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Alaverdyan, A. Y.; Andreeva, M. S.; Balygin, K. A.; Borisov, S. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kirichenko, A. M.; Klimov, A. I.; Kozhukhova, I. P.; Mirzafatikhov, R. M.; Moseiko, N. I.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Ostashev, I. E.; Palamarchuk, A. I.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.; Volokh, I. G.

    2016-05-01

    The radio-loud active galactic nuclei having the radio emission arising from a core region rather than from lobes are often referred to as “blazars” and include Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQ) and BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects. During the period 1992 - 2015, SHALON has been used for observations of the metagalactic sources NGC1275, Mkn421, Mkn501, Mkn180, 3c382, 4c+31.63, OJ 287, 3c454.3, 4c+55.17, 1739+522. We present results of long term observations of FSRQ: among them are known object 3c454.3, high-red shifted quasar 1739+522 as well as BL Lac type objects. The observation results are presented with integral spectra, images and spectral energy distributions for each of sources at energies > 800 GeV. A number of variability periods in different wavelengths including VHE γ-rays were found.

  9. RED GIANT BRANCH BUMP BRIGHTNESS AND NUMBER COUNTS IN 72 GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS OBSERVED WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Nataf, David M.; Gould, Andrew P.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Udalski, Andrzej

    2013-04-01

    We present the broadest and most precise empirical investigation of red giant branch bump (RGBB) brightness and number counts ever conducted. We implement a new method and use data from two Hubble Space Telescope globular cluster (GC) surveys to measure the brightness and star counts of the RGBB in 72 GCs. The median measurement precision is 0.018 mag in the brightness and 31% in the number counts, respectively, reaching peak precision values of 0.005 mag and 10%. The position of the main-sequence turnoff and the number of horizontal branch stars are used as comparisons where appropriate. Several independent scientific conclusions are newly possible with our parameterization of the RGBB. Both brightness and number counts are shown to have second parameters in addition to their strong dependence on metallicity. The RGBBs are found to be anomalous in the GCs NGC 2808, 5286, 6388, and 6441, likely due to the presence of multiple populations. Finally, we use our empirical calibration to predict the properties of the Galactic bulge RGBB. The updated RGBB properties for the bulge are shown to differ from the GC-calibrated prediction, with the former having lower number counts, a lower brightness dispersion, and a brighter peak luminosity than would be expected from the latter. This discrepancy is well explained by the Galactic bulge having a higher helium abundance than expected from GCs, {Delta}Y {approx} +0.06 at the median metallicity.

  10. The Chemical Composition of Red Giant Branch Stars in the Galactic Globular Clusters NGC 6342 and NGC 6366

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Rich, R. Michael; Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Hsyu, Tiffany

    2016-07-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for red giant branch stars in the Galactic bulge globular clusters NGC 6342 and NGC 6366. The velocities and abundances are based on measurements of high-resolution (R ≳ 20,000) spectra obtained with the MMT–Hectochelle and WIYN–Hydra spectrographs. We find that NGC 6342 has a heliocentric radial velocity of +112.5 km s‑1 (σ = 8.6 km s‑1), NGC 6366 has a heliocentric radial velocity of ‑122.3 km s‑1 (σ = 1.5 km s‑1), and both clusters have nearly identical metallicities ([Fe/H] ≈ ‑0.55). NGC 6366 shows evidence of a moderately extended O–Na anti-correlation, but more data are needed for NGC 6342 to determine if this cluster also exhibits the typical O–Na relation likely found in all other Galactic globular clusters. The two clusters are distinguished from similar metallicity field stars as having larger [Na/Fe] spreads and enhanced [La/Fe] ratios, but we find that NGC 6342 and NGC 6366 display α and Fe-peak element abundance patterns that are typical of other metal-rich ([Fe/H] > ‑1) inner Galaxy clusters. However, the median [La/Fe] abundance may vary from cluster-to-cluster.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abundances of Galactic red giants (Alves-Brito+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-Brito, A.; Melendez, J.; Asplund, M.; Ramirez, I.; Yong, D.

    2010-01-01

    Line list and equivalent widths (EWs) of a sample of 80 giant stars in the Galactic bulge, halo, thin- and thick disk. The list includes lines of [OI], NaI, MgI, AlI, SiI, CaI, TiI, FeI and FeII. The adopted oscillator strengths (loggfs) and excitation potential (EP) are also listed. For the bulge stars, the EWs were taken from Fulbrigth et al. (2006, Cat. , 2007ApJ...661.1152F). Refer to the paper's text for more detail. (2 data files).

  12. Current hot questions on the s process in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, M.; Campbell, S. W.; D'Orazi, V.; Karakas, A. I.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Tagliente, G.; Iliadis, C.; Rauscher, T.

    2016-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are a main site of production of nuclei heavier than iron via the s process. In massive (>4 M⊙) AGB stars the operation of the 22Ne neutron source appears to be confirmed by observations of high Rb enhancements, while the lack of Tc in these stars rules out 13C as a main source of neutrons. The problem is that the Rb enhancements are not accompanied by Zr enhancements, as expected by s-process models. This discrepancy may be solved via a better understanding of the complex atmospheres of AGB stars. Second- generation stars in globular clusters (GCs), on the other hand, do not show enhancements in any s-process elements, not even Rb. If massive AGB stars are responsible for the composition of these GC stars, they may have evolved differently in GCs than in the field. In AGB stars of lower masses, 13C is the main source of neutrons and we can potentially constrain the effects of rotation and proton-ingestion episodes using the observed composition of post-AGB stars and of stardust SiC grains. Furthermore, independent asteroseismology observations of the rotational velocities of the cores of red giants and of white dwarves will play a fundamental role in helping us to better constrain the effect of rotation. Observations of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars enriched in both Ba and Eu may require a neutron flux in-between the s and the r process, while the puzzling increase of Ba as function of the age in open clusters, not accompanied by increase in any other element heavier than iron, require further observational efforts. Finally, stardust SiC provides us high-precision constraints to test nuclear inputs such as neutron-capture cross sections of stable and unstable isotopes and the impact of excited nuclear states in stellar environments.

  13. Wind Acceleration in AGB Stars: Solid Ground and Loose Ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfner, S.

    2015-08-01

    The winds of cool luminous AGB stars are commonly assumed to be driven by radiative acceleration of dust grains which form in the extended atmospheres produced by pulsation-induced shock waves. The dust particles gain momentum by absorption or scattering of stellar photons, and they drag along the surrounding gas particles through collisions, triggering an outflow. This scenario, here referred to as Pulsation-Enhanced Dust-DRiven Outflow (PEDDRO), has passed a range of critical observational tests as models have developed from empirical and qualitative to increasingly self-consistent and quantitative. A reliable theory of mass loss is an essential piece in the bigger picture of stellar and galactic chemical evolution, and central for determining the contribution of AGB stars to the dust budget of galaxies. In this review, I discuss the current understanding of wind acceleration and indicate areas where further efforts by theorists and observers are needed.

  14. Non-LTE sodium abundance in galactic thick- and thin-disk red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeeva, S. A.; Pakhomov, Yu. V.; Mashonkina, L. I.

    2014-07-01

    The non-LTE sodium abundance has been determined from the Na I 6154 and 6161 Å lines for 38 thin-disk stars (15 of them are Ba II stars), 15 thick-disk stars, 13 Hercules-stream stars, and 13 stars that cannot be attributed neither to the thick Galactic disk nor to the thin one. The Na I model atom has been constructed using the most accurate present-day atomic data. For the Na I 6154 and 6161 Å lines, the non-LTEabundance corrections are from -0.06 to -0.24 dex, depending on the stellar parameters. No differences in [Na/Fe] abundance between the thick and thin disks have been detected; the derived ratios are close to the solar ones. The existence of a [Na/Fe] overabundance in the Ba II stars has been confirmed. The Hercules-stream stars exhibit nearly solar [Na/Fe] ratios. The results obtained can be used to test the sodium nucleosynthesis models.

  15. The hunt for red active galactic nuclei: a new infrared diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, Dario; Rodighiero, Giulia

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new infrared diagnostic to separate galaxies on the basis of their dominant infrared emission: stellar or nuclear. The main novelty with respect to existing diagnostics is the use of a broad band encompassing at the same time the 9.7-μm silicate absorption feature and one of the adjacent broad polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. This provides a robust estimate of the near- to mid-infrared continuum slope and enables a clear distinction among different classes of galaxies up to a redshift z ˜ 2.5. The diagnostic can be applied to a wealth of archival data from the ISO, Spitzer and Akari surveys, as well as future James Webb Space Telescope surveys. Based on data in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), Lockman Hole and North Ecliptic Pole fields, we find that approximately 70 per cent of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected with X-ray and optical spectroscopy dominate the total mid-infrared emission. Finally, we estimate that AGNs contribute less than 30 per cent of the mid-infrared extragalactic integrated emission.

  16. Probing the mass-loss history of AGB and red supergiant stars from CO rotational line profiles. II. CO line survey of evolved stars: derivation of mass-loss rate formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; de Koter, A.; Justtanont, K.; Verhoelst, T.; Kemper, F.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The evolution of intermediate and low-mass stars on the asymptotic giant branch is dominated by their strong dust-driven winds. More massive stars evolve into red supergiants with a similar envelope structure and strong wind. These stellar winds are a prime source for the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Aims: We aim to (1) set up simple and general analytical expressions to estimate mass-loss rates of evolved stars, and (2) from those calculate estimates for the mass-loss rates of the asymptotic giant branch, red supergiant, and yellow hypergiant stars in our galactic sample. Methods: The rotationally excited lines of carbon monoxide (CO) are a classic and very robust diagnostic in the study of circumstellar envelopes. When sampling different layers of the circumstellar envelope, observations of these molecular lines lead to detailed profiles of kinetic temperature, expansion velocity, and density. A state-of-the-art, nonlocal thermal equilibrium, and co-moving frame radiative transfer code that predicts CO line intensities in the circumstellar envelopes of late-type stars is used in deriving relations between stellar and molecular-line parameters, on the one hand, and mass-loss rate, on the other. These expressions are applied to our extensive CO data set to estimate the mass-loss rates of 47 sample stars. Results: We present analytical expressions for estimating the mass-loss rates of evolved stellar objects for 8 rotational transitions of the CO molecule and thencompare our results to those of previous studies. Our expressions account for line saturation and resolving of the envelope, thereby allowing accurate determination of very high mass-loss rates. We argue that, for estimates based on a single rotational line, the CO(2-1) transition provides the most reliable mass-loss rate. The mass-loss rates calculated for the asympotic giant branch stars range from 4 × 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 up to 8 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1. For red supergiants they reach

  17. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS, INTEGRATED RED GIANT BRANCH MASS LOSS, AND DUST PRODUCTION IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Boyer, M. L.; Gordon, K.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Whitney, B.; Van Loon, J. Th.; Hora, J. L.; Robitaille, T.; Babler, B.; Meade, M.; Block, M.; Misselt, K.

    2011-04-01

    Fundamental parameters and time evolution of mass loss are investigated for post-main-sequence stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104). This is accomplished by fitting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to existing optical and infrared photometry and spectroscopy, to produce a true Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We confirm the cluster's distance as d = 4611{sup +213}{sub -200} pc and age as 12 {+-} 1 Gyr. Horizontal branch models appear to confirm that no more red giant branch mass loss occurs in 47 Tuc than in the more metal-poor {omega} Centauri, though difficulties arise due to inconsistencies between the models. Using our SEDs, we identify those stars that exhibit infrared excess, finding excess only among the brightest giants: dusty mass loss begins at a luminosity of {approx}1000 L{sub sun}, becoming ubiquitous above L = 2000 L{sub sun}. Recent claims of dust production around lower-luminosity giants cannot be reproduced, despite using the same archival Spitzer imagery.

  18. THE FRAGMENTING PAST OF THE DISK AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: THE CULPRIT FOR THE MISSING RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Chen, Xian E-mail: Xian.Chen@aei.mpg.de

    2014-01-20

    Since 1996 we have known that the Galactic Center (GC) displays a core-like distribution of red giant branch (RGB) stars starting at ∼10'', which poses a theoretical problem because the GC should have formed a segregated cusp of old stars. This issue has been addressed invoking stellar collisions, massive black hole binaries, and infalling star clusters, which can explain it to some extent. Another observational fact, key to the work presented here, is the presence of a stellar disk at the GC. We postulate that the reason for the missing stars in the RGB is closely intertwined with the disk formation process, which initially was gaseous and went through a fragmentation phase to form the stars. Using simple analytical estimates, we prove that during fragmentation the disk developed regions with densities much higher than a homogeneous gaseous disk, i.e., ''clumps'', which were optically thick, and hence contracted slowly. Stars in the GC interacted with them and in the case of RGB stars, the clumps were dense enough to totally remove their outer envelopes after a relatively low number of impacts. Giant stars in the horizontal branch (HB), however, have much denser envelopes. Hence, the fragmentation phase of the disk must have had a lower impact on their distribution, because it was more difficult to remove their envelopes. We predict that future deeper observations of the GC should reveal less depletion of HB stars and that the released dense cores of RGB stars will still be populating the GC.

  19. Dusty Mass Loss from Galactic Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Kastner, Joel H.

    2016-06-01

    We are probing how mass loss from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars depends upon their metallicity. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are evolved stars that eject large parts of their mass in outflows of dust and gas in the final stages of their lives. Our previous studies focused on mass loss from AGB stars in lower metallicity galaxies: the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). In our present study, we analyze AGB star mass loss in the Galaxy, with special attention to the Bulge, to investigate how mass loss differs in an overall higher metallicity environment. We construct radiative transfer models of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of stars in the Galaxy identified as AGB stars from infrared and optical surveys. Our Magellanic Cloud studies found that the AGB stars with the highest mass loss rates tended to have outflows with carbon-rich dust, and that overall more carbon-rich (C-rich) dust than oxygen-rich (O-rich) was produced by AGB stars in both LMC and SMC. Our radiative transfer models have enabled us to determine reliably the dust chemistry of the AGB star from the best-fit model. For our Galactic sample, we are investigating both the dust chemistries of the AGB stars and their mass-loss rates, to compare the balance of C-rich dust to O-rich dust between the Galactic bulge and the Magellanic Clouds. We are also constructing detailed dust opacity models of AGB stars in the Galaxy for which we have infrared spectra; e.g., from the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). This detailed dust modeling of spectra informs our choice of dust properties to use in radiative transfer modeling of SEDs of Galactic AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX15AF15G.

  20. A Complete Sample of Hot Post-AGB Stars in Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W.; Moehler, S.; Napiwotzki, R.; Heber, U.; Sweigart, A.; Catelan, M.; Stecher, T.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet images of globular clusters are often dominated by one or two "UV-bright" stars. The most luminous of these are believed to be post-AGB stars, which go through a luminous UV-bright phase as they leave the AGB and move rapidly across the HR diagram toward their final white dwarf state. During the two flights of the ASTRO observatory in 1990 and 1995, the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT, Stecher 1997, PASP, 109, 584) was used to obtained ultraviolet (1600 A) images of 14 globular clusters. These images provide a complete census of hot (> 8000 K) post-AGB stars in the observed globular clusters, because the 40' field of view of UIT is large enough to image the entire population of most Galactic globulars, and because the dominant cool star population is suppressed in ultraviolet images, allowing UV-bright stars to be detected into the cluster core. We have begun a program of optical and STIS ultraviolet spectroscopy to determine the fundamental stellar parameters (\\log L, T_eff, \\log g) of all the hot post-AGB candidates discovered on the UIT images. Among the goals of our program are to test theoretical post-AGB lifetimes across the HR diagram, and to estimate the mass of the currently forming white dwarfs in globular clusters. Two trends are already apparent in our survey. First, the UV-selected sample has removed a bias against the detection of the hottest post-AGB stars, and resulted in the discovery of five cluster post-AGB stars with Teff > 50,000 K. Second, most of the new discoveries have been lower luminosity (2.5 $<$\\log L $<$ 3.0) than expected for stars which leave the AGB during the thermally pulsating phase.

  1. Low-Resolution Spectrum of the Diffuse Galactic Light and 3.3 μm PAH Emission with the AKARI InfraRed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Kohji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Sakon, Itsuki; Tanaka, Masahiro; Wada, Takehiko

    2013-12-01

    We first obtained the spectrum of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL) at general interstellar space in the 1.8-5.3μm wavelength region with the low-resolution prism spectroscopy mode of the AKARI Infra-Red Camera (IRC) NIR channel. The 3.3μm m PAH band is detected in the DGL spectrum at Galactic latitude |b| < 15˚, and its correlations with the Galactic dust and gas are confirmed. The correlation between the 3.3μm PAH band and the thermal emission from the Galactic dust is expressed not by a simple linear correlation, but by a relation with extinction. Using this correlation, the spectral shape of DGL at an optically thin region (5˚ < |b| < 15˚) was derived as a template spectrum. Assuming that the spectral shape of this template spectrum is uniform at any position, the DGL spectrum can be estimated by scaling this template spectrum using the correlation between the 3.3μm PAH band and the thermal emission from the Galactic dust.

  2. OPTICAL/NEAR-INFRARED SELECTION OF RED QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS: EVIDENCE FOR STEEP EXTINCTION CURVES TOWARD GALACTIC CENTERS?

    SciTech Connect

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krogager, J.-K.; Vestergaard, M.; Geier, S.; Venemans, B.; Noterdaeme, P.; Moller, P.; Ledoux, C.

    2013-01-15

    We present the results of a search for red QSOs using a selection based on optical imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and near-infrared imaging from UKIDSS. Our main goal with the selection is to search for QSOs reddened by foreground dusty absorber galaxies. For a sample of 58 candidates (including 20 objects fulfilling our selection criteria that already have spectra in the SDSS), 46 (79%) are confirmed to be QSOs. The QSOs are predominantly dust-reddened except for a handful at redshifts z {approx}> 3.5. However, the dust is most likely located in the QSO host galaxies (and for two, the reddening is primarily caused by Galactic dust) rather than in the intervening absorbers. More than half of the QSOs show evidence of associated absorption (BAL absorption). Four (7%) of the candidates turned out to be late-type stars, and another four (7%) are compact galaxies. We could not identify the remaining four objects. In terms of their optical spectra, these QSOs are similar to the QSOs selected in the FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey except they are on average fainter, more distant, and only two are detected in the FIRST survey. As per the usual procedure, we estimate the amount of extinction using the SDSS QSO template reddened by Small-Magellanic-Cloud-(SMC) like dust. It is possible to get a good match to the observed (rest-frame ultraviolet) spectra, but it is not possible to match the observed near-IR photometry from UKIDSS for nearly all the reddened QSOs. The most likely reasons are that the SDSS QSO template is too red at optical wavelengths due to contaminating host galaxy light and because the assumed SMC extinction curve is too shallow. Three of the compact galaxies display old stellar populations with ages of several Gyr and masses of about 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} (based on spectral energy distribution modeling). The inferred stellar densities in these galaxies exceed 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} kpc{sup -2}, which is among the highest measured for early

  3. Charged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters and the galactic extended red emission

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Young Min; Lee, Timothy J.; Gudipati, Murthy S.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The species responsible for the broad extended red emission (ERE), discovered in 1975 and now known to be widespread throughout the Galaxy, still is unidentified. Spanning the range from ≈540 to 900 nm, the ERE is a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of different interstellar environments. Over the years, a number of plausible candidates have been suggested, but subsequent observations ruled them out. The objects that present the ERE also emit the infrared features attributed to free polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, suggesting that closely related materials are plausible ERE carriers. Here, we show that the peculiar spectra and unique properties of closed-shell cationic PAH dimers satisfy the existing observational constraints and suggest that emission from mixtures of charged PAH clusters accounts for much of the ERE. This work provides a view into the structures, stabilities, abundances, and ionization balance of PAH-related species in the emission zones, which, in turn, reflects physical conditions in the emission zones and sheds fundamental light on the nanoscale processes involved in carbon-particle nucleation and growth and carbonaceous dust evolution in the interstellar medium. PMID:17372209

  4. STROeMGREN PHOTOMETRY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF RED GIANTS IN omega CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Calamida, A.; Hilker, M.; Bono, G. E-mail: mhilker@eso.or

    2009-12-01

    We present new intermediate-band Stroemgren photometry based on more than 300 u, v, b, y images of the Galactic globular cluster omega Cen. Optical data were supplemented with new multiband near-infrared (NIR) photometry (350 J, H, K{sub s} images). The final optical-NIR catalog covers a region of more than 20 x 20 arcmin squared across the cluster center. We use different optical-NIR color-color planes together with proper-motion data available in the literature to identify candidate cluster red-giant (RG) stars. By adopting different Stroemgren metallicity indices, we estimate the photometric metallicity for approx4000 RGs, the largest sample ever collected. The metallicity distributions show multiple peaks ([Fe/H]{sub phot} = -1.73 +- 0.08, -1.29 +- 0.03, -1.05 +- 0.02, -0.80 +- 0.04, -0.42 +- 0.12, and -0.07 +- 0.08 dex) and a sharp cutoff in the metal-poor (MP) tail ([Fe/H]{sub phot} approx< -2 dex) that agree quite well with spectroscopic measurements. We identify four distinct subpopulations, namely, MP ([Fe/H] <= -1.49), metal-intermediate (MI; -1.49 < [Fe/H] <= -0.93), metal-rich (MR; -0.95 < [Fe/H] <= -0.15), and solar metallicity ([Fe/H] approx 0). The last group includes only a small fraction of stars (approx8% +- 5%) and should be confirmed spectroscopically. Moreover, using the difference in metallicity based on different photometric indices, we find that the 19% +- 1% of RGs are candidate CN-strong stars. This fraction agrees quite well with recent spectroscopic estimates and could imply a large fraction of binary stars. The Stroemgren metallicity indices display a robust correlation with alpha-elements ([Ca+Si/H]) when moving from the MI to the MR regime ([Fe/H] approx> -1.7 dex).

  5. Cyanogen in NGC 1851 Red Giant Branch and Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars: Quadrimodal Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. W.; Yong, D.; Wylie-de Boer, E. C.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Angelou, G. C.; D'Orazi, V.; Martell, S. L.; Grundahl, F.; Sneden, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851 has raised much interest since Hubble Space Telescope photometry revealed that it hosts a double subgiant branch. Here we report on our homogeneous study into the cyanogen (CN) band strengths in the red giant branch (RGB) population (17 stars) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population (21 stars) using AAOmega/2dF spectra with R ~ 3000. We discover that NGC 1851 hosts a quadrimodal distribution of CN band strengths in its RGB and AGB populations. This result supports the merger formation scenario proposed for this cluster, such that the CN quadrimodality could be explained by the superposition of two "normal" bimodal populations. A small sample overlap with an abundance catalog allowed us to tentatively explore the relationship between our CN populations and a range of elemental abundances. We found a striking correlation between CN and [O/Na]. We also found that the four CN peaks may be paired—the two CN-weaker populations being associated with low Ba and the two CN-stronger populations with high Ba. If true, then s-process abundances would be a good diagnostic for disentangling the two original clusters in the merger scenario. More observations are needed to confirm the quadrimodality and also the relationship between the subpopulations. We also report CN results for NGC 288 as a comparison. Our relatively large samples of AGB stars show that both clusters have a bias toward CN-weak AGB populations.

  6. CYANOGEN IN NGC 1851 RED GIANT BRANCH AND ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS: QUADRIMODAL DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S. W.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Angelou, G. C.; D'Orazi, V.; Yong, D.; Wylie-de Boer, E. C.; Martell, S. L.; Grundahl, F.; Sneden, C. E-mail: david.yong@anu.edu.au

    2012-12-10

    The Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851 has raised much interest since Hubble Space Telescope photometry revealed that it hosts a double subgiant branch. Here we report on our homogeneous study into the cyanogen (CN) band strengths in the red giant branch (RGB) population (17 stars) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population (21 stars) using AAOmega/2dF spectra with R {approx} 3000. We discover that NGC 1851 hosts a quadrimodal distribution of CN band strengths in its RGB and AGB populations. This result supports the merger formation scenario proposed for this cluster, such that the CN quadrimodality could be explained by the superposition of two 'normal' bimodal populations. A small sample overlap with an abundance catalog allowed us to tentatively explore the relationship between our CN populations and a range of elemental abundances. We found a striking correlation between CN and [O/Na]. We also found that the four CN peaks may be paired-the two CN-weaker populations being associated with low Ba and the two CN-stronger populations with high Ba. If true, then s-process abundances would be a good diagnostic for disentangling the two original clusters in the merger scenario. More observations are needed to confirm the quadrimodality and also the relationship between the subpopulations. We also report CN results for NGC 288 as a comparison. Our relatively large samples of AGB stars show that both clusters have a bias toward CN-weak AGB populations.

  7. AGB stars and presolar grains

    SciTech Connect

    Busso, M.; Trippella, O.; Maiorca, E.; Palmerini, S.

    2014-05-09

    Among presolar materials recovered in meteorites, abundant SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains of AGB origins were found. They showed records of C, N, O, {sup 26}Al and s-element isotopic ratios that proved invaluable in constraining the nucleosynthesis models for AGB stars [1, 2]. In particular, when these ratios are measured in SiC grains, they clearly reveal their prevalent origin in cool AGB circumstellar envelopes and provide information on both the local physics and the conditions at the nucleosynthesis site (the H- and He-burning layers deep inside the structure). Among the properties ascertained for the main part of the SiC data (the so-called mainstream ones), we mention a large range of {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios, extending below the solar value [3], and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios ≳ 30. Other classes of grains, instead, display low carbon isotopic ratios (≳ 10) and a huge dispersion for N isotopes, with cases of large {sup 15}N excess. In the same grains, isotopes currently feeded by slow neutron captures reveal the characteristic pattern expected from this process at an efficiency slightly lower than necessary to explain the solar main s-process component. Complementary constraints can be found in oxide grains, especially Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals. Here, the oxygen isotopes and the content in {sup 26}Al are of a special importance for clarifying the partial mixing processes that are known to affect evolved low-mass stars. Successes in modeling the data, as well as problems in explaining some of the mentioned isotopic ratios through current nucleosynthesis models are briefly outlined.

  8. Post-AGB Stars in the Halos of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    1999-02-01

    The visually brightest members of Population II are post-AGB (PAGB) stars evolving through spectral types F and A. The aim of this proposal is to find such PAGB stars in the halos of three galaxies that lie just outside the Local Group: Sextans A, NGC 3109, and NGC 5237. The importance of PAGB stars is: (1) they can probe the structure of galactic halos, in the form of test particles much more numerous than planetary nebulae or globular clusters, with which we can look for features such as clumps or tidal streams; (2) the number counts will tell us the theoretically poorly known transition time from AGB to planetary nebula; and (3) we believe that PAGB stars will prove to be a superb new PRIMARY distance indicator, comparable to or better than Cepheids. PAGB stars of types F and A are easily recognized because of their large Balmer jumps. Our uBVI photometric system is optimal for revealing them in galactic halos, due to their unique u-B colors, and the method is extremely efficient in its telescope time requirements. Sextans A and NGC 3109 have Cepheid and TRGB distances, so they are excellent test beds for a confrontation with our proposed Pop II primary standard candles. NGC 5237 has an uncertain distance, which PAGB stars should considerably improve. The 0.9-m telescope will be used (1) to obtain uBVI calibrations of our fields, thus saving the 4-m BTC mosaic for the deep observations; and (2) to complete our survey of Milky Way globular clusters for PAGB stars to used as Galactic calibrators of their luminosities and metallicity dependence.

  9. The composition of freshly-formed dust in recent (post-)AGB thermal pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Poshak

    2013-01-01

    We recently discovered a candidate Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) star undergoing a thermal pulse (TP). WISE J1810--3305 is one of only two sources in the WISE sky survey which show very red WISE colors but a very blue 2MASS [K] vs. WISE [W1 (3.4 mu m)] color, and drastic brightening at 12 mu m since IRAS observation. This favours a scenario in which we have caught a massive dust ejection event during a TP that began only ~15 years ago. The other source is Sakurai's object, which also underwent a massive dust expulsion around the same time, but is in a later evolutionary (post-AGB) phase. Few firm constraints exist on the TP stage because of its brevity. These objects provide a unique opportunity for understanding TP evolution and dust production in real-time. Here we propose COMICS spectroscopy of WISE J1810--3305 in order to study the composition of the circumstellar dust. We will search for molecular bands, and identify whether the central object is an Oxygen or Carbon rich AGB star. We also propose identical spectroscopy of Sakurai's object in order to compare AGB with post-AGB evolution. These objects are presently brightest in the mid-IR, and COMICS is the only ground-based mid-IR camera with the requisite capability for observation.

  10. Phase-lag Distances of OH Masing AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, D.; Etoka, S.; Gérard, E.; Richards, A.

    2015-08-01

    Distances to AGB stars with optically thick circumstellar shells cannot be determined using optical parallaxes. However, for stars with OH 1612 MHz maser emission emanating from their circumstellar shells, distances can be determined by the phase-lag method. This method combines a linear diameter obtained from a phase-lag measurement with an angular diameter obtained from interferometry. The phase-lag of the variable emission from the back and front sides of the shells has been determined for 20 OH/IR stars in the galactic disk. These measurements are based on a monitoring program with the Nançay radio telescope ongoing for more than 6 years. The interferometric observations are continuing. We estimate that the uncertainties of the distance determination will be ˜20%.

  11. Post-AGB Stars in the Halos of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    1999-02-01

    The visually brightest members of Population II are post-AGB (PAGB) stars evolving through spectral types F and A. The aim of this proposal is to find such PAGB stars in the halos of Sextans A and B (two galaxies just outside the Local Group) and of NGC 4236 (a nearly edge-on spiral in the M81 Group). The importance of these stars is: (1) they will serve as probes of the structure of galactic halos, in the form of test particles much more numerous than planetary nebulae or globular clusters, with which we can look for features such as clumps or tidal streams; (2) the number counts will tell us the theoretically poorly known transition time from AGB to planetary nebula; and (3) we believe that PAGB stars will prove to be a superb new PRIMARY distance indicator, comparable to or better than Cepheids. PAGB stars of types F and A are easily recognized because of their large Balmer jumps. Our uBVI photometric system is optimal for revealing them in galactic halos, due to their unique u-B colors, and the method is extremely efficient in its telescope time requirements. In Sextans A and B PAGB stars will appear at V~eq22.3, and in NGC 4236 at V~eq24. Sextans A and B have Cepheid and TRGB distances, and NGC 4236 is a Tully-Fisher calibrator, so they are excellent test beds for a confrontation with our proposed Pop II primary standard candles. We will use the 0.9-m telescope for uBVI calibrations of our fields, saving the 4-m for the deep observations.

  12. Improving the distances of post-AGB objects in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Shane B.; Frew, David J.; Owers, Matt S.; Parker, Quentin A.; Bojičič, Ivan S.

    2016-07-01

    Post-AGB (PAGB) stars are short-lived, low-intermediate mass objects transitioning from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the white dwarf (WD) phase. These objects are characterised by a constant, core-mass dependent luminosity and a large infrared excess from the dusty envelope ejected at the top of the AGB. PAGB stars provide insights into the evolution of their direct descendants, planetary nebulae (PNe). Calculation of physical characteristics of PAGB are dependent on accurately determined distances scarcely available in the literature. Using the Torun catalogue for PAGB objects, supplemented with archival data, we have determined distances to the known population of Galactic PAGB stars. This is by modelling their spectral energy distributions (SED) with black bodies and numerically integrating over the entire wavelength range to determine the total integrated object flux. For most PAGB stars we assumed their luminosities are based on their positional characteristics and stellar evolution models. RV Tauri stars however are known to follow a period-luminosity relation (PLR) reminiscent of type-2 Cepheids. For these variable PAGB stars we determined their luminosities via the PLR and hence their distances. This allows us to overcome the biggest obstacle to characterising these poorly understood objects that play a vital part in Galactic chemical enrichment.

  13. Nucleosynthesis in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars: Relevance for Galactic Enrichment and Solar System Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busso, M.; Gallino, R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    We present a review of nucleosynthesis in AGB stars outlining the development of theoretical models and their relationship to observations. We focus on the new high resolution codes with improved opacities, which recently succeeded in accounting for the third dredge-up. This opens the possibility of understanding low luminosity C stars (enriched in s-elements) as the normal outcome of AGB evolution, characterized by production of 12C and neutron-rich nuclei in the He intershell and by mass loss from strong stellar winds. Neutron captures in AGB stars are driven by two reactions: 13C([α],n)16O, which provides the bulk of the neutron flux at low neutron densities (Nn [<=] 107 n/cm3), and 22Ne([α],n)25Mg, which is mildly activated at higher temperatures and mainly affects the production of s-nuclei depending on reaction branchings. The first reaction is now known to occur in the radiative interpulse phase, immediately below the region previously homogenized by third dredge-up. The second reaction occurs during the convective thermal pulses. The resulting nucleosynthesis phenomena are rather complex and rule out any analytical approximation (exponential distribution of neutron fluences). Nucleosynthesis in AGB stars, modeled at different metallicities, account for several observational constraints, coming from a wide spectrum of sources: evolved red giants rich in s-elements, unevolved stars at different metallicities, presolar grains recovered from meteorites, and the abundances of s-process isotopes in the solar system. In particular, a good reproduction of the solar system main component is obtained as a result of Galactic chemical evolution that mixes the outputs of AGB stars of different stellar generations, born with different metallicities and producing different patterns of s-process nuclei. The main solar s-process pattern is thus not considered to be the result of a standard archetypal s-process occurring in all stars. Concerning the 13C neutron source, its

  14. Nucleosynthesis in Super-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, C. L.; Gil-Pons, P.; Lugaro, M.; Lau, H. H. B.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Siess, L.; Campbell, S. W.; Petermann, I.

    2015-08-01

    Super-AGB stars reside in the mass range ˜ 6.5-10 M⊙ and are characterised by off-center carbon ignition prior to a thermally pulsing super-AGB phase. These stars can undergo from many tens to even thousands of thermal pulses and experience extreme nucleosynthetic conditions, with temperatures both at the base of the convective envelope and within the helium-burning intershell regions far higher than in their lower-mass counterparts. This can result in interesting nucleosynthesis from extreme hot bottom burning and also different heavy-element distributions caused by the high neutron density generated within the thermal pulse, with this material later mixed to the surface during third dredge-up events. We discuss recent nucleosynthetic yield results for super-AGB stars over the range of metallicity Z = 0.02 × 10-5 ([Fe/H] ˜ 0 to -3.3), and present a small suite of heavy element super-AGB star yield predictions. We also apply our nucleosynthetic results to examine the possible role of super-AGB stars as polluters of the anomalous stars within globular clusters.

  15. The Contribution of TP-AGB Stars to the Mid-infrared Colors of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, Nora E.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2012-07-01

    We study the mid-infrared color space of 30 galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) survey for which Sloan Digital Sky Survey data are also available. We construct two-color maps for each galaxy and compare them to results obtained from combining Maraston evolutionary synthesis models, galactic thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) colors, and smooth star formation histories. For most of the SINGS sample, the spatially extended mid-IR emission seen by Spitzer in normal galaxies is consistent with our simple model in which circumstellar dust from TP-AGB stars dominates at 8 and 24 μm. There is a handful of exceptions that we identify as galaxies that have high star formation rates presumably with star formation histories that cannot be assumed to be smooth, or anemic galaxies, which were depleted of their H I at some point during their evolution and have very low ongoing star formation rates.

  16. THE CONTRIBUTION OF TP-AGB STARS TO THE MID-INFRARED COLORS OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chisari, Nora E.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2012-07-10

    We study the mid-infrared color space of 30 galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) survey for which Sloan Digital Sky Survey data are also available. We construct two-color maps for each galaxy and compare them to results obtained from combining Maraston evolutionary synthesis models, galactic thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) colors, and smooth star formation histories. For most of the SINGS sample, the spatially extended mid-IR emission seen by Spitzer in normal galaxies is consistent with our simple model in which circumstellar dust from TP-AGB stars dominates at 8 and 24 {mu}m. There is a handful of exceptions that we identify as galaxies that have high star formation rates presumably with star formation histories that cannot be assumed to be smooth, or anemic galaxies, which were depleted of their H I at some point during their evolution and have very low ongoing star formation rates.

  17. Evolution of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars. IV. Constraining mass loss and lifetimes of low mass, low metallicity AGB stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin F.; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Gullieuszik, Marco; Bressan, Alessandro; Dolphin, Andrew; Aringer, Bernhard

    2014-07-20

    The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. In this work, we analyze the numbers and luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars in six quiescent, low metallicity ([Fe/H] ≲ –0.86) galaxies taken from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury sample, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry in both optical and near-infrared filters. The galaxies contain over 1000 TP-AGB stars (at least 60 per field). We compare the observed TP-AGB luminosity functions and relative numbers of TP-AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars, N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB}, to models generated from different suites of TP-AGB evolutionary tracks after adopting star formation histories derived from the HST deep optical observations. We test various mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). These comparisons confirm that pre-dust mass loss is important, since models that neglect pre-dust mass loss fail to explain the observed N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB} ratio or the luminosity functions. In contrast, models with more efficient pre-dust mass loss produce results consistent with observations. We find that for [Fe/H] ≲ –0.86, lower mass TP-AGB stars (M ≲ 1 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes of ∼0.5 Myr and higher masses (M ≲ 3 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes ≲ 1.2 Myr. In addition, assuming our best-fitting mass-loss prescription, we show that the third dredge-up has no significant effect on TP-AGB lifetimes in this mass and metallicity range.

  18. OT2_jalcolea_2: Additional Hpoint observations of large post-AGB sources from HIFIStars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcolea, J.

    2011-09-01

    One of the most spectacular phases in the evolution of intermediate mass stars takes place at the end of their lives. At the end of the AGB, the central star dashes across the HR diagram from the red giant to the blue dwarf region. At the same time, the spherically symmetric and slowly expanding circumstellar envelopes around AGB stars become planetary nebulae (PNe), displaying a large variety of shapes and structures far more complex. This transformation takes place at the very end of the AGB, and it is due to the interaction of fast and bipolar molecular winds with the fossil AGB circumstellar envelope. The origin of these post-AGB winds is still unclear, but we know that the resulting two-wind interactions are only active during a very short period of time, ~ 100 yr, but still they are able to strongly modify the kinematics of the nebulae and re-shape them. To better understand these processes we must study the warm molecular gas component of early post-AGB sources, both pre-planetary nebulae (pPNe) and young PNe. Herschel/HIFI is very well suited at this, because its spectral coverage, high velocity resolution, and superb sensitivity. For these reasons, 10 pPNe and young PNe were included in the KPGT HIFISTARS, were a large number of spectral lines are observed in a moderate number of frequency setups, but just at the central point. In many cases this is simply enough, since most post-AGB sources in HIFIStars are compact. However there are three cases in which the non spherically symmetric structures seen in the warm gas are larger than the telescope beam: OH231.8+4.2, NGC7027 and NGC6302. Therefore we propose to perform some additional points in these three sources in a selected sample of HIFISTARS frequency setups, were we have detected strong lines of CO, H2O, NH3 and OH. These observations are crucial to understand the kinematics and interactions traced by these warm gas probes, and gain insight in the intricate problem of the post-AGB dynamics.

  19. Shell and explosive hydrogen burning. Nuclear reaction rates for hydrogen burning in RGB, AGB and Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeltzig, A.; Bruno, C. G.; Cavanna, F.; Cristallo, S.; Davinson, T.; Depalo, R.; deBoer, R. J.; Di Leva, A.; Ferraro, F.; Imbriani, G.; Marigo, P.; Terrasi, F.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-04-01

    The nucleosynthesis of light elements, from helium up to silicon, mainly occurs in Red Giant and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Novae. The relative abundances of the synthesized nuclides critically depend on the rates of the nuclear processes involved, often through non-trivial reaction chains, combined with complex mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we summarize the contributions made by LUNA experiments in furthering our understanding of nuclear reaction rates necessary for modeling nucleosynthesis in AGB stars and Novae explosions.

  20. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  1. Searching for dark clouds in the outer galactic plane. I. A statistical approach for identifying extended red(dened) regions in 2MASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieswijk, W. W. F.; Shipman, R. F.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Most of what is known about clustered star formation to date comes from well studied star forming regions located relatively nearby, such as Rho-Ophiuchus, Serpens and Perseus. However, the recent discovery of infrared dark clouds may give new insights in our understanding of this dominant mode of star formation in the Galaxy. Though the exact role of infrared dark clouds in the formation process is still somewhat unclear, they seem to provide useful laboratories to study the very early stages of clustered star formation. Infrared dark clouds have been identified predominantly toward the bright inner parts of the galactic plane. The low background emission makes it more difficult to identify similar objects in mid-infrared absorption in the outer parts. This is unfortunate, because the outer Galaxy represents the only nearby region where we can study effects of different (external) conditions on the star formation process. Aims: The aim of this paper is to identify extended red regions in the outer galactic plane based on reddening of stars in the near-infrared. We argue that these regions appear reddened mainly due to extinction caused by molecular clouds and young stellar objects. The work presented here is used as a basis for identifying star forming regions and in particular the very early stages. An accompanying paper describes the cross-identification of the identified regions with existing data, uncovering more on the nature of the reddening. Methods: We use the Mann-Whitney U-test, in combination with a friends-of-friends algorithm, to identify extended reddened regions in the 2MASS all-sky JHK survey. We process the data on a regular grid using two different resolutions, 60´´ and 90´´. The two resolutions have been chosen because the stellar surface density varies between the crowded spiral arm regions and the sparsely populated galactic anti-center region. Results: We identify 1320 extended red regions at the higher resolution and 1589 in the

  2. The creation of AGB fallback shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The possibility that mass ejected during Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stellar evolution phases falls back towards the star has been suggested in applications ranging from the formation of accretion discs to the powering of late-thermal pulses. In this paper, we seek to explicate the properties of fallback flow trajectories from mass-loss events. We focus on a transient phase of mass ejection with sub-escape speeds, followed by a phase of a typical AGB wind. We solve the problem using both hydrodynamic simulations and a simplified one-dimensional analytic model that matches the simulations. For a given set of initial wind characteristics, we find a critical shell velocity that distinguishes between `shell fallback' and `shell escape'. We discuss the relevance of our results for both single and binary AGB stars. In particular, we discuss how our results help to frame further studies of fallback as a mechanism for forming the substantial population of observed post-AGB stars with dusty discs.

  3. The Compensation Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  4. The Facilities Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Harvey H.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  5. 2011 AGB Survey of Higher Education Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report, the second of AGB's studies of higher education governance, documents the extent to which college and university boards are following good-governance practices. In addition, it takes a focused look at board engagement to determine the degree to which governing boards are actively, intellectually, and strategically involved with their…

  6. The Executive Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legon, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  7. The Audit Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staisloff, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  8. The Investment Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices included in this text support the objectives of board committees:…

  9. STAR-TO-STAR IRON ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS IN RED GIANT BRANCH STARS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 3201

    SciTech Connect

    Simmerer, Jennifer; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan; Francois, Patrick; Charbonnel, Corinne; Monier, Richard; James, Gaeel E-mail: iii@physics.utah.edu E-mail: patrick.francois@obspm.fr E-mail: richard.monier@unice.fr

    2013-02-10

    We present the metallicity as traced by the abundance of iron in the retrograde globular cluster NGC 3201, measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 red giant branch stars. A spectroscopic analysis reveals a spread in [Fe/H] in the cluster stars at least as large as 0.4 dex. Star-to-star metallicity variations are supported both through photometry and through a detailed examination of spectra. We find no correlation between iron abundance and distance from the cluster core, as might be inferred from recent photometric studies. NGC 3201 is the lowest mass halo cluster to date to contain stars with significantly different [Fe/H] values.

  10. Star-to-star Iron Abundance Variations in Red Giant Branch Stars in the Galactic Globular Cluster NGC 3201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmerer, Jennifer; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan; Francois, Patrick; Charbonnel, Corinne; Monier, Richard; James, Gaël

    2013-02-01

    We present the metallicity as traced by the abundance of iron in the retrograde globular cluster NGC 3201, measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 red giant branch stars. A spectroscopic analysis reveals a spread in [Fe/H] in the cluster stars at least as large as 0.4 dex. Star-to-star metallicity variations are supported both through photometry and through a detailed examination of spectra. We find no correlation between iron abundance and distance from the cluster core, as might be inferred from recent photometric studies. NGC 3201 is the lowest mass halo cluster to date to contain stars with significantly different [Fe/H] values.

  11. Infrared photometry and evolution of mass-losing AGB stars. III. Mass loss rates of MS and S stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guandalini, R.

    2010-04-01

    Context. The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase marks the end of the evolution for low- and intermediate-mass stars, which are fundamental contributors to the mass return to the interstellar medium and to the chemical evolution of galaxies. The detailed understanding of mass loss processes is hampered by the poor knowledge of the luminosities and distances of AGB stars. Aims: In a series of papers we are trying to establish criteria permitting a more quantitative determination of luminosities for the various types of AGB stars, using the infrared (IR) fluxes as a basis. An updated compilation of the mass loss rates is also required, as it is crucial in our studies of the evolutionary properties of these stars. In this paper we concentrate our analysis on the study of the mass loss rates for a sample of galactic S stars. Methods: We reanalyze the properties of the stellar winds for a sample of galactic MS, S, SC stars with reliable estimates of the distance on the basis of criteria previously determined. We then compare the resulting mass loss rates with those previously obtained for a sample of C-rich AGB stars. Results: Stellar winds in S stars are on average less efficient than those of C-rich AGB stars of the same luminosity. Near-to-mid infrared colors appear to be crucial in our analysis. They show a good correlation with mass loss rates in particular for the Mira stars. We suggest that the relations between the rates of the stellar winds and both the near-to-mid infrared colors and the periods of variability improve the understanding of the late evolutionary stages of low mass stars and could be the origin of the relation between the rates of the stellar winds and the bolometric magnitudes.

  12. Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars. V. Constraining the Mass Loss and Lifetimes of Intermediate-mass, Low-metallicity AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Bressan, Alessandro; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars are relatively short lived (less than a few Myr), yet their cool effective temperatures, high luminosities, efficient mass loss, and dust production can dramatically affect the chemical enrichment histories and the spectral energy distributions of their host galaxies. The ability to accurately model TP-AGB stars is critical to the interpretation of the integrated light of distant galaxies, especially in redder wavelengths. We continue previous efforts to constrain the evolution and lifetimes of TP-AGB stars by modeling their underlying stellar populations. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared photometry taken of 12 fields of 10 nearby galaxies imaged via the Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury and the near-infrared HST/SNAP follow-up campaign, we compare the model and observed TP-AGB luminosity functions as well as the ratio of TP-AGB to red giant branch stars. We confirm the best-fitting mass-loss prescription, introduced by Rosenfield et al., in which two different wind regimes are active during the TP-AGB, significantly improves models of many galaxies that show evidence of recent star formation. This study extends previous efforts to constrain TP-AGB lifetimes to metallicities ranging ‑1.59 ≲ {{[Fe/H]}} ≲ ‑0.56 and initial TP-AGB masses up to ˜4 M ⊙, which include TP-AGB stars that undergo hot-bottom burning. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  13. Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars. V. Constraining the Mass Loss and Lifetimes of Intermediate-mass, Low-metallicity AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Bressan, Alessandro; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars are relatively short lived (less than a few Myr), yet their cool effective temperatures, high luminosities, efficient mass loss, and dust production can dramatically affect the chemical enrichment histories and the spectral energy distributions of their host galaxies. The ability to accurately model TP-AGB stars is critical to the interpretation of the integrated light of distant galaxies, especially in redder wavelengths. We continue previous efforts to constrain the evolution and lifetimes of TP-AGB stars by modeling their underlying stellar populations. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared photometry taken of 12 fields of 10 nearby galaxies imaged via the Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury and the near-infrared HST/SNAP follow-up campaign, we compare the model and observed TP-AGB luminosity functions as well as the ratio of TP-AGB to red giant branch stars. We confirm the best-fitting mass-loss prescription, introduced by Rosenfield et al., in which two different wind regimes are active during the TP-AGB, significantly improves models of many galaxies that show evidence of recent star formation. This study extends previous efforts to constrain TP-AGB lifetimes to metallicities ranging ‑1.59 ≲ {{[Fe/H]}} ≲ ‑0.56 and initial TP-AGB masses up to ∼4 M ⊙, which include TP-AGB stars that undergo hot-bottom burning. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  14. Transitory O-rich chemistry in heavily obscured C-rich post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; García-Lario, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Engels, D.; Perea-Calderón, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    Spitzer/IRS spectra of eleven heavily obscured C-rich sources rapidly evolving from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to Planetary Nebulae are presented. IRAM 30m observations for three of these post-AGBs are also reported. A few (3) of these sources are known to exhibit strongly variable maser emission of O-bearing molecules such as OH and H2 O, suggesting a transitory O-rich chemistry because of the quickly changing physical and chemical conditions in this short evolutionary phase. Interestingly, the Spitzer/IRS spectra show a rich circumstellar carbon chemistry, as revealed by the detection of small hydrocarbon molecules such as C2H2, C4H2, C6H2, C6H6, and HCN. Benzene is detected towards two sources, bringing up to three the total number of Galactic post-AGBs where this molecule has been detected. In addition, we report evidence for the possible detection of other hydrocarbon molecules like HC3N, CH3C2H, and CH3 in several of these sources. The available IRAM 30m data confirm that the central stars are C-rich - in despite of the presence of O-rich masers - and the presence of high velocity molecular outflows together with extreme AGB mass-loss rates (∼⃒10-4 Mʘ /yr). Our observations confirm the polymerization model of Cernicharo [1] that predicts a rich photochemistry in the neutral regions of these objects on timescales shorter than the dynamical evolution of the central HII region, leading to the formation of small C-rich molecules and a transitory O-rich chemistry.

  15. Lithium formation in massive AGB stars: new models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, I.; D'Antona, F.; Ventura, P.

    We present new AGB models including full coupling of nuclear evolution and turbulent transport in a diffusive scheme (Ventura et al. 1998). The novelty of these computations resides in the use of a Full Spectrum of Turbulence (FST) convective model, which allows to compute not only the appropriate convective flux distribution of billions of eddy scales (opposed to the one-eddy Mixing Length approximation), but also the self consistent average turbulent velocity and convective scale length which enter in the computation of the diffusion coefficient. Thus this new model contains a smaller number of free parameters with respect to previous MLT based computations. The coupled diffusion scheme treats independently 14 elements from ^1H to 18O, and in particular treats the production and destruction of ^7Li in the Hot Bottom Burning phase, which the FST convective models naturally achieve for masses approximately greater than 4.5M_odot (D'Antona and Mazzitelli 1996). The dependence of Lithium production on the evolving stellar mass, on the mass loss rate and on the chemical composition is presented. Predictions are given on the role of this lithium production for the galactic chemical evolution (e.g. D'Antona and Matteucci 1991), and the complete project for the computations is outlined.

  16. AGB nucleosynthesis at low metallicity: What can we learn from Carbon- and s-elements-enhanced metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, C.; Pols, O. R.; Izzard, R. G.; Karakas, A. I.

    2013-02-01

    CEMP-s stars are very metal-poor stars with enhanced abundances of carbon and s-process elements. They form a significant proportion of the very metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo and are mostly observed in binary systems. This suggests that the observed chemical anomalies are due to mass accretion in the past from an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star. Because CEMP-s stars have hardly evolved since their formation, the study of their observed abundances provides a way to probe our models of AGB nucleosynthesis at low metallicity. To this end we included in our binary evolution model the results of the latest models of AGB nucleosynthesis and we simulated a grid of 100 000 binary stars at metallicity Z = 0.0001 in a wide range of initial masses and separations. We compared our modelled stars with a sample of 60 CEMP-s stars from the SAGA database of metal-poor stars. For each observed CEMP-s star of the sample we found the modelled star that reproduces best the observed abundances. The result of this comparison is that we are able to reproduce simultaneously the observed abundance of the elements affected by AGB nucleosynthesis (e.g. C, Mg, s-elements) for about 60% of the stars in the sample.

  17. Asymmetries in AGB Stars: New Results from Aperture Masking Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykou, F.; Hron, J.; Paladini, C.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Tuthill, P. G.; Norris, B.; Lagadec, E.

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the extended circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars are not always spherical in shape. Moreover, the majority of post-AGB stars exhibit highly aspherical shapes, such as bipolar nebulae and equatorial waists in the form of dusty and gaseous disks and/or tori. As such, one should expect that the origin of the morphological changes seen in later evolutionary stages can be traced during the AGB phase. We now present a study of AGB stars using aperture masking interferometry to resolve such aspherical structures.

  18. Optically bright Post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.; Van Winckel, H.

    2014-04-01

    Post-AGB stars are low- to intermediate-mass stars in a rapid transition from the AGB phase to the Planetary Nebula (PN) phase. Post-AGB stars bear signatures of the structural and chemical composition changes that occur during the AGB phase of evolution and therefore can be used to constrain AGB models and also provide insight to the formation of PNes. In the Galaxy, the luminosities (and hence initial masses) of the diverse group of post-AGB candidates are badly affected by their unknown distances, making it difficult to use the observational characteristics of these interesting objects to throw light on the poorly-understood late stages of stellar evolution. In this talk, I will present the new results of a systematic search for post-AGB candidates in the Magellanic Clouds which became possible after the release of deep infrared surveys such as mid-infrared LMC and SMC Spitzer surveys. The catalog of post-AGB candidates in the Magellanic Clouds has been created firstly by selecting candidates based on the existence of a mid-infrared excess and secondly by obtaining low-resolution optical spectra. The optical spectra and broadband photometry were used to derive luminosities, effective temperatures and masses for the post-AGB candidates. Using a combination of colour criteria and SED analysis, we were able to classify between single and binary post-AGB objects. Binary post-AGB stars are likely to produce asymmetric PN (or bipolar PN). We also find that variability is displayed by several of the post-AGB candidates with the most common variability types being the Population II Cepheids (including RV-Tauri stars) and semi-regular variables. From the numbers of post-AGB candidates in the SMC and LMC, we were able to estimate evolutionary rates for the transient post-AGB phase. These catalogs of spectroscopically verified post-AGB candidates are a valuable resource for the study of late stages of single and binary star evolution as a function of initial mass and

  19. Post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds and neutron-capture processes in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, M.; Campbell, S. W.; Van Winckel, H.; De Smedt, K.; Karakas, A. I.; Käppeler, F.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: We explore modifications to the current scenario for the slow neutron-capture process (the s-process) in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to account for the Pb deficiency observed in post-AGB stars of low metallicity ([Fe/H] ≃-1.2) and low initial mass (≃ 1-1.5 M⊙) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Methods: We calculated the stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis for a 1.3 M⊙ star with [Fe/H] = -1.3 and tested different amounts and distributions of protons leading to the production of the main neutron source within the 13C-pocket and proton ingestion scenarios. Results: No s-process models can fully reproduce the abundance patterns observed in the post-AGB stars. When the Pb production is lowered, the abundances of the elements between Eu and Pb, such as Er, Yb, W, and Hf, are also lowered to below those observed. Conclusions: Neutron-capture processes with neutron densities intermediate between the s and the rapid neutron-capture processes may provide a solution to this problem and be a common occurrence in low-mass, low-metallicity AGB stars.

