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Sample records for red marrow 131ina

  1. Investigation of effect of variations in bone fraction and red marrow cellularity on bone marrow dosimetry in radio-immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilderman, S. J.; Roberson, P. L.; Bolch, W. E.; Dewaraja, Y. K.

    2013-07-01

    A method is described for computing patient-specific absorbed dose rates to active marrow which accounts for spatial variation in bone volume fraction and marrow cellularity. A module has been added to the 3D Monte Carlo dosimetry program DPM to treat energy deposition in the components of bone spongiosa distinctly. Homogeneous voxels in regions containing bone spongiosa (as defined on CT images) are assumed to be comprised only of bone, active (red) marrow and inactive (yellow) marrow. Cellularities are determined from biopsy, and bone volume fractions are computed from cellularities and CT-derived voxel densities. Electrons are assumed to deposit energy locally in the three constituent components in proportions determined by electron energy absorption fractions which depend on energy, cellularity, and bone volume fraction, and which are either taken from the literature or are derived from Monte Carlo simulations using EGS5. Separate algorithms are used to model primary β particles and secondary electrons generated after photon interactions. Treating energy deposition distinctly in bone spongiosa constituents leads to marrow dosimetry results which differ from homogeneous spongiosa dosimetry by up to 20%. Dose rates in active marrow regions with cellularities of 20, 50, and 80% can vary by up to 20%, and can differ by up to 10% as a function of bone volume fraction. Dose to bone marrow exhibits a strong dependence on marrow cellularity and a potentially significant dependence on bone volume fraction.

  2. Estimation of radiation absorbed doses to the red marrow in radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, D.A.; Sui Shen

    1995-02-01

    Myelotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor in radioimmunotherapy. Traditional methods most commonly used to estimate the radiation adsorbed dose to the bone marrow of patients consider contribution from radionuclide in the blood and/or total body. Targeted therapies, such as radioimmunotherapy, add a third potential source for radiation to the bone marrow because the radiolabeled targeting molecules can accumulate specifically on malignant target cells infiltrating the bone marrow. A non-invasive method for estimating the radiation absorbed dose to the red marrow of patients who have received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) has been developed and explored. The method depends on determining the cumulated activity in three contributing sources: (1) marrow; (2) blood; and (3) total body. The novel aspect of this method for estimating marrow radiation dose is derivation of the radiation dose for the entire red marrow from radiation dose estimates obtained by detection of cumulated activity in three lumbar vertebrae using a gamma camera. Contributions to the marrow radiation dose form marrow, blood, and total body cumulated activity were determined for patients who received an I-131 labeled MoAb, Lym-1, that reacts with malignant B-lymphocytes of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and nonHodgkin`s lymphoma. Six patients were selected for illustrative purposes because their vertebrae were readily visualized on lumbar images. 32 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Bone marrow transplantation for CVID-like humoral immune deficiency associated with red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Sayour, Elias J; Mousallem, Talal; Van Mater, David; Wang, Endi; Martin, Paul; Buckley, Rebecca H; Barfield, Raymond C

    2016-10-01

    Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have a higher incidence of autoimmune disease, which may mark the disease onset; however, anemia secondary to pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon presenting feature. Here, we describe a case of CVID-like humoral immune deficiency in a child who initially presented with red cell aplasia and ultimately developed progressive bone marrow failure. Although bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been associated with high mortality in CVID, our patient was successfully treated with a matched sibling BMT and engrafted with >98% donor chimerism and the development of normal antibody titers to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. PMID:27273469

  4. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  5. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianchao; Hou, Wensheng; Wu, Xiaoying; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efficiencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600–1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migration and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2, an increasing number of green fluorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 106 bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2 for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental findings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. PMID:25206807

  6. Visible red and infrared light alters gene expression in human marrow stromal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jie; Wang, Qing; Wai, Daniel; Zhou, Qunzhou; Shi, Shihong; Le, Anh D; Shi, Songtao; Yen, Stephen L-K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study tested whether or not gene expression in human marrow stromal fibroblast (MSF) cells depends on light wavelength and energy density. Material and Methods Primary cultures of isolated human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSC) were exposed to visible red (VR, 633 nm) and infrared (IR, 830) radiation wavelengths from a light emitting diode (LED) over a range of energy densities (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 Joules/cm2) Cultured cells were assayed for cell proliferation, osteogenic potential, adipogenesis, mRNA and protein content. mRNA was analyzed by microarray, and compared among different wavelengths and energy densities. Mesenchymal and epithelial cell responses were compared to determine whether responses were cell-type specific. Protein array analysis was used to further analyze key pathways identified by microarrays. Result Different wavelengths and energy densities produced unique sets of genes identified by microarray analysis. Pathway analysis pointed to TGF beta 1 in the visible red and Akt 1 in the infrared wavelengths as key pathways to study. TGF beta protein arrays suggested switching from canonical to non-canonical TGF beta pathways with increases to longer IR wavelengths. Microarrays suggest RANKL and TIMP 10 followed IR energy density dose response curves. Epithelial and mesenchymal cells respond differently to stimulation by light suggesting cell-type specific response is possible. Conclusions These studies demonstrate differential gene expression with different wavelengths, energy densities and cell types. These differences in gene expression have the potential to be exploited for therapeutic purposes and can help explain contradictory results in the literature when wavelengths, energy densities and cell types differ. PMID:25865533

  7. Resolution enhancement in MR spectroscopy of red bone marrow fat via intermolecular double-quantum coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jianfeng; Cui, Xiaohong; Huang, Yuqing; Zhong, Jianhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High-resolution 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is generally inaccessible in red bone marrow (RBM) tissues using conventional MRS techniques. This is because signal from these tissues suffers from severe inhomogeneity in the main static B0 field originated from the intrinsic honeycomb structures in trabecular bone. One way to reduce effects of B0 field inhomogeneity is by using the intermolecular double quantum coherence (iDQC) technique, which has been shown in other systems to obtain signals insensitive to B0 field inhomogeneity. In the present study, we employed an iDQC approach to enhance the spectral resolution of RBM. The feasibility and performance of this method for achieving high resolution MRS was verified by experiments on phantoms and pig vertebral bone samples. Unsaturated fatty acid peaks which overlap in the conventional MRS were well resolved and identified in the iDQC spectrum. Quantitative comparison of fractions of three types of fatty acids was performed between iDQC spectra on the in situ RMB and conventional MRS on the extracted fat from the same RBM. Observations of unsaturated fatty acids with iDQC MRS may provide valuable information and may hold potential in diagnosis of diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and leukemia.

  8. Comparison of a restrictive versus liberal red cell transfusion policy for patients with myelodysplasia, aplastic anaemia, and other congenital bone marrow failure disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yisu; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Vyas, Paresh

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the efficacy and safety of a restrictive versus liberal red cell transfusion strategy for patients with long-term bone marrow failure. These include myelodysplasia, acquired aplastic anaemia, and other inherited bone marrow failure disorders. PMID:25983657

  9. Influence of age, sex and calendar year on lifetime accumulated red bone marrow dose from diagnostic radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Meiboom, Merle Friederike; Weitmann, Kerstin; Terschüren, Claudia; von Boetticher, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to evaluate the relevance of different factors influencing lifetime accumulated red bone marrow dose, such as calendar year, age and sex. The lifetime dose was estimated for controls interviewed in person (N = 2811, 37.5% women) of the population-based representative Northern Germany Leukemia and Lymphoma Study. Data were assessed in standardized computer-assisted personal interviews. The calculation of doses is based on a comprehensive quantification model including calendar year, sex, kind of examination, and technical development. In multivariate regression models the annual red bone marrow dose was analyzed depending on age, sex and calendar year to consider simultaneously temporal changes in radiologic practice and individual risk factors. While the number of examinations continuously rises over time, the dose shows two peaks around 1950 and after 1980. Men are exposed to higher doses than woman. Until 1970 traditional examinations like conventional and mass screening examinations caused the main dose. They were then replaced by technically advanced examinations mainly computed tomography and cardiac catheter. The distribution of the red bone marrow dose over lifetime depends highly on the technical standards and radiation protection survey. To a lesser extent it is influenced by age and sex of the subjects. Thus epidemiological studies concerning the assessment of radiation exposure should consider the calendar year in which the examination was conducted. PMID:24244286

  10. Red bone marrow doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent from four maxillary occlusal projections

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, T.I.; Wohni, T.

    1984-02-01

    Phantom measurements of red bone marrow (RBM) doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent (SEDE) from four different maxillary occlusal projections are presented. For each projection, different combinations of focus-skin distances and tube potentials were compared with regard to the patient's radiation load. The axial incisal view produced the highest patient exposures, with a maximum red bone marrow dose of 122.5 microGy/exposure, integral absorbed dose of 8.6 mJ/exposure, and SEDE values of 39.6 microSv/exposure. The corresponding values from the frontal, lateral occlusal, and tuber views ranged between 4% and 44% of the axial incisal view values for the integral absorbed dose and SEDE values, and between 0.3% and 3% for the red bone marrow doses. Increasing the focus-skin distance from 17.5 cm to 27 cm is accompanied by a 24% to 30% reduction in integral absorbed dose. Increasing the tube potential from 50 kV to 65 kV likewise results in a 23% reduction in absorbed energy.

  11. Red bone marrow dose calculations in radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on the updated VCH adult male phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jinqin; Xie, Tianwu; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Qian

    2014-04-01

    Red bone marrow (RBM) is an important dose-limiting tissue that has high radiosensitivity but is difficult to identify on clinical medical images. In this study, we investigated dose distribution in RBM for prostate cancer radiotherapy. Four suborgans were identified in the skeleton of the visible Chinese human phantom: cortical bone (CB), trabecular bone (TB), RBM, and yellow bone marrow (YBM). Dose distributions in the phantom were evaluated by the Monte Carlo method. When the left os coxae was taken as the organ-at-risk (OAR), the difference in absorbed dose between RBM and each CB and TB was up to 20%, but was much less (≤3.1%) between RBM and YBM. When the left os coxae and entire bone were both taken as OARs, RBM dose also increased with increasing planning target volume size. The results indicate the validity of using dose to homogeneous bone marrow mixture for estimating dose to RBM when RBM is not available in computational phantoms. In addition, the human skeletal system developed in this study provides a model for considering RBM dose in radiotherapy planning.

  12. Differentiation between Focal Malignant Marrow-Replacing Lesions and Benign Red Marrow Deposition of the Spine with T2*-Corrected Fat-Signal Fraction Map Using a Three-Echo Volume Interpolated Breath-Hold Gradient Echo Dixon Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Paek, Mun-Young; Chung, Tae-Sub; Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of T2*-corrected fat-signal fraction (FF) map by using the three-echo volume interpolated breath-hold gradient echo (VIBE) Dixon sequence to differentiate between malignant marrow-replacing lesions and benign red marrow deposition of vertebrae. Materials and Methods We assessed 32 lesions from 32 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging after being referred for assessment of a known or possible vertebral marrow abnormality. The lesions were divided into 21 malignant marrow-replacing lesions and 11 benign red marrow depositions. Three sequences for the parameter measurements were obtained by using a 1.5-T MR imaging scanner as follows: three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence for FF; conventional T1-weighted imaging for the lesion-disc ratio (LDR); pre- and post-gadolinium enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images for the contrast-enhancement ratio (CER). A region of interest was drawn for each lesion for parameter measurements. The areas under the curve (AUC) of the parameters and their sensitivities and specificities at the most ideal cutoff values from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were obtained. AUC, sensitivity, and specificity were respectively compared between FF and CER. Results The AUCs of FF, LDR, and CER were 0.96, 0.80, and 0.72, respectively. In the comparison of diagnostic performance between the FF and CER, the FF showed a significantly larger AUC as compared to the CER (p = 0.030), although the difference of sensitivity (p = 0.157) and specificity (p = 0.157) were not significant. Conclusion Fat-signal fraction measurement using T2*-corrected three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence is feasible and has a more accurate diagnostic performance, than the CER, in distinguishing benign red marrow deposition from malignant bone marrow-replacing lesions. PMID:25469090

  13. The relative roles of MHC and non-MHC antigens in bone marrow transplantation in rats. Graft acceptance and antigenic expression on donor red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Gill, T J; Kunz, H W; Dixon-McCarthy, B D

    1983-06-01

    In order to investigate the influence of MHC and non-MHC genes in bone marrow transplantation, various combinations of congenic and inbred strains of rats were used as donors and recipients. A standard regimen of busulfan and cyclophosphamide treatment was used to condition the recipients. The resultant survival patterns of the animals indicated that: (1) a difference across the entire RT1 (MHC) complex is sufficient for the induction of fatal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in 100% of the engrafted animals; and (2) the blood group antigens RT2 and RT3, which are controlled by non-MHC genes, do not cause bone marrow graft rejection or GVHD. There were sequential changes of expression in surface alloantigens on the red cells in different donor-recipient combinations without other hematologic changes in the busulfan-cyclophosphamide conditioned bone marrow chimeras. PMID:6346598

  14. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Shenoy, Apeksha; Shen, Jincheng; Howard, David; Schipper, Matthew J.; Wilderman, Scott; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Chun, Se Young; Dewaraja, Yuni K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (∼17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results

  15. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M. Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Shen, Jincheng; Schipper, Matthew J.; Wilderman, Scott; Chun, Se Young

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (∼17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results

  16. Influence of total-body mass on the scaling of S-factors for patient-specific, blood-based red-marrow dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traino, A. C.; Ferrari, M.; Cremonesi, M.; Stabin, M. G.

    2007-09-01

    To perform patient-specific, blood-based red-marrow dosimetry, dose conversion factors (the S factors in the MIRD formalism) have to be scaled by patients' organ masses. The dose to red marrow includes both self-dose and cross-irradiation contributions. Linear mass scaling for the self-irradiation term only is usually applied as a first approximation, whereas the cross-irradiation term is considered to be mass independent. Recently, the need of a mass scaling correction on both terms, not necessarily linear and dependent on the radionuclide, has been highlighted in the literature. S-factors taking into account different mass adjustments of organs are available in the OLINDA/EXM code. In this paper, a general algorithm able to fit the mass-dependent factors Srm<--tb and Srm<--rm is suggested and included in a more general equation for red-marrow dose calculation. Moreover, parameters to be considered specifically for therapeutic radionuclides such as 131I, 90Y and 177Lu are reported. The red-marrow doses calculated by the traditional and new algorithms are compared for 131I in ablation therapy (14 pts), 177Lu- (13 pts) and 90Y- (11 pts) peptide therapy for neuroendocrine tumours, and 90Y-Zevalin therapy for NHL (21 pts). The range of differences observed is as follows: -36% to -10% for 131I ablation, -22% to 5% for 177Lu-DOTATATE, -9% to 11% for 90Y-DOTATOC and -8% to 6% for 90Y-Zevalin. All differences are mostly due to the activity in the remainder of the body contributing to cross-irradiation. This paper quantifies the influence of mass scaling adjustment on usually applied therapies and shows how to derive the appropriate parameters for other radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals.

  17. Red marrow and blood dosimetry in (131)I treatment of metastatic thyroid carcinoma: pre-treatment versus in-therapy results.

    PubMed

    Giostra, A; Richetta, E; Pasquino, M; Miranti, A; Cutaia, C; Brusasco, G; Pellerito, R E; Stasi, M

    2016-06-01

    Treatment with radioiodine is a standard procedure for patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer, but the main approach to the therapy is still empiric, consisting of the administration of fixed activities. A predictive individualized dosimetric study may represent an important tool for physicians to determine the best activity to prescribe. The aim of this work is to compare red marrow and blood absorbed dose values obtained in the pre-treatment (PT) dosimetry phase with those obtained in the in-treatment (IT) dosimetry phase in order to estimate the predictive power of PT trial doses and to determine if they can be used as a decision-making tool to safely administer higher (131)I activity to potentially increase the efficacy of treatment. The PT and IT dosimetry for 50 patients has been evaluated using three different dosimetric approaches. In all three approaches blood and red marrow doses, are calculated as the sum of two components, the dose from (131)I activity in the blood and the dose from (131)I activity located in the remainder of the body (i.e. the blood and whole-body contributions to the total dose). PT and IT dose values to blood and red marrow appear to be well correlated irrespective of the dosimetric approach used. Linear regression analyses of PT and IT total doses, for blood and red marrow, and the whole-body contribution to these doses, showed consistent best fit slope and correlation coefficient values of approximately 0.9 and 0.6, respectively: analyses of the blood dose contribution to the total doses also yielded similar values for the best fit slope but with correlation coefficient values of approximately 0.4 reflecting the greater variance in these dose estimates. These findings suggest that pre-treatment red marrow dose assessments may represent an important tool to personalize metastatic thyroid cancer treatment, removing the constraints of a fixed activity approach and permitting potentially more effective higher (131)I

  18. Red marrow and blood dosimetry in 131I treatment of metastatic thyroid carcinoma: pre-treatment versus in-therapy results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giostra, A.; Richetta, E.; Pasquino, M.; Miranti, A.; Cutaia, C.; Brusasco, G.; Pellerito, R. E.; Stasi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Treatment with radioiodine is a standard procedure for patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer, but the main approach to the therapy is still empiric, consisting of the administration of fixed activities. A predictive individualized dosimetric study may represent an important tool for physicians to determine the best activity to prescribe. The aim of this work is to compare red marrow and blood absorbed dose values obtained in the pre-treatment (PT) dosimetry phase with those obtained in the in-treatment (IT) dosimetry phase in order to estimate the predictive power of PT trial doses and to determine if they can be used as a decision-making tool to safely administer higher 131I activity to potentially increase the efficacy of treatment. The PT and IT dosimetry for 50 patients has been evaluated using three different dosimetric approaches. In all three approaches blood and red marrow doses, are calculated as the sum of two components, the dose from 131I activity in the blood and the dose from 131I activity located in the remainder of the body (i.e. the blood and whole-body contributions to the total dose). PT and IT dose values to blood and red marrow appear to be well correlated irrespective of the dosimetric approach used. Linear regression analyses of PT and IT total doses, for blood and red marrow, and the whole-body contribution to these doses, showed consistent best fit slope and correlation coefficient values of approximately 0.9 and 0.6, respectively: analyses of the blood dose contribution to the total doses also yielded similar values for the best fit slope but with correlation coefficient values of approximately 0.4 reflecting the greater variance in these dose estimates. These findings suggest that pre-treatment red marrow dose assessments may represent an important tool to personalize metastatic thyroid cancer treatment, removing the constraints of a fixed activity approach and permitting potentially more effective higher 131I activities to be

  19. Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bone marrow and capability for blood cell production, including red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells ( ... can affect the bone marrow and blood cell production. A specialist who has expertise in the diagnosis ...

  20. Estimating 131I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in thyroid cancer patients: probe detection versus image quantification*

    PubMed Central

    Willegaignon, José; Pelissoni, Rogério Alexandre; Lima, Beatriz Christine de Godoy Diniz; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Queiroz, Marcelo Araújo; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the probe detection method with the image quantification method when estimating 131I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in the treatment of thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods Fourteen patients with metastatic thyroid cancer, without metastatic bone involvement, were submitted to therapy planning in order to tailor the therapeutic amount of 131I to each individual. Whole-body scans and probe measurements were performed at 4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after 131I administration in order to estimate the effective half-life (Teff) and residence time of 131I in the body. Results The mean values for Teff and residence time, respectively, were 19 ± 9 h and 28 ± 12 h for probe detection, compared with 20 ± 13 h and 29 ± 18 h for image quantification. The average dose to the red marrow and whole body, respectively, was 0.061 ± 0.041 mGy/MBq and 0.073 ± 0.040 mGy/MBq for probe detection, compared with 0.066 ± 0.055 mGy/MBq and 0.078 ± 0.056 mGy/MBq for image quantification. Statistical analysis proved that there were no significant differences between the two methods for estimating the Teff (p = 0.801), residence time (p = 0.801), dose to the red marrow (p = 0.708), and dose to the whole body (p = 0.811), even when we considered an optimized approach for calculating doses only at 4 h and 96 h after 131I administration (p > 0.914). Conclusion There is full agreement as to the feasibility of using probe detection and image quantification when estimating 131I biokinetics and red-marrow/whole-body doses. However, because the probe detection method is inefficacious in identifying tumor sites and critical organs during radionuclide therapy and therefore liable to skew adjustment of the amount of 131I to be administered to patients under such therapy, it should be used with caution. PMID:27403014

  1. Comparison of a restrictive versus liberal red cell transfusion policy for patients with myelodysplasia, aplastic anaemia, and other congenital bone marrow failure disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yisu; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Vyas, Paresh

    2015-01-01

    Background Bone marrow failure disorders include a heterogenous group of disorders, of which myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), forms the largest subgroup. MDS is predominantly a disease of the elderly, with many elderly people managed conservatively with regular allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusions to treat their anaemia. However, RBC transfusions are not without risk. Despite regular transfusions playing a central role in treating such patients, the optimal RBC transfusion strategy (restrictive versus liberal) is currently unclear. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of a restrictive versus liberal red blood cell transfusion strategy for patients with myelodysplasia, acquired aplastic anaemia, and other inherited bone marrow failure disorders. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 4), Ovid MEDLINE (from 1946), Ovid EMBASE (from 1974), EBSCO CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to 26th May 2015. Selection criteria RCTs including patients with long-term bone marrow failure disorders that require allogeneic blood transfusion, who are not being actively treated with a haematopoietic stem cell transplant, or intensive chemotherapy. Data collection and analysis We used standard Cochrane review methodology. One author initially screened all references, and excluded any that were clearly irrelevant or duplicates. Two authors then independently screened all abstracts of articles, identified by the review search strategy, for relevancy. Two authors independently assessed the full text of all potentially relevant articles for eligibility, completed the data extraction and assessed the studies for risk of bias using The Cochrane Collaboration’s ’Risk of bias’ tool. Main results We included one trial (13 participants) and identified three ongoing trials that assess RBC

  2. Comparison of mathematical models for red marrow and blood absorbed dose estimation in the radioiodine treatment of advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranti, A.; Giostra, A.; Richetta, E.; Gino, E.; Pellerito, R. E.; Stasi, M.

    2015-02-01

    Metastatic and recurrent differentiated thyroid carcinoma is preferably treated with 131I, whose administered activity is limited by red marrow (RM) toxicity, originally correlated by Benua to a blood absorbed dose higher than 2 Gy. Afterward a variety of dosimetric approaches has been proposed. The aim of this work is to compare the results of the Benua formula with the ones of other three blood and RM absorbed dose formulae. Materials and methods have been borrowed by the dosimetric protocol of the Italian Internal Dosimetry group and adapted to the routine of our centre. Wilcoxon t-tests and percentage differences have been applied for comparison purposes. Results are significantly different (p < 0.05) from each other, with an average percentage difference between Benua versus other results of -22%. The dosimetric formula applied to determine blood or RM absorbed dose may contribute significantly to increase heterogeneity in absorbed dose and dose-response results. Standardization should be a major objective.

  3. Bone-marrow transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Bone-marrow transplants are performed for: deficiencies in red blood cells (aplastic anemia) and white blood cells (leukemia or ... Bone-marrow transplants prolong the life of patients who might otherwise die. As with all major organ transplants, however, ...

  4. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen to the body’s tissues in exchange for carbon dioxide, which is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts ...

  5. Excess of veno-occlusive disease in a randomized clinical trial on a higher trigger for red blood cell transfusion after bone marrow transplantation: a canadian blood and marrow transplant group trial.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nancy; Lacroix, Jacques; Alexandrov, Lubomir; Clayton, Lucy; Cortier, Marion; Schultz, Kirk R; Bittencourt, Henrique; Duval, Michel

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that maintaining high hemoglobin levels in patients after chemotherapy reduced the length of neutropenia. Thus, we undertook a randomized, controlled, clinical trial in children undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation after receiving a myeloablative conditioning regimen to compare 2 hemoglobin thresholds as triggers for red blood cell transfusion: 120 g/L in the experimental arm and 70 g/L in the control arm. The Data and Safety Monitoring Board closed the study after enrollment of the sixth patient because 3 patients in the experimental arm contracted veno-occlusive disease, but none in the control arm did (P = .05). Ascites was present in all 3 patients, pleura effusion in 2, and portal vein thrombosis in 2. One patient experienced hepatic failure and required treatment with the molecular adsorbent recycling system. Another patient required hemodialysis for renal failure. No major imbalance between groups was seen with regard to risk factors for veno-occlusive disease. Therefore, maintaining the hemoglobin at higher levels should be avoided after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:23220014

  6. Establishment of a γ-H2AX foci-based assay to determine biological dose of radon to red bone marrow in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; He, Linfeng; Fan, Dunhuang; Ding, Defang; Wang, Xufei; Gao, Yun; Zhang, Xuxia; Li, Qiang; Chen, Honghong

    2016-01-01

    The biodosimetric information is critical for assessment of cancer risk in populations exposed to high radon. However, no tools are available for biological dose estimation following radon exposure. Here, we established a γ-H2AX foci-based assay to determine biological dose to red bone marrow (RBM) in radon-inhaled rats. After 1–3 h of in vitro radon exposure, a specific pattern of γ-H2AX foci, linear tracks with individual p-ATM and p-DNA-PKcs foci, was observed, and the yield of γ-H2AX foci and its linear tracks displayed a linear dose-response manner in both rat peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and bone-marrow lymphocytes (BMLs). When the cumulative doses of radon inhaled by rats reached 14, 30 and 60 working level months (WLM), the yields of three types of foci markedly increased in both PBLs and BMLs, and γ-H2AX foci-based dose estimates to RBM were 0.97, 2.06 and 3.94 mGy, respectively. Notably, BMLs displayed a more profound increase of three types of foci than PBLs, and the absorbed dose ratio between BMLs and PBLs was similar between rats exposed to 30 and 60 WLM of radon. Taken together, γ-H2AX foci quantitation in PBLs is able to estimate RBM-absorbed doses with the dose-response curve of γ-H2AX foci after in vitro radon exposure and the ratio of RBM- to PBL-absorbed doses in rats following radon exposure. PMID:27445126

  7. Establishment of a γ-H2AX foci-based assay to determine biological dose of radon to red bone marrow in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; He, Linfeng; Fan, Dunhuang; Ding, Defang; Wang, Xufei; Gao, Yun; Zhang, Xuxia; Li, Qiang; Chen, Honghong

    2016-01-01

    The biodosimetric information is critical for assessment of cancer risk in populations exposed to high radon. However, no tools are available for biological dose estimation following radon exposure. Here, we established a γ-H2AX foci-based assay to determine biological dose to red bone marrow (RBM) in radon-inhaled rats. After 1-3 h of in vitro radon exposure, a specific pattern of γ-H2AX foci, linear tracks with individual p-ATM and p-DNA-PKcs foci, was observed, and the yield of γ-H2AX foci and its linear tracks displayed a linear dose-response manner in both rat peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and bone-marrow lymphocytes (BMLs). When the cumulative doses of radon inhaled by rats reached 14, 30 and 60 working level months (WLM), the yields of three types of foci markedly increased in both PBLs and BMLs, and γ-H2AX foci-based dose estimates to RBM were 0.97, 2.06 and 3.94 mGy, respectively. Notably, BMLs displayed a more profound increase of three types of foci than PBLs, and the absorbed dose ratio between BMLs and PBLs was similar between rats exposed to 30 and 60 WLM of radon. Taken together, γ-H2AX foci quantitation in PBLs is able to estimate RBM-absorbed doses with the dose-response curve of γ-H2AX foci after in vitro radon exposure and the ratio of RBM- to PBL-absorbed doses in rats following radon exposure. PMID:27445126

  8. Establishment of a γ-H2AX foci-based assay to determine biological dose of radon to red bone marrow in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; He, Linfeng; Fan, Dunhuang; Ding, Defang; Wang, Xufei; Gao, Yun; Zhang, Xuxia; Li, Qiang; Chen, Honghong

    2016-07-01

    The biodosimetric information is critical for assessment of cancer risk in populations exposed to high radon. However, no tools are available for biological dose estimation following radon exposure. Here, we established a γ-H2AX foci-based assay to determine biological dose to red bone marrow (RBM) in radon-inhaled rats. After 1–3 h of in vitro radon exposure, a specific pattern of γ-H2AX foci, linear tracks with individual p-ATM and p-DNA-PKcs foci, was observed, and the yield of γ-H2AX foci and its linear tracks displayed a linear dose-response manner in both rat peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and bone-marrow lymphocytes (BMLs). When the cumulative doses of radon inhaled by rats reached 14, 30 and 60 working level months (WLM), the yields of three types of foci markedly increased in both PBLs and BMLs, and γ-H2AX foci-based dose estimates to RBM were 0.97, 2.06 and 3.94 mGy, respectively. Notably, BMLs displayed a more profound increase of three types of foci than PBLs, and the absorbed dose ratio between BMLs and PBLs was similar between rats exposed to 30 and 60 WLM of radon. Taken together, γ-H2AX foci quantitation in PBLs is able to estimate RBM-absorbed doses with the dose-response curve of γ-H2AX foci after in vitro radon exposure and the ratio of RBM- to PBL-absorbed doses in rats following radon exposure.

  9. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  10. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity, nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  11. Personalized estimation of dose to red bone marrow and the associated leukaemia risk attributable to pelvic kilo-voltage cone beam computed tomography scans in image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibao; Yan, Yulong; Nath, Ravinder; Bao, Shanglian; Deng, Jun

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the imaging dose to red bone marrow (RBM) and the associated leukaemia risks attributable to pelvic kilo-voltage cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) scans in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The RBM doses of 42 patients (age 2.7-86.4 years) were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The trabecular spongiosa was segmented to substitute RBM rather than the whole bone. Quantitative correlations between anthropometric variables such as age, physical bone density (PBD) and RBM dose were established. Personalized leukaemia risk was evaluated using an improved Boice model which included the age-associated RBM involvement. An incremental leukaemia risk of 29%-82% (mean = 45%) was found to be associated with 40 pelvic kVCBCT scans in the subject group used in a typical external beam radiation therapy course. Higher risks were observed in children. Due to the enhanced photoelectric effect in high atomic number materials, PBD was observed to strongly affect the RBM dose. Considerable overestimations (9%-42%, mean = 28%) were observed if the whole bone doses were used as surrogates of RBM doses. The personalized estimation of RBM dose and associated leukaemia risk caused by pelvic kVCBCT scans is clinically feasible with the proposed empirical models. Higher radiogenic cancer risks are associated with repeated kVCBCT scans in IGRT of cancer patients, especially children.

  12. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may be taken from the pelvic or breast bone. Sometimes, other areas are used. Marrow is removed ...

  13. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  14. Imaging of Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sopo; Ouyang, Tao; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow is the essential for function of hematopoiesis, which is vital for the normal functioning of the body. Bone marrow disorders or dysfunctions may be evaluated by blood workup, peripheral smears, marrow biopsy, plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT), MRI and nuclear medicine scan. It is important to distinguish normal spinal marrow from pathology to avoid missing a pathology or misinterpreting normal changes, either of which may result in further testing and increased health care costs. This article focuses on the diffuse bone marrow pathologies, because the majority of the bone marrow pathologies related to hematologic disorders are diffuse. PMID:27444005

  15. Use of Monte Carlo simulations with a realistic rat phantom for examining the correlation between hematopoietic system response and red marrow absorbed dose in Brown Norway rats undergoing radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 90}Y-BR96 mAbs

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Erik; Ljungberg, Michael; Martensson, Linda; Nilsson, Rune; Tennvall, Jan; Strand, Sven-Erik; Joensson, Bo-Anders

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Biokinetic and dosimetry studies in laboratory animals often precede clinical radionuclide therapies in humans. A reliable evaluation of therapeutic efficacy is essential and should be based on accurate dosimetry data from a realistic dosimetry model. The aim of this study was to develop an anatomically realistic dosimetry model for Brown Norway rats to calculate S factors for use in evaluating correlations between absorbed dose and biological effects in a preclinical therapy study. Methods: A realistic rat phantom (Roby) was used, which has some flexibility that allows for a redefinition of organ sizes. The phantom was modified to represent the anatomic geometry of a Brown Norway rat, which was used for Monte Carlo calculations of S factors. Kinetic data for radiolabeled BR96 monoclonal antibodies were used to calculate the absorbed dose. Biological data were gathered from an activity escalation study with {sup 90}Y- and {sup 177}Lu-labeled BR96 monoclonal antibodies, in which blood cell counts and bodyweight were examined up to 2 months follow-up after injection. Reductions in white blood cell and platelet counts and declines in bodyweight were quantified by four methods and compared to the calculated absorbed dose to the bone marrow or the total body. Results: A red marrow absorbed dose-dependent effect on hematological parameters was observed, which could be evaluated by a decrease in blood cell counts. The absorbed dose to the bone marrow, corresponding to the maximal tolerable activity that could safely be administered, was determined to 8.3 Gy for {sup 177}Lu and 12.5 Gy for {sup 90}Y. Conclusions: There was a clear correlation between the hematological effects, quantified with some of the studied parameters, and the calculated red marrow absorbed doses. The decline in body weight was stronger correlated to the total body absorbed dose, rather than the red marrow absorbed dose. Finally, when considering a constant activity concentration, the phantom

  16. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cell transplant; Allogeneic-donation ... There are two types of bone marrow donation: Autologous bone marrow transplant is when people donate their own bone marrow. "Auto" means self. Allogenic bone marrow transplant is when another person ...

  17. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... creates suction. A small sample of bone marrow fluid flows into the tube. The needle is removed. Pressure and then a bandage are applied to the skin. The bone marrow fluid is sent to a laboratory and examined under ...

  18. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells ...

  19. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  20. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  1. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  2. Starvation marrow - gelatinous transformation of bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Osgood, Eric; Muddassir, Salman; Jaju, Minal; Moser, Robert; Farid, Farwa; Mewada, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management. PMID:25317270

  3. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  4. A STUDY OF PREDICTED BONE MARROW DISTRIBUTION ON CALCULATED MARROW DOSE FROM EXTERNAL RADIATION EXPOSURES USING TWO SETS OF IMAGE DATA FOR THE SAME INDIVIDUAL

    PubMed Central

    Caracappa, Peter F.; Chao, T. C. Ephraim; Xu, X. George

    2010-01-01

    Red bone marrow is among the tissues of the human body that are most sensitive to ionizing radiation, but red bone marrow cannot be distinguished from yellow bone marrow by normal radiographic means. When using a computational model of the body constructed from computed tomography (CT) images for radiation dose, assumptions must be applied to calculate the dose to the red bone marrow. This paper presents an analysis of two methods of calculating red bone marrow distribution: 1) a homogeneous mixture of red and yellow bone marrow throughout the skeleton, and 2) International Commission on Radiological Protection cellularity factors applied to each bone segment. A computational dose model was constructed from the CT image set of the Visible Human Project and compared to the VIP-Man model, which was derived from color photographs of the same individual. These two data sets for the same individual provide the unique opportunity to compare the methods applied to the CT-based model against the observed distribution of red bone marrow for that individual. The mass of red bone marrow in each bone segment was calculated using both methods. The effect of the different red bone marrow distributions was analyzed by calculating the red bone marrow dose using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code for parallel beams of monoenergetic photons over an energy range of 30 keV to 6 MeV, cylindrical (simplified CT) sources centered about the head and abdomen over an energy range of 30 keV to 1 MeV, and a whole-body electron irradiation treatment protocol for 3.9 MeV electrons. Applying the method with cellularity factors improves the average difference in the estimation of mass in each bone segment as compared to the mass in VIP-Man by 45% over the homogenous mixture method. Red bone marrow doses calculated by the two methods are similar for parallel photon beams at high energy (above about 200 keV), but differ by as much as 40% at lower energies. The calculated red bone marrow doses differ

  5. [Pharmacokinetic substantiation of the use of 111In-citrate in bone marrow studies].

    PubMed

    Korsunskiĭ, V N; Tarasenko, Iu I; Koval'chuk, N D; Kosheleva, I Iu; Popov, V I

    1986-07-01

    Soviet radiopharmaceutical 111In-citrin has been studied to define its possible application for marrow visualization. 111In-citrin has been shown to accumulate in the red marrow, parenchymal organs and to be excreted from animal organism by urinary system predominately. 111In-citrin has advantages in defining the nuclide concentrations in marrow blood and serum as compared with colloid preparations and 111In-chloride. 111In-citrin is supposed to be an adequate radiopharmaceutical preparation for visualization of the red marrow. PMID:3736386

  6. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  7. Bone Marrow Dosimetry Using 124I-PET

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jazmin; Humm, John L.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Larson, Steven M.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow is usually dose-limiting for radioimmunotherapy. In this study, we directly estimated red marrow activity concentration and the self-dose component of absorbed radiation dose to red marrow based on PET/CT of 2 different 124I-labeled antibodies (cG250 and huA33) and compared the results with plasma activity concentration and plasma-based dose estimates. Methods Two groups of patients injected with 124I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (11 patients with renal cancer receiving 124I-cG250 and 5 patients with colorectal cancer receiving 124I- huA33) were imaged by PET or PET/CT on 2 or 3 occasions after infusion. Regions of interest were drawn over several lumbar vertebrae, and red marrow activity concentration was quantified. Plasma activity concentration was also quantified using multiple patient blood samples. The red marrow–to–plasma activity concentration ratio (RMPR) was calculated at the times of imaging. The self-dose component of the absorbed radiation dose to the red marrow was estimated from the images, from the plasma measurements, and using a combination of both sets of measurements. Results RMPR was observed to increase with time for both groups of patients. Mean (±SD) time-dependent RMPR (RMPR(t)) for the cG250 group increased from 0.13 ± 0.06 immediately after infusion to 0.23 ± 0.09 at approximately 6 d after infusion. For the huA33 group, mean RMPR(t) was 0.10 ± 0.04 immediately after infusion, 0.13 ± 0.05 approximately 2 d after infusion, and 0.20 ± 0.09 approximately 7 d after infusion. Plasma-based estimates of red marrow self-dose tended to be greater than image-based values by, on average, 11% and 47% for cG250 and huA33, respectively, but by as much as −73% to 62% for individual patients. The hybrid method combining RMPR(t) and plasma activity concentration provided a closer match to the image-based dose estimates (average discrepancies, −2% and 18% for cG250 and huA33, respectively). Conclusion These results suggest that

  8. Bone marrow culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015 Updated by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  9. Bone marrow fat.

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Pierre; Pansini, Vittorio; Cortet, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Bone marrow fat (BMF) results from an accumulation of fat cells within the bone marrow. Fat is not a simple filling tissue but is now considered as an actor within bone microenvironment. BMF is not comparable to other fat depots, as in subcutaneous or visceral tissues. Recent studies on bone marrow adipocytes have shown that they do not appear only as storage cells, but also as cells secreting adipokines, like leptin and adiponectin. Moreover bone marrow adipocytes share the same precursor with osteoblasts, the mesenchymal stem cell. It is now well established that high BMF is associated with weak bone mass in osteoporosis, especially during aging and anorexia nervosa. But numerous questions remain discussed: what is the precise phenotype of bone marrow adipocytes? What is the real function of BMF, and how does bone marrow adipocyte act on its environment? Is the increase of BMF during osteoporosis responsible for bone loss? Is BMF involved in other diseases? How to measure BMF in humans? A better understanding of BMF could allow to obtain new diagnostic tools for osteoporosis management, and could open major therapeutic perspectives. PMID:24703396

  10. What Is a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure allows the recipient to get new stem cells that work properly. Stem cells are found in bone marrow, ... the body doesn't make enough red blood cells or they don't work properly. Certain immune-deficiency diseases that prevent the ...

  11. Bone marrow aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow aspiration biopsies are carried out principally to permit cytological assessment but also for immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, molecular genetic, and other specialised investigations. Often, a trephine biopsy is carried out as part of the same procedure. Bone marrow aspirations should be carried out by trained individuals who are aware of the indications, contraindications, and hazards of the procedure. They should follow a standard operating procedure. The operator should have made an adequate assessment of clinical and haematological features to ensure both that appropriate indications exist and that all relevant tests are performed. For the patient's comfort and safety, the posterior iliac crest is generally the preferred site of aspiration. Films of aspirated marrow and, when appropriate, films of crushed particles should be made and labelled. Once thoroughly dry, films should be fixed and stained. As a minimum, a Romanowsky stain and a Perls' stain are required. A cover slip should be applied. The bone marrow films should be assessed and reported in a systematic manner so that nothing of importance is overlooked, using a low power, then intermediate, then high power objective. A differential count should be performed. An interpretation of the findings, in the light of the clinical and haematological features, should be given. The report should be signed or computer authorised, using a secure password, and issued in a timely manner. Key Words: bone marrow aspirate • haematological diagnosis PMID:11533068

  12. Bone-marrow transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100112.htm Bone-marrow transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Bone-marrow is a soft, fatty tissue found inside of ...

  13. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Teens > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Risks If You Have Questions What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone ...

  14. Quantitatively different red cell/nucleated cell chimerism in patients with long-term, persistent hematopoietic mixed chimerism after bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia major or sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, Marco; Testi, Manuela; Gaziev, Javid; Condello, Rossella; Bontadini, Andrea; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Ricci, Francesca; De Felice, Lidia; Agostini, Francesca; Fraboni, Daniela; Ferrari, Giuliana; Battarra, Mariarosa; Troiano, Maria; Sodani, Pietro; Lucarelli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Background Persistent mixed chimerism represents a state in which recipient and donor cells stably co-exist after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, since in most of the studies reported in literature the engraftment state was observed in the nucleated cells, in this study we determined the donor origin of the mature erythrocytes of patients with persistent mixed chimerism after transplantation for hemoglobinopathies. Results were compared with the engraftment state observed in singly picked out burst-forming unit – erythroid colonies and in the nucleated cells collected from the peripheral blood and from the bone marrow. Design and Methods The donor origin of the erythrocytes was determined analyzing differences on the surface antigens of the erythrocyte suspension after incubation with anti-ABO and/or anti-C, -c, -D, -E and -e monoclonal antibodies by a flow cytometer. Analysis of short tandem repeats was used to determine the donor origin of nucleated cells and burst-forming unit – erythroid colonies singly picked out after 14 days of incubation. Results The proportions of donor-derived nucleated cells in four transplanted patients affected by hemoglobinopathies were 71%, 46%, 15% and 25% at day 1364, 1385, 1314 and 932, respectively. Similar results were obtained for the erythroid precursors, analyzing the donor/recipient origin of the burst-forming unit – erythroid colonies. In contrast, on the same days of observation, the proportions of donor-derived erythrocytes in the four patients with persistent mixed chimerism were 100%, 100%, 73% and 90%. Conclusions Our results showed that most of the erythrocytes present in four long-term transplanted patients affected by hemoglobinopathies and characterized by the presence of few donor engrafted nucleated cells were of donor origin. The indication that small proportions of donor engrafted cells might be sufficient for clinical control of the disease in patients affected by hemoglobinopathies is

  15. Orchiectomy increases bone marrow interleukin-6 levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Pugh, T D; Stebler, B; Ershler, W B; Keller, E T

    1998-03-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) appears to be an important factor in disease states associated with bone resorption. There is both in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting the fact that androgens down-regulate interleukin-6 production. These observations, in combination with the fact that osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells produce IL-6, led us to hypothesize that orchiectomy-induced androgen loss will result in increased IL-6 expression in the bone microenvironment. To prove our hypothesis we assessed the effect of orchiectomy on IL-6 protein and mRNA expression in bone marrow and spleen. We found that orchiectomy was associated with increased serum IL-6 levels at 3 and 28 days postsurgery. Phorbol ester-stimulated IL-6 levels were also higher in supernatants from bone marrow and spleen cell cultures from orchiectomized mice compared with unoperated or sham-operated mice. Additionally, we found that steady state IL-6 mRNA levels were increased in bone marrow but not spleen cells. Finally, we found that orchiectomized mice had splenomegaly and increased bone marrow cellularity. Histopathology of the spleen revealed lymphoid hyperplasia accompanied by a marked mononuclear cell infiltration of the red pulp. We conclude that orchiectomy induces IL-6 expression in the bone marrow. These findings suggest that endocrine and cytokine interactions contribute to bone pathophysiology. PMID:9501955

  16. Phase I/II study of Holmium-166-DOTMP for bone marrow ablation in multiple myeloma prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT)

    SciTech Connect

    Podoloff, D.A.; Bhadkamkar, V.H.; Kasi, L.P.

    1994-05-01

    We evaluated a bone seeking radionuclide, Ho-166 DOTMP (which has both beta and gamma energies) as an agent for bone marrow ablation prior to bone marrow transplant. Six men and 1 woman in the age range 42-59 yrs. who had previously failed conventional chemotherapy using VAD (Vincristine, Adriamycin, Dexamethasone) were treated. Each patient received a diagnostic dose (Dx) of 30 mCi of Ho-166 DOTMP and underwent serial total body images using photopeak and scatter windows. Transmission images were obtained on day O. Transmission, scatter and photopeak images were used to calculate marrow dose and skeletal uptake. Therapy dose (Tx) was established to deliver a prescribed absorbed dose to the marrow. Bone marrow biopsy samples from lilac crest were obtained to determine activity concentration and to calculate marrow dose. The Dx was followed by a Tx of 25 Gy (3 pts.), 40 Gy (3 pts.) and 50 Gy (1 pt.). Additional total body imaging was accomplished prior to each Tx and SPECT after the final Tx. Bone retention varied from 26-33%. The calculated red marrow dose varied from 11 to 48 Gy. Toxicity was minimal and included: myalgia (1), nausea (2), increased BUN (1), sore throat (1), fever (1x1 day). Bone marrow ablation was achieved in 3/7 pts. The last pt. treated at the highest dose level had greater than 75% reduction in myeloma protein. We conclude that at doses as high as 31.8 mCi/Kg no significant toxicity has been observed. Diagnostic pretherapy imaging and derived dosimetry is helpful in prescribing a red marrow dose prior to radionuclide therapy. The MTD has not yet been reached. However, thus far Ho-166 DOTMP has safely ablated bone marrow prior to BMT.

  17. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral infection; Conjunctival infection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies and some are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Others are nothing to worry about. ...

  18. Red Clover

    MedlinePlus

    ... 17):2057–2071. Red clover. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July 22, 2009. Red clover ( Trifolium pratense ). Natural Standard Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturalstandard.com on July ...

  19. Bone marrow trephine biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Trephine biopsies of the bone marrow should be carried out, when clinically indicated, by trained individuals following a standard operating procedure. A bone marrow aspiration should be performed as part of the same procedure. For patient safety and convenience, biopsies are usually performed on the posterior iliac crest. The biopsy specimen should measure at least 1.6 cm and, if it does not, consideration should be given to repeating the procedure, possibly on the contralateral iliac crest. If bone marrow aspiration is found to be impossible, imprints from the biopsy specimen should be obtained. Otherwise, the specimen is placed immediately into fixative and after fixation is embedded in a resin or, more usually, decalcified and embedded in paraffin wax. Thin sections are cut and are stained, as a minimum, with haematoxylin and eosin and with a reticulin stain. A Giemsa stain is also desirable. A Perls' stain does not often give useful information and is not essential in every patient. The need for other histochemical or immunohistochemical stains is determined by the clinical circumstances and the preliminary findings. Trephine biopsy sections should be examined and reported in a systematic manner, assessment being made of the bones, the vessels and stroma, and the haemopoietic and any lymphoid or other tissue. Assessment should begin with a very low power objective, the entire section being examined. Further examination is then done with an intermediate and high power objective. Ideally, reporting of trephine biopsy sections should be done by an individual who is competent in both histopathology and haematology, and who is able to make an appropriate assessment of both the bone marrow aspirate and the trephine biopsy sections. When this is not possible, there should be close consultation between a haematologist and a histopathologist. The report should both describe the histological findings and give an interpretation of their importance. A signed or computer

  20. Bone marrow invasion in multiple myeloma and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Luna, A

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is the imaging study of choice for the management of bone marrow disease. MRI sequences enable us to integrate structural and functional information for detecting, staging, and monitoring the response the treatment of multiple myeloma and bone metastases in the spine. Whole-body MRI has been incorporated into different guidelines as the technique of choice for managing multiple myeloma and metastatic bone disease. Normal physiological changes in the yellow and red bone marrow represent a challenge in analyses to differentiate clinically significant findings from those that are not clinically significant. This article describes the findings for normal bone marrow, variants, and invasive processes in multiple myeloma and bone metastases. PMID:26767542

  1. Red clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is an important forage legume grown on approximately 4 million hectares worldwide. An estimated 2.8 million kg of red clover seed per year was produced worldwide in 2005-2007. This amount of seed would be enough to maintain approximately 4 million hectares of red...

  2. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of the Red Sea was acquired on August 13, 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of algae,  Trichodesmium ...

  3. Hematopoietic bone marrow in the adult knee: spin-echo and opposed-phase gradient-echo MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Lang, P; Fritz, R; Majumdar, S; Vahlensieck, M; Peterfy, C; Genant, H K

    1993-01-01

    Hematopoietic bone marrow in the distal femur of the adult may be mistaken for a pathologic marrow process in magnetic resonance imaging of the knee. We investigated the incidence of hematopoietic marrow in the distal femur in a series of 51 adult patients and compared spin-echo (TR/TE in ms: 500/35, 2000/80) and opposed-phase gradient-echo (0.35 T, TR/TE in ms: 1000/30, theta = 75 degrees) magnetic resonance images. Zones with intermediate to low signal intensity on T1-weighted spin-echo and opposed-phase gradient-echo sequences representing hematopoietic marrow within high signal intensity fatty marrow were observed in 18 of the 51 patients. Five patterns of marrow signal reduction were identified; type 0: uniform high signal, i.e., no signal change; type I, focal signal loss; type II, multifocal signal loss without confluence; type III, confluent signal loss; and type IV, complete homogeneous reduction in marrow signal. Opposed-phase gradient-echo sequences demonstrated markedly greater red-yellow marrow contrast than conventional spin-echo sequences. Follow-up studies in three patients using a gradient-echo sequence with TE varying from 10 to 21 ms at 1-ms increments showed a cyclic increase and decrease in red and yellow marrow signal intensity depending on the TE. The contribution of intravoxel chemical shift effects on red-yellow marrow contrast in opposed-phase gradient-echo images was verified by almost complete cancellation of the TE-dependent marrow signal oscillation with use of a chemically selective pulse presaturating the water protons. Hematopoietic marrow in the adult distal femur in the absence of hematologic abnormalities is found primarily in women of menstruating age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8438189

  4. High-fidelity organic preservation of bone marrow in ca. 10 Ma amphibians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Maria E.; Orr, Patrick J.; Kearns, Stuart L.; Alcalá, Luis; Anadón, Pere; Peñalver-Mollá, Enrique

    2006-08-01

    Bone marrow in ca. 10 Ma frogs and salamanders from the Miocene of Libros, Spain, represents the first fossilized example of this extremely decay-prone tissue. The bone marrow, preserved in three dimensions as an organic residue, retains the original texture and red and yellow color of hematopoietic and fatty marrow, respectively; moldic osteoclasts and vascular structures are also present. We attribute exceptional preservation of the fossilized bone marrow to cryptic preservation: the bones of the amphibians formed protective microenvironments, and inhibited microbial infiltration. Specimens in which bone marrow is preserved vary in their completeness and articulation and in the extent to which the body outline is preserved as a thin film of organically preserved bacteria. Cryptic preservation of these labile tissues is thus to a large extent independent of, and cannot be predicted by, the taphonomic history of the remainder of the specimen.

  5. Starvation marrow – gelatinous transformation of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Osgood, Eric; Muddassir, Salman; Jaju, Minal; Moser, Robert; Farid, Farwa; Mewada, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management. PMID:25317270

  6. KSC CENTER DIRECTOR ACCEPTS PLAQUE FOR RECORD-SETTING BONE MARROW DONOR REGISTRATION DRIVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center's Bone Marrow Donor Registration Drive Chairman Dr. George A. Martin and Center Director Jay Honeycutt (left to right) accept a plaque from the Leukemia Society of America's Associate Executive Director Martin Bernstine and the American Red Cross' Southeast Regional Director Jeff Koenreich. Representatives from the American Red Cross and the Leukemia Society of America came to KSC to honor those involved in the record-setting Bone Marrow Donor Registration Drive held here earlier this year. Over 900 potential donors were added to the National Bone Marrow Registry as a result of the KSC drive. The drive established a new record for the most people registered in a single day for the American Red Cross in the three state region of which Florida is a part.

  7. Bone Marrow Derived Eosinophil Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas X.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional effector cells implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases including asthma, eosinophil gastrointestinal disorders and helminth infection. Mouse bone marrow derived progenitor cells can be differentiated into eosinophils following IL-5 exposure. These bone marrow derived eosinophils are fully differentiated at the end of a 14 day culture based on morphology and expression of molecular markers.

  8. Effect of syngeneic marrow injection upon recovery in sub- and near-lethally irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S.S.; Boggs, D.R.; Patrene, K.D.