  20. The 2014 AGB Survey of Higher Education Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge-Clark, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    "The 2014 AGB Survey of Higher Education Governance" is the fourth in AGB's studies of college and university governance. This report, based on survey responses from 592 public and independent boards, addresses a range of important governance topics that are receiving attention from boards and the news media, including presidential…

  1. Searching for heavily obscured post-AGB stars and planetary nebulae. II. Near-IR observations of IRAS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Suárez, O.; Miranda, L. F.; Gómez, J. F.

    2012-09-01

    The most massive AGB stars are expected to result in heavily obscured post-AGB stars, proto-PNe and PNe with highly axisymmetric morphologies. To investigate this evolutionary connection, we have selected a sample of 165 presumably obscured IRAS post-AGB star and PN candidates and obtained near-IR JHK images for 164 of them. These images, in conjunction with DSS, 2MASS, Spitzer GLIMPSE, MSX, AKARI, and IRAS archival data, have allowed us to identify the near-IR counterparts of 154 of these sources, providing reliable finding charts and coordinates. Near-IR narrow-band Brγ, H2, and K continuum images were acquired for 6 of these sources that were found to be resolved in near-IR JHK images. Among the extended post-AGB source and PN candidates, three are round and seven have bipolar morphologies. Five of the extended sources are ionized and may have thus entered the PN stage. We note that all extended sources with water maser emission have bipolar morphology. We have investigated the Galactic distribution of sources with the largest flux drop from the 9 μm AKARI band to the near-IR J band and found that the width of the distribution in Galactic latitude is consistent with those of bipolar PNe and DUPLEX (DUst-Prominent Longitudinally EXtended) sources. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (081.D-0812), observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, and on observations with AKARI, a JAXA project with the participation of ESA.

  2. High resolution spectroscopy of the high latitude rapidly evolving post-AGB star SAO 85766 (= IRAS 18062+2410)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, P.; Sivarani, T.; Manchado, A.; Sanz Fernández de Córdoba, L.

    2000-05-01

    SAO 85766 (b = +20o) is an IRAS source with far-infrared colours similar to planetary nebulae. According to the HDE catalogue, its spectrum in 1940 was that of an A5 star. The UV fluxes and colours derived from data obtained by the TD1 satellite in 1972 also indicate that SAO 85766 was an A-type supergiant at that epoch. However, high resolution spectra of SAO 85766 obtained in 1993 in the wavelength interval 4350Ä to 8820Ä shows that now it is similar to that of an early B type post-AGB supergiant. In addition to the absorptions lines typical of a B1I type star, the spectrum of SAO 85766 is found to show numerous permitted and forbidden emission lines of several elements, typically observed in the spectra of young high density low excitation planetary nebulae. From an analysis of the absorption lines we have estimated Teff=22000+/-500 K, log g=3.0+/-0.5, xi t=15+/-2km s-1 and [M/H]=-0.6. Carbon is found to be strongly underabundant ([C/Fe] = -1.0), similarly to what has been observed in other high galactic latitude hot post-AGB stars. The underabundance of carbon and metals, high galactic latitude, high radial velocity (46 km s-1), the presence of planetary nebula type detached cold circumstellar dust shell and also the presence of low excitation nebular emission lines in the spectrum indicate that SAO 85766 is a low mass star in the post-AGB stage of evolution. The above mentioned characteristics and the variations observed in the spectrum of SAO 85766 suggest that it has rapidly evolved during the past 50 years and it is now in the early stages of the planetary nebula phase. The central star may just have become hot enough to photoionize the circumstellar envelope ejected during the previous AGB phase. >From an analysis of the nebular emission lines we find Te=10000+/- 500K and Ne=2.5 104 cm-3. The nebula also shows an abundance pattern similar to that of the central star. The rapid post-AGB evolution of SAO 85766 appears to be similar to that observed in the

  3. Approaching a Physical Calibration of the AGB Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, Paola

    2015-08-01

    The widespread impact of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars on the observed properties of galaxies is universally accepted. Despite their importance, severe uncertainties plague AGB models and propagate through to current population synthesis studies of galaxies, undermining the interpretation of a galaxy's basic properties (mass, age, chemical evolution, dust budget). The only reliable path forward is to apply a physically-sound calibration of AGB stellar models in which all main physical processes and their interplay are taken into account (e.g., mixing, mass loss, nucleosynthesis, pulsation, molecular chemistry, dust formation). In this context, I will review recent and ongoing efforts to calibrate the evolution of AGB stars, which combine an all-round theoretical approach anchored by stellar physics with exceptionally high quality data of resolved AGB stars in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies.

  4. New input data for synthetic AGB evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenhuber, J.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    1998-12-01

    Analytic formulae are presented to construct detailed secular lightcurves of both early asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and thermally pulsing AGB stars. They are based on an extensive grid of evolutionary calculations, performed with an updated stellar evolution code. Basic input parameters are the initial mass MI i, 0.8 <= MI i/Msun <= 7, metallicity ZI i =0.0001, 0.008, 0.02, and the mixing length theory (MLT) parameter. The formulae allow for two important effects, namely that the first pulses do not reach the full amplitude, and hot bottom burning (HBB) in massive stars, which are both not accounted for by core mass - luminosity relations of the usual type. Furthermore, the dependence of the effective temperature and a few other quantities characterizing the conditions at the base of the convective envelope, which are relevant for HBB, are investigated as functions of luminosity, total and core mass for different formulations of the convection theory applied, MLT or Canuto & Mazzitelli's (\\cite{can:maz}) theory.

  5. Carbon dust particle size distributions around mass-losing AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jura, M.

    1997-03-01

    Solids of presolar SiC and interstellar carbon have qualitatively similar relative size distribution for particles with radii, a, in the range 0.35 μmAGB stars such as the well studied IRC+10216 seem to be smaller than the interstellar or presolar particles. The close binary system, the Red Rectangle, appears to produce much larger grains than does IRC+10216, and we suggest that many of the interstellar and presolar particles with radii >0.35 μm are produced by interacting binary systems rather than single mass-losing stars.

  6. Evolution and mixing on the AGB

    SciTech Connect

    Lattanzio, J.C.

    1988-07-27

    It is now well known that Nature can make Carbon stars at lower luminosities than can (human) theorists. A number of workers, stimulated by this challenge, have been attracted to the problem. In this paper I review recent evolutionary models of relatively low mass AGB stars, with emphasis placed on the mixing of carbon to the stellar surface. In particular I discuss some recent improvements in the physics used to construct stellar models. These topics include: breathing pulses of the convective core found during exhaustion of the core helium supply; the effects of carbon recombination; the occurrence of semiconvection in the region between the two nuclear burning shells, and the importance of mass loss. It appears that different effects may operate at different stellar masses and abundances. Recent calculations have successfully produced models of low luminosity Carbon stars. The strengths and weaknesses of these models will be contrasted. 60 refs., 5 figs.

  7. The effects of rotation on the surface composition and yields of low mass AGB stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, S.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.

    Over the past 20 years, stellar evolutionary models have been strongly improved in order to reproduce with reasonable accuracy both photometric and spectroscopic observations. Notwithstanding, the majority of these models do not take into account macroscopic phenomena, like rotation and/or magnetic fields. Their explicit treatment could modify stellar physical and chemical properties. One of the most interesting problems related to stellar nucleosynthesis is the behavior of the s-process spectroscopic indexes ([hs/ls] and [Pb/hs]) in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. In this contribution we show that, for a fixed metallicity, rotation can lead to a spread in the [hs/ls] and [Pb/hs] in low-mass AGB stars. In particular, we demonstrate that the Eddington-Sweet and the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instabilities may have enough time to smear the 13C-pocket (the major neutron source) and the 14N-pocket (the major neutron poison). In fact, a different overlap between these pockets leads to a different neutrons-to-seeds ratio, with important consequences on the corresponding s-process distributions. Possible consequences on the chemical evolution of Galactic globular clusters are discussed.

  8. Age Dating Merger Events in Early Type Galaxies via the Detection of AGB Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thorough statistical analysis of the J-H vs. H-K color plane of all detected early type galaxies in the 2MASS catalog with velocities less than 5000 km/s has been performed. This all sky survey is not sensitive to one particular galactic environment and therefore a representative range of early type galaxy environments have been sampled. Virtually all N-body simulation so major mergers produces a central starburst due to rapid collection of gas. This central starburst is of sufficient amplitude to change the stellar population in the central regions of the galaxy. Intermediate age populations are given away by the presence of AGB stars which will drive the central colors redder in H-K relative to the J- H baseline. This color anomaly has a lifetime of 2-5 billion years depending on the amplitude of the initial starburst Employing this technique on the entire 2MASS sample (several hundred galaxies) reveals that the AGB signature occurs less than 1% of the time. This is a straightforward indication that virtually all nearby early type galaxies have not had a major merger occur within the last few billion years.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optical spectra of post-AGB stars (Bakker+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, E. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Schoenmaker, T.

    1996-10-01

    We present optical high-resolution spectra of a sample of sixteen post-AGB stars and IRC +10216. Of the post-AGB stars, ten show C2 Phillips (A1{PI}u- X1{SIGMA}+g) and Swan (d3{PI}g-a3{PI}u) and CN Red System (A2{PI}-X2{SIGMA}+) absorption, one CH+ (A1{PI}-X1{SIGMA}+) emission, one CH+ absorption, and four without any molecules. We find typically Trot ~43-399, 155-202, and 18-50K, logN~14.90-15.57, 14.35, and 15.03-16.47cm-2 for C2, CH+, and CN respectively, and 0.6<=N(CN)/N(C2)<=11.2. We did not detect isotopic lines, which places a lower limit on the isotope ratio of 12C/13C>20. The presence of C2 and CN absorption is correlated with cold dust (Tdust<=300K) and the presence of CH+ with hot dust (Tdust>=300K). All objects with the unidentified 21μm emission feature exhibit C2 and CN absorption, but not all objects with C2 and CN detections exhibit a 21μm feature. The derived expansion velocity, ranging from 5 to 44km/s, is the same as that derived from CO millimeter line emission. This unambiguously proves that these lines are of circumstellar origin and are formed in the AGB ejecta (circumstellar shell expelled during the preceding AGB phase). Furthermore there seems to be a relation between the C2 molecular column density and the expansion velocity, which is attributed to the fact that a higher carbon abundance of the dust leads to a more efficient acceleration of the AGB wind. Using simple assumptions for the location of the molecular lines and molecular abundances, mass-loss rates have been derived from the molecular absorption lines and are comparable to those obtained from CO emission lines and the infrared excess. (6 data files).

  10. Ultraviolet Properties of Galactic Globular Clusters with GALEX. I. The Color-Magnitude Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Rood, Robert T.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara; Beccari, Giacomo; Rey, Soo-Chang; Rhee, Jaehyon; Rich, R. Michael; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook

    2012-05-01

    We present Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) data for 44 Galactic globular clusters (GCs) obtained during three GALEX observing cycles between 2004 and 2008. This is the largest homogeneous data set on the UV photometric properties of Galactic GCs ever collected. The sample selection and photometric analysis are discussed, and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented. The blue and intermediate-blue horizontal branch is the dominant feature of the UV CMDs of old Galactic GCs. Our sample is large enough to display the remarkable variety of horizontal branch shapes found in old stellar populations. Other stellar types that are obviously detected are blue stragglers and post-core-He burning stars. The main features of UV CMDs of Galactic GCs are briefly discussed. We establish the locus of post-core-He burning stars in the UV CMD and present a catalog of candidate asymptotic giant branch (AGB), AGB-manqué, post early-AGB, and post-AGB stars within our cluster sample. The authors dedicate this paper to the memory of co-author Bob Rood, a pioneer in the theory of the evolution of low-mass stars, and a friend, who sadly passed away on 2011 November 2.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 2808 AGB and RGB stars Na abundance (Wang+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Primas, F.; Charbonnel, C.; van der Swaelmen, M.; Bono, G.; Chantereau, W.; Zhao, G.

    2016-05-01

    The high-resolution spectra of our sample of AGB and RGB stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808 were obtained with the high-resolution multi-object spectrograph FLAMES, mounted on ESO/VLT-UT2. A combined mode was used where the brightest five objects was observed with UVES-fibre and the remaining targets with GIRAFFE/Medusa. The basic information of our sample stars are listed in Table 2, including the evolutionary phase, instrument used for observation, coordinates, photometry and barycentric radial velocity. Our Fe abundances were derived from the equivalent widths of Fe lines, while the Na abundances were determined with spectra synthesis. Both FeI and Na abundances have been corrected for the non-LTE effect. In Table 4 we show the derived stellar parameters of our sample stars, and the Na abundances are shown in Table 6. (3 data files).

  12. Spectroscopic survey of post-AGB star candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, C. B.; Miranda, L. F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims:Our goal is to establish the true nature of post-AGB star candidates and to identify new post-AGB stars. Methods: We used low resolution optical spectroscopy and we compared the spectra of the candidate post-AGB stars with those of stars in the library specta available in the literature and with spectra of "standard" post-AGB stars, and direct imaging in narrow-band filters. Results: Spectra were obtained for 16 objects: 14 objects have not been observed previously and 2 objects are already known post-AGB stars used as "standards" for identification. From the spectra we identify: six new post-AGB stars with spectral types between G5 and F5, two H ii regions the morphology of which is revealed in the direct images for the first time, a G giant with infrared emission, a young stellar object, a probable post-AGB star with emission lines and three objects for which the classification is still unclear. As a whole, our results provide new, reliable identifications for 10 objects among listed post-AGB star candidates. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), and at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada, which is operated by the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas through the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Granada, Spain). Appendices A-D are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. AGB Stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portman, Matthew; Sargent, Benjamin A.; Held, Leander; Kastner, Joel; SAGE Team

    2016-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are evolved, pulsating variable stars that generate massive outflows of gas and dust, thereby enriching the interstellar medium (ISM) in the products of stellar nucleosynthesis. Recent studies find the dustiest, most extreme AGB stars contribute a disproportionately large amount of matter to their host galaxies; these extreme AGB stars are also the most variable, and they emit most of their energy at mid-infrared wavelengths. Therefore, using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have imaged several target AGB stars identified in previous surveys of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Our aim is to obtain light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microns wavelength for these extreme AGB stars. Using multiple epochs of data taken within the last 3 years by our survey and then further comparing this data to past surveys of the SMC and LMC with Spitzer, we were able to generate preliminary light curves for a sample of 30 extreme AGB stars, as well as for other stars found within the image fields. This research project was made possible by the Rochester Institute of Technology Center for Imaging Science Research Experience for Undergraduates program, funded by National Science Foundation grant PHY-1359361 to RIT.

  14. EFFECT OF HIGH-ENERGY RESONANCES ON THE {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N REACTION RATE AT AGB AND POST-AGB RELEVANT TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    The {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction is of great importance in several astrophysical scenarios, as it influences the production of key isotopes such as {sup 19}F, {sup 18}O, and {sup 15}N. Fluorine is synthesized in the intershell region of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, together with s-elements, by {alpha} radiative capture on {sup 15}N, which in turn is produced in the {sup 18}O proton-induced destruction. Peculiar {sup 18}O abundances are observed in R-Coronae Borealis stars, having {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O {approx}< 1, hundreds of times smaller than the galactic value. Finally, there is no definite explanation of the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in pre-solar grains formed in the outer layers of AGB stars. Again, such an isotopic ratio is influenced by the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction. In this work, a high accuracy {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction rate is proposed, based on the simultaneous fit of direct measurements and of the results of a new Trojan Horse experiment. Indeed, current determinations are uncertain because of the poor knowledge of the resonance parameters of key levels of {sup 19}F. In particular, we have focused on the study of the broad 660 keV 1/2{sup +} resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level of {sup 19}F. Since {Gamma} {approx} 100-300 keV, it determines the low-energy tail of the resonant contribution to the cross section and dominates the cross section at higher energies. Here, we provide a reaction rate that is a factor of two larger above T {approx} 0.5 10{sup 9} K based on our new improved determination of its resonance parameters, which could strongly influence present-day astrophysical model predictions.

  15. SUPER-AGB-AGB EVOLUTION AND THE CHEMICAL INVENTORY IN NGC 2419

    SciTech Connect

    Ventura, Paolo; D'Antona, Francesca; Carini, Roberta; Di Criscienzo, Marcella; D'Ercole, Annibale; Vesperini, Enrico

    2012-12-20

    We follow the scenario of formation of second-generation stars in globular clusters by matter processed by hot bottom burning (HBB) in massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and super-AGB stars (SAGB). In the cluster NGC 2419 we assume the presence of an extreme population directly formed from the AGB and SAGB ejecta, so we can directly compare the yields for a metallicity Z = 0.0003 with the chemical inventory of the cluster NGC 2419. At such a low metallicity, the HBB temperatures (well above 10{sup 8} K) allow a very advanced nucleosynthesis. Masses {approx}6 M{sub Sun} deplete Mg and synthesize Si, going beyond Al, so this latter element is only moderately enhanced; sodium cannot be enhanced. The models are consistent with the observations, although the predicted Mg depletion is not as strong as in the observed stars. We predict that the oxygen abundance must be depleted by a huge factor (>50) in the Mg-poor stars. The HBB temperatures are close to the region where other p-capture reactions on heavier nuclei become possible. We show that high potassium abundance found in Mg-poor stars can be achieved during HBB by p-captures on the argon nuclei, if the relevant cross section(s) are larger than listed in the literature or if the HBB temperature is higher. Finally, we speculate that some calcium production is occurring owing to proton capture on potassium. We emphasize the importance of a strong effort to measure a larger sample of abundances in this cluster.

  16. Near-infrared and Brγ observations of post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Steene, G. C.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Wood, P. R.

    2000-10-01

    Brgamma emission originates in the post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (post-AGB) wind, and that the central star is not yet hot enough to ionize the AGB shell. We measured the J H K L magnitudes of the objects and present their infrared spectral energy distributions. They are typical for post-AGB stars according to the scheme of van der Veen et al. (\\cite{vdVeen89}). We also constructed various color-color diagrams using the near-infrared and IRAS magnitudes. No distinction can be made between the objects showing Brgamma in emission, absorption, or a flat spectrum in the near and far-infrared color-color diagrams. The near-infrared color-color diagrams show evidence for a very large range of extinction, which in part is of circumstellar origin. Near-infrared versus far-infrared color-color diagrams show trends that are consistent with the expected evolution of the circumstellar shell. This sample of post-AGB stars show a larger range in color and are generally redder and closer to the galactic plane than the ones known so far. The properties of most of these objects are fully consistent with the assumption that they are post-AGB stars that have not evolved far enough yet to ionize a significant fraction of their circumstellar material. Based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile; the Australia Telescope Compact Array, which is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operations as a National Facility managed by CSIRO; Siding Spring Observatory.

  17. Ultraviolet emission from main-sequence companions of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Roberto; Guerrero, Martín A.

    2016-09-01

    Although the majority of known binary asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are symbiotic systems (i.e. with a white dwarf as a secondary star), main-sequence companions of AGB stars can be more numerous, even though they are more difficult to find because the primary high luminosity hampers the detection of the companion at visual wavelengths. However, in the ultraviolet the flux emitted by a secondary with Teff > 5500 ˜ 6000 K may prevail over that of the primary, and then it can be used to search for candidates to binary AGB stars. In this work, theoretical atmosphere models are used to calculate the UV excess in the GALEX near- and far-UV bands due to a main-sequence companion. After analysing a sample of confirmed binary AGB stars, we propose as a criterium for binarity: (1) the detection of the AGB star in the GALEX far-UV band and/or (2) a GALEX near-UV observed-to-predicted flux ratio >20. These criteria have been applied to a volume-limited sample of AGB stars within 500 pc of the Sun; 34 out of the sample of 58 AGB stars (˜60 per cent) fulfill them, implying to have a main-sequence companion of spectral type earlier than K0. The excess in the GALEX near- and far-UV bands cannot be attributed to a single temperature companion star, thus suggesting that the UV emission of the secondary might be absorbed by the extended atmosphere and circumstellar envelope of the primary or that UV emission is produced in accretion flows.

  18. SMA Observations of CO J=2-1 Emission from Evolved Stars in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Patel, N. A.; Meixner, M.; Otsuka, M.; Riebel, D.; Srinivasan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are in the final stages of their lives, in which they eject mass. The dust grains formed in these mass outflows experience radiation pressure from the star and push the gas in the star's outflow away with the dust. There is much infrared data available to determine AGB dust mass loss in, e.g., the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds (e.g., the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy project; PI: M. Meixner). However, the dependence of gas-to-dust ratios on metallicity for AGB stars, of use in determining total mass loss rates from optical and infrared observations constraining dust mass loss rates, is not well known. To remedy this, we present results from our 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of 8 evolved stars in the inner Galactic Bulge (about 8 kpc distant). The metallicities of these OH/IR and AGB stars have been measured by others. We detect CO J=2-1 emission from OH 359.943+0.260. We possibly detect CO J=2-1 emission from [SLO2003] A12, though this detection is heavily contaminated by surrounding extended emission. We do not detect CO J=2-1 emission from the rest of our sample. Combining these CO data and analysis with observations at infrared wavelengths constraining dust mass loss, we determine the gas-to-dust ratios of Galactic Bulge stars for which CO emission is detected, determining a value of 320 for OH 359.943+0.260 and an upper limit of < 260 for [SLO2003] A12. We discuss applications of this work to studies of mass loss from evolved stars elsewhere, such as AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds. We also discuss prospects for future CO observations of OH/IR and AGB stars in the Galactic Bulge.

  19. Galactic dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, David

    There is a broad agreement between the predictions of galactic dynamo theory and observations; although there are still some unresolved difficulties, the theory appears to be robust. Now attention is turning from generic models to studies of particular features of the large-scale magnetic fields, and also to models for specific galaxies. The effects of noncircular flows, for example driven by the interaction of spiral arms and galactic bars with the dynamo, are of current interest.

  20. Super and massive AGB stars - III. Nucleosynthesis in metal-poor and very metal-poor stars - Z = 0.001 and 0.0001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Carolyn L.; Gil-Pons, Pilar; Lau, Herbert H. B.; Lattanzio, John C.; Siess, Lionel; Campbell, Simon W.

    2014-06-01

    We present a new grid of stellar models and nucleosynthetic yields for super-AGB stars with metallicities Z = 0.001 and 0.0001, applicable for use within galactic chemical evolution models. Contrary to more metal-rich stars where hot bottom burning is the main driver of the surface composition, in these lower metallicity models the effect of third dredge-up and corrosive second dredge-up also have a strong impact on the yields. These metal-poor and very metal-poor super-AGB stars create large amounts of 4He, 13C, 14N and 27Al as well as the heavy magnesium isotopes 25Mg and 26Mg. There is a transition in yield trends at metallicity Z ≈ 0.001, below which we find positive yields of 12C, 16O, 15N and 28Si, which is not the case for higher metallicities. We explore the large uncertainties derived from wind prescriptions in super-AGB stars, finding ≈2 orders of magnitude difference in yields of 22Ne, 23Na, 24, 25, 26Mg, 27Al and our s-process proxy isotope g. We find inclusion of variable composition low-temperature molecular opacities is only critical for super-AGB stars of metallicities below Z ≈ 0.001. We analyse our results, and those in the literature, to address the question: Are super-AGB stars the polluters responsible for extreme population in the globular cluster NGC 2808? Our results, as well as those from previous studies, seem unable to satisfactorily match the extreme population in this globular cluster.

  1. Why Galaxies Care about AGB Stars: Setting the Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renzini, A.

    2015-08-01

    In this introduction to the Third Congress of Vienna on asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, I first try to highlight why it is so hard to cope with the AGB evolutionary phase. This phase is indeed dominated by three main physical processes concerning bulk motions of matter inside/around stars, namely envelope convection, mixing, and mass loss. They are inextricably interlaced with each other in a circular sequence of reactions and counter-reactions which has so far undermined our attempts at calibrating such processes independent of one another. The second part of this introduction is focused on globular clusters, illustrating how they came to be a new frontier for AGB evolution and a new opportunity to understand it.

  2. Sensitivity study for s process nucleosynthesis in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloczek, A.; Thomas, B.; Glorius, J.; Plag, R.; Pignatari, M.; Reifarth, R.; Ritter, C.; Schmidt, S.; Sonnabend, K.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a large-scale sensitivity study of reaction rates in the main component of the s process. The aim of this study is to identify all rates, which have a global effect on the s process abundance distribution and the three most important rates for the production of each isotope. We have performed a sensitivity study on the radiative 13C-pocket and on the convective thermal pulse, sites of the s process in AGB stars. We identified 22 rates, which have the highest impact on the s-process abundances in AGB stars.

  3. Optically visible post-AGB/RGB stars and young stellar objects in the Small Magellanic Cloud: candidate selection, spectral energy distributions and spectroscopic examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.; Van Winckel, H.

    2014-04-01

    We have carried out a search for optically visible post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) candidates in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). First, we used mid-IR observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope to select optically visible candidates with excess mid-IR flux and then we obtained low-resolution optical spectra for 801 of the candidates. After removing poor-quality spectra and contaminants, such as M-stars, C-stars, planetary nebulae, quasi-stellar objects and background galaxies, we ended up with a final sample of 63 high-probability post-AGB/RGB candidates of A-F spectral type. From the spectral observations, we estimated the stellar parameters: effective temperature (Teff), surface gravity (log g) and metallicity ([Fe/H]). We also estimated the reddening and deduced the luminosity using the stellar parameters combined with photometry. For the post-AGB/RGB candidates, we found that the metallicity distribution peaks at [Fe/H] ≈ -1.00 dex. Based on a luminosity criterion, 42 of these 63 sources were classified as post-red giant branch (post-RGB) candidates and the remaining 21 as post-AGB candidates. From the spectral energy distributions, we were able to infer that 6 of the 63 post-AGB/RGB candidates have a surrounding circumstellar shell suggesting that they are single stars, while 27 of the post-AGB/RGB candidates have a surrounding disc, suggesting that they lie in binary systems. For the remaining 30 post-AGB/RGB candidates the nature of the circumstellar environment was unclear. Variability is displayed by 38 of the 63 post-AGB/RGB candidates with the most common variability types being the Population II Cepheids (including RV-Tauri stars) and semiregular variables. This study has also revealed a new RV Tauri star in the SMC, J005107.19-734133.3, which shows signs of s-process enrichment. From the numbers of post-AGB/RGB stars in the SMC, we were able to estimate evolutionary rates. We find that the number of post-AGB and post-RGB candidates that

  4. Nucleosynthesis Predictions for Intermediate-Mass AGB Stars: Comparison to Observations of Type I Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakas, Amanda I.; vanRaai, Mark A.; Lugaro, Maria; Sterling, Nicholas C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.

    2008-01-01

    Type I planetary nebulae (PNe) have high He/H and N/O ratios and are thought to be descendants of stars with initial masses of approx. 3-8 Stellar Mass. These characteristics indicate that the progenitor stars experienced proton-capture nucleosynthesis at the base of the convective envelope, in addition to the slow neutron capture process operating in the He-shell (the s-process). We compare the predicted abundances of elements up to Sr from models of intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to measured abundances in Type I PNe. In particular, we compare predictions and observations for the light trans-iron elements Se and Kr, in order to constrain convective mixing and the s-process in these stars. A partial mixing zone is included in selected models to explore the effect of a C-13 pocket on the s-process yields. The solar-metallicity models produce enrichments of [(Se, Kr)/Fe] less than or approx. 0.6, consistent with Galactic Type I PNe where the observed enhancements are typically less than or approx. 0.3 dex, while lower metallicity models predict larger enrichments of C, N, Se, and Kr. O destruction occurs in the most massive models but it is not efficient enough to account for the greater than or approx. 0.3 dex O depletions observed in some Type I PNe. It is not possible to reach firm conclusions regarding the neutron source operating in massive AGB stars from Se and Kr abundances in Type I PNe; abundances for more s-process elements may help to distinguish between the two neutron sources. We predict that only the most massive (M grester than or approx.5 Stellar Mass) models would evolve into Type I PNe, indicating that extra-mixing processes are active in lower-mass stars (3-4 Stellar Mass), if these stars are to evolve into Type I PNe.

  5. CN and CH Abundance Analysis in a Sample of Eight Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolinski, Jason P.; Lee, Y.; Beers, T. C.; Martell, S. L.; An, D.; Sivarani, T.

    2011-01-01

    Galactic globular clusters exhibit star-to-star variations in their light element abundances that are not predicted by formation and evolution models involving single stellar generations. Recently it has been suggested that internal pollution from early supernovae and AGB winds may have played important roles in forming a second generation of enriched stars. We present updated results of a CN and CH abundance analysis of stars from the base to the tip of the red giant branch, and in some cases down onto the main sequence, for eight globular clusters with available photometric and spectroscopic data from SDSS-I and SDSS-II/SEGUE. These results include a discussion of the radial distribution of CN enrichment and how this may impact the current paradigm. Funding for SDSS-I and SDSS-II has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Japanese Monbukagakusho, the Max Planck Society, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The SDSS Web Site is http://www.sdss.org/. This work was supported in part by grants PHY 02-16783 and PHY 08-22648: Physics Frontiers Center/Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), awarded by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  6. Galactic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    Galactic winds have become arguably one of the hottest topics in extragalactic astronomy. This enthusiasm for galactic winds is due in part to the detection of winds in many, if not most, high-redshift galaxies. Galactic winds have also been invoked by theorists to (1) suppress the number of visible dwarf galaxies and avoid the "cooling catastrophe" at high redshift that results in the overproduction of massive luminous galaxies, (2) remove material with low specific angular momentum early on and help enlarge gas disks in CDM + baryons simulations, (3) reduce the dark mass concentrations in galaxies, (4) explain the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies from selective loss of metal-enriched gas from smaller galaxies, (5) enrich and "preheat" the ICM, (6) enrich the IGM without disturbing the Lyαforest significantly, and (7) inhibit cooling flows in galaxy clusters with active cD galaxies. The present paper highlights a few key aspects of galactic winds taken from a recent ARAA review by Veilleux, Cecil, &Bland-Hawthorn (2005; herafter VCBH). Readers interested in a more detailed discussion of this topic are encouraged to refer to the original ARAA article.

  7. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of southern post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D. J.; Cottrell, P. L.; Pollard, K. R.; Albrow, M. D.

    2004-05-01

    We present the results of contemporaneous photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 20 post-AGB stars from Mt John University Observatory. Photometric measures were carried our suing Johnson BV and Cousins RI filters, and the radial velocity measurements were acquired using spectra from an echelle spectrograph. Our program spanned five years and the stars covered a range of spectral types from B to K in order to investigate the behavior of post-AGB stars as they evolve away from the AGB. A number of stars proved to be variable inways incompatible with post-AGB models and are reclassified. Periodicities are presented for a number of stars. Photometrically, HD 70379 was found to be pulsating in two modes with periods of 85 and 97 d. The radial velocities also varied, with the peak amplitude occurring when the photometry was also changing most. AI CMi presented three different types of spectra associated with photometric brightness, with varying strengths of narrow emission lines and molecular bandheads. The Hα profiles in almost all of the stars show evidence of emission which varies on time scales of days to months. The Na D line profiles are generally complex showing between 4 and 7 components due to both circumstellar and interstellar material.

  8. Winds of Binary AGB Stars as Observed by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Mečina, M.; Paladini, C.; Cox, N. L. J.; Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Pourbaix, D.; Mohamed, S.; Siopis, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present Herschel/PACS observations of the large-scale environments of binary AGB stars as part of the Mass-loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample. From the literature we found 18 of the objects to be members of physically bound multiple systems. Several show a large-scale far-IR emission which differs significantly from spherical symmetry. A probable cause is the gravitational force of the companion on the stellar AGB wind and the mass-losing star itself. A spiral pattern is thereby imprinted in the dusty stellar wind. The most remarkable structures are found around o Ceti, W Aquilæ, R Aquarii, and π1 Gruis. The environments of o Cet and W Aql show a spiral pattern while the symbiotic nature of R Aqr is revealed as two opposing arms which reflect a nova outburst. The emission around π1 Gru is dominated by two structures, a disk and an arc, which are presumably not caused by the same companion. We found evidence that π1 Gru is a hierarchical triple system in which a close companion attracts the AGB wind onto the orbital plane and the outer companion forms a spiral arm. These far-IR observations underline the role of a companion as a major external influence in creating asymmetric winds in the AGB phase, even before the star becomes a planetary nebula (PN).

  9. The Governance Committee: Independent Institutions. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, E. B.; Lanier, James L.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimal committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices outlined in this publication support the objectives of board…

  10. From Nuclei to Dust Grains: How the AGB Machinery Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobrecht, D.; Cristallo, S.; Piersanti, L.

    2015-12-01

    With their circumstellar envelopes AGB stars are marvelous laboratories to test our knowledge of microphysics (opacities, equation of state), macrophysics (convection, rotation, stellar pulsations, magnetic fields) and nucleosynthesis (nuclear burnings, slow neutron capture processes, molecules and dust formation). Due to the completely different environments those processes occur, the interplay between stellar interiors (dominated by mixing events like convection and dredge-up episodes) and stellar winds (characterized by dust formation and wind acceleration) is often ignored. We intend to develop a new approach involving a transition region, taking into consideration hydrodynamic processes which may drive AGB mass-loss. Our aim is to describe the process triggering the mass-loss in AGB stars with different masses, metallicities and chemical enrichments, possibly deriving a velocity field of the outflowing matter. Moreover, we intend to construct an homogeneous theoretical database containing detailed abundances of atomic and molecular species produced by these objects. As a long term goal, we will derive dust production rates for silicates, alumina and silicon carbides, in order to explain laboratory measurements of isotopic ratios in AGB dust grains.

  11. Examining the Impact of Early AGB Nucleosynthesis on the Apparent Cosmological Variation in the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenfelter, Timothy; Mathews, Grant; Olive, Keith

    2004-10-01

    Evidence from a large sample of quasar absorption-line spectra in damped Lyman-α systems has shown potential cosmological variation of the fine structure constant α. The most statistically significant portion of this sample involves the comparison of Mg and Fe wavelength shifts using the many-multiplet (MM) method. However, this method is sensitive to the heavy isotopes, especially in Mg. We implement recent yields of intermediate mass (IM) stars, which evolve beyond the CNO cycle, to show that the ensuing isotope distribution of Mg can account for the observed variation in α provided early star-formation was particularly rich in IM stars. During the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) phase of IM stars, heavy Mg isotopes are robustly produced via hot-bottom burning and thermal pulsing in helium burning shell. We incorporate these recently appreciated processes in the galactic chemical evolution models of these damped Lyman-α systems (early galaxies) and delve into the consequences of this chemical evolution alternative to an α variation. We find that this analysis adds to the mounting evidence that the low-metallicity Universe was strongly influenced by IM stars beyond the standard power law distribution of stellar masses. Because these AGB stars have a significant influence on other abundances, especially nitrogen, we use measurements of N, Si Fe, C, and O to constrain our models. In this way, we obtain an alternative explanation of the α variation that is consistent with observations.

  12. The red/infrared evolution in galaxies - Effect of the stars on the asymptotic giant branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokshi, Arati; Wright, Edward L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of including the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population in a spectral synthesis model of galaxy evolution is examined. Stars on the AGB are luminous enough and also evolve rapidly enough to affect the evolution of red and infrared colors in galaxies. The validity of using infrared colors as distance indicators to galaxies is then investigated in detail. It is found that for z of 1 or less infrared colors of model galaxies behave linearly with redshift.

  13. Milky Way Red Dwarfs in the BoRG Survey; Galactic Scale-height and the Distribution of Dwarf Stars in WFC3 Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Trenti, M.; Clarkson, W.; Sahu, K.; Bradley, L.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N.; De Marchi, G.; Andersen, M.; Bouwens, R.; Ryan, R.

    2014-06-01

    of M-dwarfs however will make them ideal tracers of Galactic halo substructure with EUCLID and reference stars for James Webb Space Telescope observations.

  14. Milky Way red dwarfs in the BoRG survey; galactic scale-height and the distribution of dwarf stars in WFC3 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Holwerda, B. W.; Bouwens, R.; Trenti, M.; Clarkson, W.; Sahu, K.; Bradley, L.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N.; Ryan, R.; De Marchi, G.; Andersen, M.

    2014-06-10

    -redshift galaxies. The relative ubiquity of M-dwarfs however will make them ideal tracers of Galactic halo substructure with EUCLID and reference stars for James Webb Space Telescope observations.

  15. A Photometric and Spectroscopic Survey of AGB Stars in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, James P.

    1996-04-01

    Asymptotic giant-branch (AGB) stars are identified and classified in five 7' X 7' fields spaced along M31's SW semi-major axis using a four band photometric system. An investigation of the AGB luminosity functions and red giant-branch widths reveals significant differences between the star forming histories of the five fields. The distance modulus of M31 is derived using carbon stars (C-stars) and found to be consistent with both a value obtained from Cepheids and with values in the literature. The ratio of AGB C- to M-stars (C/M ratio) in the five fields is found to increase with galactocentric distance and it is shown that photometric incompleteness is not responsible for this effect. This is the first clear demonstration of a varying C/M ratio in an external galaxy. The C/M ratios appear to be insensitive to star-forming history differences but sensitive to metallicity differences between the fields. Previous observations are used to define a relationship between the C/M ratio and metallicity, and this is used to obtain estimates of the field metallicities. These estimates are found to be consistent with a previous measurement of M31's metallicity gradient. The C/M ratios measured in M31 indicate that the composition of M31's interstellar medium may be position dependent, and evidence is cited in favour of this. Follow up spectroscopy was obtained in two of the five fields, and is used to show that the photometric system did an excellent job of discriminating between M-, S- and C-stars. Of the 48 C-stars for which spectra were obtained, 7 have strongly enhanced 13C bands (J-stars), 2 have strong H-alpha emission, while 3 are found to exhibit enhanced Li absorption (Li-stars). Both the J- and Li-stars are fainter than predicted by current theoretical models, while the colours of the H-alpha stars suggest they may be in the terminal phases of their evolution. The C_2 and CN bandstrengths of the C-stars are measured, and no correlation between these bandstrengths

  16. A Photometric and Spectroscopic Survey of AGB Stars in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, James Philip

    1996-01-01

    Asymptotic giant-branch (AGB) stars are identified and classified in five 7^'times7 ^' fields spaced along M31's SW semi-major axis using a four band photometric system. An investigation of the AGB luminosity functions and red giant -branch widths reveals significant differences between the star forming histories of the five fields. The distance modulus of M31 is derived using carbon stars (C-stars) and found to be consistent with both a value obtained from Cepheids and with values in the literature. The ratio of AGB C- to M-stars (C/M ratio) in the five fields is found to increase with galactocentric distance and it is shown that photometric incompleteness is not responsible for this effect. This is the first clear demonstration of a varying C/M ratio in an external galaxy. The C/M ratios appear to be insensitive to star -forming history differences but sensitive to metallicity differences between the fields. Previous observations are used to define a relationship between the C/M ratio and metallicity, and this is used to obtain estimates of the field metallicities. These estimates are found to be consistent with a previous measurement of M31's metallicity gradient. The C/M ratios measured in M31 indicate that the composition of M31's interstellar medium may be position dependent, and evidence is cited in favour of this. Follow up spectroscopy was obtained in two of the five fields, and is used to show that the photometric system did an excellent job of discriminating between M -, S- and C-stars. Of the 48 C-stars for which spectra were obtained, 7 have strongly enhanced ^ {13}C bands (J-stars), 2 have strong H alpha emission, while 3 are found to exhibit enhanced Li absorption (Li-stars). Both the J- and Li-stars are fainter than predicted by current theoretical models, while the colours of the Hα stars suggest they may be in the terminal phase of their evolution. The C_2 and CN bandstrengths of the C-stars are measured, and no correlation between these

  17. Nucleosynthesis in AGB Stars Traced by Oxygen Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nutte, R.; Decin, L.; Olofsson, H.; de Koter, A.; Lombaert, R.; Milam, S.; Ramstedt, S.

    2015-08-01

    Isotopic ratios are by far the best diagnostic tracers of the stellar origin of elements, as they are very sensitive to the precise conditions in the nuclear burning regions. They allow us to give direct constraints on stellar evolution models and on the progenitor mass. However, up to now different isotopic ratios have been well constrained for only a handful of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. We present new data on isotopologue lines of a well-selected sample of AGB stars, covering the three spectral classes of C-, S- and M-type stars. We report on the first efforts made in determining accurate isotopologue fractions, focusing on oxygen isotopes which are a crucial tracer of the poorly constrained extra mixing processes in stellar atmospheres.

  18. Optical Spectroscopy of the Post-AGB Star HD 89353

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad-Yob, S.-J.; Gopir, G. K.; Malasan, H. L.; Anwar, R.

    2009-08-01

    Using the compact spectrograph at 600 lines/mm, and the 50.8 cm telescope at the Langkawi National Observatory, we obtained moderate resolution spectra of the post-AGB star HD 89353. The objective is to measure carbon and nitrogen abundances as a test of nucleosynthesis in AGB stars. The wavelength covered is between 4800-5600, 6467-7276, and 7035-7840 Å. A preliminary analysis showed the presence of the CI lines: 4932.00, 5039.05, 6586.269, 7108.934, 7111.480, 7113.178, 7115.182, 7116.991 and 7119.656 Å, and the NI lines: 7442.28 and 7423.63 Å. There was also emission line of H-alpha. We measured the equivalent widths of the C and N lines for future abundance calculation.

  19. Starlight and Sandstorms: Mass Loss Mechanisms on the AGB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfner, S.

    2011-09-01

    There are strong observational indications that the dense slow winds of cool luminous AGB stars are driven by radiative pressure on dust grains which form in the extended atmospheres resulting from pulsation-induced shocks. For carbon stars, detailed models of outflows driven by amorphous carbon grains show good agreement with observations. Some still existing discrepancies may be due to a simplified treatment of cooling in shocks, drift of the grains relative to the gas, or effects of giant convection cells or dust-induced pattern formation. For stars with C/O < 1, recent models indicate that absorption by silicate dust is probably insufficient to drive their winds. A possible alternative is scattering by Fe-free silicate grains with radii of a few tenths of a micron. In this scenario one should expect less circumstellar reddening for M- and S-type AGB stars than for C-stars with comparable stellar parameters and mass loss rates.

  20. Nucleosynthesis in Low Mass Very Metal Poor AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, A.

    The evolution of a 1.5 M⊙, Z= 10-5 stellar model has been followed starting at the ZAMS up to the thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase. Calculations were done using the LPCODE [1], to which some changes were done. The most important and relevant to this work is the incorporation of a full nuclear network from H to Po, comprising about 525 isotopes and 910 nuclear reactions, appropriate for the computation of the s-process occurring in AGB stars. Convection is treated according to the mixing length theory (λMLT = 1.7) and convective mixing as a diffusive process. Diffusive overshooting is also included according to [2] and the free parameter f adopted is 0.015. Mass loss is given by the Reimers formula, with the parameter η = 1.

  1. Probing the Mass Loss History of AGB Stars with Herschelfootnotemark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschbaum, F.; Mecina, M.; Ottensamer, R.; Luntzer, A.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Decin, L.; Royer, P.; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.; Barlow, M.; Lim, T.

    2011-09-01

    An overview is given of AGB stars imaged with the PACS and SPIRE instruments on-board the Herschel Space Observatory in the framework of the MESS Guaranteed Time Key Programme. The objects AQ And, U Ant, W Aql, U Cam, RT Cap, Y CVn, TT Cyg, UX Dra, W Ori, AQ Sgr, and X TrA all show detached or extended circumstellar emission.

  2. Magnetic fields around AGB stars and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlemmings, W. H. T.

    2014-08-01

    Stars with a mass up to a few solar masses are one of the main contributors to the enrichment of the interstellar medium in dust and heavy elements. However, while significant progress has been made, the process of the mass-loss responsible for this enrichment is still not exactly known and forces beyond radiation pressure might be required. Often, the mass lost in the last phases of the stars life will become a spectacular planetary nebula. The shaping process of often strongly a-spherical PNe is equally elusive. Both binaries and magnetic fields have been suggested to be possible agents although a combination of both might also be a natural explanation. Here I review the current evidence for magnetic fields around AGB and post-AGB stars pre-Planetary Nebulae and PNe themselves. Magnetic fields appear to be ubiquitous in the envelopes of apparently single stars, challenging current ideas on its origin, although we have found that binary companions could easily be hidden from view. There are also strong indications of magnetically collimated outflows from post-AGB/pre-PNe objects supporting a significant role in shaping the circumstellar envelope.

  3. Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totten, E. J.; Irwin, M. J.

    1996-04-01

    A byproduct of the APM high redshift quasar survey (Irwin et al. 1991) was the discovery of ~ 20 distant (20-100kpc) cool AGB carbon stars (all N-type) at high Galactic latitude. In August we used the INT+IDS to survey the rest of the high latitude SGC sky visible from La Palma and found 10 more similar carbon stars. Before this work there were only a handful of published faint high latitude cool carbon stars known (eg. Margon et al., 1984, Mould et al., 1985) and there has been speculation as to their origin (eg. Sanduleak, 1980, van den Bergh & Lafontaine, 1984). Intermediate age carbon stars (3 -- 7 Gyrs) seem unlikely to have formed in the halo in isolation from other star forming regions so how did they get there ? One possiblity that we are investigating, is that they arise from either the disruption of tidally captured dSph galaxies or are a manifestion of the long sought after optical component of the Magellanic Stream. Lack of proper motion rules out the possibility of them being dwarf carbon stars (eg. Warren et al., 1992); indeed no N-type carbon stars have been found to be dwarf carbon stars. Our optical spectroscopy confirms their carbon star type (they are indistinguishable from cool AGB carbon stars in nearby dwarf galaxies) and hence probable large distances. We are extending our survey to the NGC region, obtaining radial velocities and good S:N fluxed spectra for all the carbon stars. This will enable us to investigate their kinematics, true spatial distribution and hence their origin. Even, in the event that these objects are somehow an integral part of the Galactic halo, then their velocities and large distances will enable direct studies of the velocity ellipsoid and rotation of the outer halo (eg. Green et al., 1994).

  4. S-process nucleosynthesis in AGB stars with the full spectrum of turbulence scheme for convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagüe, A.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Ventura, P.; Lugaro, M.

    2016-07-01

    The chemical evolution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars models depends greatly on the input physics (e.g. convective model, mass loss recipe). Variations of hot bottom burning (HBB) strength, or third dredge-up (TDU) efficiency are among the main consequences of adopting different input physics in the AGB models. The ATON evolutionary code stands apart from others in that it uses the Full Spectrum of Turbulence convective model. Here we present the first results of a newly developed s-process nucleosynthesis module for ATON AGB models. Our results are compared also with observations and theoretical predictions of present AGB nucleosynthesis models using different input physics.

  5. Post Asymptotic Giant Branch and Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Post asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars, central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important phases of stellar evolution as the material they feedback is the seed of subsequent star formation in a galaxy. The majority of low and intermediate mass stars are expected to evolve through these channels, however, it is uncertain how many actually do, and at what rate. The Galactic halo, with its older population, provides a direct test of evolutionary models for low mass stars. Birthrate estimates of PNe are uncertain and worse still, are in contradiction with accepted white dwarf (WD) birthrate estimates. Much of the uncertainty stems from the lack of complete samples and poorly determined distance estimates. New surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Galaxy Evolutionary Explorer (GALEX) and the INT Photometric Ha Survey (IPHAS) have discovered many new PNe and have observed the far edges of the Galaxy. Improved methods of determining distances to CSPNe are presented here, using model atmospheres, evolutionary tracks and high resolution reddening maps utilising these revolutionary surveys. Locating the CSPN is non-trivial particularly for evolved PNe, as they are extended with their central star often displaced from the centre of the nebula. Therefore, photometric criteria are required to locate the CSPN in the nebula's field. Synthetic photometry of the CSPNe is derived from spectral energy distributions (SEDs) computed from a grid of model atmospheres covering the parameter range of CSPNe. The SEDs are convolved with filter transmission curves to compute synthetic magnitudes for a given photometric system which are then calibrated with standard stars and WDs. A further project borne out of a search for luminous central stars of faint PNe, resulted in a systematic search for post-AGB stars in the Galactic halo. In this work, new candidate halo post-AGB stars are discovered from a search through the SDSS spectroscopic

  6. Great Galactic Buddies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 8.15 Billion Lightyears8.59 Billion Lightyears8.98 Billion Lightyears 9.09 Billion Lightyears

    Like great friends, galaxies stick together. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have spotted a handful of great galactic pals bonding back when the universe was a mere 4.6 billion years old. The universe is believed to be 13.7 billion years old.

    Collectively, these great galactic buddies are called galaxy clusters. A typical galaxy cluster can contain hundreds of galaxies and trillions of stars.

    In this false-color composite, some of the oldest galaxy clusters in the universe pose for Spitzer's infrared array camera. The individual galaxies that make up the distant clusters are shown as red dots in all four images.

    The green blobs are Milky Way stars along the line of sight, and the blue specks are faint galaxies at various distances along the line of sight. The green and blue data are from a visible-light, ground-based telescope.

    The cluster at 9.1 billion light-years away (lower right panel) is currently the most distant galaxy cluster ever detected.

    These images are three-color composites, in which blue represents visible light with a wavelength of 0.4 microns, and green indicates visible light of 0.8 microns. The visible data were captured by the ground-based Mosaic I camera at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Tucson, Ariz. Red represents infrared light of 4.5 microns, captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera.

  7. Galactic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2013-04-01

    All galaxies began as spiral galaxies. The early universe began with sets of two or more pre-galactic arms orbiting each other. As gravitational attraction between the arms took effect, the fore-sections of the arms tangentially collided forming spiral galaxies when they attached with the orbital motion of the arms being converted to the rotational motion of the newly formed spiral galaxies or (Iφ)arm1+ (Iφ)arm2+ ...+ (Iφ)armn= (Iφ)galaxy. If the centripetal force on the arms is more than the gravitational force on the arms, the spiral galaxy remains a spiral galaxy i.e. mv^2/r>=Gmarmmgalaxy/r^2. If the galaxy is slowly rotating, the spiral arms collapse into the body of the galaxy because the gravitational force is greater than the centripetal force on the arms and an elliptical galaxy is formed i.e. mv^2/r < Gmarmsmgalaxy/r^2.

  8. Galactic planetary nebulae with precise nebular abundances as a tool to understand the evolution of asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Ventura, P.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Yagüe, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present nucleosynthesis predictions (HeCNOCl) from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models, with diffusive overshooting from all the convective borders, in the metallicity range Z⊙/4 < Z < 2 Z⊙. They are compared to recent precise nebular abundances in a sample of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) that is divided among double-dust chemistry (DC) and oxygen-dust chemistry (OC) according to the infrared dust features. Unlike the similar subsample of Galactic carbon-dust chemistry PNe recently analysed by us, here the individual abundance errors, the higher metallicity spread, and the uncertain dust types/subtypes in some PNe do not allow a clear determination of the AGB progenitor masses (and formation epochs) for both PNe samples; the comparison is thus more focused on a object-by-object basis. The lowest metallicity OC PNe evolve from low-mass (˜1 M⊙) O-rich AGBs, while the higher metallicity ones (all with uncertain dust classifications) display a chemical pattern similar to the DC PNe. In agreement with recent literature, the DC PNe mostly descend from high-mass (M ≥ 3.5 M⊙) solar/supersolar metallicity AGBs that experience hot bottom burning (HBB), but other formation channels in low-mass AGBs like extra mixing, stellar rotation, binary interaction, or He pre-enrichment cannot be disregarded until more accurate C/O ratios would be obtained. Two objects among the DC PNe show the imprint of advanced CNO processing and deep second dredge-up, suggesting progenitors masses close to the limit to evolve as core collapse supernovae (above 6M⊙). Their actual C/O ratio, if confirmed, indicate contamination from the third dredge-up, rejecting the hypothesis that the chemical composition of such high-metallicity massive AGBs is modified exclusively by HBB.

  9. Galactic planetary nebulae with precise nebular abundances as a tool to understand the evolution of asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Ventura, P.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Yagüe, A.

    2016-06-01

    We present nucleosynthesis predictions (HeCNOCl) from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models, with diffusive overshooting from all the convective borders, in the metallicity range Z⊙/4 < Z < 2Z⊙. They are compared to recent precise nebular abundances in a sample of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) that is divided among double-dust chemistry (DC) and oxygen-dust chemistry (OC) according to the infrared dust features. Unlike the similar subsample of Galactic carbon-dust chemistry PNe recently analysed by us, here the individual abundance errors, the higher metallicity spread, and the uncertain dust types/subtypes in some PNe do not allow a clear determination of the AGB progenitor masses (and formation epochs) for both PNe samples; the comparison is thus more focussed on a object-by-object basis. The lowest metallicity OC PNe evolve from low-mass (˜1 M⊙) O-rich AGBs, while the higher metallicity ones (all with uncertain dust classifications) display a chemical pattern similar to the DC PNe. In agreement with recent literature, the DC PNe mostly descend from high-mass (M ≥3.5 M⊙) solar/supersolar metallicity AGBs that experience hot bottom burning (HBB), but other formation channels in low-mass AGBs like extra mixing, stellar rotation, binary interaction, or He pre-enrichment cannot be disregarded until more accurate C/O ratios would be obtained. Two objects among the DC PNe show the imprint of advanced CNO processing and deep second dredge-up, suggesting progenitors masses close to the limit to evolve as core collapse supernovae (above 6~M⊙). Their actual C/O ratio, if confirmed, indicate contamination from the third dredge-up, rejecting the hypothesis that the chemical composition of such high-metallicity massive AGBs is modified exclusively by HBB.