    1989-06-01

    Mice were given sub-lethal (200-600 cGy) or near-lethal (800 cGy) whole body irradiation and the effect of injecting syngeneic marrow on subsequent hematopoietic recovery was studied. Marrow cell injection enhanced erythropoietic recovery after sub-lethal irradiation as reflected in hematocrit values and rate of appearance of /sup 59/Fe-labeled red cells in blood. However, this enhanced erythropoiesis was only seen in the spleen, and /sup 59/Fe uptake in marrow was reduced. When the irradiation dose was kept constant and the marrow dose increased from 10(5) to 10(6) to 10(7) cells, there was a somewhat erratic increase in spleen /sup 59/Fe and a decrease in marrow /sup 59/Fe uptake. When marrow cell number was kept constant and the dose of irradiation was increased from 200 to 400 to 600 to 800 cGy, there was an exponential increase in spleen /sup 59/Fe uptake but the marrow /sup 59/Fe uptake changed from depressed after lower doses to increased after 800 cGy. Cell injection after sub-lethal irradiation did not increase or decrease granulocytopoiesis. Injection of irradiated marrow cells also reduced marrow erythropoiesis and this was evident after both sub- and near-lethal irradiation. However, injection of irradiated cells did not increase splenic erythropoiesis. Following splenectomy, the depressed marrow erythropoiesis attending injection of viable cells was virtually eliminated but no increase was seen. These data suggest that the injection of autologous or syngeneic marrow may not be effective as a means of accelerating hematopoietic recovery after irradiation unless near-lethal or lethal dose have been received.

  9. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  10. Evaluation of the in vivo genotoxicity of Allura Red AC (Food Red No. 40).

    PubMed

    Honma, Masamitsu

    2015-10-01

    Allura Red AC (Food Red No. 40) is a red azo dye that is used for food coloring in beverage and confectionary products. However, its genotoxic properties remain controversial. To clarify the in vivo genotoxicity, we treated mice with Allura Red AC and investigated the induction of DNA damage (liver, glandular stomach), clastogenicity/anuegenicity (bone marrow), and mutagenicity (liver, glandular stomach) using Comet assays, micronucleus tests, and transgenic gene mutation assays, respectively. All studies were conducted in accordance with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guideline. Although Allura Red AC was administered up to the maximum doses recommended by the OECD guideline, no genotoxic effect was observed in any of the genotoxic endpoints. These data clearly show no evidence of in vivo genotoxic potential of Allura Red AC administered up to the maximum doses in mice. PMID:26364875

  11. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-14

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  12. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-23

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  13. Red Capes, Red Herrings, and Red Flags.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Donald W.

    The argument that the personality structures obtained from retrospective ratings reflect semantic similarity structures has been as provocative as a red cape in the bull ring. High congruence between those two kinds of structures seems well established. What is less clear is how and why those structures differ from that for immediate judgments of…

  14. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents ... bone marrow sample for procedures (such as a stem cell transplant ) or other testing (such as chromosomal ...

  15. Internal dose to active marrow and endosteum from radioactive iodine.

    PubMed

    Hoseinian-Azghadi, E; Rafat-Motavalli, L; Miri-Hakimabad, H

    2015-04-01

    This study analyses the active marrow and endosteum dose differences between the new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) male and female reference computational phantoms and the stylised phantom for two thyroid agents. The active marrow and endosteum doses from (131)I and (123)I were calculated for 0-55 % maximum thyroid uptakes using the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo code. The biokinetic models were taken from ICRP Publication 53. To evaluate the absorbed doses to red marrow and endosteum, the deposited energy was determined for the 19 spongiosa regions and 6 medullary cavities and was mass weighted using the mass fractions available in ICRP Publication 116. The results were then compared with the published values given in ICRP Publication 53. The poor anatomic realism of the stylised phantom used in ICRP Publication 53 leads to important dose differences between the ICRP voxel phantoms and the stylised phantom. The influence of the use of different bone material was also investigated. Underestimations of ∼60% were observed for active marrow doses of the stylised phantom compared with reference voxel phantoms. The results highlight the importance of the accuracy of the shape and inter-organ distances of the anthropomorphic model used. PMID:25157198

  16. Characteristics of marrow production and reticulocyte maturation in normal man in response to anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Robert S.

    1969-01-01

    Erythropoiesis in normal man was studied during periods of phlebotomy-induced anemia of varying severity. This study permitted a comparison of marrow production measurements over a wide range of marrow production levels. As long as the serum iron remained above 50 μg/100 ml, measurements of plasma iron turnover provided an excellent index of marrow production at all levels of red cell production. In contrast, the absolute reticulocyte count demonstrated a poor correlation with the other measurements. This was shown to be the result of a prolongation of the time required for circulating reticulocytes to lose their reticulum, which correlated with the severity of the anemia. For the clinical application of the reticulocyte count as a measurement of marrow production, an adjustment must be made for this alteration in the circulating reticulocyte maturation time. PMID:5773082

  17. What Happens During a Bone Marrow Transplant? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure allows the recipient to get new stem cells that work properly. Stem cells are found in bone marrow, ... The body doesn’t make enough red blood cells, or they don’t work properly. Certain immune-deficiency diseases that prevent the ...

  18. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  19. Modeling Hematopoiesis and Responses to Radiation Countermeasures in a Bone Marrow-on-a-Chip.

    PubMed

    Torisawa, Yu-Suke; Mammoto, Tadanori; Jiang, Elisabeth; Jiang, Amanda; Mammoto, Akiko; Watters, Alexander L; Bahinski, Anthony; Ingber, Donald E

    2016-05-01

    Studies on hematopoiesis currently rely on animal models because in vitro culture methods do not accurately recapitulate complex bone marrow physiology. We recently described a bone marrow-on-a-chip microfluidic device that enables the culture of living hematopoietic bone marrow and mimics radiation toxicity in vitro. In the present study, we used this microdevice to demonstrate continuous blood cell production in vitro and model bone marrow responses to potential radiation countermeasure drugs. The device maintained mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in normal proportions for at least 2 weeks in culture. Increases in the number of leukocytes and red blood cells into the microfluidic circulation also could be detected over time, and addition of erythropoietin induced a significant increase in erythrocyte production. Exposure of the bone marrow chip to gamma radiation resulted in reduction of leukocyte production, and treatment of the chips with two potential therapeutics, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor or bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), induced significant increases in the number of hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid cells in the fluidic outflow. In contrast, BPI was not found to have any effect when analyzed using static marrow cultures, even though it has been previously shown to accelerate recovery from radiation-induced toxicity in vivo. These findings demonstrate the potential value of the bone marrow-on-a-chip for modeling blood cell production, monitoring responses to hematopoiesis-modulating drugs, and testing radiation countermeasures in vitro. PMID:26993746

  20. Mechanics of intact bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lauren E; Birch, Nathan P; Schiffman, Jessica D; Crosby, Alfred J; Peyton, Shelly R

    2015-10-01

    The current knowledge of bone marrow mechanics is limited to its viscous properties, neglecting the elastic contribution of the extracellular matrix. To get a more complete view of the mechanics of marrow, we characterized intact yellow porcine bone marrow using three different, but complementary techniques: rheology, indentation, and cavitation. Our analysis shows that bone marrow is elastic, and has a large amount of intra- and inter-sample heterogeneity, with an effective Young׳s modulus ranging from 0.25 to 24.7 kPa at physiological temperature. Each testing method was consistent across matched tissue samples, and each provided unique benefits depending on user needs. We recommend bulk rheology to capture the effects of temperature on tissue elasticity and moduli, indentation for quantifying local tissue heterogeneity, and cavitation rheology for mitigating destructive sample preparation. We anticipate the knowledge of bone marrow elastic properties for building in vitro models will elucidate mechanisms involved in disease progression and regenerative medicine. PMID:26189198

  1. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  2. Bone marrow and splenic histology in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wotherspoon, Andrew; Attygalle, Ayoma; Mendes, Larissa Sena Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia is a rare chronic neoplastic B-cell lymphoproliferation that characteristically involves blood, bone marrow and spleen with liver, lymph node and skin less commonly involved. Histologically, the cells have a characteristic appearance with pale/clear cytoplasm and round or reniform nuclei. In the spleen, the infiltrate involves the red pulp and is frequently associated with areas of haemorrhage (blood lakes). The cells stain for B-cell related antigens as well as with antibodies against tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, DBA44 (CD72), CD11c, CD25, CD103, CD123, cyclin D1 and annexin A1. Mutation of BRAF -V600E is present and antibody to the mutant protein can be used as a specific marker. Bone marrow biopsy is essential in the initial assessment of disease as the bone marrow may be inaspirable or unrepresentative of degree of marrow infiltration as a result of the tumour associated fibrosis preventing aspiration of the tumour cell component. Bone marrow biopsy is important in the assessment of therapy response but in this context staining for CD11c and Annexin A1 is not helpful as they are also markers of myeloid lineage and identification of low level infiltration may be obscured. In this context staining for CD20 may be used in conjunction with morphological assessment and staining of serial sections for cyclin D1 and DBA44 to identify subtle residual infiltration. Staining for CD79a and CD19 is not recommended as these antibodies will identify plasma cells and can lead to over-estimation of disease. Staining for CD20 should not be used in patients following with anti-CD20 based treatments. Down regulation of cyclin D1 and CD25 has been reported in patients following BRAF inhibitor therapy and assessment of these antigens should not be used in this context. Histologically, hairy cell leukaemia needs to be distinguished from other B-cell lymphoproliferations associated with splenomegaly including splenic marginal zone lymphoma, splenic

  3. [Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes comprise a series of disorders caused by various gene mutations. Genetic tests were formerly difficult to perform because of the large size and number of causative genes. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing has enabled simultaneous testing of all causative genes to be performed at an acceptable cost. We collaboratively conducted a series of whole-exome sequencing studies of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes and discovered RPS27/RPL27 and FANCT as causative genes of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Fanconi anemia, respectively. Furthermore, we established a target gene sequencing system to cover 189 genes associated with pediatric blood diseases to assist genetic diagnoses in clinical practice. In this review, discovery of new causative genes and possible roles of next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are discussed. PMID:26935625

  4. Widespread marrow necrosis during pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Knickerbocker, W.J.; Quenville, N.F.

    1982-11-01

    Recently, a 22-year-old Caucasian female was referred to our Hospital two days post-partum. She had been feeling unwell during the last few days of her pregnancy and complained of multiple aches and pains, worst in the abdomen and lower back. Her admission platelet count was severely depressed and a bone biopsy showed extensive marrow necrosis with viable bony trabeculae. There was no evidence of vasculitis, vascular thrombosis, or malignancy. Widespread marrow necrosis in pregnancy followed by recovery, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported.

  5. Bone Marrow Transplants: "Another Possibility at Life"

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Bone Marrow Transplants “Another Possibility at Life” Past Issues / Summer ... year, and, for 16,000 of them, a bone marrow transplant is the best treatment option, notes Susan ...

  6. Planning for a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Planning for a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) If you're going to have ... to a friend or family member undergoing a bone marrow or cord blood transplant. Help Your Loved One ...

  7. Transplant Outcomes (Bone Marrow and Cord Blood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reports show patient survival and transplant data of bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplants in the transplant ... Data by Center Report —View the number of bone marrow and cord blood transplants performed at a specific ...

  8. Marrow Fat and Bone—New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Horowitz, Mark C.; MacDougald, Ormond A.; Scheller, Erica L.; Rodeheffer, Matthew S.; Rosen, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: There is growing interest in the relationship between bone mineral density, bone strength, and fat depots. Marrow adipose tissue, a well-established component of the marrow environment, is metabolically distinct from peripheral fat depots, but its functional significance is unknown. Objective: In this review, we discuss animal and human data linking the marrow adipose tissue depot to parameters of bone density and integrity as well as the potential significance of marrow adipose tissue in metabolic diseases associated with bone loss, including type 1 diabetes mellitus and anorexia nervosa. Potential hormonal determinants of marrow adipose tissue are also discussed. Conclusions: We conclude that whereas most animal and human data demonstrate an inverse association between marrow adipose tissue and measures of bone density and strength, understanding the functional significance of marrow adipose tissue and its hormonal determinants will be critical to better understanding its role in skeletal integrity and the role of marrow adipose tissue in the pathophysiology of bone loss. PMID:23393168

  9. A bone marrow toxicity model for 223Ra alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F; Song, Hong; Watchman, Christopher J; Bolch, Wesley E; Aksnes, Anne-Kirsti; Ramdahl, Thomas; Flux, Glenn D; Sgouros, George

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Ra-223, an α-particle emitting bone-seeking radionuclide, has recently been used in clinical trials for osseous metasteses of prostate cancer. We investigated the relationship between absorbed fraction-based red marrow dosimetry and cell level-dosimetry using a model that accounts for the expected localization of this agent relative to marrow cavity architecture. We show that cell level-based dosimetry is essential to understanding potential marrow toxicity. Methods The GEANT4 software package was used to create simple spheres representing marrow cavities. Ra-223 was positioned on the trabecular bone surface or in the endosteal layer and simulated for decay, along with the descendants. The interior of the sphere was divided into cell-size voxels and the energy was collected in each voxel and interpreted as dose cell histograms. The average absorbed dose values and absorbed fractions were also calculated in order to compare those results with previously published values. Results The absorbed dose was predominantly deposited near the trabecular surface. The dose cell histograms results were used to plot the percentage of cells that received a potentially toxic absorbed dose (2 or 4 Gy) as a function of the average absorbed dose over the marrow cavity. The results show (1) a heterogeneous distribution of cellular absorbed dose, strongly dependent on the position of the cell within the marrow cavity; and (2) that increasing the average marrow cavity absorbed dose, or equivalently, increasing the administered activity resulted in only a small increase in potential marrow toxicity (i.e., the number of cells receiving more than 4 or 2 Gy), for a range of average marrow cavity absorbed doses from 1 Gy to 20 Gy. Conclusion The results from the trabecular model differ markedly from a standard absorbed fraction method while presenting comparable average dose values. These suggest that increasing the amount of radioactivity may not substantially increase the risk of

  10. A bone marrow toxicity model for 223Ra alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Song, Hong; Watchman, Christopher J.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Aksnes, Anne-Kirsti; Ramdahl, Thomas; Flux, Glenn D.; Sgouros, George

    2012-05-01

    Ra-223, an α-particle emitting bone-seeking radionuclide, has recently been used in clinical trials for osseous metastases of prostate cancer. We investigated the relationship between absorbed fraction-based red marrow dosimetry and cell level-dosimetry using a model that accounts for the expected localization of this agent relative to marrow cavity architecture. We show that cell level-based dosimetry is essential to understanding potential marrow toxicity. The GEANT4 software package was used to create simple spheres representing marrow cavities. Ra-223 was positioned on the trabecular bone surface or in the endosteal layer and simulated for decay, along with the descendants. The interior of the sphere was divided into cell-size voxels and the energy was collected in each voxel and interpreted as dose cell histograms. The average absorbed dose values and absorbed fractions were also calculated in order to compare those results with previously published values. The absorbed dose was predominantly deposited near the trabecular surface. The dose cell histogram results were used to plot the percentage of cells that received a potentially toxic absorbed dose (2 or 4 Gy) as a function of the average absorbed dose over the marrow cavity. The results show (1) a heterogeneous distribution of cellular absorbed dose, strongly dependent on the position of the cell within the marrow cavity; and (2) that increasing the average marrow cavity absorbed dose, or equivalently, increasing the administered activity resulted in only a small increase in potential marrow toxicity (i.e. the number of cells receiving more than 4 or 2 Gy), for a range of average marrow cavity absorbed doses from 1 to 20 Gy. The results from the trabecular model differ markedly from a standard absorbed fraction method while presenting comparable average dose values. These suggest that increasing the amount of radioactivity may not substantially increase the risk of toxicity, a result unavailable to the

  11. [The role of blood banks in bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Höcker, P; Wagner, A; Sklenar, G

    1991-01-01

    The transfusion service (TS) plays an important role in bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Many of the techniques and methods employed are also used in the daily work of a TS like tissue typing, apheresis techniques, handling of blood and its components under sterile conditions. In the pretransplantation phase the TS is responsible for the typing of recipient and presumptive donors, harvesting of autologous blood and selection of appropriate blood components. During BMT the TS can perform bone marrow harvesting, depletion of red cells in case of ABO-incompatibility and bone marrow manipulation when T-cell depletion or purging procedures are considered. Peripheral stem cell harvest by apheresis is also best performed by the TS experienced in such techniques. Storage of hematopoietic cells in liquid nitrogen and thawing are also techniques already used in most of the transfusion services. Post BMT, the support with blood components, irradiated and almost free of white cells to avoid TA-GVH and CMV-infection, is a major job of the TS. These facts demonstrate that a well organized transfusion service is a 'conditio sine qua non' for successful BMT. PMID:1725636

  12. Immune transfer studies in canine allogeneic marrow graft donor-recipient pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse-Wilde, H.; Krumbacher, K.; Schuening, F.D.; Doxiadis, I.; Mahmoud, H.K.; Emde, C.; Schmidt-Weinmar, A.; Schaefer, U.W.

    1986-07-01

    Transfer of immunity occurring with bone marrow grafting was studied using the dog as a preclinical model. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed between DLA-identical beagle litter-mates. The donors were immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) or sheep red blood cells (SRBC), and their humoral response was monitored by hemagglutination. The recipients of bone marrow from TT-immunized donors showed a marked increase of antibody titer one week posttransplantation, while in the recipients of marrow from SRBC immunized donors the antibody titers were considerably lower. Within the following 60 days the antibody titers in both groups diminished gradually to pregrafting levels. Control experiments in which cell-free plasma from donors immunized with TT and SRBC respectively was transfused indicated that the initial rise of specific antibody titers after marrow grafting is likely to be due to a passive transfer of humoral immunity. A single challenge of these marrow graft recipients with the respective antigen 15-18 weeks posttransplantation led to a secondary type of humoral immune response. It could be demonstrated that transfer of memory against TT or SRBC was independent from the actual antibody titer and the time of vaccination of the donor. One dog was immunized with TT after serving as marrow donor. When the donor had shown an antibody response, a peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) transfusion was given to his chimera. Subsequent challenge of the latter resulted in a secondary type of specific antibody response. This indicates that specific cellular-bound immunological memory can be transferred after BMT from the donor to his allogeneic bone marrow chimera by transfusion of peripheral blood leukocytes. The data may be of importance in clinical BMT to protect patients during the phase of reduced immune reactivity by transfer of memory cells.

  13. Gillick, bone marrow and teenagers.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    The Human Tissue Authority can authorise a bone marrow harvest on a child of any age if a person with parental responsibility consents to the procedure. Older children have the legal capacity to consent to medical procedures under Gillick, but it is unclear if Gillick can be applied to non-therapeutic medical procedures. The relevant donation guidelines state that the High Court shall be consulted in the event of a disagreement, but what is in the best interests of the teenage donor under s.1 of the Children Act 1989? There are no legal authorities on child bone marrow harvests in the United Kingdom. This article considers the best interests of the older saviour sibling and questions whether, for the purposes of welfare, the speculative benefits could outweigh the physical burdens. PMID:25911618

  14. Primary bone marrow oedema syndromes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    MRI scanning in patients with rheumatological conditions often shows bone marrow oedema, which can be secondary to inflammatory, degenerative, infective or malignant conditions but can also be primary. The latter condition is of uncertain aetiology and it is also uncertain whether it represents a stage in the progression to osteonecrosis in some patients. Patients with primary bone marrow oedema usually have lower limb pain, commonly the hip, knee, ankle or feet. The diagnosis is one of exclusion with the presence of typical MRI findings. Treatment is usually conservative and includes analgesics and staying off the affected limb. The natural history is that of gradual resolution of symptoms over a number of months. Evidence for medical treatment is limited, but open-label studies suggest bisphosphonates may help in the resolution of pain and improve radiological findings. Surgical decompression is usually used as a last resort. PMID:24080251

  15. Marrow fat composition in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Bredella, Miriam A.; Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Daley, Scott M.; Miller, Karen K.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Klibanski, Anne; Torriani, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Women with anorexia nervosa (AN) have increased marrow fat despite severe depletion of body fat. Recent studies have suggested that marrow fat composition may serve as a biomarker for bone quality. The purpose of our study was to investigate marrow fat composition of the femur using proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS), and the relationship between measures of marrow fat composition and BMD and body composition in women with AN and normal-weight controls. Materials and Methods 14 women with AN (29.5±1.9 years) and 12 age-matched normal-weight controls underwent 1H-MRS to determine total marrow fat content and marrow fat composition of the femoral diaphysis and soleus intramyocellular lipids und unsaturated muscle lipids. MRI was performed to quantify abdominal fat, thigh fat and muscle. Lumbar spine BMD, fat and lean mass were assessed by DXA. Results Subjects with AN had higher marrow fat content (p<0.05), but similar marrow fat composition (p >0.05) compared to normal-weight controls. There was an inverse association between marrow methylene protons, an estimate of fatty acid (FA) saturated bonds, and lumbar spine BMD (r= -0.52, p=0.008) independent of %ideal body weight (%IBW). Olefinic protons at 5.3 ppm, an estimate of FA unsaturated bonds, were inversely associated with body fat depots, independent of %IBW, and positively associated with soleus unsaturation (p≤0.05). Conclusion Women with AN have higher total femoral marrow fat but similar composition compared to normal-weight controls. The degree of marrow FA saturation correlates inversely with BMD, suggesting that saturated lipids may have negative effects on BMD. The degree of marrow FA unsaturation correlates positively with soleus unsaturation, suggesting that marrow fat composition may be influenced by the same factors as ectopic lipid composition in muscle. PMID:24953711

  16. Evaluation of iron status: zinc protoporphyrin vis-a-vis bone marrow iron stores.

    PubMed

    Das, Sheila; Philip, Kandathil Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) in the red cells is an indicator of iron status in the bone marrow (BM) and can be easily measured by Protofluor-Z Hematofluorometer from Helena Laboratories. It is well known that bone marrow iron is a gold standard for the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) even in the pre-latent phase. Hence, it was considered pertinent to evaluate the diagnostic utility of ZPP in comparison with bone marrow iron stores. 107 random BM were selected over a period of 2(1/2) years; in each case, RBC indices where recorded along with ZPP and Perls' Prussian blue reaction for BM iron stores. The specificity and sensitivity were found to be 77.8% and sensitivity 69.8%, respectively. However, the sensitivity increased up to 96.2% when Hb, RBC indices and ZPP were considered for the diagnosis of IDA. PMID:18417877

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Zhang, Yong; Loeliger, Kelsey; Poon, Andrea; Simakova, Olga; Zingone, Adriana; Costello, Rene; Childs, Richard; Noel, Pierre; Silver, Samuel; Kwok, Mary; Mo, Clifton; Young, Neal; Landgren, Ola; Sloand, Elaine; Maric, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare disorder characterized by inhibition of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and normochromic, normocytic anaemia with reticulocytopenia. Among 51 PRCA patients, we identified 12 (24%) patients having monoclonal gammopathy, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or smouldering multiple myeloma, with presence of monoclonal protein or abnormal serum free light chains and atypical bone marrow features of clonal plasmacytosis, hypercellularity and fibrosis. Thus far, three patients treated with anti-myeloma based therapeutics have responded with reticulocyte recovery and clinical transfusion independence, suggesting plasma cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of this specific monoclonal gammopathy-associated PRCA. PMID:26999424

  18. Cure of murine thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation without eradication of endogenous stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemaker, G.; Visser, T.P.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1986-09-01

    alpha-Thalassemic heterozygous (Hbath/+) mice were used to investigate the possible selective advantage of transplanted normal (+/+) hemopoietic cells. Without conditioning by total-body irradiation (TBI), infusion of large numbers of normal bone marrow cells failed to correct the thalassemic peripheral blood phenotype. Since the recipients' stem cells are normal with respect to number and differentiation capacity, it was thought that the transplanted stem cells were not able to lodge, or that they were not stimulated to proliferate. Therefore, a nonlethal dose of TBI was given to temporarily reduce endogenous stem cell numbers and hemopoiesis. TBI doses of 2 or 3 Gy followed by infusion of normal bone marrow cells proved to be effective in replacing the thalassemic red cells by normal red cells, whereas a dose of 1 Gy was ineffective. It is concluded that cure of thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation does not necessarily require eradication of thalassemic stem cells. Consequently, the objectives of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation of thalassemic patients (and possibly other nonmalignant hemopoietic disorders) should be reconsidered.

  19. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  20. Fat Embolism Syndrome Secondary to Bone Marrow Necrosis in Patients with Hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Gangaraju, Radhika; Reddy, Vishnu V B; Marques, Marisa B

    2016-09-01

    Bone marrow necrosis with subsequent embolization of the fat and necrotic tissues into the systemic circulation causing fat embolism syndrome and multiorgan failure is a rare complication of patients with hemoglobinopathies. The exact etiology of this condition is not known. Because it occurs more often in patients with compound heterozygous conditions than in sickle cell disease, some patients are unaware of their predisposition. The initial symptoms are nonspecific, such as back and/or abdominal pain, fever, and fatigue, which may rapidly progress to respiratory failure and severe neurologic compromise. Common laboratory tests reveal anemia without reticulocytosis, thrombocytopenia, leukoerythroblastic picture with immature white cells and nucleated red blood cells, increased lactate dehydrogenase, high ferritin, and, sometimes increased creatinine. The diagnosis can be delayed because of an apparent lack of awareness about bone marrow necrosis with fat embolism syndrome, its rarity, and its similarities with other conditions such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Although a bone marrow biopsy is diagnostic, waiting for it delays definitive treatment, which appears to be essential for the recovery of end-organ damage, such as neurologic and pulmonary damage. In our experience, either multiple units of red blood cell transfusion or, preferably, red cell exchange initiated promptly, is lifesaving. PMID:27598359

  1. Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes (IBMFS)

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI IBMFS Cohort Study consists of affected individuals and their immediate families in North America who have an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS)-either one that has been specifically identified and defined, or bone marrow failure that appears to be inherited but has not yet been clearly identified as having a genetic basis.