  10. Nonradial instability strips for post-AGB stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stanghellini, L. ); Cox, A.N. ); Starrfield, S.G. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1990-01-01

    We test several pre-degenerate (PNN and DO) and degenerate (DB) models for stability against nonradial oscillations. These models lie on the 0.6 M{sub {circle dot}} evolutionary track calculated by Iben. The post-AGB stars have a residual CO core with only a little surface hydrogen and helium. In order to match all the observed pulsators. We use three different surface compositions for the DO stars, and a pure helium surface for the DB white dwarfs. We find 3 DO and 1 DB instability strips that we compare to the available observations. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  11. HIRAS images of fossil dust shells around AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.; Kester, Do J. M.; Bontekoe, Tj. Romke; Loup, C.

    1994-01-01

    We present high resolution HIRAS 60 and 100 micron images of AGB stars surrounded by fossil dust shells. Resolving the extended emission of the circumstellar dust allows a determination of the mass loss history of the star. We show that the geometry of the 60 micron emission surrounding HR 3126 agrees well with that of the optical reflection nebula. The emission around the carbon star U Hya is resolved into a central point source and a ring of dust, and the mass loss rate in the detached shell is 70 times higher than the current mass loss rate.

  12. What Is, Or Should Be, The AGB? A Report from the Membership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Junius A.; And Others

    This document presents the results of a survey of member presidents and trustees of the Association of Governing Boards (AGB). The questionnaire employed several strategies for determining member needs and interests, and their perception of the role that the AGB should play in serving those needs and interests. First, a number of frequent concerns…

  13. Spitzer Light Curves of Dusty AGB Stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin; Meixner, Margaret; Riebel, David; Vijh, Uma; Hora, Joe; Boyer, Martha; Cook, Kem; Groenewegen, Martin; Whitelock, Patricia; Ita, Yoshifusa; Feast, Michael; Kemper, Ciska; Marengo, Massimo; Otsuka, Masaaki; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2014-12-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) variable stars are, together with supernovae, the main sources of enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM) in processed material, particularly carbon, nitrogen and heavy s-process elements. The dustiest, extreme AGB stars contribute the largest enrichment per star. We propose to measure the first light curves for 32 of the dustiest AGB variable stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using the warm Spitzer mission's IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging for monthly imaging measurements. We know most are variable based on dual-epoch observations from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) surveys of the SMC and ground-based near-infrared observations, but we have not observed these dusty SMC stars at the mid-infrared wavelengths available to Spitzer. Only Spitzer will be able to measure the light curve of this key phase of the AGB: the dustiest and indeed final stage of the AGB. Without this information, our developing picture of AGB evolution is decidedly incomplete. The observations we propose will test the validity of AGB evolution models, and, thus, their predictions of the return of mass and nucleosynthetic products to the ISM. A value-added component to this study is that we will obtain variability information on other AGB stars that lie within the fields of view of our observations. This proposal continues the studies we have begun with our Cycle 9 program (pid 90219) and our Cycle 10 program (pid 10154).

  14. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z.; Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (≅ 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (≅ 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (∼3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub −2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub −0.8}{sup +1.4} per

  15. Infrared spectroscopy of asymptotic giant branch stars in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golriz, S. S.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Vanhollebeke, E.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Habing, H. J.; Kemper, F.; Schultheis, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Wood, P. R.; Cami, J.

    2014-10-01

    We have selected a homogeneous sample of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Galactic bulge population from the ISOGAL survey. Our target stars cover a wide range of mass-loss rates (˜10-8-10-4 M⊙ yr-1) and differ primarily by their age on the AGB. This homogeneous sample is thus ideally suited to study the dust formation process as a function of age on the AGB. We observed our sample with Spitzer-Infrared Spectrograph, and studied the overall properties of the infrared spectra of these targets. The analysis is complicated by the presence of strong and variable background emission, and the extracted infrared AGB star spectra are affected by interstellar extinction. Several stars in our sample have no detectable dust emission, and we used these `naked stars' to characterize the stellar and molecular contributions to the infrared spectra of our target stars. The resulting dust spectra of our targets do indeed show significant variety in their spectral appearance, pointing to differing dust compositions for the targets. We classify the spectra based on the shape of their 10-μm emission following the scheme by Sloan & Price. We find that the early silicate emission classes associated with oxide dust are generally under-represented in our sample due to extinction effects. We also find a weak 13-μm dust feature in two of our otherwise naked star spectra, suggesting that the carrier of this feature could potentially be the first condensate in the sequence of dust condensation.

  16. The pathways of C: from AGB stars, to the Interstellar Medium, and finally into the protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.

    2011-05-01

    The origin, and role of C in the formation of first solar system aggregates is described. Stellar grains evidence demonstrates that Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars were nearby to the solar nebula at the time of solar system formation. Such stars continue to burn H and He in shells that surround the C-O core. During their evolution, flashes occur in the He shell and the C, and O produced are eventually dredged up into the star's envelop and then to the stellar surface, and finally masively ejected to the interstellar medium (IM). Once in a molecular cloud, the electrophilicity of C makes this element reactable with the surrounding gas to produce different molecular species. Primitive meteorites, particularly these known as chondrites, preserved primeval materials of the disk. The abundances of short-lived radionuclides (SLN), inferred to have been present in the early solar system (ESS), are a constraint on the birth and early evolution of the solar system as their relatively short half lives do not allow the observed abundances to be explained by galactic chemical evolution processes. We present a model of a 6.5 solar masses star of solar metallicity that simultaneously match the abundances of SLNs inferred to have been present in the ESS by using a dilution factor of 1 part of AGB material per 300 parts of original solar nebula material, and taking into account a time interval between injection of SLNs and consolidation of chondrites equal to 0.53 Myr [2]. Such a polluting source does not overproduce 53Mn, as supernova models do, and only marginally affects isotopic ratios of stable elements. The AGB stars released O- and C-rich gas with important oxidizing implications to first solar system materials as recently detected in circumstellar environments [3]. REF: [1] Lada C.J. and Lada E.A. 2003. Ann. Rev. A&A. 41: 57; [2] Trigo-Rodriguez J.M. et al. 2009. MAPS 44: 627; [3] Decin L. et al. 2010. Nature 467: 64.

  17. New observations and models of circumstellar CO line emission of AGB stars in the Herschel SUCCESS programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; Teyssier, D.; Justtanont, K.; Olofsson, H.; Cerrigone, L.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Cernicharo, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; García-Lario, P.; Marston, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are in one of the latest evolutionary stages of low to intermediate-mass stars. Their vigorous mass loss has a significant effect on the stellar evolution, and is a significant source of heavy elements and dust grains for the interstellar medium. The mass-loss rate can be well traced by carbon monoxide (CO) line emission. Aims: We present new Herschel/HIFI and IRAM 30 m telescope CO line data for a sample of 53 galactic AGB stars. The lines cover a fairly large range of excitation energy from the J = 1 → 0 line to the J = 9 → 8 line, and even the J = 14 → 13 line in a few cases. We perform radiative transfer modelling for 38 of these sources to estimate their mass-loss rates. Methods: We used a radiative transfer code based on the Monte Carlo method to model the CO line emission. We assume spherically symmetric circumstellar envelopes that are formed by a constant mass-loss rate through a smoothly accelerating wind. Results: We find models that are consistent across a broad range of CO lines for most of the stars in our sample, i.e., a large number of the circumstellar envelopes can be described with a constant mass-loss rate. We also find that an accelerating wind is required to fit, in particular, the higher-J lines and that a velocity law will have a significant effect on the model line intensities. The results cover a wide range of mass-loss rates (~10-8 to 2 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1) and gas expansion velocities (2 to 21.5 km s-1) , and include M-, S-, and C-type AGB stars. Our results generally agree with those of earlier studies, although we tend to find slightly lower mass-loss rates by about 40%, on average. We also present "bonus" lines detected during our CO observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is

  18. AGB stars in Leo P and their use as metallicity probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee ( ), Chien-Hsiu

    2016-09-01

    Leo P is the most metal-poor yet star-forming galaxy in the local volume, and has the potential to serve as a local counterpart to interpret the properties of distant galaxies in the early universe. We present a comprehensive search of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in Leo P using deep infrared imaging. AGB stars are the major dust contributors; the metal poor nature of Leo P can help to shed light on the dust formation process in very low-metallicity environments, similar to the early Universe. We select and classify oxygen-rich and carbon-rich candidate AGB stars using J - K versus K colour-magnitude diagram. To filter out contaminations from background galaxies, we exploit the high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging and identify 9 oxygen-rich AGBs and 13 carbon-rich AGB stars in Leo P. We then use the ratio of carbon-rich and oxygen-rich AGB stars (C/M ratio) as an indicator of on-site metallicity and derive the global metallicity [Fe/H] = -1.8 dex for Leo P, in good agreement with previous studies using isochrone fitting. Follow-up observations of these Leo P AGB stars in the mid-infrared [e.g. Spitzer, James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)] will be invaluable to measure the dust formation rates using Spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting.

  19. High resolution spectroscopy of the hot post-AGB stars IRAS 13266-5551 (CPD-55 5588) and IRAS 17311-4924 (Hen3-1428)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, G.; Parthasarathy, M.; Reddy, B. E.

    2005-03-01

    High resolution spectra covering the wavelength range 4900 Å to 8250 Å of the hot post-AGB stars IRAS 13266-5551 (CPD-55 5588) and IRAS 17311-4924 (Hen3-1428) reveal absorption lines of C II, N II, O II, Al III, Si III and Fe III and a rich emission line spectrum consisting of H I, He I, C II, N I, O I, Mg II, Al II, Si II, V I, Mn I, Fe III, [Fe II] and [Cr II]. The presence of [N II] and [O I] lines and absence of [O III] indicate low excitation nebulae around these stars. The components of Na I absorption lines indicate the presence of neutral circumstellar envelopes in addition to the low excitation nebulae around these two hot post-AGB stars. The Hα lines show P-Cygni profiles indicating ongoing post-AGB mass loss. From the absorption lines we derived heliocentric radial velocities of 65.31 ± 0.34 km s-1 and 27.55 ± 0.74 km s-1 for IRAS 13266-5551 and IRAS 17311-4924 respectively. The high Galactic latitude and large radial velocity of IRAS 13266-5551 indicate that it belongs to the old disk population. Preliminary estimates for the CNO abundances in IRAS 13266-5551 are obtained. Based on observations made with the Victor M. Blanco 4m telescope of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. Appendices and Tables [see full text], [see full text], [see full text] and [see full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  20. Herschel and ALMA observations of AGB star envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrien Els Decin, Leen

    2015-08-01

    The stellar winds of evolved (super)giant stars are known to be the prime birthplaces for the interstellar material in our galaxy. Fusion in the stellar interiors creates carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and for more massive stars elements such as magnesium, sulphur etc. are synthesized. Thanks to dredge-ups in the stellar atmosphere and subsequent extensive mass loss through a stellar wind this material is injected into the interstellar medium (ISM).These stellar winds are really unique chemical laboratories in which various gas-phase and gas-dust processes create and destroy gas and dust species and hence manufacture the pristine building blocks of the ISM. The efficiency and working of these various chemical processes is ultimately linked to the dynamical processes which establish the morpho-kinematical structure of the wind. Unraveling the intriguing coupling between these macro-scale dynamical and micro-scale chemical processes is a real challenge to which recent advances in instrumentation, theoretical modeling, and laboratory experiments have contributed a lot. Thanks to their unprecedented sensitivity, spatial resolution and wavelength coverage, Herschel and ALMA have proven to be two key instruments in solving some enigmas related to AGB stellar winds. In this talk, I will give a review of some of the most recent results in the field of AGB stellar winds based on Herschel and ALMA data and I will discuss some open questions that I hope will be answered in the next decade thanks to a combined effort between instrumentation and laboratory specialists and theoretical astrophysicists.

  1. Erratum: “Milky Way Red Dwarfs in the Borg Survey; Galactic Scale-Height and the Distribution of Dwarfs Stars in WFC3 Imaging" (2014, ApJ, 788, 77)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Trenti, M.; Clarkson, W.; Sahu, K.; Bradley, L.; Stiavelli, M.; Pirzkal, N.; De Marchi, G.; Andersen, M.; Bouwens, R.; Ryan, R.; van Vledder, I.; van der Vlugt, D.

    2016-07-01

    In the catalog of M-dwarfs presented in Holwerda et al. (2014, H14 hereafter), there is an issue with the conversion from celestial coordinates to Galactic ones, done with pyephem a wrapper around a trusted and vetted library ephermis. Here we present the corrected coordinates (using AstroPy) and distances based on AB magnitudes. We have amended the tables and figures accordingly. The relation between vertical scale-height (z0) and M- dwarf subtype found in H14 is no longer present. We find a scale-height of 600 pc for all types, in part due to the presence of a second Galactic structural component.

  2. Constraining Mass Loss and Lifetimes of Low Mass, Low Metallicity AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, P.; Marigo, P.; Girardi, L.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bressan, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Weisz, D. R.; Williams, B. F.; Dolphin, A.; Aringer, B.

    2015-08-01

    The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. We present a detailed framework for constraining model luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars using resolved stellar populations. We show an example of this method that compares various TP-AGB mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). We find that models with more efficient pre-dust driven mass loss produce results consistent with observations, as opposed to more canonical mass-loss models. Efficient pre-dust driven mass-loss predicts, for [Fe/H] ≲ -1.2, that lower mass TP-AGB stars (M≲ 1 M⊙) must have lifetimes less than about 1.2 Myr.

  3. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    2011-03-01

    in the halo; 32. Baade-Wesselink analyses of field vs. cluster RR lyrae variables; 33. The rotation of population II A stars; 34. Horizontal branch stars and possibly related objects; 35. A new group of post-AGB objects - the hot carbon-poor stars; 36. MK classifications of hot stars in the halo 37. Photometry of XX Virginis and V716 Ophiuchi and the period luminosity relations of type II cepheids; 38. Rotation and oxygen line strengths in blue horizontal branch stars; Part V. Miscellaneous: 39. UBV CCd photometry of the halo of M31; 40. Can stars still form in the galactic halo?; 41. The ultraviolet imaging telescope on the Astro -1 and Astro -2 missions; 42. Are analogues of hot subdwarf stars responsible for the UVX phenomenon in galaxy nucleli; 43. A survey for field BHB stars outside the solar circle; 44. Post-AGB A and F supergiants as standard candles; 45. The extended horizontal-branch: a challenge for stellar evolution theory; 46. Astronomical patterns in fractals: the work of A. G. Davis Philip on the Mandelbrot Set; Part VI. Summary: 47. Final remarks; Author index; Subject index.

  4. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    1994-08-01

    in the halo; 32. Baade-Wesselink analyses of field vs. cluster RR lyrae variables; 33. The rotation of population II A stars; 34. Horizontal branch stars and possibly related objects; 35. A new group of post-AGB objects - the hot carbon-poor stars; 36. MK classifications of hot stars in the halo 37. Photometry of XX Virginis and V716 Ophiuchi and the period luminosity relations of type II cepheids; 38. Rotation and oxygen line strengths in blue horizontal branch stars; Part V. Miscellaneous: 39. UBV CCd photometry of the halo of M31; 40. Can stars still form in the galactic halo?; 41. The ultraviolet imaging telescope on the Astro -1 and Astro -2 missions; 42. Are analogues of hot subdwarf stars responsible for the UVX phenomenon in galaxy nucleli; 43. A survey for field BHB stars outside the solar circle; 44. Post-AGB A and F supergiants as standard candles; 45. The extended horizontal-branch: a challenge for stellar evolution theory; 46. Astronomical patterns in fractals: the work of A. G. Davis Philip on the Mandelbrot Set; Part VI. Summary: 47. Final remarks; Author index; Subject index.

  5. Where Galactic Snakes Live

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment. The sinuous object is actually the core of a thick, sooty cloud large enough to swallow dozens of solar systems. In fact, astronomers say the 'snake's belly' may be harboring beastly stars in the process of forming.

    The galactic creepy crawler to the right of the snake is another thick cloud core, in which additional burgeoning massive stars might be lurking. The colorful regions below the two cloud cores are less dense cloud material, in which dust has been heated by starlight and glows with infrared light. Yellow and orange dots throughout the image are monstrous developing stars; the red star on the 'belly' of the snake is 20 to 50 times as massive as our sun. The blue dots are foreground stars.

    The red ball at the bottom left is a 'supernova remnant,' the remains of massive star that died in a fiery blast. Astronomers speculate that radiation and winds from the star before it died, in addition to a shock wave created when it exploded, might have played a role in creating the snake.

    Spitzer was able to spot the two black cloud cores using its heat-seeking infrared vision. The objects are hiding in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy, invisible to optical telescopes. Because their heat, or infrared light, can sneak through the dust, they first showed up in infrared images from past missions. The cloud cores are so thick with dust that if you were to somehow transport yourself into the middle of them, you would see nothing but black, not even a star in the sky. Now, that's spooky!

    Spitzer's new view of the region provides the best look yet at the massive embryonic stars hiding inside the snake. Astronomers say these observations will ultimately help them better understand how massive stars form. By studying the clustering and range of masses of the stellar embryos, they hope

  6. The Galactic disc distribution of planetary nebulae with warm dust emission features - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassus, S.; Roche, P. F.

    2001-02-01

    We address the question of whether the distribution of warm-dust compositions in IR-bright Galactic disc PNe (Paper I, Casassus et al.) can be linked to the underlying stellar population. The PNe with warm dust emission represent a homogeneous population, which is presumably young and minimally affected by a possible dependence of PN lifetime on progenitor mass. The sample in Paper I thus allows testing of the predictions of single-star evolution, through a comparison with synthetic distributions and under the assumption that tip-of-the-AGB and PN statistics are similar. We construct a schematic model for AGB evolution (adapted from Groenewegen & de Jong), the free parameters of which are calibrated with the luminosity function (LF) of C stars in the LMC, the initial-final mass relation and the range of PN compositions. The observed metallicity gradient and distribution of star-forming regions with Galactocentric radius (Bronfman et al.) allow us to synthesize the Galactic disc PN progenitor population. We find that the fraction of O-rich PNe, f(0), is a tight constraint on AGB parameters. For our best model, a minimum PN progenitor mass Mmin=1 M⊙ predicts that about 50per cent of all young PNe should be O-rich, compared with an observed fraction of 22per cent; thus Mmin=1.2 M⊙, at a 2σ confidence level Mmin=1.3 M⊙ at 1σ). By contrast, current AGB models for single stars can account neither for the continuous range of N enrichment (Leisy & Dennefeld) nor for the observation that the majority of very C-rich PNe have Peimbert type I (Paper I). f(O) is thus an observable quantity much easier to model. The decrease in f(O) with Galactocentric radius, as reported in Paper I, is a strong property of the synthetic distribution, independent of Mmin. This trend reflects the sensitivity of the surface temperature of AGB stars and of the core mass at the first thermal pulse to the Galactic metallicity gradient.

  7. The Distances of the Galactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdönmez, Aykut; Güver, Tolga; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Ak, Tansel

    2016-06-01

    Utilising the unique location of red clump giants on colour-magnitude diagrams obtained from various near-IR surveys, we derived specific reddening-distance relations towards 119 Galactic novae for which independent reddening measurements are available. Using the derived distance-extinction relation and the independent measurements of reddening we calculated the most likely distances for each system. We present the details of our distance measurement technique and the results of this analysis, which yielded the distances of 73 Galactic novae and allowed us to set lower limits on the distances of 46 systems. We also present the data of reddening-distance relations derived for each nova, which may be useful to analyze the different Galactic components present in the line of sight.

  8. The distances of the Galactic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdönmez, Aykut; Güver, Tolga; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Ak, Tansel

    2016-09-01

    Utilizing the unique location of red clump giants on colour-magnitude diagrams obtained from various near-infrared surveys, we derived specific reddening-distance relations towards 119 Galactic novae for which independent reddening measurements are available. Using the derived distance-extinction relation and the independent measurements of reddening we calculated the most likely distances for each system. We present the details of our distance measurement technique and the results of this analysis, which yielded the distances of 73 Galactic novae and allowed us to set lower limits on the distances of 46 systems. We also present the reddening-distance relations derived for each nova, which may be useful to analyse the different Galactic components present in the line of sight.

  9. SAO 244567 - A post-AGB star which has turned into a planetary nebula within the last 40 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; Garcia-Lario, P.; Pottasch, S. R.; Manchado, A.; Clavel, J.; de Martino, D.; van de Steene, G. C. M.; Sahu, K. C.

    1993-01-01

    SAO 244567 (Hen 1357 = CPD -59 deg 6926 = IRAS 17119-5926) is an IRAS source with far infrared colors and flux distribution similar to those of planetary nebulae. The IUE ultraviolet spectra obtained in July 1988 and April 1992 show nebular emission lines, and also the changes in the spectra suggest the formation of the planetary nebula and the rapid evolution of the central star. The optical spectrum of this star obtained by Henize around 1950 shows only the H-alpha line in emission, while the most recent one, obtained in 1990 shows strong forbidden emission lines corresponding to a low excitation and young planetary nebula. The IUE ultraviolet spectra show evidence for the presence of stellar wind and mass loss. The stellar lines show P-Cygni type profiles and the terminal velocity of the stellar wind is about - 3000 km/s. The spectral type of the central star is O8 V. The presence of a detached cold dust shell (125 K), high galactic latitude and abundances suggest that SAO 244567 has recently evolved from a low or intermediate mass progenitor star which has ejected its outer envelope during the AGB stage of evolution and is rapidly evolving towards hotter spectral types.

  10. Integrated Properties of AGB Stars in Resolved and Unresolved Stellar Populations: Simple Stellar Populations and Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lançon, A.

    2011-09-01

    The evolution of AGB stars is notoriously complex. The confrontation of AGB population models with observed stellar populations is a useful alternative to the detailed study of individual stars in efforts to converge towards a reliable evolution theory. I review here the impact of studies of star clusters on AGB models and AGB population synthesis, deliberately leaving out any more complex stellar populations. Over the last 10 years, despite much effort, the absolute uncertainties in the predictions of the light emitted by intermediate-age populations have not been reduced to a satisfactory level. Observational sample definitions, as well as the combination of the natural variance in AGB properties with small number statistics, are largely responsible for this situation. There is hope that the constraints may soon become strong enough, thanks to large unbiased surveys of star clusters, resolved colour-magnitude diagrams, and new analysis methods that can account for the stochastic nature of AGB populations in clusters.

  11. AKARI All-Sky Survey: Contribution from AGB Stars to the Far Infrared Flux of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollo, A.; Rybka, P.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2011-09-01

    Using the data from the AKARI FIS All-Sky Survey, we estimate the contribution from AGB stars to the far-infrared (FIR) flux from the Milky Way. We check the positions of different types of AGB stars in FIR color-color diagrams. Our conclusion is a large contribution from AGB stars, and particularly post-AGB stars, to the FIR flux in the outer regions of the Milky Way, and possibly other similar galaxies. FIR colors of different types of AGB stars are similar, with a large scatter, but post-AGB stars seem to be significantly redder and, as a result, contribute more to the total Galaxy flux at longer FIR wavelengths.

  12. Molecular processes from the AGB to the PN stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. Anibal

    2012-08-01

    Many complex organic molecules and inorganic solid-state compounds have been observed in the circumstellar shell of stars (both C-rich and O-rich) in the transition phase between Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars and Planetary Nebulae (PNe). This short (~102-104 years) phase of stellar evolution represents a wonderful laboratory for astrochemistry and provides severe constraints on any model of gas-phase and solid-state chemistry. One of the major challenges of present day astrophysics and astrochemistry is to understand the formation pathways of these complex organic molecules and inorganic solid-state compounds (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and graphene in the case of a C-rich chemistry and oxides and crystalline silicates in O-rich environments) in space. In this review, I present an observational review of the molecular processes in the late stages of stellar evolution with a special emphasis on the first detections of fullerenes and graphene in PNe.

  13. Dust clouds around red giant stars - Evidence of sublimating comet disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matese, J. J.; Whitmire, D. P.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-09-01

    The dust production by disk comets around intermediate mass stars evolving into red giants is studied, focusing on AGB supergiants. The model of Iben and Renzini (1983) is used to study the observed dust mass loss for AGB stars. An expression is obtained for the comet disk net dust production rate and values of the radius and black body temperature corresponding to peak sublimation are calculated for a range of stellar masses. Also, the fractional amount of dust released from a cometesimal disk during a classical nova outburst is estimated.

  14. Discovery in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In our efforts to map our galaxys structure, one region has remained very difficult to probe: the galactic center. A new survey, however, uses infrared light to peer through the gas and dust in the galactic plane, searching for variable stars in the bulge of the galaxy. This study has discovered a population of very young stars in a thin disk in the galactic center, providing clues to the star formation history of the Milky Way over the last 100 million years.Obscured CenterThe center of the Milky Way is dominated by a region known as the galactic bulge. Efforts to better understand this region in particular, its star formation history have been hindered by the stars, gas, and dust of the galactic disk, which prevent us from viewing the galactic bulge at low latitudes in visible light.The positions of the 35 classical Cepheids discovered in VVV data, projected onto an image of the galactic plane. Click for a better look! The survey area is bounded by the blue lines, and the galactic bar is marked with a red curve. The bottom panel shows the position of the Cepheids overlaid on the VVV bulge extinction map. [Dkny et al. 2015]Infrared light, however, can be used to probe deeper through the dust than visible-light searches. A new survey called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) uses the VISTA telescope in Chile to search, in infrared, for variable stars in the inner part of the galaxy. The VVV survey area spans the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high.Led by Istvn Dkny, a researcher at the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, a team has now used VVV data to specifically identify classical Cepheid variable stars in the bulge. Why? Cepheids are pulsating stars with a very useful relation between their periods and luminosities that allows them to be used as distance indicators. Moreover, classical Cepheids are indicators of young stellar populations which can

  15. High rotational CO lines in post-AGB stars and PNe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justtanont, K.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Skinner, C. J.; Haas, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    A significant fraction of a star's initial mass is lost while it is on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). Mass loss rates range from 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr for early AGB stars to a few 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr for stars at the tip of the AGB. Dust grains condense from the outflow as the gas expands and form a dust shell around the central star. A superwind (approximately 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -3) solar mass/yr) is thought to terminate the AGB phase. In the post-AGB phase, the star evolves to a higher effective temperature, the mass loss decreases (approximately 10(exp -8) solar mass/yr), but the wind velocity increases (approximately 1000 km/s). During this evolution, dust and gas are exposed to an increasingly harsher radiation field and when T(sub eff) reaches about 30,000 K, the nebula is ionized and becomes a planetary nebula (PN). Photons from the central star can create a photodissociation region (PDR) in the expanding superwind. Gas can be heated through the photoelectric effect working on small grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's). This gas can cool via the atomic fine structure lines of O I (63 microns and 145 microns) and C II (158 microns), as well as the rotational lines of CO. In the post-AGB phase, the fast wind from the central star will interact with the material ejected during the AGB phase. The shock caused by this interaction will dissociate and heat the gas. This warm gas will cool through atomic fine structure lines of O I and the rotational lines of (newly formed) CO.

  16. Wide-field Monitoring of the Galactic Plane in the K- and the H-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, K.; Nakada, Y.; Izumiura, H.; Watanabe, E.; Shimizu, Y.; Okada, N.; Okita, K.; Norimoto, K.; Okata, T.; Koyano, H.; Yoshida, M.

    The Okayama Astrophysical Observatory of NAOJ started the monitoring program of mass-losing AGB stars using an imaging camera named Okayama Astrophysical Observatory Wide Field Camera. The fast optics yields a field of view of 1¡ß1 deg2 and the pixel resolution of 2 arcsec at the focus of the 91-cm telescope. A HAWAII2 array will be installed inside the camera reaching the limiting magnitude of K=13 with a 45-s exposure. In 2003 the monitoring will start covering the Galactic plane from l=0 to 270 deg every three weeks.

  17. Multiple populations in more metal-rich galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Maria J.

    In this thesis we present chemical abundances for bright stars in the intermediate metallicity globular cluster (GC) M5, and the relatively metal-rich GCs M71 and 47 Tuc with the goal of improving the understanding of chemical evolution in the metallicity regime sampled by these three GCs. The first chapter presents a brief historical overview in light element abundance variations in globular clusters. In the second chapter we present the results obtained for 47 Tuc, the most-metal rich cluster of my sample. 47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and GC formation in massive more metal-rich GCs since it is the closest massive GC. Chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu were determined for 164 red giant branch (RGB) stars in 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4-m telescope and the FLAMES multi-object spectrograph at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The average [Fe/H]= --0.79+/-0.09 dex is consistent with literature values, as well as over-abundances of alpha-elements ([alpha/Fe] ~ 0.3 dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r-process dominated ([Eu/La]=+0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anti-correlation, a signature typically seen in Galactic GCs, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] ~ --0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A KS-test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of AGB nucleosynthesis yields

  18. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  19. Constraints on Galactic Center Activity: A Search for Enhanced Galactic Center Lithium and Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.; Turner, B. E.; Hobbs, L. M.

    1998-12-01

    The abundances of lithium and boron provide important information about big bang nucleosynthesis, Galactic chemical evolution, stellar evolution, and cosmic-ray spallation reactions. We conducted the first search for the ground-state hyperfine-structure transitions of Li I (2S1/2; F = 2-1 803 MHz) and B I (2P1/2; F = 2-1 732 MHz). We used the 43 m NRAO radio telescope to search for enhanced Galactic center (GC) Li and B expected from models of Galactic activity. We did not detect Li I or B I and obtained upper limits of N(Li I) < 1.9 × 1016 cm-2, (Li/H) < 3.9 × 10-8, N(B I) < 2.2 × 1018 cm-2, and (B/H) < 9.2 × 10-6 for the dense 20 km s-1 Sgr A molecular cloud where our largest sources of uncertainties are Li I/Li, B I/B, and N(H). Our observations imply (Li/H)GC < 22 (Li/H)disk, (Li/H)GC < 39 (Li/H)disk-spallation, (B/H)GC < 1.2 × 104 (B/H)disk, (B/H)GC < 1.5 × 104 (B/H)disk-spallation. For a simple model combining mass loss from AGB stars (only for Li), spallation reactions, and SN ν-nucleosynthesis, we estimate (Li/H)GC = 1.3 × 10-8 (13 times enhancement) and (B/H)GC = 7.4 × 10-9 (10 times enhancement). If Li is primarily produced via spallation reactions from a cosmic-ray proton flux φp(t) with the same energy and trapping as in the disk, then [\\smallint φp(t)dt]GC < 13[\\smallint φp(t)dt]disk. Comparing our results to AGN models, we conclude that the GC has not had an extended period of AGN activity containing a large cosmic-ray flux (LCR <= 1044 ergs s-1 for 108 yr), a large low-energy cosmic-ray flux (less than 100 times the disk flux), or a large γ-ray flux (Lγ < 1042 ergs s-1 for 109 yr). Furthermore, since any Galactic deuterium production will significantly enhance the abundances of Li and B, our results imply that there are no sources of D in the GC or Galaxy. Therefore, all the Galactic D originated from the infall of primordial matter with the current D/H reduced by astration and mixing.

  20. FUV Emission from AGB Stars: Modeling Accretion Activity Associated with a Binary Companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Alyx Catherine; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that the late stages of evolution for Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are influenced by the presence of binary companions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of direct observational evidence of binarity. However, more recently, strong indirect evidence comes from the discovery of UV emission in a subsample of these objects (fuvAGB stars). AGB stars are comparatively cool objects (< or =3000 K), thus their fluxes falls off drastically for wavelengths 3000 Angstroms and shorter. Therefore, ultraviolet observations offer an important, new technique for detecting the binary companions and/or associated accretion activity. We develop new models of UV emission from fuvAGB stars constrained by GALEX photometry and spectroscopy of these objects. We compare the GALEX UV grism spectra of the AGB M7 star EY Hya to predictions using the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, specifically investigating the ultraviolet wavelength range (1344-2831 Angstroms). We investigate models composed of contributions from a photoionized "hot spot" due to accretion activity around the companion, and "chromospheric" emission from collisionally ionized plasma, to fit the UV observations.

  1. Galactic evolution of 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2010-04-01

    Lithium represents a key element in cosmology, as it is one of the few nuclei synthesized during the Big Bang. The primordial abundance of 7Li allows us to impose constraints on the primordial nucleosynthesis and on the baryon density of the universe. However, 7Li is not only produced during the Big Bang but also during galactic evolution: measures of stellar Li in our Galaxy suggest an almost constant Li abundance (the so-called Spite plateau) at low metallicities and a subsequent increase in the disk stars, leading to a Li abundance in Population I stars higher by a factor of ten than in Population II stars. This means that there must exist several possible stellar sources of 7Li: asymptotic giant branch stars, supernovae, novae, red giant stars. 7Li is also partly produced in spallation processes while 6Li is entirely produced by such processes. All of these sources have been included in galactic chemical evolution models and constraints have been derived on the primordial 7Li and its evolution, as well on stellar models. I will review these models and their results and what we have learned about 7Li evolution. Some still open problems, such as the disagreement between the primordial 7Li abundance as derived by WMAP and as measured in Population II stars, and the uncertainties about the main sources of stellar 7Li will be discussed.

  2. The nebula around the post-AGB star 89 Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, V.; van Winckel, H.; Neri, R.; Alcolea, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Deroo, P.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:We aim to study the structure of the nebula around the post-AGB, binary star 89 Her. The presence of a rotating disk around this star had been proposed but not been yet confirmed by observations. Methods: We present high-resolution PdBI maps of CO J=2-1 and 1-0. Properties of the nebula are directly derived from the data and model fitting. We also present N-band interferometric data on the extent of the hot dust emission, obtained with the VLTI. Results: Two nebular components are found: (a) an extended hour-glass-like structure, with expansion velocities of 7 km s-1 and a total mass 3× 10-3 M{⊙}, and (b) an unresolved very compact component, smaller than 0.4 arcsec and with a low total velocity dispersion of 5 km s-1. We cannot determine the velocity field in the compact component, but we argue that it can hardly be in expansion, since this would require too recent and too sudden an ejection of mass. On the other hand, assuming that this component is a Keplerian disk, we derive disk properties that are compatible with expectations for such a structure; in particular, the size of the rotating gas disk should be very similar to the extent of the hot dust component from our VLTI data. Assuming that the equator of the extended nebula coincides with the binary orbital plane, we provide new results on the companion star mass and orbit. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, as well as on observations of the Belgian Guaranteed time on VISA (ESO). IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  3. Dust in the Early Universe and the Contribution of AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, R.; Valiante, R.; Ventura, P.; dell'Agli, F.; di Criscienzo, M.

    2015-08-01

    We review the role of AGB stars in early dust enrichment in light of new theoretical dust yields for stars with mass 1-8 M⊙ and metallicity 3×10-4≥ Z ≥0.008, obtained with models that follow stellar evolution from the pre-main sequence phase until the almost complete ejection of the stellar mantle. The models have been shown to reproduce the measured dust production rates by carbon-rich and oxygen-rich AGB stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, as well as the observed colors of the so-called extreme stars in the LMC. We discuss the relative role of AGB stars and SNe in early dust enrichment and the impact of these two classes of stellar sources on the nature and composition of the first dust.

  4. Optical Properties of Amorphous Alumina Dust in the Envelopes around O-Rich AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Kyung-Won

    2016-08-01

    We investigate optical properties of amorphous alumina (Al_2O_3) dust grains in the envelopes around O-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars using laboratory measured optical data. We derive the optical constants of amorphous alumina over a wide wavelength range that satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relation and reproduce the laboratory data. Using the amorphous alumina and silicate dust, we compare the radiative transfer model results with the observed spectral energy distributions. Comparing the theoretical models with observations on various IR two-color diagrams for a large sample of O-rich AGB stars, we find that the amorphous alumina dust (about 10-40%) mixed with amorphous silicate better models the observed points for the O-rich AGB stars with thin dust envelopes.

  5. Winds of M- and S-type AGB stars: an unorthodox suggestion for the driving mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfner, S.; Andersen, A. C.

    2007-04-01

    Context: Current knowledge suggests that the dust-driven wind scenario provides a realistic framework for understanding mass loss from C-rich AGB stars. For M-type objects, however, recent detailed models demonstrate that radiation pressure on silicate grains is not sufficient to drive the observed winds, contrary to previous expectations. Aims: In this paper, we suggest an alternative mechanism for the mass loss of M-type AGB stars, involving the formation of both carbon and silicate grains due to non-equilibrium effects, and we study the viability of this scenario. Methods: We model the dynamical atmospheres and winds of AGB stars by solving the coupled system of frequency-dependent radiation hydrodynamics and time-dependent dust formation, using a parameterized description of non-equilibrium effects in the gas phase. This approach allows us to assess under which circumstances it is possible to drive winds with small amounts of carbon dust and to get silicate grains forming in these outflows at the same time. Results: The properties of the resulting wind models, such as mass-loss rates and outflow velocities, are well within the observed limits for M-type AGB stars. Furthermore, according to our results, it is quite unlikely that significant amounts of silicate grains will condense in a wind driven by a force totally unrelated to dust formation, as the conditions in the upper atmosphere and wind acceleration region put strong constraints on grain growth. Conclusions: .The proposed scenario provides a natural explanation for the observed similarities in wind properties of M-type and C-type AGB stars and implies a smooth transition for stars with increasing carbon abundance, from solar-composition to C-rich AGB stars, possibly solving the longstanding problem of the driving mechanism for stars with a C/O close to one.

  6. Variable X-Ray and UV emission from AGB stars: Accretion activity associated with binarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Sánchez Contreras, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Almost all of our current understanding of the late evolutionary stages of (1 — 8) Mʘ stars is based on single-star models. However, binarity can drastically affect late stellar evolution, producing dramatic changes in the history and geometry of mass loss that occurs in stars as they evolve off the AGB to become planetary nebulae (PNe). A variety of binary models have been proposed, which can lead to the generation of accretion disks and magnetic fields, which in turn produce the highly collimated jets that have been proposed as the primary agents for the formation of bipolar and multipolar PNe. However, observational evidence of binarity in AGB stars is sorely lacking simply these stars are very luminous and variable, invalidating standard techniques for binary detection. Using an innovative technique of searching for UV emission from AGB stars with GALEX, we have identified a class of AGB stars with far- ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars), that are likely candidates for active accretion associated with a binary companion. We have carried out a pilot survey for X-ray emission from fuvAGB stars. The X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations show similar variations in the UV fluxes. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a main-sequence companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Obscured AGB in Magellanic Clouds. I. (Loup+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loup, C.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    1997-02-01

    We have selected 198 IRAS sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and 11 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, which are the best candidates to be mass-loosing AGB stars (or possibly post-AGB stars). We used the catalogues of Schwering & Israel (1990, Cat. ) and Reid et al. (1990, Cat. ). They are based on the IRAS pointed observations and have lower detection limits than the Point Source Catalogue. We also made cross-identifications between IRAS sources and optical catalogues. (8 data files).

  8. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  9. Red supergiants as type II supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Marco, Amparo

    2015-08-01

    Recent searches for supernova IIp progenitors in external galaxies have led to the identification of red objects with magnitudes and colours indicative of red supergiants, in most cases implying quite low luminosities and hence masses well below 10Msol. Stellar models, on the other hand, do not predict explosions from objects below 9 Msol. What does our knowledge of local red supergiants tells us about the expected properties of such objects?We have carried out a comprehensive spectroscopic and photometric study of a sample of hundreds of red supergiants in the Milky Way and both Magellanic Clouds. We have explored correlations between different parameters and the position of stars in the HR diagrams of open clusters. At solar metallicty, there is strong evidence for a phase of very heavy mass loss at the end of the red supergiant phase, but the existence of such a phase is still not confirmed at SMC metallicities. Objects of ~ 7Msol, on the other hand, become very dusty in the SMC, and appear as very luminous Miras.Among Milky Way clusters, we find a surprising lack of objects readily identifiable as the expected 7 to 10 Msol red supergiants or AGB stars. We are carrying out an open cluster survey aimed at filling this region of the HR diagram with reliable data. Finally, we will discuss the implications of all this findings for the expected properties of supernova progenitors, as it looks unlikely that typical red supergiants may explode without undergoing further evolution.

  10. Galactic cosmic ray composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment is given of the galactic cosmic ray source (GCRS) elemental composition and its correlation with first ionization potential. The isotopic composition of heavy nuclei; spallation cross sections; energy spectra of primary nuclei; electrons; positrons; local galactic reference abundances; comparison of solar energetic particles and solar coronal compositions; the hydrogen; lead; nitrogen; helium; and germanium deficiency problems; and the excess of elements are among the topics covered.

  11. Near infrared photographic sky survey. 1: Catalog of red stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craine, E. R.; Duerr, R. E.; Horner, V. M.; Imhoff, C. L.; Routsis, D. E.; Swihart, D. L.; Turnshek, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Red stellar objects for which V-1 was greater than a value of about 2 (supm). 5 were extracted from photographs of 23 program fields. Tabular data for each field show the object name; the 1950 epoch right ascension, declination, galactic longitude, galactic latitude; radial distance from field venter in decimal degrees; color classes; and objects ordered by redness.

  12. Sublimating comets as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in the gas outflow from AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, D. P.; Matese, John J.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    A growing amount of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that most main sequence stars are surrounded by disks of cometary material. The dust production by comets in such disks is investigated when the central stars evolve up the red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Once released, the dust is ablated and accelerated by the gas outflow and the fragments become the seeds necessary for condensation of the gas. The origin of the requisite seeds has presented a well known problem for classical nucleation theory. This model is consistent with the dust production observed in M giants and supergiants (which have increasing luminosities) and the fact that earlier supergiants and most WR stars (whose luminosities are unchanging) do not have significant dust clouds even though they have significant stellar winds. Another consequence of the model is that the spatial distribution of the dust does not, in general, coincide with that of the gas outflow, in contrast to the conventional condensation model. A further prediction is that the condensation radius is greater that that predicted by conventional theory which is in agreement with IR interferometry measurements of alpha-Ori.

  13. A Distinct Structure inside the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Baba, Daisuke; Haba, Yasuaki; Kadowaki, Ryota; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Nagashima, Chie; Nagayama, Takahiro; Murai, Yuka; Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji; Naoi, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Sato, Shuji

    2005-03-01

    We present the result of a near-infrared (JHKs) survey along the Galactic plane, -10.5d<=l<=10.5d and b=+1deg, with the IRSF 1.4 m telescope and the SIRIUS camera. Ks versus H-Ks color-magnitude diagrams reveal a well-defined population of red clump stars whose apparent magnitude peak changes continuously along the Galactic plane, from Ks=13.4 at l=-10deg to Ks=12.2 at l=10deg after dereddening. This variation can be explained by the barlike structure found in previous studies, but we find an additional inner structure at |l|<~4deg, where the longitude-apparent magnitude relation is distinct from the outer bar and where the apparent magnitude peak changes by only ~0.1 mag over the central 8°. The exact nature of this inner structure is as yet uncertain.

  14. FUV and Optical Spectroscopy of Hot Post-AGB Stars in Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William V.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the atmospheric parameters (effective temperature and surface gravity) and abundances of the hot, post-AGB (PAGB) stars in globular clusters observed with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) on the Astro-l and 2 missions.

  15. AKARI All-Sky Far-Infrared Survey: Where to Look for AGB Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybka, P.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2011-09-01

    We selected a sample of 5,176 far-infrared sources from the FIS AKARI All-Sky Survey. Searching public databases, we identified their counterparts observed at other wavelengths and derived a method to separate stars from galaxies. The sample of stars is dominated by AGB-related objects.

  16. AGB Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality," approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of Governing Boards (AGB) in March 2011, urges institutional administrators and governing boards to engage fully in this area of board responsibility. The seven principles in this statement offer suggestions to…

  17. The LF of TP-AGB stars in the LMC/SMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruzual, Gustavo; Charlot, Stephane; GonzalezLopezlira, Rosa; Srinivasan, Sundar; Boyer, Martha L.

    2013-01-01

    We show that Monte Carlo simulations of the TP-AGB stellar population in the LMC and SMC galaxies using the CB. models produce LF and color distributions that are in closer agreement with observations than those obtained with the BC03 and CB07 models. This is a progress report of work that will be published elsewhere.

  18. AGB stars as a source of short-lived radioactive nuclei in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Gallino, R.; Busso, M.; Raiteri, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to estimate the possible contribution of some short-lived nuclei to the early solar nebula from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) sources. Low mass (1 to 3 solar mass) AGB stars appear to provide a site for synthesis of the main s process component for solar system material with an exponential distribution of neutron irradiations varies as exp(-tau/tau(sub 0)) (where tau is the time integrated neutron flux with a mean neutron exposure tau(sub 0)) for solar abundances with tau(sub 0) = 0.28 mb(sup -1). Previous workers estimated the synthesis of key short-lived nuclei which might be produced in AGB stars. While these calculations exhibit the basic characteristics of nuclei production by neutron exposure, there is need for a self-consistent calculation that follows AGB evolution and takes into account the net production from a star and dilution with the cloud medium. Many of the general approaches and the conclusions arrived at were presented earlier by Cameron. The production of nuclei for a star of 1.5 solar mass during the thermal pulsing of the AGB phase was evaluated. Calculations were done for a series of thermal pulses with tau(sub 0) = 0.12 and 0.28 mb(sup -1). These pulses involve s nucleosynthesis in the burning shell at the base of the He zone followed by the ignition of the H burning shell at the top of the He zone. After about 10-15 cycles the abundances of the various nuclei in the He zone become constant. Computations of the abundances of all nuclei in the He zone were made following Gallino. The mass of the solar nebula was considered to consist of some initial material of approximately solar composition plus some contributions from AGB stars. The ratios of the masses required from the AGB He burning zone to the ISM necessary to produce the observed value of Pd-107/Pd-108 in the early solar system were calculated and this dilution factor was applied to all other relevant nuclei.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: C2 Phillips and CN Red bands in HD 56126 (Bakker+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, E. J.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Trams, N. R.; van der Wolf, F. L. A.

    1996-03-01

    We present the detection of molecular absorption lines in the optical spectrum of the post-AGB star HD 56126. The C2 Phillips A1{PI}u- X1{SIGMA}+g(1,0), (2,0), and (3,0); Swan d3{PI}g-a3{PI}u(0,0) and (1,0); and CN Red system A2{PI}-X2{SIGMA}+ (1,0), (2,0), (3,0), and (4,0) bands have been identified. From the identification of the molecular bands we find an expansion velocity of 8.5+/-0.6km/s independent of excitation condition or molecular specie. On the basis of the expansion velocity, rotational temperatures, and molecular column densities we argue that the line-forming region is the AGB remnant. This is in agreement with the expansion velocity derived from the CO lines. We find column densities of logNC2=15.3+/-0.3cm-2 and logNCN=15.5+/-0.3cm-2, and rotational temperatures of Trot=242+/-20K and Trot=24+/-5K respectively for C2 and CN. By studying molecular line absorption in optical spectra of post-AGB stars we have found a new tracer of the AGB remnant. From comparison with the results of CO and IR observations it is possible to obtain information on non-spherical behavior of the AGB remnant. Using different molecules with different excitation conditions it should be possible to study the AGB remnant as a function of the distance to the star, and thus as a function of the evolutionary status of the star on the AGB. (6 data files).

  20. On the interior properties of red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, I., Jr.

    The interior evolution of red giants is focused on, the major emphasis being on the evolution of stars during the double shell-burning stage. The evolutionary course during the first and second ascent up the red giant branch of the H-R diagram are discussed for stars that vary with respect to certain critical masses, and the thermal pulse phase is also treated. Core, envelope, and surface phenomena are explained along with the process of development into white dwarfs or supernovas. The interplay of internal forces caused by various fuel-burning processes, electron-degeneracy pressure, and gravity are detailed, and phenomena such as core dredge-up, relaxed oscillations, and AGB stars are explained. Numbers are given for the properties of H-burning and convective shells, and detailed comparisons with observations are made.

  1. Relics of Ancient Post-AGB Stars in a Primitive Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, M.; Pignatari, M.; Herwig, F.; Zinner, E.; Gallino, R.; Huss, G. R.

    2013-11-01

    Graphite is one of the many presolar circumstellar condensate species found in primitive meteorites. While the isotopic compositions of low-density graphite grains indicate an origin in core-collapse supernovae, some high-density grains have extreme isotopic anomalies in C, Ca, and Ti, which cannot be explained by envelope predictions of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars or theoretical supernova models. The Ca and Ti isotopic anomalies, however, match the predictions of He-shell abundances in AGB stars. In this study, we show that the C, Ca, and Ti isotopic anomalies are consistent with nucleosynthesis predictions of the H-ingestion phase during a very late thermal pulse (VLTP) event in post-AGB stars. The low 12C/13C isotopic ratios in these grains are a result of abundant 12C efficiently capturing the protons that are being ingested during the VLTP. Very high neutron densities of ~1015 cm-3, typical of the i-process, are achieved during this phase in post-AGB stars. The large 42, 43, 44Ca excesses in some graphite grains are indicative of neutron capture nucleosynthesis during VLTP. The comparison of VLTP nucleosynthesis calculations to the graphite data also indicate that apparent anomalies in the Ti isotopic ratios are due to large contributions from 46, 48Ca, which cannot be resolved from the isobars 46, 48Ti during the measurements. We conclude that presolar graphite grains with moderate to extreme Ca and Ti isotopic anomalies originate in post-AGB stars that suffer a VLTP.

  2. X-ray Observations of AGB Stars with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, J. H.; Soker, N.

    2003-12-01

    We report the preliminary results of an XMM-Newton observing program to determine the X-ray emission properties of a sample of well-studied AGB stars. Our goal is to set constraints on magnetic (dynamo) activity during mass-losing AGB evolutionary stages, and thereby test models wherein AGB star magnetic fields influence mass loss geometry and shape planetary nebulae. We detected X-ray emission from the Mira system, with a total EPIC count rate of ˜0.11 s-1. This emission may be due to accretion or magnetic activity associated with Mira B, a companion of uncertain nature located only 0.6" from the mass-losing AGB star. The X-ray spectrum of the Mira system displays emission from highly ionized Ne, and initial (single-component) spectral fits suggest a characteristic emission region temperature ˜10 MK, intervening absorbing column ˜3×1021 cm-2, and an intrinsic X-ray luminosity of ˜2×1029 ergs s-1. The (apparently single) star T Cas is undetected in X-rays. At the meeting, we will also report on results from observations of TX Cam, an AGB star for which the presence of relatively strong (5-10 G at ˜3 R⋆ ) magnetic fields has been inferred from maser polarization measurements in the radio. This research is partly supported via NASA/GSFC grant NAG5--13158 (XMM-Newton Guest Observer program) to the Center for Imaging Science at Rochester Institute of Technology.

  3. RELICS OF ANCIENT POST-AGB STARS IN A PRIMITIVE METEORITE

    SciTech Connect

    Jadhav, M.; Huss, G. R.; Pignatari, M.; Herwig, F.; Zinner, E.; Gallino, R.

    2013-11-10

    Graphite is one of the many presolar circumstellar condensate species found in primitive meteorites. While the isotopic compositions of low-density graphite grains indicate an origin in core-collapse supernovae, some high-density grains have extreme isotopic anomalies in C, Ca, and Ti, which cannot be explained by envelope predictions of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars or theoretical supernova models. The Ca and Ti isotopic anomalies, however, match the predictions of He-shell abundances in AGB stars. In this study, we show that the C, Ca, and Ti isotopic anomalies are consistent with nucleosynthesis predictions of the H-ingestion phase during a very late thermal pulse (VLTP) event in post-AGB stars. The low {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotopic ratios in these grains are a result of abundant {sup 12}C efficiently capturing the protons that are being ingested during the VLTP. Very high neutron densities of ∼10{sup 15} cm{sup –3}, typical of the i-process, are achieved during this phase in post-AGB stars. The large {sup 42,43,44}Ca excesses in some graphite grains are indicative of neutron capture nucleosynthesis during VLTP. The comparison of VLTP nucleosynthesis calculations to the graphite data also indicate that apparent anomalies in the Ti isotopic ratios are due to large contributions from {sup 46,48}Ca, which cannot be resolved from the isobars {sup 46,48}Ti during the measurements. We conclude that presolar graphite grains with moderate to extreme Ca and Ti isotopic anomalies originate in post-AGB stars that suffer a VLTP.

  4. Photodissociation and chemistry of N2 in the circumstellar envelope of carbon-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Millar, Tom J.; Walsh, Catherine; Heays, Alan N.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are irradiated externally by ultraviolet photons; hence, the chemistry is sensitive to the photodissociation of N2 and CO, which are major reservoirs of nitrogen and carbon, respectively. The photodissociation of N2 has recently been quantified by laboratory and theoretical studies. Improvements have also been made for CO photodissociation. Aims: For the first time, we use accurate N2 and CO photodissociation rates and shielding functions in a model of the circumstellar envelope of the carbon-rich AGB star, IRC +10216. Methods: We use a state-of-the-art chemical model of an AGB envelope, the latest CO and N2 photodissociation data, and a new method for implementing molecular shielding functions in full spherical geometry with isotropic incident radiation. We compare computed column densities and radial distributions of molecules with observations. Results: The transition of N2→ N (also, CO → C → C+) is shifted towards the outer envelope relative to previous models. This leads to different column densities and radial distributions of N-bearing species, especially those species whose formation/destruction processes largely depend on the availability of atomic or molecular nitrogen, for example, CnN (n = 1, 3, 5), CnN- (n = 1, 3, 5), HCnN (n = 1, 3, 5, 7, 9), H2CN and CH2CN. Conclusions: The chemistry of many species is directly or indirectly affected by the photodissociation of N2 and CO, especially in the outer shell of AGB stars where photodissociation is important. Thus, it is important to include N2 and CO shielding in astrochemical models of AGB envelopes and other irradiated environments. In general, while differences remain between our model of IRC +10216 and the observed molecular column densities, better agreement is found between the calculated and observed radii of peak abundance.