  2. Rosiglitazone Promotes Bone Marrow Adipogenesis to Impair Myelopoiesis under Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenyi; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Shujuan; Feng, Yonghuai; Liu, Kaiyan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The therapeutic use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) causes unwanted hematological side effects, although the underlying mechanisms of these effects are poorly understood. This study tests the hypothesis that rosiglitazone impairs the maintenance and differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which ultimately leads to hematological abnormalities. Methods Mice were fed a rosiglitazone-supplemented diet or a normal diet for 6 weeks. To induce hematopoietic stress, all mice were injected once with 250 mg/kg 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) intraperitoneally. Next, hematopoietic recovery, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) subsets, and myeloid differentiation after 5-Fu treatment were evaluated. The adipogenesis induced by rosiglitazone was assessed by histopathology and oil red O staining. The effect of adipocytes on HSPCs was studied with an in vitro co-culture system. Results Rosiglitazone significantly enhanced bone marrow adipogenesis and delayed hematopoietic recovery after 5-Fu treatment. Moreover, rosiglitazone inhibited proliferation of a granulocyte/monocyte progenitor (GMP) cell population and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) colonies, although the proliferation and mobilization of Lin-c-kit+Sca-1+ cells (LSK) was maintained following hematopoietic stress. These effects could be partially reversed by the selective PPARγ antagonist BADGE. Finally, we demonstrated in a co-culture system that differentiated adipocytes actively suppressed the myeloid differentiation of HSPCs. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate that rosiglitazone inhibits myeloid differentiation of HSPCs after stress partially by inducing bone marrow adipogenesis. Targeting the bone marrow microenvironment might be one mechanism by which rosiglitazone impairs stress-induced hematopoiesis. PMID:26895498

  3. Is hydroxyethyl starch necessary for sedimentation of bone marrow?

    PubMed

    Dijkstra-Tiekstra, Margriet J; Setroikromo, Airies C; Kraan, Marcha; Gkoumassi, Effimia; de Wildt-Eggen, Janny

    2015-02-01

    Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is used to separate hematopoietic progenitor cells after bone marrow (BM) collection from red blood cells. The aims were to study alternatives for HAES-steril (200 kDa; not available anymore) and to optimize the sedimentation process. Using WBC-enriched product (10 × 10(9) WBC/L), instead of BM, sedimentation at 10% hematocrit using final 0.6 or 0.39% Voluven (130 kDa) or without HES appeared to be good alternatives for 0.6% HAES-steril. MNC recovery >80% and RBC depletion >90% was reached. Optimal sedimentation was reached using 110-140 mL volume. Centrifugation appeared not suitable for sedimentation. Additional testing with BM might be necessary to confirm these results. PMID:25544385

  4. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with bone marrow metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zen, H G; Jame, J M; Chang, A Y; Li, W Y; Law, C K; Chen, K Y; Lin, C Z

    1991-02-01

    Five of 23 patients with recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were diagnosed to have bone marrow metastasis. They all had advanced local-regional disease, and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive radiotherapy after the initial diagnosis. Bone marrow metastasis developed 4-24 months later. The clinical features were anemia (5 of 5), leukopenia (3 of 5), thrombocytopenia (4 of 5), sepsis (3 of 5), tenderness of the sternum (3 of 5), and fever (4 of 5). Patients frequently had elevation of serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P), and IgG and IgA antibody titers to Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen when bone marrow involvement was diagnosed. However, clinical manifestations and laboratory tests were not specific. It is important that three patients had normal bone scans. All five patients had a rapid downhill course; four patients died within 23 days, and the fifth 3 months after the diagnosis of bone marrow metastasis. We concluded that bone marrow was a common metastatic site in NPC patients. Bone marrow metastasis adversely affected patients' survival and required a high index of suspicion for diagnosis. We suggested that bone marrow biopsy should be considered as a routine staging procedure in NPC patients and indicated especially when patients presented with abnormal blood counts, sepsis, bone pain, or tenderness of the sternum. It may be positive in the face of a normal bone scan. PMID:1987743

  5. [Expression of Toll-like receptors in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Xia; Bai, Hai; Yang, Guo-Rong; Xue, Yong-Jie; Su, Ya-Nan

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics of Toll-like receptor expression in mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow of healthy donor (BM-MSCs). BM-MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of healthy donor by Ficoll method. Expressions of CD34, CD45, HLA-DR, CD44 and CD71 in BM-MSCs were detected by flow cytometry. CD71 in BM-MSCs was assayed by immunocytochemistry. The adipocyte and osteoblast induction of BM-MSCs were detected by alizarin red stain and oil red stain respectively. TLR 1 - 10 mRNA levels in BM-MSCs were evaluated by semiquantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that expressions of CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR in BM-MSC were negative while the expressions of CD44 and CD71 were positive. CD71 in BM-MSCs was positive. After induced by osteoblast and adipocyte inductor, BM-MSCs were positive for alizarin red staining and oil red staining respectively. All of TLR 1 - 10 mRNA were found in BM-MSCs with high expression levels of TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9 and low expression levels of TLR1, TLR5, TLR6, TLR10. In conclusion, different levels of TLR 1 - 10 mRNA were expressed in BM-MSCs of healthy donor. PMID:19549390

  6. Analyzing the cellular contribution of bone marrow to fracture healing using bone marrow transplantation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Colnot, C. . E-mail: colnotc@orthosurg.ucsf.edu; Huang, S.; Helms, J.

    2006-11-24

    The bone marrow is believed to play important roles during fracture healing such as providing progenitor cells for inflammation, matrix remodeling, and cartilage and bone formation. Given the complex nature of bone repair, it remains difficult to distinguish the contributions of various cell types. Here we describe a mouse model based on bone marrow transplantation and genetic labeling to track cells originating from bone marrow during fracture healing. Following lethal irradiation and engraftment of bone marrow expressing the LacZ transgene constitutively, wild type mice underwent tibial fracture. Donor bone marrow-derived cells, which originated from the hematopoietic compartment, did not participate in the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages during fracture healing. Instead, the donor bone marrow contributed to inflammatory and bone resorbing cells. This model can be exploited in the future to investigate the role of inflammation and matrix remodeling during bone repair, independent from osteogenesis and chondrogenesis.

  7. The bone marrow aspirate and biopsy in the diagnosis of unsuspected nonhematologic malignancy: A clinical study of 19 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ozkalemkas, Fahir; Ali, Rıdvan; Ozkocaman, Vildan; Ozcelik, Tulay; Ozan, Ulku; Ozturk, Hulya; Kurt, Ender; Evrensel, Turkkan; Yerci, Omer; Tunali, Ahmet

    2005-01-01

    Background Although bone marrow metastases can be found commonly in some malignant tumors, diagnosing a nonhematologic malignancy from marrow is not a usual event. Methods To underscore the value of bone marrow aspiration and biopsy as a short cut in establishing a diagnosis for disseminated tumors, we reviewed 19 patients with nonhematologic malignancies who initially had diagnosis from bone marrow. Results The main indications for bone marrow examination were microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA), leukoerythroblastosis (LEB) and unexplained cytopenias. Bone marrow aspiration was not diagnostic due to dry tap or inadequate material in 6 cases. Biopsy results were parallel to the cytological ones in all cases except one; however a meticulous second examination of the biopsy confirmed the cytologic diagnosis in this patient too. The most common histologic subtype was adenocarcinoma, and after all the clinical and laboratory evaluations, the primary focus was disclosed definitively in ten patients (5 stomach, 3 prostate, 1 lung, 1 muscle) and probably in four patients (3 gastrointestinal tract, 1 lung). All work up failed in five patients and these cases were classified as tumor of unknown origin (TUO). Conclusion Our series showed that anemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated red cell distribution width (RDW) and hypoproteinemia formed a uniform tetrad in patients with disseminated tumors that were diagnosed via bone marrow examination. The prognosis of patients was very poor and survivals were only a few days or weeks (except for 4 patients whose survivals were longer). We concluded that MAHA, LEB and unexplained cytopenias are strong indicators of the necessity of bone marrow examination. Because of the very short survival of many patients, all investigational procedures should be judged in view of their rationality, and should be focused on treatable primary tumors. PMID:16262899

  8. Pure red cell aplasia in a simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation patient: inside the erythroblast

    PubMed Central

    Labbadia, Francesca; Salido-Fierréz, Eduardo; Majado-Martinez, Juliana; Cabañas-Perianes, Valentin; Moraleda, Jiménez José M.

    2012-01-01

    A case of pure red cell aplasia in a simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplant recipient on immunosuppressive therapy is reported here. The patient presented with anemia unresponsive to erythropoietin treatment. Bone marrow cytomorphology was highly suggestive of parvovirus pure red cell aplasia, which was confirmed with serology and polymerase chain reaction positive for parvovirus B19 DNA in peripheral blood. After the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin the anemia improved with a rising number of the reticulocytes. PMID:23087806

  9. Bone marrow lesions: A systematic diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Filippo Del; Farahani, Sahar J; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow lesions on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are common and may be seen with various pathologies. The authors outline a systematic diagnostic approach with proposed categorization of various etiologies of bone marrow lesions. Utilization of typical imaging features on conventional MR imaging techniques and other problem-solving techniques, such as chemical shift imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), to achieve accurate final diagnosis has been highlighted. PMID:25114392

  10. Fat embolism syndrome following bone marrow harvesting.

    PubMed

    Baselga, J; Reich, L; Doherty, M; Gulati, S

    1991-06-01

    A case of fat embolism syndrome is reported following an uncomplicated bone marrow harvest. The presenting symptoms were restlessness, shortness of breath and arterial hypoxemia. A lung perfusion scan ruled out the presence of a lung thromboembolism. The patient received supportive therapy and recovered within a few hours. We speculate that the larger gauge needle (13 vs 15) used to aspirate the bone marrow may have represented increased trauma to the iliac crest leading to fat embolism. PMID:1873595

  11. Erythropoietin stimulation decreases hepcidin expression through hematopoietic activity on bone marrow cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yusuke; Noguchi-Sasaki, Mariko; Yasuno, Hideyuki; Yorozu, Keigo; Shimonaka, Yasushi

    2012-12-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) are now central to the treatment of renal anemia and are associated with improved clinical outcomes. It is well known that erythropoietin (EPO) is a key regulator of erythropoiesis through its promotion of red blood cell production. In order to investigate the role of ESA on iron metabolism, we analyzed the regulation of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin by ESA treatment in a bone marrow transplant model in mouse. After treating C57BL/6 mice with continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (C.E.R.A.), recombinant human epoetin-β (rhEPO), or recombinant human carbamylated epoetin-β (rhCEPO), we investigated serum hepcidin concentrations and parameters of erythropoiesis. Serum hepcidin concentrations after rhEPO treatment were analyzed in mice subjected to total body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation. C.E.R.A. administration caused long-term downregulation of serum hepcidin levels. Serum hepcidin levels in rhEPO-treated mice decreased significantly, whereas there was no change in rhCEPO-treated mice. The reduction in circulating hepcidin levels after rhEPO administration was not observed in irradiated mice. Finally, bone marrow transplantation recovered the response to rhEPO administration that downregulates hepcidin concentration in irradiated mice. These results indicate that ESA treatment downregulates serum hepcidin concentrations, mainly by indirect mechanisms affecting hematopoietic activity in bone marrow cells. PMID:23160767

  12. Osteosarcoma after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Hideaki; Maeda, Naoko; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Horibe, Keizo

    2013-03-01

    Three children treated with bone marrow transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia developed secondary osteosarcoma in the left tibia at the age of 13, 13, and 9 years, respectively, at 51, 117, and 106 months after transplantation, respectively. Through treatment with chemotherapy and surgery, all 3 patients are alive without disease. We surveyed the literature and reviewed 10 cases of osteosarcoma after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT), including our 3 cases. Eight of the patients had received myeloablative total body irradiation before SCT. The mean interval from SCT to the onset of osteosarcoma was 6 years and 4 months, and the mean age at the onset of osteosarcoma was 14 years and 5 months. The primary site of the post-SCT osteosarcoma was the tibia in 6 of 10 cases, in contrast to de novo osteosarcoma, in which the most common site is the femur. At least 7 of the 10 patients are alive without disease. Osteosarcoma should be one of the items for surveillance in the follow-up of patients who undergo SCT. PMID:22995925

  13. Celiac disease with pure red cell aplasia: an unusual hematologic association in pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sitangshu; Dey, Pranab Kumar; Roy, Pratyay; Sinha, Malay Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Anemia in Celiac disease (CD) is usually hypoproliferative, reflecting impaired absorption of essential nutrients like iron and various vitamins. We report a 2-year-old boy with Celiac disease and severe anemia due to pure red cell aplasia, diagnosed by bone marrow biopsy. This rare, unexplained extra digestive manifestation responded to gluten free diet. PMID:25332626

  14. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  15. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

    MedlinePlus

    ... dignity and resilience Geneva, 14 September 2016 – The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies... ... News Contact us Sitemap Go to top The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies ( ...

  16. Bone Marrow Injury Induced via Oxidative Stress in Mice by Inhalation Exposure to Formaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Cliona; Li, Rui; Zhang, Luoping; Wu, Yang; Ye, Xin; Yang, Xu; Ding, Shumao

    2013-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant has been classified as a human leukemogen. However, toxicity of formaldehyde in bone marrow, the target site of leukemia induction, is still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate bone marrow toxicity (bone marrow pathology, hematotoxicity) and underlying mechanisms (oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis) in formaldehyde-exposed mice. Male Balb/c mice were exposed to formaldehyde (0, 0.5, and 3.0 mg/m3) by nose-only inhalation for 8 hours/day, over a two week period designed to simulate a factory work schedule, with an exposure-free “weekend” on days 6 and 7, and were sacrificed on the morning of day 13. Counts of white blood cells, red blood cells and lymphocytes were significantly (p<0.05) decreased at 0.5 mg/m3 (43%, 7%, and 39%, respectively) and 3.0 mg/m3 (52%, 27%, and 43%, respectively) formaldehyde exposure, while platelet counts were significantly increased by 109% (0.5 mg/m3) and 67% (3.0 mg/m3). Biomarkers of oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species, glutathione depletion, cytochrome P450 1A1 and glutathione s-transferase theta 1 expression), inflammation (nuclear factor kappa-B, tomour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta), and apoptosis (activity of cysteine-aspartic acid protease 3) in bone marrow tissues were induced at one or both formaldehyde doses mentioned above. Conclusions/Significance Exposure of mice to formaldehyde by inhalation induced bone marrow toxicity, and that oxidative stress, inflammation and the consequential apoptosis jointly constitute potential mechanisms of such induced toxicity. PMID:24040369

  17. The safety of intraosseous infusions: risks of fat and bone marrow emboli to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P; Julius, C J; Petras, R E; Porembka, D T; Gallagher, J M

    1989-10-01

    The technique of intraosseous infusion is a life-saving emergency alternative when IV access is impossible or will be critically delayed. Concerns about its safety remain, especially concerning the risk of bone marrow and fat emboli to the lungs. We examined autopsy pulmonary specimens on two children who had received intraosseous infusions during resuscitation attempts and found an average of 0.23 to 0.71 bone marrow and fat emboli per mm2 of lung. We studied normotensive dogs with intraosseous infusions of emergency drugs and solutions into the distal femur. Three dogs were studied with each of the following emergency drugs or solutions: controls with normal saline (0.9% NaCl), epinephrine 0.01 mg/kg, NaHCO3 1 mEq/kg, CaCl 10 mg/kg, atropine 0.01 mg/kg, hydroxyethyl starch 6% in normal saline 10 mL/kg, 50% dextrose in water 0.25 g/kg, and lidocaine 1 mg/kg. Four hours after infusion, the animals were killed, and representative sections of the lung were examined with oil red-0 and hematoxylin and eosin stains for the presence of fat and bone marrow emboli. Fat and bone marrow emboli were found in all lung sections, varying from 0.11 to 4.48 emboli/mm2 lung (mean, 0.91 emboli/mm2 lung) for the emergency drugs and solutions and 0.06 to 0.53 emboli/mm2 (mean, 0.29 emboli/mm2 lung) for the controls. Analysis of variance revealed no significant difference (P = .07) in mean number of fat and bone marrow emboli per square millimeter of lung among the emergency drugs and compared with controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2802282

  18. Bone marrow changes in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ecklund, Kirsten; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Feldman, Henry A; Buzney, Catherine D; Mulkern, Robert V; Kleinman, Paul K; Rosen, Clifford J; Gordon, Catherine M

    2010-02-01

    Early osteoporosis is common among adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa (AN) and may result from premature conversion of red (RM) to yellow bone marrow. We performed right knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 1.0 T extremity scanner in 20 patients and 20 healthy controls, aged 16.2 +/- 1.6 years (mean +/- SD). Coronal T(1)-weighted (T(1)W) images and T(1) maps were generated from T(1) relaxometry images. Blinded radiologists visually assessed RM in the distal femoral and proximal tibial metaphyses in T(1)W images using a scale of signal intensity from 0 (homogeneous hyperintensity, no RM) to 4 (all dark, complete RM). Subjects with AN exhibited nearly twofold lower metaphyseal RM scores in both the femur (0.64 versus 1.22, p = .03) and tibia (0.54 versus 0.96, p = .08). In relaxometric measurements of four selected regions (femur and tibia amd epiphysis and metaphysis), subjects with AN showed higher mean epiphyseal but lower metaphyseal T(1). The net AN-control difference between epiphysis and metaphysis was 70 ms in the femur (+31 versus -35 ms, p = .02) and of smaller magnitude in the tibia. In relaxometry data from the full width of the femur adjacent to the growth plate, AN subjects showed mean T(1) consistently lower than in controls by 30 to 50 ms in virtually every part of the sampling region. These findings suggest that adolescents with AN exhibit premature conversion of hematopoietic to fat cells in the marrow of the peripheral skeleton potentially owing to adipocyte over osteoblast differentiation in the mesenchymal stem cell pool. PMID:19653811

  19. Bone Marrow Immunity and Myelodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Claude; Wu, Yuenv; Aanei, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by an ineffective hematopoiesis with production of aberrant clones and a high cell apoptosis rate in bone marrow (BM). Macrophages are in charge of phagocytosis. Innate Immune cells and specific T cells are in charge of immunosurveillance. Little is known on BM cell recruitment and activity as BM aspirate is frequently contaminated with peripheral blood. But evidences suggest an active role of immune cells in protection against MDS and secondary leukemia. BM CD8+ CD28− CD57+ T cells are directly cytotoxic and have a distinct cytokine signature in MDS, producing TNF-α, IL-6, CCL3, CCL4, IL-1RA, TNFα, FAS-L, TRAIL, and so on. These tools promote apoptosis of aberrant cells. On the other hand, they also increase MDS-related cytopenia and myelofibrosis together with TGFβ. IL-32 produced by stromal cells amplifies NK cytotoxicity but also the vicious circle of TNFα production. Myeloid-derived suppressing cells (MDSC) are increased in MDS and have ambiguous role in protection/progression of the diseases. CD33 is expressed on hematopoietic stem cells on MDS and might be a potential target for biotherapy. MDS also has impact on immunity and can favor chronic inflammation and emergence of autoimmune disorders. BM is the site of hematopoiesis and thus contains a complex population of cells at different stages of differentiation from stem cells and early engaged precursors up to almost mature cells of each lineage including erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, myelo-monocytic cells (monocyte/macrophage and granulocytes), NK cells, and B cells. Monocytes and B cell finalize their maturation in peripheral tissues or lymph nodes after migration through the blood. On the other hand, T cells develop in thymus and are present in BM only as mature cells, just like other well vascularized tissues. BM precursors have a strong proliferative capacity, which is usually associated with a high risk for genetic errors, cell dysfunction, and

  20. Impact of bone marrow on respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Sara M

    2008-06-01

    The bone marrow is not only a site of haematopoiesis but also serves as an important reservoir for mature granulocytes and stem cells, including haematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and fibrocytes. In respiratory diseases, such as asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis these cells are mobilised from the bone marrow in response to blood-borne mediators and subsequently recruited to the lungs. Although the granulocytes contribute to the inflammatory reaction, stem cells may promote tissue repair or remodelling. Understanding the factors and molecular mechanisms that regulate the mobilisation of granulocytes and stem cells from the bone marrow may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of a wide range of respiratory disorders. PMID:18372214

  1. Pure Red Cell Aplasia Following Interleukin-2 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dutcher, Janice P.; Fan, Wen; Wiernik, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman with metastatic renal cell carcinoma underwent systemic treatment with high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). Anemia requiring transfusion of 1 unit of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) was required during the second week of IL-2 therapy. One month following completion of high-dose IL-2 treatment, she was hospitalized for severe, symptomatic anemia and received 5 units of PRBCs. She was referred back for evaluation. A complete hematologic evaluation was performed including antiviral serology, evaluation for hemolysis, complete iron studies, and finally bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. The diagnosis was pure red cell aplasia, and no inciting viral cause could be ascertained. She required PRBCs for 5 months following IL-2 therapy. It was concluded that IL-2 was the cause of her red cell aplasia. This subsequently resolved spontaneously, and she had normal hemoglobin and hematocrit, respectively, 1 and 2 years after treatment. PMID:27144182

  2. Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, B.; Andreeff, M.; Li, D.

    1983-11-01

    Cell survival kinetics in both peripheral blood and in bone marrow have been studied over the time course of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation. Our unique TBI regimen allows the study of the in vivo radiation effect uncomplicated by prior cyclophosphamide, since this agent is given after TBI in our cytoreduction scheme. Peripheral blood cell concentrations were monitored with conventional laboratory cell counts and differentials. Absolute bone marrow cell concentrations were monitored by measuring cell concentrations in an aspirate sample and correcting for dilution with blood by a cell cycle kinetic method using cytofluorometry. For lymphocytes in peripheral blood in patients in remission, the effective D/sub 0/ ranged from 373 rad in 10 children less than or equal to 10 y old, to 536 rad in the four patients between 11 to 17 y old, while n = 1.0 in all groups. There was no trend observed according to age. Granulocytes had a much higher effective D/sub 0/, approximately 1000 rad in vivo. Absolute nucleated cell concentration in marrow dropped slowly initially, due to an increased lymphocyte concentration in marrow during a concurrent drop in lymphocyte concentration in peripheral blood, but eventually fell on the last day of TBI ranging from 7 to 44% of the initial marrow nucleated cell concentration. Marrow myeloid elements, however, dropped continuously throughout the course of TBI.

  3. Bone Marrow Stress Decreases Osteogenic Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Baht, Gurpreet S; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    Age-related bone loss may be a result of declining levels of stem cells in the bone marrow. Using the Col2.3Δtk (DTK) transgenic mouse, osteoblast depletion was used as a source of marrow stress in order to investigate the effects of aging on osteogenic progenitors which reside in the marrow space. Five-month-old DTK mice were treated with one or two cycles of ganciclovir to conditionally ablate differentiated osteoblasts, whereas controls were saline-treated. Treatment cycles were two weeks in length followed by four weeks of recovery. All animals were sacrificed at 8 months of age; bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were harvested for cell culture and whole bones were excised for bone quality assessment. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays were conducted to investigate the osteogenic potential of BMSC in vitro, and RNA was extracted to assess the expression of osteoblastic genes. Bone quality assessments included bone histomorphometry, TRAP staining, microcomputed tomography, and biomechanical testing. Osteoblast depletion decreased CFU-F (fibroblast), CFU-ALP (alkaline phosphatase), and CFU-VK (von Kossa) counts and BMSC osteogenic capacity in cell culture. Ex vivo, there were no differences in bone mineral density of vertebrae or femurs between treatment groups. Histology showed a decrease in bone volume and bone connectivity with repeated osteoblast depletion; however, this was accompanied by an increase in bone formation rate. There were no notable differences in osteoclast parameters or observed bone marrow adiposity. We have developed a model that uses bone marrow stress to mimic age-related decrease in osteogenic progenitors. Our data suggest that the number of healthy BMSCs and their osteogenic potential decline with repeated osteoblast depletion. However, activity of the remaining osteoblasts increases to compensate for this loss in progenitor osteogenic potential. PMID:26220824

  4. Marrow-tumor interactions: the role of the bone marrow in controlling chemically induced tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, C

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes work done to evaluate the role of the bone marrow in tumor growth regulation. Work done with the MCA tumor showed that several subclasses of mononuclear bone marrow cells (e.g. natural regulatory cell, NRC) play a major role in the regulation of tumor growth. Experiments with the spontaneous CE mammary carcinoma system illustrate that a rapid growth of certain neoplasms may be due to the fact that through some as yet undefined mechanism the tumor eliminates mononuclear cells in the bone marrow of the host and stops their production. (KRM)

  5. Marrow cells as progenitors of lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Fine, Alan

    2004-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence showing that marrow-derived cells can engraft as differentiated epithelial cells of various tissues, including the lung. These findings challenge long-held views regarding the basic biology of stem cells. Elucidating the fundamental mechanisms controlling these processes is the major challenge of this field. Regardless, these experiments suggest new strategies for the treatment of chronic diseases. PMID:14757420

  6. Comparative morphology of the marrow sac.

    PubMed

    Bi, L X; Simmons, D J; Hawkins, H K; Cox, R A; Mainous, E G

    2000-12-01

    Electron microscopic techniques have been used to profile the morphologies of marrow sacs in different laboratory species. These structures all comprise a condensed layer of overlapping fibroblast-like stromal cells and apparently confine the medullary and endosteal osteoblast/lining cells to separate histiotypic compartments. There were some variations in the morphology of the sac cells in the different species. In rats, cats, and sheep, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed a seamless arrangement of marrow sac cells which resembled a thin, flat simple squamous epithelium; they displayed few intercellular cytoplasmic processes. In the rabbit and pigeon, the sac comprised a more woven, multilayered fabric of broadly elongate flat fibroblast-like cells which displayed numerous intercellular processes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that all marrow sac cells were attenuated with elongated nuclei, a few small round mitochondria, and a sparse rough endoplasmic reticulum. In the majority of animals, the sac was one to two cell layers thick. The rabbit and pigeon sacs were multilayered, and never less than three to four cells deep. The cell layers were not closely apposed. Tight or gap junctions were absent at the points of intercellular contact. These morphological results suggest that marrow sacs are common elements of the vertebrate skeleton with species specific morphologies. PMID:11074407

  7. Peripheral red blood cell split chimerism as a consequence of intramedullary selective apoptosis of recipient red blood cells in a case of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Marziali, Marco; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid; Fraboni, Daniela; Paciaroni, Katia; Gallucci, Cristiano; Alfieri, Cecilia; Roveda, Andrea; De Angelis, Gioia; Cardarelli, Luisa; Ribersani, Michela; Andreani, Marco; Lucarelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC) has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80% circulating donor red blood cells (RBC). The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism. PMID:25408852

  8. Peripheral Red Blood Cell Split Chimerism as a Consequence of Intramedullary Selective Apoptosis of Recipient Red Blood Cells in a Case of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marziali, Marco; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid; Fraboni, Daniela; Paciaroni, Katia; Gallucci, Cristiano; Alfieri, Cecilia; Roveda, Andrea; De Angelis, Gioia; Cardarelli, Luisa; Ribersani, Michela; Andreani, Marco; Lucarelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC) has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80% circulating donor red blood cells (RBC). The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism. PMID:25408852

  9. Comparison of bone marrow aspiration and bone marrow biopsy in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hamid, G A; Hanbala, N