  5. Induction and characterization of suppressor T cells and soluble factors with modified timothy grass pollen AgB.

    PubMed

    Malley, A; Deppe, L B; Brandt, C J

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antigen B (AgB), a major antigen of timothy grass pollen, modified by photooxidation (Ox-AgB) does not react with rabbit, human, or mouse antibodies directed against AgB and does not induce antibodies reactive with either native or modified AgB. However, immunization of mice with Ox-AgB in alum induces significant T helper cell activity. In this review, we describe the conditions and kinetics for Ox-AgB induction of T suppressor cells, the secretion of AgB-specific T suppressor factor (TSF), and the partial purification of AgB-specific TSF. PMID:6453098

  6. Abundances of presolar graphite and SiC from supernovae and AGB stars in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst; Gallino, Roberto

    2014-05-02

    Pesolar graphite grains exhibit a range of densities (1.65 – 2.20 g/cm{sup 3}). We investigated abundances of presolar graphite grains formed in supernovae and in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the four density fractions KE3, KFA1, KFB1 and KFC1 extracted from the Murchison meteorite to probe dust productions in these stellar sources. Seventy-six and 50% of the grains in the low-density fractions KE3 and KFA1, respectively, are supernova grains, while only 7.2% and 0.9% of the grains in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1 have a supernova origin. Grains of AGB star origin are concentrated in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1. From the C isotopic distributions of these fractions and the presence of s-process Kr with {sup 86}Kr/{sup 82}Kr = 4.43±0.46 in KFC1, we estimate that 76% and 80% of the grains in KFB1 and KFC1, respectively, formed in AGB stars. From the abundance of graphite grains in the Murchison meteorite, 0.88 ppm, the abundances of graphite from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.24 ppm and 0.44 ppm, respectively: the abundances of graphite in supernovae and AGB stars are comparable. In contrast, it has been known that 1% of SiC grains formed in supernovae and 95% formed in AGB stars in meteorites. Since the abundance of SiC grains is 5.85 ppm in the Murchison meteorite, the abundances of SiC from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.063 ppm and 5.6 ppm, respectively: the dominant source of SiC grains is AGB stars. Since SiC grains are harder and likely to survive better in space than graphite grains, the abundance of supernova graphite grains, which is higher than that of supernova SiC grains, indicates that supernovae proficiently produce graphite grains. Graphite grains from AGB stars are, in contrast, less abundant that SiC grains from AGB stars (0.44 ppm vs. 5.6 ppm). It is difficult to derive firm conclusions for graphite and SiC formation in AGB stars due to the difference in susceptibility to grain destruction. Metallicity of

  7. Abundances of presolar graphite and SiC from supernovae and AGB stars in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst; Gallino, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Pesolar graphite grains exhibit a range of densities (1.65 - 2.20 g/cm3). We investigated abundances of presolar graphite grains formed in supernovae and in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the four density fractions KE3, KFA1, KFB1 and KFC1 extracted from the Murchison meteorite to probe dust productions in these stellar sources. Seventy-six and 50% of the grains in the low-density fractions KE3 and KFA1, respectively, are supernova grains, while only 7.2% and 0.9% of the grains in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1 have a supernova origin. Grains of AGB star origin are concentrated in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1. From the C isotopic distributions of these fractions and the presence of s-process Kr with 86Kr/82Kr = 4.43±0.46 in KFC1, we estimate that 76% and 80% of the grains in KFB1 and KFC1, respectively, formed in AGB stars. From the abundance of graphite grains in the Murchison meteorite, 0.88 ppm, the abundances of graphite from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.24 ppm and 0.44 ppm, respectively: the abundances of graphite in supernovae and AGB stars are comparable. In contrast, it has been known that 1% of SiC grains formed in supernovae and 95% formed in AGB stars in meteorites. Since the abundance of SiC grains is 5.85 ppm in the Murchison meteorite, the abundances of SiC from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.063 ppm and 5.6 ppm, respectively: the dominant source of SiC grains is AGB stars. Since SiC grains are harder and likely to survive better in space than graphite grains, the abundance of supernova graphite grains, which is higher than that of supernova SiC grains, indicates that supernovae proficiently produce graphite grains. Graphite grains from AGB stars are, in contrast, less abundant that SiC grains from AGB stars (0.44 ppm vs. 5.6 ppm). It is difficult to derive firm conclusions for graphite and SiC formation in AGB stars due to the difference in susceptibility to grain destruction. Metallicity of the parent AGB stars of

  8. Spitzer Digs Up Galactic Fossil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a globular cluster previously hidden in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Globular clusters are compact bundles of old stars that date back to the birth of our galaxy, 13 or so billion years ago. Astronomers use these galactic 'fossils' as tools for studying the age and formation of the Milky Way.

    Most clusters orbit around the center of the galaxy well above its dust-enshrouded disc, or plane, while making brief, repeated passes through the plane that each last about a million years. Spitzer, with infrared eyes that can see into the dusty galactic plane, first spotted the newfound cluster during its current pass. A visible-light image (inset of Figure 1) shows only a dark patch of sky.

    The red streak behind the core of the cluster is a dust cloud, which may indicate the cluster's interaction with the Milky Way. Alternatively, this cloud may lie coincidentally along Spitzer's line of sight.

    Follow-up observations with the University of Wyoming Infrared Observatory helped set the distance of the new cluster at about 9,000 light-years from Earth - closer than most clusters - and set the mass at the equivalent of 300,000 Suns. The cluster's apparent size, as viewed from Earth, is comparable to a grain of rice held at arm's length. It is located in the constellation Aquila.

    Astronomers believe that this cluster may be one of the last in our galaxy to be uncovered.

    This image composite was taken on April 21, 2004, by Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

    Galactic Fossil Found Behind Curtain of Dust In Figure 2, the image mosaic shows the same patch of sky in various wavelengths of light. While the

  9. The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hoare, M. G.; Longmore, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Davis, C. J.; Adamson, A.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; de Grijs, R.; Smith, M.; Gosling, A.; Mitchison, S.; Gáspár, A.; Coe, M.; Tamura, M.; Parker, Q.; Irwin, M.; Hambly, N.; Bryant, J.; Collins, R. S.; Cross, N.; Evans, D. W.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hodgkin, S.; Lewis, J.; Read, M.; Riello, M.; Sutorius, E. T. W.; Lawrence, A.; Drew, J. E.; Dye, S.; Thompson, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near-infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 deg2 of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5° < b < 5° in the J, H and K filters and a ~200-deg2 area of the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud complex in these three filters and the 2.12 μm (1-0) H2 filter. It will provide data on ~2 × 109 sources. Here we describe the properties of the data set and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science comprises six studies. (1) A GPS-Spitzer-GLIMPSE cross-match for the star formation region G28.983-0.603 to identify YSOs. This increases the number of YSOs identified by a factor of 10 compared to GLIMPSE alone. (2) A wide-field study of the M17 nebula, in which an extinction map of the field is presented and the effect of source confusion on luminosity functions in different subregions is noted. (3) H2 emission in the ρ Ophiuchi dark cloud. All the molecular jets are traced back to a single active clump containing only a few protostars, which suggests that the duration of strong jet activity and associated rapid accretion in low-mass protostars is brief. (4) X-ray sources in the nuclear bulge. The GPS data distinguishes local main-sequence counterparts with soft X-ray spectra from nuclear bulge giant counterparts with hard X-ray spectra. (5) External galaxies in the zone of avoidance. The galaxies are clearly distinguished from stars in fields at longitudes l > 90°. (6) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. The (i' - J) versus (J - H) diagram is used to distinguish A-F type

  10. Asteroseismology and Galactic Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, C.

    2015-02-01

    Galactic Archeology is a coined term to describe the fact that the Milky Way's history is encoded both in the amounts of various chemical elements seen in the spectra of stellar atmospheres (abundances), and in stellar motions. One of the pillars of Galactic Archaeology is the use of stellar abundance ratios as an indirect age estimator, which although imprecise, has been proved useful in providing relative ages between the different galactic components. The lack of more precise age determination for large samples of field stars is one of the main reasons why different scenarios for the formation of our Galaxy can still be accommodated to current observational constraints, thus preventing a clear picture of the Milky Way's assembling history. Another difficulty is that most of the available information (especially on ages) has been confined to a region close to the Sun. These two main obstacles can now start to be overcome thanks to a) large spectroscopic and photometric surveys covering larger portions of the Milky Way, and b) the combination of the photometric and spectroscopic information with that coming from asteroseismology. The latter promises a breakthrough in the field of Galactic Archaeology, as it brings the opportunity to, for the first time, measure ages for large samples of distant field giant stars, which cover a large age-baseline. When combining this information with that soon available from Gaia, the field of Galactic Archaeology will be shaken and modelers will certainly have less flexibility in finding models that comply to these precious new observational constraints. The goal of these short lectures is to put Asteroseismology in the context of Galactic Archaeology.

  11. Production and Recycling of Carbon in the Early Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Johannes; Thidemann Hansen, Terese; Nordström, Birgitta

    2015-08-01

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars - [Fe/H] below ~ -3 - are fossil records of the conditions in the early halo. High-resolution 8m-class spectroscopy has shown that the detailed abundance pattern of EMP giant stars is surprisingly uniform and essentially Solar (e.g. Bonifacio+ 2012), apart from the usual α-enhancement in the halo. In the simplest picture, iron is a proxy for both overall metallicity and time, so the EMP stars should form before the oldest and most metal-poor Galactic globular clusters, notably at the lowest metallicities ([Fe/H] ≲ -3.5).It is thus striking that 20-40% of the EMP giants are strongly enhanced in carbon - the CEMP stars (Lucatello+ 2006). This is conventionally ascribed to mass transfer from a former AGB binary companion, and from a limited compilation of data, Lucatello+ (2005) concluded that most or all CEMP stars are indeed binaries, similar to the classical Ba and CH stars (e.g. Jorissen+ 1998). However, most of the sample was of the inner-halo CEMP-s variety (C and s-process elements both enhanced), while CEMP-no stars dominate the outer halo (Carollo+ 2014). Our precise radial velocity monitoring for CEMP stars over 8 years shed light on this issue.Our data suggest a normal binary frequency for the CEMP-no stars; i.e. the C was not produced in a binary companion, but in sites at interstellar distances, e.g. ‘faint’ SNe, and imprinted on the natal clouds of the low-mass stars we observe. This has immediate implications for the formation of dust in primitive, high-redshift galaxies (Watson+ 2015) and the origin of C-enhanced DLAs (Cooke+ 2011, 2012). The CEMP-s binary orbits are also revealing, with periods up to several decades and generally low amplitudes and eccentricities, suggesting that EMP AGB stars have very large radii, facilitating extensive mass loss. More work on faint SNe and EMP AGB envelopes is needed!

  12. Galactic Conformity Beyond the Virial Radius in Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Aaron D.; Primus Team, Illustris Team

    2016-01-01

    We report on the presence of galactic conformity at distances out to 10 Mpc in the Illustris suite of simulations, as well as on a search for conformity in the PRIMUS redshift survey. Galactic conformity, where red galaxies preferentially surround other red galaxies at fixed mass, is used as a probe of galaxy assembly bias — the picture in which environmental factors and assembly history, other than dark matter halo mass, are necessary to understand the halo occupation statistics of galaxies. Using the Illustris suite of simulations, we demonstrate how a galactic conformity signal at z = 0 can arise from a combination of the underlying dark matter clustering as a function of halo formation age and a galaxy color-halo age relation. With observations from the PRIMUS redshift survey, we probe the deprojected 3D galactic conformity signal as a function of redshift over the range 0.2 < z < 1. Together, these results motivate further observations to discern the effect size of to discern the effect size of the galactic conformity signal, its variation in redshift, and what baryonic processes, such as feedback or accretion, play a dominant role in its creation.

  13. The Hubble Space TelescopeUV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters - V. Constraints on formation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renzini, A.; D'Antona, F.; Cassisi, S.; King, I. R.; Milone, A. P.; Ventura, P.; Anderson, J.; Bedin, L. R.; Bellini, A.; Brown, T. M.; Piotto, G.; van der Marel, R. P.; Barbuy, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Hidalgo, S.; Marino, A. F.; Ortolani, S.; Salaris, M.; Sarajedini, A.

    2015-12-01

    We build on the evidence provided by our Legacy Survey of Galactic globular clusters (GC) to submit to a crucial test four scenarios currently entertained for the formation of multiple stellar generations in GCs. The observational constraints on multiple generations to be fulfilled are manifold, including GC specificity, ubiquity, variety, predominance, discreteness, supernova avoidance, p-capture processing, helium enrichment and mass budget. We argue that scenarios appealing to supermassive stars, fast rotating massive stars and massive interactive binaries violate in an irreparable fashion two or more among such constraints. Also the scenario appealing to asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars as producers of the material for next generation stars encounters severe difficulties, specifically concerning the mass budget problem and the detailed chemical composition of second-generation stars. We qualitatively explore ways possibly allowing one to save the AGB scenario, specifically appealing to a possible revision of the cross-section of a critical reaction rate destroying sodium, or alternatively by a more extensive exploration of the vast parameter space controlling the evolutionary behaviour of AGB stellar models. Still, we cannot ensure success for these efforts and totally new scenarios may have to be invented to understand how GCs formed in the early Universe.

  14. On the formation of molecules and solid-state compounds from the AGB to the PN phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Manchado, A.

    2016-07-01

    During the asymptoyic giant branch (AGB) phase, different elements are dredge- up to the stellar surface depending on progenitor mass and metallicity. When the mass loss increases at the end of the AGB, a circumstellar dust shell is formed, where different (C-rich or O-rich) molecules and solid-state compounds are formed. These are further processed in the transition phase between AGB stars and planetary nebulae (PNe) to create more complex organic molecules and inorganic solid-state compounds (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and graphene precursors in C-rich environments and oxides and crystalline silicates in O-rich ones). We present an observational review of the different molecules and solid-state materials that are formed from the AGB to the PN phases. We focus on the formation routes of complex fullerene (and fullerene-based) molecules as well as on the level of dust processing depending on metallicity.

  15. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral infection; Conjunctival infection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies and some are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Others are nothing to worry about. ...

  16. Red Clover

    MedlinePlus

    ... 17):2057–2071. Red clover. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July 22, 2009. Red clover ( Trifolium pratense ). Natural Standard Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturalstandard.com on July ...

  17. Red clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is an important forage legume grown on approximately 4 million hectares worldwide. An estimated 2.8 million kg of red clover seed per year was produced worldwide in 2005-2007. This amount of seed would be enough to maintain approximately 4 million hectares of red...

  18. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of the Red Sea was acquired on August 13, 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of algae,  Trichodesmium ...

  19. A chemically peculiar post-AGB star in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Van Winckel, H.; De Smedt, K.; Wood, P. R.

    2016-07-01

    Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (post-AGB) stars bear signatures of the entire chemical and morphological changes that occur prior to and during the AGB phase of evolution. These objects also provide vital clues on the ultimate fate of the star. Detailed chemical abundance studies of some of these objects have shown that they are chemically much more diverse than anticipated. As expected, some are the most s-process enriched objects known to date while others are not s-process enriched. Our recent study has revealed a star in the Small Magellanic Cloud, J005252.87-722842.9, which displays a peculiar chemical signature that does not correspond to the expected chemical diversity observed in these objects. This unique object reveals the possibility of a new stellar evolutionary channel where the star evolves without any third dredge-up episodes or during its evolution becomes devoid of its nucleosynthetic history.

  20. An ALMA View of the Complex Circumstellar Environment of the Post-AGB Object HD 101584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, H.; Vlemmings, W.; Maercker, M.; Humphreys, E.; Lindqvist, M.; Nyman, L.; Ramstedt, S.

    2015-12-01

    We use 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 2-1 lines and 1.3 mm continuum ALMA observations to study the circumstellar evolution of the binary HD 101584, a post-AGB star and a low-mass companion, which is most likely a post-common-envelope-evolution system. It is inferred that the circumstellar medium has a bipolar hour-glass structure, seen almost pole-on, formed by an energetic, ≍ 150 km s-1, jet. Significant amount of material resides in an unresolved central region. It is proposed that the circumstellar morphology is related to an event which took place ≍ 500 yr ago, possibly a capture event where the companion spiraled in towards the AGB star. However, the kinetic energy of the accelerated gas exceeds the released orbital energy. Hence, the observed phenomenon does not match current common-envelope scenarios, and another process must augment, or even dominate, the ejection process.

  1. The Impact of FUSE on our Understanding of Stellar Post-AGB Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Ziegler, M.; Koesterke, L.; Kruk, J. W.; Oliveira, C. M.

    2009-05-24

    State-of-the-art non-LTE spectral analysis requires high-resolution and high-S/N observations of strategic metal lines in order to achieve reliable photospheric parameters like, e.g., effective temperature, surface gravity, and element abundances.Hot stars with effective temperatures higher than about 40 000 K exhibit their metal-line spectrum arising from highly ionized species predominantly in the (far) ultraviolet wavelength range.FUSE observations of hot, compact stars provided the necessary data. With these, it has been, e.g., possible to identify fluorine for the first time in observations of post-AGB stars. The evaluation of ionization equilibria of highly ionized neon, phosphorus, sulfur, and argon provides a new sensitive tool to determine effective temperatures of the hottest stars precisely. Moreover, abundance determinations have put constraints on stellar evolutionary models which, in turn, have improved greatly our picture of post-AGB evolution.

  2. An ALMA view of the post-AGB object HD 101584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, H.; Vlemmings, W.; Maercker, M.; Humphreys, E.; Lindqvist, M.; Nyman, L.; Ramstedt, S.

    2016-07-01

    ALMA cycles 1 and 3 observations of CO isotopologues and 1.3mm continuum are used in a study of the circumstellar environment of the binary HD 101584, a post-AGB star and a low-mass companion that is most likely a post-common-envelope-evolution system. These data are supplemented with new information from OH maser emission. It is inferred that the large- scale circumstellar medium has a bipolar hour-glass structure, seen almost pole-on, formed by an energetic, ≥⃒ 150 km s-1, jet. Significant amount of material still resides in the central region. It is proposed that the circumstellar morphology is related to an event which took place ≤⃒ 500 yr ago, possibly a capture event where the companion spiralled in towards the AGB star. Several observed features remain to be explained, and may hint to a more complicated scenario.

  3. Large-scale environments of binary AGB stars probed by Herschel. I. Morphology statistics and case studies of R Aquarii and W Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Nowotny, W.; Cox, N. L. J.; Aringer, B.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Decin, L.; van Eck, S.; Gail, H.-P.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Kornfeld, K.; Mecina, M.; Posch, Thomas; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mass loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample offers a selection of 78 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) observed with the PACS photometer on-board Herschel at 70 μm and 160 μm. For most of these objects, the dusty AGB wind is not spherically symmetric and the wind shape can be subdivided into four classes. In the present paper we concentrate on the influence of a companion on the morphology of the stellar wind. Literature was searched to find binaries in the MESS sample, which were subsequently linked to their wind-morphology class to assert that the binaries are not distributed equally among the classes. In the second part of the paper we concentrate on the circumstellar environment of the two prominent objects R Aqr and W Aql. Each shows a characteristic signature of a companion interaction with the stellar wind. For the symbiotic star R Aqr, PACS revealed two perfectly opposing arms that in part reflect the previously observed ring-shaped nebula in the optical. However, from the far-IR there is evidence that the emitting region is elliptical rather than circular. The outline of the wind of W Aql seems to follow a large Archimedean spiral formed by the orbit of the companion but also shows strong indications of an interaction with the interstellar medium. We investigated the nature of the companion of W Aql and found that the magnitude of the orbital period supports the size of the spiral outline. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  4. A Pilot Deep Survey for X-Ray Emission from fuvAGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, R.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Stute, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ˜(0.002-0.2) L⊙ and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ˜(35-160) × 106 K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  5. Evolved stars in the Local Group galaxies. I. AGB evolution and dust production in IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Boyer, M. L.; García-Hernández, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We used models of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, that also describe the dust-formation process in the wind, to interpret the combination of near- and mid-infrared photometric data of the dwarf galaxy IC 1613. This is the first time that this approach is extended to an environment different from the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). Our analysis, based on synthetic population techniques, shows a nice agreement between the observations and the expected distribution of stars in the colour-magnitude diagrams obtained with JHK and Spitzer bands. This allows a characterization of the individual stars in the AGB sample in terms of mass, chemical composition, and formation epoch of the progenitors. We identify the stars exhibiting the largest degree of obscuration as carbon stars evolving through the final AGB phases, descending from 1 - 1.25M⊙ objects of metallicity Z = 10-3 and from 1.5 - 2.5M⊙ stars with Z = 2 × 10-3. Oxygen-rich stars constitute the majority of the sample (˜65%), mainly low mass stars (<2M⊙) that produce a negligible amount of dust (≤10-7M⊙/yr). We predict the overall dust-production rate from IC 1613, mostly determined by carbon stars, to be ˜6 × 10-7M⊙/yr with an uncertainty of 30%. The capability of the current generation of models to interpret the AGB population in an environment different from the MCs opens the possibility to extend this kind of analysis to other Local Group galaxies.

  6. On the nature of the most obscured C-rich AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; Karakas, A. I.; Dell'Agli, F.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Boyer, M. L.; Di Criscienzo, M.

    2016-04-01

    The stars in the Magellanic Clouds with the largest degree of obscuration are used to probe the highly uncertain physics of stars in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase of evolution. Carbon stars in particular provide key information on the amount of third dredge-up and mass-loss. We use two independent stellar evolution codes to test how a different treatment of the physics affects the evolution on the AGB. The output from the two codes is used to determine the rates of dust formation in the circumstellar envelope, where the method used to determine the dust is the same for each case. The stars with the largest degree of obscuration in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are identified as the progeny of objects of initial mass 2.5-3 M⊙ and ˜1.5 M⊙, respectively. This difference in mass is motivated by the difference in the star formation histories of the two galaxies, and offers a simple explanation of the redder infrared colours of C-stars in the LMC compared to their counterparts in the SMC. The comparison with the Spitzer colours of C-rich AGB stars in the SMC shows that a minimum surface carbon mass fraction X(C) ˜ 5 × 10-3 must have been reached by stars of initial mass around 1.5 M⊙. Our results confirm the necessity of adopting low-temperature opacities in stellar evolutionary models of AGB stars. These opacities allow the stars to obtain mass-loss rates high enough (≳10-4 M⊙ yr-1) to produce the amount of dust needed to reproduce the Spitzer colours.

  7. Evolved stars in the Local Group galaxies - I. AGB evolution and dust production in IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Boyer, M. L.; García-Hernández, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    We used models of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, which also describe the dust-formation process in the wind, to interpret the combination of near- and mid-infrared photometric data of the dwarf galaxy IC 1613. This is the first time that this approach is extended to an environment different from the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). Our analysis, based on synthetic population techniques, shows nice agreement between the observations and the expected distribution of stars in the colour-magnitude diagrams obtained with JHK and Spitzer bands. This allows a characterization of the individual stars in the AGB sample in terms of mass, chemical composition and formation epoch of the progenitors. We identify the stars exhibiting the largest degree of obscuration as carbon stars evolving through the final AGB phases, descending from 1-1.25 M⊙ objects of metallicity Z = 10-3 and from 1.5-2.5 M⊙ stars with Z = 2 × 10-3. Oxygen-rich stars constitute the majority of the sample (˜65 per cent), mainly low-mass stars (<2 M⊙) that produce a negligible amount of dust (≤10-7 M⊙ yr-1). We predict the overall dust-production rate from IC 1613, mostly determined by carbon stars, to be ˜6 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1 with an uncertainty of 30 per cent. The capability of the current generation of models to interpret the AGB population in an environment different from the MCs opens the possibility to extend this kind of analysis to other Local Group galaxies.

  8. Evolved stars in the Local Group galaxies - I. AGB evolution and dust production in IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Boyer, M. L.; García-Hernández, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    We used models of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, that also describe the dust-formation process in the wind, to interpret the combination of near- and mid-infrared photometric data of the dwarf galaxy IC 1613. This is the first time that this approach is extended to an environment different from the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). Our analysis, based on synthetic population techniques, shows a nice agreement between the observations and the expected distribution of stars in the colour-magnitude diagrams obtained with JHK and Spitzer bands. This allows a characterization of the individual stars in the AGB sample in terms of mass, chemical composition, and formation epoch of the progenitors. We identify the stars exhibiting the largest degree of obscuration as carbon stars evolving through the final AGB phases, descending from 1-1.25Msun objects of metallicity Z=0.001 and from 1.5-2.5Msun stars with Z=0.002. Oxygen-rich stars constitute the majority of the sample (65%), mainly low mass stars (<2Msun) that produce a negligible amount of dust (<10^{-7}Msun/yr). We predict the overall dust-production rate from IC 1613, mostly determined by carbon stars, to be 6x10^{-7}Msun/yr with an uncertainty of 30%. The capability of the current generation of models to interpret the AGB population in an environment different from the MCs opens the possibility to extend this kind of analysis to other Local Group galaxies.

  9. Surprising detection of an equatorial dust lane on the AGB star IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, S. V.; Min, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Canovas, H.; Pols, O. R.; Rodenhuis, M.; de Juan Ovelar, M.; Keller, C. U.; Decin, L.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Understanding the formation of planetary nebulae remains elusive because in the preceding asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase these stars are heavily enshrouded in an optically thick dusty envelope. Methods: To further understand the morphology of the circumstellar environments of AGB stars we observe the closest carbon-rich AGB star IRC+10216 in scattered light. Results: When imaged in scattered light at optical wavelengths, IRC+10216 surprisingly shows a narrow equatorial density enhancement, in contrast to the large-scale spherical rings that have been imaged much further out. We use radiative transfer models to interpret this structure in terms of two models: firstly, an equatorial density enhancement, commonly observed in the more evolved post-AGB stars, and secondly, in terms of a dust rings model, where a local enhancement of mass-loss creates a spiral ring as the star rotates. Conclusions: We conclude that both models can be used to reproduce the dark lane in the scattered light images, which is caused by an equatorially density enhancement formed by dense dust rather than a bipolar outflow as previously thought. We are unable to place constraints on the formation of the equatorial density enhancement by a binary system. Final reduced images (FITS) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A3Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  10. Detailed Modelling of the Circumstellar Envelope of the S-type AGB Star W Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; Bergman, P.; Justtanont, K.; Lombaert, R.; Maercker, M.; Olofsson, H.; Ramstedt, S.; Royer, P.

    2015-08-01

    We present new Herschel HIFI (de Graauw et al. 2010) and PACS (Poglitsch et al. 2010) sub-millimeter and far-infrared line observations of several molecular species towards the S-type AGB star W Aql. We use these observations, which probe a wide range of gas temperatures, to constrain the circumstellar properties of W Aql, including mass-loss rate and molecular abundances.

  11. The Transformation of an AGB Star to a Planetary Nebula: How the Journey Begins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Blumenfeld, C.; Morris, M.; S'anchez Contreras, C.; Claussen, M.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results from an HST imaging survey of a sample of late AGB stars with a detected history of extensive past mass-loss, i.e., those in which this process has now come to an end. The goal of this survey is to identify and characterise the earliest stages of the process that transforms these objects, first into bipolar or multipolar pre-planetary nebulae (PPNe), and then into similarly-shaped planetary nebulae. Since the cessation of mass-loss leads to the lack of hot dust close to the star, their thermal emission at short ( 25 micron) wavelengths, is expected to be lower than that for typical AGB stars. We have therefore used the IRAS 25 to 12 micron flux ratio, F25/F12 > 0.33 (but < 0.67 in order to exclude PPNe), to select a list of 60 such ``nascent pre-planetary nebulae" (or nPPNe); 48 were imaged in our SNAPshot imaging program. We found compact, but non-stellar, morphologies in about a quarter of our observed sample. The remaining objects are either unresolved, or only marginally resolved. Aspherical structure is seen in the resolved objects. The aspherical structure in nPPNe is different from that observed in PPNe, which generally show limb-brightened, roughly equal-sized lobes on both sides of the center. In contrast, only one-sided structures are seen in our survey nPPNe. In some objects, a diffuse, round, halo is also seen, representing the undisturbed AGB mass-loss envelope. A few sources show discrete circular (partial) arc-like features. The discovery of the one-side collimated features, together with detailed earlier studies of a few nPPNe (e.g. V Hya, IRC+10216), supports the hypothesis that the mechanism for creating the large-scale density inhomogeneties are high velocity outflows carving the AGB mass-loss envelope from the inside out.

  12. Variability Studies in Two Hypergiants and a Post-AGB Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Stephen; Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian

    2016-01-01

    In the course of long-term photometric monitoring of post-AGB stars at the Valparaiso University campus observatory, we have also observed some objects of uncertain evolutionary state. This includes two objects that have some of the characteristics of post-AGB stars, such as large IR excesses and F-G spectral types. The weight of recent evidence suggests that two of these, IRAS 19114+0002 (AFGL 2343) and IRAS 19244+1115 (IRC+10 420), are instead hypergiants, objects of very high luminosity arising from evolved high-mass progenitors. A third object, IRAS 20004+2955 (V1027 Cyg), appears to be a cool post-AGB star evolving from a low or intermediate-mass progenitor. We have light and color curves from 1994-2007, along with some radial velocity data from 1991-1995. These three objects display complex light and color curves with evidence of periodicity in the range of 100 to 300 days. We will present the results of these studies. This research is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (most recently AST 1413660), the Indiana Space Grant Consortium, and Valparaiso University.

  13. ALMA reveals sunburn: CO dissociation around AGB stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Lagadec, E.; Sloan, G. C.; Boyer, M. L.; Matsuura, M.; Smith, R. J.; Smith, C. L.; Yates, J. A.; van Loon, J. Th.; Jones, O. C.; Ramstedt, S.; Avison, A.; Justtanont, K.; Olofsson, H.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Goldman, S. R.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2015-11-01

    Atacama Large Millimetre Array observations show a non-detection of carbon monoxide around the four most luminous asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. Stellar evolution models and star counts show that the mass-loss rates from these stars should be ˜1.2-3.5 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1. We would naïvely expect such stars to be detectable at this distance (4.5 kpc). By modelling the ultraviolet radiation field from post-AGB stars and white dwarfs in 47 Tuc, we conclude that CO should be dissociated abnormally close to the stars. We estimate that the CO envelopes will be truncated at a few hundred stellar radii from their host stars and that the line intensities are about two orders of magnitude below our current detection limits. The truncation of CO envelopes should be important for AGB stars in dense clusters. Observing the CO (3-2) and higher transitions and targeting stars far from the centres of clusters should result in the detections needed to measure the outflow velocities from these stars.

  14. Winds, Bubbles, ...but Magnetized: Solutions for High Speed Post-AGB Winds and Their Extreme Collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segura, G.; López, J. A.; Franco, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides solutions for the origin of post-AGB winds, their acceleration up to high speed, and the subsequent formation of extremely collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of km/s up to 10^3km/s are calculated, which produce proto-planetary nebulae with linear momenta in the range 10^36 to 10^40gcm/s and with kinetic energies in the range 10^42 to 10^47 erg. These results match available observations of proto-planetary nebulae. In the present simplistic scheme, the driver of the wind is just the magnetic pressure at the stellar surface. Other forces are not taken into account in this study, except gravity. We conclude that mass-loss rates of post-AGB stars and transition times from late AGB up to planetary nebula central stars could be directly linked with the production of magnetic field at the stellar core. As an example, mass-loss rates as large as 8×10^-5 M[ sun ]/yr and transition times as short as 5000 years are predicted.

  15. VLT/NACO Imaging of the Nearest AGB Star, L2 Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montargès, M.; Kervella, P.; Ridgway, S. T.; Perrin, G.; Chesneau, O.

    2015-08-01

    AGB stars are the most important contributors to the chemical enrichment of the Galaxy. During their later evolutionary stages they experience intense pulsations and eject most of their layers as they become planetary nebulae (PNe). The process leading to the formation of bipolar PNe remains poorly understood. It is assumed that the circumstellar disk of an AGB star could collimate the stellar wind to form a bipolar PN, yet very few of these disks have been observed. Using the adaptive-optics system of the VLT/NACO instrument at the Paranal Observatory and a "lucky imaging" technique, our team obtained near-infrared diffraction-limited images of the nearest AGB star, L2 Puppis. The deconvolved images reveal a dark structure in front of the star whose morphology and photometry match a dusty edge-on disk of olivine and pyroxene modeled with a Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. The L band images also show a loop structure, possibly the signature of an interacting hidden companion.

  16. Stellar Dust Production in Chemically Primitive Environments: Infrared Lightcurves and Mass Loss in Extremely Metal-poor AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, George

    In their final stage of evolution, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars inject a substantial amount of dust into the surrounding interstellar medium, potentially dominating the total stellar dust budgets of their host galaxies. However, stellar models conflict over whether metal-poor AGB stars can condense enough dust to drive a strong stellar wind, so it is unclear what role AGB stars play in the early Universe compared to other dust sources, e.g., in high-redshift quasars that show evidence for massive dust reservoirs. Empirically, AGB stars that are massive enough to contribute in the early Universe are only well studied in the Milky Way and the nearby Magellanic Clouds; all three environments are relatively metal-rich and thus unlikely to be representative of high-redshift AGB stars. This lack of observations of metal-poor AGB stars motivated the survey of DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer (DUSTiNGS), which imaged 50 nearby dwarf galaxies in the infrared and identified 526 dusty "extreme" AGB stars. The DUSTiNGS stars confirm that dust can form at metallicities as low as 0.008 solar, more than an order of magnitude lower than had been previously observed. However, very little is known about the DUSTiNGS stars; among the unknowns are the photospheric chemistries, stellar masses, temperatures, luminosities, pulsation periods and amplitudes, dust-production rates, and even their statuses as bona fide AGB stars. To eliminate these unknowns, we were awarded 56 hours of Priority 1 observing time in Spitzer's cycle 11 to obtain 6 new epochs of imaging for a subset of the DUSTiNGS variables over an 18 month baseline. These will be the first infrared light curves of metal-poor, dust-producing AGB stars, allowing us to study the influence of metallicity on pulsation and dust production. Combined with additional archival data, our cycle-11 Spitzer program will allow estimates of all of the parameters listed above, enabling the first direct comparisons to models of AGB

  17. Simulations of Galactic Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  18. The Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.

    2016-06-01

    The Galactic bulge is the least studied component of our Galaxy. Yet, its formation and evolution are key to understand the formation of the Galaxy itself. Studies on the Galactic bulge have increased significantly in the last years, but still there are many points of controversy. This volume contains several contributions from experts in different aspects of the bulge. Issues discussed include the following: the presence of an old spheroidal bulge, or identification of its old stellar population with the thick disk or halo; fraction of stars younger than 10 Gyr is estimated to be of < 5 to 22% depending on method and authors; multiple populations or only a metal-poor and a metal-rich ones; spheroidal or ellipsoidal distribution of RR Lyrae; formation of the bulge from early mergers or from secular evolution of the bar; different methods of mapping extinction; selection and identification of bulge globular clusters.

  19. Galactic-scale civilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.

    1980-01-01

    Evolutionary arguments are presented in favor of the existence of civilization on a galactic scale. Patterns of physical, chemical, biological, social and cultural evolution leading to increasing levels of complexity are pointed out and explained thermodynamically in terms of the maximization of free energy dissipation in the environment of the organized system. The possibility of the evolution of a global and then a galactic human civilization is considered, and probabilities that the galaxy is presently in its colonization state and that life could have evolved to its present state on earth are discussed. Fermi's paradox of the absence of extraterrestrials in light of the probability of their existence is noted, and a variety of possible explanations is indicated. Finally, it is argued that although mankind may be the first occurrence of intelligence in the galaxy, it is unjustified to presume that this is so.

  20. Topics in galactic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Frank Blane

    1989-01-01

    The distant satellites of the Milky Way Galaxy are used to probe the distribution of dark matter in the Galactic halo. A new method of statistical analysis based on Bayes' theorem was devised, which directly yields confidence intervals for the mass of the Galaxy once the eccentricity distribution of the satellites is specified. Assuming an isotropic velocity distribution for 10 objects at distances of 50 to 140 kiloparsecs, mass results suggest that the Galaxy's massive dark halo extends to approximately less than 50 kiloparsecs from the Galactic center. A model galaxy with an artificial bar is used to explore the effect of dynamical friction on a galactic bar. An analytic formula is provided which correctly predicts angular momentum changes for a bar in interaction with a non self-gravitating disk. N-body simulations further show that disk self-gravity tends to make a bar without inner Lindblad resonances spin down more rapidly, and tends to make a bar dominated by inner Lindblad resonances spin up less rapidly. The long-term dynamical evolution of galactic bars is investigated using fully self gravitating bar-unstable disk-halo models. The models develop rapidly rotating bars which then slow down through transfers of angular momentum both to the outer disk and to the halo. The models suggest that the distance between the end of a bar and its corotation circle is proportional to the bar's age, and an approximate formula is presented which expresses this relationship. It is also concluded that the average tangential velocity within a barlike object drops by a factor of about 2 over approximately 45 initial rotation periods.

  1. Chemical abundance study of two strongly s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the LMC: J051213.81-693537.1 and J051848.86-700246.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.

    2015-11-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we systematically study the chemical abundances of extra-galactic post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. The aim of our programme is to derive chemical abundances of stars covering a large range in luminosity and metallicity with the ultimate goal of testing, constraining, and improving our knowledge of the poorly understood AGB phase, especially the third dredge-up mixing processes and associated s-process nucleosynthesis. Aims: Post-AGB photospheres are dominated by atomic lines and indicate the effects of internal chemical enrichment processes over the entire stellar lifetime. In this paper, we study two carefully selected post-AGB stars: J051213.81-693537.1 and J051848.86-700246.9 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Both objects show signs of s-process enhancement. The combination of favourable atmospheric parameters for detailed abundance studies and their known distances (and hence luminosities and initial masses) make these objects ideal probes of the AGB third dredge-up and s-process nucleosynthesis in that they provide observational constraints for theoretical AGB models. Methods: We use high-resolution optical UVES spectra to determine accurate stellar parameters and subsequently perform detailed elemental abundance studies of post-AGB stars. Additionally, we use available photometric data covering optical and IR bands to construct spectral energy distributions for reddening and luminosity determinations. We then estimate initial masses from theoretical post-AGB tracks. Results: We obtained accurate atmospheric parameters for J051213.81-693537.1 (Teff = 5875 ± 125 K, log g = 1.00 ± 0.25 dex, [Fe/H] = -0.56 ± 0.16 dex) and J051848.86-700246.9 (Teff = 6000 ± 125 K, log g = 0.50 ± 0.25 dex, [Fe/H] = -1.06 ± 0.17 dex). Both stars show extreme s-process enrichment associated with relatively low C/O ratios of 1.26 ± 0.40 and 1.29 ± 0.30 for J051213-693537.1 and J051848

  2. Galactic Diffuse Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

    2007-10-25

    Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

  3. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  4. Galactic diffuse gamma rays from galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateyama, N.; Nishimura, J.

    2001-08-01

    The dominant part of the diffuse gamma rays from the Galactic plane, with energy greater than 1TeV, has been thought as due to the inverse Compton scattering of the interstellar photons with the high-energy cosmic electrons. In these energy regions, the diffuse gamma-ray observation gives us unique infor-mation on the energy spectrum of the high-energy electrons in the interstellar space, since we cannot observe those electrons directly. This provides us information on the cosmicray source, production mechanism and propagation in the Galaxy. We discuss the implication of our results by comparing with the work of Porter and Protheroe, and also compare with the data observed by the most recent extensive air showers. It is also pointed out that the patchy structure of gammaray distribution will appear at high-energy side, if we observe the distribution with a higher angular resolution of a few arc degrees. This patchy structure will become clear beyond 10TeV of IC gamma rays, where the number of contributing sources of parent decrease and the diffusion distance of the electrons become smaller.

  5. The abundance of HCN in circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars of different chemical type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöier, F. L.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, H.; Lindqvist, M.; Bieging, J. H.; Marvel, K. B.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: A multi-transition survey of HCN (sub-) millimeter line emission from a large sample of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of different chemical type is presented. The data are analysed and circumstellar HCN abundances are estimated. The sample stars span a large range of properties such as mass-loss rate and photospheric C/O-ratio. The analysis of the new data allows for more accurate estimates of the circumstellar HCN abundances and puts new constraints on chemical models. Methods: In order to constrain the circumstellar HCN abundance distribution a detailed non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) excitation analysis, based on the Monte Carlo method, is performed. Effects of line overlaps and radiative excitation from dust grains are included. Results: The median values for the derived abundances of HCN (with respect to H2) are 3 × 10-5, 7 × 10-7 and 10-7 for carbon stars (25 stars), S-type AGB stars (19 stars) and M-type AGB stars (25 stars), respectively. The estimated sizes of the HCN envelopes are similar to those obtained in the case of SiO for the same sample of sources and agree well with previous results from interferometric observations, when these are available. Conclusions: We find that there is a clear dependence of the derived circumstellar HCN abundance on the C/O-ratio of the star, in that carbon stars have about two orders of magnitude higher abundances than M-type AGB stars, on average. The derived HCN abundances of the S-type AGB stars have a larger spread and typically fall in between those of the two other types, however, slightly closer to the values for the M-type AGB stars. For the M-type stars, the estimated abundances are much higher than what would be expected if HCN is formed in thermal equilibrium. However, the results are also in contrast to predictions from recent non-LTE chemical models, where very little difference is expected in the HCN abundances between the various types of AGB stars. This publication is based on data

  6. Characteristics of convection and overshooting in RGB and AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xiang-Jun; Li, Yan

    2011-10-01

    Based on the turbulent convection model (TCM) of Li & Yang, we have studied the characteristics of turbulent convection in the envelopes of 2 and 5Modot stars at the red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch phases. The TCM has been successfully applied over the entire convective envelopes, including the convective unstable zone and the overshooting regions. We find that the convective motions become progressively stronger when the stellar models are located farther up along the Hayashi line. In the convective unstable zone, we find that the turbulent correlations are proportional to functions of a common factor (∇ - ∇ad)T¯, which explains similar distributions in those correlations. For the TCM we find that if the obtained stellar temperature structure is close to that of the mixing length theory (MLT), the convective motion will have a much larger velocity and thus be more violent. However, if the turbulent velocity is adjusted to be close to that of the MLT, the superadiabatic convection zone would be much more extended inward, which would lead to a lower effective temperature of the stellar model. For the overshooting distance, we find that the e-folding lengths of the turbulent kinetic energy k in both the top and bottom overshooting regions decrease as the stellar model is progressively located farther up along the Hayashi line, but both the extents of the decrease are not obvious. The overshooting distances of the turbulent correlation are almost the same for the different stellar models with the same set of TCM parameters. For the decay modes of the kinetic energy k, we find that they are very similar for different stellar models based on the same set of TCM parameters, and there is a nearly linear relationship between lg k and ln P for different stellar models. When Cs or α increases while the other parameters are fixed, the obtained linearly decaying distance will become longer.

  7. Yields from low metallicity, intermediate mass AGB stars:. Their role for the CNO and lithium abundances in Globular Cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; D'Antona, F.; Mazzitelli, I.

    2002-10-01

    We present the results of extensive computation of the Thermal Pulse phase AGB evolution of stars of metallicities in mass fraction 2 x 10-4 <= Z <= 0.01, for those masses in the range 2.5 <= M/Msun <= 6, which suffer the Hot Bottom Burning (HBB) phase. The evolution is fully computed, by assuming a mass loss rate consistent with the observations of the Magellanic Clouds lithium-rich stars, and modelling convection with the Full Spectrum of Turbulence model by Canuto and Mazzitelli. The results are discussed in the framework of their importance for the evolution of proto-Globular Clusters, whose spectra show that the stars are very probably formed from matter contaminated by the ejecta of these stars, or have accreted it after formation. The main results we find are the following: 1) for metallicities Z <= 10-3, masses above ~ 4 Msun suffer complete CNO cycling in HBB, so that they show at the surface the result of this process, and the oxygen abundance is reduced; 2) most models suffer the third dredge up. Although carbon is processed to nitrogen by HBB, the oxygen burning is so strong in the lowest metallicities (2 x 10-4) that carbon becomes more abundant than oxygen: in other words, low-metallicity intermediate mass stars may show up as carbon stars due to the drastic oxygen burning; 3) if Globular Cluster stars are contaminated by matter processed through these phases, we must expect a non negligible helium enhancement in their composition: from a Big Bang abundance Y=0.24, e.g., we might expect an abundance Y=0.28. This may have no practical consequences if pollution concerns only the external parts of the stars, but is very important if the stars formed as a whole from a helium rich environment. 4) The lithium yields, although not important for galactic chemical evolution, are very interestingly close to the initial Big Bang abundance: processing by HBB is the only way in which we can obtain substantial amounts of gas which have gone through full CNO burning

  8. Searching for OH maser emission towards the MIPSGAL compact Galactic bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingallinera, A.; Trigilio, C.; Leto, P.; Umana, G.; Buemi, C.; Cerrigone, L.; Agliozzo, C.

    2015-11-01

    We conducted radio observations searching for OH 18-cm maser emission from a sample of 169 unclassified MIPSGAL compact Galactic bubbles. These sources are thought to be the circumstellar envelopes of different kinds of evolved stars. Our observations were aimed at shedding light on the nature of MIPSGAL bubbles, since their characterization is a fundamental aid for the development of accurate physical models of stellar and Galaxy evolution. The maser emission is observationally linked to the last stages of the life of low- and intermediate-mass stars, which may constitute a significant fraction of the MIPSGAL bubbles. In particular OH masers are usually observed towards post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. Our observations were performed with the Green Bank Telescope and, for each source, produced spectra around the four OH 18-cm transitions. The observations were compared with archive interferometer data in order to exclude possible contamination from nearby sources. The main result is that the OH maser emission is not a common feature among the MIPSGAL bubbles, with only one certain detection. We conclude that among the MIPSGAL bubbles the post-AGB stars could be very rare.

  9. GALACTIC S STARS: INVESTIGATIONS OF COLOR, MOTION, AND SPECTRAL FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, Elizabeth; Green, Paul J.; Gray, Richard O.

    2011-09-01

    Known bright S stars, recognized as such by their enhanced s-process abundances and C/O ratio, are typically members of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) or the red giant branch. Few modern digital spectra for these objects have been published, from which intermediate resolution spectral indices and classifications could be derived. For published S stars, we find accurate positions using the Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and use the FAST spectrograph of the Tillinghast reflector on Mt. Hopkins to obtain the spectra of 57 objects. We make available a digital S star spectral atlas consisting of 14 spectra of S stars with diverse spectral features. We define and derive basic spectral indices that can help distinguish S stars from late-type (M) giants and carbon stars. We convolve all our spectra with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey bandpasses, and employ the resulting gri magnitudes together with 2MASS JHK{sub s} mags to investigate S star colors. These objects have colors similar to carbon and M stars, and are therefore difficult to distinguish by color alone. Using near- and mid-infrared colors from IRAS and Akari, we identify some of the stars as intrinsic (AGB) or extrinsic (with abundances enhanced by past mass transfer). We also use V band and 2MASS magnitudes to calculate a temperature index for stars in the sample. We analyze the proper motions and parallaxes of our sample stars to determine upper and lower limit absolute magnitudes and distances, and confirm that most are probably giants.

  10. THE INNER GALACTIC BULGE: EVIDENCE FOR A NUCLEAR BAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Ortwin; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma

    2012-01-15

    Recent data from the VVV survey have strengthened evidence for a structural change in the Galactic bulge inward of |l| {<=} 4 Degree-Sign . Here we show with an N-body barred galaxy simulation that a boxy bulge formed through the bar and buckling instabilities effortlessly matches measured bulge longitude profiles for red clump stars. The same simulation snapshot was earlier used to clarify the apparent boxy bulge-long bar dichotomy, for the same orientation and scaling. The change in the slope of the model longitude profiles in the inner few degrees is caused by a transition from highly elongated to more nearly axisymmetric isodensity contours in the inner boxy bulge. This transition is confined to a few degrees from the Galactic plane; thus the change of slope is predicted to disappear at higher Galactic latitudes. We also show that the nuclear star count map derived from this simulation snapshot displays a longitudinal asymmetry similar to that observed in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) data, but is less flattened to the Galactic plane than the 2MASS map. These results support the interpretation that the Galactic bulge originated from disk evolution and question the evidence advanced from star count data for the existence of a secondary nuclear bar in the Milky Way.

  11. Galactic distribution of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiradakis, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The density distributions of pulsars in luminosity, period, Z-distance, and galactocentric distance were derived, using a uniform sample of pulsars detected during a 408-MHz pulsar survey at Jodrell Bank. There are indications of a fine-scale structure in the spatial distributions and evidence that there is a general correlation with other galactic populations and the overall spiral structure. The electron layer in our galaxy is shown to be wider than the pulsar layer and uniform on a large scale. The number of pulsars in the galaxy has been estimated and used to derive the pulsar birthrate.

  12. Galactic distribution of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiradakis, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The density distributions of pulsars in luminosity, period, Z-distance, and galactocentric distance were derived using a uniform sample of pulsars detected during a 408 MHz pulsar survey at Jodrell Bank. There are indications of a fine scale structure in the spatial distribution and evidence that there is a general correlation with other galactic populations and the overall spiral structure. The electron layer in the galaxy is shown to be wider than the pulsar layer and uniform on a large scale. The number of pulsars in the galaxy was estimated and used to derive the pulsar birthrate.

  13. Hot Science With A "warm" Telescope: Galactic Studies With The Spitzer "warm" Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Carey, S.; Helou, G.; Hurt, R.; Rebull, L.; Soifer, B. T.; Squires, G.; Storrie-Lombardi, L.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the capabilities for Galactic science in the Spitzer Space Telescope "warm" mission phase. The unique capabilities of IRAC in this mission will allow to: complete the census of the Galactic plane by mapping it over the entire longitude range; measure extinction in conjunction with existing near-infrared surveys such as 2MASS, and at higher spatial resolution than other long wavelength surveys; observe heavily extincted Galactic areas such as bars, interacting dwarf satellites, and spiral arms, with superior penetration than near-infrared data; study larger regions of star formation surrounding massive molecular clouds, such as the outer regions of OB associations and distant GMCs, to augment present studies of clouds within 500 pc; conduct wide angle surveys of cool T and Y dwarfs, and AGB stars in the halo. In spring 2009, the liquid helium cryogen on-board Spitzer will be expended, but the observatory will remain operative with 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging capabilities over two 5 arcmin X 5 arcmin fields-of-view. Sensitivity in these channels will remain unchanged from the cryogenic mission. During the warm mission, Spitzer can operate until early 2014 with extremely high-efficiency, providing up to 35,000 hours of science observing time. This enables several unprecedented opportunities to address fundamental and key scientific questions requiring large allocations of observing time, while maintaining opportunities for broad community use with more traditional time allocations.

  14. A search for water maser emission toward obscured post-AGB star and planetary nebula candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J. F.; Rizzo, J. R.; Suárez, O.; Palau, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Guerrero, M. A.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Torrelles, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Water maser emission at 22 GHz is a useful probe for studying the transition between the nearly spherical mass loss in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to a collimated one in the post-AGB phase. In their turn, collimated jets in the post-AGB phase could determine the shape of planetary nebulae once photoionization starts. Aims: We intend to find new cases of post-AGB stars and planetary nebulae (PNe) with water maser emission, including some especially interesting and rare types: water fountains (evolved objects with high velocity collimated jets traced by water masers) or water-maser-emitting PNe. Since previous studies have shown a higher detection rate of water maser emission in evolved objects that are optically obscured, we selected a sample that contains a significant fraction of post-AGB and young PN candidate sources showing signs of strong obscuration. Methods: We searched for water maser emission in 133 evolved objects using the radio telescopes in Robledo de Chavela, Parkes, and Green Bank. Results: We detected water maser emission in 15 sources of our sample, of which seven are reported here for the first time (IRAS 13483-5905, IRAS 14249-5310, IRAS 15408-5413, IRAS 17021-3109, IRAS 17348-2906, IRAS 17393-2727, and IRAS 18361-1203). We identified three water fountain candidates: IRAS 17291-2147, with a total velocity spread of ≃96 km s-1 in its water maser components and two sources (IRAS 17021-3109 and IRAS 17348-2906) that show water maser emission whose velocity lies outside the velocity range covered by OH masers. We have also identified IRAS 17393-2727 as a possible new water-maser-emitting PN. Conclusions: The detection rate is higher in obscured objects (14%) than in those with optical counterparts (7%), which is consistent with previous results. Water maser emission seems to be common in objects that are bipolar in the near-IR (43% detection rate in such sources). The water maser spectra of water fountain candidates like IRAS 17291

  15. Mass-losing peculiar red giants - The comparison between theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mass loss from evolved red giants is considered. It seems that red giants on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) are losing between 0.0003 and 0.0006 solar mass/sq kpc yr in the solar neighborhood. If all the main sequence stars between 1 and 5 solar masses ultimately evolve into white dwarfs with masses of 0.7 solar mass, the predicted mass loss rate in the solar neighborhood from these stars is 0.0008 solar mass/sq kpc yr. Although there are still uncertainties, it appears that there is no strong disagreement between theory and observation.

  16. Model atmospheres and spectroscopy of red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergemann, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Cool red supergiants are among the most complex and fascinating stars in the Universe. They can be observed to enormous distances allowing us to study the key property of their host galaxies - chemical abundances. I will review different aspects of spectroscopic diagnosis of giants and show how these impact science done with Galactic and extra-galactic observations. I will also assess the of potential of the planned instruments to provide different stellar information with new generations of models, such as the quality and families of chemical abundances in stars.

  17. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-14

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  18. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-23

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  19. Red Capes, Red Herrings, and Red Flags.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Donald W.

    The argument that the personality structures obtained from retrospective ratings reflect semantic similarity structures has been as provocative as a red cape in the bull ring. High congruence between those two kinds of structures seems well established. What is less clear is how and why those structures differ from that for immediate judgments of…

  20. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The exising models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  1. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The existing models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  2. Galactic cosmic rays and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiener, Juergen

    2010-03-01

    The nucleosynthesis of the light elements Li, Be and B by galactic cosmic rays is presented. Observations of cosmic rays and the nuclear reactions responsible for Li, Be and B nucleosynthesis are described, followed by some words on propagation. At the end, some open questions concerning galactic cosmic rays are discussed.