    2009-07-01

    Naturally trephine biopsies have definitive advantages over aspirates in case of dry tap bone marrow aspirates as a result of fibrosis or densely packed bone marrow by tumour cells and may be informative independent of cytology especially in bone marrow involvement by lymphomas and carcinomas. In this prospective descriptive study we aimed to compare between the bone marrow trephine biopsy (BMTB) and bone marrow aspirates (BMAs) regarding the detection rate of solid tumours, lymphoma and myeloma involvement of the bone marrow. The study was carried out in the department of pathology and Haematology-Oncology of Al-Gamhouria Teaching Hospital/Aden during the period between Jan 2005 to Dec 2005. A total of 32 patients with suspected or confirmed malignancy undergone both BMTB and BMA from the posterior superior iliac crest and both results were compared. We divided them into three groups: those with solid tumours (21) patients, lymphoma (7) patients and with MM (4) patients. Our results showed that BMA had a 47.6% sensitivity, 100.0% specificity, with positive predictive value (100%), and negative predictive value (50.0%). In solid tumours alone it had a sensitivity of (40.0%), 100% specificity, with positive predictive value (100%), and negative predictive value (64.7%). This gives the BMA a lower sensitivity in detecting solid tumour metastasis and lymphoma involvement in comparison to BMTB. In conclusion, any patient with suspected or confirmed cancer should undergo BMTB because of its high sensitivity compared to BMA. PMID:20194084

  10. Bone marrow manifestations in multicentric Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hazem A H; Balachandran, Kirsty; Bower, Mark; Naresh, Kikkeri N

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to document the morphological and immunophenotypic features, and describe the diagnostic features of bone marrow (BM) involvement in human herpes virus 8 Multicentric Castleman disease (HHV8-MCD). BM trephine biopsy (BMTB) specimens from 28 patients were revisited. Samples were evaluated for expression of CD3, CD20, CD138, CD68R, glycophorin C, CD42b, HHV8-latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA1), Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA and light chains. Presence of significant numbers of HHV8-LANA1(+) lymphoid/plasmacytic cells, noted in 10/28 cases, was indicative of BM involvement and was associated with low CD4 and CD8 counts in peripheral blood. The characteristic morphological appearance of MCD seen in lymph nodes is a rare finding in BMTB. 4/5 cases with lymphoid aggregates were involved by MCD, whereas 6/23 cases without lymphoid aggregates were involved by MCD (P = 0·023). 9/18 cases with hypercellular marrow were involved by MCD, whilst only 1/8 cases with normo/hypocellular marrow showed involvement by MCD (P = 0·070). While 9/21 cases with increased marrow reticulin were involved by MCD, none of the cases with no increase in reticulin were involved by MCD (P = 0·080). Reactive plasmacytosis is a frequent finding. We conclude that bone marrow is involved in a significant proportion of patients with MCD (36%), and involvement can be identified by HHV8-LANA1 immunohistochemistry. PMID:26817834

  11. Adiponectin Promotes Human Jaw Bone Marrow Stem Cell Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pu, Y; Wu, H; Lu, S; Hu, H; Li, D; Wu, Y; Tang, Z

    2016-07-01

    Human jaw bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (h-JBMMSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells with osteogenic differentiation potential. The relationship between adiponectin (APN) and the metabolism of h-JBMMSCs has not been fully elucidated, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of APN on h-JBMMSC metabolism. h-JBMMSCs were obtained from the primary culture of human jaw bones and treated with or without APN (1 µg/mL). Osteogenesis-related gene expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To further investigate the signaling pathway, mechanistic studies were performed using Western blotting, immunofluorescence, lentiviral transduction, and SB202190 (a specific p38 inhibitor). Alizarin Red staining showed that APN promoted h-JBMMSC osteogenesis. Real-time PCR, ALP assay, and ELISA showed that ALP, osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin, and integrin-binding sialoprotein were up-regulated in APN-treated cells compared to untreated controls. Immunofluorescence revealed that adaptor protein containing a pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine domain, and leucine zipper motif (APPL1) translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm with APN treatment. Additionally, the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) increased over time with APN treatment. Moreover, knockdown of APPL1 or p38 MAPK inhibition blocked the expression of APN-induced calcification-related genes including ALP, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), and OCN. Furthermore, Alizarin Red staining of calcium nodes was not increased by the knockdown of APPL1 or p38 inhibition. Our data suggest that this regulation is mediated through the APPL1-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. These findings collectively provide evidence that APN induces the osteogenesis of h-JBMMSCs through APPL1-mediated p38 MAPK activation

  12. Red Clover Breeding Progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is an important forage legume grown on approximately 4 million hectares worldwide. It has a long and varied history in agriculture. Active breeding efforts began at the end of the 19th century. Since this time significant improvement in red clover cultivar for a...

  13. Cobb's Red Cabbage Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an indicator made from the pigment in red cabbage. Cabbage is grated then soaked in water. When the water is a strong red, the cabbage is strained out. The cabbage-juice indicator is then used to test for acids and bases. Includes a list of good foods to test for acidity and alkalinity. (PVD)

  14. Facilitation of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by a T cell-specific immunotoxin containing daunomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.S.; Inazawa, M.; Sinha, N.; Sawada, S.; Vergidis, R.; Diener, E.

    1987-12-01

    Daunomycin coupled via an acid-sensitive spacer to monoclonal Thy-1.2-specific antibody was used to purge T lymphocytes from a 1:1 mixture of murine C57BL/6J bone marrow and spleen cells prior to engraftment in fully allogeneic, irradiated BALB/c recipients. Treatment of bone marrow with the immunotoxin at a concentration used for purging had no effect on the viability of committed hematopoietic progenitor or multipotent stem cells. All of the recipients of purged bone marrow were at least 80% chimeric for donor peripheral blood cells and none developed graft-versus-host disease. Out of 50 chimeras, 49 were still alive more than 200 days posttransplantation. The chimeras were shown to be tolerant to donor tissue as tested by mixed lymphocyte reactivity, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and skin grafting. The same tests revealed full immunocompetence of chimeras to third-party alloantigens. In vivo IgM and IgG antibody responses to sheep red blood cells were similar in magnitude in allogeneically and syngeneically reconstituted mice.

  15. Application of ferrokinetic investigation for differential diagnosis in bone marrow hypoplasia and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M; Roth, P; Werner, E; Kaltwasser, J P

    1979-02-01

    In this study, erythropoietic activity of bone marrow has been evaluated by ferrokinetics. For that purpose, the data of radioiron disappearance from plasma and its ultimate incorporation in red blood cells after the injection of about 10 muCi of 59Fe tagged autologous plasma, were analysed and fitted to the sum of three exponentials, using a non-linear least square SAAM-25 program on UNIVAC-1108 computer. A function representing time-activity relationship, was constructed. The functional physiological model of iron metabolism, proposed by Cavill and Ricketts, was used to calculate various ferrokinetic parameters in terms of coefficients and exponents of the time-activity function. After identifying the parameters that could be used as indices of erythropoietic activity of bone marrow, the study was repeated in six patients after they had undergone myelostimulative therapy. A distinct correlation was found between ferrokinetic observations and clinical and biochemical findings. It has been demonstrated that in histologically diagnosed cases with bone marrow hypoplasia, a further differentiation between pure aplasia and those with hypoplasia together with ineffective erythropoiesis was possible. This discrimination which is clinically very important, is only possible by means of kinetic investigations. PMID:499222

  16. Jupiter's Great Red spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This color composite made from Voyager 2 narrow-angle camera frames shows the Great Red Spot during the late Jovian afternoon. North of the Red Spot lies a curious darker section of the South Equatorial Belt (SEB), the belt in which the Red Spot is located. A bright eruption of material passing from the SEB northward into the diffuse equatorial clouds has been observed on all occasions when this feature passes north of the Red Spot. The remnants of one such eruption are apparent in this photograph. To the lower left of the Red Spot lies one of the three long-lived White Ovals. This photograph was taken on June 29, 1979, when Voyager 2 was over 9 million kilometers (nearly 6 million miles) from Jupiter. The smallest features visible are over 170 kilometers (106 miles) across.

  17. MR imaging of therapy-induced changes of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Tobias; Link, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    MR imaging of bone marrow infiltration by hematologic malignancies provides non-invasive assays of bone marrow cellularity and vascularity to supplement the information provided by bone marrow biopsies. This article will review the MR imaging findings of bone marrow infiltration by hematologic malignancies with special focus on treatment effects. MR imaging findings of the bone marrow after radiation therapy and chemotherapy will be described. In addition, changes in bone marrow microcirculation and metabolism after anti-angiogenesis treatment will be reviewed. Finally, new specific imaging techniques for the depiction of regulatory events that control blood vessel growth and cell proliferation will be discussed. Future developments are directed to yield comprehensive information about bone marrow structure, function and microenvironment. PMID:17021706

  18. Biology of Marrow Failure Syndromes: Role of Microenvironment and Niches

    PubMed Central

    Balderman, Sophia R.; Calvi, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    The marrow microenvironment and its components regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC) fate. An abnormality in the marrow microenvironment and specific dysfunction of the HSC niche could play a critical role in initiation, disease progression and response to therapy of marrow failure syndromes. Therefore, the identification of changes in the HSC niche in marrow failure syndromes should lead to further knowledge of the signals that disrupt the normal microenvironment. In turn, niche disruption may contribute to disease morbidity resulting in pancytopenia and clonal evolution, and its understanding could point to new therapeutic targets for these conditions. We briefly (a) review evidence for the importance of the marrow microenvironment as a regulator of normal hematopoiesis, (b) summarize the current knowledge regarding the role of dysfunctions in the marrow microenvironment in marrow failure syndromes, and (c) propose a strategy through which niche stimulation can complement current treatment for MDS. PMID:25696837

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal marrow: Basic understanding of the normal marrow pattern and its variant

    PubMed Central

    Nouh, Mohamed Ragab; Eid, Ahmed Fathi

    2015-01-01

    For now, magnetic resonance (MR) is the best noninvasive imaging modality to evaluate vertebral bone marrow thanks to its inherent soft-tissue contrast and non-ionizing nature. A daily challenging scenario for every radiologist interpreting MR of the vertebral column is discerning the diseased from normal marrow. This requires the radiologist to be acquainted with the used MR techniques to judge the spinal marrow as well as its normal MR variants. Conventional sequences used basically to image marrow include T1W, fat-suppressed T2W and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging provides gross morphological data. Interestingly, using non-routine MR sequences; such as opposed phase, diffusion weighted, MR spectroscopy and contrasted-enhanced imaging; may elucidate the nature of bone marrow heterogeneities; by inferring cellular and chemical composition; and adding new functional prospects. Recalling the normal composition of bone marrow elements and the physiologic processes of spinal marrow conversion and reconversion eases basic understanding of spinal marrow imaging. Additionally, orientation with some common variants seen during spinal marrow MR imaging as hemangiomas and bone islands is a must. Moreover, awareness of the age-associated bone marrow changes as well as changes accompanying different variations of the subject’s health state is essential for radiologists to avoid overrating normal MR marrow patterns as pathologic states and metigate unnecessary further work-up. PMID:26753060

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal marrow: Basic understanding of the normal marrow pattern and its variant.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Mohamed Ragab; Eid, Ahmed Fathi

    2015-12-28

    For now, magnetic resonance (MR) is the best noninvasive imaging modality to evaluate vertebral bone marrow thanks to its inherent soft-tissue contrast and non-ionizing nature. A daily challenging scenario for every radiologist interpreting MR of the vertebral column is discerning the diseased from normal marrow. This requires the radiologist to be acquainted with the used MR techniques to judge the spinal marrow as well as its normal MR variants. Conventional sequences used basically to image marrow include T1W, fat-suppressed T2W and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging provides gross morphological data. Interestingly, using non-routine MR sequences; such as opposed phase, diffusion weighted, MR spectroscopy and contrasted-enhanced imaging; may elucidate the nature of bone marrow heterogeneities; by inferring cellular and chemical composition; and adding new functional prospects. Recalling the normal composition of bone marrow elements and the physiologic processes of spinal marrow conversion and reconversion eases basic understanding of spinal marrow imaging. Additionally, orientation with some common variants seen during spinal marrow MR imaging as hemangiomas and bone islands is a must. Moreover, awareness of the age-associated bone marrow changes as well as changes accompanying different variations of the subject's health state is essential for radiologists to avoid overrating normal MR marrow patterns as pathologic states and metigate unnecessary further work-up. PMID:26753060

  1. Pure red cell aplasia induced by epoetin zeta.

    PubMed

    Panichi, Vincenzo; Ricchiuti, Guido; Scatena, Alessia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) may develop in patients with chronic kidney disease receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA). We report on a 72-year-old patient who developed hypo-proliferative anaemia unresponsive to ESA following the administration of epoetin zeta subcutaneously for 7 months. On the basis of severe isolated hypoplasia of the erythroid line in the bone marrow and high-titre neutralizing anti-erythropoietin antibodies (Ab), a diagnosis of Ab-mediated PRCA was made. Epoetin zeta was discontinued and the patient was given steroids. This was associated with anaemia recovery. To our knowledge this is the first PRCA case related to epoetin zeta. PMID:27478604

  2. Pure red cell aplasia induced by epoetin zeta

    PubMed Central

    Panichi, Vincenzo; Ricchiuti, Guido; Scatena, Alessia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) may develop in patients with chronic kidney disease receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA). We report on a 72-year-old patient who developed hypo-proliferative anaemia unresponsive to ESA following the administration of epoetin zeta subcutaneously for 7 months. On the basis of severe isolated hypoplasia of the erythroid line in the bone marrow and high-titre neutralizing anti-erythropoietin antibodies (Ab), a diagnosis of Ab-mediated PRCA was made. Epoetin zeta was discontinued and the patient was given steroids. This was associated with anaemia recovery. To our knowledge this is the first PRCA case related to epoetin zeta. PMID:27478604

  3. The effect of autologous bone marrow stromal cells differentiated on scaffolds for canine tibial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells that form many tissues. Various scaffolds are available for bone reconstruction by tissue engineering. Osteoblastic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) promote osteogenesis on scaffolds and stimulate bone regeneration. We investigated the use of cultured autologous BMSC on different scaffolds for healing defects in tibias of adult male canines. BMSC were isolated from canine humerus bone marrow, differentiated into osteoblasts in culture and loaded onto porous ceramic scaffolds including hydroxyapatite 1, hydroxyapatite gel and calcium phosphate. Osteoblast differentiation was verified by osteonectine and osteocalcine immunocytochemistry. The scaffolds with stromal cells were implanted in the tibial defect. Scaffolds without stromal cells were used as controls. Sections from the defects were processed for histological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analyses to analyze the healing of the defects. BMSC were spread, allowed to proliferate and differentiate to osteoblasts as shown by alizarin red histochemistry, and osteocalcine and osteonectine immunostaining. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BMSC on the scaffolds were more active and adhesive to the calcium phosphate scaffold compared to the others. Macroscopic bone formation was observed in all groups, but scaffolds with stromal cells produced significantly better results. Bone healing occurred earlier and faster with stromal cells on the calcium phosphate scaffold and produced more callus compared to other scaffolds. Tissue healing and osteoblastic marker expression also were better with stromal cells on the scaffolds. Increased trabecula formation, cell density and decreased fibrosis were observed in the calcium phosphate scaffold with stromal cells. Autologous cultured stromal cells on the scaffolds were useful for healing of canine tibial bone defects. The calcium phosphate scaffold was the best for both cell

  4. Post-bone marrow transplant patient management.

    PubMed Central

    Poliquin, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Increasingly, bone marrow transplant (BMT) is the treatment of choice for certain hematologic diseases. BMT is, however, a risky procedure with many potentially serious complications. Some complications are the result of the conditioning regimen, a stage of transplantation that includes large doses of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Conditioning-induced neutropenia and thrombocytopenia often result in infection, bleeding, and mucositis. Veno-occlusive disease (VOD), a chemotherapy-induced hepatotoxicity, can cause a mild to severe form of liver disease. Other complications are directly attributable to the engrafted new marrow. Graft-versus-host disease, a rejection process initiated by immunocompetent donor T lymphocytes, is a complication frequently observed in allogeneic BMT. Approximately 14-28 days after the day of transplant, signs of engraftment begin to appear. When specific discharge criteria are met, the BMT patient is discharged from the hospital. Specific follow-up medical care is ongoing for about one year after BMT. PMID:2293508

  5. [Allogenic bone marrow transplantation complications. Part II].

    PubMed

    Saloua, L; Tarek, B O; Abderrahman, A; Abdeladhim, B A

    2000-03-01

    Bone marrow transplantation increase the chances of cure of many hematology and also neoplasms cancers. The procedure is however a cause of expected mortality and morbidity. The complications are represented by mucocutaneous, toxicity graft versus host disease, veno-occlusive disease and most importantly injections consequences all this complications needs to be prevented and treated considering the risk associated to the moderling immunosuppression. PMID:11026816

  6. Total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation: the influence of fractionation and delay of marrow infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, A.S.; Tracy, D.; Lam, W.C.; Order, S.E.

    1980-03-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide is being employed increasingly in the therapy of end stage leukemia. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) represents a major acute toxicity after allogeneic transplantation. A more rapid reconstitution of lymphoid organs and bone marrow post transplant may result in increased immune competence and hence fewer opportunistic pulmonary infections and IP. By delaying the infusion of marrow to 72 hr after TBI (1250 rad at 7.5 rad/min) instead of the customary 24 hr, we can demonstrate an increase in initial repopulation of thymus, spleen and bone marrow, with syngeneic transplants in Lewis rats. Interstitial pneumonitis may also be caused, in part, by the pulmonary toxicity of large single exposures of TBI. Clinical and laboratory data suggest that fractionated TBI may be less toxic to the lung. When fractionated TBI (625 rad x 2, 7.5 rad/min) is compared to single dose TBI (1250 rad, 7.5 rad/min), and increased initial repopulation of lymphoid organs is observed when fractionated therapy is employed. Delay in marrow infusion and fractionation of TBI exposure may have clinical advantages in patients who receive BMT.

  7. Knee cartilage defect: marrow stimulating techniques.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M Zain; Swenson, Richard D; Lynch, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    Painful chondral defects of the knee are very difficult problems. The incidence of these lesions in the general population is not known since there is likely a high rate of asymptomatic lesions. The rate of lesions found during arthroscopic exam is highly variable, with reports ranging from 11 to 72 % Aroen (Aroen Am J Sports Med 32: 211-5, 2004); Curl(Arthroscopy13: 456-60, 1997); Figueroa(Arthroscopy 23(3):312-5, 2007;); Hjelle(Arthroscopy 18: 730-4, 2002). Examples of current attempts at cartilage restoration include marrow stimulating techniques, ostochondral autografts, osteochondral allografts, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Current research in marrow stimulating techniques has been focused on enhancing and guiding the biology of microfracture and other traditional techniques. Modern advances in stem cell biology and biotechnology have provided many avenues for exploration. The purpose of this work is to review current techniques in marrow stimulating techniques as it relates to chondral damage of the knee. PMID:26411978

  8. Liver disease after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Farthing, M J; Clark, M L; Sloane, J P; Powles, R L; McElwain, T J

    1982-01-01

    Liver dysfunction occurs after bone marrow transplantation but the relative importance of graft versus host disease and other factors, such as infection, radiation, and drugs, has not been clearly established. We have studied liver status before and after bone marrow transplantation in 43 consecutive patients and have related this to survival and factors that are recognised to cause liver injury. Minor abnormalities of liver tests occurred in 21% of patients before grafting but this did not influence survival or the development of liver disease after transplantation. During the first 50 days after grafting, 83% of patients had abnormal liver tests which were more severe in patients who subsequently died. Alanine transaminase was significantly higher in non-survivors and appeared to predict survival early after transplantation. Only non-survivors developed clinical signs of liver disease. Severe liver disease was always associated with graft versus host disease and atypia of the small bile ducts was the most useful histological marker of hepatic involvement with this disease. Two of the patients with hepatic graft versus host disease also has hepatic veno-occlusive disease and three fatalities had opportunistic infection of the liver, although, in the latter, death was not due primarily to liver dysfunction. Previous hepatitis and androgen therapy could not be implicated as important causes of hepatic damage but chemotherapy for acute leukaemia and conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation appear to be the most important factors in the development of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7042484

  9. Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a mosaic of two images taken by the Galileo spacecraft. The image was created using two filters, violet and near-infrared, at each of two camera positions. The Great Red Spot is a storm in Jupiter's atmosphere and is at least 300 years-old. Winds blow counterclockwise around the Great Red Spot at about 400 kilometers per hour (250 miles per hour). The size of the storm is more than one Earth diameter (13,000 kilometers or 8,000 miles) in the north-south direction and more than two Earth diameters in the east-west direction. In this oblique view, where the Great Red Spot is shown on the planet's limb, it appears longer in the north-south direction. The image was taken on June 26, 1996.

    The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. Red Bull Stratos Presentation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Red Bull Stratos High Performance Director Andy Walshe & Technical Project Director Art Thompson share the Stratos story with JSC. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner reached 128,100 ...

  11. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen ... hemocytoblasts give rise to all of the formed elements in blood. If a hemocytoblast commits to becoming ...

  12. Whence the red panda?

    PubMed

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  13. Extended flow cytometry characterization of normal bone marrow progenitor cells by simultaneous detection of aldehyde dehydrogenase and early hematopoietic antigens: implication for erythroid differentiation studies

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Peppino; Di Noto, Rosa; Lo Pardo, Catia; Morabito, Paolo; Abate, Giovanna; Gorrese, Marisa; Raia, Maddalena; Pascariello, Caterina; Scalia, Giulia; Gemei, Marica; Mariotti, Elisabetta; Del Vecchio, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a cytosolic enzyme highly expressed in hematopoietic precursors from cord blood and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood, as well as in bone marrow from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. As regards human normal bone marrow, detailed characterization of ALDH+ cells has been addressed by one single study (Gentry et al, 2007). The goal of our work was to provide new information about the dissection of normal bone marrow progenitor cells based upon the simultaneous detection by flow cytometry of ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens, with particular attention to the expression of ALDH on erythroid precursors. To this aim, we used three kinds of approach: i) multidimensional analytical flow cytometry, detecting ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens in normal bone marrow; ii) fluorescence activated cell sorting of distinct subpopulations of progenitor cells, followed by in vitro induction of erythroid differentiation; iii) detection of ALDH+ cellular subsets in bone marrow from pure red cell aplasia patients. Results In normal bone marrow, we identified three populations of cells, namely ALDH+CD34+, ALDH-CD34+ and ALDH+CD34- (median percentages were 0.52, 0.53 and 0.57, respectively). As compared to ALDH-CD34+ cells, ALDH+CD34+ cells expressed the phenotypic profile of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells, with brighter expression of CD117 and CD133, accompanied by lower display of CD38 and CD45RA. Of interest, ALDH+CD34- population disclosed a straightforward erythroid commitment, on the basis of three orders of evidences. First of all, ALDH+CD34- cells showed a CD71bright, CD105+, CD45- phenotype. Secondly, induction of differentiation experiments evidenced a clear-cut expression of glycophorin A (CD235a). Finally, ALDH+CD34- precursors were not detectable in patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). Conclusion Our study, comparing surface antigen expression of ALDH+/CD34+, ALDH

  14. Pathophysiological role of enhanced bone marrow adipogenesis in diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Piccinin, Meghan A; Khan, Zia A

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes leads to complications in select organ systems primarily by disrupting the vasculature of the target organs. These complications include both micro- (cardiomyopathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) and macro-(atherosclerosis) angiopathies. Bone marrow angiopathy is also evident in both experimental models of the disease as well as in human diabetes. In addition to vascular disruption, bone loss and increased marrow adiposity have become hallmarks of the diabetic bone phenotype. Emerging evidence now implicates enhanced marrow adipogenesis and changes to cellular makeup of the marrow in a novel mechanistic link between various secondary complications of diabetes. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of enhanced marrow adipogenesis in diabetes and the link between changes to marrow cellular composition, and disruption and depletion of reparative stem cells. PMID:26317050

  15. Bone marrow transfusions in previously irradiated, hematologically normal syngeneic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Brecher, G.; Lawce, H.; Tjio, J.H.

    1981-03-01

    Transfusion of syngeneic marrow into normal, nonirradiated recipients results only in minimal proliferation of donor cells. However, irradiated recipients, restored to hematologic normalcy by an initial marrow transfusion, subsequently sustain proliferation which replaces approximately 10% of endogenous marrow after a single transfusion of 4 x 10/sup 7/ marrow cells of the same strain as the host. Cells from histoincompatible donors proliferate only rarely or minimally in the marrows of these irradiated, but hematologically normal recipients without reirradiation. Syngeneic male donor cells proliferate in irradiated and restored female mice, while female donor cells fail to proliferate in the marrow of syngeneic male recipients. A possible explanation is that transfused female cells respond immunologically to the abundant H-Y antigen in the male environment and are eliminated as a result.

  16. Bone marrow ablation followed by allogeneic marrow grafting during first complete remission of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.J.; Spruce, W.E.; Farbstein, M.J.

    1983-03-01

    Of 33 patients who had undergone allogeneic bone marrow transplantation during first complete remission of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, 21 patients have now been followed in continued complete remission for 6-64 mo (median greater than 18 mo) without maintenance chemotherapy. The median age of the surviving patients is 27 yr. Transplant-related complications occurring throughout the first year after marrow grafting were fatal in 7 patients, and leukemic recurrence led to the death of 5 patients. The actuarial long-term disease-free survival is 60% and the actuarial remission rate is 79%.

  17. Vertebral hyperemia associated with bone marrow insult and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, H.A.; Bolden, R.O.; Simone, F.J.

    1984-06-01

    A 15-year-old boy with rhabdoid sarcoma received chemotherapy, which was followed by bone marrow depression, massive nosebleeds and, finally, hematologic recovery. On both hepatobiliary and renal scintigraphy, prominent vertebral activity was present in early images. Correlation with his clinical course suggests that the findings reflect hyperemia due to marrow insult and recovery. Radionuclide imaging to detect hyperemia may be a useful probe for drug effects on hematopoietic bone marrow.

  18. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E.; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  19. Bone marrow fibrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, J P; Reid, M M

    1989-01-01

    Bone marrow trephine biopsy specimens were obtained at diagnosis from 63 of 76 consecutively presenting children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The association between marrow fibrosis and presenting features, including immunophenotype, was analysed. Reticulin was increased in 45 of 56 cases in which blasts expressed B lineage markers, but in only one of seven with T-ALL. A weak association was also found between marrow fibrosis and splenomegaly in those with common ALL. Marrow fibrosis is apparently associated with some examples of ALL of B cell lineage, but precisely which subtypes and whether the phenomenon is clinically important remain to be determined. PMID:2613918

  20. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  1. Marrow Fat and Bone: Review of Clinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ann V.

    2015-01-01

    With growing interest in the connection between fat and bone, there has been increased investigation of the relationship with marrow fat in particular. Clinical research has been facilitated by the development of non-invasive methods to measure bone marrow fat content and composition. Studies in different populations using different measurement techniques have established that higher marrow fat is associated with lower bone density and prevalent vertebral fracture. The degree of unsaturation in marrow fat may also affect bone health. Although other fat depots tend to be strongly correlated, marrow fat has a distinct pattern, suggesting separate mechanisms of control. Longitudinal studies are limited, but are crucial to understand the direct and indirect roles of marrow fat as an influence on skeletal health. With greater appreciation of the links between bone and energy metabolism, there has been growing interest in understanding the relationship between marrow fat and bone. It is well established that levels of marrow fat are higher in older adults with osteoporosis, defined by either low bone density or vertebral fracture. However, the reasons for and implications of this association are not clear. This review focuses on clinical studies of marrow fat and its relationship to bone. PMID:25870585

  2. Holoprosencephaly and Pure Red Cell Aplasia in a Feline Leukaemia Virus-Positive Kitten.

    PubMed

    Southard, T L; Rodriguez-Ramos Fernandez, J; Priest, H; Stokol, T

    2016-01-01

    A 9-month-old, female, domestic longhair cat with severe anaemia tested positive for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and was humanely destroyed and submitted for necropsy examination. Gross findings included a non-divided rostral telencephalon, consistent with semilobar holoprosencephaly. Histological examination of the bone marrow revealed an almost complete absence of erythroid precursor cells, consistent with pure red cell aplasia, and mild to moderate myelofibrosis. This case demonstrates a very unusual central nervous system defect, as well as an atypical presentation of pure red cell aplasia, in a FeLV-positive kitten. PMID:26897097

  3. Bone marrow and bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells therapy for the chronically ischemic myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Baffour, Richard

    2003-09-01

    Bone marrow stem cells have been shown to differentiate into various phenotypes including cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Bone marrow stem cells are mobilized and home in to areas of injured myocardium where they are involved in tissue repair. In addition, bone marrow secretes multiple growth factors, which are essential for angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In some patients, these processes are not enough to avert clinical symptoms of ischemic disease. Therefore, in vivo administration of an adequate number of stem cells would be a significant therapeutic advance. Unfractionated bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells, which contain both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells may be more appropriate for cell therapy. Studies in animal models suggest that implantation of different types of stem cells improve angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, tissue perfusion as well as left ventricular function. Several unanswered questions remain. For example, the optimal delivery approach, dosage and timing of the administration of cell therapy as well as durability of improvements need to be studied. Early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and feasibility of various cell therapies in ischemic disease. Randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials need to be completed to determine the effectiveness of stem cell.

  4. Metastatic thymoma involving the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Wenceslao, Stella; Krause, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, thymomas can be involved in a considerable variety of clinical presentations. Clinicians should be mindful of the breadth of associations with other diseases, including autoimmune disorders and many secondary nonthymic malignancies. For the pathologist, knowledge of the extremely varied histopathologic presentation of thymoma is vital to formulate a proper differential, workup, and diagnosis. The presented case illustrates the finding of very rare metastatic thymoma involvement of bone marrow, identified during evaluation for pancytopenia. The history of prior prostate cancer and an uncharacterized pancreatic lesion, as well as the familial presentation, also suggests a possible underlying hereditary syndrome. PMID:26722174

  5. The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chirnomas, S Deborah; Kupfer, Gary M

    2013-12-01

    Molecular pathogenesis may be elucidated for inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS). The study and presentation of the details of their molecular biology and biochemistry is warranted for appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients and to identify the physiology of the normal hematopoiesis and mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Several themes have emerged within each subsection of IBMFS, including the ribosomopathies, which include ribosome assembly and ribosomal RNA processing. The Fanconi anemia pathway has become interdigitated with the familial breast cancer syndromes. In this article, the diseases that account for most IBMFS diagnoses are analyzed. PMID:24237972

  6. Autologous bone marrow transplantation by photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.

    1992-06-01

    Simultaneous exposure of Merocyanine 540 dye containing cultured tumor cells to 514-nm laser light (93.6 J/cm2) results in virtually complete cell destruction. Under identical conditions, 40% of the normal progenitor (CFU-GM) cells survive the treatment. Laser- photoradiation treated, cultured breast cancer cells also were killed, and living tumor cells could not be detected by clonogenic assays or by anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody method. Thus, laser photoradiation therapy could be useful for purging of contaminating tumor cells from autologous bone marrow.

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Stuart T.; Midwinter, Robyn G.; Coupland, Lucy A.; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S.; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Chong, Beng H.; Parish, Christopher R.; Stocker, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119+-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119+-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes. PMID:25682599

  8. The study of indicators of bone marrow and peripheral blood of rats with diabetes and transplanted liver tumor after intravenous injection of gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikht, Nataliya I.; Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Matveeva, Olga V.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2015-03-01

    In study the evaluation of the influence of gold nanorods on morphological indicators of red bone marrow and peripheral blood of rats with diabetes and transplanted liver tumor after intravenous administration of gold nanorods was conducted. We used gold nanorods with length 41 ± 8 nm and diameter of 10.2±2 nm, synthesized in the laboratory of nanobiotechnology IBPPM RAS (Saratov). After intravenous administration of gold nanorods the decrease of leukocytes, platelets and lymphocytes was observed in animals of control group in blood. It was marked the decrease of the number of mature cellular elements of the leukocyte germ in bone marrow - stab neutrophils and segmented leukocytes, and the increase of immature elements- metamyelocytes, indicating the activation of leukocyte germ after nanoparticle administration. The decrease of leukocyte amount was noted in blood and the increase of cellular elements of the leukocyte germ was revealed in bone marrow, indicating the activation of leukocyte germ in rats with alloxan diabetes and transplanted tumors. The changes of morphological indicators of blood and bone marrow testify about stimulation of myelocytic sprouts of hemopoiesis in bone marrow as a result of reduction of mature cells in peripheral blood after gold nanoparticle administration.

  9. Red-based cumulus.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    2015-02-01

    Observations and model simulations of cumulus clouds whose bases are tinted red when the Sun is well above the horizon are presented. Conditions for seeing red bases include (1) a red underlying surface (which may consist of dust clouds, as from haboobs) with high albedo, (2) small fractional cloud cover when the Sun is far enough below the zenith for direct sunlight to illuminate much of the surface directly below and around cloud base, (3) optically thick clouds so that the bases are dark, and (4) clouds with bases that are near enough to the observer to appear high in the sky so that the admixture of scattered light from the intervening atmosphere is minimized. PMID:25967822

  10. Reviving red snapper.

    PubMed

    Estabrook, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Red snappers in the Gulf of Mexico once hovered on the brink of extinction, their population having dropped to 2 percent of what had historically swum in the Gulf. But thanks to a recently introduced plan that turns the conventional wisdom of fisheries management on its head, the picture has begun to change. Called Individual Fishing Quotas (IFQs), the new regulations, which give a guaranteed allotment of fish to each participant instead of applying industry-wide quotas, went into effect for Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in early 2007. The results were immediate and so profound that the Gulf Fishery Management Council voted earlier this year to increase the annual limit on red snapper to nearly 7 million pounds from 5 million. PMID:21542214

  11. Targeted Pathologic Evaluation of Bone Marrow Donors Identifies Previously Undiagnosed Marrow Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Tilson, MP; Jones, RJ; Sexauer, A; Griffin, CA; Morsberger, LA; Batista, DAS; Small, D; Burns, KH; Gocke, CD; Vuica-Ross, M; Borowitz, MJ; Duffield, AS

    2013-01-01

    Potential bone marrow donors are screened to ensure the safety of both the donor and recipient. At our institution, potential donors with abnormal peripheral blood cell counts, a personal history of malignancy, or age >60 years are evaluated to ensure that they are viable candidates for donation. Evaluation of the marrow includes morphologic, flow cytometric and cytogenetic studies. 122 potential donors were screened between the years of 2001–2011, encompassing approximately 10% of all donors. The median age of the screened potential donors was 59 years, and included 59 men and 63 women. The donors were screened because of age >60 years old (33), anemia (22), cytopenias other than anemia (27), elevated peripheral blood counts without a concurrent cytopenia (20), elevated peripheral blood counts with a concurrent cytopenia (10), history of malignancy (4), abnormal peripheral blood differential (3), prior graft failure (1), history of treatment with chemotherapy (1), and body habitus (1). Marrow abnormalities were detected in 9% (11/122) of donors. These donors were screened because of anemia (5/22; 23%), age >60 years (2/33; 6%), history of malignancy (2/4; 50%), elevated peripheral blood counts (1/20; 5%), and body habitus (1/1; 100%). Abnormalities included plasma cell dyscrasia (3), abnormal marrow cellularity (3), clonal cytogenetic abnormalities (2), low-grade myelodysplastic syndrome (1), a mutated JAK2 V617F allele (1), and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (1). Our experience indicates that extended screening of potential donors identifies a significant number of donors with previously undiagnosed marrow abnormalities. PMID:23769818

  12. Lustre on Red Sky.

    SciTech Connect

    Monk, Stephen Todd; Mervini, Joe

    2010-04-01

    The goals of Lustre on Red Sky are: (1) provide home/projects/scratch Lustre file systems; (2) adhere to the Sun HPC stack; (3) implement software RAID on Sun provided JBODs; and (4) design for easy administration. Conclusions are: (1) software RAID includes additional risks and administration vs. hardware RAID solutions; (2) limited testing of hardware in these configurations make it ill-suited for rapid deployment in a production environment; and (3) Lustre has been a shining star on this machine, Red Sky users are pleased with its performance.

  13. Proliferative and Glycolytic Assessment of the Whole-Body Bone Marrow Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Goryawala, Mohammed; Adjoua, Malek; Güleç, Seza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Quantitative assessment of active bone marrow (BM) in vivo is yet to be well-defined. This study aims to compare total body BM volume estimations obtained from use of both18F-FLT PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT in order to consolidate higher cellular proliferation rates with imaging the highly active red BM in pancreatic cancer. Methods: This phase I pilot study includes seven patients with pancreatic cancers who underwent both 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG imaging each acquired within a week’s duration. A CT-based classifier is used for segmenting bone into cortical and trabecular regions. The total BM volume is determined through statistical thresholding on PET activity found within the trabecular bone. Results: Results showed that 18F-FLT measures of red BM volume (RBV) were higher than those obtained from 18F-FDG (∆=89.21 ml). RBV obtained using 18F-FLT in males were found to have high correlation with measured weight (R2=0.61) and BMI (R2=0.70). The red BM fraction obtained from 18F-FLT was significantly different between males and females, with females showing much higher red bone matter within the trabecular bone (p<0.05). In contrast to 18F-FLT, 18F-FDG BM measurements showed that RBV was significantly different between males and females (p<0.05). Results also show that spinal activity SUV threshold for red BM segmentation is significantly different between 18F-FLT PET and 18F-FDG PET (p<0.05). Conclusion: By combining 18F-FLT-PET and 18F-FDG-PET, this study provides useful insights for in vivo BM estimation through its proliferative and glycolytic activities. PMID:26316472

  14. National Marrow Donor Program and Be The Match Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Bone Marrow Transplants The National Marrow Donor Program and Be The Match Registry Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents Creating connections. Saving lives. Founded in 1987 by the federal government, the ...

  15. Immunotactoid glomerulopathy with massive bone marrow deposits in a patient with IgM kappa monoclonal gammopathy and hypocomplementemia.

    PubMed

    Da'as, N; Kleinman, Y; Polliack, A; Amir, G; Ne'eman, Z; Kopolovic, J; Bits, H; Darmon, D

    2001-08-01

    A case of immunotactoid glomerulopathy with an amyloid-like material in the glomeruli and bone marrow is described. Clinically the patient was diagnosed as having severe nephrotic syndrome, hypocomplementemia, and IgM kappa monoclonal gammopathy. Immunotactoid glomerulopathy is an unusual cause of glomerulonephritis, characterized by Congo red-negative, amyloid-like deposits in the glomeruli. This unusual case presentation shows that immunotactoid glomerulopathy may be a manifestation of systemic disease. This patient also presented with hypocomplementemia, an extremely rare associated finding that has been reported previously in only four cases of immunotactoid glomerulopathy. PMID:11479168

  16. Red Cross Swimming Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlasich, Cynthia

    1989-01-01

    Six new aquatic courses, developed by the Red Cross, are described. They are: Infant and Preschool Aquatics, Longfellow's Whale Tales (classroom water safety lessons for K-Six), Basic Water Safety, Emergency Water Safety, Lifeguard Training, and Safety Training for Swim Coaches. (IAH)

  17. Red Emitting VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetter, Michael; Roßbach, Robert; Michler, Peter

    This chapter describes the progress in development of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL) emitting in the red spectral region around 650 nm for data transmission over polymer optical fibers (POF). First, growth issues of red VCSEL using two different material systems, namely AlGaAs and AlGaInP, are introduced. In particular, the optical and electrical state-of-the-art characteristics as low threshold currents ({≤} 1 mA) and high output powers (several mW) are presented with a special focus on emission wavelength. Also the thermal budget and heat removal in the devices are pointed out with regard to the geometry of the VCSEL. Small-signal modulation response in terms of maximum resonance frequency in dependance on temperature behavior are discussed. Applications of these devices in optical interconnects are described and digital data transmission at data rates up to 2.1 Gbit/s over step-index POF is reported. These properties make red emitting VCSEL perfectly suited for high-speed low power consuming light sources for optical data communication via POF. By introducing InP quantum dots as gain material in red emitting VCSEL nearly temperature independent record low threshold current densities of around 10 A/cm2 could be observed.

  18. 'Saanich' Red Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Saanich' is a new floricane-fruiting red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) cultivar from the breeding program at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre (PARC) of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Agassiz, British Columbia. 'Saanich', tested as BC 89-34-41, was selected from a 1989 cross of BC 82-5-161 and BC...

  19. Clover, Red (Trifolium pretense)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic modification of plants by the insertion of transgenes can be a powerful experimental approach to answer basic questions about gene product function. This technology can also be used to make improved crop varieties for use in the field. To apply this powerful tool to red clover, an important ...

  20. 'Valley Red' Strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Valley Red' is a new June-bearing (short-day) strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duchesne ex Rozier) cultivar from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, Ore., released in cooperation with the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, Th...

  1. 'Vintage' Red Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Vintage' is a new primocane-fruiting red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA–ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR released in cooperation with the Oregon State Agricultural Experiment Station and the Washington State University Agricu...

  2. Canadian Red Cross.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Red Cross is guided by its Fundamental Principles--humanity, impartiality, neutrality, independence, voluntary service, unity, and universality--and organized in a traditional geographic hierarchical structure. Among the characteristics that have contributed to its success are a budgeting process that starts at the local level, measurement of program outcomes, and coordinated fundraising activities at the regional level. PMID:18551842

  3. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    PubMed

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis. PMID:18173180

  4. Effects of low level light irradiation on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells derived from rat bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Tyng; Chen, Chih-Wei; Huang, Po-Ya

    2013-01-01

    Low level light irradiation (LLLI) was found to exert positive effects on various cells in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LLLI on the migration of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rbMSCs). Light irradiation was applied at the energy density of 4 J/cm(2) using red (630 nm) and near infrared (NIR, 850 nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs). Wound healing assay showed both red and NIR light irradiation increased cell mobility. Red and NIR light enhanced transmembrane migration of rbMSCs up to 292.9% and 263.6% accordingly. This agreed with enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 enhanced by irradiation. F-actin accumulation and distribution correlated to increased migration in light-irradiated MSCs. Reactive oxygen species production as well as the expression of pFAK and pNF-кB were elevated after red and NIR LLLI. The study demonstrated that red and NIR LLLI increased rbMSCs migration and identified the phosphorylation of FAK and NF-кB as critical steps for the elevated cell migration upon LLLI. PMID:24110639

  5. Bone marrow atrophy induced by murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, A E; Price, P; Shellam, G R

    1994-01-01

    Acute, sublethal infection of mice with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) resulted in up to 80% decreases in the number of cells recoverable from the bone marrow, and a decrease in peripheral blood leucocyte counts during the first week of infection. Depopulation of the leucopoietic areas of the marrow was evident from examination of histological sections. The severity of bone marrow atrophy in MCMV-infected mice of different strains correlated with previously described genetically determined sensitivity to MCMV disease. Although the phenomenon only occurred when mice were inoculated with infectious virus preparations, fewer than one in 10(5) marrow cells were productively infected, suggesting that atrophy was not due to lytic infection of large numbers of bone marrow cells. Interestingly, increases in serum colony-stimulating activity were observed and these were proportional to the severity of bone marrow atrophy. After MCMV infection, we observed increases in the proportions of cells expressing some B-cell and myeloid cell markers and a decrease in the proportion of cells expressing an erythroid cell marker. There was no change in the frequency of marrow cells expressing mature T-cell markers. The numbers of myeloid lineage-committed progenitor cells (GM-CFU) in the marrow decreased 10- to 20-fold in BALB/c nu/+ mice, while there was a threefold decrease in their numbers in BALB/c nu/nu mice. In addition, increases in serum colony-stimulating activity were greater in BALB/c nu/+ mice than in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Our results suggest that growth factors produced after MCMV infection may accelerate the maturation and migration of cells from the marrow to sites of virus replication and inflammation, thus accounting for the depletion in numbers of marrow cells observed soon after MCMV infection. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7959876

  6. Comparative Study of Bone Marrow and Blood B Cells in Infantile and Acquired Agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Nabih I.; Casella, Salvatore R.; Abdou, Nancy L.; Abrahamsohn, Ises A.

    1973-01-01

    The status of immunoglobulin (Ig) receptors of the bone marrow dependent (B) cells present in either the bone marrow (BM) or peripheral blood (PB) of three patients with infantile agammaglobulinemia (I-AGG), or seven patients with acquired agammaglobulinemia (A-AGG) is compared with those of 12 controls. Quantitative and qualitative changes of the different classes of Ig receptors on B cells were evaluated by their capacity to bind [125I]anti-Ig, to be stained with fluorescinated anti-Ig and their in vitro proliferative capacity upon incubation with the anti-Ig. Patients with I-AGG lacked B cells in both the BM and PB. Whereas BM cells of patients with A-AGG carried receptors similar to control cells, their blood B cells had fewer IgM, IgG, and IgA cells which failed to proliferate in vitro in the presence of the anti-Ig. An anti-IgM of the IgG class was detected in the sera of patients with A-AGG but not in sera of I-AGG. The isolated anti-IgM agglutinated human red cells coated with IgM. The anti-IgM partially blocked the binding of fluorescinated or radiolabeled anti-IgM to IgM peripheral blood lymphocytes of normal controls. The eluted anti-IgM in presence of complement was partially cytotoxic to normal cells. It is concluded that I-AGG-B cell defect is due to failure of B cell development in the bone marrow compartment whereas the peripheral exclusion of IgM cells by an anti-IgM with the subsequent failure of differentiation of both IgG and IgA cells could be an important mechanism in A-AGG-B cell defect. PMID:4580388

  7. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M.; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT) remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) pool that also gives rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes, among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here, we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions, and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption, and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high-fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone – a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk – mice demonstrate a fivefold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise

  8. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT) remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) pool that also gives rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes, among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here, we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions, and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption, and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high-fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone - a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk - mice demonstrate a fivefold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise significantly

  9. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    James, Sally; Fox, James; Afsari, Farinaz; Lee, Jennifer; Clough, Sally; Knight, Charlotte; Ashmore, James; Ashton, Peter; Preham, Olivier; Hoogduijn, Martin; Ponzoni, Raquel De Almeida Rocha; Hancock, Y.; Coles, Mark; Genever, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis of functional markers for BMSC subsets. All clones expressed typical BMSC cell-surface antigens; however, clones with trilineage differentiation capacity exhibited enhanced vascular interaction gene sets, whereas non-differentiating clones were uniquely CD317 positive with significantly enriched immunomodulatory transcriptional networks and high IL-7 production. IL-7 lineage tracing and CD317 immunolocalization confirmed the existence of a rare non-differentiating BMSC subtype, distinct from Cxcl12-DsRed+ perivascular stromal cells in vivo. Colony-forming CD317+ IL-7hi cells, identified at ∼1%–3% frequency in heterogeneous human BMSC fractions, were found to have the same biomolecular profile as non-differentiating BMSC clones using Raman spectroscopy. Distinct functional identities can be assigned to BMSC subpopulations, which are likely to have specific roles in immune control, lymphopoiesis, and bone homeostasis. PMID:26070611

  10. Daily variation in radiosensitivity of circulating blood cells and bone marrow cell density in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    Mice on a 12/12 light/dark cycle were bled during a twenty-four hour period each week for eight weeks to establish daily values of circulating blood cells. No significant daily variation was found in total red blood cells, hematocrit, or percentage of reticulocytes. A significant (P < 0.001) daily variation was found in total white blood cells, with the minimum occurring at 8 PM and the maximum occurring during the daylight hours from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mice were then exposed to 0 R, 20 R, 50 R, or 100 R of x-radiation to determine what dose significantly reduces the total white cell count in circulating blood. It was found that 100 R significantly (P < .05) reduces the total white cell count over a four week period post-exposure. To determine if circulating blood cells and bone marrow cells show a diurnal radiosensitivity, mice were exposed to 100 R or 200 R of x-radiation at noon or midnight. Hematocrits, reticulocyte and white blood cell counts, daily white blood cell rhythm, and bone marrow cell density indicate that these mice were more radiosensitive at night.

  11. Registration of 'Red Ruby' Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red Ruby’ soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed by the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2007 via an exclusive licensing agreement through Michigan State University (MSU) Technologies. Red Ruby was selected from the cross Pioneer ‘2552’/Pioneer ‘2737W’ ma...

  12. The Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Chirnomas, S. Deborah; Kupfer, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the rarity of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS), they represent diseases for which the molecular pathogenesis may be elucidated. Their study and presentation of the details of their molecular biology and biochemistry is warranted not only for appropriate diagnosis and management of afflicted patients but also because they lend clues to the normal physiology of the normal hematopoiesis and, in many cases, mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Several themes have emerged within each subsection of IBMFS, including the ribosomopathies that entail both ribosome assembly as well as ribosomal RNA processing. The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway itself has become interdigitated with the familial breast cancer syndromes. The sections that follow present a more detailed analysis of the diseases that account for the majority of IBMFS diagnoses. PMID:24237972

  13. Lung function after bone marrow grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Depledge, M.H.; Barrett, A.; Powles, R.L.

    1983-02-01

    Results of a prospective lung function study are presented for 48 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated with total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) at the Royal Marsden Hospital between 1978 and 1980. Patients with active disease or who were in remission following cytoreductive chemotherapy had mildly impaired gas exchange prior to grafting. After TBI and BMT all patients studied developed progressive deterioration of lung function during the first 100 days, although these changes were subclinical. Infection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) were associated with further worsening of restrictive ventilatory defects and diffusing capacity (D/sub L/CO). Beyond 100 days, ventilatory ability returned to normal and gas transfer improved, although it failed to reach pre-transplant levels. There was no evidence of progressive pulmonary fibrosis during the first year after grafting.

  14. Marrow Adipose Tissue: Trimming the Fat.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Erica L; Cawthorn, William P; Burr, Aaron A; Horowitz, Mark C; MacDougald, Ormond A

    2016-06-01

    Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) is a unique fat depot, located in the skeleton, that has the potential to contribute to both local and systemic metabolic processes. In this review we highlight several recent conceptual developments pertaining to the origin and function of MAT adipocytes; consider the relationship of MAT to beige, brown, and white adipose depots; explore MAT expansion and turnover in humans and rodents; and discuss future directions for MAT research in the context of endocrine function and metabolic disease. MAT has the potential to exert both local and systemic effects on metabolic homeostasis, skeletal remodeling, hematopoiesis, and the development of bone metastases. The diversity of these functions highlights the breadth of the potential impact of MAT on health and disease. PMID:27094502

  15. [Current problems in pediatric bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kato, S

    1993-05-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been increasingly applied to a variety of potentially fatal diseases in childhood. However, trends of indication of BMT are changing because chemotherapy in leukemia and immunosuppressive therapy with/without colony stimulating factor in aplastic anemia are improving. Several progresses have been noted in matched unrelated BMT and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation as well as in sibling BMT or autologous BMT. Many efforts are being made to decrease rejection rate or leukemia relapse and to improve quality of life by new conditioning regimens. Attempts to induce GVL effects or syngeneic GVHD are currently under progress. The quality of life in long term surviving children are generally good and acceptable, although delay in growth, infertility, cataract and obstructive lung disease are seen in a few patients. PMID:8315825

  16. Marrow failure: a window into ribosome biology.

    PubMed

    Ruggero, Davide; Shimamura, Akiko

    2014-10-30

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, and dyskeratosis congenita are inherited syndromes characterized by marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and cancer predisposition. Genetic and molecular studies have uncovered distinct abnormalities in ribosome biogenesis underlying each of these 3 disorders. How defects in ribosomes, the essential organelles required for protein biosynthesis in all cells, cause tissue-specific abnormalities in human disease remains a question of fundamental scientific and medical importance. Here we review the overlapping and distinct clinical features of these 3 syndromes and discuss current knowledge regarding the ribosomal pathways disrupted in each of these disorders. We also explore the increasing complexity of ribosome biology and how this informs our understanding of developmental biology and human disease. PMID:25237201

  17. Marrow failure: a window into ribosome biology

    PubMed Central

    Ruggero, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, and dyskeratosis congenita are inherited syndromes characterized by marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and cancer predisposition. Genetic and molecular studies have uncovered distinct abnormalities in ribosome biogenesis underlying each of these 3 disorders. How defects in ribosomes, the essential organelles required for protein biosynthesis in all cells, cause tissue-specific abnormalities in human disease remains a question of fundamental scientific and medical importance. Here we review the overlapping and distinct clinical features of these 3 syndromes and discuss current knowledge regarding the ribosomal pathways disrupted in each of these disorders. We also explore the increasing complexity of ribosome biology and how this informs our understanding of developmental biology and human disease. PMID:25237201

  18. A Method for Generation of Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages from Cryopreserved Mouse Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Djalma S.; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2010-01-01

    The broad use of transgenic and gene-targeted mice has established bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) as important mammalian host cells for investigation of the macrophages biology. Over the last decade, extensive research has been done to determine how to freeze and store viable hematopoietic human cells; however, there is no information regarding generation of BMDM from frozen murine bone marrow (BM) cells. Here, we establish a highly efficient protocol to freeze murine BM cells and further generate BMDM. Cryopreserved murine BM cells maintain their potential for BMDM differentiation for more than 6 years. We compared BMDM obtained from fresh and frozen BM cells and found that both are similarly able to trigger the expression of CD80 and CD86 in response to LPS or infection with the intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila. Additionally, BMDM obtained from fresh or frozen BM cells equally restrict or support the intracellular multiplication of pathogens such as L. pneumophila and the protozoan parasite Leishmania (L.) amazonensis. Although further investigation are required to support the use of the method for generation of dendritic cells, preliminary experiments indicate that bone marrow-derived dendritic cells can also be generated from cryopreserved BM cells. Overall, the method described and validated herein represents a technical advance as it allows ready and easy generation of BMDM from a stock of frozen BM cells. PMID:21179419

  19. Publication bias in blood and marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mahwash; Paulson, Kristjan; Lambert, P; Szwajcer, David; Seftel, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    Only a small proportion of abstracts lead to full publication. Abstracts with "positive" results are more likely to be published than other abstracts, leading to publication bias. To date, this issue has not been examined in the blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) literature. We hypothesized that because BMT centers are often based at academic centers, the proportion of abstracts leading to publication will be high. All abstracts presented at the Canadian Blood and Marrow Transplant Group biannual meetings in 2002, 2004, and 2006 were reviewed and categorized by study type, funding source, single-center or multicenter study, form of presentation, and positive or negative results, using the authors' definitions. To determine publication, each reference was searched on multiple databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and CINAHL) by first, second, and final author names. Two authors performed abstract categorization and searching, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Of the 141 abstracts reviewed, only 43 were published (30.4%). Twenty-one studies were published from 2002 (36.8%), compared with 12 from 2004 (24.0%) and 10 from 2006 (29.4%) (P = .35). Neither positive results nor the number of involved centers were associated with the likelihood of publication. Clinical studies (retrospective or prospective) were more likely to be published than nonclinical studies (P = .014). Funded studies and oral presentations were more likely to be published (P = .009 and .004, respectively). A low rate of publication is seen in the field of BMT. Studies with clinical outcomes, externally funded studies, and studies presented orally were more likely to be published. However, there was no publication bias in favor of studies with positive results. Publication bias should be evaluated further at larger BMT meetings, and efforts should be made to encourage full publication of scientific abstracts. PMID:21130176

  20. The great red flashlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbach, Edward A.

    After fifty years of fighting with flashlights which persisted in rolling to the ground, being mislaid, or stashed in a pocket, the author designed a unit which was always on hand and needed no search for the switch. A normally closed switch, internal to the bottom of the flashlight case, is opened by the weight of the unit suspended on a cord about the neck. Lifting the unit with two fingers turns on the red light, while releasing the unit automatically turns it off. A felt covering around the flashlight provides comfort on cold nights. Because this red light would be a welcome tool for other variable star observers, more units were assembled and brought to the AAVSO meeting in Houston for distribution to observers who agreed to give each unit a workout and report on its performance. The author is waiting to hear from these observers.