  3. Compact reflection nebulae, a transit phase of evolution from post-AGB to planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Slijkhuis, S.

    1989-01-01

    In a search of the optical counter-part of candidates of protoplanetary nebulae on the plates of UK Schmidt, ESO Schmidt, and POSS, five compact reflection nebulae associated with post-AGB stars were found. A simplified model (dust shell is spherical symmetric, expansion velocity of dust shell is constant, Q(sub sca)(lambda) is isotropic, and the dust grain properties are uniform) is used to estimate the visible condition of the dust shell due to the scattering of the core star's light. Under certain conditions the compact reflection nebulae can be seen of the POSS or ESO/SRC survey plates.

  4. Chemistry and distribution of daughter species in the circumstellar envelopes of O-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Millar, Tom J.; Heays, Alan N.; Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    Context. Thanks to the advent of Herschel and ALMA, new high-quality observations of molecules present in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are being reported that reveal large differences from the existing chemical models. New molecular data and more comprehensive models of the chemistry in circumstellar envelopes are now available. Aims: The aims are to determine and study the important formation and destruction pathways in the envelopes of O-rich AGB stars and to provide more reliable predictions of abundances, column densities, and radial distributions for potentially detectable species with physical conditions applicable to the envelope surrounding IK Tau. Methods: We use a large gas-phase chemical model of an AGB envelope including the effects of CO and N2 self-shielding in a spherical geometry and a newly compiled list of inner-circumstellar envelope parent species derived from detailed modeling and observations. We trace the dominant chemistry in the expanding envelope and investigate the chemistry as a probe for the physics of the AGB phase by studying variations of abundances with mass-loss rates and expansion velocities. Results: We find a pattern of daughter molecules forming from the photodissociation products of parent species with contributions from ion-neutral abstraction and dissociative recombination. The chemistry in the outer zones differs from that in traditional PDRs in that photoionization of daughter species plays a significant role. With the proper treatment of self-shielding, the N → N2 and C+→ CO transitions are shifted outward by factors of 7 and 2, respectively, compared with earlier models. An upper limit on the abundance of CH4 as a parent species of (≲2.5 × 10-6 with respect to H2) is found for IK Tau, and several potentially observable molecules with relatively simple chemical links to other parent species are determined. The assumed stellar mass-loss rate, in particular, has an impact on the

  5. The Keck Aperture Masking Experiment: Dust Enshrouded Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, T. D.; Monnier, J. D.; Tuthill, P. G.; Danchi, W. C.; Anderson, M.

    2012-01-01

    While the importance of dusty asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to galactic chemical enrichment is widely recognised, a sophisticated understanding of the dust formation and wind-driving mechanisms has proven elusive due in part to the difficulty in spatially-resolving the dust formation regions themselves. We have observed twenty dust-enshrouded AGB stars as part of the Keck Aperture Masking Experiment, resolving all of them in multiple near-infrared bands between 1.5 m and 3.1 m. We find 45% of the targets to show measurable elongations that, when correcting for the greater distances of the targets, would correspond to significantly asymmetric dust shells on par with the well-known cases of IRC +10216 or CIT 6. Using radiative transfer models, we find the sublimation temperature of Tsub(silicates) = 1130 90K and Tsub(amorphous carbon) = 1170 60 K, both somewhat lower than expected from laboratory measurements and vastly below temperatures inferred from the inner edge of YSO disks. The fact that O-rich and C-rich dust types showed the same sublimation temperature was surprising as well. For the most optically-thick shells ( 2.2 m > 2), the temperature profile of the inner dust shell is observed to change substantially, an effect we suggest could arise when individual dust clumps become optically-thick at the highest mass-loss rates.

  6. The mass-loss evolution of oxygen-rich AGB stars and its consequences for stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, W. E. C. J.

    1989-02-01

    A semiempirical mass loss equation (MLE) for Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars with oxygen-rich circumstellar shells is presented. The MLE is a function of stellar luminosity, expansion velocity of the circumstellar shell, and the ratio between the IRAS 25 and 12 micron flux densities. The results are compared with previously derived MLEs. The IRAS Point Source Catalog is used to find the mass loss as a function of time. The MLE is tested by estimating the total mass lost on the AGB. A simple expression is found relating the initial main sequence mass and the maximum AGB luminosity. The time-dependent properties of the MLE are tested using a sample of Miras and OH/IR stars. A relation between period, luminosity, and stellar envelope mass is found and compared with the observed period-luminosity relations for globular cluster Miras and Miras in the LMC. Good agreement is found.

  7. On the introduction of 17O+p reaction rates evaluated through the THM in AGB nucleosynthesis calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2014-05-01

    The rates for the 17O(p,αα14N, 17O(p,α)18F and 18O(p,α)15N reactions deduced trough the Trojan Horse Method (THM) have been introduced into a state-of-the-art asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models for proton-capture nucleosynthesis and cool bottom process. The predicted abundances have been compared with isotopic compositions provided by geochemical analysis of presolar grains. As a result, an improved agreement is found between the models and the isotopic mix of oxide grains of AGB origins, whose composition is the signature of low-temperature proton-capture nucleosynthesis.

  8. STELLAR TRANSITS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence E-mail: bkocsis@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 10{sup 6} solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or {approx}10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  9. Stellar Transits in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 106 solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or ~10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  10. Galactic Hearts of Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger graph

    This artist's concept shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope detected more than 20 bright and dusty galactic mergers like the one depicted here, all teeming with the tiny gem-like crystals.

    When galaxies collide, they trigger the birth of large numbers of massive stars. Astronomers believe these blazing hot stars act like furnaces to produce silicate crystals in the same way that glass is made from sand. The stars probably shed the crystals as they age, and as they blow apart in supernovae explosions.

    At the same time the crystals are being churned out, they are also being destroyed. Fast-moving particles from supernova blasts easily convert silicates crystals back to their amorphous, or shapeless, form.

    How is Spitzer seeing the crystals if they are rapidly disappearing? Astronomers say that, for a short period of time at the beginning of galactic mergers, massive stars might be producing silicate crystals faster than they are eliminating them. When our own galaxy merges with the Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years, a similar burst of massive stars and silicate crystals might occur.

    Crystal Storm in Distant Galaxy The graph (see inset above) of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a distant galaxy called IRAS 08752+3915 is experiencing a storm of tiny crystals made up of silicates. The crystals are similar to the glass-like grains of sand found on Earth's many beaches.

    The data were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light open to reveal its rainbow-like components. The resulting spectrum shown here reveals the signatures of both crystalline (green) and non-crystalline (brown) silicates.

    Spitzer detected the same

  11. Galactic Archaeology with the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi; Cohen, Judith; Wyse, Rosemary

    2015-08-01

    We present our Galactic Archaeology survey plan with the Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) for Subaru. PFS is a massively-multiplexed, fiber-fed optical and near-infrared 3-arm spectrograph (N_fiber = 2,400, 380 < lambda < 1260 nm, 1.3 degree diameter hexagonal field, low- and medium-resolution modes of R = 2,000-3,000 and 5,000, respectively), offering us unique opportunities in survey astronomy. Following successful design reviews, the instrument is now under construction with first light anticipated in 2018. In the Galactic Archaeology program, for which we expect to have about 100 nights over 5 years, radial velocities and chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way and M31 will be used to infer the past assembly histories of these galaxies and the structure of their dark matter halos. Data will be secured for numerous stars in the Galactic thick-disk, halo and tidal streams as faint as V = 22 mag, including stars with V < 20 mag to complement the goals of the Gaia mission. A medium-resolution mode with R = 5,000 to be implemented in the red arm will allow the measurement of multiple alpha-element abundances and more precise velocities for Galactic stars, elucidating the detailed chemo-dynamical structure and evolution of each of the main stellar components of the Milky Way Galaxy and of its dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The M31 campaign will target red giant branch stars with 21.5 < V < 22.5 mag, obtaining radial velocities and metallicities over an unprecedented large area of its stellar halo. In synergy with these planned PFS survey, the coordinated imaging surveys with Hyper Suprime Cam are going on over wide areas of the Galactic satellites and the M31 halo, based on the combination of broad-band and narrow-band filters to separate candidate giants from foreground dwarfs as spectroscopic targets.

  12. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic Studies of Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Star and Red Supergiant Star Dust Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William T.; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of Oxygen-rich (O-rich) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We present an update of our investigation of differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  13. Comparative Studies of the Dust around Red Supergiant and Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela K.; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret; Sloan, Greg; Jones, Olivia

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of red supergiant (RSG) and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies and in various Milky Way globular clusters. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper), the Spitzer program SMC-Spec (PI: G. Sloan), and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 μm emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We investigate differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars and assess effects of varying metallicity (LMC versus SMC versus Milky Way globular cluster) and other properties (mass-loss rate, luminosity, etc.) on the dust originating from these stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  14. Galactic Diffuse Polarized Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, Ettore

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse polarized emission by synchrotron is a key tool to investigate magnetic fields in the Milky Way, particularly the ordered component of the large scale structure. Key observables are the synchrotron emission itself and the RM is by Faraday rotation. In this paper the main properties of the radio polarized diffuse emission and its use to investigate magnetic fields will be reviewed along with our current understanding of the galactic magnetic field and the data sets available. We will then focus on the future perspective discussing RM-synthesis - the new powerful instrument devised to unlock the information encoded in such an emission - and the surveys currently in progress like S-PASS and GMIMS.

  15. The Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    Exciting new broadband observations of the galactic nucleus have placed the heart of the Milky Way under intense scrutiny in recent years. This has been due in part to the growing interest from theorists motivated to study the physics of black hole accretion, magnetized gas dynamics, and unusual star formation. The center of our Galaxy is now known to harbor the most compelling supermassive black hole candidate, weighing in at 3-4 million solar masses. Its nearby environment is comprised of a molecular dusty ring, clusters of evolved and young stars, diffuse hot gas, ionized gas streamers, and several supernova remnants. This chapter will focus on the physical makeup of this dynamic region and the feasibility of actually imaging the black hole's shadow in the coming decade with mm interferometry.

  16. The Galactic center wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Roger A.

    1992-01-01

    The combined effect of winds from a cluster of stars in the central 0.8 pc of the Galaxy is modeled as uniform power and mass input over the central region. The flow becomes supersonic outside the central region, and the expected decrease in pressure is in approximate accord with observations. The pressure variations on a larger scale suggest that the Galactic center wind passes through a shock front at a radius of a few pc, leading to a shocked wind bubble on a scale of 100 pc. The tangential magnetic field can come to dominate the pressure in the shocked wind flow even if the energy density of the magnetic field in the initial wind is only 0.1 percent of the wind kinetic energy density. The magnetic region produced in this way may be related to some of the apparently magnetized structures observed in the central region of the Galaxy.

  17. Galactic antiprotons from photinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Rudaz, S.; Walsh, T. F.

    1985-01-01

    Stable photinos, the photino being the supersymmetry partner of the photon, can explain both the 'missing mass' in galactic halos and the cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum up to the highest energies observed so far. This requires a photino mass around 15 GeV; significantly higher masses are cosmologically disfavored. As a consequence, the observed cosmic-ray antiproton-to-proton ratio is predicted to decrease abruptly just above the measured energy range, at E = m(x). If observed, this striking effect would strongly support the hypothesis that photinos make up the missing matter in the galaxy and also lead to a measurement of the photino mass from cosmic-ray data.

  18. The Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Observations at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) have had a critical formative impact on the study of the Galactic bulge, much of the work being inspired and supported by Victor Blanco and collaborators, which is presented in a historical overview. Recent observations at CTIO include the Blanco 4m/Hydra Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA) that has mapped the Galactic bulge velocity field from -10

  19. Calibration of Post-AGB Supergiants as Standard Extragalactic Candles for HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes activities carried out with support from the NASA Ultraviolet, Visible, and Gravitational Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program. The aim of the program is to calibrate the absolute magnitudes of post-asymptotic-giant-branch (post-AGB or PAGB) stars, which we believe will be an excellent new "standard candle" for measuring extragalactic distances. The reason for this belief is that in old populations, the stars that are evolving through the PAGB region of the HR (Hertzsprung-Russell) diagram arise from only a single main-sequence turnoff mass. In addition, the theoretical PAGB evolutionary tracks show that they evolve through this region at constant luminosity; hence the PAGB stars should have an extremely narrow luminosity function. Moreover, as the PAGB stars evolve through spectral types F and A (en route from the AGB to hot stellar remnants and white dwarfs), they have the highest luminosities attained by old stars (both bolometrically and in the visual band). Finally, the PAGB stars of these spectral types are very easily identified, due to their large Balmer jumps, which are due to their very low surface gravities.

  20. An Analysis and Classification of Dying AGB Stars Transitioning to Pre-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Adam C.

    2011-01-01

    The principal objective of the project is to understand part of the life and death process of a star. During the end of a star's life, it expels its mass at a very rapid rate. We want to understand how these Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars begin forming asymmetric structures as they start evolving towards the planetary nebula phase and why planetary nebulae show a very large variety of non-round geometrical shapes. To do this, we analyzed images of just-forming pre-planetary nebula from Hubble surveys. These images were run through various image correction processes like saturation correction and cosmic ray removal using in-house software to bring out the circumstellar structure. We classified the visible structure based on qualitative data such as lobe, waist, halo, and other structures. Radial and azimuthal intensity cuts were extracted from the images to quantitatively examine the circumstellar structure and measure departures from the smooth spherical outflow expected during most of the AGB mass-loss phase. By understanding the asymmetrical structure, we hope to understand the mechanisms that drive this stellar evolution.

  1. Pulsational variability in proto-planetary nebulae and other post-AGB objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2016-07-01

    Light and velocity curves of several classes of pulsating stars have been successfully modeled to determine physical properties of the stars. In this observational study, we review briefly the pulsational variability of the main classes of post-AGB stars. Our attention is focused in particular on proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe), those in the short-lived phase from AGB stars to the planetary nebulae. New light curves and period analyses have been used to determine the following general properties of the PPNe variability: (a) periods range from 35 to 160 days for those of F—G spectral types, with much shorter periods (< 1 day) found for those of early-B spectral type; (b) there is a correlation between the pulsation period, maximum amplitude, and temperature of the star, with cooler stars pulsating with longer periods and larger amplitudes; (c) similar correlations are found for carbon-rich, oxygen-rich, and lower-metalicity PPNe; and (d) multiple periods are found for all of them, with P2/P1 = 1.0±0.1. New models are needed to exploit these results.

  2. Observations of diffuse galactic gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The observations of galactic diffuse gamma radiation are reviewed. The connections of the gamma ray observations with galactic structure and cosmic rays are discussed. The high latitude galactic component and the low latitude emission from the galactic plane are examined. The observations in other regions of the gamma ray spectrum are discussed.

  3. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): A Primer for University and College Board Members. An AGB White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voss, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    The environment in which MOOCs and other forms of online education operate is changing virtually every day. Based upon a presentation given to the board of directors of AGB, this white paper is an effort to give board chairs, presidents, and others some context to help guide discussions on their own campuses. It provides a primer on MOOCs,…

  4. SMA Spectral Line Imaging Survey at 279 - 355 GHz of the Oxygen-rich AGB Star IK Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beck, E.; Kamiński, T.; Menten, K. M.; Patel, N. A.; Young, K. H.; Gottlieb, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    Dedicated, unbiased spectral scans of asymptotic giant branch stars have so far been published only for a few carbon-rich stars, with a strong focus on the nearby and bright IRC +10216. We present results from a spectral survey of the circumstellar envelope of the oxygen-rich AGB star IK Tau obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at ~ 0'.9 angular resolution in the frequency range 279-355 GHz, expanding the molecular inventory for M-type evolved stars and filling an observational gap. The survey shows over 140 emission lines, belonging to more than 30 species. The emission of AlO and of several vibrationally excited species traces the acceleration of the wind. Isotopic ratios for carbon, silicon, and sulfur will be derived from the observed emission of isotopologues of CO, SiO, SiS, HCN, SO, and SO2. This will allow us to constrain the AGB nucleosynthesis of IK Tau. We highlight the first detection of PO and PN around an oxygen-rich AGB star, detected at unexpectedly high abundances, and emphasise the importance of unbiased spectral surveys of AGB stars and the need for updated chemical models.

  5. Testing the effect of continuum elimination methods on studies of infrared dust features from AGB star spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisle, Colby; Speck, A.

    2014-01-01

    Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are major contributors of cosmic dust to the interstellar medium. Understanding the cosmic dust ejected from these stars is essential to understanding the broader topics of evolution and composition of stellar and interstellar objects in our universe. AGB stars produce either carbon- or oxygen (O)-rich dust. O-rich AGB stars have been classified into groups according to the shapes of their spectral features in the mid-infrared (IR). Because their spectral features are similar, stars within each group are expected to have similar dust shell parameters, especially with respect to the composition of the dust. We have selected a sample of 26 O-rich AGB stars, in a single group in order to investigate an apparently homogenous group of stars. In particular, we chose stars in group SE1. Using spectral data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), and the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) we investigated variations in the spectral parameters of these stars: i.e. continuum temperature, feature strength, peak position(s), FWHM. In this preliminary work we present a study of the effect of the methods by which we eliminate the continuum prior to measuring the feature parameters.

  6. A G-Protein β Subunit, AGB1, Negatively Regulates the ABA Response and Drought Tolerance by Down-Regulating AtMPK6-Related Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong-bei; Chen, Ming; Ma, Ya-nan; Xu, Zhao-shi; Li, Lian-cheng; Chen, Yao-feng; Ma, You-zhi

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are versatile regulators involved in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the function of G-proteins is primarily associated with ABA signaling. However, the downstream effectors and the molecular mechanisms in the ABA pathway remain largely unknown. In this study, an AGB1 mutant (agb1-2) was found to show enhanced drought tolerance, indicating that AGB1 might negatively regulate drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Data showed that AGB1 interacted with protein kinase AtMPK6 that was previously shown to phosphorylate AtVIP1, a transcription factor responding to ABA signaling. Our study found that transcript levels of three ABA responsive genes, AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 (downstream gene of AtVIP1), were significantly up-regulated in agb1-2 lines after ABA or drought treatments. Other ABA-responsive and drought-inducible genes, such as RD29A (downstream gene of AtMYB44), were also up-regulated in agb1-2 lines. Furthermore, overexpression of AtVIP1 resulted in hypersensitivity to ABA at seed germination and seedling stages, and significantly enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic plants. These results suggest that AGB1 was involved in the ABA signaling pathway and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis through down-regulating the AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 cascade. PMID:25635681

  7. Compact radio sources in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Garwood, Robert; Dickey, John M.

    1988-01-01

    The preliminary results of a search for infrared counterparts to compact continuum radio sources found within 0.5 deg of the Galactic plane are presented. Out of 75 positions searched, nine very red sources, each with a probability of less than 0.01 of being a random field star, were found. Most of the nine sources are characterized by deep silicate absorption features at 10 microns and a red energy distribution that continues to rise beyond 25 microns. Six of the sources are best explained as late O or early B stars exciting a compact H II region. The radio emission is close to that expected for the rate of emission of ionizing photons for a normal main-sequence star. Although these H II regions are compact, they are not sufficiently dusty in the immediate environment of the star to significantly reduce the ionizing flux. Three of the sources show considerably more emission than expected for a main-sequence star, indicating they are either hotter than a main-sequence star with the same luminosity or the radio emision is nonthermal and coming from a more exotic object.

  8. Spiral Galactic Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2009-05-01

    Before the period of galactic formation the uiverse consisted of a vast number of pre-formed systems consisting of two or more pre-galactic arms, the arms orbiting each other. As the orbits of the arms decayed the sides of the fore-sections of the arms tangentially collided and joined and thereby forming multi-armed spiral galaxies which began to rotate.The rotation resulted from the conversion of the orbital motion of the individual arms when joined into faster rotational motion of the newly formed galaxy. The spiral arms were maintained by the centripital force of the rapidly rotational motion of the galaxy system. As the rotational motion of the galaxy slowed down the arms of the spiral galaxy collapsed towards the body of the galaxy due to lessening of centripetal force on the arms and elliptical galaxies were formed and with further lessening of galactic rotational motion galactic disks were formed. One can see in galaxies M51, M100, NGC2336 and NGC4939 the galactic arms came from external orbit, not disks or instabilities in support of this theory. Also in support of this theory of galactic evolution is that spiral galaxies rotate faster than ellipticals or disks.

  9. Detection of CI line emission from the detached CO shell of the AGB star R Sculptoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, H.; Bergman, P.; Lindqvist, M.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) lose substantial amounts of matter, to the extent that they are important for the chemical evolution of, and dust production in, the Universe. The mass loss is believed to increase gradually with age on the AGB, but it may also occur in the form of bursts, possibly related to the thermal pulsing phenomenon. Detached, geometrically thin, CO shells around carbon stars are good signposts of brief and intense mass ejection. Aims: We aim to put further constraints on the physical properties of detached CO shells around AGB stars. Methods: The photodissociation of CO and other carbon-bearing species in the shells leads to the possibility of detecting lines from neutral carbon. We have therefore searched for the CI(3P1-3P0) line at 492 GHz towards two carbon stars, S Sct and R Scl, with detached CO shells of different ages, ≈8000 and 2300 years, respectively. Results: The CI(3P1-3P0) line was detected towards R Scl. The line intensity is dominated by emission from the detached shell. The detection is at a level consistent with the neutral carbon coming from the full photodissociation of all species except CO, and with only limited photoionisation of carbon. The best fit to the observed 12CO and 13CO line intensities, assuming a homogeneous shell, is obtained for a shell mass of ≈0.002 M⊙, a temperature of ≈100 K, and a CO abundance with respect to H2 of 10-3. The estimated CI/CO abundance ratio is ≈0.3 for the best-fit model. However, a number of arguments point in the direction of a clumpy medium, and a viable interpretation of the data within such a context is provided. Based on observations with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope. APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory.

  10. Presolar Graphite from AGB Stars: Microstructure and s-Process Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, Thomas K.; Stadermann, Frank J.; Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-10-01

    Correlated transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry with submicron spatial resolution (NanoSIMS) investigations of the same presolar graphites spherules from the Murchison meteorite were conducted, to link the isotopic anomalies with the mineralogy and chemical composition of the graphite and its internal grains. Refractory carbide grains (especially titanium carbide) are commonly found within the graphite spherules, and most have significant concentrations of Zr, Mo, and Ru in solid solution, elements primarily produced by s-process nucleosynthesis. The effect of chemical fractionation on the Mo/Ti ratio in these carbides is limited, and therefore from this ratio one can infer the degree of s-process enrichment in the gas from which the graphite condensed. The resulting s-process enrichments within carbides are large (~200 times solar on average), showing that most of the carbide-containing graphites formed in the mass outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. NanoSIMS measurements of these graphites also show isotopically light carbon (mostly in the 100<12C/13C<400 range). The enrichment of these presolar graphites in both s-process elements and 12C considerably exceeds that astronomically observed around carbon stars. However, a natural correlation exists between 12C and s-process elements, as both form in the He intershell region of thermally pulsing AGB stars and are dredged up together to the surface. Their observation together suggests that these graphites may have formed in chemically and isotopically inhomogeneous regions around AGB stars, such as high-density knots or jets. As shown in the companion paper, a gas density exceeding that expected for smooth mass outflows is required for graphite of the observed size to condense at all in circumstellar environments, and the spatially inhomogeneous, high-density regions from which they condense may also be incompletely mixed with the surrounding gas. We have greatly expanded

  11. Galactic planetary science.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-04-28

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets--mainly radial velocity and transit--or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even 'just' in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current 'understanding'. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy. PMID:24664916

  12. Galactic planetary science

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets—mainly radial velocity and transit—or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even ‘just’ in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current ‘understanding’. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy. PMID:24664916

  13. Cepheids and other variable stars and the distance to the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2013-02-01

    We review and discuss results of our survey of variable stars towards the Galactic Centre and their distances. In our near-infrared monitoring survey using IRSF/SIRIUS, we detected a number of Miras and Cepheids (both classical and type II) within 20 arcmin of the Galactic Centre. These distance indicators yield a distance to the Galactic Centre of between 7.5 and 8.5 kpc. A new calibration of the red clump also leads to a distance of ~ 8 kpc. For these indicators, which are luminosity-based, a large uncertainty resides in the correction for the foreground extinction, which depends on the reddening law. Nevertheless, our estimates are consistent with previous estimates based the kinematics of stars near the Galactic Centre, and this supports the reddening law we use.

  14. The detection of heavy metals in the circumstellar envelopes of post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkova, V. G.; Panchuk, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    A new kind of peculiarity is discussed: splitting or asymmetry of strong absorption lines in the optical spectra of selected post-AGB stars with carbon envelopes and atmospheres enriched in carbon and s-process heavy metals. This effect is strongest for BaII ions, whose lines can be split into two or three components. Infrared and radio spectroscopy data are used to demonstrate that the individual components of split absorption lines are formed in structured circumstellar envelopes. Thus, this effect reveals efficient enrichment of the envelope in heavy metals synthesized during the star's earlier evolution. The nature of the strong absorption profile (split or asymmetric, number of components) could be related to the morphology and kinematical and chemical properties of the enenvelope.

  15. Optically Visible Post-AGB and Post-RGB Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    We have performed an extensive low-resolution (R ≍ 1300) optical spectral survey with the AAOmega multi-fiber spectrograph mounted on the 3.9-m Anglo Australian telescope, resulting in a clean and complete census of well-characterised post-AGB objects with spectroscopically determined stellar parameters - Teff, log g, [Fe/H] and E(B-V) - spanning a wide range in luminosity in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The known distances to the Magellanic clouds enabled luminosity estimations for all the objects and led to one of the most important results of this survey: the serendipitous discovery of a group of new, low-luminosity, evolved, dusty post-RGB objects in both Clouds. In this paper, we present an overview of this survey and a few important results.

  16. ALMA observations of the not-so detached shell around the carbon AGB star R Sculptoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maercker, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    I present our ALMA observations of the CO emission around the carbon AGB star R Sculptoris. The data reveal the known detached shell and a previously unknown, binary induced, spiral shape. The observations confirm a formation of the shell during a thermal pulse about 2300 years ago. The full analysis of the ALMA data shows that the shell around R Scl in fact is entirely filled with molecular gas, and hence not as detached as previously thought. This has implications for the mass-loss rate evolution immediately after the pulse, indicating a much higher mass-loss rate than previously assumed. Comparing the ALMA images to our optical observations of polarised, dust scattered light, we further show that the distributions of the dust and gas coincide almost perfectly, implying a common evolution of the dust and gas, and constraining the wind-driving mechanism. The mass-loss process and amount of mass lost during the thermal pulse cycle affect the chemical evolution of the star, its lifetime on the AGB, and the return of heavy elements to the ISM. New high-resolution ALMA observations constrain the parameters of the binary system and the inner spiral, and will allow for a detailed hydrodynamical modelling of the gas and dust during and after the last thermal pulse. Our results present the only direct measurements of the thermal pulse evolution currently available. They greatly increase our understanding of this fundamental period of stellar evolution, and the implications it has for the chemical evolution of evolved stars, the ISM, and galaxie

  17. IS THE POST-AGB STAR SAO 40039 MILDLY HYDROGEN-DEFICIENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S. Sumangala; Pandey, Gajendra; Giridhar, Sunetra; Lambert, David L. E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2011-08-10

    We have conducted an LTE abundance analysis for SAO 40039, a warm post-AGB star whose spectrum is known to show surprisingly strong He I lines for its effective temperature and has been suspected of being H-deficient and He-rich. High-resolution optical spectra are analyzed using a family of model atmospheres with different He/H ratios. Atmospheric parameters are estimated from the ionization equilibrium set by neutral and singly ionized species of Fe and Mg, the excitation of Fe I and Fe II lines, and the wings of the Paschen lines. On the assumption that the He I lines are of photospheric and not chromospheric origin, a He/H ratio of approximately unity is found by imposing the condition that the adopted He/H ratio of the model atmosphere must equal the ratio derived from the observed He I triplet lines at 5876, 4471, and 4713 A, and singlet lines at 4922 and 5015 A. Using the model with the best-fitting atmospheric parameters for this He/H ratio, SAO 40039 is confirmed to exhibit mild dust-gas depletion, i.e., the star has an atmosphere deficient in elements of high condensation temperature. The star appears to be moderately metal-deficient with [Fe/H] = -0.4 dex. But the star's intrinsic metallicity as estimated from Na, S, and Zn, elements of a low condensation temperature, is [Fe/H]{sub o} {approx_equal} -0.2 ([Fe/H]{sub o} refers to the star's intrinsic metallicity). The star is enriched in N and perhaps O as well, changes reflecting the star's AGB past and the event that led to He enrichment.

  18. The carbon star adventure: modelling atmospheres of a set of C-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Gioia; Paladini, Claudia; Hron, Josef; Aringer, Bernard; Erikssonn, Kjell; Groenewegen, Martin

    2015-08-01

    We study the atmospheres of a set of carbon rich AGB stars to improve our understanding of the dynamic processes happening in there.For the first time we compare in a systematic way spectrometric, photometric and mid-infrared (VLTI/MIDI) interferometric measurements with different type of model atmospheres: (1) hydrostatic models + MOD-dusty models (Groenewegen, 2012) added a posteriori; (2) self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres (Eriksson et al. 2014). These allow to interpret in a coherent way the dynamic behavior of gas and dust. In addition, the geometric model fitting tool for interferometric data GEM-FIND is applied to carry out a first interpretation of the structural environment of the stars.The results underline that the joint use of different kind of observations, as photometry, spectroscopy and interferometry, is essential for understanding and modeling the atmosphere of pulsating C-rich AGB stars. For our first target, the carbon-rich Mira star RU Vir, the dynamic model atmospheres fit well the ISO/SWS spectra in the wavelength range λ = [2.9, 13.0] μm. However, the object turned out to be “peculiar”: we notice a discrepancy in the visible part of the SED, and in the visibilities. Possible causes are intra/inter-cycle variations in the dynamic model atmospheres, and an eventual presence of a companion star and/or disk or clumps in the atmosphere of RU Vir (Rau et al. subm.). Results on further targets will also be presented.The increased sample of C-rich stars of this work provides crucial constraints for the atmospheric structure and the formation of SiC. Moreover the second generation VLTI instrument MATISSE will be a perfect tool to detect and study asymmetries, as it will allow interferometric imaging in the L, M, and N bands.

  19. Finding Distant Galactic HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V.; Cunningham, V.

    2015-12-01

    The WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions contains ˜2000 H ii region candidates lacking ionized gas spectroscopic observations. All candidates have the characteristic H ii region mid-infrared morphology of WISE 12 μ {{m}} emission surrounding 22 μ {{m}} emission, and additionally have detected radio continuum emission. We here report Green Bank Telescope hydrogen radio recombination line and radio continuum detections in the X-band (9 GHz; 3 cm) of 302 WISE H ii region candidates (out of 324 targets observed) in the zone 225^\\circ ≥slant {\\ell }≥slant -20^\\circ , | {\\text{}}b| ≤slant 6^\\circ . Here we extend the sky coverage of our H ii region Discovery Survey, which now contains nearly 800 H ii regions distributed across the entire northern sky. We provide LSR velocities for the 302 detections and kinematic distances for 131 of these. Of the 302 new detections, 5 have ({\\ell },{\\text{}}b,v) coordinates consistent with the Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm (OSC), the most distant molecular spiral arm of the Milky Way. Due to the Galactic warp, these nebulae are found at Galactic latitudes >1° in the first Galactic quadrant, and therefore were missed in previous surveys of the Galactic plane. One additional region has a longitude and velocity consistent with the OSC but lies at a negative Galactic latitude (G039.183-01.422 -54.9 {km} {{{s}}}-1). With Heliocentric distances >22 kpc and Galactocentric distances >16 kpc, the OSC H ii regions are the most distant known in the Galaxy. We detect an additional three H ii regions near {\\ell }≃ 150^\\circ whose LSR velocities place them at Galactocentric radii >19 kpc. If their distances are correct, these nebulae may represent the limit to Galactic massive star formation.

  20. JASMINE: galactic structure surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, Naoteru; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Taihei; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Suganuma, Masahiro; Niwa, Yoshito; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Matsuhara, Hideo; Noda, Atsushi; Tsuiki, Atsuo; Utashima, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Akira

    2006-06-01

    We introduce a Japanese plan of infrared(z-band:0.9μm) space astrometry(JASMINE-project). JASMINE is the satellite (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for INfrared Exploration) which will measure distances and apparent motions of stars around the center of the Milky Way with yet unprecedented precision. It will measure parallaxes, positions with the accuracy of 10 micro-arcsec and proper motions with the accuracy of ~ 4microarcsec/ year for stars brighter than z=14mag. JASMINE can observe about ten million stars belonging to the bulge components of our Galaxy, which are hidden by the interstellar dust extinction in optical bands. Number of stars with σ/π < 0.1 in the direction of the Galactic central bulge is about 1000 times larger than those observed in optical bands, where π is a parallax and σ is an error of the parallax. With the completely new "map of the bulge in the Milky Way", it is expected that many new exciting scientific results will be obtained in various fields of astronomy. Presently, JASMINE is in a development phase, with a target launch date around 2015. We adopt the following instrument design of JASMINE in order to get the accurate positions of many stars. A 3-mirrors optical system(modified Korsch system)with a primary mirror of~ 0.85m is one of the candidate for the optical system. On the astro-focal plane, we put dozens of new type of CCDs for z-band to get a wide field of view. The accurate measurements of the astrometric parameters requires the instrument line-of-sight highly stability and the opto-mechanical highly stability of the payload in the JASMINE spacecraft. The consideration of overall system(bus) design is now going on in cooperation with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency(JAXA).

  1. Galactic Habitable Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, A.; Mao, S.; Kawata, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fossil record shows that the Earth has experienced several mass extinctions over the past 500 million years1, and it has been suggested that there is a periodicity in extinction events on timescales of tens1 and/or hundreds of millions of years. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of the mass extinctions, including the suggestion that the Earth's ozone layer may have been destroyed by intense radiation from a nearby supernovae2- 3, exposing the Earth's surface to damaging UV radiation. Recent observations of cores taken from the ocean floor revealed atoms of a very rare isotope of iron (60Fe) believed to have arrived on Earth around 2 million years ago as fallout from a nearby supernovae4. Astronomical evidence for that past supernovae was recently found in the debris of a young cluster of massive stars5, by tracing its past orbit, putting it at the right place at the right time to explain the mild extinction event. Here we report new high-resolution (both in space and time) N-body chemodynamical simulations (carried out with our novel code GCD+6) of the evolution of a model Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the orbit of èsun-like' stars over a 500 million year period, checking the proximity to supernovae throughout the history of the orbit and comparing the times when this occurs with past mass extinctions on Earth. We additionally explain the important effects of the spiral arm pattern, radial migration of stars and Galactic chemistry on habitability.

  2. The Bubbling Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchwell, E.; Povich, M. S.; Allen, D.; Taylor, M. G.; Meade, M. R.; Babler, B. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Watson, C.; Whitney, B. A.; Wolfire, M. G.; Bania, T. M.; Benjamin, R. A.; Clemens, D. P.; Cohen, M.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Jackson, J. M.; Kobulnicky, H. A.; Mathis, J. S.; Mercer, E. P.; Stolovy, S. R.; Uzpen, B.; Watson, D. F.; Wolff, M. J.

    2006-10-01

    A visual examination of the images from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) has revealed 322 partial and closed rings that we propose represent partially or fully enclosed three-dimensional bubbles. We argue that the bubbles are primarily formed by hot young stars in massive star formation regions. We have found an average of about 1.5 bubbles per square degree. About 25% of the bubbles coincide with known radio H II regions, and about 13% enclose known star clusters. It appears that B4-B9 stars (too cool to produce detectable radio H II regions) probably produce about three-quarters of the bubbles in our sample, and the remainder are produced by young O-B3 stars that produce detectable radio H II regions. Some of the bubbles may be the outer edges of H II regions where PAH spectral features are excited and may not be dynamically formed by stellar winds. Only three of the bubbles are identified as known SNRs. No bubbles coincide with known planetary nebulae or W-R stars in the GLIMPSE survey area. The bubbles are small. The distribution of angular diameters peaks between 1' and 3' with over 98% having angular diameters less than 10' and 88% less than 4'. Almost 90% have shell thicknesses between 0.2 and 0.4 of their outer radii. Bubble shell thickness increases approximately linearly with shell radius. The eccentricities are rather large, peaking between 0.6 and 0.7; about 65% have eccentricities between 0.55 and 0.85.

  3. A Disturbed Galactic Duo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The galaxies in this cosmic pairing, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, display some curious features, demonstrating that each member of the duo is close enough to feel the distorting gravitational influence of the other. The gravitational tug of war has warped the spiral shape of one galaxy, NGC 3169, and fragmented the dust lanes in its companion NGC 3166. Meanwhile, a third, smaller galaxy to the lower right, NGC 3165, has a front-row seat to the gravitational twisting and pulling of its bigger neighbours. This galactic grouping, found about 70 million light-years away in the constellation Sextans (The Sextant), was discovered by the English astronomer William Herschel in 1783. Modern astronomers have gauged the distance between NGC 3169 (left) and NGC 3166 (right) as a mere 50 000 light-years, a separation that is only about half the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy. In such tight quarters, gravity can start to play havoc with galactic structure. Spiral galaxies like NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 tend to have orderly swirls of stars and dust pinwheeling about their glowing centres. Close encounters with other massive objects can jumble this classic configuration, often serving as a disfiguring prelude to the merging of galaxies into one larger galaxy. So far, the interactions of NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 have just lent a bit of character. NGC 3169's arms, shining bright with big, young, blue stars, have been teased apart, and lots of luminous gas has been drawn out from its disc. In NGC 3166's case, the dust lanes that also usually outline spiral arms are in disarray. Unlike its bluer counterpart, NGC 3166 is not forming many new stars. NGC 3169 has another distinction: the faint yellow dot beaming through a veil of dark dust just to the left of and close to the galaxy's centre [1]. This flash is the leftover of a supernova detected in 2003 and known accordingly as SN 2003cg. A supernova of this

  4. A Disturbed Galactic Duo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    The galaxies in this cosmic pairing, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, display some curious features, demonstrating that each member of the duo is close enough to feel the distorting gravitational influence of the other. The gravitational tug of war has warped the spiral shape of one galaxy, NGC 3169, and fragmented the dust lanes in its companion NGC 3166. Meanwhile, a third, smaller galaxy to the lower right, NGC 3165, has a front-row seat to the gravitational twisting and pulling of its bigger neighbours. This galactic grouping, found about 70 million light-years away in the constellation Sextans (The Sextant), was discovered by the English astronomer William Herschel in 1783. Modern astronomers have gauged the distance between NGC 3169 (left) and NGC 3166 (right) as a mere 50 000 light-years, a separation that is only about half the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy. In such tight quarters, gravity can start to play havoc with galactic structure. Spiral galaxies like NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 tend to have orderly swirls of stars and dust pinwheeling about their glowing centres. Close encounters with other massive objects can jumble this classic configuration, often serving as a disfiguring prelude to the merging of galaxies into one larger galaxy. So far, the interactions of NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 have just lent a bit of character. NGC 3169's arms, shining bright with big, young, blue stars, have been teased apart, and lots of luminous gas has been drawn out from its disc. In NGC 3166's case, the dust lanes that also usually outline spiral arms are in disarray. Unlike its bluer counterpart, NGC 3166 is not forming many new stars. NGC 3169 has another distinction: the faint yellow dot beaming through a veil of dark dust just to the left of and close to the galaxy's centre [1]. This flash is the leftover of a supernova detected in 2003 and known accordingly as SN 2003cg. A supernova of this

  5. Neutron-capture element and Sc abundances in low- and high-alpha Galactic halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, David; Fishlock, Cherie; Karakas, Amanda

    2015-08-01

    Nissen & Schuster (2010) identified two samples of Galactic halo stars with distinct kinematic and chemical properties. The "high-alpha" population is associated with the dissipative monolithic collapse of a proto-Galactic gas cloud while the "low-alpha" population was likely accreted from dwarf galaxies having experienced slower star formation rates. For a subset of these stars, we measured precise abundances of Sc, Zr, La, Ce, Nd and Eu. We find differences in the abundance ratios of [Sc/Fe], [Zr/Fe], and [La/Zr] between the low- and high-alpha groups. The most intriguing result is that the low-alpha stars appear to have higher [Eu/Fe] ratios than the high-alpha stars, in contrast to the expectation that Eu should follow the alpha elements. These data challenge the hypothesis that the high-alpha stars formed in regions only enriched by massive stars and that the low-alpha received additional enrichment from SNeIa and low-mass AGB stars. This work has three main consequences for galaxy halos: 1. The new Eu data could be explained by different IMFs for the two halo populations; 2. The low [alpha/Fe] ratios in some, and perhaps all, dwarf galaxies may be driven (in part of in whole) by different IMFs rather than SNeIa contributions; 3. These data may provide important new constraints on the origin of Eu.

  6. Elliptical accretion disks in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eracleous, Michael; Livio, Mario; Halpern, Jules P.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    1995-01-01

    We present a calculation of the profiles of emission lines originating in a relativistic, eccentric disk, and show examples of the resulting model profiles. Our calculations are motivated by the fact that in about one-quarter of the double-peaked emission lines observed in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (and in the mildly active nucleus of NGC 1097), the red peak is stronger than the blue peak, which is contrary to the prediction of relativistic, circular disk models. Using the eccentric disk model we fit some of the observed profiles that cannot be fitted with a circular disk model. We propose two possible scenarios for the formation of an eccentric disk in an active galactic nucleus: (a) tidal perturbation of the disk around a supermassive black hole by a smaller binary companion, and (b) formation of an elliptical disk from the debris resulting from the tidal disruption of a star by the central black hole. In the former case we show that the eccentricity can be long-lived because of the presence of the binary companion. In the latter case, although the inner parts of the disk may circularize quickly, we estimate that the outer parts will maintain their eccentricity for times much longer than the local viscous time. We suggest that it may be possible to detect profile variability on much shorter timescales than those ranging from a decade to several centuries by comparing the evolution of the line profile with detailed model predictions. We argue that line-profile variability may also be the most promising discriminant among competing models for the origin of asymmetric, double-peaked emission lines.

  7. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na(+) is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na(+) on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na(+) mediated stomatal opening than K(+) mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K(+)-mediated but not Na(+)-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na(+) on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  8. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na+ is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na+ on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na+ mediated stomatal opening than K+ mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K+-mediated but not Na+-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na+ on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  9. Galactic gamma-ray observations and galactic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1975-01-01

    Recent observations of gamma-rays originating in the galactic disk together with radio observations, support an emerging picture of the overall structure of our galaxy with higher interstellar gas densities and star formation rates in a region which corresponds to that of the inner arms. The emerging picture is one where molecular clouds make up the dominant constituent of the interstellar gas in the inner galaxy and play a key role in accounting for the gamma-rays and phenomena associated with the production of young stars and other population 1 objects. In this picture, cosmic rays are associated with supernovae and are primarily of galactic origin. These newly observed phenomena can be understood as consequences of the density wave theories of spiral structure. Based on these new developments, the suggestion is made that a new galactic population class, Population O, be added to the standard Populations 1 and 2 in order to recognize important differences in dynamics and distribution between diffuse galactic H1 and interstellar molecular clouds.

  10. The Heliosphere and Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heliosphere deflects galactic cosmic rays from entering the system. Galactic cosmic rays are a very high energy form of particle radiation that are extremely difficult to shield against and are...

  11. On the introduction of {sup 17}O+p reaction rates evaluated through the THM in AGB nucleosynthesis calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.

    2014-05-09

    The rates for the {sup 17}O(p,αα{sup 14}N, {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 18}F and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reactions deduced trough the Trojan Horse Method (THM) have been introduced into a state-of-the-art asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models for proton-capture nucleosynthesis and cool bottom process. The predicted abundances have been compared with isotopic compositions provided by geochemical analysis of presolar grains. As a result, an improved agreement is found between the models and the isotopic mix of oxide grains of AGB origins, whose composition is the signature of low-temperature proton-capture nucleosynthesis.

  12. Detailed modelling of the circumstellar molecular line emission of the S-type AGB star W Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; Bergman, P.; Justtanont, K.; Lombaert, R.; Maercker, M.; Olofsson, H.; Ramstedt, S.; Royer, P.

    2014-09-01

    Context. S-type AGB stars have a C/O ratio which suggests that they are transition objects between oxygen-rich M-type stars and carbon-rich C-type stars. As such, their circumstellar compositions of gas and dust are thought to be sensitive to their precise C/O ratio, and it is therefore of particular interest to examine their circumstellar properties. Aims: We present new Herschel HIFI and PACS sub-millimetre and far-infrared line observations of several molecular species towards the S-type AGB star W Aql. We use these observations, which probe a wide range of gas temperatures, to constrain the circumstellar properties of W Aql, including mass-loss rate and molecular abundances. Methods: We used radiative transfer codes to model the circumstellar dust and molecular line emission to determine circumstellar properties and molecular abundances. We assumed a spherically symmetric envelope formed by a constant mass-loss rate driven by an accelerating wind. Our model includes fully integrated H2O line cooling as part of the solution of the energy balance. Results: We detect circumstellar molecular lines from CO, H2O, SiO, HCN, and, for the first time in an S-type AGB star, NH3. The radiative transfer calculations result in an estimated mass-loss rate for W Aql of 4.0 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 based on the 12CO lines. The estimated 12CO/13CO ratio is 29, which is in line with ratios previously derived for S-type AGB stars. We find an H2O abundance of 1.5 × 10-5, which is intermediate to the abundances expected for M and C stars, and an ortho/para ratio for H2O that is consistent with formation at warm temperatures. We find an HCN abundance of 3 × 10-6, and, although no CN lines are detected using HIFI, we are able to put some constraints on the abundance, 6 × 10-6, and distribution of CN in W Aql's circumstellar envelopeusing ground-based data. We find an SiO abundance of 3 × 10-6, and an NH3 abundance of 1.7 × 10-5, confined to a small envelope. If we include uncertainties

  13. To be or not to be asymmetric? VLTI and the mass loss geometry of red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Claudia; Klotz, Daniela; Sacuto, Stephane; Hron, Josef; Wittkowski, Markus; Lagadec, Eric; Verhoelst, Tijl; Jorissen, Alain; Richichi, Andrea; Groenewegen, Martin; Olofsson, Hans; Kerschbaum, Franz

    2012-07-01

    The mass-loss process is a key ingredient for our understanding in many fields of astrophysics, including stellar evolution and the enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM) via stellar yields. We combined the capability of the VLTI/MIDI and VLT/VISIR instruments with very recent Herschel/PACS observations to characterize the geometry of mass loss from evolved red giants on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) at various scales. This paper describes the sample of objects, the observing strategy, the tool for the interpretation, and preliminary MIDI results for two targets: U Ant and θ Aps.

  14. Sulphur molecules in the circumstellar envelopes of M-type AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; De Beck, E.; Black, J. H.; Olofsson, H.; Justtanont, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: The sulphur compounds SO and SO2 have not been widely studied in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. By presenting and modelling a large number of SO and SO2 lines in the low mass-loss rate M-type AGB star R Dor, and modelling the available lines of those molecules in a further four M-type AGB stars, we aim to determine their circumstellar abundances and distributions. Methods: We use a detailed radiative transfer analysis based on the accelerated lambda iteration method to model circumstellar SO and SO2 line emission. We use molecular data files for both SO and SO2 that are more extensive than those previously available. Results: Using 17 SO lines and 98 SO2 lines to constrain our models for R Dor, we find an SO abundance of (6.7 ± 0.9) × 10-6 and an SO2 abundance of 5 × 10-6 with both species having high abundances close to the star. We also modelled 34SO and found an abundance of (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10-7, giving an 32SO/34SO ratio of 21.6 ± 8.5. We derive similar results for the circumstellar SO and SO2 abundances and their distributions for the low mass-loss rate object W Hya. For the higher mass-loss rate stars, we find shell-like SO distributions with peak abundances that decrease and peak abundance radii that increase with increasing mass-loss rate. The positions of the peak SO abundance agree very well with the photodissociation radii of H2O. We also modelled SO2 in two higher mass-loss rate stars but our models for these were less conclusive. Conclusions: We conclude that for the low mass-loss rate stars, the circumstellar SO and SO2 abundances are much higher than predicted by chemical models of the extended stellar atmosphere. These two species may also account for all the available sulphur. For the higher mass-loss rate stars we find evidence that SO is most efficiently formed in the circumstellar envelope, most likely through the photodissociation of H2O and the subsequent reaction between S and OH. The S

  15. New insights into the dust formation of oxygen-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovicova, I.; Wittkowski, M.; Ohnaka, K.; Boboltz, D. A.; Fossat, E.; Scholz, M.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are one of the major sources of dust in the universe. The formation of molecules and dust grains and their subsequent expulsion into the interstellar medium via strong stellar winds is under intense investigation. This is in particular true for oxygen-rich stars, for which the path of dust formation has remained unclear. Aims: We conducted spatially and spectrally resolved mid-infrared multi-epoch interferometric observations to investigate the dust formation process in the extended atmospheres of oxygen-rich AGB stars. Methods: We observed the Mira variable AGB stars S Ori, GX Mon, and R Cnc between February 2006 and March 2009 with the MIDI instrument at the VLT interferometer. We compared the data to radiative transfer models of the dust shells, where the central stellar intensity profiles were described by dust-free dynamic model atmospheres. We used Al2O3 and warm silicate grains, following earlier studies in the literature. Results: Our S Ori and R Cnc data could be well described by an Al2O3 dust shell alone, and our GX Mon data by a mix of an Al2O3 and a silicate shell. The best-fit parameters for S Ori and R Cnc included photospheric angular diameters ΘPhot of 9.7 ± 1.0 mas and 12.3 ± 1.0 mas, optical depths τV(Al2O3) of 1.5 ± 0.5 and 1.35 ± 0.2, and inner radii Rin of 1.9 ± 0.3 RPhot and 2.2 ± 0.3 RPhot, respectively. Best-fit parameters for GX Mon were ΘPhot = 8.7 ± 1.3 mas, τV(Al2O3) = 1.9 ± 0.6, Rin(Al2O3) = 2.1 ± 0.3 RPhot, τV(silicate)= 3.2 ± 0.5, and Rin(silicate)= 4.6 ± 0.2 RPhot. Our data did not show evidence of intra-cycle and cycle-to-cycle variability or of asymmetries within the error-bars and within the limits of our baseline and phase coverage. Conclusions: Our model fits constrain the chemical composition and the inner boundary radii of the dust shells, as well as the photospheric angular diameters. Our interferometric results are consistent with Al2O3 grains condensing close to

  16. Radial velocity variable, hot post-AGB stars from the MUCHFUSS project. Classification, atmospheric parameters, formation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reindl, N.; Geier, S.; Kupfer, T.; Bloemen, S.; Schaffenroth, V.; Heber, U.; Barlow, B. N.; Østensen, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    In the course of the MUCHFUSS project we recently discovered four radial velocity (RV) variable, hot (Teff≈ 80 000-110 000 K) post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Among them, we found the first known RV variable O(He) star, the only second known RV variable PG 1159 close binary candidate, as well as the first two naked (i.e., without planetary nebula (PN)) H-rich post-AGB stars of spectral type O(H) that show significant RV variations. We present a non-LTE spectral analysis of these stars along with one further O(H)-type star whose RV variations were found to be not significant. We also report the discovery of a far-infrared excess in the case of the PG 1159 star. None of the stars in our sample displays nebular emission lines, which can be explained well in terms of a very late thermal pulse evolution in the case of the PG 1159 star. The "missing" PNe around the O(H)-type stars seems strange, since we find that several central stars of PNe have much longer post-AGB times. Besides the non-ejection of a PN, the occurrence of a late thermal pulse, or the re-accretion of the PN in the previous post-AGB evolution offer possible explanations for those stars not harbouring a PN (anymore). In the case of the O(He) star J0757, we speculate that it might have been previously part of a compact He transferring binary system. In this scenario, the mass transfer must have stopped after a certain time, leaving behind a low-mass close companion that may be responsible for the extreme RV shift of 107.0 ± 22.0 km s-1 that was measured within only 31 min.

  17. A Study of the λ10830 He I Line Among Red Giants in Messier 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme H.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Strader, Jay

    2014-10-01

    Two properties of Messier 13 are pertinent to the study of mass loss among metal-poor stars and the chemical evolution of globular clusters: (1) an extended blue horizontal branch, which seems to demand mass loss from red giant progenitor stars and possibly an enhanced helium abundance, and (2) the presence of internal abundance inhomogeneities of elements in the mass range from C to Al. A popular explanation for this second phenomenon is that M13 was self-enriched by intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (IM-AGB) stars of a type that may also have been able to instigate helium enrichment. Spectra of the λ10830 absorption feature produced by He I have been obtained by using the NIRSPEC spectrometer on the Keck 2 telescope for seven red giants in M13 chosen to have a range in λ3883 CN band strengths, oxygen, and sodium abundances. Whereas these spectra do reveal the presence of fast winds among some M13 red giants, they provide little support for helium abundance differences of the type that might have been generated by a burst of IM-AGB star activity within the M13 protocluster. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  18. The Effects of Stellar Chemistry on the Broad 9-15 Micron Spectral Feature of O-rich AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrant, David J.; Speck, A.

    2013-01-01

    Dust plays an important role in many astrophysical processes. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars expel gas from their surfaces; as it moves away from the star, it cools and condenses to produce dust. Carbon monoxide (CO) is extremely stable and will trap most of the oxygen and carbon. The lesser abundant of carbon and oxygen will be entirely trapped in CO, while the more abundant will have excess atoms available to form dust. AGB stars are divided into carbon-rich (C-rich) stars or oxygen-rich (O-rich) stars. O-rich AGB stars with low mass-loss rates show a 9-15 micron feature, which is attributed to various dust species, such as silicates and oxides. This broad feature is fitted with two overlapping Gaussian functions. The parameters of the Gaussian fits are compared to stellar chemistry properties, such as the elemental abundances (C, N, O, Fe, Ti, Ni, Y, Zr, and Nd) and ratios (C/N, C/O, C/Fe…) in order to assess the effect of chemistry on dust formation.