  1. Great Red Spot (GRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A huge permanent anticyclone in Jupiter's southern hemisphere, visible as a reddish oval at just over 20 °S. The earliest unequivocal observation was by Heinrich Schwabe in 1831 (the often-quoted sighting by Robert Hooke in 1664 now seems to have been of a similar but different spot). The GRS became a striking feature around 1880, when it developed a deep red coloration. It was also prominent in ...

  2. Red giants seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, B.; Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.

    2013-11-01

    The space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler are indiscreet. With their asteroseismic programs, they tell us what is hidden deep inside the stars. Waves excited just below the stellar surface travel throughout the stellar interior and unveil many secrets: how old is the star, how big, how massive, how fast (or slow) its core is dancing. This paper intends to paparazze the red giants according to the seismic pictures we have from their interiors.

  3. Usefulness of bone marrow imaging in childhood malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Oseas, R.S.; Siddiqui, A.R.; Wellman, H.N.; Baehner, R.L.

    1982-08-01

    Two hundred six /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid bone marrow scans in 110 pediatrics patients were reviewed. The normal distribution of sulfur colloid in the lower extremities in various age groups was established. There was progressive loss of uptake with increasing age from less than two years to greater than ten years. Tumor replacement was seen as regions of decreased radioactivity, and the extent of the scan defect paralleled the response of the disease to therapy. Both chemotherapy and irradiation resulted in an extension of the /sup 99m/Tc SC to peripheral marrow sites. In irradiated areas, marrow scan defects were demonstrated and generally recovered normal activity by six months after the completion of therapy. Marrow scan abnormalities caused by tumor replacement were present in four patients despite normal bone scans and radiographs. Ultimate confirmation of tumor involvement was by needle aspiration or biopsy. Persistent marrow defects were seen in two patients with neuroblastoma who had remission of their disease: biopsy revealed myelofibrosis. /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid bone marrow scanning is a sensitive monitor of altered marrow activity associated with pediatric hematologic or oncologic diseases.

  4. In Vivo Transplantation of Autogenous Marrow-Derived Cells Following Rapid Intraoperative Magnetic Separation Based on Hyaluronan to Augment Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Fleury, Sean; Luangphakdy, Viviane; Shinohara, Kentaro; Pan, Hui; Boehm, Cynthia; Vasanji, Amit; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Walker, Esteban; Yaszemski, Michael; Hascall, Vincent; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This project was designed to test the hypothesis that rapid intraoperative processing of bone marrow based on hyaluronan (HA) could be used to improve the outcome of local bone regeneration if the concentration and prevalence of marrow-derived connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) could be increased and nonprogenitors depleted before implantation. Methods HA was used as a marker for positive selection of marrow-derived CTPs using magnetic separation (MS) to obtain a population of HA-positive cells with an increased CTP prevalence. Mineralized cancellous allograft (MCA) was used as an osteoconductive carrier scaffold for loading of HA-positive cells. The canine femoral multidefect model was used and four cylindrical defects measuring 10 mm in diameter and 15 mm in length were grafted with MCA combined with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow that was enriched in HA+ CTPs and depleted in red blood cells and nonprogenitors. Outcome was assessed at 4 weeks using quantitative 3D microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis of bone formation and histomorphological assessment. Results Histomorphological assessment showed a significant increase in new bone formation and in the vascular sinus area in the MS-processed defects. Robust bone formation was found throughout the defect area in both groups (defects grafted with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow.) Percent bone volume in the defects, as assessed by micro-CT, was greater in defects engrafted with MS processed cells, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Rapid intraoperative MS processing to enrich CTPs based on HA as a surface marker can be used to increase the concentration and prevalence of CTPs. MCA grafts supplemented with heparinized bone marrow or MS processed cells resulted in a robust and advanced stage of bone regeneration at 4 weeks. A greater new bone formation and vascular sinus area was found in defects grafted with MS processed cells

  5. Dietary Pseudopurpurin Improves Bone Geometry Architecture and Metabolism in Red-Bone Guishan Goats

    PubMed Central

    Han, TieSuo; Li, Peng; Wang, JianGuo; Liu, GuoWen; Wang, Zhe; Ge, ChangRong; Gao, ShiZheng

    2012-01-01

    Red-colored bones were found initially in some Guishan goats in the 1980s, and they were designated red-boned goats. However, it is not understood what causes the red color in the bone, or whether the red material changes the bone geometry, architecture, and metabolism of red-boned goats. Pseudopurpurin was identified in the red-colored material of the bone in red-boned goats by high-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–mass spetrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Pseudopurpurin is one of the main constituents of Rubia cordifolia L, which is eaten by the goats. The assessment of the mechanical properties and micro-computed tomography showed that the red-boned goats displayed an increase in the trabecular volume fraction, trabecular thickness, and the number of trabeculae in the distal femur. The mean thickness, inner perimeter, outer perimeter, and area of the femoral diaphysis were also increased. In addition, the trabecular separation and structure model index of the distal femur were decreased, but the bone mineral density of the whole femur and the mechanical properties of the femoral diaphysis were enhanced in the red-boned goats. Meanwhile, expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin mRNA was higher, and the ratio of the receptor activator of the nuclear factor kappa B ligand to osteoprotegerin was markedly lower in the bone marrow of the red-boned goats compared with common goats. To confirm further the effect of pseudopurpurin on bone geometry, architecture, and metabolism, Wistar rats were fed diets to which pseudopurpurin was added for 5 months. Similar changes were observed in the femurs of the treated rats. The above results demonstrate that pseudopurpurin has a close affinity with the mineral salts of bone, and consequently a high level of mineral salts in the bone cause an improvement in bone strength and an enhancement in the structure and metabolic functions of the bone. PMID:22624037

  6. Inhibition of adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by erythropoietin via activating ERK and P38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Liu, G X; Zhu, J C; Chen, X Y; Zhu, A Z; Liu, C C; Lai, Q; Chen, S T

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether erythropoietin (EPO) can inhibit adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the mouse bone marrow and its underlying mechanism. We separated and extracted mouse bone marrow MSCs and induced adipogenic differen-tiation using 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, insulin, and dexamethasone. Different concentrations of EPO were added to the cells and observed by Oil Red O staining on the 20th day to quantitatively analyze the degree of cell differentiation. mRNA expression levels of peroxysome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT enhancer binding protein α, and adiponectin were analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the activity of PPARγ, extracellular sig-nal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) were determined by western blotting. EPO significantly inhibited adipogenic differentiation of MSCs after 20 days and reduced absorbance values by Oil Red O staining without affecting proliferation activity. EPO downregulated the mRNA expression of PPARγ, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α, fatty acid binding protein 4, and adiponec-tin during adipogenesis and increased protein phosphorylation of ERK, p38 MAPK, and PPARγ during differentiation. EPO downregulated the mRNA expression of PPARγ, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α, fatty acid binding protein 4, and adiponectin by increasing protein phosphor-ylation of ERK, p38 MAPK, and PPARγ during differentiation, which inhibited adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. PMID:26125905

  7. Effects of the extract of Ginkgo biloba on the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhe; Zhang, Jiadi; Gu, Xu; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Shuman; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    The balance of osteogenesis and adipogenesis in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) is disrupted in osteoporosis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGB) on proliferation, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. The effect of EGB on proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. Osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by Alizarin Red S staining and Alkaline phosphatase assay. Adipogenic differentiation was evaluated by Oil Red O staining. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Real-time PCR) was used to detect the expression of osteogenic specific genes (BMP-2, Runx2 and Colla1) and adipogenic specific genes (ap2, PPARγ). EGB did not significantly affect proliferation of BMSCs. However, it increased the calcium accumulation and significantly promoted the activity of alkaline phosphatase, especially when the concentration of EGB reached 150 µg/mL. EGB dose-dependently inhibited the adipogenic ability of BMSCs. The osteogenic-related genes (BMP-2, Runx2, Colla1) were overexpressed while the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, such as PPAR-γ and ap2, was decreasing with the increase of EGB concentration. Our data proves that EGB inhibited adipocyte differentiation and enhanced osteogenic differentiation in BMSCs, but had no effect on the proliferation of BMSCs. PMID:27508023

  8. Effects of the extract of Ginkgo biloba on the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe; Zhang, Jiadi; Gu, Xu; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Shuman; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    The balance of osteogenesis and adipogenesis in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) is disrupted in osteoporosis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGB) on proliferation, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. The effect of EGB on proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. Osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by Alizarin Red S staining and Alkaline phosphatase assay. Adipogenic differentiation was evaluated by Oil Red O staining. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Real-time PCR) was used to detect the expression of osteogenic specific genes (BMP-2, Runx2 and Colla1) and adipogenic specific genes (ap2, PPARγ). EGB did not significantly affect proliferation of BMSCs. However, it increased the calcium accumulation and significantly promoted the activity of alkaline phosphatase, especially when the concentration of EGB reached 150 µg/mL. EGB dose-dependently inhibited the adipogenic ability of BMSCs. The osteogenic-related genes (BMP-2, Runx2, Colla1) were overexpressed while the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, such as PPAR-γ and ap2, was decreasing with the increase of EGB concentration. Our data proves that EGB inhibited adipocyte differentiation and enhanced osteogenic differentiation in BMSCs, but had no effect on the proliferation of BMSCs. PMID:27508023

  9. Isolation, Characterization and Growth Kinetic Comparison of Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Aliborzi, Ghaem; Vahdati, Akbar; Mehrabani, Davood; Hosseini, Seyed Ebrahim; Tamadon, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from different sources have different characteristics. Moreover, MSCs are not isolated and characterized in Guinea pig for animal model of cell therapy. Aim of the Work was the isolating of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and adipose tissue MSCs (AT-MSCs) from Guinea pig and assessing their characteristics. Material and Methods In this study, bone marrow and adipose tissue were collected from three Guinea pigs and cultured and expanded through eight passages. BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs at passages 2, 5 and 8 were seeded in 24-well plates in triplicate. Cells were counted from each well 1~7 days after seeding to determine population doubling time (PDT) and cell growth curves. Cells of passage 3 were cultured in osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation media. Results: BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs attached to the culture flask and displayed spindle-shaped morphology. Proliferation rate of AT-MSCs in the analyzed passages was more than BM-MSCs. The increase in the PDT of MSCs occurs with the increase in the number of passages. Moreover, after culture of BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs in differentiation media, the cells differentiated toward osteoblasts and adipocytes as verified by Alizarin Red staining and Oil Red O staining, respectively. Conclusion BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs of Guinea pig could be valuable source of multipotent stem cells for use in experimental and preclinical studies in animal models. PMID:27426093

  10. Distinct bone marrow blood vessels differentially regulate haematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Itkin, Tomer; Gur-Cohen, Shiri; Spencer, Joel A; Schajnovitz, Amir; Ramasamy, Saravana K; Kusumbe, Anjali P; Ledergor, Guy; Jung, Yookyung; Milo, Idan; Poulos, Michael G; Kalinkovich, Alexander; Ludin, Aya; Kollet, Orit; Shakhar, Guy; Butler, Jason M; Rafii, Shahin; Adams, Ralf H; Scadden, David T; Lin, Charles P; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2016-04-21

    Bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) form a network of blood vessels that regulate both leukocyte trafficking and haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) maintenance. However, it is not clear how BMECs balance these dual roles, and whether these events occur at the same vascular site. We found that mammalian bone marrow stem cell maintenance and leukocyte trafficking are regulated by distinct blood vessel types with different permeability properties. Less permeable arterial blood vessels maintain haematopoietic stem cells in a low reactive oxygen species (ROS) state, whereas the more permeable sinusoids promote HSPC activation and are the exclusive site for immature and mature leukocyte trafficking to and from the bone marrow. A functional consequence of high permeability of blood vessels is that exposure to blood plasma increases bone marrow HSPC ROS levels, augmenting their migration and differentiation, while compromising their long-term repopulation and survival. These findings may have relevance for clinical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and mobilization protocols. PMID:27074509

  11. [Bone marrow involvement in ovarian cancer determined by immunohistochemical methods].

    PubMed

    Gabriel, M; Obrebowska, A; Spaczyński, M

    2000-01-01

    Atypical epithelial cells in the bone marrow of patients with ovarian cancer were evaluated using immunohistochemical techniques. We investigated cytospin preparations of bone marrow taken from 9 women with benign ovarian tumors and 59 women with malignant ovarian tumors. Two monoclonal antibodies (NCL-C11 and NCL-CA 125) were used. With both antibodies we were able to detect keratin and CA 125 antigen expression in the bone marrow of 9 (18.4%) of the patients with ovarian cancer. With regard to the wide histological differentiation of ovarian carcinomas, the presence of atypical epithelial cells in the bone marrow was required as a prognostic factor for survival and relapses. This should be investigated in a larger study group. PMID:11326158

  12. Understanding Bone Marrow Transplantation as a Treatment Option

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have had, and your overall health. Transplant Process A bone marrow or cord blood transplant is ... The Transplant Process . For more about the search process, HLA matching, and steps of a transplant, such ...

  13. NIH Blood and Marrow Transplant Late Effects Consensus Conference

    Cancer.gov

    This day and a half symposium will bring together experts in blood and marrow transplantation, late effects, and health care delivery to discuss current evidence and knowledge gaps, develop consensus guidelines, and inform future research in the BMT survivor population.

  14. Who Needs a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to find out whether you have any medical problems that could cause complications after the transplant. (See "What To Expect Before a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant" for more information.) Rate This Content: NEXT >> ...

  15. Technetium-99m antimony colloid for bone-marrow imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Martindale, A.A.; Papadimitriou, J.M.; Turner, J.H.

    1980-11-01

    Technetium-99m antimony colloid was prepared in our laboratory for bone-marrow imaging. Optimal production of colloid particles of size range 1 to 13 nm was achieved by the use of polyvinylpyrrolidone of mol. wt. 44,000. Electron microscopy was used to size the particles. Studies in rabbits showed exclusive concentration in the subendothelial dendritic phagocytes of the bone marrow. Pseudopods from these cells were found to traverse interendothelial junctions and concentrate colloid from the sinusoids. Imaging studies of bone marrow in rabbits showed the superiority of the Tc-99m antimony colloid over the much larger colloidal particle of Tc-99m sulfur colloid. Tissue distribution studies in the rat confirmed that bone-marrow uptake of Tc-99m antimony colloid was greater than that of Tc-99m sulfur colloid, although blood clearance was much slower.

  16. Bone scan appearances following biopsy of bone and bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-10-01

    The influence of sternal marrow aspiration, iliac crest marrow aspiration, and iliac crest bone biopsy on bone scan appearances was examined. Eighteen patients were scanned a mean of 9.9 days after sternal marrow aspiration with a Salah needle. Bone scans obtained in 9 patients a mean of 10 days aftr iliac crest trephine marrow biopsy with a Jamshidi needle showed no abnormality at the biopsy site. In 18 patients with metabolic bone disease who had undergone iliac crest bone biopsy with an 8 mm needle, a scan abnormality due to the biopsy was usually present when the interval between the biopsy and the scan was 5 days to 2 months. Patients who were scanned within 3 days of iliac crest bone biopsy or more than 2 months after biopsy had normal scan appearance at the biopsy site.

  17. Bone Marrow Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Marrow Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bonemarrowdiseases.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  18. Bone Marrow Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Marrow Diseases URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/bonemarrowdiseases.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  19. Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie shows counterclockwise atmospheric motion around Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The clip was made from blue-filter images taken with the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft during seven separate rotations of Jupiter between Oct. 1 and Oct. 5, 2000.

    The clip also shows the eastward and westward motion of the zonal jets, seen as the horizontal stripes flowing in opposite directions. The zonal jets circle the planet. As far as can be determined from both Earth-based and spacecraft measurements, the positions and speeds of the jets have not changed for 100 years. Since Jupiter is a fluid planet without a solid boundary, the jet speeds are measured relative to Jupiter's magnetic field, which rotates, wobbling like a top because of its tilt, every 9 hours 55.5 minutes. The movie shows motions in the magnetic reference frame, so winds to the west correspond to features that are rotating a little slower than the magnetic field, and eastward winds correspond to features rotating a little faster.

    Because the Red Spot is in the southern hemisphere, the direction of motion indicates it is a high-pressure center. Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Scientists suspect these small white features are lightning storms. The storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for the large-scale features.

    The smallest features in the movie are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across. The spacing of the movie frames in time is not uniform; some consecutive images are separated by two Jupiter rotations, and some by one. The images have been re-projected using a simple cylindrical map projection. They show an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east-west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet

  20. Memory T-cell competition for bone marrow seeding.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Francesca; Santoni, Angela

    2003-03-01

    The presence in the bone marrow of memory CD8 T cells is well recognized. However, it is still largely unclear how T-cell migration from the lymphoid periphery to the bone marrow is regulated. In the present report, we show that antigen-specific CD4 T cells, as well as antigen-specific CD8 T cells, localize to the bone marrow of immunized mice, and are sustained there over long periods of time. To investigate the rules governing T-cell migration to the bone marrow, we generated chimeric mice in which the lymphoid periphery contained two genetically or phenotypically distinct groups of T cells, one of which was identical to the host. We then examined whether a distinct type of T cell had an advantage over the others in the colonization of bone marrow. Our results show that whereas ICAM1 and CD18 molecules are both involved in homing to lymph nodes, neither is crucial for T-cell bone marrow colonization. We also observed that memory-phenotype CD44high T cells, but not virgin-type CD44-/low T cells, preferentially home to the bone marrow upon adoptive transfer to normal young mice, but not to thymectomized old recipients where an existing memory T-cell pool precludes their free access. Thus, T-cell colonization of the bone marrow uses distinct molecules from those implicated in lymph node homing, and is regulated both by the properties of the T cell and by the competitive efficacy of other T cells inhabiting the same, saturable niche. This implies that the homing potential of an individual lymphocyte is not merely an intrinsic property of the cell, but rather a property of the lymphoid system taken as a whole. PMID:12603595

  1. A marker chromosome in post-transplant bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Morsberger, Laura; Powell, Kerry; Ning, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Detection of small supernumerary marker chromosomes in karyotype analysis represents a diagnostic challenge. While such markers are usually detected during cytogenetic studies of constitutional chromosome abnormalities, they have also been found in specimens submitted from patients with acquired malignancies. We report here the detection of a marker chromosome in a bone marrow specimen from a patient who received a bone marrow transplantation. We discuss the importance of proper characterization and interpretation of marker chromosomes in clinical practice. PMID:27252781

  2. Bone Marrow Negative Visceral Leishmaniasis in an Adolescent Male

    PubMed Central

    Jetley, S; Rana, S; Khan, S; Zeeba, JS; Hassan, MJ; Kapoor, P

    2013-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis or Kala Azar is endemic in certain regions of India. In endemic areas, the constellation of fever, progressive weight loss, weakness, pronounced splenomegaly, anemia, leukopenia, and hypergammaglobulinemia is highly suggestive of visceral leishmaniasis. Demonstration of the parasite in liver, splenic or bone marrow aspirates is confirmatory. We present a case in which Leishmania donovani (LD) bodies were demonstrated on splenic aspirate. We were unable to demonstrate LD bodies on bone marrow aspiration. PMID:23682278

  3. Activation of bone marrow phagocytes following benzene treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, D L; MacEachern, L; Snyder, R

    1989-01-01

    Techniques in flow cytometry/cell sorting were used to characterize the effects of benzene and its metabolites on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. Treatment of male Balb/c mice with benzene (880 mg/kg) or a combination of its metabolites, hydroquinone and phenol (50 mg/kg), resulted in a 30 to 40% decrease in bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed two subpopulations of bone marrow cells that could be distinguished by their size and density or granularity. The larger, more dense subpopulation was found to consist predominantly of macrophages and granulocytes as determined by monoclonal antibody binding and by cell sorting. Benzene treatment had no selective cytotoxic effects on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. To determine if benzene treatment activated bone marrow phagocytes, we quantified production of hydrogen peroxide by these cells using the fluorescent indicator dye, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. We found that macrophages and granulocytes from bone marrow of treated mice produced 50% more hydrogen peroxide in response to the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate than did cells from control animals. It is hypothesized that phagocyte activation and production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates may contribute to hematotoxicity induced by benzene. PMID:2676504

  4. Pulmonary fat and bone marrow embolism in aircraft accident victims.

    PubMed

    Bierre, A R; Koelmeyer, T D

    1983-04-01

    On 28 November 1979, an Air New Zealand DC10 aircraft crashed into Mt Erebus, Antarctica with the loss of 257 passengers and crew. Postmortem examinations were carried out on 231 victims in Auckland, 4641 kilometres north of the crash site, and lung tissue was present in 205 cases. Pulmonary fat emboli were present in 134 cases (65%), pulmonary bone marrow emboli in 60 (29%) and pulmonary edema in 76 cases (37%). Clear relationships were demonstrated, firstly between the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism, secondly between the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism and the presence of pulmonary edema, and thirdly between the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism and the extent of cardiovascular damage. It was apparent that death had occurred immediately following impact, and the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism varied inversely with the severity of the injuries found. The most severely injured victims were those seated in the rear cabin of the aircraft suggesting that this was the site of impact with the ground. Our studies show that pulmonary fat embolism occurs very rapidly after severe injury and is followed by increasing numbers of fat and bone marrow emboli depending on the nature of the mortal injuries. PMID:6888959

  5. Bone scan appearances following bone and bone marrow biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-01-01

    Bone marrow and bone biopsies are performed not infrequently in patients referred for bone scans and represent a potential cause of a ''false positive'' focal abnormality on the bone scan. The authors have therefore examined the scan appearances in a series of patients who had undergone either sternal marrow biopsy, (Salah needle, diameter 1.2 mm) trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy (Jamshidi 11 gauge needle, diameter 3.5 mm) or a transiliac bone biopsy (needle diameter 8 mm). Of 18 patients studied 1 to 45 days after sternal marrow 17 had normal scan appearances at the biopsy site and 1 had a possible abnormality. None of 9 patients studied 4 to 19 days after trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy had a hot spot at the biopsy site. A focal scan abnormality was present at the biopsy site in 9/11 patients studied 5 to 59 days after a trans iliac bone biopsy. No resultant scan abnormality was seen in 4 patients imaged within 3 days of the bone biopsy or in 3 patients imaged 79 to 138 days after the procedure. Bone marrow biopsy of the sternum or iliac crest does not usually cause bone scan abnormalities. A focal abnormality at the biopsy site is common in patients imaged 5 days to 2 months after bone biopsy. The gauge of the needle employed in the biopsy and thus the degree of bone trauma inflicted, is likely to be main factor determining the appearance of bone scan abnormalities at the biopsy site.