  19. Post-AGB Stars in Nearby Galaxies as Calibrators for HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes activities carried out with support from the NASA Ultraviolet, Visible, and Gravitational Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program under Grant NAG 5-6821. The Principal Investigator is Howard E. Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute). STScI Postdoctoral Associates Laura K. Fullton (1998), David Alves (1998-2001), and Michael Siegel (2001) were partially supported by this grant. The aim of the program is to calibrate the absolute magnitudes of post-asymptotic- giant-branch (post-AGB or PAGB) stars, which we believe will be an excellent new "standard candle" for measuring extragalactic distances. The argument is that, in old populations, the stars that are evolving through the PAGB region of the HR diagram arise from only a single main-sequence turnoff mass. In addition, theoretical PAGB evolutionary tracks show that they evolve through this region at constant luminosity; hence the PAGB stars should have an extremely narrow luminosity function. Moreover, as the PAGB stars evolve through spectral types F and A (en route from the AGB to hot stellar remnants and white dwarfs), they have the highest luminosities attained by old stars (both bolometrically and in the visual band). Finally, PAGB stars of these spectral types are very easily identified. because of their large Balmer jumps, which are due to their very low surface gravities. Our approach is first to identify PAGB stars in Milky Way globular clusters and in other Local Group galaxies, which are at known distances, and thus to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for the PAGB stars. With this Milky Way and Local Group luminosity calibration, we will then be in a position to find PAGB stars in more distant galaxies from the ground, and ultimately from the Hubble Space Telescope. and thus derive distances. These PAGB stars are, as noted above, the visually brightest members of Population II, and hence will allow distance measurements to galaxies that do not contain Cepheids, such as

  20. Dust-driven winds of AGB stars: The critical interplay of atmospheric shocks and luminosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.; Nowotny, W.; Eriksson, K.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Winds of AGB stars are thought to be driven by a combination of pulsation-induced shock waves and radiation pressure on dust. In dynamic atmosphere and wind models, the stellar pulsation is often simulated by prescribing a simple sinusoidal variation in velocity and luminosity at the inner boundary of the model atmosphere. Aims: We experiment with different forms of the luminosity variation in order to assess the effects on the wind velocity and mass-loss rate, when progressing from the simple sinusoidal recipe towards more realistic descriptions. This will also give an indication of how robust the wind properties derived from the dynamic atmosphere models are. Methods: Using state-of-the-art dynamical models of C-rich AGB stars, a range of different asymmetric shapes of the luminosity variation and a range of phase shifts of the luminosity variation relative to the radial variation are tested. These tests are performed on two stellar atmosphere models. The first model has dust condensation and, as a consequence, a stellar wind is triggered, while the second model lacks both dust and wind. Results: The first model with dust and stellar wind is very sensitive to moderate changes in the luminosity variation. There is a complex relationship between the luminosity minimum, and dust condensation: changing the phase corresponding to minimum luminosity can either increase or decrease mass-loss rate and wind velocity. The luminosity maximum dominates the radiative pressure on the dust, which in turn, is important for driving the wind. An earlier occurrence of the maximum, with respect to the propagation of the pulsation-induced shock wave, then increases the wind velocity, while a later occurrence leads to a decrease. These effects of changed luminosity variation are coupled with the dust formation. In contrast there is very little change to the structure of the model without dust. Conclusions: Changing the luminosity variation, both by introducing a phase shift

  1. Dust-driven winds of AGB stars: The critical interplay of atmospheric shocks and luminosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.; Nowotny, W.; Eriksson, K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Winds of AGB stars are thought to be driven by a combination of pulsation-induced shock waves and radiation pressure on dust. In dynamic atmosphere and wind models, the stellar pulsation is often simulated by prescribing a simple sinusoidal variation in velocity and luminosity at the inner boundary of the model atmosphere. Aims: We experiment with different forms of the luminosity variation in order to assess the effects on the wind velocity and mass-loss rate, when progressing from the simple sinusoidal recipe towards more realistic descriptions. This will also give an indication of how robust the wind properties derived from the dynamic atmosphere models are. Methods: Using state-of-the-art dynamical models of C-rich AGB stars, a range of different asymmetric shapes of the luminosity variation and a range of phase shifts of the luminosity variation relative to the radial variation are tested. These tests are performed on two stellar atmosphere models. The first model has dust condensation and, as a consequence, a stellar wind is triggered, while the second model lacks both dust and wind. Results: The first model with dust and stellar wind is very sensitive to moderate changes in the luminosity variation. There is a complex relationship between the luminosity minimum, and dust condensation: changing the phase corresponding to minimum luminosity can either increase or decrease mass-loss rate and wind velocity. The luminosity maximum dominates the radiative pressure on the dust, which in turn, is important for driving the wind. An earlier occurrence of the maximum, with respect to the propagation of the pulsation-induced shock wave, then increases the wind velocity, while a later occurrence leads to a decrease. These effects of changed luminosity variation are coupled with the dust formation. In contrast there is very little change to the structure of the model without dust. Conclusions: Changing the luminosity variation, both by introducing a phase shift

  2. PIPER and Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David

    2009-01-01

    In addition to probing inflationary cosmology, PIPER will measure the polarized dust emission from the Galaxy. PIPER will be capable of full (I,0,U,V) measurement over four frequency bands ' These measurements will provide insight into the physics of dust grains and a probe of the Galactic magnetic field on large and intermediate scales.

  3. Dust in the galactic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittet, D. C. B.

    An overview of dust in the galactic environment is given which covers general concepts, methods of investigation, important results and their significance, relevant literature, and suggestions for future research. The general topics addressed include: element abundances and depletions, interstellar extinction and scattering, interstellar polarization and grain alignment, spectral absorption features, continuum and line emission, and the origin and evolution of interstellar grains.

  4. The galactic cycle of extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillman, Michael; Erenler, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    Global extinction and geological events have previously been linked with galactic events such as spiral arm crossings and galactic plane oscillation. The expectation that these are repeating predictable events has led to studies of periodicity in a wide set of biological, geological and climatic phenomena. Using data on carbon isotope excursions, large igneous provinces and impact craters, we identify three time zones of high geological activity which relate to the timings of the passage of the Solar System through the spiral arms. These zones are shown to include a significantly large proportion of high extinction periods. The mass extinction events at the ends of the Ordovician, Permian and Cretaceous occur in the first zone, which contains the predicted midpoints of the spiral arms. The start of the Cambrian, end of the Devonian and end of the Triassic occur in the second zone. The pattern of extinction timing in relation to spiral arm structure is supported by the positions of the superchrons and the predicted speed of the spiral arms. The passage times through an arm are simple multiples of published results on impact and fossil record periodicity and galactic plane half-periods. The total estimated passage time through four arms is 703.8 Myr. The repetition of extinction events at the same points in different spiral arm crossings suggests a common underlying galactic cause of mass extinctions, mediated through galactic effects on geological, solar and extra-solar processes. The two largest impact craters (Sudbury and Vredefort), predicted to have occurred during the early part of the first zone, extend the possible pattern to more than 2000 million years ago.

  5. The Formation of Galactic Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Ferguson, Henry C.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2000-03-01

    Part I. Introduction: What are galactic bulges?; Part II. The Epoch of Bulge Formation: Origin of bulges; Deep sub-mm surveys: High-z ULIRGs and the formation of spheroids; Ages and metallicities for stars in the galactic bulge; Integrated stellar populations of bulges: First results; HST-NICMOS observations of galactic bulges: Ages and dust; Inside-out bulge formation and the origin of the Hubble sequence; Part III. The Timescales of Bulge Formation: Constraints on the bulge formation timescale from stellar populations; Bulge building with mergers and winds; Role of winds, starbursts, and activity in bulge formation; Dynamical timescales of bulge formation; Part IV. Physical Processes in Bulge Formation: the role of bars for secular bulge formation; Bars and boxy/peanut-shaped bulges: an observational point of view; Boxy- and peanut-shaped bulges; A new class of bulges; The role of secondary bars in bulge formation; Radial transport of molecular gas to the nuclei of spiral galaxies; Dynamical evolution of bulge shapes; Two-component stellar systems: Phase-space constraints; Central NGC 2146 - a firehose-type bending instability?; Bulge formation: the role of the multi-phase ISM; Global evolution of a self-gravitating multi-phase ISM in the central kpc region of galaxies; Part V. Bulge Phenomenology: Bulge-disk decomposition of spiral galaxies in the near-infrared; The triaxial bulge of NGC 1371; The bulge-disk orthogonal decoupling in galaxies: NGC 4698 and NGC 4672; The kinematics and the origin of the ionized gas in NGC 4036; Optically thin thermal plasma in the galactic bulge; X-ray properties of bulges; The host galaxies of radio-loud AGN; The centers of radio-loud early-type galaxies with HST; Central UV spikes in two galactic spheroids; Conference summary: where do we stand?

  6. Radiation Hazard from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Ashraf

    2006-03-01

    Space radiation is a major hazard to astronauts in long-duration human space explosion. Astronauts are exposed to an enormous amount of radiation during their missions away from the Earth in outer space. Deep space is a rich environment of protons, gamma rays and cosmic rays. A healthy 40 years old man staying on Earth away from large doses of radiation stands a 20% chance of dying from cancer. If the same person travels into a 3- year Mars mission, the added risk should increase by 19%. This indicates that there is 39% chance of having cancer after he comes back to Earth. Female astronaut chances to get cancer is even almost double the above percentage. The greatest threat to astronauts en route to the red planet is galactic cosmic rays (GCR). GCRs penetrate through the skin of spaceships and people like tiny firearm bullets, breaking the strands of DNA molecules, damaging genes, and killing cells. Understanding the nature of the GCRs, their effect on biological cells, and their interactions with different shielding materials is the key point to shield against them in long space missions. In this paper we will present a model to evaluate the biological effects of GCRs and suggestion different ways to shield against them.

  7. THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF POST-STARBURST GALAXIES IN THE NEWFIRM MEDIUM-BAND SURVEY: A LOW CONTRIBUTION FROM TP-AGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kriek, Mariska; Conroy, Charlie; Labbe, Ivo; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Quadri, Ryan F.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Rudnick, Gregory

    2010-10-10

    Stellar population synthesis (SPS) models are a key ingredient of many galaxy evolution studies. Unfortunately, the models are still poorly calibrated for certain stellar evolution stages. Of particular concern is the treatment of the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase, as different implementations lead to systematic differences in derived galaxy properties. Post-starburst galaxies are a promising calibration sample, as TP-AGB stars are thought to be most prominently visible during this phase. Here, we use post-starburst galaxies in the NEWFIRM medium-band survey to assess different SPS models. The available photometry allows the selection of a homogeneous and well-defined sample of 62 post-starburst galaxies at 0.7 {approx_lt} z {approx_lt} 2.0, from which we construct a well-sampled composite spectral energy distribution (SED) over the range 1200-40000 A. The SED is well fit by the Bruzual and Charlot SPS models, while the Maraston models do not reproduce the rest-frame optical and near-infrared parts of the SED simultaneously. When the fitting is restricted to {lambda} < 6000 A, the Maraston models overpredict the near-infrared luminosity, implying that these models give too much weight to TP-AGB stars. Using the flexible SPS models by Conroy et al. and assuming solar metallicity, we find that the contribution of TP-AGB stars to the integrated SED is a factor of {approx}3 lower than predicted by the latest Padova TP-AGB models. Whether this is due to lower bolometric luminosities, shorter lifetimes, and/or heavy dust obscuration of TP-AGB stars remains to be addressed. Altogether, our data demand a low contribution from TP-AGB stars to the SED of post-starburst galaxies.

  8. Observational signatures of galactic winds powered by active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nims, Jesse; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2015-03-01

    We predict the observational signatures of galaxy scale outflows powered by active galactic nuclei (AGN). Most of the emission is produced by the forward shock driven into the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) rather than by the reverse shock. AGN-powered galactic winds with energetics suggested by phenomenological feedback arguments should produce spatially extended ˜1-10 keV X-ray emission ˜ 1041-44 erg s- 1, significantly in excess of the spatially extended X-ray emission associated with normal star-forming galaxies. The presence of such emission is a direct test of whether AGN outflows significantly interact with the ISM of their host galaxy. We further show that even radio-quiet quasars should have a radio luminosity comparable to or in excess of the far-infrared-radio correlation of normal star-forming galaxies. This radio emission directly constrains the total kinetic energy flux in AGN-powered galactic winds. Radio emission from AGN wind shocks can also explain the recently highlighted correlations between radio luminosity and the kinematics of AGN narrow-line regions in radio-quiet quasars.

  9. MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION AND ITS VARIATION WITH GALACTIC LONGITUDE

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li Aigen E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.c

    2009-12-10

    Based on the data obtained from the Spitzer/Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIPMSE) Legacy Program and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) project, we derive the extinction in the four IRAC bands, [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], and [8.0] mum, relative to the 2MASS K{sub s} band (at 2.16 mum) for 131 GLIPMSE fields along the Galactic plane within |l| <= 65 deg., using red giants and red clump giants as tracers. As a whole, the mean extinction in the IRAC bands (normalized to the 2MASS K{sub s} band), A{sub [3.6]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.63+-0.01, A{sub [4.5]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.57+-0.03, A{sub [5.8]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.49+-0.03, A{sub [8.0]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.55+-0.03, exhibits little variation with wavelength (i.e., the extinction is somewhat flat or gray). This is consistent with previous studies and agrees with that predicted from the standard interstellar grain model for R{sub V} = 5.5 by Weingartner and Draine. As far as individual sightline is concerned, however, the wavelength dependence of the mid-infrared interstellar extinction A{sub l}ambda/A{sub K{sub s}} varies from one sightline to another, suggesting that there may not exist a 'universal' IR extinction law. We, for the first time, demonstrate the existence of systematic variations of extinction with Galactic longitude which appears to correlate with the locations of spiral arms as well as with the variation of the far-infrared luminosity of interstellar dust.

  10. The Contribution of Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch and Red Supergiant Starts to the Luminosities of the Magellanic Clouds at 1-24 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L.

    2013-01-01

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at approx 3 - 4 micron, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at approx 3 - 4 micron and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 micron, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1 - 4 micron. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8 - 1 micron). At longer wavelengths (much > 8 micron), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 micron, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 micron flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 micron flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 micron flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 micron at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  11. THE CONTRIBUTION OF THERMALLY-PULSING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND RED SUPERGIANT STARS TO THE LUMINOSITIES OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS AT 1-24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L. E-mail: martha.l.boyer@nasa.gov

    2013-02-10

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at {approx}3-4 {mu}m, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at {approx}3-4 {mu}m and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 {mu}m, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1-4 {mu}m. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8-1 {mu}m). At longer wavelengths ({>=}8 {mu}m), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 {mu}m, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 {mu}m flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 {mu}m flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 {mu}m flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 {mu}m at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  12. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  13. A Nearby Galactic Exemplar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    spiral arms are shown with particular clarity in this image as red and pink clouds. With its huge field of view, 34 x 34 arcminutes, similar to the apparent size of the full Moon in the sky, the WFI is an ideal tool for astronomers to study large objects such as NGC 300. NGC 300 is also the home of many interesting astronomical phenomena that have been studied with ESO telescopes. ESO astronomers recently discovered the most distant and one of the most massive stellar-mass black holes yet found (eso1004) in this galaxy, as the partner of a hot and luminous Wolf-Rayet star in a binary system. NGC 300 and another galaxy, NGC 55, are slowly spinning around and towards each other, in the early stages of a lengthy merging process (eso0914). The current best estimate of the distance to the NCG 300 was also determined by astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory (eso0524), among others. Notes [1] Although it is normally considered as member of the Sculptor Group, the most recent distance measurements show that NGC 300 lies significantly closer to us than many of the other galaxies in the group and may be only loosely associated with them. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world

  14. Galactic Fountains and Gas Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinacci, F.; Binney, J.; Fraternali, F.; Nipoti, C.; Ciotti, L.; Londrillo, P.

    2010-06-01

    Star-forming disc galaxies such as the Milky Way need to accrete >~1 Msolar of gas each year to sustain their star formation. This gas accretion is likely to come from the cooling of the hot corona, however it is still not clear how this process can take place. We present simulations supporting the idea that this cooling and the subsequent accretion are caused by the passage of cold galactic-fountain clouds through the hot corona. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability strips gas from these clouds and the stripped gas causes coronal gas to condense in the cloud's wake. For likely parameters of the Galactic corona and of typical fountain clouds we obtain a global accretion rate of the order of that required to feed the star formation.

  15. INTEGRAL Galactic bulge monitoring program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuulkers, E.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Belloni, T.; Chenevez, J.; Ibarra, A.; Munoz-Darias, T.; Bazzano, A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; De Cesare, G.; Diaz Trigo, M.; Jourdain, E.; Lubinski, P.; Natalucci, L.; Ness, J. U.; Parmar, A.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Rodriguez, J.; Roques, J. P.; Sanchez-Fernandez; C.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    2010-12-01

    The central region of our Galaxy, the Galactic bulge, is a rich host of variable high-energy X-ray and gamma-ray point sources. These sources include bright and relatively faint X-ray transients, X-ray bursters, persistent neutron star and black-hole candidate binaries, high-mass X-ray binaries, etc.. We have a program to monitor the Galactic bulge region regularly and frequently with the gamma-ray observatory INTEGRAL, whenever it is observable. As a service to the scientific community the high-energy light curves of sources present, as well as the images of the region are made available through the WWW at http://integral.esac.esa.int/BULGE/ as soon as possible after the observations have been performed. We show the ongoing results of this exciting program.

  16. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow survey with a flux limit of 1e-14 erg/cm2/s (0.5-10.0 keV) that covers a pair of 6 sq. deg. areas centred 1.5 deg. above and below the Galactic Center. The extinction and crowding in these regions are such that optical/infrared counterparts to the 1640 X-ray sources found with Chandra are accessible to detailed follow-up. The GBS is designed to set constraints on four important areas in astrophysics: stellar-mass black hole formation, the neutron star equation of state, the nature of the progenitors of type Ia supernovae and the common envelope evolution. Here I present the survey properties and goals, our multiwavelength methods to identify and clasify the counterparts to the X-ray sources and the first scientific results.

  17. Red Quasars: Hunting For Hidden Rubies in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calapa, Marie; Gregg, M.; West, M.

    2014-01-01

    Energetic galactic nuclei, known as quasars, have typically been thought of as blue objects. Over the past decade, however, the existence of a population of red quasars has emerged, revealing a new frontier in the study of these objects. Techniques for efficiently finding red quasars are needed, and we are exploring various selection methods for identifying them in large photometric surveys. Combining IR and optical photometry from UKIDSS and SDSS, we have found a way to separate red quasar candidates from most other sources more effectively than using optical data alone. After our technique proved successful with known red quasars, we applied it to a sample of random objects chosen from a small patch of sky. Investigating those objects that qualified as likely candidates, we found that a large fraction, approaching 50%, were red quasars. This selection technique was then used to make a list of red quasar candidates for further investigation with SpeX at IRTF. Our method for effectively identifying red quasars, using only photometric data, will improve statistics of the red population of quasars. In our small sample area alone, we were able to find over a 1,000 red quasar candidates, implying their numbers may be a significant fraction of all quasars in the universe, perhaps even the majority. Developing a reliable method to find these objects will increase our understanding of the relation between red and blue quasars and the quasar phenomenon in general.

  18. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Jonker, P. G.; Maccarone, T.; Torres, M. A. P.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Johnson, C.; Greiss, S.

    2015-05-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a multi-wavelength survey of two 6×1 degree strips above and below the Galactic plane, including deep r' and i' imaging and time domain photometry from CTIO and shallow, wide-field X-ray imaging with Chandra. Targeting fields above |b|=1 avoids most of the copious extinction along the Galactic plane while maintaining high source density. This results in targets that are accessible to follow up in optical and NIR wavelengths. The X-ray observations are shallow to maximize the number of quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) relative to Cataclysmic Variables (CVs). The goals of the GBS are to conduct a census of Low Mass X-ray Binaries in the Milky Way in order to constrain models of binary evolution, the common envelope phase in particular, and to expand the number of known LMXBs for optical follow up. Mass measurements in particular will help constrain the black hole (BH) mass distribution and the equation of state for neutron stars (NS). Constraining the BH mass distribution will constrain models of their formation in supernovae. The current population of Galactic BHs suffers from selection effects, which the GBS avoids by finding new objects while still in quiescence. We expect to find qLMXBs, magnetic CVs, RS CVn stars, and smaller numbers of other types of sources. After removing duplicates, there are 1640 unique X-ray sources in the 12 square degree survey area, which closely matches the predicted number of 1648. We are currently matching X-ray sources to counterparts in other wavelengths using new photometric and spectroscopic observations as well as in archival data where it exists, and searching for variability and periodicity in the counterparts in photometric data. So far, we have spectroscopically identified 27 interacting binaries including promising candidates for quiescent black holes.

  19. Constraints on galactic wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiksin, Avery

    2016-09-01

    Observational implications are derived for two standard models of supernovae-driven galactic winds: a freely expanding steady-state wind and a wind sourced by a self-similarly expanding superbubble including thermal heat conduction. It is shown that, for the steady-state wind, matching the measured correlation between the soft X-ray luminosity and star formation rate of starburst galaxies is equivalent to producing a scaled wind mass-loading factor relative to the star formation rate of 0.5-3, in agreement with the amount inferred from metal absorption line measurements. The match requires the asymptotic wind velocity v∞ to scale with the star formation rate dot{M}_{ast } (in M⊙ yr-1) approximately as v_∞ ≃ (700-1000) {{km s^{-1}}} {dot{M}_{ast }}^{1/6}. The implied mass injection rate is close to the amount naturally provided by thermal evaporation from the wall of a superbubble in a galactic disc, suggesting that thermal evaporation may be a major source of mass loading. The predicted mass-loading factors from thermal evaporation within the galactic disc alone, however, are somewhat smaller, 0.2-2, so that a further contribution from cloud ablation or evaporation within the wind may be required. Both models may account for the 1.4 GHz luminosity of unresolved radio sources within starburst galaxies for plausible parameters describing the distribution of relativistic electrons. Further observational tests to distinguish the models are suggested.

  20. Structure of the Galactic Bulge: Is the Milky Way a Double-barred Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; IRSF/SIRIUS Team

    2006-12-01

    Using the data of the IRSF/SIRIUS infrared survey along the Galactic plane (| l | <= 10.°5 at b = +1°), we find a distinct structure, which is probably a secondary bar, inside the primary bar of our Galaxy. The apparent magnitude peak of Bulge red clump stars changes continuously from KS ~ 13.5 (l = -10°) to KS ~ 12.3 (l = +10°), and this can be explained by the bar structure of the Galactic Bulge. However, the apparent magnitude changes by only ~ 0.1 mag over the central 8°, and this indicates that there is a distinct structure inside the primary bar. In the process of the distance derivation, we have used the infrared extinction law in the J, H, and KS bands toward the Galactic center newly determined from our survey.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Extended red(dened) regions in 2MASS (Frieswijk+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieswijk, W. W. F.; Shipman, R. F.

    2010-04-01

    Basic parameters of 2909 extended red regions in the outer Galactic plane (1320 at 60" and 1589 at 90" resolution). The sources have been extracted from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS, Cat. ). For each source Galactic coordinates, total number of resolution cells, linear extend in longitude and latitude and number of 2MASS point sources are given. The calculated reliability of the sources is >99.9%. (1 data file).

  2. Potential use of Pseudomonas koreensis AGB-1 in association with Miscanthus sinensis to remediate heavy metal(loid)-contaminated mining site soil.

    PubMed

    Babu, A Giridhar; Shea, Patrick J; Sudhakar, D; Jung, Ik-Boo; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2015-03-15

    Endophytic bacteria have the potential to promote plant growth and heavy metal(loid) (HM) removal from contaminated soil. Pseudomonas koreensis AGB-1, isolated from roots of Miscanthus sinensis growing in mine-tailing soil, exhibited high tolerance to HMs and plant growth promoting traits. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis revealed that AGB-1 sequestered HMs extracellularly and their accumulation was visible as dark metal complexes on bacterial surfaces and outside of the cells. DNA sequencing of HM resistance marker genes indicated high homology to the appropriate regions of the arsB, ACR3(1), aoxB, and bmtA determinants. Inoculating mining site soil with AGB-1 increased M. sinensis biomass by 54%, chlorophyll by 27%, and protein content by 28%. High superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, and the lower malondialdehyde content of plants growing in AGB-1-inoculated soil indicate reduced oxidative stress. Metal(loid) concentrations in roots and shoots of plants grown in inoculated soil were higher than those of the controls in pot trials with mine tailing soil. Results suggest that AGB-1 can be used in association with M. sinensis to promote phytostabilization and remediation of HM-contaminated sites. PMID:25575343

  3. Characterizing uncertainties of the national-scale forest gross aboveground biomass (AGB) loss estimate: a case study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Stehman, S.; Potapov, P.; Turubanova, S.; Baccini, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Houghton, R. A.; Hansen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Modern remote sensing techniques enable the mapping and monitoring of aboveground biomass (AGB) carbon stocks without relying on extensive in situ measurements. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is among the countries where a national forest inventory (NFI) has yet to be established due to a lack of infrastructure and political instability. We demonstrate a method for producing national-scale gross AGB loss estimates and quantifying uncertainty of the estimates using remotely sensed-derived forest cover loss and biomass carbon density data. Forest cover type and loss were characterized using published Landsat-based data sets and related to LIDAR-derived biomass data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). We produced two gross AGB loss estimates for the DRC for the last decade (2000-2010): a conservative estimate accounting for classification errors in the 60-m resolution FACET forest cover change product, and a maximal estimate that also took into consideration omitted change at the 30m spatial resolution. Omitted disturbances were largely related to smallholder agriculture, the detection of which is scale-dependent. The use of LIDAR data as a substitute for NFI data to estimate AGB loss based on Landsat-derived activity data was demonstrated. Comparisons of our forest cover loss and AGB estimates with published studies raise the issue of scale in forest cover change mapping and its impact on carbon stock change estimation using remotely sensed data.

  4. New Developments in Galactic Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Kenneth C.; HERMES/GALAH Team

    2014-01-01

    The goal of Galactic Archaeology is to unravel observationally the events that occurred during the assembly of the Milky Way. For example, how did the star formation rate and the mass spectrum of the star-forming clusters change with time since the Galaxy began to form, how much did minor mergers and accretion of satellite galaxies contribute to the stellar content of the Galactic components, and how did the chemical properties of the Galaxy evolve? The data for Galactic Archaeology include the phase space coordinates of stars (position and velocity) and the chemical space coordinates (abundances of up to about 30 chemical elements). Although we know that the distribution of individual elements contains important information about the star formation history and chemical evolution of the Galaxy, the available data for large samples of stars has so far restricted the use of chemical space data mainly to the overall metallicity and the alpha-element enhancement. We are entering an era of large high-resolution spectroscopic surveys in which the abundances of many elements from all of the major nucleosynthesis processes will be measured. It will be possible to use chemical tagging techniques to identify the debris of individual dispersed star forming aggregates. In combination with astrometry from the Gaia mission, it will be possible to derive ages for this recovered star formation debris, and build up the star formation history of the regions of the Milky Way accessible to these large surveys. The Galactic thick disk is of particular interest. Because almost all disk galaxies appear to have an old thick disk, thick disks are an important but as yet poorly understood part of the formation process for disk galaxies. Some theories of thick disk formation associate the thick disk with the large star-bursting complexes seen in proto-disk galaxies at high redshift. If the Galactic thick disk was built in this way, from a relatively small number of large aggregates, it will

  5. Spectroscopic Determination of Masses (and Implied Ages) for Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, M.; Hogg, David W.; Rix, H.-W.; Martig, M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Ho, A. Y. Q.

    2016-06-01

    The mass of a star is arguably its most fundamental parameter. For red giant stars, tracers luminous enough to be observed across the Galaxy, mass implies a stellar evolution age. It has proven to be extremely difficult to infer ages and masses directly from red giant spectra using existing methods. From the Kepler and apogee surveys, samples of several thousand stars exist with high-quality spectra and asteroseismic masses. Here we show that from these data we can build a data-driven spectral model using The Cannon, which can determine stellar masses to ∼0.07 dex from apogee dr12 spectra of red giants; these imply age estimates accurate to ∼0.2 dex (40%). We show that The Cannon constrains these ages foremost from spectral regions with CN absorption lines, elements whose surface abundances reflect mass-dependent dredge-up. We deliver an unprecedented catalog of 70,000 giants (including 20,000 red clump stars) with mass and age estimates, spanning the entire disk (from the Galactic center to R∼ 20 kpc). We show that the age information in the spectra is not simply a corollary of the birth-material abundances {{[Fe/H]}} and [α /{Fe}], and that, even within a monoabundance population of stars, there are age variations that vary sensibly with Galactic position. Such stellar age constraints across the Milky Way open up new avenues in Galactic archeology.

  6. Spectroscopic Determination of Masses (and Implied Ages) for Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, M.; Hogg, David W.; Rix, H.-W.; Martig, M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Ho, A. Y. Q.

    2016-06-01

    The mass of a star is arguably its most fundamental parameter. For red giant stars, tracers luminous enough to be observed across the Galaxy, mass implies a stellar evolution age. It has proven to be extremely difficult to infer ages and masses directly from red giant spectra using existing methods. From the Kepler and apogee surveys, samples of several thousand stars exist with high-quality spectra and asteroseismic masses. Here we show that from these data we can build a data-driven spectral model using The Cannon, which can determine stellar masses to ˜0.07 dex from apogee dr12 spectra of red giants; these imply age estimates accurate to ˜0.2 dex (40%). We show that The Cannon constrains these ages foremost from spectral regions with CN absorption lines, elements whose surface abundances reflect mass-dependent dredge-up. We deliver an unprecedented catalog of 70,000 giants (including 20,000 red clump stars) with mass and age estimates, spanning the entire disk (from the Galactic center to R˜ 20 kpc). We show that the age information in the spectra is not simply a corollary of the birth-material abundances {{[Fe/H]}} and [α /{Fe}], and that, even within a monoabundance population of stars, there are age variations that vary sensibly with Galactic position. Such stellar age constraints across the Milky Way open up new avenues in Galactic archeology.

  7. Radial-Velocity Analysis of the Post-AGB Star, HD101584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F.; Hearnshaw, J.; Rosenzweig, P.; Guzman, E.; Sivarani, T.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2007-08-01

    This project concerns the analysis of the periodicity of the radial velocity of the peculiar emission-line supergiant star HD 101584 (F0 Ia), and also we propose a physical model to account for the observations. From its peculiarities, HD 101584 is a star that is in the post-AGB phase. This study is considered as a key to clarify the multiple aspects related with the evolution of the circum-stellar layer associated with this star's last phase. The star shows many lines with P Cygni profiles, including H-alpha, Na D lines in the IR Ca triplet, indicating a mass outflow. For HD 101584 we have performed a detailed study of its radial-velocity variations, using both emission and absorption lines over a wide range of wavelength. We have analyzed the variability and found a periodicity for all types of lines of 144 days, which must arise from the star's membership in a binary system. The data span a period of five consecutive years and were obtained using the 1-m telescope of Mt John Observatory, in New Zealand., with the echelle and Hercules high resolution spectrographs and CCD camera. HD101584 is known to be an IRAS source, and our model suggests it is a proto-planetary nebula, probably with a bipolar outflow and surrounded by a dusty disk as part of a binary system. We have found no evidence for HD101584 to contain a B9 star as found by Bakker et al (1996). A low resolution IUE spectrum shows the absence of any strong UV continuum that would be expected for a B star to be in this system.

  8. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  9. Seeing red in M32: Constraints on the stellar content from near- and mid-infrared observations and applications for studies of more distant galaxies {sup ,} {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.

    2014-08-10

    The properties of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Local Group galaxy M32 are investigated using ground- and space-based observations that span the 1-8 μm wavelength interval, with the goal of demonstrating the utility of infrared observations as probes of stellar content. Comparisons with isochrones indicate that the brightest resolved stars in M32 have ages of a few gigayears and are younger on average than AGB stars with the same intrinsic brightness in the outer disk of M31. Accounting for stellar variability is shown to be essential for modeling AGB luminosity functions (LFs). Model LFs that assume the star-forming history measured by Monachesi et al. and the variability properties of Galactic AGB stars match both the K and [5.8] LFs of M32. Models also suggest that the slope of the [5.8] LF between M{sub [5.8]} = –8.5 and –10.0 is sensitive to the mix of stellar ages, and a sizeable fraction of the stars in M32 must have an age older than 7 Gyr in order to match the [5.8] LF. The structural properties of M32 in the infrared are also investigated. The effective radii that are computed from near-infrared and mid-infrared isophotes are similar to those measured at visible wavelengths, suggesting that the stellar content of M32 is well mixed. However, isophotes at radii >16'' (>60 pc) in the near- and mid-infrared are flatter than those at visible wavelengths. The coefficient of the fourth-order cosine term in the Fourier expansion of isophotes changes from 'boxy' values at r < 16'' to 'disky' values at r > 48''in [3.6] and [4.5]. The mid-infrared colors near the center of M32 do not vary systematically with radius, providing evidence of a well mixed stellar content in this part of the galaxy.

  10. The physics of galactic winds driven by active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) drive fast winds in the interstellar medium of their host galaxies. It is commonly assumed that the high ambient densities and intense radiation fields in galactic nuclei imply short cooling times, thus making the outflows momentum conserving. We show that cooling of high-velocity shocked winds in AGN is in fact inefficient in a wide range of circumstances, including conditions relevant to ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), resulting in energy-conserving outflows. We further show that fast energy-conserving outflows can tolerate a large amount of mixing with cooler gas before radiative losses become important. For winds with initial velocity vin ≳ 10 000 km s-1, as observed in ultraviolet and X-ray absorption, the shocked wind develops a two-temperature structure. While most of the thermal pressure support is provided by the protons, the cooling processes operate directly only on the electrons. This significantly slows down inverse Compton cooling, while free-free cooling is negligible. Slower winds with vin ˜ 1000 km s-1, such as may be driven by radiation pressure on dust, can also experience energy-conserving phases but under more restrictive conditions. During the energy-conserving phase, the momentum flux of an outflow is boosted by a factor ˜vin/2vs by work done by the hot post-shock gas, where vs is the velocity of the swept-up material. Energy-conserving outflows driven by fast AGN winds (vin ˜ 0.1c) may therefore explain the momentum fluxes Ṗ≫LAGN/c of galaxy-scale outflows recently measured in luminous quasars and ULIRGs. Shocked wind bubbles expanding normal to galactic discs may also explain the large-scale bipolar structures observed in some systems, including around the Galactic Centre, and can produce significant radio, X-ray and γ-ray emission. The analytic solutions presented here will inform implementations of AGN feedback in numerical simulations, which typically do not include all the important

  11. NanoSIMS studies of Ba isotopic compositions in single presolar silicon carbide grains from AGB stars and supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marhas, K. K.; Hoppe, P.; Ott, U.

    2007-08-01

    We have studied 74 single presolar silicon carbide grains with sizes between 0.2 and 2.6 μm from the Murchison and Murray meteorites for Ba isotopic compositions using NanoSIMS. We also analyzed 7 SiC particles either consisting of sub-micron-size SiC grains or representing a morphologically and isotopically distinct subgroup. Of the 55 (likely) mainstream grains, originating from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 32 had high enough Ba contents for isotopic analysis. For 26 of them, CsHx interferences were either negligible or could be corrected with confidence. They exhibit typical s-process Ba isotopic patterns with slightly higher than solar 134Ba/136Ba and lower than solar 135,137,138Ba/136Ba ratios. Results are generally well explained in the context of neutron capture nucleosynthesis in low mass (1-3 M⊙) AGB stars and provide constraints on AGB models, by reducing the needed 13C spread from factor of ˜20 down to 2. Out of the 19 supernova X grains, three had sufficient concentrations for isotopic analysis. They tend to exhibit higher than solar 134Ba/136Ba and 138Ba/136Ba ratios, close to solar 137Ba/136Ba, and 135Ba/136Ba lower than solar but higher than in mainstream grains. This signature could indicate a mixture of n-burst type Ba with either "normal Ba" more s-process-rich than solar, or normal Ba plus weak s-process Ba. In the n-burst component Cs may have to be separated from Ba at ˜10 years after the SN explosion. Depending on predictions for its composition, another possibility is early separation (at ˜1 year) coupled with addition of some unfractionated n-burst matter. Abundances of trace elements (Sr, Zr, Cs, La, and Ce) analyzed along with Ba signify that implantation may have been an important process for their introduction.

  12. Detection of HCN and C2H2 in ISO Spectra of Oxygen-Rich AGB Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbon, Duane F.; Chiar, Jean; Goorvitch, David; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Cool oxygen-rich AGB stars were not expected to have organic molecules like HCN in either their photospheres or circumstellar envelopes (CSEs). The discovery of HCN and CS microwave emission from the shallowest CSE layers of these stars was a considerable surprise and much theoretical effort has been expended in explaining the presence of such organics. To further explore this problem, we have undertaken a systematic search of oxygen-rich AGB stellar spectra in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) data archive. Our purposes are to find evidence regarding critical molecular species that could be of value in choosing among the proposed theoretical models, to locate spectral features which might give clues to conditions deeper in the CSEs, and to lay the groundwork for future SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility) and SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) observations. Using carefully reduced observations, we have detected weak absorption features arising from HCN and possibly C2H2 in a small number of oxygen-rich AGB stars. The most compelling case is NML Cyg which shows both HCN (14 microns) and CO2 (15 microns). VY CMa, a similar star, shows evidence for HCN, but not CO2. Two S-type stars show evidence for the C-H bending transitions: W Aql at 14 microns (HCN) and both W Aql and S Cas at 13.7 microns (C2H2). Both W Aql and S Cas as well as S Lyr, a SC-type star, show 3 micron absorption which may arise from the C-H stretch of HCN and C2H2. In the case of NML Cyg, we show that the HCN and CO2 spectral features are formed in the CSE at temperatures well above those of the outermost CSE layers and derive approximate column densities. In the case of the S-stars, we discuss the evidence for the organic features and their photospheric origin.

  13. Detection of silicon in the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertier, T.; Houck, J. R.; Graf, P.; Gull, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    The detection of the forbidden Si II 34.815 micron line in the Galactic center region is reported. It is demonstrated that, in the case of the Galactic center, the emission arises mainly from the photodissociation region and not the shocked molecular component seen via H2, CO, and OH lines. It is also shown that significant Si II emission is not expected from the ionized gas even though the Galactic center is a rather low excitation H II region.

  14. ATOMIC HYDROGEN IN A GALACTIC CENTER OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Green, J. A.; Hill, A. S.; Lockman, F. J.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Green, A. J.

    2013-06-10

    We describe a population of small, high-velocity, atomic hydrogen clouds, loops, and filaments found above and below the disk near the Galactic center. The objects have a mean radius of 15 pc, velocity widths of {approx}14 km s{sup -1}, and are observed at |z| heights up to 700 pc. The velocity distribution of the clouds shows no signature of Galactic rotation. We propose a scenario where the clouds are associated with an outflow from a central star-forming region at the Galactic center. We discuss the clouds as entrained material traveling at {approx}200 km s{sup -1} in a Galactic wind.

  15. Meteoritic silicon carbide and its stellar sources - Implications for galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Tang; Anders, Edward; Hoppe, Peter; Zinner, Ernst

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar silicon carbide grains in meteorites provide a novel means for studying the carbon-star population of about 5 x 10 to the 9th years ago. Their C-12/C-13 ratios differ greatly from the solar value but resemble those of present-day csrbon stars, implying little change in the galactic C-13 inventory. Isotope data on nitrogen and silicon suggest that the silicon carbide grains come mainly from red giants, with small contributions from novae.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity and kinematics in Galactic bar (Babusiaux+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babusiaux, C.; Katz, D.; Hill, V.; Royer, F.; Gomez, A.; Arenou, F.; Combes, F.; Di Matteo, P.; Gilmore, G.; Haywood, M.; Robin, A. C.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N.; Sartoretti, M.; Schultheis, P.

    2014-01-01

    We observe red clump stars in four fields along the Galactic bar major axis (l=10°, -6°, 6° and b=0°, plus a field at l=0°, b=1°) with low-resolution spectroscopy from FLAMES/GIRAFFE (setup LR08) at the VLT, observing around the CaII triplet. We developed robust methods to extract radial velocity and metallicity estimates from these low signal-to-noise spectra. Results have been derived by fixing atmospheric parameters typical of a red clump star (Teff=4750K, logg=2.5). For some targets, the metallicity could not be derived. (1 data file).

  17. Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121°C and their red fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A. Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey

    2010-09-01

    We have shown that the red cells found in the Red Rain (which fell on Kerala, India, in 2001) survive and grow after incubation for periods of up to two hours at 121°C . Under these conditions daughter cells appear within the original mother cells and the number of cells in the samples increases with length of exposure to 121°C. No such increase in cells occurs at room temperature, suggesting that the increase in daughter cells is brought about by exposure of the Red Rain cells to high temperatures. This is an independent confirmation of results reported earlier by two of the present authors, claiming that the cells can replicate under high pressure at temperatures upto 300°C. The flourescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectagle planetary nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving an extraterrestrial origin.

  18. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTiNGS). II. DISCOVERY OF METAL-POOR DUSTY AGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan; Barmby, Pauline; Bonanos, Alceste Z.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Lagadec, Eric; Lennon, Daniel; Marengo, Massimo; McDonald, Iain; Zijlstra, Albert; Sloan, G. C.; Van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2015-02-10

    The DUSTiNGS survey (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer) is a 3.6 and 4.5 μm imaging survey of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. Using two epochs, spaced approximately six months apart, we identify a total of 526 dusty variable AGB stars (sometimes called ''extreme'' or x-AGB stars; [3.6]-[4.5] > 0.1 mag). Of these, 111 are in galaxies with [Fe/H] < –1.5 and 12 are in galaxies with [Fe/H] < –2.0, making them the most metal-poor dust-producing AGB stars known. We compare these identifications to those in the literature and find that most are newly discovered large-amplitude variables, with the exception of ≈30 stars in NGC 185 and NGC 147, 1 star in IC 1613, and 1 star in Phoenix. The chemical abundances of the x-AGB variables are unknown, but the low metallicities suggest that they are more likely to be carbon-rich than oxygen-rich and comparisons with existing optical and near-IR photometry confirm that 70 of the x-AGB variables are confirmed or likely carbon stars. We see an increase in the pulsation amplitude with increased dust production, supporting previous studies suggesting that dust production and pulsation are linked. We find no strong evidence linking dust production with metallicity, indicating that dust can form in very metal-poor environments.

  19. THE GALACTIC CENTER: NOT AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris

    2013-06-01

    We present 10 {mu}m-35 {mu}m Spitzer spectra of the interstellar medium in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), the central 210 pc Multiplication-Sign 60 pc of the Galactic center (GC). We present maps of the CMZ in ionic and H{sub 2} emission, covering a more extensive area than earlier spectroscopic surveys in this region. The radial velocities and intensities of ionic lines and H{sub 2} suggest that most of the H{sub 2} 0-0 S(0) emission comes from gas along the line-of-sight, as found by previous work. We compare diagnostic line ratios measured in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey to our data. Previous work shows that forbidden line ratios can distinguish star-forming galaxies from low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our GC line ratios agree with star-forming galaxies and not with LINERs or AGNs.

  20. Black holes in galactic centers

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    For more than 25 years astronomers have known that some galaxies also have a bright, compact central nucleus whose emission does not come from normal stars. The most extreme instances of these so-called active galactic nuclei are quasars, objects no larger than the solar system whose total radiation exceeds that of 100 billion stars. Quasars seem to represent a particularly agitated stage in the development of some galaxies. Astronomers generally agree that gravity powers active galactic nuclei. The best candidate for the central engine of quasars is a black hole--a collapsed body whose gravity is so great that nothing, including light, can escape from it. The discovery of black holes in galactic centers, exciting in its own right, could affect current ideas about the evolution of the universe. Quasars appeared when the universe was less than one billion years old, indicting that some galaxies had already developed dense central regions. The early appearance of quasars rules out many cosmological models, which predict that the formation of galaxies should require billions of years, and even raises problems for the reigning cold dark matter model. Recent measurements of the cosmic background radiation intensify the puzzle. Most theorists think that galaxies formed from density variations in the newborn universe. Yet measurements of the background radiation indicate that any variations were so slight that it is difficult to understand how they could have produced the structures seen today. Apart from its cosmological significance, the detection of massive black holes also could elucidate predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity.

  1. Three Dimensional Stellar Kinematics of the Galactic Bar and Disk: Where APOGEE Meets GLIMPSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Robert; Babler, Brian; D'Onghia, Elena; Clarkson, Will; Churchwell, Ed; Kirkpatrick, Davy; Zasowski, Gail; Majewski, Steve

    2016-08-01

    We propose to use the Spitzer Space Telescope to re-image 53 square degrees (fourteen fields) of the inner Galactic plane (galactic longitudes \\|L\\|=6-45 degrees) that have also been targeted by the APOGEE/APOGEE-2 surveys-Sloan III and IV programs to obtain high resolution H band spectroscopy for hundreds of thousands of red giants. We will combine the proposed observations (198 hours) with the original GLIMPSE observations of the Galactic plane in 2004-2005 to measure the proper motions of sources along the Galactic plane over the past decade. When combined with the 43 square degrees of Priority 1 data being obtained for Cycle 12--which cover \\|L\\|< 5 degrees and \\|B\\|<2 degrees, plus Baade's window -we will have proper motion constraints for over 25 million sources. The combination of Spitzer proper motions for millions of sources and APOGEE radial velocities for thousands of sources will be used to constrain models of stellar kinematics for the Galactic bar(s) and disk. We will also use this data to test several bar formation models that have been developed to explain the mysterious 'high-velocity' Milky Way bar stars (Nidever et al 2012b), one of the first APOGEE discoveries. This program will be the most uniform and deep Galactic plane proper motion study as mid-infrared observations are minimally affected by extinction over most of the region we propose to cover. We also expect to be able to find at least 150 high proper motion stars which could be substellar objects and possible micro-lensing candidates against the crowded Galactic disk.

  2. Wanted: Galactic Thief Who Steals Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    A big galaxy is stealing gas right off the 'back' of its smaller companion in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The stolen gas is hot, but it might eventually cool down to make new stars and planets.

    The robber galaxy, called 3C 326 North, and its victim, 3C 326 South, are located about a billion light-years away from Earth in the Serpens constellation. They are both called radio galaxies, because the relativistic jets streaming out of their centers give off a great deal of radio waves. Other dots in the picture are foreground stars and background galaxies.

    When astronomers first collected data on the 3C 326 galaxies with Spitzer's infrared spectrometer, they were surprised to find that 3C 326 North is loaded with an enormous amount of hot gas, called molecular hydrogen gas, which is fuel for stars and planets. They then studied this archived picture taken with Spitzer's infrared array camera and noticed a tail of stars connecting 3C 326 North to 3C 326 South. This tail revealed that the galactic pair are gravitationally tangled and might eventually merge --and that 3C 326 North must be hoisting gas from its smaller companion.

    How is 3C 326 stealing the gas? The answer is gravity. The larger 3C 326 North, which is about the same mass as our Milky Way galaxy, has more gravity so the gas from 3C 326 South falls toward it in the same way that water rolls down hill on Earth. Even in space, it seems the bullies are bigger!

    This image shows infrared light of three wavelengths: 8-micron light is red; 4.5 microns is green; 3.6 microns is blue.

  3. A windswept cometary tail on the Galactic center supergiant IRS 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Morris, Mark

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution VLA observations provide evidence of optically thick radio emission from IRS 7, a cool red supergiant star, located at a projected distance of roughly 1 1t-yr from the Galactic center. IRS 7 shows a remarkable tail of ionized gas pointing directly away from the compact nonthermal radio source at the Galactic center, Sgr A(asterisk). Given previous evidence for a strong source of UV emission and for a strong circumnuclear wind emanating from the Galactic center, the free-free emission from IRS 7 and its associated tail are interpreted in terms of the ionization and removal of the circumstellar envelope of the red supergiant either by the ram pressure of the nuclear wind or by the pressure of radiation arising from the immediate vicinity of Sgr A(asterisk). The wind mechanism is preferred because: (1) the force it can potentially exert is much greater; and (2) Sgr A(asterisk) is clearly not a known source of luminous energy in the near-IR, whereas it remains a plausible source of a hot, high-velocity wind. Also considered is the potential effect of a nuclear wind upon the atmospheres of red giants in the inner parsec.

  4. New light on Galactic post-asymptotic giant branch stars - I. First distance catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Shane B.; Frew, David J.; Parker, Quentin A.; Bojičić, Ivan S.

    2015-02-01

    We have commenced a detailed analysis of the known sample of Galactic post-asymptotic giant branch (PAGB) objects compiled in the Toruń catalogue of Szczerba et al., and present, for the first time, homogeneously derived distance determinations for the 209 likely and 87 possible catalogued PAGB stars from that compilation. Knowing distances are essential in determining meaningful physical characteristics for these sources and this has been difficult to determine for most objects previously. The distances were determined by modelling their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with multiple blackbody curves, and integrating under the overall fit to determine the total distance-dependent flux. This approach was undertaken for consistency as precise spectral types, needed for more detailed fitting, were unknown in the majority of cases. The SED method works because the luminosity of these central stars is very nearly constant from the tip of the AGB phase to the beginning of the white dwarf cooling track. This then enables us to use a standard-candle luminosity to estimate the SED distances. For Galactic thin-disc PAGB objects, we use three luminosity bins based on typical observational characteristics, ranging between 3500 and 12 000 L⊙. We further adopt a default luminosity of 4000 L⊙ for bulge objects and 1700 L⊙ for the thick-disc and halo objects. We have also applied the above technique to a further sample of 54 related nebulae not in the current edition of the Toruń catalogue. In a follow-up paper, we will estimate distances to the subset of RV Tauri variables using empirical period-luminosity relations, and to the R CrB stars, allowing a population comparison of these objects with the other subclasses of PAGB stars for the first time.

  5. The nature of the red disc-like galaxies at high redshift: dust attenuation and intrinsically red stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, D.; Maraston, C.; Gordon, K. D.; Witt, A. N.

    2005-10-01

    We investigate which conditions of dust attenuation and stellar populations allow models of dusty, continuously star-forming, bulge-less disc galaxies at 0.8 <~z<~ 3.2 to meet the different colour selection criteria of high-z`red' galaxies (e.g. RC-K > 5.3, IC-K > 4, J-K > 2.3). As a main novelty, we use stellar population models that include the thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase of stellar evolution. The star formation rate of the models declines exponentially as a function of time, the e-folding time being longer than 3 Gyr. In addition, we use calculations of radiative transfer of the stellar and scattered radiation through different dusty interstellar media in order to explore the wide parameter space of dust attenuation. We find that synthetic discs can exhibit red optical/near-infrared colours because of reddening by dust, but only if they have been forming stars for at least ~1 Gyr. Extremely few models barely exhibit RC-K > 5.3, if the inclination i= 90° and if the opacity 2 ×τV>~ 6. Hence, RC-K-selected galaxies at 1 <~z<~ 2 most probably are either systems with an old, passively evolving bulge or starbursts. Synthetic discs at 1 <~z<~ 2 exhibit 4 < IC-K < 4.8, if they are seen edge on (i.e. at i~ 90°) and if 2 ×τV>~ 0.5. This explains the large fraction of observed, edge-on disc-like galaxies with Ks < 19.5 and F814W-Ks>~ 4. Finally, models with 2 <~z<~ 3.2 exhibit 2.3 < J-K < 3, with no bias towards i~ 90° and for a large range in opacity (e.g. 2 ×τV > 1 for i~ 70°). In conclusion, red disc-like galaxies at 0.8 <~z<~ 3.2 may not necessarily be dustier than nearby disc galaxies (with 0.5 <~ 2 ×τV<~ 2) and/or much older than ~1 Gyr. This result is due both to a realistic description of dust attenuation and to the emission contribution by TP-AGB stars, with ages of 0.2 to 1-2 Gyr and intrinsically red colours.

  6. CEN 34 - high-mass YSO in M 17 or background post-AGB star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Liu, Yao; Fang, Min; Jiang, Zhibo

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the proposed high-mass young stellar object (YSO) candidate CEN 34, thought to be associated with the star-forming region M 17. Its optical to near-infrared (550-2500 nm) spectrum reveals several photospheric absorption features, such as Hα, the Ca ii triplet, and the CO bandhead, but lacks emission lines. The spectral features in the range 8375-8770 Å are used to constrain an effective temperature Teff = 5250 ± 250 K (early-/mid-G) and a log g = 2.0 ± 0.3 (supergiant). The spectral energy distribution (SED) displays a faint infrared excess that resembles that of a high-mass YSO or an evolved star of intermediate mass. Moreover, the observed temperature and surface gravity are identical for high-mass YSOs and evolved stars. The radial velocity of CEN 34 relative to the local standard of rest (VLSR) as obtained from various photospheric lines is of the order of -60 km s-1 and thus distinct from the +25 km s-1 found for several OB stars in the cluster and for the associated molecular cloud. The SED modeling yields 10-4 M⊙ of circumstellar material, which contributes only a tiny fraction to the total visual extinction (11 mag). The distance of CEN 34 is between 2.0 kpc and 4.5 kpc. In the case of a YSO, a dynamical ejection process is proposed to explain the VLSR difference between CEN 34 and M 17. Additionally, to match the temperature and luminosity, we speculate that CEN 34 had accumulated the bulk of its mass with an accretion rate >4 × 10-3M⊙/yr over a very short time span (~103 yrs), and it is currently undergoing a phase of gravitational contraction without any further mass gain. However, all the aforementioned characteristics of CEN 34 are compatible with an evolved star of 5-7 M⊙ and an age of 50-100 Myr, so it is most likely a background post-AGB star with a distance between 2.0 kpc and 4.5 kpc. We consider the latter classification as the more likely interpretation. Further discrimination of the two possible scenarios should come

  7. The planetary nebulae and H II regions in NGC 6822 revisited. Clues to AGB nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, Jorge; Peña, Miriam; Flores-Durán, Sheila; Hernández-Martínez, Liliana

    2016-02-01

    Aims: The chemical behaviour of an ample sample of planetary nebulae (PNe) in NGC 6822 is analysed. Methods: Spectrophotometric data of 11 PNe and two H ii regions were obtained with the OSIRIS spectrograph attached to the Gran Telescopio Canarias. Data for other 13 PNe and three H ii regions were retrieved from the literature. Physical conditions and chemical abundances of O, N, Ne, Ar, and S were derived in a consistent way for 19 PNe and 4 H ii regions. Results: Abundances in the PNe sample are widely distributed showing 12 + log (O/H) from 7.4 to 8.2 and 12 + log (Ar/H) from 4.97 to 5.80. Two groups of PNe can be differentiated: one old with low metallicity (12 + log (O/H) <8.0 and 12 + log (Ar/H) < 5.7) and another younger one with metallicities similar to the values for H ii regions. The old objects are distributed in a larger volume than the young ones. An important fraction of PNe (over 30%) was found to be highly N-rich (Peimbert Type I PNe). Such PNe occur at any metallicity. In addition, about 60% of the sample presents high ionization (He++/He ≥ 0.1), possessing a central star with effective temperature higher than 100 000 K. Possible biases in the sample are discussed. From comparison with stellar evolution models by Karakas (2010) and Fishlock et al. (2014) of the observed N/O abundance ratios, our PNe should have had initial masses that are lower than 4 M⊙, although if the comparison is made with Ne vs. O abundances, the initial masses should have been lower than 2 M⊙. It appears that these models of stars of 2-3 M⊙ are producing too much 22Ne in the stellar surface at the end of the AGB. On the other hand, the comparison with another set of stellar evolution models with a different treatment of convection and on the assumptions about the overshoot of the convective core during the core H-burning phase, provided there is reasonable agreement between the observed and predicted N/O and Ne/H ratios if initial masses of more massive stars are

  8. SPITZER survey of dust grain processing in stable discs around binary post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, C.; van Winckel, H.; Min, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Lloyd Evans, T.

    2008-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the mineralogy and dust processing in the circumbinary discs of binary post-AGB stars using high-resolution TIMMI2 and SPITZER infrared spectra. Methods: We perform a full spectral fitting to the infrared spectra using the most recent opacities of amorphous and crystalline dust species. This allows for the identification of the carriers of the different emission bands. Our fits also constrain the physical properties of different dust species and grain sizes responsible for the observed emission features. Results: In all stars the dust is oxygen-rich: amorphous and crystalline silicate dust species prevail and no features of a carbon-rich component can be found, the exception being EP Lyr, where a mixed chemistry of both oxygen- and carbon-rich species is found. Our full spectral fitting indicates a high degree of dust grain processing. The mineralogy of our sample stars shows that the dust is constituted of irregularly shaped and relatively large grains, with typical grain sizes larger than 2 μm. The spectra of nearly all stars show a high degree of crystallinity, where magnesium-rich end members of olivine and pyroxene silicates dominate. Other dust features of e.g. silica or alumina are not present at detectable levels. Temperature estimates from our fitting routine show that a significant fraction of grains must be cool, significantly cooler than the glass temperature. This shows that radial mixing is very efficient is these discs and/or indicates different thermal conditions at grain formation. Our results show that strong grain processing is not limited to young stellar objects and that the physical processes occurring in the discs are very similar to those in protoplanetary discs. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), La Silla, observing program 072.D-0263, on observations made with the 1.2 m Flemish Mercator telescope at Roque de los Muchachos, Spain, the 1.2 m Swiss Euler telescope at La Silla

  9. Dust formation in the oxygen-rich AGB star IK Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobrecht, D.; Cherchneff, I.; Sarangi, A.; Plane, J. M. C.; Bromley, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    interferometric observations. The derived dust-to-gas mass ratio for IK Tau is in the range 1-6 × 10-3 and agrees with values derived from observations of O-rich Mira-type stars. Conclusions: Our results confirm the importance of periodic shocks in chemically shaping the inner wind of AGB stars and providing gas conditions conducive to the efficient synthesis of molecules and dust by non-equilibrium processes. They indicate that the wind acceleration will possibly develop in the radius range 4-8 R⋆ in IK Tau.

  10. Supernova Nucleosynthesis and Galactic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielemann, F.-K.; Argast, D.; Brachwitz, F.; Hix, W. R.; Höflich, P.; Liebendörfer, M.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Mezzacappa, A.; Nomoto, K.; Panov, I.

    The understanding of the abundance evolution in the interstellar medium, and especially the enrichment of heavy elements, as a function of space and time reflects the history of star formation and the lifetimes of the diverse contributing stellar objects. Therefore, the understanding of the endpoints of stellar evolution is essential. These are mainly planetary nebulae and type II/Ib/Ic supernovae as evolutionary endpoints of single stars, but also events in binary systems can contribute, like e.g. supernovae of type Ia, novae and possibly X-ray bursts and neutron star or neutron star - black hole mergers. Despite many efforts, a full and self-consistent understanding of supernovae (the main contributors to nucleosynthesis in galaxies) is not existing, yet. However, observed spectra, light curves, radioactivities/decay gamma-rays and galactic evolution witness the composition of their ejecta and constrain model uncertainties. We focus on (i) neutrino-induced explosions for type II supernovae and the innermost ejected layers, (ii) electron captures in type Ia supernovae and neutron-rich Fe-group nuclei and finally (iii) galactic chemical evolution and possible r-process sites.

  11. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galaxies. I will show how, from these comparisons, one can derive important constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and galaxy formation mechanisms. Most of the concepts described in this lecture can be found in the monograph by Matteucci (2012).

  12. Chemical complexity in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Pintado, Jesus

    2007-12-01

    In recent years our knowledge of the chemical complexity in the nuclei of galaxies has dramatically changed. Recent observations of the nucleus of the Milky Way, of the starburst galaxy NGC253 and of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp220 have shown large abundance of complex organic molecules believed to be formed on grains. The Galactic center appears to be the largest repository of complex organic molecule like aldehydes and alcohols in the galaxy. We also measure large abundance of methanol in starburst galaxies and in ULIRGs suggesting that complex organic molecules are also efficiently produced in the central region of galaxies with strong star formation activity. From the systematic observational studies of molecular abundance in regions dominated by different heating processes like shocks, UV radiation, X-rays and cosmic rays in the center of the Milky Way, we are opening the possibility of using chemistry as a diagnostic tool to study the highly obscured regions of galactic centers. The templates found in the nucleus of the Milky Way will be used to establish the main mechanisms driving the heating and the chemistry of the molecular clouds in galaxies with different type of activity. The role of grain chemistry in the chemical complexity observed in the center of galaxies will be also briefly discussed.

  13. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Clem, J.; Dieball, A.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ratti, E. M.; van Haaften, L. M.; Heinke, C.; Ozel, F.; Groot, P. J.; Verbunt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to detailed follow-up. Our strategy is based on going deep enough to detect quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), but no deeper in order to avoid an excess of cataclysmic variables (CVs), while covering a large area to maximize the numbers of recovered objects. The primary goals of the GBS are to test predictions of binary evolutionary models through number counts and period distributions of detected sources, and to greatly expand the sample of LMXBs suitable for detailed optical follow-up including mass determination. We have identified 1234 X-ray sources most with optical counterparts, and expect these to be divided evenly between quiescent LMXBs, magnetic CVs, and R CVn stars, with smaller numbers of other source types. We are actively pursuing multiwavelength follow-up including searches for optical, infrared, and ultraviolet counterparts, measurement of variability, and optical spectroscopy. I will summarize the goals of the project and highlight some of the results obtained so far. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908789.

  14. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  15. Special Features of Galactic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, Christos; Voglis, Nikos; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos

    This is an introductory article to some basic notions and currently open problems of galactic dynamics. The focus is on topics mostly relevant to the so-called `new methods' of celestial mechanics or Hamiltonian dynamics, as applied to the ellipsoidal components of galaxies, i.e., to the elliptical galaxies and to the dark halos and bulges of disk galaxies. Traditional topics such as Jeans theorem, the role of a `third integral' of motion, Nekhoroshev theory, violent relaxation, and the statistical mechanics of collisionless stellar systems are first discussed. The emphasis is on modern extrapolations of these old topics. Recent results from orbital and global dynamical studies of galaxies are then shortly reviewed. The role of various families of orbits in supporting self-consistency, as well as the role of chaos in galaxies, are stressed. A description is then given of the main numerical techniques of integration of the N-body problem in the framework of stellar dynamics and of the results obtained via N-Body experiments. A final topic is the secular evolution and self-organization of galactic systems.

  16. Star formation in Galactic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M < 100 M⊙), and up to sizes approaching 10 pc for higher mass regions (M > 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  17. Hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction between an AGB star and a main-sequence companion in eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; De Marco, Orsola; Macdonald, Daniel; Galaviz, Pablo; Passy, Jean-Claude; Iaconi, Roberto; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2016-02-01

    The Rotten Egg Nebula has at its core a binary composed of a Mira star and an A-type companion at a separation >10 au. It has been hypothesized to have formed by strong binary interactions between the Mira and a companion in an eccentric orbit during periastron passage ˜800 yr ago. We have performed hydrodynamic simulations of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star interacting with companions with a range of masses in orbits with a range of initial eccentricities and periastron separations. For reasonable values of the eccentricity, we find that Roche lobe overflow can take place only if the periods are ≪100 yr. Moreover, mass transfer causes the system to enter a common envelope phase within several orbits. Since the central star of the Rotten Egg nebula is an AGB star, we conclude that such a common envelope phase must have lead to a merger, so the observed companion must have been a tertiary companion of a binary that merged at the time of nebula ejection. Based on the mass and time-scale of the simulated disc formed around the companion before the common envelope phase, we analytically estimate the properties of jets that could be launched. Allowing for super-Eddington accretion rates, we find that jets similar to those observed are plausible, provided that the putative lost companion was relatively massive.

  18. Modelling a set of C-rich AGB stars: the cases of RU Vir and R Lep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G.; Paladini, C.; Hron, J.; Aringer, B.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Nowotny, W.

    We study the atmospheres of a set of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch AGB stars to improve our understanding of the dynamic processes happening there. We compare in a systematic way spectrometric, photometric and mid-infrared (VLTI/MIDI) interferometric measurements with different types of model atmospheres: (1) hydrostatic models + MOD-dusty models added a posteriori; (2) self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres. These allow us to interpret in a coherent way the dynamic behavior of gas and dust. The results underline that the joint use of different kinds of observations, as photometry, spectroscopy and interferometry, is essential for understanding the atmospheres of pulsating C-rich AGB stars. For our first target, the carbon-rich Mira star RU Vir, the dynamic model atmospheres fit well the ISO/SWS spectrum in the wavelength range lambda = [2.9, 13.0] mu m. However, the object turned out to be somehow ''peculiar''. The other target we present is R Lep. Here the agreement between models and observations is much better although the MIDI data at 11.4 mu m cannot be properly modelled.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Water maser emission toward post-AGB and PN (Gomez+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J. F.; Rizzo, J. R.; Suarez, O.; Palau, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Guerrero, M. A.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Torrelles, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The observed sources are listed in Table 1. They comprise most of the sources in Ramos-Larios et al. (2009A&A...501.1207R). They are post-AGB stars and PN candidates with the IRAS color criteria of Suarez et al. (2006A&A...458..173S) and with signs of strong optical obscuration. We have also included some optically visible post-AGB stars from Suarez et al. (2006A&A...458..173S) that were not included in our previous water maser observations of Suarez et al. (2007A&A...467.1085S, 2009A&A...505..217S) or for which those observations had poor sensitivity. We observed the 616-523 transition of H2O (rest frequency = 22235.08MHz) using three different telescopes: the DSS-63 antenna (70m diameter) at the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex (MDSCC) near Robledo de Chavela (Spain), the 64m antenna at the Parkes Observatory of the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), and the 100m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The observed positions, rms noise per spectral channel, and observing dates are listed in Table 1. (3 data files).

  20. Galactic Variable Sky with EGRET and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, S.W.; /SLAC

    2006-11-28

    The characteristics of the largely-unidentified Galactic sources of gamma rays that were detected by EGRET are reviewed. Proposed source populations that may have the correct spatial, spectral, luminosity, and variability properties to be the origins of the EGRET sources are also presented. Finally, the prospects for studying Galactic gamma-ray sources with the GLAST LAT are reviewed.

  1. A CATALOG OF GALACTIC INFRARED CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.

    2012-02-15

    We collected almost all of the Galactic infrared carbon stars (IRCSs) from literature published up to the present to organize a catalog of 974 Galactic IRCSs in this paper. Some of their photometric properties in the near-, mid-, and far-infrared are discussed.

  2. Chemical and dynamical evolution of galactic discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Catherine J.

    1989-01-01

    The relative roles of star formation and viscously-induced radial flows in galactic disks are discussed. It is shown that the present-day distributions of stars, gas, and metals in galactic spirals need not reflect initial conditions but may instead indicate a cooperation between star forming and viscous processes over the disk lifetime.

  3. Anisotropy and corotation of galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Amenomori, M; Ayabe, S; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y-Q; Lu, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-10-20

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments. PMID:17053141

  4. The MSX Galactic Plane Survey : A Cinematic Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, S. D.; Egan, M. P.; Mizuno, D. R.; Kuchar, T. A.; Carey, S. J.

    1999-12-01

    The Galactic Plane Survey by the SPIRIT III telescope aboard the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) imaged the entire Galactic plane for |b| < 5 degrees in five mid-infrared passbands between 4 and 26 μ m. The resolution of the survey is 18 arcseconds and the sensitivity is comparable to or better than previous mid-infrared surveys. The MSX Galactic plane survey is the highest resolution full survey of the plane in the mid-infrared. In anticipation of the upcoming public release of the data, we present an overview of the results of this survey in the form of a three-color movie of the plane. The three colors correspond to MSX band A (6.8 - 10.8 μ m = blue), the sum of MSX bands C and D (11.1 - 16.9 μ m = green) and band E (18.2 - 25.1 μ m = red). Visible in the movie are numerous rings, filaments and shells due to star forming regions, supernova remants, circumstellar shells and planetary nebula. Also distinguishable are patches which are dark in the mid-infrared. These objects are now known to be large, cold molecular cores. The entire plane is pervaded by diffuse emission in Band A most likely due to cationic PAHs. Changes in dust properties and excitation are evident in the color variations color in the movie. In addition to being a unique dataset, this data will undoubtably be useful in interpretating ISO investigations in the plane and for preparing future observations with SIRTF and SOFIA.

  5. Exploring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca

    While in external or high-redshift galaxies we can only measure integrated stellar properties at best, the Milky Way offers us the unique opportunity to study its individual baryonic components, including stars. We use oscillations measured in red giant stars by the Kepler satellite to derive stellar ages and explore the vertical age structure across few kpc of the Milky Way disc. We find that old stars dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the plane a rich zoology of ages exists. The age distribution of stars shows a smooth distribution over the last 10 Gyr, which together with a flat age-metallicity relation is consistent with a quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about two.

  6. Emission-line objects projected upon the galactic bulge.

    PubMed

    Herbig, G H

    1969-08-01

    Low-dispersion slit spectrograms have been obtained of 34 faint objects that lie in the direction of the galactic bulge and have the Halpha line in emission upon a detectable continuum. Eleven of these are certain or probable symbiotic stars. A rough comparison with R CrB stars in the same area suggests that these brightest symbiotics in the bulge have in the mean M(v) approximately -3 to -4, which suggest Population II red giants rather than conventional Population I M-type objects. The sample also contains a number of hot stars having H and [O II] or [O III] in emission, as well as four conventional Be stars, and six certain or possible planetary nebulae. PMID:16578699

  7. THE SAGITTARIUS STREAMS IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC HEMISPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Koposov, Sergey E.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Gieles, M.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, G. F.; Niederste-Ostholt, M.; Penarrubia, J.; Smith, M. C.; Bizyaev, D.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Schneider, D. P.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2012-05-01

    The structure of the Sagittarius stream in the southern Galactic hemisphere is analyzed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8. Parallel to the Sagittarius tidal track, but {approx}10 Degree-Sign away, there is another fainter and more metal-poor stream. We provide evidence that the two streams follow similar distance gradients but have distinct morphological properties and stellar populations. The brighter stream is broader, contains more metal-rich stars, and has a richer color-magnitude diagram with multiple turnoffs and a prominent red clump as compared to the fainter stream. Based on the structural properties and the stellar population mix, the stream configuration is similar to the Northern 'bifurcation'. In the region of the South Galactic Cap, there is overlapping tidal debris from the Cetus stream, which crosses the Sagittarius stream. Using both photometric and spectroscopic data, we show that the blue straggler population belongs mainly to Sagittarius and the blue horizontal branch stars belong mainly to the Cetus stream in this confused location in the halo.

  8. On Galactic Density Modeling in the Presence of Dust Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Green, Gregory M.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2016-02-01

    Inferences about the spatial density or phase-space structure of stellar populations in the Milky Way require a precise determination of the effective survey volume. The volume observed by surveys such as Gaia or near-infrared spectroscopic surveys, which have good coverage of the Galactic midplane region, is highly complex because of the abundant small-scale structure in the three-dimensional interstellar dust extinction. We introduce a novel framework for analyzing the importance of small-scale structure in the extinction. This formalism demonstrates that the spatially complex effect of extinction on the selection function of a pencil-beam or contiguous sky survey is equivalent to a low-pass filtering of the extinction-affected selection function with the smooth density field. We find that the angular resolution of current 3D extinction maps is sufficient for analyzing Gaia sub-samples of millions of stars. However, the current distance resolution is inadequate and needs to be improved by an order of magnitude, especially in the inner Galaxy. We also present a practical and efficient method for properly taking the effect of extinction into account in analyses of Galactic structure through an effective selection function. We illustrate its use with the selection function of red-clump stars in APOGEE using and comparing a variety of current 3D extinction maps.

  9. The Physical Nature of the Circum-Galactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre

    The installation of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) as part of its last servicing mission has revolutionized the study of gas in and around galaxies through the study of ultra-violet (UV) diagnostics. These diagnostics are enabling studies of gas flows in and out of low-redshift, evolved galaxies that are not feasible from the ground. Despite the great observational advances made possible with COS, it is necessary to complement the high-quality spectra with theoretical modeling sufficiently accurate for robust and complete physical interpretation so that the full scientific potential of the mission can be realized. The clear correlation between O VI absorption in galactic halos and the specific star formation rate of central galaxies revealed by COS, in particular, highlights the close connection between circum-galactic gas and galaxies. It is now also appreciated that the gaseous halos of galaxies contain a total mass and a mass in metals that are at least comparable to (and likely significantly greater than) the total and metal masses in the interstellar medium of galaxies. The circum-galactic medium (CGM) is thus intimately related to galaxy evolution, including the transformation of blue star-forming disks into red passive ellipticals. However, the physical origin of observed galaxy-halo gas correlations and of halo gas in general is presently not understood. We will model the CGM of low-redshift galaxies probed by HST observations with cosmological simulations of unprecedented resolution and with much more physically predictive models of star formation and stellar and black hole feedback than previously available. Our simulations will also employ a numerical solver that resolves all the main historical differences between grid- and particle-based hydrodynamical codes. Importantly, we will process all of our simulations with radiative transfer calculations to faithfully map the simulations to observable quantities, a

  10. "AGB Statement on Institutional Governance" and "Governing in the Public Trust: External Influences on Colleges and Universities." The Fundamentals. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This booklet contains two statements from the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB). The "Statement on Institutional Governance" encourages all governing boards and chief executives to examine the clarity, coherence, and appropriateness of their institutions' governance structures, policies, and practices. It presents…

  11. Galactic Center Fly-in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, A.; Fu, C.-W.; Li, Y.; Frisch, P. C.

    2006-06-01

    Beginning with the familiar constellations of the night sky, we present a multispectral zoom into the core of the Milky Way Galaxy. After traveling over seven orders of magnitude in spatial scale, we discover the violent phenomena occurring within one light year of the Black Hole at the Galactic Core. This animated zoom includes data with wavelengths from radio to X-ray, and is based entirely on data or models that have been aligned at all spatial scales in order to provide a single continuous visual trip into the Center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The visualization challenge has been to align and choreograph data acquired over a wide range of wavelength and spatial scales, and obtain a new scientific as well as educational perspective of the dense core of our Galaxy.

  12. Galactic Interactions and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willig, T.; Storrs, A.

    2005-12-01

    In studying galactic interactions is it possible with present instrumentation to find evidence of dark matter within these interactions? The present theory is that dark matter and its gravitational force is what accounts for much of spiral galaxy rotation curves. If this is true, we should be able to find evidence of dark matter when two galaxies (one being a spiral galaxy) interact. Several pairs of interacting galaxies in various stages of interaction will be studied. In addition, several non interacting spiral galaxies will be studied for comparisons. We present analysis of a variety of archival imaging data from radio maps through x-ray images in an attempt to observe the effects of dark matter in galaxy interactions.

  13. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  14. The galactic model of GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Li, H.

    1997-09-01

    The galactic model of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) is based upon the observed production of soft gamma ray repeaters (SGRs) in the galaxy and the consequences of a reasonable model to explain them. In this view GRBs are the long term result of the burn-out conditions of the SGRs in this and in other galaxies. A delay of {approximately} 30 million years before GRBs are being actively produced can be understood as the time required for the ejected matter during the SGR phase to cool, condense, and form planetesimals that are eventually captured by the central neutron star. The amount of disk matter and the interaction between each GRB and the disk determine the rate of burst production and turn-off time of GRBs. The x-ray afterglow as well as optical emission is derived from x-ray fluorescence and ionization of previously ablated matter.

  15. Carbon and Oxygen Galactic Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carigi, L.; Peimbert, M.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2006-06-01

    A chemical evolution model of the Galaxy has been computed to reproduce the O/H gradients from Galactic HII regions. This model solves the C enrichment problem because it fits the C/H and C/O gradients and the C and O histories of the solar vicinity. The model is based on C yields dependent on metallicity (Z) owing to stellar winds. The C yields of massive stars (MS) increase with Z and those of low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) decrease with Z. An important result is that the fraction of carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) due to MS and LIMS is strongly dependent on Z of the ISM, therefore, that fraction depends on time and on the Galactocentric distance. At present and in the solar vicinity about half of the C in the interstellar medium has been produced by MS and half by LIMS.

  16. Theory of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The involvement of accretion disks around supermassive black holes in the theory of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is discussed. The physics of thin and thick accretion disks is discussed and the partition between thermal and nonthermal energy production in supermassive disks is seen as uncertain. The thermal limit cycle may operate in supermassive disks (Shields, 1985), with accumulation of gas in the disk for periods of 10 to the 4th to 10 to the 7th years, punctuated by briefer outbursts during which the mass is rapidly transferred to smaller radii. An extended X-ray source in AGN is consistent with observations (Tennant and Mushotsky, 1983), and a large wind mass loss rate exceeding the central accretion rate means that only a fraction of the mass entering the disk will reach the central object; the rest being lost to the wind. Controversy in the relationship between the broad lines and the disk is also discussed.

  17. Detecting galactic binaries with LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Porter, Edward K.

    2005-09-01

    One of the main sources of gravitational waves for the LISA space-borne interferometer is galactic binary systems. The waveforms for these sources are represented by eight parameters of which four are intrinsic and four are extrinsic to the system. Geometrically, these signals exist in an 8D parameter space. By calculating the metric tensor on this space, we calculate the number of templates needed to search for such sources. We show in this study that below a particular monochromatic frequency of f0 ~ 1.6 × 10-3 Hz we can ignore one of the intrinsic parameters and search over a 7D space. Beyond this frequency, we have a change in dimensionality of the parameter space from 7 to 8 dimensions. This sudden change in dimensionality results in a change in the scaling of template number as a function of the monochromatic frequency from ~f1.250 to ~f5.880.

  18. Solar modulation of galactic antiprotons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perko, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Galactic antiproton data of current interest lie in an energy regime heavily influenced by solar modulation. Correcting for it needs to be done more carefully than it has been in the past. The well-known force-field analytic approximation of the spherically-symmetric, steady-state, cosmic-ray transport equation is applied in order to account for modulation down to at least 100 MeV. A sample solution which applies to the currently available antiproton data set (1979-80), and can be used to accurately modulate any possible interstellar antiproton spectrum, is given. The solution is easily adapted for comparison to future measurements. It also shows that boosting the low-energy (less than 600 MeV) side of the interstellar antiproton spectrum will not affect the low-energy spectrum at 1 AU, due to strong adiabatic deceleration during that time.

  19. Microlensing by the galactic bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Spergel, David N.; Rich, R. Michael

    1995-01-01

    We compute the optical depth and duration distribution of microlensing events towrd Baade's window in a model composed of a Galactic disk and a bar. The bar model is a self-consistent dynamical model built out of individual orbits that has been populated to be consistent with the COBE maps of the Galaxy and kinematic observations of the Galactic bulge. We find that most of the lenses are in the bulge with a line-of-sight distance 6.25 kpc (adopting R(sub 0) = 8 kpc). The microlensing optical depth of a 2 x 10(exp 10) solar mass bar plus a truncated disk is (2.2 +/- 0.45) x 10(exp -6), consistent with the large optical depth (3.2 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp -6) found by Udalski et al. (1994). This model optical depth is enhanced over the predictions of axisymmetric models by Kiraga & Paczynski (1994) by slightly more than a factor of 2, since the bar is elongated along the line of sight. The large Einstein radius and small transverse velocity dispersion also predict a longer event duration in the self-consistent bar model than in the Kiraga-Paczynski model. The event rate and duration distribution also depend on the lower mass cutoff of the lens mass function. With a 0.1 solar mass cutoff, five to seven events (depending on the contribution of disk lenses) with a logarithmic mean duration of 20 days are expected for the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) according to our model, while Udalski et al. (1994) observed nine events with durations from 8 to 62 days. On the other hand, if most of the lenses are brown dwarfs, our model predicts too many short-duration events. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test finds only 7% probability for the model with 0.01 solar mass cutoff to be consistent with current data.

  20. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  1. The Galactic evolution of phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Faraggiana, R.; Steffen, M.

    2011-08-01

    Context. As a galaxy evolves, its chemical composition changes and the abundance ratios of different elements are powerful probes of the underlying evolutionary processes. Phosphorous is an element whose evolution has remained quite elusive until now, because it is difficult to detect in cool stars. The infrared weak P i lines of the multiplet 1, at 1050-1082 nm, are the most reliable indicators of the presence of phosphorus. The availability of CRIRES at VLT has permitted access to this wavelength range in stellar spectra. Aims: We attempt to measure the phosphorus abundance of twenty cool stars in the Galactic disk. Methods: The spectra are analysed with one-dimensional model-atmospheres computed in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The line formation computations are performed assuming LTE. Results: The ratio of phosphorus to iron behaves similarly to sulphur, increasing towards lower metallicity stars. Its ratio with respect to sulphur is roughly constant and slightly larger than solar, [P/S] = 0.10 ± 0.10. Conclusions: We succeed in taking an important step towards the understanding of the chemical evolution of phosphorus in the Galaxy. However, the observed rise in the P/Fe abundance ratio is steeper than predicted by Galactic chemical evolution model developed by Kobayashi and collaborators. Phosphorus appears to evolve differently from the light odd-Z elements sodium and aluminium. The constant value of [P/S] with metallicity implies that P production is insensitive to the neutron excess, thus processes other than neutron captures operate. We suggest that proton captures on 30Si and α captures on 27Al are possibilities to investigate. We see no clear distinction between our results for stars with planets and stars without any detected planet. Based on observations obtained with the CRIRES spectrograph at ESO-VLT Antu 8.2 m telescope at Paranal, Programme 386.D-0130, P.I. E. Caffau.

  2. THE RGB AND AGB STAR NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN LIGHT OF THE RECENT {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N AND {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N REACTION-RATE DETERMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.

    2013-02-20

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on A = 17 and A = 18 oxygen isotopes, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. In particular, the strengths of the 20 keV and 65 keV resonances in the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N reactions, respectively, have been extracted, as well as the contribution of the tail of the broad 656 keV resonance in the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction inside the Gamow window. The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O + p radiative capture channel. As a result, more accurate reaction rates for the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N, {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N, and {sup 17}O(p, {gamma}){sup 18}F processes have been deduced, devoid of systematic errors due to extrapolation or the electron screening effect. Such rates have been introduced into state-of-the-art red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models for proton-capture nucleosynthesis coupled with extra-mixing episodes. The predicted abundances have been compared with isotopic compositions provided by geochemical analysis of presolar grains. As a result, an improved agreement is found between the models and the isotopic mix of oxide grains of AGB origins, whose composition is the signature of low-temperature proton-capture nucleosynthesis. The low {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N found in SiC grains cannot be explained by the revised nuclear reaction rates and remains a serious problem that has not been satisfactorily addressed.

  3. Galactic Bulge Giants: Probing Stellar and Galactic Evolution. 1. Catalogue of Spitzer IRAC and MIPS Sources (PREPRINT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uttenthaler, Stefan; Stute, Matthias; Sahai, Raghvendra; Blommaert, Joris A.; Schultheis, Mathias; Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Groenewegen, Martin A.; Price, Stephan D.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. We aim at measuring mass-loss rates and the luminosities of a statistically large sample of Galactic bulge stars at several galactocentric radii. The sensitivity of previous infrared surveys of the bulge has been rather limited, thus fundamental questions for late stellar evolution, such as the stage at which substantial mass-loss begins on the red giant branch and its dependence on fundamental stellar properties, remain unanswered. We aim at providing evidence and answers to these questions. Methods. To this end, we observed seven 15 15 arcmin2 fields in the nuclear bulge and its vicinity with unprecedented sensitivity using the IRAC and MIPS imaging instruments on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope. In each of the fields, tens of thousands of point sources were detected. Results. In the first paper based on this data set, we present the observations, data reduction, the final catalogue of sources, and a detailed comparison to previous mid-IR surveys of the Galactic bulge, as well as to theoretical isochrones. We find in general good agreement with other surveys and the isochrones, supporting the high quality of our catalogue.

  4. Clouds Dominate the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Using the exquisite sensitivity of the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, W. Va., has produced the best cross-section ever of the Milky Way Galaxy's diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. This image confirms the presence of discrete hydrogen clouds in the halo, and could help astronomers understand the origin and evolution of the rarefied atmosphere that surrounds our Galaxy. Lockman presented his findings at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, WA. Hydrogen Clouds Graphic Artist's Rendering of the Milky Way (background) with insert showing GBT image of cross-section of neutral atomic Hydrogen Credit: Kirk Woellert/National Science Foundation Patricia Smiley, NRAO. "The first observations with the Green Bank Telescope suggested that the hydrogen in the lower halo, the transition zone between the Milky Way and intergalactic space, is very clumpy," said Lockman. "The latest data confirm these results and show that instead of trailing away smoothly from the Galactic plane, a significant fraction of the hydrogen gas in the halo is concentrated in discrete clouds. There are even some filaments." Beyond the star-filled disk of the Milky Way, there exists an extensive yet diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. For years, astronomers have speculated about the origin and structure of this gas. "Even the existence of neutral hydrogen in the halo has been somewhat of a puzzle," Lockman remarked. "Unlike the Earth's atmosphere, which is hot enough to hold itself up against the force of gravity, the hydrogen in the halo is too cool to support itself against the gravitational pull of the Milky Way." Lockman points out that some additional factor has to be involved to get neutral hydrogen to such large distances from the Galactic plane. "This force could be cosmic rays, a supersonic wind, the blast waves from supernovae, or something we have not thought of

  5. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  6. DIFFUSE GALACTIC LIGHT IN THE FIELD OF THE TRANSLUCENT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE CLOUD MBM32

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaka, N.; Kawara, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Sameshima, H.; Tsujimoto, T.; Peterson, B. A.

    2013-04-10

    We have conducted B-, g-, V-, and R-band imaging in a 45' Multiplication-Sign 40' field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S{sub {nu}}({lambda}) with that of 100 {mu}m emission S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m). A {chi}{sup 2} minimum analysis is applied to fit a linear function to the measured correlation and derive the slope parameter b({lambda}) = {Delta}S{sub {nu}}({lambda})/{Delta}S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) of the best-fit linear function. Compiling a sample by combining our b({lambda}) and published ones, we show that the b({lambda}) strength varies from cloud to cloud by a factor of four. Finding that b({lambda}) decreases as S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) increases in the sample, we suggest that a nonlinear correlation including a quadratic term of S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m){sup 2} should be fitted to the measured correlation. The variation of optical depth, which is A{sub V} = 0.16-2.0 in the sample, can change b({lambda}) by a factor of 2-3. There would be some contribution to the large b({lambda}) variation from the forward-scattering characteristic of dust grains which is coupled to the non-isotropic interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Models of the scattering of diffuse Galactic light (DGL) underestimate the b({lambda}) values by a factor of two. This could be reconciled by deficiency in UV photons in the ISRF or by a moderate increase in dust albedo. Our b({lambda}) spectrum favors a contribution from extended red emission (ERE) to the diffuse optical light; b({lambda}) rises from B to V faster than the models, seems to peak around 6000 A and decreases toward long wavelengths. Such a characteristic is expected from the models in which the DGL is combined with ERE.

  7. How to Spot a Disrupted Galactic Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    orbit and is currently at its furthest distance from the Galactic center. They suggest that the elliptic orbit and advanced age of the clump indicate it is most likely to be a disrupted globular cluster, rather than a dwarf galaxy.Interestingly, when the authors went back to search for a stellar overdensity corresponding to Lamost 1 in photometric data, they were unable to detect it. This reaffirms that their approach of searching for velocity and metallicity clumping is an important tool for discovering otherwise-invisible diffuse streams.BonusCheck out this cool graphic Vickers made using Stellarium and Aladin to demonstratewhere in the sky the stars ofLamost 1 are located. Lamost 1sstars are the red dots in the constellation Draco.CitationJohn J. Vickers et al 2016 ApJ 816 L2. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/816/1/L2

  8. Production of Lithium in the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casuso, E.; Beckman, J. E.

    2000-07-01

    +disk) of abundances of 12C, 13C, 14N, 16O, 26Fe, the two main peaks (one in the halo and one in the disk) in the G-dwarf stellar frequency distribution, and the evolution of 9Be and 10B+11B via GCR spallation reactions without requiring the very high local cosmic-ray fluxes implied by the spallation close to SN. Adding a natural mechanism of differential depletion in red supergiant envelopes, we can explain the observed time evolution of the abundance of D and that of the isotopic ratios 7Li/6Li and 11B/10B starting from a standard big bang nucleosynthesis model with baryon density ~0.05. Our model also predicts the second Li ``plateau'' found for [Fe/H] between -0.2 and +0.2, due to the ``loop back'' implied for Li (also for 9Be and B) because of the required infall of low-metallicity gas to the disk. Without ruling out other mechanisms for the main production of Li in the Galactic disk, the low-energy α+α fusion reaction in the interstellar medium offers a promising contribution.

  9. On the atmospheric structure and fundamental parameters of red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Marcaide, J. M.; Abellan, F. J.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present near-infrared spectro-interferometric studies of red supergiant (RSG) stars using the VLTI/AMBER instrument, which are compared to previously obtained similar observations of AGB stars. Our observations indicate spatially extended atmospheric molecular layers of water vapor and CO, similar as previously observed for Mira stars. Data of VY~CMa indicate that the molecular layers are asymmetric, possibly clumpy. Thanks to the spectro-interferometric capabilities of the VLTI/AMBER instrument, we can isolate continuum bandpasses, estimate fundamental parameters of our sources, locate them in the HR diagram, and compare their positions to recent evolutionary tracks. For the example of VY CMa, this puts it close to evolutionary tracks of initial mass 25-32 M ⊙. Comparisons of our data to hydrostatic model atmospheres, 3d simulations of convection, and 1d dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models indicate that none of these models can presently explain the observed atmospheric extensions for RSGs. The mechanism that levitates the atmospheres of red supergiant is thus a currently unsolved problem.

  10. Pitch angle of galactic spiral arms

    SciTech Connect

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro E-mail: kokubo@th.nao.ac.jp

    2014-06-01

    One of the key parameters that characterizes spiral arms in disk galaxies is a pitch angle that measures the inclination of a spiral arm to the direction of galactic rotation. The pitch angle differs from galaxy to galaxy, which suggests that the rotation law of galactic disks determines it. In order to investigate the relation between the pitch angle of spiral arms and the shear rate of galactic differential rotation, we perform local N-body simulations of pure stellar disks. We find that the pitch angle increases with the epicycle frequency and decreases with the shear rate and obtain the fitting formula. This dependence is explained by the swing amplification mechanism.

  11. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen to the body’s tissues in exchange for carbon dioxide, which is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts ...

  12. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  13. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

    MedlinePlus

    ... dignity and resilience Geneva, 14 September 2016 – The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies... ... News Contact us Sitemap Go to top The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies ( ...

  14. The Abundance Pattern of Two Barium Stars in the Galactic Halo: HD 104340 and HD 206983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, S.; Pereira, C. B.

    2001-07-01

    We present the abundance pattern of two barium stars in the Galactic halo, HD 104340 and HD 206983, based on high-resolution optical spectra. We also determined the spectroscopic stellar atmospheric parameters, temperature, and microturbulent velocity, as well as stellar surface gravity from a solution of excitation and ionization equilibria of Fe I and Fe II lines under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The abundance analysis reveals HD 104340 to be a metal-poor K giant with [Fe/H]=-1.72 and HD 206983 also a metal-poor K giant with [Fe/H]=-1.43. From a set of Fe I lines, the radial velocity is found to be 263.3+/-0.6 km s-1 and -319.2+/-4.4 km s-1 for HD 104340 and HD 206983, respectively. Their high velocity, low metallicity, and high galactic latitude imply that both stars are members of a Galactic halo population. From our study and by using information from the literature we believe that HD 206983 is another member of a group known as metal-deficient barium stars. We compare the abundance pattern with the abundances of a halo population. We found that the abundances of the iron group, α-elements, manganese, copper, and zinc, as well as sodium and magnesium, of HD 104340 and HD 206983 follow the abundance pattern of a halo population. The heavy element abundance pattern of both stars shows enhancement by a factor of 4-8 with respect to the metal-poor stars with the same metallicity as that analyzed by us. We also discuss the abundances of the s-process elements and compare our results with other objects that display the same degree of enrichment due to neutron capture reactions, binary systems, and AGB stars, through a diagram of metallicity versus neutron exposure given by the [hs/ls] index. Based on the observations made with the 1.52 m telescope at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) under agreement with Observatório Nacional (Brazil).

  15. Assessing Performance of P-Band Backscattering Coefficients and TSAR in Hemi-Boreal Forest AGB Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenmei; Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Feng, Qi

    2014-11-01

    To assess performance of P-band backscattering coefficients and TSAR for hemi-boreal forest AGB estimation, airborne P-band repeat-path Pol-InSAR data collected by ESAR in Ramingstorp test site during March and May 2007 are applied. The correlation coefficient (R) between P-band backscattering coefficients and in-situ biomass reaches 0.87 for HH polarization. Meanwhile, the R between P-band backscattering power at specific height and in-situ biomass are higher in VV polarization than that in HH and HV polarization. And R between P-band backscattering power and in-situ biomass reaches 0.70 at 5m and 10m height in VV polarization.

  16. Application of a Theory and Simulation-based Convective Boundary Mixing Model for AGB Star Evolution and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battino, U.; Pignatari, M.; Ritter, C.; Herwig, F.; Denisenkov, P.; Den Hartogh, J. W.; Trappitsch, R.; Hirschi, R.; Freytag, B.; Thielemann, F.; Paxton, B.

    2016-08-01

    The s-process nucleosynthesis in Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars depends on the modeling of convective boundaries. We present models and s-process simulations that adopt a treatment of convective boundaries based on the results of hydrodynamic simulations and on the theory of mixing due to gravity waves in the vicinity of convective boundaries. Hydrodynamics simulations suggest the presence of convective boundary mixing (CBM) at the bottom of the thermal pulse-driven convective zone. Similarly, convection-induced mixing processes are proposed for the mixing below the convective envelope during third dredge-up (TDU), where the {}13{{C}} pocket for the s process in AGB stars forms. In this work, we apply a CBM model motivated by simulations and theory to models with initial mass M = 2 and M=3 {M}ȯ , and with initial metal content Z = 0.01 and Z = 0.02. As reported previously, the He-intershell abundances of {}12{{C}} and {}16{{O}} are increased by CBM at the bottom of the pulse-driven convection zone. This mixing is affecting the {}22{Ne}(α, n){}25{Mg} activation and the s-process efficiency in the {}13{{C}}-pocket. In our model, CBM at the bottom of the convective envelope during the TDU represents gravity wave mixing. Furthermore, we take into account the fact that hydrodynamic simulations indicate a declining mixing efficiency that is already about a pressure scale height from the convective boundaries, compared to mixing-length theory. We obtain the formation of the {}13{{C}}-pocket with a mass of ≈ {10}-4 {M}ȯ . The final s-process abundances are characterized by 0.36\\lt [{{s}}/{Fe}]\\lt 0.78 and the heavy-to-light s-process ratio is -0.23\\lt [{hs}/{ls}]\\lt 0.45. Finally, we compare our results with stellar observations, presolar grain measurements and previous work.

  17. H II REGION DRIVEN GALACTIC BUBBLES AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2012-12-01

    The relative alignments of mid-infrared traced Galactic bubbles are compared to the orientation of the mean Galactic magnetic field in the disk. The orientations of bubbles in the northern Galactic plane were measured and are consistent with random orientations-no preferential alignment with respect to the Galactic disk was found. A subsample of H II region driven Galactic bubbles was identified, and as a single population they show random orientations. When this subsample was further divided into subthermal and suprathermal H II regions, based on hydrogen radio recombination linewidths, the subthermal H II regions showed a marginal deviation from random orientations, but the suprathermal H II regions showed significant alignment with the Galactic plane. The mean orientation of the Galactic disk magnetic field was characterized using new near-infrared starlight polarimetry and the suprathermal H II regions were found to preferentially align with the disk magnetic field. If suprathermal linewidths are associated with younger H II regions, then the evolution of young H II regions is significantly affected by the Galactic magnetic field. As H II regions age, they cease to be strongly linked to the Galactic magnetic field, as surrounding density variations come to dominate their morphological evolution. From the new observations, the ratios of magnetic-to-ram pressures in the expanding ionization fronts were estimated for younger H II regions.

  18. Dark matter particles in the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, R. Belli, P.; Montecchia, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, J. M.; Sheng, X. D.; Ye, Z. P.

    2009-12-15

    Arguments on the investigation of the DarkMatter particles in the galactic halo are addressed. Recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized and the perspectives are discussed.

  19. Dark matter particles in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Montecchia, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, J. M.; Sheng, X. D.; Ye, Z. P.

    2009-12-01

    Arguments on the investigation of the DarkMatter particles in the galactic halo are addressed. Recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized and the perspectives are discussed.

  20. The source and distribution of Galactic positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Dixon, D. D.; Cheng, L.-X.; Leventhal, M.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Skibo, J. G.; Smith, D. M.; Tueller, J.

    1997-01-01

    The oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of the Galactic plane and the Galactic center region were combined with observations acquired with other instruments in order to produce a map of the Galactic 511 keV annihilation radiation. Two mapping techniques were applied to the data: the maximum entropy method, and the basis pursuit inversion method. The resulting maps are qualitatively similar and show evidence for a central bulge and a weak galactic disk component. The weak disk is consistent with that expected from positrons produced by the decay of radioactive Al-26 in the interstellar medium. Both maps suggest an enhanced region of emission near l = -4 deg, b = 7 deg, with a flux of approximately 50 percent of that of the bulge. The existence of this emission appears significant, although the location is not well determined. The source of this enhanced emission is presently unknown.

  1. Evaluation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Heiblim, Samuel; Malott, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Models of the galactic cosmic ray spectra have been tested by comparing their predictions to an evaluated database containing more than 380 measured cosmic ray spectra extending from 1960 to the present.

  2. The Heliosphere and the Galactic Environment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The boundaries surrounding our heliosphere can change both due to changes in our galactic environment and through changes in the solar wind emitted by the Sun. We see here an animation of the bound...

  3. A newly discovered stellar type: dusty post-red giant branch stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.; Van Winckel, H.; Nie, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Context. We present a newly discovered class of low-luminosity, dusty, evolved objects in the Magellanic Clouds. These objects have dust excesses, stellar parameters, and spectral energy distributions similar to those of dusty post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. However, they have lower luminosities and hence lower masses. We suggest that they have evolved off the red giant branch (RGB) instead of the AGB as a result of binary interaction. Aims: In this study we aim to place these objects in an evolutionary context and establish an evolutionary connection between RGB binaries (such as the sequence E variables) and our new sample of objects. Methods: We compared the theoretically predicted birthrates of the progeny of RGB binaries to the observational birthrates of the new sample of objects. Results: We find that there is order-of-magnitude agreement between the observed and predicted birthrates of post-RGB stars. The sources of uncertainty in the birthrates are discussed; the most important sources are probably the observational incompleteness factor and the post-RGB evolution rates. We also note that mergers are relatively common low on the RGB and that stars low on the RGB with mid-IR excesses may recently have undergone a merger. Conclusions: Our sample of dusty post-RGB stars most likely provides the first observational evidence for a newly discovered phase in binary evolution: post-RGB binaries with circumstellar dust.

  4. Relativistic Dark Matter at the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Wizansky, Tommer; /SLAC

    2007-11-16

    In a large region of the supersymmetry parameter space, the annihilation cross section for neutralino dark matter is strongly dependent on the relative velocity of the incoming particles. We explore the consequences of this velocity dependence in the context of indirect detection of dark matter from the galactic center. We find that the increase in the annihilation cross section at high velocities leads to a flattening of the halo density profile near the galactic center and an enhancement of the annihilation signal.

  5. Modelling galactic conformity with the colour-halo age relation in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Aaron D.; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sales, Laura V.; Zhu, Emily; Genel, Shy; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Torrey, Paul; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons between observational surveys and galaxy formation models find that dark matter haloes' mass can largely explain their galaxies' stellar mass. However, it remains uncertain whether additional environmental variables, known as assembly bias, are necessary to explain other galaxy properties. We use the Illustris simulation to investigate the role of assembly bias in producing galactic conformity by considering 18 000 galaxies with Mstellar > 2 × 109 M⊙. We find a significant signal of galactic conformity: out to distances of about 10 Mpc, the mean red fraction of galaxies around redder galaxies is higher than around bluer galaxies at fixed stellar mass. Dark matter haloes exhibit an analogous conformity signal, in which the fraction of haloes formed at earlier times (old haloes) is higher around old haloes than around younger ones at fixed halo mass. A plausible interpretation of galactic conformity is the combination of the halo conformity signal with the galaxy colour-halo age relation: at fixed stellar mass, particularly towards the low-mass end, Illustris' galaxy colours correlate with halo age, with the reddest galaxies (often satellites) preferentially found in the oldest haloes. We explain the galactic conformity effect with a simple semi-empirical model, assigning stellar mass via halo mass (abundance matching) and galaxy colour via halo age (age matching). Regarding comparison to observations, we conclude that the adopted selection/isolation criteria, projection effects, and stacking techniques can have a significant impact on the measured amplitude of the conformity signal.

  6. On the characterization of the Galactic warp in the Gaia era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, H.; Figueras, F.; Aguilar, L.; Mateu, C.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Lopez-Corredoira, M.; Garzon Lopez, F.

    2014-07-01

    We explore the possibility of detecting and characterising the warp of the stellar disc of our Galaxy using the synthetic Gaia data and the UCAC4 proper motion catalogue. We develop a new kinematic model for the galactic warp. We generate random realisations of test particles which evolve in a realistic Galactic potential warped adiabatically to various final configurations. The Gaia selection function, its errors model and a realistic 3D extinction map are applied to mimic three tracer populations: OB, A and Red Clump stars. A family of Great Circle Cell Counts (GC3) methods is used. They are ideally suited to find the tilt and twist of a collection of rings, which allow us to detect and measure the warp parameters. Moreover, We look for the kinematic signature of the warp in the μb proper motions of stars as a function of galactic longitude. Using the UCAC4 proper motions, we do not obtain a similar trend as the one we expect from our warp model. We explore a possible source of this discrepancy in terms of systematics caused by a residual spin of the Hipparcos celestial reference frame (HCRF) with respect to the extra-galactic inertial one.

  7. Spectroscopic determination of masses (and implied ages) for red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, Melissa; Hogg, David W.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Martig, Marie; Ho, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The mass of a star is arguably its most fundamental parameter and for red giant stars it implies a stellar evolution age. Stellar masses and ages have never been derived directly from spectra of red giants. However, using the APOGEE Kepler sample of stars, (the APOKASC sample), with high-quality spectra and astroseismic masses, we can build a data-driven spectral model using THE CANNON (arXiv:1501.07604) to infer stellar mass and therefore age from stellar spectra. We determine stellar masses to 0.07 dex from APOGEE DR12 spectra of red giants; these imply age estimates accurate to 0.2 dex (40 percent). THE CANNON constrains the ages foremost from spectral regions with particular absorption lines, elements whose surface abundances reflect mass-dependent dredge-up. We deliver an unprecedented catalog of 85,000 giants (including 20,000 red-clump stars) with mass and age estimates, spanning the entire disk (from the Galactic center to R ˜ 20 kpc). Such stellar age constraints across the Milky Way open up new avenues in Galactic archeology.

  8. WIMPs at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-05-07

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW, ZZ, hh, tt{sup -bar}), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb{sup -bar} is also enlarged to 35 GeV≲m{sub χ}≲165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, τ, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.

  9. WIMPs at the galactic center

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-05-07

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW,more » ZZ, hh, tt¯), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb¯ is also enlarged to 35 GeV ≲ mχ ≲ 165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, τ, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.« less

  10. WIMPs at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-05-07

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW, ZZ, hh, tt¯), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb¯ is also enlarged to 35 GeV ≲ mχ ≲ 165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, τ, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.

  11. A Galactic Binary Detection Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2011-01-01

    The Galaxy is suspected to contain hundreds of millions of binary white dwarf systems, a large fraction of which will have sufficiently small orbital period to emit gravitational radiation in band for space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). LISA's main science goal is the detection of cosmological events (supermassive black hole mergers, etc.) however the gravitational signal from the galaxy will be the dominant contribution to the data - including instrumental noise over approximately two decades in frequency. The catalogue of detectable binary systems will serve as an unparalleled means of studying the Galaxy. Furthermore, to maximize the scientific return from the mission, the data must be "cleansed" of the galactic foreground. We will present an algorithm that can accurately resolve and subtract 2:: 10000 of these sources from simulated data supplied by the Mock LISA Data Challenge Task Force. Using the time evolution of the gravitational wave frequency, we will reconstruct the position of the recovered binaries and show how LISA will sample the entire compact binary population in the Galaxy.

  12. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  13. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

  14. Origin of Enigmatic Galactic-center Filaments Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Twenty years ago, astronomers discovered a number of enigmatic radio-emitting filaments concentrated near the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. These features initially defied explanation, but a new study of radio images of the Galactic center may point to their possible source. By combining data from the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) astronomer Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University has found evidence that at least some of the filaments spring from the concentrated star-formation regions that populate the Galactic center. Galatic Center Combined VLA and GBT image (green) of the Galactic center, with red inset of GBT data only (red). Bright region on right is location of supermassive black hole. Linear filaments are visible above this area. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Yusef-Zadeh, et.al. (Click on Image for Larger Version) Yusef-Zadeh presented his findings at the Denver, Colorado, meeting of the American Astronomical Society. William Cotton of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, Virginia, and William Hewitt of Northwestern University also contributed to this research. "Astronomers have long puzzled over the cause of these striking features," said Yusef-Zadeh, "and the turbulent nature of the Galactic center has made detailed analysis difficult. With new multi-wavelength radio images of the Galactic center, however, we can finally see a link between areas of starburst activity and these long-linear filaments." The filaments, which range from 10 to 100 light-years in length and are perhaps little more than 1 to 3 light-years across, occur only in a very narrow area, within approximately two degrees of the Galactic center (which translates to approximately 900 light-years across). Early theories about the origin of these filaments suggested that they were somehow related to the Milky Way’s own magnetic field. This was due to the fact that the first filaments detected

  15. Survey of the Galactic center with IRSF/SIRIUS - near-infrared extinction law and bulge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo

    2005-04-01

    Since 2001, we have observed the central region of our Galaxy with the near-infrared (J, H, and Ks) camera SIRIUS and the 1.4 m telescope IRSF. Here I present the results about the infrared extinction law and the structure of the Galactic Bulge with bulge red clump stars. From the observation of the red clump stars, we have determined directly the ratios of extinction to color-excess (AKs/E(H-Ks) and AKs/E(J-Ks), which are clearly less than the ratios determined by previous color-differences methods. We also find a smaller structure (|l| <~ 4°) inside the Galactic bar although its exact nature is as yet uncertain.

  16. ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE 2) flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 0.31 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emission, based on the integrated intensity of emission from the Galactic plane instead of cross-correlations with the thermal dust spatial morphology. The Galactic plane intensity measured by ARCADE 2 is fainter than predicted by models without spinning dust, and is consistent with spinning dust contributing 0.4 +/- 0.1 of the Galactic plane emission at 23 GHz.

  17. Tests of two convection theories for red giant and red supergiant envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1995-01-01

    Two theories of stellar envelope convection are considered here in the context of red giants and red supergiants of intermediate to high mass: Boehm-Vitense's standard mixing-length theory (MLT) and Canuto & Mazzitelli's new theory incorporating the full spectrum of turbulence (FST). Both theories assume incompressible convection. Two formulations of the convective mixing length are also evaluated: l proportional to the local pressure scale height (H(sub P)) and l proportional to the distance from the upper boundary of the convection zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red zone (z). Applications to test both theories are made by calculating stellar evolutionary sequences into the red phase of core helium burning. Since the theoretically predicted effective temperatures for cool stars are known to be sensitive to the assigned value of the mixing length, this quantity has been individually calibrated for each evolutionary sequence. The calibration is done in a composite Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for the red giant and red supergiant members of well-observed Galactic open clusters. The MLT model requires the constant of proportionality for the convective mixing length to vary by a small but statistically significant amount with stellar mass, whereas the FST model succeeds in all cases with the mixing lenghth simply set equal to z. The structure of the deep stellar interior, however, remains very nearly unaffected by the choices of convection theory and mixing lenghth. Inside the convective envelope itself, a density inversion always occurs, but is somewhat smaller for the convectively more efficient MLT model. On physical grounds the FST model is preferable, and seems to alleviate the problem of finding the proper mixing length.