  6. Marrow fat metabolism is linked to the systemic energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lecka-Czernik, Beata

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the role of bone in the systemic regulation of energy metabolism indicate that bone marrow cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts, are involved in this process. Marrow adipocytes store significant quantities of fat and produce adipokines, leptin and adiponectin, which are known for their role in the regulation of energy metabolism, whereas osteoblasts produce osteocalcin, a bone-specific hormone that has a potential to regulate insulin production in the pancreas and adiponectin production in fat tissue. Both osteoblasts and marrow adipocytes express insulin receptor and respond to insulin-sensitizing anti-diabetic TZDs in a manner, which tightly links bone with the energy metabolism system. Metabolic profile of marrow fat resembles that of both, white and brown fat, which is reflected by its plasticity in acquiring different functions including maintenance of bone micro-environment. Marrow fat responds to physiologic and pathologic changes in energy metabolism status by changing volume and metabolic activity. This review summarizes available information on the metabolic function of marrow fat and provides hypothesis that this fat depot may acquire multiple roles depending on the local and perhaps systemic demands. These functions may include a role in bone energy maintenance and endocrine activities to serve osteogenesis during bone remodeling and bone healing. PMID:21757043

  7. Transplantation immunology: Solid Organ and bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Javier; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2010-01-01

    Development of the field of organ and tissue transplantation has accelerated remarkably since the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) was discovered in 1967. Matching of donor and recipient for MHC antigens has been shown to have a significant positive effect on graft acceptance. The roles of the different components of the immune system involved in the tolerance or rejection of grafts and in graft-versus-host disease have been clarified. These components include: antibodies, antigen presenting cells, helper and cytotoxic T cell subsets, immune cell surface molecules, signaling mechanisms and cytokines that they release. The development of pharmacologic and biological agents that interfere with the alloimmune response and graft rejection has had a crucial role in the success of organ transplantation. Combinations of these agents work synergistically, leading to lower doses of immunosuppressive drugs and reduced toxicity. Reports of significant numbers of successful solid organ transplants include those of the kidneys, liver, heart and lung. The use of bone marrow transplantation for hematological diseases, particularly hematological malignancies and primary immunodeficiencies, has become the treatment of choice in many of these conditions. Other sources of hematopoietic stem cells are also being used, and diverse immunosuppressive drug regimens of reduced intensity are being proposed to circumvent the mortality associated with the toxicity of these drugs. Gene therapy to correct inherited diseases by infusion of gene-modified autologous hematopoietic stem cells has shown efficacy in two forms of severe combined immunodeficiency, providing an alternative to allogeneic tissue transplantation. PMID:20176267

  8. Post-bone marrow transplant thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Obut, F; Kasinath, V; Abdi, R

    2016-07-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a systemic disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and organ failure. Post-bone marrow transplant TMA (post-BMT TMA) is a life-threatening condition that has been reported to afflict between 0.5 and 63.6% of BMT patients. The incidence of post-BMT TMA is affected by evolving therapies such as conditioning regimens. The etiology of post-BMT TMA is thought to be multifactorial, including the effects of immunosuppressive agents, viral infections, TBI and GvHD. A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of complement system activation and endothelial damage in post-BMT TMA. Although plasmapheresis has commonly been used, its therapeutic rationale for the majority of post-BMT TMA cases is unclear in the absence of circulatory inhibitors. It has become possible to target complement activation with eculizumab, a drug that blocks the terminal complement pathway. Early studies have highlighted the importance of anti-complement therapies in treating post-BMT TMA. Moreover, finding complement gene mutations may identify patients at risk, but whether such patients benefit from prophylactic anti-complement therapies before BMT remains to be studied. This review focuses on diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, treatment and renal outcomes of post-BMT TMA. PMID:26974272

  9. Endocrine complications following pediatric bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Josephine; Lewis, Victor; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Stephure, David K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for various diseases can lead to endocrine system dysfunction owing to preparative regimens involving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We assessed the prevalence of post-BMT endocrine complications in children treated at the Alberta Children's Hospital (ACH) from 1991 to 2001. Time of onset of endocrine dysfunction, underlying disease processes, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and age at BMT were characterized. Subjects of <18 years of age at the time of allogeneic or autologous BMT for whom 1-year follow-up through the ACH and a chart were available for review were included in the study. Subjects with a pre-existing endocrine condition were excluded. Of the 194 pediatric BMT procedures performed at the ACH between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2001, 150 complete charts were available for review. Sixty five subjects received follow-up care at other centers and were excluded. Therefore, a total of 85 subjects were included in the review. The prevalence of endocrine complications identified was: primary hypothyroidism 1.2%, compensated hypothyroidism 7.0%, hyperthyroidism 2.4%, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism 22.4%, abnormal bone density 2.4%, and secondary diabetes mellitus 1.2%. These findings emphasize the need to screen for endocrine system dysfunction, particularly hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism, in children who have undergone BMT. Children need long-term follow-up so that endocrine complications can be diagnosed and treated promptly. PMID:21823531

  10. Long-term survival of murine allogeneic bone marrow chimeras: effect of anti-lymphocyte serum and bone marrow dose

    SciTech Connect

    Norin, A.J.; Emeson, E.E.; Veith, F.J.

    1981-02-01

    Graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and failure of donor stem cells to engraft permanently are two major obstacles to successful bone marrow transplantation. The effect of a single large dose of anti-lymphocyte serum (ALS) on mice receiving various numbers of H-2 incompatible bone marrow cells was evaluated. Most animals receiving lethal total body irradiation (TBI) and allogeneic marrow died within 45 days due to GVHD. Mice that were given ALS 6 to 24 h before TBI and bone marrow 24 h after irradiation survived in good health for more than 200 days. These cell preparations caused lethal GVHD in third party mice indicating that the lack of alloreactivity was specific to the strain in which the unresponsiveness was originally induced.

  11. Bone marrow cells other than stem cells seed the bone marrow after rescue transfusion of fatally irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.; Inoue, T.; Bullis, J.E.

    1987-12-01

    In a previous publication, iodinated deoxyuridine (/sup 125/IUdR) incorporation data were interpreted as indicating that spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) in DNA synthesis preferentially seeded bone marrow. In the present studies, the CFU-S content of marrow from irradiated, bone-marrow transfused mice was directly determined. Pretreatment of the transfused cells with cytocidal tritiated thymidine resulted in an insignificant diminution in CFU-S content when compared with nontritiated thymidine pretreatment, implying that there is no preferential seeding. The /sup 125/IUdR incorporation data have been reinterpreted as being a result of the proliferation of other progenitor cells present that have seeded the bone marrow.

  12. Red - Take a Closer Look

    PubMed Central

    Buechner, Vanessa L.; Maier, Markus A.; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Schwarz, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    Color research has shown that red is associated with avoidance of threat (e.g., failure) or approach of reward (e.g., mating) depending on the context in which it is perceived. In the present study we explored one central cognitive process that might be involved in the context dependency of red associations. According to our theory, red is supposed to highlight the relevance (importance) of a goal-related stimulus and correspondingly intensifies the perceivers’ attentional reaction to it. Angry and happy human compared to non-human facial expressions were used as goal-relevant stimuli. The data indicate that the color red leads to enhanced attentional engagement to angry and happy human facial expressions (compared to neutral ones) - the use of non-human facial expressions does not bias attention. The results are discussed with regard to the idea that red induced attentional biases might explain the red-context effects on motivation. PMID:25254380

  13. Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Two Distinct Classes of Erythroblastic Island Isolated from Adult Mammalian Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jia Hao; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Fraser, Stuart T

    2016-04-01

    Erythroblastic islands are multicellular clusters in which a central macrophage supports the development and maturation of red blood cell (erythroid) progenitors. These clusters play crucial roles in the pathogenesis observed in animal models of hematological disorders. The precise structure and function of erythroblastic islands is poorly understood. Here, we have combined scanning electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of surface proteins to develop a better understanding of the ultrastructure of these multicellular clusters. The erythroid-specific surface antigen Ter-119 and the transferrin receptor CD71 exhibited distinct patterns of protein sorting during erythroid cell maturation as detected by immuno-gold labeling. During electron microscopy analysis we observed two distinct classes of erythroblastic islands. The islands varied in size and morphology, and the number and type of erythroid cells interacting with the central macrophage. Assessment of femoral marrow isolated from a cavid rodent species (guinea pig, Cavis porcellus) and a marsupial carnivore species (fat-tailed dunnarts, Sminthopsis crassicaudata) showed that while the morphology of the central macrophage varied, two different types of erythroblastic islands were consistently identifiable. Our findings suggest that these two classes of erythroblastic islands are conserved in mammalian evolution and may play distinct roles in red blood cell production. PMID:26898901

  14. Seeing red on the road.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Romnán, Amparo; Megías, Alberto; Díaz-Piedra, Carolina; Catena, Andrés; Di Stasi, Leandro L

    2015-01-01

    Human and animal research has found that red perception is associated with specific behavioral reactions, generally characterized by intense responses. Here, we explored whether red cars are perceived as more dangerous than other colored cars. One hundred Spanish drivers examined several road scenarios which involved hazardous cars with different colors: red, green, yellow, black, gray, and white. Driver's behavior (response time and probability of braking) and the perceived level of risk for each scenario were analyzed. Although car color affected participants' response times, contrary to expectations, red cars did not elicit faster responses or higher perceived levels of risk. PMID:26489219

  15. Molecular and histopathological detection of Hepatozoon canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Portugal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatozoon canis is a protozoan tick-borne pathogen of dogs and wild canids. Hepatozoon spp. have been reported to infect foxes in different continents and recent studies have mostly used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection and characterization of the infecting species. Surveying red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) may contribute to better understanding the epidemiology of canine vector-borne diseases, including hepatozoonosis caused by H. canis in domestic dogs. The present study investigated the prevalence of Hepatozoon spp. by means of histopathology and molecular analysis of different tissues in red foxes from different parts of Portugal. Methods Blood and tissues including bone marrow, heart, hind leg muscle, jejunum, kidney, liver, lung, popliteal or axillary lymph nodes, spleen and/or tongue were collected from 91 red foxes from eight districts in northern, central and southern Portugal. Tissues were formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, cut and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified a ~650 bp fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of Hepatozoon spp. and the DNA products were sequenced. Results Hepatozoon canis was detected in 68 out of 90 foxes (75.6%) from all the sampled areas by PCR and sequencing. Histopathology revealed H. canis meronts similar in shape to those found in dogs in the bone marrow of 11 (23.4%) and in the spleen of two (4.3%) out of 47 foxes (p = 0.007). All the 11 foxes found positive by histopathology were also positive by PCR of bone marrow and/or blood. Positivity by PCR (83.0%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than by histopathological examination (23.4%) in paired bone marrow samples from the same 47 foxes. Sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of H. canis were 98–99% identical to those in GenBank. Conclusions Hepatozoon canis was found to be highly prevalent in red fox populations from northern, central and southern Portugal. Detection of the parasite by histopathology was

  16. International red meat trade.

    PubMed

    Brester, Gary W; Marsh, John M; Plain, Ronald L

    2003-07-01

    The maturation of the US beef and pork markets and increasing consumer demands for convenience, safety, and nutrition suggests that the beef and pork industries must focus on product development and promotion. New marketing arrangements are developing that help coordinate production with consumer demands. The relative high levels of incomes in the United States are likely to increase the demands for branded products rather than increase total per capita consumption. Foreign markets represent the greatest opportunity for increased demand for commodity beef and pork products. Increasing incomes in developing countries will likely allow consumers to increase consumption of animal-source proteins. Real prices of beef and pork have declined substantially because of sagging domestic demand and increasing farm-level production technologies. Increasing US beef and pork exports have obviated some of the price declines. Pork attained a net export position from a quantity perspective in 1995. The United States continues to be a net importer of beef on a quantity basis but is close to becoming a net exporter in terms of value. By-products continue to play a critical role in determining the red meat trade balance and producer prices. The United States, however, must continue to become cost, price, and quality competitive with other suppliers and must secure additional market access if it is to sustain recent trade trends. Several trade tensions remain in the red meat industry. For example, mandated COOL will undoubtedly have domestic and international effects on the beef and pork sectors. Domestically, uncertainty regarding consumer demand responses or quality perceptions regarding product origin, as well as added processor-retailer costs will be nontrivial. How these factors balance out in terms of benefits versus costs to the industry is uncertain. From an international perspective, some beef and pork export suppliers to the United States could view required labeling as a

  17. Fade to Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared Andromeda Galaxy (M31) Poster [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stars Dust

    This animation shows the Andromeda galaxy, first as seen in visible light by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, then as seen in infrared by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The visible-light image highlights the galaxy's population of about one trillion stars. The stars are so crammed into its core that this region blazes with bright starlight.

    In contrast, the false-colored Spitzer view reveals red waves of dust against a more tranquil sea of blue stars. The dust lanes can be seen twirling all the way into the galaxy's center. This dust is warmed by young stars and shines at infrared wavelengths , which are represented in red. The blue color signifies shorter-wavelength infrared light primarily from older stars.

    The Andromeda galaxy, also known affectionately by astronomers as Messier 31, is located 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. It is the closest major galaxy to the Milky Way, making it the ideal specimen for carefully examining the nature of galaxies. On a clear, dark night, the galaxy can be spotted with the naked eye as a fuzzy blob.

    Andromeda's entire disk spans about 260,000 light-years, which means that a light beam would take 260,000 years to travel from one end of the galaxy to the other. By comparison, the Milky Way is about 100,000 light-years across. When viewed from Earth, Andromeda occupies a portion of the sky equivalent to seven full moons.

    Because this galaxy is so large, the infrared images had to be stitched together out of about 3,000 separate Spitzer exposures. The light detected by Spitzer's infrared array camera at 3.6 and 4.5 microns is sensitive mostly to starlight and is shown in blue and green, respectively. The 8-micron light shows warm dust and is shown in red. The

  18. Ambiguous red shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfman, Carl E.

    2010-12-01

    A one-parameter conformal invariance of Maxwell's equations allows the wavelengths of electromagnetic waves to change as they propagate, and do so even in otherwise field-free space. This produces an ambiguity in interpretations of stellar red shifts. Experiments that will determine the value of the group parameter, and thereby remove the ambiguity, are proposed. They are based on an analysis of the anomalous frequency shifts uncovered in the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft studies, and physical interpretation of an isomorphism discovered by E.L. Hill. If the group parameter is found to be non-zero, Hubble's relations will have to be reinterpreted and space-time metrics will have to be altered. The cosmological consequences of the transformations are even more extensive because, though they change frequencies they do not alter the energy and momentum conservation laws of classical and quantum-electrodynamical fields established by Cunningham and by Białynicki-Birula.

  19. Red microchip VECSEL array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Jennifer E.; Morton, Lynne G.; Calvez, Stephane; Dawson, Martin D.; Leinonen, Tomi; Pessa, Markus; Gibson, Graham; Padgett, Miles J.

    2005-09-01

    We report an InGaP/AlInGaP/GaAs microchip vertical-external-cavity surface emitting laser operating directly at red wavelengths and demonstrate its potential for array-format operation. Optical pumping with up to 3.3W at 532nm produced a maximum output power of 330mW at 675nm, in a single circularly-symmetric beam with M2<2. Simultaneous pumping with three separate input beams, generated using a diffractive optical element, achieved lasing from three discrete areas of the same chip. Output power of ~95mW per beam was obtained from this 3x1 array, each beam having a Gaussian intensity profile with M2<1.2. In a further development, a spatial light modulator allowed computer control over the orientation and separation of the pump beams, and hence dynamic control over the configuration of the VECSEL array.

  20. Red microchip VECSEL array.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Jennifer; Morton, Lynne; Calvez, Stephane; Dawson, Martin; Leinonen, Tomi; Pessa, Markus; Gibson, Graham; Padgett, Miles

    2005-09-01

    We report an InGaP/AlInGaP/GaAs microchip vertical-external-cavity surface emitting laser operating directly at red wavelengths and demonstrate its potential for array-format operation. Optical pumping with up to 3.3W at 532nm produced a maximum output power of 330mW at 675nm, in a single circularly-symmetric beam with M2<2. Simultaneous pumping with three separate input beams, generated using a diffractive optical element, achieved lasing from three discrete areas of the same chip. Output power of ~95mW per beam was obtained from this 3x1 array, each beam having a Gaussian intensity profile with M2<1.2. In a further development, a spatial light modulator allowed computer control over the orientation and separation of the pump beams, and hence dynamic control over the configuration of the VECSEL array. PMID:19498743

  1. Understanding donors' motivations: a study of unrelated bone marrow donors.

    PubMed

    Switzer, G E; Dew, M A; Butterworth, V A; Simmons, R G; Schimmel, M

    1997-07-01

    Medical advances in bone marrow transplantation techniques and immunosuppressive medications have dramatically increased the number of such transplants performed each year, and consequently, the demand for bone marrow from unrelated donors. Although physiological aspects of bone marrow donation have been thoroughly investigated, very few studies have examined psychosocial factors that may impact individuals' donation decisions and outcomes. To examine one particular set of donor psychosocial issues, this study investigated motives for bone marrow donation among 343 unrelated bone marrow donors who donated through the National Marrow Donor Program. Six distinct types of donor motives were identified from open-ended questionnaire responses. Donors most frequently reported motives reflecting some awareness of both the costs (to themselves) and potential benefits (to themselves and the recipient) of donation. A desire to act in accordance with social or religious precepts, expected positive feelings about donating, empathy for the recipient, and the simple desire to help another person were also commonly cited reasons for donating. Among a series of donor background characteristics, donors' gender was the variable most strongly associated with motive type; women were most likely to cite expected positive feelings, empathy, and the desire to help someone. Central study findings indicated that donor motives predicted donors reactions to donation even after the effects of donor background characteristics (including gender) were controlled. Donors who reported exchange motives (weighing costs and benefits) and donors who reported simple (or idealized) helping motives experienced the donation as less positive in terms of higher predonation ambivalence and negative postdonation psychological reactions than did remaining donors. Donors who reported positive feeling and empathy motives had the most positive donation reactions in terms of lower ambivalence, and feeling like

  2. The Compton Effect Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierein, John

    2004-05-01

    In 1923 (Phil Mag. 46, 897.) A. H. Compton noted that the Compton effect produces a red shift for all wavelengths when the scattered electron is free and not bound to an atom or molecule. He suggested that the red shift in the visible spectrum at the limb of the sun is larger than that at the center due to the Compton effect from the greater number of free electrons in the sun's atmosphere along the line of sight. Kierein and Sharp (1968, Solar Physics 3, 450) quantified this and showed a good correlation of red shift observations with the variation in the number of these electrons along the line of sight from center to limb and suggested that the quasar red shift and cosmological red shift could be similarly explained. Grote Reber mapped and measured the background hectometric radiation and found it to be unexpectedly bright. In 1968 (J. Franklin Inst. 285,1), while describing these measurements and maps he explained this brightness as being due to the Compton effect causing the cosmological red shift and accelerating intergalactic electrons. The resulting universe is static. The predicted red shift from the Compton effect deviates from Hubble's law only at large red shifts.

  3. Lack of DNA polymerase theta (POLQ) radiosensitizes bone marrow stromal cells in vitro and increases reticulocyte micronuclei after total-body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Goff, Julie P; Shields, Donna S; Seki, Mineaki; Choi, Serah; Epperly, Michael W; Dixon, Tracy; Wang, Hong; Bakkenist, Christopher J; Dertinger, Stephen D; Torous, Dorothea K; Wittschieben, John; Wood, Richard D; Greenberger, Joel S

    2009-08-01

    Abstract Mammalian POLQ (pol theta) is a specialized DNA polymerase with an unknown function in vivo. Roles have been proposed in chromosome stability, as a backup enzyme in DNA base excision repair, and in somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. The purified enzyme can bypass AP sites and thymine glycol. Mice defective in POLQ are viable and have been reported to have elevated spontaneous and radiation-induced frequencies of micronuclei in circulating red blood cells. To examine the potential roles of POLQ in hematopoiesis and in responses to oxidative stress responses, including ionizing radiation, bone marrow cultures and marrow stromal cell lines were established from Polq(+/+) and Polq(-/-) mice. Aging of bone marrow cultures was not altered, but Polq(-/-) cells were more sensitive to gamma radiation than were Polq(+/+) cells. The D(0) was 1.38 +/- 0.06 Gy for Polq(+/+) cells compared to 1.27 +/- 0.16 and 0.98 +/- 0.10 Gy (P = 0.032) for two Polq(-/-) clones. Polq(-/-) cells were moderately more sensitive to bleomycin than Polq(+/+) cells and were not hypersensitive to paraquat or hydrogen peroxide. ATM kinase activation appeared to be normal in gamma-irradiated Polq(-/-) cells. Inhibition of ATM kinase activity increased the radiosensitivity of Polq(+/+) cells slightly but did not affect Polq(-/-) cells. Polq(-/-) mice had more spontaneous and radiation-induced micronucleated reticulocytes than Polq+/+ and (+/-) mice. The sensitivity of POLQ-defective bone marrow stromal cells to ionizing radiation and bleomycin and the increase in micronuclei in red blood cells support a role for this DNA polymerase in cellular tolerance of DNA damage that can lead to double-strand DNA breaks. PMID:19630521

  4. Use of long-term human marrow cultures to demonstrate progenitor cell precursors in marrow treated with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Winton, E.F.; Colenda, K.W.

    1987-07-01

    The continued retrieval of progenitor cells (CFU-GEMM, BFU-E, CFU-E, CFU-GM) from human long-term marrow cultures (LTMC) is not uncommonly used as evidence that proliferation and differentiation are occurring in more primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in these cultures. Alternatively, the continued presence of progenitors in LTMC could be the result of survival and/or limited self-renewal of progenitor cells present when the culture was initiated, and such progenitors would have little relevance to the parent HSC. The following studies were designed to determine the relative contributions of precursors of progenitor cells to the total progenitor cells present in LTMC using a two-stage regeneration model. The adherent layer in LTMC was established over 3 weeks, irradiated (875 rad) to permanently eliminate resident hematopoietic cells, and recharged with autologous cryo-preserved marrow that was either treated or not treated (control) with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC, 100 micrograms/ml for 30 min). The 4-HC-treated marrow contained no progenitor cells, yet based on clinical autologous bone marrow transplant experience, has intact HSC. Within 1-3 weeks, progenitor cells reappeared in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow, and were preferentially located in the adherent layer. By 2-6 weeks, the number of progenitor cells in the adherent layer of LTMC recharged with 4-HC marrow was equivalent to control LTMC. The progenitors regenerating in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow appear to originate from precursors of progenitor cells, perhaps HSC. We propose this model may be useful in elucidating cellular and molecular correlates of progenitor cell regeneration from precursors.

  5. Reconstitution of the CD45RO(+) and CD20(+) lymphoid marrow population following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for Ph(+) CML.

    PubMed

    Thiele, J; Kvasnicka, H M; Beelen, D W; Welter, A; Schneider, S; Leder, L D; Schaefer, U W

    2001-02-01

    Following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) investigations on the recovery of the B and T lymphocyte populations have focused on the peripheral blood and only marginally regard the bone marrow. An immunohistochemical and morphometric study was performed on 352 trephine biopsies derived from 123 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) at standardized endpoints before and after allogeneic BMT and compared to a control group. The purpose of this investigation was to quantify the B-CD20(+) and T-CD45RO(+) lymphocyte subsets and to determine possible relationships with the occurrence of acute and chronic GVHD. Moreover, we studied the dynamics of lymphocyte repopulation in the post-transplant period, correlations with the total peripheral lymphocyte count and differences associated with sibling vs alternate HLA-compatible (unmanipulated) marrow grafts. Morphometric analysis revealed a very fast regeneration of CD45RO(+) and CD20(+) marrow lymphocytes in the first 2 weeks following BMT. In less than 2 months, in most patients, the post-transplant quantity of lymphocytes was comparable to that of the normal bone marrow. This finding was opposed to the profound depression of the absolute lymphocyte count in the peripheral blood. No relevant relationships could be calculated between engraftment status and the lymphocyte repopulation in the bone marrow. On the other hand, significant correlations were calculable between the development of (chronic and acute) GVHD including severity with the number of CD45RO(+) lymphocytes. In non-related graft constellations a more frequent evolution of acute grade III + IV GVHD was detectable. This complication was accompanied by an increased quantity of CD45RO(+) lymphocytes in the marrow. PMID:11313672

  6. The survival of cryopreserved human bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hill, R S; Mackinder, C A; Postlewaight, B F; Blacklock, H A

    1979-07-01

    Two methods for cryopreservation of bone marrow stem cells were compared using bone marrow obtained from 36 patients. Included in this group were 21 persons with the diagnosis of leukaemia including 14 either with acute myeloid or lymphoblastic leukaemia in remission following intensive remission induction chemotherapy. After freeze-preservation and reconstitution, all marrow samples were tested for nucleated cell (NC) recovery and grown on agar to assess colony forming units (CFUC) and cluster forming units in culture (CluFUc). A slow dilution reconstitution method using freezing media containing AB negative plasma resulted in recovery of 85% of the CFUc activity of fresh marrow. This result was significantly better than the 47% CFUc recovery obtained when freezing media without plasma and a rapid dilution reconstitution technique were used. NC recoveries following slow dilution (51%) and rapid dilution (44%) were not significantly different. CluFUc were disproportionately reduced compared with CFUc although yielding similar results with both methods (26% and 32%). No correlation was found for either method between CFUc and NC recovery or between CFUc and CluFUc recovery in cryopreserved bone marrow. PMID:392422

  7. Hematopoietic bone marrow recovery after radiation therapy: MRI evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Casamassima, F.; Ruggiero, C.; Caramella, D.; Tinacci, E.; Villari, N.; Ruggiero, M. )

    1989-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to detect the increase of adipocytes in the hematopoietic bone marrow that occurs as a consequence of radiotherapy and is indicative of the loss of myeloid tissue. By monitoring this process, it is also possible to determine the recovery of the bone marrow. The amount of viable hematopoietic tissue plays a fundamental role in determining whether the patient is able to undergo further antineoplastic therapy, particularly chemotherapy. We examined 35 patients who had been treated with radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma (12), uterine cervix carcinoma (nine), ovarian dysgerminoma (six), testicular seminoma (four), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (four). We observed that radiation-induced modifications of the MRI pattern in the bone marrow are tightly linked to two parameters; the administered radiation dose and the length of time passed after the treatment. Bone marrow recovery was observed only when patients were treated with doses lower than 50 Gy. The earlier radiation-induced modifications of the bone marrow MRI pattern occurred 6 to 12 months after irradiation, and they were most evident 5 to 6 years after the treatment. From 2 to 9 years after radiotherapy, we observed partial recovery. Complete recovery, when it occurred, was observed only 10 to 23 years after the treatment. Our results indicate that MRI studies are likely to be useful in the assessment of radiation-induced injuries.

  8. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.C.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasng the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-h interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplotype-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  9. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasing the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-hr interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplo-type-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  10. Targeting bone marrow lymphoid niches in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Uy, Geoffrey L; Hsu, Yen-Michael S; Schmidt, Amy P; Stock, Wendy; Fletcher, Theresa R; Trinkaus, Kathryn M; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F; Link, Daniel C

    2015-12-01

    In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) the bone marrow microenvironment provides growth and survival signals that may confer resistance to chemotherapy. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) potently inhibits lymphopoiesis by targeting stromal cells that comprise the lymphoid niche in the bone marrow. To determine whether lymphoid niche disruption by G-CSF sensitizes ALL cells to chemotherapy, we conducted a pilot study of G-CSF in combination with chemotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL. Thirteen patients were treated on study; three patients achieved a complete remission (CR/CRi) for an overall response rate of 23%. In the healthy volunteers, G-CSF treatment disrupted the lymphoid niche, as evidenced by reduced expression of CXCL12, interleukin-7, and osteocalcin. However, in most patients with relapsed/refractory ALL expression of these genes was markedly suppressed at baseline. Thus, although G-CSF treatment was associated with ALL cell mobilization into the blood, and increased apoptosis of bone marrow resident ALL cells, alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment were modest and highly variable. These data suggest that disruption of lymphoid niches by G-CSF to sensitize ALL cells to chemotherapy may be best accomplished in the consolidation where the bone marrow microenvironment is more likely to be normal. PMID:26467815