  18. The {sup 13}C-pocket structure in AGB models: constraints from zirconium isotope abundances in single mainstream SiC grains

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nan; Davis, Andrew M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Savina, Michael R.

    2014-06-20

    We present postprocess asymptotic giant branch (AGB) nucleosynthesis models with different {sup 13}C-pocket internal structures to better explain zirconium isotope measurements in mainstream presolar SiC grains by Nicolussi et al. and Barzyk et al. We show that higher-than-solar {sup 92}Zr/{sup 94}Zr ratios can be predicted by adopting a {sup 13}C-pocket with a flat {sup 13}C profile, instead of the previous decreasing-with-depth {sup 13}C profile. The improved agreement between grain data for zirconium isotopes and AGB models provides additional support for a recent proposal of a flat {sup 13}C profile based on barium isotopes in mainstream SiC grains by Liu et al.

  19. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reaction rate determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-02-01

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O ( p ,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of "presolar" grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  20. The 13C-Pocket Structure in AGB Models: Constraints from Zirconium Isotope Abundances in Single Mainstream SiC Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Davis, Andrew M.; Savina, Michael R.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    We present postprocess asymptotic giant branch (AGB) nucleosynthesis models with different 13C-pocket internal structures to better explain zirconium isotope measurements in mainstream presolar SiC grains by Nicolussi et al. and Barzyk et al. We show that higher-than-solar 92Zr/94Zr ratios can be predicted by adopting a 13C-pocket with a flat 13C profile, instead of the previous decreasing-with-depth 13C profile. The improved agreement between grain data for zirconium isotopes and AGB models provides additional support for a recent proposal of a flat 13C profile based on barium isotopes in mainstream SiC grains by Liu et al.

  1. Models for galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to those compact galactic X-ray sources whose X-ray luminosities are considerably in excess of the solar luminosity. It is pointed out that the key breakthrough in the development of an understanding of compact galactic X-ray sources was the discovery of X-ray pulsars with the UHURU satellite. There is now overwhelming evidence that these objects are neutron stars in close binary stellar systems. The X-ray pulsations are thought to be thermal emission from the magnetic polar caps of a neutron star that is accreting matter from a companion star and whose magnetic field is misaligned with its rotation axis. Among the compact galactic X-ray sources that are not X-ray pulsars, some still show direct evidence of binary membership, such as X-ray eclipses. There is evidence that the galactic-bulge sources are, in fact, close binary stellar systems. It is concluded, that the great majority of bright galactic X-ray sources, with only a tiny handful of exceptions (such as the Crab and Vela pulsars), are likely to be binaries.

  2. Study of the inner dust envelope and stellar photosphere of the AGB star R Doradus using SPHERE/ZIMPOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouri, T.; Maercker, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Kervella, P.; de Koter, A.; Ginski, C.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Min, M.; Dominik, C.; O'Gorman, E.; Schmid, H.-M.; Lombaert, R.; Lagadec, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. On the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) low- and intermediate-mass stars eject a large fraction of their envelope, but the mechanism driving these outflows is still poorly understood. For oxygen-rich AGB stars, the wind is thought to be driven by radiation pressure caused by scattering of radiation off dust grains. Aims: We study the photosphere, the warm molecular layer, and the inner wind of the close-by oxygen-rich AGB star R Doradus. We focus on investigating the spatial distribution of the dust grains that scatter light and whether these grains can be responsible for driving the outflow of this star. Methods: We use high-angular-resolution images obtained with SPHERE/ZIMPOL to study R Dor and its inner envelope in a novel way. We present observations in filters V, cntHα, and cnt820 and investigate the surface brightness distribution of the star and of the polarised light produced in the inner envelope. Thanks to second-epoch observations in cntHα, we are able to see variability on the stellar photosphere. We study the polarised-light data using a continuum-radiative-transfer code that accounts for direction-dependent scattering of photons off dust grains. Results: We find that in the first epoch the surface brightness of R Dor is asymmetric in V and cntHα, the filters where molecular opacity is stronger, while in cnt820 the surface brightness is closer to being axisymmetric. The second-epoch observations in cntHα show that the morphology of R Dor has changed completely in a timespan of 48 days to a more axisymmetric and compact configuration. This variable morphology is probably linked to changes in the opacity provided by TiO molecules in the extended atmosphere. The observations show polarised light coming from a region around the central star. The inner radius of the region from where polarised light is seen varies only by a small amount with azimuth. The value of the polarised intensity, however, varies by between a factor of 2.3 and 3.7 with

  3. Constraints on the H2O formation mechanism in the wind of carbon-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaert, R.; Decin, L.; Royer, P.; de Koter, A.; Cox, N. L. J.; González-Alfonso, E.; Neufeld, D.; De Ridder, J.; Agúndez, M.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Khouri, T.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Kerschbaum, F.; Cernicharo, J.; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The recent detection of warm H2O vapor emission from the outflows of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars challenges the current understanding of circumstellar chemistry. Two mechanisms have been invoked to explain warm H2O vapor formation. In the first, periodic shocks passing through the medium immediately above the stellar surface lead to H2O formation. In the second, penetration of ultraviolet interstellar radiation through a clumpy circumstellar medium leads to the formation of H2O molecules in the intermediate wind. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of H2O emission for a sample of 18 carbon-rich AGB stars and subsequently constrain which of the above mechanisms provides the most likely warm H2O formation pathway. Methods: Using far-infrared spectra taken with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel telescope, we combined two methods to identify H2O emission trends and interpreted these in terms of theoretically expected patterns in the H2O abundance. Through the use of line-strength ratios, we analyzed the correlation between the strength of H2O emission and the mass-loss rate of the objects, as well as the radial dependence of the H2O abundance in the circumstellar outflow per individual source. We computed a model grid to account for radiative-transfer effects in the line strengths. Results: We detect warm H2O emission close to or inside the wind acceleration zone of all sample stars, irrespective of their stellar or circumstellar properties. The predicted H2O abundances in carbon-rich environments are in the range of 10-6 up to 10-4 for Miras and semiregular-a objects, and cluster around 10-6 for semiregular-b objects. These predictions are up to three orders of magnitude greater than what is predicted by state-of-the-art chemical models. We find a negative correlation between the H2O/CO line-strength ratio and gas mass-loss rate for Ṁg> 5 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1, regardless of the upper-level energy of the relevant transitions

  4. Kinematical and Chemical Vertical Structure of the Galactic Thick Disk. I. Thick Disk Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Méndez, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    The variation of the kinematical properties of the Galactic thick disk with Galactic height Z is studied by means of 412 red giants observed in the direction of the south Galactic pole up to 4.5 kpc from the plane. We confirm the non-null mean radial motion toward the Galactic anticenter found by other authors, but we find that it changes sign at |Z| = 3 kpc, and the proposed inward motion of the local standard of rest alone cannot explain these observations. The rotational velocity decreases with |Z| by -30 km s-1 kpc-1, but the data are better represented by a power law with index 1.25, similar to that proposed from the analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. All the velocity dispersions increase with |Z|, but the vertical gradients are small. The dispersions grow proportionally, with no significant variation of the anisotropy. The ratio σU/σW = 2 suggests that the thick disk could have formed from a low-latitude merging event. The vertex deviation increases with Galactic height, reaching ~20° at |Z| = 3.5 kpc. The tilt angle also increases, and the orientation of the ellipsoid in the radial-vertical plane is constantly intermediate between the alignment with the cylindrical and the spherical coordinate systems. The tilt angle at |Z| = 2 kpc coincides with the expectations of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics, but an extension of the calculations to higher |Z| is required to perform a conclusive test. Finally, between 2.5 and 3.5 kpc we detect deviations from the linear trend of many kinematical quantities, suggesting that some kinematical substructure could be present. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (proposal IDs 075.B-0459(A), 077.B-0348(A)). This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan and the duPont Telescopes, located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  5. Evolution, Nucleosynthesis, and Yields of AGB Stars at Different Metallicities. III. Intermediate-mass Models, Revised Low-mass Models, and the ph-FRUITY Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new set of models for intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars (4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 M⊙) at different metallicities (-2.15 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.15). This set integrates the existing models for low-mass AGB stars (1.3 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 3.0) already included in the FRUITY database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the main sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. This effect is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, therefore, thermal pulses (TPs) are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it from deeply penetrating the underlying radiative layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy element nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the 22Ne(α,n)25Mg reaction, which is efficiently activated during TPs. At low metallicities, our models undergo hot bottom burning and hot third dredge up. We compare our theoretical final core masses to available white dwarf observations. Moreover, we quantify the influence intermediate-mass models have on the carbon star luminosity function. Finally, we present the upgrade of the FRUITY web interface, which now also includes the physical quantities of the TP-AGB phase for all of the models included in the database (ph-FRUITY).

  6. PTF10fqs: A Luminous Red Nova in the Spiral Messier 99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Mansi; Helou, George; Surace, Jason; Kulkarni, Shri

    2010-06-01

    On April 16, 2010 we discovered a rare transient (PTF10fqs) in the luminosity gap between novae and supernovae with the Palomar Transient Factory. PTF10fqs is located on a spiral arm in M99, a member of the Virgo Cluster. On April 18, we obtained a Gemini spectrum and on April 20, multi-color photometry with the Palomar 60-inch. The explosion signature resembles that of a class of 'Luminous Red Novae'; only two other such transients are known. A plethora of models have been proposed: stellar merger, e-capture on AGB star, weird nova and weird supernova. Here, we propose MIR photometry to determine the total energetics of the event and as a unique tracer of the circumstellar dust. Together with our ongoing multi-wavelength (optical, NIR, radio, UV and X-ray) follow-up of PTF10fqs, we hope to make progress in deciphering the nature of this class.

  7. Measuring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc using asteroseismology and SAGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, L.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Schlesinger, K. J.; Stello, D.; Huber, D.; Serenelli, A. M.; Schönrich, R.; Cassisi, S.; Pietrinferni, A.; Hodgkin, S.; Milone, A. P.; Feltzing, S.; Asplund, M.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a vertical age gradient in the Milky Way disc has been indirectly known for long. Here, we measure it directly for the first time with seismic ages, using red giants observed by Kepler. We use Strömgren photometry to gauge the selection function of asteroseismic targets, and derive colour and magnitude limits where giants with measured oscillations are representative of the underlying population in the field. Limits in the 2MASS system are also derived. We lay out a method to assess and correct for target selection effects independent of Galaxy models. We find that low-mass, i.e. old red giants dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the Galactic plane they exhibit a wide range of ages and metallicities. Parametrizing this as a vertical gradient returns approximately 4 Gyr kpc-1 for the disc we probe, although with a large dispersion of ages at all heights. The ages of stars show a smooth distribution over the last ≃10 Gyr, consistent with a mostly quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about 2. We also find a flat age-metallicity relation for disc stars. Finally, we show how to use secondary clump stars to estimate the present-day intrinsic metallicity spread, and suggest using their number count as a new proxy for tracing the ageing of the disc. This work highlights the power of asteroseismology for Galactic studies; however, we also emphasize the need for better constraints on stellar mass-loss, which is a major source of systematic age uncertainties in red giant stars.

  8. Is the 21-micron Feature Observed in Some Post-AGB Stars Caused by the Interaction Between Ti Atoms and Fullerenes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A. III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent measurements of fullerenes and Ti atoms recorded in our laboratory have demonstrated the presence of an infrared feature near 21 pm. The feature observed has nearly the same shape and position as is observed for one of the most enigmatic features in post-asymptotic giant blanch (AGB) stars. In our experimental system large cage carbon particles, such as large fullerenes, were produced from CO gas by the Boudouard reaction. Large-cage carbon particles intermixed with Ti atoms were produced by the evaporation of a Ti metal wrapped carbon electrode in CO gas. The infrared spectra of large fullerenes interacting with Ti atoms show a characteristic feature at 20.3 micron that closely corresponds to the 20.1 micron feature observed in post-AGB stars. Both the lab- oratory and stellar spectra also show a small but significant peak at 19.0 micron, which is attributed to fullerenes. Here, we propose that the interaction between fullerenes and Ti atoms may be a plausible explanation for the 21-micron feature seen in some post-AGB stars.

  9. Red Clover Breeding Progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is an important forage legume grown on approximately 4 million hectares worldwide. It has a long and varied history in agriculture. Active breeding efforts began at the end of the 19th century. Since this time significant improvement in red clover cultivar for a...

  10. Cobb's Red Cabbage Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an indicator made from the pigment in red cabbage. Cabbage is grated then soaked in water. When the water is a strong red, the cabbage is strained out. The cabbage-juice indicator is then used to test for acids and bases. Includes a list of good foods to test for acidity and alkalinity. (PVD)

  11. GCN: a gaseous Galactic halo stream?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shoko

    2010-10-01

    We show that a string of HI clouds that form part of the high-velocity cloud complex known as GCN is a probable gaseous stream extending over more than 50° in the Galactic halo. The radial velocity gradient along the stream is used to deduce transverse velocities as a function of distance, enabling a family of orbits to be computed. We find that a direction of motion towards the Galactic disc coupled with a mid-stream distance of ~20kpc provides a good match to the observed sky positions and radial velocities of the HI clouds comprising the stream. With an estimated mass of 105Msolar, its progenitor is likely to be a dwarf galaxy. However, no stellar counterpart has been found amongst the currently known Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies or stellar streams and the exact origin of the stream is therefore currently unknown.

  12. New Constraints on the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, I.; Nordhaus, J.; Quillen, A. C.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work has related the Galactic bar to structure in the local stellar velocity distribution. Here we show that the bar also influences the spatial gradients of the velocity vector via the Oort constants. By numerical integration of test particles we simulate measurements of the Oort C-value in a gravitational potential including the Galactic bar. We account for the observed trend that C is increasingly negative for stars with higher velocity dispersion. By comparing measurements of C with our simulations we improve on previous models of the bar, estimating that the bar pattern speed is Ωb/Ω0=1.87+/-0.04, where Ω0 is the local circular frequency, and the bar angle lies within 20deg<=φ0<=45deg. We find that the Galactic bar affects measurements of the Oort constants A and B less than ~2 km s-1 kpc-1 for the hot stars.

  13. New Constraints on the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, Ivan; Nordhaus, J.; Quillen, A. C.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work has related the Galactic Bar to structure in the local stellar velocity distribution. Here we show that the Bar also influences the spatial gradients of the velocity vector via the Oort constants. By numerical integration of test-particles we simulate measurements of the Oort C-value in a gravitational potential including the Galactic Bar. We account for the observed trend that C is increasingly negative for stars with higher velocity dispersion. By comparing measurements of C with our simulations we improve on previous models of the Bar, estimating that the Bar pattern speed is Omega_b/Omega_0=1.87\\pm0.04, where Omega_0 is the local circular frequency, and the Bar angle lies within 20Galactic Bar affects measurements of the Oort constants A and B less than 2 km/s/kpc for the hot stars.

  14. The distances of the Galactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdonmez, Aykut; Guver, Tolga; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Ak, Tansel

    2016-07-01

    Using location of the RC stars on the CMDs obtained from the UKIDSS, VISTA and 2MASS photometry, we have derived the reddening-distance relations towards each Galactic nova for which at least one independent reddening measurement exists. We were able to determine the distances of 72 Galactic novae and set lower limits on the distances of 45 systems. The reddening curves of the systems are presented. These curves can be also used to estimate reddening or the distance of any source, whose location is close to the position of the nova in our sample. The distance measurement method in our study can be easily applicable to any source, especially for ones that concentrated along the Galactic plane.

  15. Gamma rays, cosmic rays, and galactic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of cosmic and gamma radiation by SAS-2 satellite are summarized and analyzed to determine processes responsible for producing observed galactic radiation. In addition to the production of gamma rays in discrete galactic objects such as pulsars, there are three main mechanisms by which high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) radiation is produced by high-energy interactions involving cosmic rays in interstellar space. These processes, which produce what may be called diffuse galactic gamma-rays, are: (1) the decay of pi mesons produced by interactions of cosmic ray nucleons with interstellar gas nuclei; (2) the bremsstrahlung radiation produced by cosmic ray electrons interacting in the Coulomb fields of nuclei of interstellar gas atoms; and (3) Compton interactions between cosmic ray electrons and low-energy photons in interstellar space.

  16. FIRE simulations: galactic outflows and their consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keres, Dusan; FIRE team

    2016-06-01

    We study gaseous outflows and their consequences in high-resolution galaxy formation simulations with explicit stellar feedback from the Feedback in Realistic Environments project. Collective, galaxy scale, effect of stellar feedback results in episodic ejections of large amount of gas and heavy elements into the circum-galactic medium. Gas ejection episodes follow strong bursts of star formation. Properties of galactic star formation and ejection episodes depend on galaxy mass and redshift and, together with gas infall and recycling, shape the evolution of the circum-galactic medium and galaxies. As a consequence, our simulated galaxies have masses, star formation histories and heavy element content in good agreement with the observed population of galaxies.

  17. Nonthermal galactic emission below 10 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novaco, J. C.; Brown, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Radio Astronomy Explorer-2 (RAE-2) satellite has provided new measurements of the nonthermal galactic radio emission at frequencies below 10 MHz. Measurements of the emission spectra are presented for the center, anticenter, north polar, and south polar directions at 22 frequencies between 0.25 and 9.18 MHz. Survey maps of the spatial distribution of the observed low frequency galactic emission at 1.31, 2.20, 3.93, 4.70, 6.55, and 9.18 MHz are presented. The observations were obtained with the 229-meter traveling-wave V-antenna on this lunar orbiting spacecraft. The improved frequency coverage offers additional insights into structure of the local galactic neighborhood.

  18. Chemical abundances in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, M.; Lecureur, A.; Hill, V.; Barbuy, B.; Renzini, A.; Minniti, D.; Gómez, A.; Ortolani, S.

    We spectroscopically characterize the Galactic Bulge to infer its star formation timescale, compared to the other Galactic components, through the chemical signature on its individual stars. O, Na, Mg, Al were obtained for 50 K giants in four fields towards the Galactic bulge from UVES spectra (R=45,000), while Fe was measured in more than 400 stars with a slightly low resolution (R=20,000) and the GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. Oxygen and Magnesium show a well defined trend with [Fe/H], with abundances larger than those measured in both thin and thick disk stars, supporting a scenario in which the bulge formed before and more rapidly than the disk. On the other hand the iron distribution peaks at solar metallicity and it is slightly narrower than that measured in previous works. Part of the present results have been published by \\citet{Zoccali06} and \\citet{Lecureur07}, and part will be discussed in forthcoming papers.

  19. SAS-2 gamma-ray results from the galactic plane and their implications for galactic structure and galactic cosmic-ray dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The final SAS-2 results related to high energy galactic gamma-ray emission show a strong correlation with galactic structural features seen at other wavelenghts, when the known gamma-ray sources are subtracted. Theoretical considerations and analysis of the gamma-ray data suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density is enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of the galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model that assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2)on the scale of the galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3)the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height to the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of over 2:1.

  20. Far-infrared and submillimeter survey of the galactic center and nearby galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. F.; Niles, D. W.; Kanskar, M.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Thronson, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Maps are presented with 12-arcmin resolution of the Galactic Center and adjacent galactic plane, from l(Pc) = 359 deg to l(Pc) = 5 deg. The data were obtained with the Steward Observatory's cryogenically-cooled, balloon-borne telescope. The data are from channels filtered for a bandpass of 70 to 110 microns and for a longpass of wavelength greater than 80 microns. For the typical effective temperature of 25 K of a galactic H II region at this spatial resolution, the effective wavelengths of the channels are 93 microns and 145 microns. Continuous emission is mapped along the galactic plane in both wavelengths. There are two contrasts between the immediate vicinity of SgrA l(Pc) smaller than 1 deg, and the galactic plane in general. Firstly, for l(Pi) greater than 1 deg the galactic plane narrows dramatically at 93 microns, while retaining its width at 145 microns. Secondly, the individual sources at l(Pc) (which are associated with H II regions) have greater peak brightness in the 145-micron channel than the 93-micron channel, while SgrA has approximately equal peak brightness in each. The maps demonstrate the importance of submillimeter wavelengths to galactic surveys.

  1. Jupiter's Great Red spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This color composite made from Voyager 2 narrow-angle camera frames shows the Great Red Spot during the late Jovian afternoon. North of the Red Spot lies a curious darker section of the South Equatorial Belt (SEB), the belt in which the Red Spot is located. A bright eruption of material passing from the SEB northward into the diffuse equatorial clouds has been observed on all occasions when this feature passes north of the Red Spot. The remnants of one such eruption are apparent in this photograph. To the lower left of the Red Spot lies one of the three long-lived White Ovals. This photograph was taken on June 29, 1979, when Voyager 2 was over 9 million kilometers (nearly 6 million miles) from Jupiter. The smallest features visible are over 170 kilometers (106 miles) across.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VI light curves of Galactic LPVs (Soszynski+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soszynski, I.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Kozlowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.

    2013-08-01

    The fifteenth part of the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars (OIII-CVS) contains 232406 long-period variables (LPVs) detected in the OGLE-II and OGLE-III fields toward the Galactic bulge. The sample consists of 6528 Mira stars, 33235 semiregular variables and 192643 OGLE small amplitude red giants. The catalog data and data resources that are being published include observational parameters of stars, finding charts, and time-series I- and V-band photometry obtained between 1997 and 2009. (5 data files).

  3. Variable Radio Sources in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Proctor, Deanne D.

    2010-07-01

    Using three epochs of Very Large Array observations of the Galactic plane in the first quadrant taken ~15 years apart, we have conducted a search for a population of variable Galactic radio emitters in the flux density range 1-100 mJy at 6 cm. We find 39 variable sources in a total survey area of 23.2 deg2. Correcting for various selection effects and for the extragalactic variable population of active galactic nuclei, we conclude there are ~1.6 deg-2 Galactic sources which vary by more than 50% on a time scale of years (or shorter). We show that these sources are much more highly variable than extragalactic objects; more than 50% show variability by a factor >2 compared to <10% for extragalactic objects in the same flux density range. We also show that the fraction of variable sources increases toward the Galactic center (another indication that this is a Galactic population), and that the spectral indices of many of these sources are flat or inverted. A small number of the variables are coincident with mid-IR sources and two are coincident with X-ray emitters, but most have no known counterparts at other wavelengths. Intriguingly, one lies at the center of a supernova remnant, while another appears to be a very compact planetary nebula; several are likely to represent activity associated with star formation regions. We discuss the possible source classes which could contribute to the variable cohort and follow-up observations which could clarify the nature of these sources.

  4. The diffuse galactic far-ultraviolet sky

    SciTech Connect

    Hamden, Erika T.; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark

    2013-12-20

    We present an all-sky map of the diffuse Galactic far ultraviolet (1344-1786 Å) background using Galaxy Evolution Explorer data, covering 65% of the sky with 11.79 arcmin{sup 2} pixels. We investigate the dependence of the background on Galactic coordinates, finding that a standard cosecant model of intensity is not a valid fit. Furthermore, we compare our map to Galactic all-sky maps of 100 μm emission, N {sub H} {sub I} column, and Hα intensity. We measure a consistent low level far-UV (FUV) intensity at zero points for other Galactic quantities, indicating a 300 photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} Å{sup –1} non-scattered isotropic component to the diffuse FUV. There is also a linear relationship between FUV and 100 μm emission below 100 μm values of 8 MJy sr{sup –1}. We find a similar linear relationship between FUV and N {sub H} {sub I} below 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}. The relationship between FUV and Hα intensity has no such constant cutoff. For all Galactic quantities, the slope of the linear portion of the relationship decreases with Galactic latitude. A modified cosecant model, taking into account dust scattering asymmetry and albedo, is able to accurately fit the diffuse FUV at latitudes above 20°. The best fit model indicates an albedo, a, of 0.62 ± 0.04 and a scattering asymmetry function, g, of 0.78 ± 0.05. Deviations from the model fit may indicate regions of excess FUV emission from fluorescence or shock fronts, while low latitude regions with depressed FUV emission are likely the result of self-shielding dusty clouds.

  5. Asteroseismology for Galactic archaeology: bridging two fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Stello, Dennis; Huber, Daniel; Serenelli, Aldo; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Milone, Antonino; Asplund, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Asteroseismology has the capability of precisely determining stellar properties that would otherwise be inaccessible, such as radii, masses, and thus ages of field stars. When coupling this information with classical determinations of stellar parameters, such as metallicities, effective temperatures, and angular diameters, powerful new diagnostics for Galactic studies can be obtained. An overview of the ongoing Strömgren survey for Asteroseismology and Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) is presented, along with recent results using asteroseismology to investigate the age structure of the Milky Way disc.

  6. A cost effective and operational methodology for wall to wall Above Ground Biomass (AGB) and carbon stocks estimation and mapping: Nepal REDD+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilani, H., Sr.; Ganguly, S.; Zhang, G.; Koju, U. A.; Murthy, M. S. R.; Nemani, R. R.; Manandhar, U.; Thapa, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nepal is a landlocked country with 39% forest cover of the total land area (147,181 km2). Under the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) and implemented by the World Bank (WB), Nepal chosen as one of four countries best suitable for results-based payment system for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD and REDD+) scheme. At the national level Landsat based, from 1990 to 2000 the forest area has declined by 2%, i.e. by 1467 km2, whereas from 2000 to 2010 it has declined only by 0.12% i.e. 176 km2. A cost effective monitoring and evaluation system for REDD+ requires a balanced approach of remote sensing and ground measurements. This paper provides, for Nepal a cost effective and operational 30 m Above Ground Biomass (AGB) estimation and mapping methodology using freely available satellite data integrated with field inventory. Leaf Area Index (LAI) generated based on propose methodology by Ganguly et al. (2012) using Landsat-8 the OLI cloud free images. To generate tree canopy height map, a density scatter graph between the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) estimated maximum height and Landsat LAI nearest to the center coordinates of the GLAS shots show a moderate but significant exponential correlation (31.211*LAI0.4593, R2= 0.33, RMSE=13.25 m). From the field well distributed circular (750m2 and 500m2), 1124 field plots (0.001% representation of forest cover) measured which were used for estimation AGB (ton/ha) using Sharma et al. (1990) proposed equations for all tree species of Nepal. A satisfactory linear relationship (AGB = 8.7018*Hmax-101.24, R2=0.67, RMSE=7.2 ton/ha) achieved between maximum canopy height (Hmax) and AGB (ton/ha). This cost effective and operational methodology is replicable, over 5-10 years with minimum ground samples through integration of satellite images. Developed AGB used to produce optimum fuel wood scenarios using population and road

  7. THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH AS PROBES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY: THE NEARBY DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY KKH 98

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Williams, B.; Dalcanton, J.; Ammons, S. M.; Max, C.; Koo, D. C.; Dolphin, A. E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed E-mail: ammons@ucolick.or E-mail: koo@ucolick.or E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.co

    2010-03-20

    We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D = 2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (near-IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR-bright stars reaching over 1 mag below the tip of the RGB. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the red clump and the main-sequence turnoff for 0.5 Gyr old populations. Compared to the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD), the near-IR CMD shows significantly tighter AGB sequences, providing a good probe of the intermediate-age (0.5-5 Gyr) populations. We match observed CMDs with stellar evolution models to recover the SFH of KKH 98. On average, the galaxy has experienced relatively constant low-level star formation (5 x 10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for much of cosmic time. Except for the youngest main-sequence populations (age <0.1 Gyr), which are typically fainter than the AO data flux limit, the SFH estimated from the 592 IR-bright stars is a reasonable match to that derived from the much larger optical data set. Differences between the optical- and IR-derived SFHs for 0.1-1 Gyr populations suggest that current stellar evolution models may be overproducing the AGB by as much as a factor of 3 in this galaxy. At the depth of the AO data, the IR-luminous stars are not crowded. Therefore, these techniques can potentially be used to determine the stellar populations of galaxies at significantly further distances.

  8. Gamma ray constraints on the Galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, Donald D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma ray signatures of Galactic supernovae of all types to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of the nuclear yields, we determine mean Galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of Galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse Galactic gamma ray line emission.

  9. Constraining {sup 13}C amounts in AGB stars through isotopic analysis of trace elements in presolar SiC.

    SciTech Connect

    Barzyk, J. G.; Savina, M. R.; Davis, A. M.; Gallino, R.; Gyngard, F.; Amari, S.; Zinner, E.; Pelliln, M. J.; Lewis, R. S.; Clayton, R. N.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Chicago; Chicago Ctr Cosmochem.; Universita di Torino; Washington Univ.

    2007-07-01

    Analyses of the isotopic compositions of multiple elements (Mo, Zr, and Ba) in individual mainstream presolar SiC grains were done by resonant ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). While most heavy element compositions were consistent with model predictions for the slow neutron capture process (s-process) in low-mass (1.5-3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) asymptotic giant branch stars of solar metallicity when viewed on single-element three-isotope plots, grains with compositions deviating from model predictions were identified on multi-element plots. These grains have compositions that cannot result from any neutron capture process but can be explained by contamination in some elements with solar system material. Previous work in which only one heavy element per grain was examined has been unable to identify contaminated grains. The multi-element analyses of this study detected contaminated grains which were subsequently eliminated from consideration. The uncontaminated grains form a data set with a greatly reduced spread on the three-isotope plots of each element measured, corresponding to a smaller range of {sup 13}C pocket efficiencies in parent AGB stars. Furthermore, due to this reduced spread, the nature of the stellar starting material, previously interpreted as having solar isotopic composition, is uncertain. The constraint on {sup 13}C pocket efficiencies in parent stars of these grains may help uncover the mechanism responsible for formation of {sup 13}C, the primary neutron source for s-process nucleosynthesis in low-mass stars.

  10. Optical spectrum of the post-AGB Star HD56126 in the wavelength interval 4010-8790 Å Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkova, V. G.; Chentsov, E. L.; Tavolganskaya, N. S.; Shapovalov, M. V.

    2007-06-01

    The optical spectrum of the post-AGB star HD56126 identified with the infrared source IRAS07134+1005 is studied in detail using high spectral resolution observations (R = 25000 and 60000) performed with the echelle spectrographs of the 6-m telescope. A total of about one and a half thousand absorptions of neutral atoms and ions, absorption bands of C2, CN, and CH molecules, and interstellar bands (DIBs) are identified in the 4012 to 8790 Å Å wavelength interval, and the depths and radial velocities of these spectral features are measured. Differences are revealed between the variations of the radial velocities measured from spectral features of different excitation. In addition to the well-known variability of the H α profile, we found variations in the profiles of a number of FeII, YII, and BaII lines. We also produce an atlas of the spectrum of HD56126 and its comparison star α Per. The full version of the Atlas is available in electronic form from: http://www.sao.ru/hq/ssl/Atlas/Atlas.html.

  11. Global radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of red supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytag, B.; Chiavassa, A.

    2013-05-01

    The small-scale surface granulation on cool main-sequence stars and white dwarfs influences the overall appearance of these objects only weakly. And it is only indirectly observable by analyzing e.g. line-shapes or temporal fluctuations - except for the Sun. The large-scale and high-contrast convective surface cells and accompanying sound waves on supergiants and low-gravity AGB stars on the other hand have a strong impact on the outer atmospheric layers and are directly detectable by interferometric observations. Necessary to interpret modern observations with their high resolution in frequency, time, and/or space are detailed numerical multi-dimensional time-dependent radiation-hydrodynamical simulations. Local simulations of small patches of convective surface layers and the atmosphere of main-sequence stars have matured over three decades and have reached an impressive level of agreement with observations and also between different computational codes. However, global simulations of the entire convective surface and atmosphere of a red supergiants are considerably more demanding - and limited - and have become available only for about one decade. Still, they show how the surface is shaped by the interaction of small surface granules, that sit on top of large envelope convection cells, and waves, that can travel as shocks into the outer atmosphere. The route to more complete future models will be discussed, that comprise the outer atmosphere of the stars and that could explain some of the little-understood phenomena like chromosphere, molsphere, or wind-formation.

  12. Pulsation-triggered Mass Loss from AGB Stars: The 60 Day Critical Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Low- and intermediate-mass stars eject much of their mass during the late, red giant branch (RGB) phase of evolution. The physics of their strong stellar winds is still poorly understood. In the standard model, stellar pulsations extend the atmosphere, allowing a wind to be driven through radiation pressure on condensing dust particles. Here, we investigate the onset of the wind, using nearby RGB stars drawn from the Hipparcos catalog. We find a sharp onset of dust production when the star first reaches a pulsation period of 60 days. This approximately coincides with the point where the star transitions to the first overtone pulsation mode. Models of the spectral energy distributions show stellar mass-loss rate suddenly increasing at this point, by a factor of ∼10 over the existing (chromospherically driven) wind. The dust emission is strongly correlated with both pulsation period and amplitude, indicating stellar pulsation is the main trigger for the strong mass loss, and determines the mass-loss rate. Dust emission does not strongly correlate with stellar luminosity, indicating radiation pressure on dust has little effect on the mass-loss rate. RGB stars do not normally appear to produce dust, whereas dust production by asymptotic giant branch stars appears commonplace, and is probably ubiquitous above the RGB-tip luminosity. We conclude that the strong wind begins with a step change in mass-loss rate and is triggered by stellar pulsations. A second rapid mass-loss-rate enhancement is suggested when the star transitions to the fundamental pulsation mode at a period of ∼300 days.

  13. Pulsation-triggered Mass Loss from AGB Stars: The 60 Day Critical Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Low- and intermediate-mass stars eject much of their mass during the late, red giant branch (RGB) phase of evolution. The physics of their strong stellar winds is still poorly understood. In the standard model, stellar pulsations extend the atmosphere, allowing a wind to be driven through radiation pressure on condensing dust particles. Here, we investigate the onset of the wind, using nearby RGB stars drawn from the Hipparcos catalog. We find a sharp onset of dust production when the star first reaches a pulsation period of 60 days. This approximately coincides with the point where the star transitions to the first overtone pulsation mode. Models of the spectral energy distributions show stellar mass-loss rate suddenly increasing at this point, by a factor of ˜10 over the existing (chromospherically driven) wind. The dust emission is strongly correlated with both pulsation period and amplitude, indicating stellar pulsation is the main trigger for the strong mass loss, and determines the mass-loss rate. Dust emission does not strongly correlate with stellar luminosity, indicating radiation pressure on dust has little effect on the mass-loss rate. RGB stars do not normally appear to produce dust, whereas dust production by asymptotic giant branch stars appears commonplace, and is probably ubiquitous above the RGB-tip luminosity. We conclude that the strong wind begins with a step change in mass-loss rate and is triggered by stellar pulsations. A second rapid mass-loss-rate enhancement is suggested when the star transitions to the fundamental pulsation mode at a period of ˜300 days.

  14. Spectropolarimetric test of the relativistic disk model for the broad emission lines of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Kaiyou; Halpern, Jules P.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, it was claimed that the broad emission lines of the radio galaxy Arp 102B can be fitted by the line profile from a simple relativistic Keplerian thin disk. It was argued that the lines originating from the relativistic accretion disk could be polarized due to electron scattering, which is likely to be the dominant opacity in the line-emitting region of Arp 102B. In the present work, the expected polarization properties of these broad emission lines are calculated. The percentage of polarization depends strongly on the inclination angle. For some angles, the red peak of the polarized, double-peaked line profile can be higher than the blue peak. This is in contrast to the total line profile, in which the blue peak is always higher than the red one. Spectropolarimetric observations could, therefore, provide an independent test of the relativistic disk model for the broad emission lines of Arp 102B and other active galactic nuclei.

  15. THE EDGE OF THE YOUNG GALACTIC DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Carraro, Giovanni; Vazquez, Ruben A.; Perren, Gabriel; Moitinho, Andre

    2010-08-01

    In this work, we report and discuss the detection of two distant diffuse stellar groups in the third Galactic quadrant. They are composed of young stars, with spectral types ranging from late O to late B, and lie at galactocentric distances between 15 and 20 kpc. These groups are located in the area of two cataloged open clusters (VdB-Hagen 04 and Ruprecht 30), projected toward the Vela-Puppis constellations, and within the core of the Canis Major overdensity. Their reddening and distances have been estimated by analyzing their color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, derived from deep UBV photometry. The existence of young star aggregates at such extreme distances from the Galactic center challenges the commonly accepted scenario in which the Galactic disk has a sharp cutoff at about 14 kpc from the Galactic center and indicates that it extends to much greater distances (as also supported by the recent detection of CO molecular complexes well beyond this distance). While the groups we find in the area of Ruprecht 30 are compatible with the Orion and Norma-Cygnus spiral arms, respectively, the distant group we identify in the region of VdB-Hagen 04 lies in the external regions of the Norma-Cygnus arm, at a galactocentric distance ({approx}20 kpc) where no young stars have been detected so far in the optical.

  16. Argon and neon in Galactic nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, Dan F.; Rank, David M.; Witteborn, F. C.; Wooden, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    KAO observations of the 6.98 micron line of (Ar II), and KAO and ground-based observations of the 8.99 micron line of (Ar III) and the 12.8 micron line of (Ne II) are presented for a number of Galactic H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  17. Terrestrial impact of the galactic historical SNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyudin, A. F.

    2002-03-01

    Galactic supernovae (SNe) of the last millennium have left their signatures in many energy domains, with the optical being the best known due to the absence of astronomical instruments before the 17th century being more sophisticated than the human eye. Alongside with these records found in the scriptes of the ancient eastern and western astronomers, quite recently other signatures were recognised as valuable tracers of historical SNe, for example, different ionic and/or molecular depositions in the polar ice, radioactive isotopes depositions, and the /γ-ray emission from the radioactive 44Ti produced in the SN explosion. While the ice depositions are expected to be the result of the supernova flash in the UV and soft X-rays, the 60Fe radioactive isotope deposition into the deep-ocean ferromanganese crust is the result of direct isotope transfer by cosmic rays dust grains originating in the SN blast wave. These and other impacts of the galactic SNe are important from the point of view of their possible influence on the terrestrial environment. In this paper we consider known tracers of historical SNe and compare them to the proposed new tracer based on the atmospheric response to the galactic supernova emission in the UV and X-rays. In addition to using the 44Ti radioactive decay line photons for uncovering hidden galactic supernova remnants by imaging /γ-ray telescopes, all such tracers form an important complement to the historical SNe record.

  18. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  19. Mass Distributions Implying Flat Galactic Rotation Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    The rotational speeds of stars in the disc of a spiral galaxy are virtually independent of the distances of the stars from the centre of the galaxy. In common parlance, the stellar speed versus distance plot known as a galactic rotation curve is by observation typically nearly flat. This observation provides strong evidence that most galactic…

  20. The Edge of the Young Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni; Vázquez, Ruben A.; Costa, Edgardo; Perren, Gabriel; Moitinho, André

    2010-08-01

    In this work, we report and discuss the detection of two distant diffuse stellar groups in the third Galactic quadrant. They are composed of young stars, with spectral types ranging from late O to late B, and lie at galactocentric distances between 15 and 20 kpc. These groups are located in the area of two cataloged open clusters (VdB-Hagen 04 and Ruprecht 30), projected toward the Vela-Puppis constellations, and within the core of the Canis Major overdensity. Their reddening and distances have been estimated by analyzing their color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, derived from deep UBV photometry. The existence of young star aggregates at such extreme distances from the Galactic center challenges the commonly accepted scenario in which the Galactic disk has a sharp cutoff at about 14 kpc from the Galactic center and indicates that it extends to much greater distances (as also supported by the recent detection of CO molecular complexes well beyond this distance). While the groups we find in the area of Ruprecht 30 are compatible with the Orion and Norma-Cygnus spiral arms, respectively, the distant group we identify in the region of VdB-Hagen 04 lies in the external regions of the Norma-Cygnus arm, at a galactocentric distance (~20 kpc) where no young stars have been detected so far in the optical.

  1. Galactic Winds and Intragroup Medium Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupke, Renato; Lloyd-Davies, Ed; Bregman, Joel

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this proposal was to study the metallicity distribution of HCG 97 with the goals of determining the SN Type enrichment, the strength of galactic winds and how it impacts on the evolution of cluster's ICM within the framework of hierarchical formation scenarios.

  2. Aberration in proper motions for Galactic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.-C.; Xie, Y.; Zhu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Accelerations of both the solar system barycenter (SSB) and stars in the MilkyWay cause a systematic observational effect on the stellar proper motions, which was first studied by J. Kovalevsky (2003). This paper intends to extend that work and aims to estimate the magnitude and significance of the aberration in proper motions of stars, especially in the region near the Galactic center (GC). We adopt two models for the Galactic rotation curve to evaluate the aberrational effect on the Galactic plane. We show that the effect of aberration in proper motions depends on the galactocentric distance of stars; it is dominated by the acceleration of stars in the central region of the Galaxy. Then we investigate the applicability of the theoretical expressions: if the orbital period of stars is only a fraction of the light time from the star to the SSB, the expression with approximation proposed by Kovalevsky is not appropriate. With a more suitable formulation, we found that the aberration has no effect on the determination of the stellar orbits on the celestial sphere. In the future this aberrational effect under consideration should be considered with high-accurate astrometry, particularly in constructing the Gaia celestial reference system realized by Galactic stars.

  3. Young Massive Clusters in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, D. F.

    2004-12-01

    The three young clusters in the Galactic Center represent the closest examples of massive starbursts and they define the upper mass limit of the Galactic cluster mass functions. In this review, I describe the characteristics and content of the Arches, Quintuplet, and Central clusters. They each are more massive than any other cluster in the Galaxy, and the Arches cluster, in particular, has a mass and age that make it ideal for studies of massive stellar evolution and dense stellar systems. A preliminary measurement indicates that the initial mass function in the Galactic center is top-heavy, suggesting an environmental effect that has otherwise been absent in similar observations for Galactic clusters. Given the relatively more evolved nature of the Quintuplet and Central clusters, these clusters contain stars in a wide range of evolutionary states, including Luminous Blue Variables and Wolf-Rayet stars. The Quintuplet cluster provides a particularly interesting view of the most massive stars that are known, the Pistol Star and FMM362. An analysis of the mass spectrum in the Arches cluster suggests an upper mass cutoff of ˜150-200 M⊙.

  4. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  5. Modeling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yar-Mukhamedov, D.

    2015-04-15

    An analytic model for evolution of galactic magnetic fields in hierarchical galaxy formation frameworks is introduced. Its major innovative components include explicit and detailed treatment of the physics of merger events, mass gains and losses, gravitational energy sources and delays associated with formation of large-scale magnetic fields. This paper describes the model, its implementation, and core results obtained by its means.

  6. MODIFIED GRAVITY SPINS UP GALACTIC HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Li, Baojiu; Koyama, Kazuya

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the effect of modified gravity on the specific angular momentum of galactic halos by analyzing the halo catalogs at z = 0 from high-resolution N-body simulations for a f(R) gravity model that meets the solar-system constraint. It is shown that the galactic halos in the f(R) gravity model tend to acquire significantly higher specific angular momentum than those in the standard {Lambda}CDM model. The largest difference in the specific angular momentum distribution between these two models occurs for the case of isolated galactic halos with mass less than 10{sup 11} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, which are likely least shielded by the chameleon screening mechanism. As the specific angular momentum of galactic halos is rather insensitive to other cosmological parameters, it can in principle be an independent discriminator of modified gravity. We speculate a possibility of using the relative abundance of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) as a test of general relativity given that the formation of the LSBGs occurs in fast spinning dark halos.

  7. Red Bull Stratos Presentation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Red Bull Stratos High Performance Director Andy Walshe & Technical Project Director Art Thompson share the Stratos story with JSC. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner reached 128,100 ...

  8. Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a mosaic of two images taken by the Galileo spacecraft. The image was created using two filters, violet and near-infrared, at each of two camera positions. The Great Red Spot is a storm in Jupiter's atmosphere and is at least 300 years-old. Winds blow counterclockwise around the Great Red Spot at about 400 kilometers per hour (250 miles per hour). The size of the storm is more than one Earth diameter (13,000 kilometers or 8,000 miles) in the north-south direction and more than two Earth diameters in the east-west direction. In this oblique view, where the Great Red Spot is shown on the planet's limb, it appears longer in the north-south direction. The image was taken on June 26, 1996.

    The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  9. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen ... hemocytoblasts give rise to all of the formed elements in blood. If a hemocytoblast commits to becoming ...

  10. DUST IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: ANOMALOUS SILICATE TO OPTICAL EXTINCTION RATIOS?

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, Jianwei; Hao, Lei; Li, Aigen

    2014-09-01

    Dust plays a central role in the unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, little is known about the nature (e.g., size, composition) of the dust that forms a torus around the AGN. In this Letter, we report a systematic exploration of the optical extinction (A{sub V} ) and the silicate absorption optical depth (Δτ{sub 9.7}) of 110 type 2 AGNs. We derive A{sub V} from the Balmer decrement based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, and Δτ{sub 9.7} from the Spitzer/InfraRed Spectrograph data. We find that with a mean ratio of (A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7}) ≲ 5.5, the optical-to-silicate extinction ratios of these AGNs are substantially lower than that of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) for which A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ≈ 18.5. We argue that the anomalously low A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ratio could be due to the predominance of larger grains in the AGN torus compared to that in the Galactic diffuse ISM.

  11. TARGET SELECTION FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zasowski, G.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Andrews, B.; Epstein, C.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Jackson, K.; Majewski, S. R.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Beaton, R. L.; Nidever, D. L.; Pinto, H. J. Rocha; Girardi, L.; Cudworth, K. M.; Munn, J.; Blake, C. H.; Covey, K.; Deshpande, R.; Fleming, S. W.; Fabbian, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s and others

    2013-10-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of {approx}10{sup 5} red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.

  12. Whence the red panda?

    PubMed

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  13. On the Galactic Spin of Barred Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Li, Cheng; Park, Changbom; Wang, Lixin

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of the connection between the galactic spin parameter (λ d ) and the bar fraction in a volume-limited sample of 10,674 disk galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The galaxies in our sample are visually classified into one of three groups: non-barred galaxies and galaxies hosting long or short bars, respectively. We find that the spin distributions of these three classes are statistically different, with galaxies hosting long bars having the lowest λ d values, followed by non-barred galaxies, while galaxies with short bars present typically high spin parameters. The bar fraction presents its maximum at low to intermediate λ d values for the case of long bars, while the maximum for short bars is at high λ d . This bimodality is in good agreement with previous studies finding longer bars hosted by luminous, massive, red galaxies with a low content of cold gas, while short bars were found in low luminosity, low mass, blue galaxies that were typically gas rich. In addition, the rise and fall of the bar fraction as a function of λ d , within the long-bar sample shown in our results, can be explained as a result of two competing factors: the self-gravity of the disk that enhances bar instabilities and the support by random motions, instead of ordered rotational motion, that prevents the formation/growth of bars.

  14. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  15. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-10

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time. PMID:22575961

  16. ON THE GALACTIC SPIN OF BARRED DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Li, Cheng; Wang, Lixin; Park, Changbom

    2013-09-20

    We present a study of the connection between the galactic spin parameter (λ{sub d}) and the bar fraction in a volume-limited sample of 10,674 disk galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The galaxies in our sample are visually classified into one of three groups: non-barred galaxies and galaxies hosting long or short bars, respectively. We find that the spin distributions of these three classes are statistically different, with galaxies hosting long bars having the lowest λ{sub d} values, followed by non-barred galaxies, while galaxies with short bars present typically high spin parameters. The bar fraction presents its maximum at low to intermediate λ{sub d} values for the case of long bars, while the maximum for short bars is at high λ{sub d}. This bimodality is in good agreement with previous studies finding longer bars hosted by luminous, massive, red galaxies with a low content of cold gas, while short bars were found in low luminosity, low mass, blue galaxies that were typically gas rich. In addition, the rise and fall of the bar fraction as a function of λ{sub d}, within the long-bar sample shown in our results, can be explained as a result of two competing factors: the self-gravity of the disk that enhances bar instabilities and the support by random motions, instead of ordered rotational motion, that prevents the formation/growth of bars.

  17. THE NATURE OF OPTICALLY DULL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Chris D.; Gabor, Jared M.; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Brusa, Marcella; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Kelly, Brandon C.; Huchra, John P.; Jahnke, Knud; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick Z.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Maineri, Vincenzo

    2009-11-20

    We present infrared, optical, and X-ray data of 48 X-ray bright, optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field. These objects exhibit the X-ray luminosity of an AGN but lack broad and narrow emission lines in their optical spectrum. We show that despite the lack of optical emission lines, most of these optically dull AGNs are not well described by a typical passive red galaxy spectrum: instead they exhibit weak but significant blue emission like an unobscured AGN. Photometric observations over several years additionally show significant variability in the blue emission of four optically dull AGNs. The nature of the blue and infrared emission suggest that the optically inactive appearance of these AGNs cannot be caused by obscuration intrinsic to the AGNs. Instead, up to approx70% of optically dull AGNs are diluted by their hosts, with bright or simply edge-on hosts lying preferentially within the spectroscopic aperture. The remaining approx30% of optically dull AGNs have anomalously high f{sub X} /f{sub O} ratios and are intrinsically weak, not obscured, in the optical. These optically dull AGNs are best described as a weakly accreting AGN with a truncated accretion disk from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow.

  18. The angular clustering of WISE-selected active galactic nuclei: Different halos for obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Donoso, E.; Yan, Lin; Stern, D.; Assef, R. J.

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the angular correlation function for a sample of ∼170,000 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) extracted from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalog, selected to have red mid-IR colors (W1 – W2 > 0.8) and 4.6 μm flux densities brighter than 0.14 mJy). The sample is expected to be >90% reliable at identifying AGNs and to have a mean redshift of (z) = 1.1. In total, the angular clustering of WISE AGNs is roughly similar to that of optical AGNs. We cross-match these objects with the photometric Sloan Digital Sky Survey catalog and distinguish obscured sources with r – W2 > 6 from bluer, unobscured AGNs. Obscured sources present a higher clustering signal than unobscured sources. Since the host galaxy morphologies of obscured AGNs are not typical red sequence elliptical galaxies and show disks in many cases, it is unlikely that the increased clustering strength of the obscured population is driven by a host galaxy segregation bias. By using relatively complete redshift distributions from the COSMOS survey, we find that obscured sources at (z) ∼ 0.9 have a bias of b = 2.9 ± 0.6 and are hosted in dark matter halos with a typical mass of log (M/M {sub ☉} h {sup –1}) ∼ 13.5. In contrast, unobscured AGNs at (z) ∼ 1.1 have a bias of b = 1.6 ± 0.6 and inhabit halos of log (M/M {sub ☉} h {sup –1}) ∼ 12.4. These findings suggest that obscured AGNs inhabit denser environments than unobscured AGNs, and they are difficult to reconcile with the simplest AGN unification models, where obscuration is driven solely by orientation.

  19. A starburst region at the tip of the Galactic bar around l=347-350

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Amparo; Negueruela, Ignacio; González-Fernández, Carlos; Maíz-Apellániz, Jesús; Dorda, Ricardo; Clark, J. Simon

    2015-08-01

    In the past few years, several clusters of red supergiants have been discovered in a small region of the Milky Way, close to the base of the Scutum-Crux Arm and the tip of the Long Bar, between l=24º and l=29º. According to the number of observed red supergiants and using population synthesis models, they must contain very large stellar populations to harbour so many RSGs, some of them being candidates to the most massive young clusters in the Galaxy. These massive open clusters are part of a huge structure most likely containing hundreds of red supergiants. These results suggest that the Scutum complex represents a giant star formation region triggered by dynamical excitation by the Galactic bar, whose tip is believed to intersect the Scutum-Crux Arm close to this region. If this scenario is correct, a similar structure would be expected close to the opposite end of the Galactic long bar. We must find in an area between l=347º-350º (these sight lines include the expected location of the far tip of the Galactic bar in the model of González-Fernández et al. (2012)) likely candidates to very massive open clusters.We are carrying out a comprehensive optical and infrared photometric and spectroscopic study of this region containing the open clusters VdBH 222, Teutsch 85 and their surroundings. We have analyzed the population of VdBH 222 and we have found a large population of luminous supergiants and OB stars. The cluster lies behind ~7.5 mag of extinction and has a probable distance of ~ 10 kpc and an age of ~12 Ma. VdBH 222 is a young massive cluster with a likely mass > 20000 Msolar. Now, we are analyzing the population of the open cluster Teutsch 85 and surroundings, finding a numerous population of supergiants.In this work, we will discuss the possible role of the Galactic bar in triggering the formation of starburst clusters.

  20. Seeing Red in M32: Constraints on the Stellar Content from Near- and Mid-infrared Observations and Applications for Studies of More Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2014-08-01

    The properties of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Local Group galaxy M32 are investigated using ground- and space-based observations that span the 1-8 μm wavelength interval, with the goal of demonstrating the utility of infrared observations as probes of stellar content. Comparisons with isochrones indicate that the brightest resolved stars in M32 have ages of a few gigayears and are younger on average than AGB stars with the same intrinsic brightness in the outer disk of M31. Accounting for stellar variability is shown to be essential for modeling AGB luminosity functions (LFs). Model LFs that assume the star-forming history measured by Monachesi et al. and the variability properties of Galactic AGB stars match both the K and [5.8] LFs of M32. Models also suggest that the slope of the [5.8] LF between M [5.8] = -8.5 and -10.0 is sensitive to the mix of stellar ages, and a sizeable fraction of the stars in M32 must have an age older than 7 Gyr in order to match the [5.8] LF. The structural properties of M32 in the infrared are also investigated. The effective radii that are computed from near-infrared and mid-infrared isophotes are similar to those measured at visible wavelengths, suggesting that the stellar content of M32 is well mixed. However, isophotes at radii >16'' (>60 pc) in the near- and mid-infrared are flatter than those at visible wavelengths. The coefficient of the fourth-order cosine term in the Fourier expansion of isophotes changes from "boxy" values at r < 16'' to "disky" values at r > 48''in [3.6] and [4.5]. The mid-infrared colors near the center of M32 do not vary systematically with radius, providing evidence of a well mixed stellar content in this part of the galaxy. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.